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1

Environmental Effects of Dredging. Regulatory Identification of Hydrocarbon Contaminants in Dredged Material.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This note summarizes the findings of a workshop convened to assist Corps regulators in the evaluation of hydrocarbon contamination in dredged material. The workshop participants suggested a list of 15 compounds to be used in a tiered testing approach. The...

1987-01-01

2

Contaminant leaching model for dredged material disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the hydrologic evaluation of leachate production and quality model, a screening-level tool to simulate contaminant leaching from a confined disposal facility (CDF) for dredged material. The model combines hydraulics, hydrology, and equilibrium partitioning, using site-specific design specifications, weather data, and equilibrium partitioning coefficients from the literature or from sequential batch or column leach tests of dredged material. The hydraulics and hydrology are modeled using Version 3 of the hydrologic evaluation of landfill performance model. The equilibrium partitioning model includes provisions for estuarine sediments that have variable distribution coefficients resulting from saltwater washout. Model output includes contaminant concentrations in the CDF profile, contaminant concentration and mass releases through the bottom of the CDF, and contaminant concentrations and masses captured by leachate collection systems. The purpose of the model is to provide sound information for evaluating the potential leachate impacts on ground water at dredged material CDFs and the effectiveness of leachate control measures.

Schroeder, P.R.; Aziz, N.M.

1999-09-01

3

Guidelines for Selecting Control and Treatment Options for Contaminated Dredged Material.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Alternative technologies and alternative strategies for dredging, transport, and disposal of contaminated dredged material are reviewed. Contaminant control/treatment during three basic operations are discussed. These include contaminant control/treatment...

M. J. Cullinane D. E. Averett R. A. Shafer

1986-01-01

4

Experimental determination of efficiency of capping materials during consolidation of metal-contaminated dredged material.  

PubMed

Capping has received considerable attention as a method to reduce contaminant transport from contaminated sediments and sub-aqueous disposed dredged materials. Consolidation of dredged material after capping can result in a substantial advection of pore water, into or through the capping layer. The effect of two different capping materials (crushed limestone and gneiss) on the transport of heavy metals and phosphorus during consolidation was studied with a novel experimental design. Capped dredged material was placed in a consolidation cell and pore water expelled during the consolidation was collected for chemical analysis. To support interpretation of the results from this test, interactions between the capping material and the dredged material were also studied in batch tests. The study revealed large differences in the capping efficiency (CE) between the two materials. Both materials were efficient caps for Fe and P (CE>99% with 2cm cap), while limestone also was efficient for Mn (CE>92% with 2cm cap). Contrary to what was expected, capping of dredged material with crushed gneiss increased the release of Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cd, and Cu, resulting in negative CE. The batch tests showed that leaching from the crushed gneiss was the source of the observed release of metals. The results also show that the high concentrations of heavy metals in the dredged material were immobilised, probably by sulphides. Protection against re-suspension and oxidation will therefore in many cases be the most important effect of the cap. PMID:17631382

Eek, Espen; Godøy, Olaug; Aagaard, Per; Breedveld, Gijs D

2007-07-13

5

A decision-analysis approach for contaminated dredged material management in South Korea.  

PubMed

To meet London Protocol requirements, South Korea is preparing to reduce the need for disposal of dredged material at sea. The new requirements controlling ocean disposal of dredged material pose significant challenges to the South Korean government, because the previous practice of offshore disposal of contaminated dredged material is no longer permitted. Hence, other alternatives for treating and disposing of contaminated dredged material are being evaluated and selected for implementation. A new management and decision approach is therefore needed for regulators and implementers to show what information and what decision-making processes were used to make the decision, to increase administrative transparency for such projects in the public domain. To address this need, an iterative approach was developed for dredged material management that includes the essential elements of process, people, and tools needed for successful environmental decision making. The approach has 6 steps: problem definition, developing objectives and criteria, identifying alternatives, performing the evaluation, comparing alternatives, and selecting the preferred alternative. The primary objective of the approach is to provide a systematic means of exploring contaminated dredged material management alternatives in South Korea using criteria that integrate risk with economic and stakeholder value information. The approach incorporates the desired decision-making attributes of transparency, comparative analysis, and inclusion of public input. Although it was developed for South Korea, the approach can be applied in any situation in which dredged material management alternatives are being considered to manage contaminated sediment risks. PMID:20821675

Hong, Gi Hoon; Kim, Suk Hyun; Suedel, Burton C; Clarke, Joan U; Kim, Jongbum

2010-01-01

6

Field Bioassay Test for Detecting Contaminant Uptake from Dredged Material by Marsh Plants.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A method designed to evaluate the response of marsh plants grown in bioassay experiment test units was tested in Georgia and Oregon marshes. Indigenous marsh plants were grown on three types of contaminated dredged material and compared with control plant...

P. L. Wolf J. L. Gallagher C. H. Pennington

1978-01-01

7

Air emission flux from contaminated dredged materials stored in a pilot-scale confined disposal facility.  

PubMed

A pilot-scale field simulation was conducted to estimate the air emissions from contaminated dredged material stored in a confined disposal facility (CDF). Contaminated dredged material with a variety of organic chemicals, obtained from Indiana Harbor Canal, was used in the study. It was placed in an outdoor CDF simulator (i.e., a lysimeter of dimensions 4 ft x 4 ft x 2 ft). A portable, dynamic flux chamber was used to periodically measure emissions of various polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A weather station was set up to monitor and record the meteorological conditions during the experiment. The fluxes of several PAHs were monitored over time for 6 1/2 months. Initial 6-hr average fluxes varied from 2 to 20 ng/cm2/hr for six different PAHs. The flux values declined rapidly for all compounds soon after placement of the dredged material in the CDE Chemical concentrations derived from flux values were generally of low magnitude compared with ambient standards. Data obtained from the experiment were compared against those predicted using models for air emissions. Model simulations showed that initially the flux was largely from exposed pore water from saturated (wet) sediment, whereas the long-term flux was controlled by diffusion through the pore air of the unsaturated sediment. Model predictions generally overestimated the measured emissions. A rainfall event was simulated, and the dredged material was reworked to simulate that typical of a CDF operation. Increased flux was observed upon reworking the dredged material. PMID:11266100

Ravikrishna, R; Valsaraj, K T; Reible, D D; Thibodeaux, L J; Price, C B; Brannon, J M; Meyers, T E; Yost, S

2001-03-01

8

Air emissions from exposed contaminated sediments and dredged material  

SciTech Connect

The sediment-to-air fluxes of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene and pyrene) and a heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (dibenzofuran) from a laboratory-contaminated sediment and those of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) from three field sediments were investigated in experimental microcosms. The flux was dependent on the sediment moisture content, air-filled porosity, and the relative humidity of the air flowing over the sediment surface. The mathematical model predictions of flux from the laboratory-spiked sediment agreed with observed values. The fluxes of compounds with higher hydrophobicity were more air-side resistance controlled. Conspicuous differences were observed between the fluxes from the laboratory-spiked and two of the three field sediments. Two field sediments showed dramatic increases in mass-transfer resistances with increasing exposure time and had significant fractions of oil and grease. The proposed mathematical model was inadequate for predicting the flux from the latter field sediments. Sediment reworking enhanced the fluxes from the field sediments due to exposure of fresh solids to the air. Variations in flux from the lab-spiked sediment as a result of change in air relative humidity were due to differences in retardation of chemicals on a dry or wet surface sediment. High moisture in the air over the dry sediment increased the competition for sorption sites between water and contaminant and increased the contaminant flux.

Valsaraj, K.T.; Ravikrishna, R.; Reible, D.D.; Thibodeaux, L.J. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Choy, B. [Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Price, C.B.; Brannon, J.M.; Myers, T.E. [Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Environmental Lab.; Yost, S. [DynTel Corp., Vicksburg, MS (United States)

1999-01-01

9

Contaminant Area Aquaculture Program. Determination of the chemical suitability of a dredged material containment area for aquaculture. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This concerns use of dredged material containment areas (DMCA) for aquaculture, specifically for production of a crop intended for human consumption. New DMCA's used only periodically for dredged material disposal could be managed to produce valuable crops. Previous studies conducted by the Corps of Engineers, including one where shrimp was raised at a DMCA, and others relating to the effects of sediment contaminants on aquatic organisms, are reviewed. The literature indicated that most dredged material is uncontaminated and that many sediment constituents such as metal are relatively unavailable to aquatic animals; DMCAs containing parts-per-million levels of organic contaminants such as pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, or petroleum hydrocarbons should not be used for aquaculture without extensive testing.

Tatem, H.E.

1990-12-01

10

Processing contaminated dredged material from the Port of New York-New Jersey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shipping activities in the Port of New York-New Jersey are currently threatened by restrictions on dredging of navigational\\u000a channels and private berthing areas becaused of concerns about the environmental effects caused by ocean disposal of the dredged\\u000a material. Current proposals for solutions to the problem include ocean disposal of uncontaminated material, use of confined\\u000a disposal facilities (both upland facilities and

E. A. Stern; K. Donato; K. W. Jones; N. L. Clesceri

1998-01-01

11

Accumulation by fish of contaminants releases from dredged sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inasmuch as the process of dredging and disposing of dredged materials causes a resuspension of these materials and an increase in bioavailability of associated contaminants, we conducted a series of experiments to examine the potential accumulation by fish of contaminants from suspended sediments. In the first experiment we compared accumulation of contaminants by yellow perch of hatchery and lake origin

James G. Seelye; Robert J. Hesselberg; Michael J. Mac

1982-01-01

12

HUMAN HEALTH RISK SCREEN FOR THE PROPOSED OPEN WATER DISPOSAL OF CONTAMINATED DREDGED MATERIALS  

EPA Science Inventory

The laboratory bioaccumulation test has been a standard testing requirement to evaluate the open water disposal dredged materials since the late 1970's. Heretofore, the interpretation of these test results, using the clam, Macoma nasuta, and worm, Nereis virens, has been an ass...

13

Heavy Metal Uptake, Translocation, and Bioaccumulation Studies of Triticum aestivum Cultivated in Contaminated Dredged Materials  

PubMed Central

Phytoremediation is a technology that uses vegetation to remediate contaminants from water, soil, and sediments. Unlike traditional remediation techniques such as soil washing or vitrification, phytoremediation offers a technology that is solar-driven, aesthetically pleasing, and cost effective. Recent studies indicate that winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a potential accumulator for heavy metals such as lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) in hydroponic systems. Based on these findings, a laboratory study was conducted with the primary objective of determining the phytoaccumulation capability of this plant species for heavy metals from contaminated dredged materials (DMs) originating from two confined disposal facilities (CDF). The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) manages several hundred million cubic meters of DMs each year, and 5 to 10 % of these DMs require special handling because they are contaminated with hazardous substances that can move from the substrates into food webs causing unacceptable risk outside CDFs. Phytoremediation may offer an alternative to decrease this risk. Chemical analyses by USACE personnel identified 17 metals in various DMs, but in this present study, only zinc (Zn) and Cd were investigated. Pre-germinated seeds of the test plants were planted under laboratory conditions in pots containing the various DMs and reference soil. Four weeks after planting, plants were harvested and separated into roots and shoots for biomass production and tissue metal concentrations analyses. Results showed that T. aestivum plants have the capacity to tolerate and grow in multiple-metal contaminated DMs with the potential of accumulating various amounts of Zn and Cd. Root and shoot biomass of T. aestivum were not significantly affected by the DMs on which the plants were grown suggesting that this plant species can grow just as well on DMs contaminated by various metals as in the reference soil. No significant differences in the Zn tissue concentrations were observed, differences in Cd tissue concentrations were noted. A maximum concentration of 26 mg Cd kg?1 DW was detected in T. aestivum shoots. Although Cd tissue concentrations of T. aestivum plants in this study were below the Cd plant hyperaccumulation criterion of >100 mg kg?1 Cd found in other studies, this plant species however may still have beneficial uses for phytoremediation studies. T. aestivum plants may serve as an indicator plant for environmental assessment and management, in which the concentration of heavy metals (e.g. Cd) mirrors the concentration in the substrate without dying due to phytotoxicity at low metal concentrations.

Shumaker, Ketia L.; Begonia, Gregorio

2005-01-01

14

DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL MANAGEMENT MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

US Army Corps of Engineers public web site with computer models, available for download, used in evaluating various aspects of dredging and dredged material disposal. (landfill and water Quality models are also available at this site.) The site includes the following dredged mate...

15

DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL USE OF DREDGED MATERIALS.  

SciTech Connect

Our group is leading a large-sale demonstration of dredged material decontamination technologies for the New York/New Jersey Harbor. The goal of the project is to assemble a complete system for economic transformation of contaminated dredged material into an environmentally-benign material used in the manufacture of a variety of beneficial use products. This requires the integration of scientific, engineering, business, and policy issues on matters that include basic knowledge of sediment properties, contaminant distribution visualization, sediment toxicity, dredging and dewatering techniques, decontamination technologies, and product manufacturing technologies and marketing. A summary of the present status of the system demonstrations including the use of both existing and new manufacturing facilities is given here. These decontamination systems should serve as a model for use in dredged material management plans of regions other than NY/NJ Harbor, such as Long Island Sound, where new approaches to the handling of contaminated sediments are desirable.

STERN, E.A.; LODGE, J.; JONES, K.W.; CLESCERI, N.L.; FENG, H.; DOUGLAS, W.S.

2000-12-03

16

Processing of NY/NJ Harbor estuarine dredged material  

SciTech Connect

Management of contaminated dredged material is a major problem for the ports and harbors of the US. One attractive solution to processing the dredged material is to remove or stabilize the contaminants and produce a material suitable for beneficial use or unrestricted upland disposal. The components of a comprehensive dredged material processing project designed for treatment of the estuarine sediments found in the Port of NY-NJ are described.

Jones, K.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Stern, E.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, New York, NY (United States). Region 2; Donato, K. [Army Corps of Engineers, New York, NY (United States); Clesceri, N.L. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental and Energy Engineering

1997-04-01

17

Contaminant modeling. Environmental effects of dredging. Technical note  

SciTech Connect

This note provides initial information on contaminant models that are potentially applicable to situations where the presence of toxic materials in sediments complicates Corps of Engineers (CE) dredging activities.

Bird, S.L.; Dortch, M.

1988-03-01

18

Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis: Management plan assessment report. Dredged Material Management Year 1990  

SciTech Connect

Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA) is an interagency program for the management of unconfined, open-water disposal of dredged material into Puget Sound, Washington. The Management Plans for the PSDDA program identify disposal sites, describe dredged material evaluation procedures, and establish site monitoring and management practices. The plans also commit the involved agencies to a cooperative annual review process which evaluates disposal site use and conditions, dredged material testing results, and new scientific information, in order to determine if changes to the evaluation procedures and/or disposal site management practices are needed. Sampling was conducted to determine any chemical/biological contamination.

Not Available

1991-03-01

19

Methods To Characterize Contaminant Residuals After Environmental Dredging  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental dredging is a common remedial action for managing contaminated sediments. However, post dredging contaminant concentrations in surface sediment are difficult to predict prior to initiating dredging actions. In some cases, post surface concentrations have been high...

20

Model and Assessment of the Contribution of Dredged Material Disposal to Sea-Surface Contamination in Puget Sound.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hydrophobic or floatable materials released to the water column during dredge disposal operations may accumulate in high concentrations on the water surface. If such surface accumulations occur, they could impact the reproduction of fish and shellfish wit...

J. T. Hardy C. E. Cowan

1986-01-01

21

Environmental effects of dredging. A computerized procedure for predicting plant uptake of heavy metals from contaminated freshwater dredged material. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

PURPOSE: The Decision-Making Framework (DMF) developed by Peddicord, et. al. (in preparation) provides a framework for evaluating sediments before dredging. This framework is made up of several modules, one of which is the plant bioassay for materials proposed for upland or wetland placement. Like the DMF, the plant bioassay module is based on tiered testing. Tier I is a computer simulation based on chemical extraction of test and reference sediments; Tier II is an actual laboratory/greenhouse plant bioassay. The purpose of this note is to briefly describe development and use of the computer simulation on a personal computer (PC).

Folsom, B.L.; Houck, M.H.

1990-03-01

22

Chemical Stability of Capped Dredged Material Disposal Mounds in Long Island Sound, Usa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geochemical analysis and visual inspection of cores collected from capped dredged material mounds revealed that in many cores, cap material was clearly distinguishable, both visually and chemically, from mound material. Contaminated dredged sediments were disposed in Long Island Sound eleven and seven years prior to sampling, and capped with uncontaminated dredged sediments. Core data provided no conclusive evidence of physical

Thomas J. Fredette; Joseph D. Germano; Drew A. Carey; Peggy M. Murray; Paula G. Kullberg

1992-01-01

23

Environmental effects of dredging: Upland animal bioassays of dredged materials. Technical note  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Clean Water Act in the United States requires that the environmental evaluation of dredged material prior to discharge or impacting the waters of the United States include the effects of disposal on concentrations of contaminants through biological processes. This results in a need for Corps of Engineers districts to be able to predict the contamination of animals that may

J. W. Simmers; R. G. Rhett; C. R. Lee

1986-01-01

24

Upland Habitat Development with Dredged Material: Engineering and Plant Propagation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Upland habitat development using dredged material as a substrate was shown by the Dredged Material Research Program (DMRP) to be a feasible alternative to standard dredged material disposal operations. This report synthesizes pertinent literature and rese...

A. W. Ford B. R. Wells L. J. Hunt M. C. Landin

1978-01-01

25

Wetland Habitat Development with Dredged Material: Engineering and Plant Propagation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Marsh habitat development using dredged material as a substrate was shown by the Dredged Material Research Program (DMRP) to often be a feasible alternative to traditional dredged material disposal operations. This report synthesizes pertinent literature ...

1978-01-01

26

Environmental Effects of Dredging. Biomagnification of Contaminants in Aquatic Food Webs as a Result of Open-Water Disposal of Dredged Material.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This note provides information regarding the potential extent of biomagnification (the tendency for contaminant concentrations in animal tissues to increase through successively higher trophic levels) of contaminants in aquatic food chains resulting from ...

S. H. Kay

1985-01-01

27

Tampa Bay Dredged Material Disposal Site Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Ocean Bed Conditions; Disposal Operation Phenomena; Short-Term Fate of Turbidity Plume; Long-Term Fate of Deposited Dredge Material; Appendix A: Example Problem for Change in Maintenance Rate.

D. T. Williams

1983-01-01

28

Sampling and detection of tagged dredged material  

SciTech Connect

Systems for sampling and detecting tagged dredged sand in the Upper Mississippi River were developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Rock Island District. The Corps plans to demonstrate main-channel disposal of dredged material, and it requires systems to detect the movement of the dredged material after the material has been placed in a deep reach of river. The dredged material in the demonstration will be tagged with sand particles coated with fluorescent dye. Argonne designed systems for: sampling of the bottom surficial sediments at discrete points along transects from a boat that employs a precision navigation system; on-board visual inspection of the samples for dyed sand in an ultraviolet light box; and photography of ultraviolet-illuminated samples. This report describes the systems and their use as well as the results of tests to determine proper settings for photographic equipment.

Van Loon, L.S.; McCown, D.L.; Ditmars, J.D.

1982-01-01

29

DECONTAMINATING AND PROCESSING DREDGED MATERIAL FOR BENEFICIAL USE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management of contaminated dredged material is a major problem in the Port of New York and New Jersey. One component of an overall management plan can be the application of a decontamination technology followed by creation of a product suitable for beneficial use. This concept is the focus of a project now being carried out by the US Environmental Protection

Nicholas L. Clesceri; Eric A. Stern; Huan Feng; Keith W. Jones

2000-01-01

30

Long-term effects of dredging operations program. long-term evaluation of plants and animals colonizing contaminated estuarine dredged material placed in both upland and wetland environments. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Contaminated sediment was dredged from Black Rock Harbor, Connecticut, in October 1983 and placed in aquatic, upland, and wetland environments as part of the Field Verification Program (FVP), conducted during the period 1981-1986. Laboratory tests were conducted on the sediment prior to dredging to evaluate potential contaminant mobility under each of the disposal alternatives. Prior to dredging for upland disposal and wetland creation at the FVP field site, upland tests (i.e., plant and earthworm bioassays) and wetland tests (i.e., plant, sandworm, snail, and mussel bioassays) were conducted. Laboratory test results were sub-subsequently field verified at the field test site at Tongue Point, Bridgeport, CT. The results of the upland disposal and wetland creation portions of the FVP, and the changes occurring since completion of the FVP for each disposal environment, are summarized herein. The emphasis of this report is on the contaminant mobility of heavy metals. This interim report includes data collected through 1989. Contaminant mobility and the progressive development of the upland and wetland ecosystems at this site will be evaluated until September 1985.

Brandon, D.L.; Lee, C.R.; Simmers, J.W.; Skogerboe, J.G.; Wilhelm, G.S.

1991-09-01

31

Environmental Effects of Dredging Technical Notes (EEDTN).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Biomagnification of Contaminants in Aquatic Food Webs as a Result of Open-Water Disposal of Dredged Material; Plant Bioassay of Dredged Material; Interim Guidance for Predicting Quality of Effluent Discharged from Confined Dredged Material Dispo...

1985-01-01

32

Canaveral ODMDS Dredged Material Erosion Rate Analysis  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the erosion properties of four sediments related to the Canaveral Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site have been determined as a function of density, consolidation, and shear stress by means of a high shear stress sediment erosion flume at Sandia National Laboratories. Additional analysis was completed for each sediment to determine mineralogy, particle size, and organic content. This was done to support numerical modeling efforts, aid in effective management, and minimize environmental impact. The motivation for this work is based on concerns of dredged material transporting beyond the designated site and estimates of site capacity.

JEPSEN,RICHARD A.; ROBERTS,JESSE D.; LUCERO,AMY L.; CHAPIN JR.,D. MICHAEL

2001-07-01

33

Environmental effects of dredging technical notes. Assessment of the genotoxic potential of dredged material. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

This technical note describes an approach for assessing the genotoxic potential of dredged material. The use of integrated batteries of rapid and mechanistically interpretable in vitro and in vivo assays in a tiered approach is fundamental to applied toxicology. The research described here brings this approach to the testing of sediments. Work completed to date and future work will mesh to form an advanced and cost-effective methodology. The purpose of this methodology is to increase the accuracy of environmental risk assessments and facilitate making decisions concerning open-water disposal of dredged material. A great number of the contaminants typically found in dredged material are toxic to exposed organisms through effects on DNA. Such effects are usually the result of low-level chronic exposures. These effects can result in reproductive failure of organisms, impaired growth and development of offspring, and tumors (often cancerous) in vertebrates. Collectively, such effects are called `genotoxicity` and result from damage to the genome of a cell. The damage is heritable, that is, passed on to future cell generations upon duplication of the affected cells.

NONE

1996-08-01

34

TOXICITY TESTING, RISK ASSESSMENT, AND OPTIONS FOR DREDGED MATERIAL MANAGEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Programs for evaluating proposed discharges of dredged material into waters of the United States specify a tiered testing and evaluation protocol that includes performance of acute and chronic bioassays to assess toxicity of the dredged sediments. Although these evaluations refl...

35

Land Use of Dredged Material Containment Areas. Productive Use Examples.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study documents examples of productive land uses of dredged material containment areas. The examples were obtained from published literature and project descriptions and discussions with persons knowledgeable in the planning and execution of dredging ...

O. Beeman A. P. Benkendorf

1978-01-01

36

Uncertainty and variability in risk from trophic transfer of contaminants in dredged sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The risks associated with bioaccumulative contaminants must be considered when evaluating dredged material disposal alternatives. The bioaccumulation of organochlorines and other contaminants by higher trophic level organisms represents one of the most significant sources of uncertainty in risk assessment. Both population variability (e.g. true population heterogeneity in body weight, lipid content, etc.) and uncertainty (e.g. measurement error) in trophic transfer

Igor Linkov; Katherine E von Stackelberg; Dmitriy Burmistrov; Todd S Bridges

2001-01-01

37

Management of dredged material at Toledo, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

Toledo Harbor, at the mouth of the Maumee River in northwest Ohio, is the second most active port and largest single dredging project on the Great Lakes. Over 770,000 cub. m is dredged each year. material has been confined since 1955. Most of this half of the harbor was declared suitable In 1983, over water disposal. Monitoring of the open-water disposal has not shown any adverse impact on water quality. Studies of the release or bioavailability of phosphorus (P) bound to the sediments indicate that P is released from the sediments at a rate of from 10 to 30 percent per day. On an annual basis, dredging and disposal account for 0.4 to 0.6 percent of the total external loading of P to Lake Erie. High-resolution visible data from the French satellite SPOT were used to demonstrate the total extent of the dredging plume. Efforts will be made in the future to use the satellite for routine monitoring.

Adams, J.R.

1992-04-01

38

Evaluating contamination of dredges and disposal criteria in Greek coastal areas.  

PubMed

Sediments were collected from areas that were going to be dredged located at six small Greek ports, as well as from possible disposal areas. In order to assess the contamination level of dredged material, the samples were analysed for pH, organic matter, the metals Cd, Pb, Hg, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and major organic compounds (PAHs, PCBs). The sediments' quality was evaluated by two approaches: (i) by classifying each area according to two sets of Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs) and (ii) by calculating the contamination factors and degree for each area. The results showed that organic compounds were detected in trace amounts in 14% of the port samples belonging to the PAHs group. The characterization of the sediment samples was based on the metals' concentration showing that the majority of the areas to be dredged (80%) are classified as of medium-low contamination according to the SQGs. However, according to the contamination degree, only 30% of the areas are classified as of low contamination, while 40% as of moderate contamination and 30% of the areas as of considerable contamination. From the point of view of "no disturbance" of the ecosystem, decisions about dumping should be taken only after evaluating the material to be dredged. If the SQGs are exceeded, dumping must be forbidden. Otherwise, further evaluation is needed based on the comparison with the receiving area, i.e. by estimating the contamination degree. Dumping could be allowed if the contamination degree is found to be below moderate. PMID:18397800

Leotsinidis, Michalis; Sazakli, Eleni

2008-04-07

39

Environmental effects of dredging: Upland animal bioassays of dredged materials. Technical note  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Water Act in the United States requires that the environmental evaluation of dredged material prior to discharge or impacting the waters of the United States include the effects of disposal on concentrations of contaminants through biological processes. This results in a need for Corps of Engineers districts to be able to predict the contamination of animals that may be associated with potential disposal alternatives: open-water disposal, upland disposal, and wetland creation. The following is a summary of the results of bioassay procedures using the earthworm Eisenia foetida to evaluate the potential contaminant mobility into soil-dwelling animals. These tests were derived from proposed Organization for European Common Development (OECD) and European Economics Commission (EEC) test procedures (evaluating the effects of new chemicals) and modified to consider accumulation and sublethal effects rather than toxicity.

Simmers, J.W.; Rhett, R.G.; Lee, C.R.

1986-01-01

40

Environmental effects of dredging: Building, developing, and managing dredged material islands for bird habitat. Technical note  

Microsoft Academic Search

This note describes the environmental considerations and techniques that have been developed and tested for building, developing, and managing dredged material islands for use by birds for nesting and other life requirements. The text of this note was taken from lectures presented from 1979 to 1986 at the Dredging Short Courses held each year by the Texas AM University Center

Landin

1986-01-01

41

New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project, Acushnet River Estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 3. Characterization and elutriate testing of Acushnet River Estuary sediment. Technical report, August 1985March 1988  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several of the alternatives being considered for the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project involve dredging of contaminated sediment from the Acushnet River Estuary and placement of the contaminated dredged material in confined disposal areas. Evaluation of these alternatives requires testing sediment from the site to determine chemical and physical characteristics, settling properties, contaminant releases for various migration pathways, and treatment

Averett

1989-01-01

42

Dredged-material disposal-management studies for the Port of New York and New Jersey. Progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent progress is presented of ocean disposal activities and studies of alternatives to ocean disposal for contaminated dredged material from the Port of New York and New Jersey. The capping studies conducted in 1980-81 and subsequent monitoring have shown that ocean disposal of dredged material in the New York Bight can be managed effectively by pin-point disposal and capping when

J. F. Tavolaro; J. Zammit

1992-01-01

43

Sustainable material reuse solutions for dredged sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Yorkshire Business Unit of British Waterways (BW) was due to start dredging canals in the South Yorkshire (SY) region. Dredging is vital to maintain navigable waters and help ensure the long-term passage of freight and pleasure craft. The canals in SY had not been dredged for 10 years, which was beginning to impact the effectiveness of the waterways in

P. Studds; Zoë M. Miller

2010-01-01

44

Environmental effects of dredging: Dredged material containment area management practices for increasing storage capacity. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this technical note describes techniques for managing confined dredged material disposal areas to maximize storage capacity. Management of these disposal facilities is recommended to extend their useful life and, thus minimize the requirement for additional disposal facilities.

Poindexter-Rolli, M.E.

1989-07-01

45

Environmental Effects of Dredging: Building, Developing, and Managing Dredged Material Islands for Bird Habitat.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This note describes the environmental considerations and techniques that have been developed and tested for building, developing, and managing dredged material islands for use by birds for nesting and other life requirements. The text of this note was tak...

M. C. Landin

1986-01-01

46

78 FR 37759 - Ocean Dumping; Atchafalaya-West Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site Designation  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Dumping; Atchafalaya-West Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site...designate the Atchafalaya-West Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site...Atchafalaya River Bar Channel Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site...Environmental protection, Water pollution control. Dated: June...

2013-06-24

47

Impact of remobilized contaminants in Mytilus edulis during dredging operations in a harbour area: bioaccumulation and biomarker responses.  

PubMed

Dredging operations in harbours are recurrent to maintain accessibility and navigational depths. One of the main environmental risks of these operations is the remobilization of contaminants trapped in the sediments, rendering them more bioavailable to the biota. However, regulatory policies regarding the contamination risk of dredging chiefly apply to the disposal of dredged materials rather than the direct impact of the procedure itself. In order to assess the ecotoxicological risk of harbour dredging operations in a polluted estuary (the Tagus, W Portugal), the present study compared bioaccumulation and biomarker responses in field-deployed mussels before and after the beginning of operations, complemented by sediment characterization and risk analysis based on standardized sediment quality guidelines. The results revealed a very significant increase in genotoxicity and oxidative stress from the beginning of dredging onwards, which was accompanied by increased bioaccumulation of toxicants, especially polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Overall, the results indicate the importance of surveying the direct impacts of these procedures on local contamination, especially considering these sediments had been previously classified as "trace contaminated", according to normative guidelines, and therefore safe for disposal. This study shows the importance of obtaining both chemical and biological data in standard monitoring procedures and that the remobilization of contaminants by dredging operations may be grossly underestimated, which calls for caution when assessing the impact of these activities even in low to moderately polluted areas. PMID:22938960

Martins, Marta; Costa, Pedro M; Raimundo, Joana; Vale, Carlos; Ferreira, Ana M; Costa, Maria H

2012-08-28

48

Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Point Frazer Bend Reach, Winyah Bay, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

The port of Georgetown, South Carolina, is served by navigational channels within Winyah Bay and the lower Sampit River. Dredging is required to maintain these waterways and to facilitate normal shipping traffic. Prior to dredging, ecological evaluations must be conducted to determine the suitability of the proposed dredged material for open-ocean disposal. These evaluations are to be performed under Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and, Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), following the testing protocols presented in Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal Testing Manual, hereafter referred to as the 1991 Implementation Manual. The Charleston Intensive Project is a reevaluation of sediments collected from two stations (IH-2 and IH-3) in the Frazier Point Bend reach of the Winyah Bay channel. Reference sediment was also collected from site IH-R2, just south of Hare Island. The results of physical/chemical analyses indicated that some contaminants of concern were present in test treatments representing dredged material when compared with the reference treatment IH-R2. The results of this study indicate that, based on the acute toxicity and chemical analyses, dredged material represented by these test treatments is suitable for open-ocean disposal.

Gardiner, W.W.; Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.

1995-02-01

49

Environmental effects of dredging: Building, developing, and managing dredged material islands for bird habitat. Technical note  

SciTech Connect

This note describes the environmental considerations and techniques that have been developed and tested for building, developing, and managing dredged material islands for use by birds for nesting and other life requirements. The text of this note was taken from lectures presented from 1979 to 1986 at the Dredging Short Courses held each year by the Texas AM University Center for Dredging Studies and from information compiled for Engineer Manual EM 1110-2-5026 entitled `Beneficial Uses of Dredged Material.` One hundred years of dredging and open-water disposal operations by the Corps of Engineers (CE), state agencies, and private enterprise has resulted in the creation of over 2000 man-made islands throughout US coastal waters, riverine waterways, and the Great Lakes. The CE continues to maintain an interest in developing such islands because of its responsibility in using environmentally acceptable disposal methods and sites, the increasing shortage of upland disposal sites, the need for wildlife habitats in waterway areas, and the islands` recreational potential.

Landin, M.C.

1986-12-01

50

Use of Dredged Material in Solid Waste Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results from an investigation of the feasibility of using dredged material in solid waste management. Potential uses investigated included the construction of cover, liners, gas vents, leachate drains, and gas barriers at sanitary...

M. J. Bartos

1977-01-01

51

Guidelines for Dredged Material Disposal Area Reuse Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to present disposal area reuse management guidelines developed under the Dredged Material Research Program (DMRP). The guidance provided herein has a threefold purpose. First, it is intended to describe the concept of disposa...

A. W. Ford M. E. Poindexter M. J. Bartos R. L. Montgomery

1978-01-01

52

Chemical and ecotoxicological guidelines for managing disposal of dredged material  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different conventions around the world have produced guidelines for the disposal of dredged material (e.g., London Convention 1972 (LC) (www.Londonconvention.org); Oslo\\/Paris Convention (OSPAR) (www.ospar.org); and, the Helsinki and Barcelona Conventions). They suggest the use of different methodologies from physico-chemical to biological approaches to the management of different routes of disposal or uses of the dredged material.Most of these conventions propose

J. Blasco

2004-01-01

53

Dredged material decontamination demonstration for the port of New York\\/New Jersey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management of contaminated dredged material is a significant challenge in the Port of New York and New Jersey as a result of more stringent regional ocean placement regulations with escalating costs for upland placement. One component of an overall management plan can be the application of a decontamination technology followed by creation of a product suitable for beneficial use. This

Keith W. Jones; Huan Feng; Eric A. Stern; James Lodge; Nicholas L. Clesceri

2001-01-01

54

Sampling and analysis of sediments in dredged material from Wilma Uplands Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect

The Lower Granite Reservoir provides slack-water navigation for the Lewiston, Idaho, and Clarkston, Washington area. The levee system associated with the reservoir protects industrial, commercial, and residential areas from inundation of waters impounded behind the dam. Sediment deposition at the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater rivers has required frequent dredging events In past years, Including two recent events in 1986 and 1987. Dredged material from the 1986 and 1987 events was placed in three containment ponds located on the north bank of the Snake River, near River Mile 134.7. The ponds were used to hold approximately 400,000 cubic yards of dredged material removed from the port areas at the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater rivers. Prior to dredging, the river sediments were tested and found to be typical of non-contaminated sediment. Since that testing, dioxins and furans have been found in the effluent from a Kraft pulp mill in Lewiston that discharges directly into the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater rivers. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) believed that dredged material placed in the containment ponds may contain contaminated levels of dioxins and furans. At their request, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) sampled sediments from these ponds and performed a chemical analysis.

Pinza, M.R.; Karle, L.M.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1992-09-01

55

Metal availability in a highly contaminated, dredged-sediment disposal site: field measurements and geochemical modeling.  

PubMed

Two complementary approaches were used to characterize arsenic and metal mobilizations from a dredged-sediment disposal site: a detailed field study combined with hydrogeochemical modeling. Contaminants in sediments were found to be mainly present as sulfides subject to oxidation. Secondary phases (carbonates, sulfates, (hydr)oxides) were also observed. Oxidative processes occurred at different rates depending on physicochemical conditions and contaminant contents in the sediment. Two distinct areas were identified on the site, each corresponding to a specific contaminant mobility behavior. In a reducing area, Fe and As were highly soluble and illustrated anoxic behavior. In well-oxygenated material, groundwater was highly contaminated in Zn, Cd and Pb. A third zone in which sediments and groundwater were less contaminated was also characterized. This study enabled us to prioritize remediation work, which should aim to limit infiltration and long-term environmental impact. PMID:20615596

Lions, Julie; Guérin, Valérie; Bataillard, Philippe; van der Lee, Jan; Laboudigue, Agnès

2010-07-07

56

Environmental effects of dredging. Literature review for residue-effects relationships with hydrocarbon contaminants in marine organisms. Technical note  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this literature review was to identify potential residue-effects relationships involving hydrocarbon contaminants which are described in the scientific literature. That information will be used to develop guidance for interpreting the results of bioaccumulation experiments conducted in the regulatory evaluation of dredged material.

NONE

1990-12-01

57

Environmental effects of dredging. Technical considerations for application of leach tests to sediments and dredged material. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

This note summarizes the characteristics of and differences among laboratory leach tests used for preproject evaluation of leachate quality in confined disposal facilities (CDFs) for dredged material. The guidance provided in this note is based on ongoing research conducted under the Long-Term Effects of Dredging Operations (LEDO) Program.

Myers, T.E.; Brannon, J.M.

1991-10-01

58

Lake-dredged material for beef cattle pasture establishment  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Carbonatic lake-dredged materials can be used as soil amendments (lime and fertilizer) for early establishment of bahiagrass in beef cattle pastures in Florida. Some of the indirect benefits of the liming effects of this material for pastures include enhancing nutrient availability, nitrification, n...

59

Dredged material isolation on the abyssal seafloor: A feasibility study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the result of an examination of the feasibility of isolating contaminated dredged material on the abyssal seafloor. The focus is on the technical and environmental factors that constrain the considerations of feasibility. A thorough conceptual design of a dredging to abyssal deposition system is analyzed with regard to each subsystem and to the entire operational concept. These subsystems include: (1) a low leakage dredge, (2) equipment for material handling and loading into geosynthetic fabric containers (GFCs), (3) the barge for transport and navigation, and (4) the subsystem for releasing the GFCs to sink to the abyssal seafloor isolation site. Particular consideration is given to the exclusion of dredged material from the ocean`s productive zone in the upper 1000 m. New theoretical models and previous empirical results are used to predict GFC motion through the water column and response to impact on the abyssal seafloor, including the case of potential release of contaminated, turbid water at impact. A geochemical model of the temporal and spatial evolution of the post-deposition geochemistry of the water column, the GFC contents and the sediments below is developed and analyzed; the results show that release of metals into the ocean waters would be insignificant. A model of the biological impacts of the introduction of dredged material in the abyssal environment is used to infer that: (1) biological diversity in the vicinity of the deposition site will be diminished, (2) biomass will be increased by dominance of a few fast growing, opportunistic benthic species, and (3) concentrations of trace elements and organic contaminant.

Valent, P.J.; Young, D.K.

1997-12-01

60

Considerations in Selecting Bioassay Organisms for Determining the Potential Environmental Impact of Dredged Material.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A list of factors was developed to aid in the selection of test species for bioassay and bioaccumulation potential studies with dredged material. The list was compiled after interviews with personnel involved in dredged material testing from the Corps of ...

P. J. Shuba S. R. Petrocelli R. E. Bentley

1981-01-01

61

Planning of a Demonstration Project for Main Channel Disposal of Dredged Material.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes a plan for establishing a demonstration project for main channel disposal of dredged material in the Upper Mississippi River. Different tracer methods for tracking the movement of dredged material disposed on the thalweg were reviewe...

D. B. Simons Y. H. Chen

1980-01-01

62

Recovery of dredged material for beneficial use: the future role of physical separation processes.  

PubMed

Sediments dredged from navigational waterways have historically been disposed in confined disposal facilities (CDFs) or in open water. When sediments are contaminated, open water disposal is typically not an alternative, and sediments are placed in CDFs. Many CDFs are nearing capacity, and siting and constructing new facilities is both difficult and expensive. In many cases, CDFs contain both clean and contaminated dredged material. Removal of materials suitable for beneficial use (BU) is one alternative under consideration to extend the life of existing CDFs, as is separation of recoverable materials at the time of disposal. Several technologies for recovery of clean materials or treatment of contaminated materials for beneficial use are presently under evaluation. Physical separation technologies have been demonstrated to have potential in reducing the volume of sediment that must be managed with confined disposal, but there are several technical issues that remain to be addressed. Determination of beneficial use specifications, physical and chemical characterization of dredged material, overall site characterization, selection of suitable unit operations, management of liquid and solid residuals, and cost/benefit analysis, are all important aspects to successful implementation of separation processes. Several of these elements are presently being evaluated in research conducted by the US Army Corps of Engineers, at the ERDC Waterways Experiment Station (WES). PMID:11463502

Olin-Estes, T J; Palermo, M R

2001-07-30

63

New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project, Acushnet River Estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 3. Characterization and elutriate testing of Acushnet River Estuary sediment. Technical report, August 1985-March 1988  

SciTech Connect

Several of the alternatives being considered for the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project involve dredging of contaminated sediment from the Acushnet River Estuary and placement of the contaminated dredged material in confined disposal areas. Evaluation of these alternatives requires testing sediment from the site to determine chemical and physical characteristics, settling properties, contaminant releases for various migration pathways, and treatment requirements for disposal area effluent. The purpose of this report is to describe the estuary composite sediment sample and the hot-spot-sediment sample tested at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station as part of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Acushnet River Estuary Engineering Feasibility Study of Dredging and Dredged Material Disposal Alternatives. Bulk sediment chemistry, physical characteristics, and elutriate testing for the sediments are included.

Averett, D.E.

1989-03-01

64

DECONTAMINATING AND PROCESSING DREDGED MATERIAL FOR BENEFICIAL USE  

SciTech Connect

Management of contaminated dredged material is a major problem in the Port of New York and New Jersey. One component of an overall management plan can be the application of a decontamination technology followed by creation of a product suitable for beneficial use. This concept is the focus of a project now being carried out by the US Environmental Protection Agency-Region 2, the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District, the US Department of Energy-Brookhaven National Laboratory, and regional university groups that have included Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Rutgers University, New Jersey Institute of Technology, and Stevens Institute of Technology. The project has gone through phased testing of commercial technologies at the bench scale (15 liters) and pilot scale (1.5--500 m{sup 3}) levels. Several technologies are now going forward to large-scale demonstrations that are intended to treat from 23,000 to 60,000 m{sup 3}. Selections of the technologies were made based on the effectiveness of the treatment process, evaluation of the possible beneficial use of the treated materials, and other factors. Major elements of the project are summarized here.

CLESCERI,N.L.; STERN,E.A.; FENG,H.; JONES,K.W.

2000-07-01

65

Assessment of dredged material toxicity in San Francisco Bay. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is designed to address concerns regarding the potential toxicity of dredged material from San Francisco Bay and to provide input into the San Francisco District's Long-Term Management Strategy for dredged material disposal. To this end, a review of the regulatory history of dredged material management within San Francisco Bay and the development of sediment toxicity tests to assess

T. M. Dillon; D. W. Moore

1990-01-01

66

DREDGED MATERIAL TRANSPORT AT DEEP-OCEAN DISPOSAL SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

Assessment of environmental impact of dredged material disposal in deep ocean water calls for predictions of water column concentration, exposure time as well as the impacted area of the bottom (footprint). redictions based on vertical willing and horizontal advection of single p...

67

DREDGED MATERIAL PLUME DISPERSAL IN CENTRAL LONG ISLAND SOUND  

EPA Science Inventory

A simulation model based upon in situ current velocity data and records of disposal events was developed to predict the chemical exposure field resulting from dredged material disposal plumes in central Long island Sound (CLIS) during the spring of 1983. n the model, plumes are a...

68

CALIBRATION OF A PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR INSTANTANEOUSLY DISCHARGED DREDGED MATERIAL  

EPA Science Inventory

This report describes modifications to a computer model originally developed by R.C.Y. Koh and Y.C. Chang for predicting the physical fate of dredged material instantaneously released into a water column. Changes to the simulation include the calibration and verification of the p...

69

Recent Developments In Bioremediation Of Recalcitrant Organics In Dredged Material  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bioremediation of recalcitrant organics was investigated in laboratory, pilot, and demonstration scale studies. The efforts focused on demonstrating bioremediation potential for dredged material in confined disposal facilities. Random samples collected over time (3 months to 1 year) were chemically analyzed (3 to 5 replicates) using standard U.S. Enviromental Protection Agency procedures. Signifcance was determined using ANOVA techniques. Laboratory scale studies

Tommy E. Myers; Daniel E. Averett

70

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF EFFECTIVE MONITORING PROGRAMS FOR DREDGING CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Currently, there is a growing national debate about dredging contaminated sediments, including risks to human health and the environment as well as the overall effectiveness of remedial activities. Presently, monitoring methods are available to address both concerns. This present...

71

New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project Acushnet River estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 10. Evaluation of dredging and dredging control technologies. Technical report, August 1985-March 1988  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an evaluation of dredging equipment and techniques for removal of highly contaminated sediments from the upper estuary of the Acushnet River, a portion of the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project. Site conditions as related to dredge selection and operation, factors considered in selection of equipment, various dredge types considered for use, and operational procedures and controls for sediment resuspension during dredging are described. Each of the dredge types is ranked according to the following criteria: compatibility for full-scale cleanup, availability, safety, potential for sediment resuspension, maneuverability, cleanup precision, cost and production flexibility, required water depth for operation, ability to access the site, and compatibility with disposal options.

Palermo, M.R.; Pankow, V.R.

1988-11-01

72

Quality of dredged material in the river Seine basin (France). II. Micropollutants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dredging rivers is needed to ensure safe navigable waters, rivers and waterways. To anticipate the management of dredged materials in the case of the river Seine basin, the quality of the sediments in the river is checked every 3 years before dredging operations. The river Seine Basin is heavily submitted to pollution pressure from nearby industrial activities and urban expansion

S. Carpentier; R. Moilleron; C. Beltran; D. Herve; D. Thevenot

2002-01-01

73

Marine dredged sediments as new materials resource for road construction.  

PubMed

Large volumes of sediments are dredged each year in Europe in order to maintain harbour activities. With the new European Union directives, harbour managers are encouraged to find environmentally sound solutions for these materials. This paper investigates the potential uses of Dunkirk marine dredged sediment as a new material resource for road building. The mineralogical composition of sediments is evaluated using X-ray diffraction and microscopy analysis. Since sediments contain a high amount of water, a dewatering treatment has been used. Different suitable mixtures, checking specific geotechnical criteria as required in French standards, are identified. The mixtures are then optimized for an economical reuse. The mechanical tests conducted on these mixtures are compaction, bearing capacity, compression and tensile tests. The experimental results show the feasibility of the beneficial use of Dunkirk marine dredged sand and sediments as a new material for the construction of foundation and base layers for roads. Further research is now needed to prove the resistance of this new material to various environmental impacts (e.g., frost damage). PMID:17826971

Siham, Kamali; Fabrice, Bernard; Edine, Abriak Nor; Patrick, Degrugilliers

2007-09-10

74

Environmental effects of dredging, technical notes. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

Biomagnification of Contaminants in Aquatic Food Webs as a Result of Open-Water Disposal of Dredged Material ; Fate of Dredged Material During Open-Water Disposal; Engineering Considerations for Capping Subaqueous Dredged Material Deposits-Background and Preliminary Planning; Engineering Considerations for Capping Subaqueous Dredged Material Deposits-Design Concepts and Placement Techniques; Monitoring Dredged Material Consolidation and Settlement at Aquatic Disposal Sites; Computerized Database for Interpretation of the Relationship Between Contaminant Tissue Residues and Biological Effects in Aquatic Organisms; Use of Daphnia Magna to Predict Consequences of Bioaccumulation; Simplified Approach for Evaluating Bioavailability of Neutral Organic Chemicals in Sediment; A Procedure for Determining Cap Thickness for Capping Subaqueous Dredged Material Deposits; Acoustic Tools and Techniques for Physical Monitoring of Aquatic Dredged Material Disposal Sites; Contaminant Modeling; Use of Seabed Drifters for Locating and Monitoring Dredged Material Placement Sites.

NONE

1996-08-01

75

Environmental effects of dredging. Procedures for examining the relationship between sediment geochemistry and biological impacts of contaminants. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between sediment-bound contaminants and biological uptake of these contaminants is complex because of the many physical, chemical, and biological factors that can affect the relationship (McElroy and Means 1988). Operational and procedural problems encountered in determining how a sediment- associated contaminant affects aquatic organisms cause additional complications. If sediment quality criteria (SQC) are to be used to regulate dredged material disposal, prediction of biological responses based on changes in sediment geochemistry, i.e., sediment physical and chemical properties, and sediment contaminant levels must be possible. Radioactive tracers can be used to evaluate the effects of changing concentrations of sediment contaminants on aquatic organisms if the assumption can be made that the contaminant does not degrade during the study. Spiking a sediment with contaminants has generally been accomplished by the addition of organic solvent carriers containing the contaminant to the soil or sediment (Adams, pg1 2.)

Brannon, J.M.; McFarland, V.; Pennington, J.C.; Price, C.B.; Reilley, F.J.

1989-12-01

76

Metal solubility as a function of pH in a contaminated, dredged sediment affected by oxidation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The solubility as a function of pH for metals in a reduced dredged sediment, subjected to different redox conditions, was studied in a laboratory experiment. The redox conditions imposed simulated (i) the undisturbed sediment (flooded), (ii) a dredged material stored in a confined pond (aerated once and then flooded), (iii) an upland stored dredged material (drained and dried), and (iv)

F. M. Tack; O. W. J. J. Callewaert; M. G. Verloo

1996-01-01

77

Uncertainty and variability in risk from trophic transfer of contaminants in dredged sediments.  

PubMed

The risks associated with bioaccumulative contaminants must be considered when evaluating dredged material disposal alternatives. The bioaccumulation of organochlorines and other contaminants by higher trophic level organisms represents one of the most significant sources of uncertainty in risk assessment. Both population variability (e.g. true population heterogeneity in body weight, lipid content, etc.) and uncertainty (e.g. measurement error) in trophic transfer can lead to large errors in predicted risk values for ecological receptors. This paper describes and quantitatively evaluates sources of uncertainty and variability in estimating the risk to an ecological receptor (osprey) from the trophic transfer of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sediments from the New York-New Jersey (NY-NJ) Harbor. The distribution of toxicity quotients is obtained using a food chain model for the osprey and specifying distributions for input parameters, which are disaggregated to represent either uncertainty or variability. PCB concentrations in sediment and water are treated as predominantly uncertain, whereas lipid content in fish, feeding preferences, and fish weight are assumed to contribute primarily to population variability in PCB accumulation. The analysis shows that point estimates of reasonable maximum exposure (RME) exceed the uncertainty bounds on the 95th percentile of variability. The analysis also shows that uncertainties in the sediment and water contaminant concentrations contribute more to the range of risk estimates than does the variability in the population exposure parameters. The separation of uncertainty and variability in food chain models can help to support management decisions regarding dredged material disposal by providing a quantitative expression of the confidence in ecological risk estimates. A rationale is provided for the distinction between uncertain and variable parameters based on management goals and data availability. PMID:11453301

Linkov, I; von Stackelberg, K E; Burmistrov, D; Bridges, T S

2001-07-01

78

40 CFR 227.13 - Dredged materials.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE EVALUATION OF PERMIT APPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN DUMPING OF MATERIALS Environmental Impact...United States, and their disposal into ocean waters is regulated by the...

2013-07-01

79

Environmental effects of dredging. Managing dredged material via thin-layer disposal in coastal marshes. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

This technical note describes how dredged material can be successfully managed in an environmentally sound manner in marshes by placing it in layers of 5 to 15 cm. (Unless otherwise indicated, all layer thicknesses indicated in this report refer to material that has undergone postdisposal consolidation.) Environmental studies of this process and of the regulatory history of thin-layer disposal in marshes are summarized. General planning and monitoring considerations are described, including descriptions of the types of equipment used to place dredged material in thin layers in marshes.

Wilber, P.

1993-07-01

80

Assessing the efficacy of dredged materials from lake panasoffkee, Florida: Implication to environment and agriculture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background, Aims and Scope  Current dredged material disposal alternatives have several limitations. Options for dealing with dredged materials include\\u000a leaving them alone, capping them with clean sediments, placing them in confined facilities, disposing of them at upland sites,\\u000a treating them chemically, or using them for wetlands creation or other beneficial uses The ability to reuse lake-dredge materials\\u000a (LDM) for agricultural purposes

Gilbert C. Sigua; Mike L. Holtkamp; Samuel W. Coleman

2004-01-01

81

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from MOTBY  

SciTech Connect

The National Park Service, US Department of the Interior requested U.S. Army Corps of Engineers/New York District (USACE-NYD) to evaluate sediments around the Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY) in Bayonne, New Jersey for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Sediment samples were collected from MOTBY. Tests and analyses were conducted on MOTBY sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from MOTBY included grain size and total organic carbon (TOC) analyses and one acute toxicity test with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita. In addition to this benthic toxicity test, a bioaccumulation test (28-day exposure) was conducted.

Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1996-09-01

82

TOXICITY ASSESSMENT OF DREDGED MATERIALS: ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY AS DETERMINED BY BIOASSAYS AND BIOACCUMULATION TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Whenever dredged materials are disposed into the ocean, the potential effects of the materials on human health, fishery resources, and marine ecosystems may range from being negligible or unmeasurable to important. Because these effects may differ greatly at each dredged material...

83

DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED MATERIAL USING EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need to achieve an environmental ly acceptable and economically beneficial reuse option for the management of dredged material is self-evident in order to retain and enhance the economic viability of America's waterways and harbors. JCI\\/UPCYCLE Associates' technological and commercial approach focuses on the utilization of dredged material as a feedstock in the manufacture of a value added building material,

J. D. Derman; H. A. Schlieper

84

Environmental effects of dredging. Implementation approach for thalweg disposal of dredged material. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

This technical note introduces the concept of thalweg disposal and associated considerations for implementation, including disposal site selection, environmental and regulatory considerations, and suitable dredging methods and equipment. Monitoring procedures are also outlined.

Olin, T.J.; Miller, A.C.; Palermo, M.R.

1993-05-01

85

Environmental effects of dredging. Evaluating environmental effects of dredged material management alternatives - a technical framework. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Note presents a brief description of a joint U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Technical Framework for the identification of environmentally acceptable alternatives for the management of dredged material. This Technical Note replaces the earlier Technical Note EEDPA-06-14, which should be discarded.

Palermo, M.R.; Francingues, N.R.; Engler, R.M.

1993-02-01

86

Environmental effects of dredging: General guidelines for monitoring effluent quality from confined dredged material disposal areas. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

This note provides general guidance for developing plans for routine field monitoring of the quality of the effluent from confined dredged material disposal areas for determining compliance with effluent standards. It also provides guidance on additional monitoring which can provide other useful information for the project designers and sponsors.

Thackston, E.L.; Palermo, M.R.

1988-11-01

87

Cd and Zn concentrations in small mammals and willow leaves on disposal facilities for dredged material  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disposal sites for dredged material are often polluted with heavy metals. The uptake of Cd and Zn by small mammals and willow trees was assessed on three sites with a different pollution degree. Detailed soil sampling showed a huge variation in soil characteristics within the sites, typical for disposal sites for dredged material. This variation made risk assessment and interpretation

J Mertens; S Luyssaert; S Verbeeren; P Vervaeke; N Lust

2001-01-01

88

Use Of Sediment Transport Calculations In Dredged Material Disposal Site Selection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of suitable sites for ocean disposal of dredged material is an ongoing problem for federal agencies, local port authorities, and users of marine resources. One of the considerations in site selection is dispersion of dredged material away from the site, either during disposal operations, or afterward. No formal technique for evaluation of sediment dispersion among candidate sites in the

C. R. Sherwood

1989-01-01

89

33 CFR 336.1 - Discharges of dredged or fill material into waters of the U.S.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...be conducted on such dredged material. (iii) If the state...evaluate the discharge of dredged material into waters of the U.S...as appropriate, regional economy. It is the Corps' policy...regulate the discharge of dredged material from its projects to...

2010-07-01

90

33 CFR 336.1 - Discharges of dredged or fill material into waters of the U.S.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...be conducted on such dredged material. (iii) If the state...evaluate the discharge of dredged material into waters of the U.S...as appropriate, regional economy. It is the Corps' policy...regulate the discharge of dredged material from its projects to...

2009-07-01

91

Synchrotron x-ray and electron micro-probe study of contaminated dredged sediments.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sediments originating from periodic dredging of waterways were traditionally disposed of in storage sites without any precautions or treatments. There may be some environmental concerns especially when the dredged material comes from historically contaminated areas such as the North French coal basin. This study aims to characterize the metal mobility (mainly Zn and Pb) in deposited dredged sediments by combining chemical and spectroscopic techniques. The sediments consist of a silty fraction (~ 40 %: dominant quartz, minor feldspar), carbonates and a clay fraction (illite dominant, illite-smectite mixed layer, kaolinite). This mineralogical heterogeneity and the observed grain-size distribution (70 to 80 % wt of the total sediment is <50µm) lead to a need to use microbeam techniques to identify Zn and Pb carriers. Electron probe micro-analyse (EPMA) combined with microbeam x-ray fluorescence (µXRF) at Synchrotron sources were used to identify Zn and Pb carriers. In particular Zn and Pb distributions in thin-section samples were determined by µ-XRF elemental mappings. EPMA was used to determine the distribution of light elements for which the energy of the emission lines is below 4 keV (Si, S, P…). The presence of reduced (sulphides) and oxidized (sulphates, oxihydroxides) phases strongly suggests that the redox state is one of the major parameters controlling the metal mobility. Therefore x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments were also performed to study the oxidation state in both bulk samples and on selected regions of interest in thin section samples. Preliminary chemical analyses In this work, the potential effects of the sample preparation on phase's structure and redox state were also studied and will be presented. In particular measurements using x-ray absorption spectroscopy were carried out on air dried or lyophilised powders and on samples stored in a cryogenic environment after sampling. For the latter, we studied the evolution of the iron oxidation state during the sample warm up (from -190°C to 20°C). To conclude, the need of further investigations will be discussed.

Poitevin, A.; Lerouge, C.; Wille, G.; Bataillard, P.; Hennet, L.

2012-04-01

92

Nematodes as Sensitive Indicators of Change at Dredged Material Disposal Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Demonstration of the recovery of marine habitats from perturbation, or of the effectiveness of protective measures, is dependent on the sensitivity of the target group in responding to change. This paper highlights the utility of the nematode component of the meiofauna as a tool for assessing disturbance from dredgings disposal. Transect surveys were conducted at three major dredged material disposal

S. E. Boyd; H. L. Rees; C. A. Richardson

2000-01-01

93

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Buttermilk Channel, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

Buttermilk Channel was one of seven waterways that was sampled and evaluated for dredging and sediment disposal. Sediment samples were collected and analyses were conducted on sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the channel included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies.

W. W. Gardiner; E. S. Barrows; L. D Antrim; B. D. Gruendell; J. Q. Word; J. J. S. Tokos

1996-01-01

94

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from South Brother Island Channel, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

South Brother Island Channel was one of seven waterways that the US Army Crops of Engineers-New York District requested the Battelle\\/Marine Sciences Laboratory to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal. Tests and analyses were conducted on South Brother Island Channel sediment core samples and evaluations were performed. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from South Brother Island Channel included

E. S. Barrows; W. W. Gardiner; L. D. Antrim; B. D. Gruendell; J. Q. Word; J. J. S. Tokos

1996-01-01

95

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle\\/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and

M. R. Pinza; W. W. Gardiner; E. S. Barrows; A. B. Borde

1996-01-01

96

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Arthur Kill Project Area, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of Arthur Kill Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material following current ammonia reduction protocols. Arthur Kill was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were recollected from the Arthur Kill Project areas in August 1995. Tests and analyses were conducted

B. D. Gruendell; E. S. Barrows; A. B. Borde

1997-01-01

97

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hackensack River Project Area, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of the Hackensack River Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material with current ammonia reduction protocols. Hackensack River was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were re-collected from the Hackensack River Project area in August 1995. Tests and analyses were

B. D. Gruendell; E. S. Barrows; A. B. Borde

1997-01-01

98

Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel: Phase 3 -- biological testing  

SciTech Connect

The John F. Baldwin Ship Channel is a 28-mile-long portion of the San Francisco Bay to Stockton Ship Channel, the primary shipping lane through San Francisco Bay and Delta. The San Francisco District of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for construction of the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel, which is authorized to be deepened to a project depth of {minus}45 ft relative to mean lower low water (MLLW). Approximately 8.5 million cubic yards (mcy) of sediment will be removed from the channel to reach this project depth. The USACE requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to conduct testing for ocean disposal under the guidelines in Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal-Testing Manual (EPA/USACE 1991). This testing manual contains a tiered evaluation approach developed specifically for ocean disposal of dredged material at a selected site. In this study, John F. Baldwin Ship Channel sediments were evaluated under the Tier III (biological) testing guidance, which is considered to be highly stringent and protective of the environment. The Tier III guidance for ocean disposal testing requires tests of water column effects, (following dredged material disposal), deposited sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants from deposited sediment (dredged material).

Kohn, N.P.; Karle, L.M.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; White, P.J.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1993-10-01

99

Mechanical Characteristics of Light-Weighted Soils Using Dredged Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the mechanical characteristics of light-weighted soils (LWS) consisting of expanded polystyrene (EPS), dredged clays, and cement through both unconfined and triaxial compression tests. The mechanical characteristics of the compressive strength of LWS are analyzed with varying initial water contents of dredged clays, EPS ratio, cement ratio, and curing pressure. In the triaxial compression test, it is found

Gil-Lim Yoonz; Sang-Soo Jeon; Byung-Tak Kim

2004-01-01

100

Checking Studies on Zones of Siting Feasibility for Dredged Material in Puget Sound.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dredged material from adjacent rivers and embayments have been placed in Puget Sound marine waters for nearly a century. Recent concern for the potential impact of these materials on the biological resources of Puget Sound waters (and ultimately on public...

1986-01-01

101

Environmental effects of dredging: Guide to selecting a dredge for minimizing resuspension of sediment. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

This technical note contains assessments of conventional and special-purpose dredges in removing sediment with minimal sediment resuspension. If sediment resuspension is a critical factor in dredging areas of contaminated material, the following guidance will aid in specifying the dredge and operating conditions. Investigations were conducted as part of the Corps of Engineers Improvement of Operations and Maintenance Techniques (IOMT) Research Program to evaluate the resuspension of sediment into the water column due to dredging operations. Laboratory, field, and literature studies have been used to define the sediment resuspension characteristics of most conventional and several special-purpose dredges. The natural hydrophobic tendency of most organic contaminants and the high sediment-sorptive capacity for inorganic contaminants limits release to the soluble forms and makes the simple measure of sediment resuspension during dredging a relative measure of the potential for contaminant release.

Hayes, D.F.

1986-12-01

102

Evaluation of Dredged Material Plumes - Physical Monitoring Techniques.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Information on the extent and nature of suspended-sediment plumes generated by dredge activities is necessary to enhance understanding of technical issues including sediment transport processes and associated environmental concerns. This technical note re...

1998-01-01

103

Development and Management of Avian Habitat on Dredged Material Islands. Synthesis of Research Results.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Seven regional DMRP studies were conducted throughout Corps of Engineers maintained waterways to determine dredged material island use by nesting waterbirds and the succession of vegetation on these islands as affected by bird use, to compare diked and un...

R. F. Soots M. C. Landin

1978-01-01

104

UTILIZING A CHIRP SONAR TO ACCURATELY CHARACTERIZE NEWLY DEPOSITED MATERIAL AT THE CALCASIEU OCEAN DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL SITE, LOUISIANA  

EPA Science Inventory

The distribution of dredged sediments is measured at the Calcasieu Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS) using a chirp sonar immediately after disposal and two months later. ubbottom reflection data, generated by a chirp sonar transmitting a 4 to 20 kHz FM sweep, is proces...

105

Dredged-material-effects assessment: Single-species toxicity/bioaccumulation and macrobenthos colonization tests  

SciTech Connect

Toxicity tests and bioaccumulation tests conducted according to methods established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Corps of Engineers in 1977 were used to evaluate potential environmental impacts of ocean disposal of dredged materials. Assessments of potential impacts based on results of currently recommended single-species tests were compared with results from macrobenthos colonization tests of dredged material from three harbors in the Gulf of Mexico and two in the Atlantic Ocean.

Parrish, P.R.; Moore, J.C.; Clark, J.R.

1989-01-01

106

Bioassays on Illinois waterway dredged material. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Sediment from the Illinois Waterway navigation channel is hydraulically dredged by the US Army Engineer District, Rock Island, and placed in the nearshore environment via pipeline. Water returning to the river can have a high-suspended solids load approaching fluid mud consistency. There is a concern that this return water may exceed the State of Illinois water quality standards for ammonia and have adverse effects on aquatic life. To address these concerns, composite sediment samples and site water collected from selected sites in the Illinois Waterway were evaluated in toxicity tests. Acute (48-hr) toxicity tests were conducted with two species, Pimephales promelas (the fathead minnow) and Daphnia magna (a freshwater cladoceran). A chronic (21-day) toxicity test was also conducted using Daphnia magna. Animals were exposed separately to different concentrations of filtered and unfiltered elutriates prepared from Acute, Cadmium, Daphnia magna, Pimephales promela, Ammonia, Chronic, Elutriate, Sediment, Bioassay, Cladoceran, Fathead minnow. Illinois Waterway edged material. Total ammonia concentrations were measured in all tests and the un-ionized fraction was calculated by adjusting for temperature and pH. Tests were conducted at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. In addition, as part of an interlaboratory effort, a 48-hr acute toxicity test with Pimephales pomelas fry was conducted concurrently by the Hygienic Laboratory of the University of Iowa, Des Moines, IA.

Moore, D.W.; Gibson, A.B.; Dillon, T.M.

1992-12-01

107

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Buttermilk Channel, New York  

SciTech Connect

Buttermilk Channel was one of seven waterways that was sampled and evaluated for dredging and sediment disposal. Sediment samples were collected and analyses were conducted on sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the channel included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. A composite sediment samples, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1996-08-01

108

Environmental Effects of Dredging Program. Interim Procedures for Estimating Mixing Zones for Effluent From Dredged Material Disposal Sites (Single-Point Discharge).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This technical note presents a simple analytical method for evaluating the size of mixing zones for effluents from confined dredged material disposal areas. The method involves a simplistic two-dimensional calculation based on dispersion principles. Discu...

1987-01-01

109

Chemical gradients in sediment cores from an EPA reference site off the farallon islands — Assessing chemical indicators of dredged material disposal in the deep sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heavy metal and organic contaminants have been determined in undisturbed sediment cores from the US Environmental Protection Agency reference site for dredged material on the continental slope off San Francisco. As expected, the concentrations are significantly lower than toxic effects guidelines, but concentrations of PCBs, PAHs, Hg, Pb, and Clostridium perfringens (a bacterium spore found in sewage) were nearly two

M. H Bothner; P. W Gill; W. S Boothman; B. B Taylor; H. A Karl

1998-01-01

110

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Shark River Project area  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Shark River Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Tests and analyses were conducted on the Shark River sediments. The evaluation of proposed dredged material consisted of bulk sediment chemical and physical analysis, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation tests. Individual sediment core samples collected from the Shark River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One sediment composite was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate, prepared from suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Shark River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs. Benthic acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation tests were performed.

Antrim, L.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1996-09-01

111

Reducing the Effects of Dredged Material Levees on Coastal Marsh Function: Sediment Deposition and Nekton Utilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dredged material levees in coastal Louisiana are normally associated with pipeline canals or, more frequently, canals dredged\\u000a through the wetlands to allow access to drilling locations for mineral extraction. The hydrologic impact on marshes behind\\u000a the levee is of concern to coastal resource managers because of the potential impact on sediment transport and deposition,\\u000a and the effect on estuarine organism

Denise J. Reed; Mark S. Peterson; Brian J. Lezina

2006-01-01

112

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Westchester Creek project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic acute and water-column toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Thirteen individual sediment core samples were collected from this area and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample representing the Westchester Creek area to be dredged, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended- particulate phase (SPP) of the Westchester Creek sediment composite, was analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

1996-11-01

113

Dredged material decontamination demonstration for the port of New York/New Jersey.  

PubMed

Management of contaminated dredged material is a significant challenge in the Port of New York and New Jersey as a result of more stringent regional ocean placement regulations with escalating costs for upland placement. One component of an overall management plan can be the application of a decontamination technology followed by creation of a product suitable for beneficial use. This concept is the focus of a project now being carried out by the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region 2, the US Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, the US Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and regional university groups that have included Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Rutgers University, New Jersey Institute of Technology, and Stevens Institute of Technology. The project has progressed through phased testing of commercial technologies at the bench scale (15 liters) (Marcor, Metcalf & Eddy, Gas Technology Institute, Westinghouse Science & Technology, BioGenesis, International Technology, and BioSafe) and pilot-scale (1.5-500m(3)) (BioGenesis, Gas Technology Institute, and Westinghouse Science & Technology) levels. The technologies developed by Gas Technology Institute and BioGenesis are now going forward to commercial demonstration facilities that are intended to treat from 23000 to 60000m(3) of dredged material during their first operational period in 2001-2002. Beneficial use products are soils and cement. Treatment costs for the final commercial facilities are estimated at US$ 39 per m(3). Selection of the technologies was made based on the effectiveness of the treatment process, evaluation of the possible beneficial use of the treated materials, and other factors. Major elements of the project are summarized here. PMID:11463507

Jones, K W; Feng, H; Stern, E A; Lodge, J; Clesceri, N L

2001-07-30

114

Trace elements in soil and biota in confined disposal facilities for dredged material  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We studied the relation of trace element concentrations in soil to those in house mice (Mus musculus), common reed (Phragmites australis) and ladybugs (Coccinella septempunctata) at five disposal facilities for dredged material. The sites had a wide range of soil trace element concentrations, acid soils and a depauperate fauna. They were very poor wildlife habitat because they were dominated by the common reed. Bioassay earthworms exposed to surface soils from three of the five sites died, whereas those exposed to four of five soils collected a meter deep survived, presumably because the deeper, unoxidized soil, was not as acid. Concentrations of Ni and Cr in the biota from each of the sites did not seem to be related to the concentrations of the same elements in soil. Although Pb, Zn and Cu concentrations in biota were correlated with those in soil, the range of concentrations in the biota was quite small compared to that in soil. The concentrations of Pb detected in mice were about as high as the concentrations previously reported in control mice from other studies. Mice from the most contaminated site (530 ppm Pb in soil) contained only slightly more Pb (8 ppm dry wt) than did mice (2-6 ppm dry wt) from sites containing much less Pb (22-92 ppm in soil). Despite the acid soil conditions, very little Cd was incorporated into food chains. Rather, Cd was leaching from the surface soil. We concluded that even the relatively high concentrations of trace elements in the acid dredged material studied did not cause high, concentrations of trace elements in the biota.

Beyer, W.N.; Miller, G.; Simmers, J.W.

1990-01-01

115

Preliminary Feasibility Study: Transport and Distribution of Dredged Materials by Hovercraft for Wetland Nourishment and Restoration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A variety of mechanisms have resulted in the loss of coastal wetlands. Thin-layer disposal of dredged material has been proposed to maintain and restore wetland areas. Transport of this material into wetlands areas is problematic due to the sensitivity of...

T. J. Olin M. R. Palermo A. C. Gibson

1994-01-01

116

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean Disposal from Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project Area  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Shoal harbor/Compton Creek Project Area in Belford and Monmouth, New Jersey to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. This was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project area consisted of bulk chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic and water-column acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation studies. Eleven core samples were analyzed or grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. Other sediments were evaluated for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

Gardiner, W.W.; Borde, A.B.; Nieukirk, S.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.

1996-10-01

117

Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Port Chester, New York  

SciTech Connect

Port Chester was one of seven waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. Tests and analyses were conducted on Port Chester sediment core samples. Because the Port Chester area is located on the border between New York and southeast Connecticut, its dredged material may also be considered for disposal at the Central Long Island Sound Disposal Site. The sediment evaluation consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and dredged material elutriate preparations, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Port Chester were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. In addition, sediment was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and 1,4-dichlorobenzene.

Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, WA (United States)

1996-08-01

118

78 FR 939 - Notice of Public Meeting: Designation of an Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Sites (ODMDS) in...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Meeting: Designation of an Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Sites...Potential Designation of One or More Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Sites...and the general public on the need for action, the range of alternatives...are unsure that your specific needs can be accommodated,...

2013-01-07

119

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hackensack River Project Area, New York  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of the Hackensack River Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material with current ammonia reduction protocols. Hackensack River was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were re-collected from the Hackensack River Project area in August 1995. Tests and analyses were conducted according to the manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Green Book,{close_quotes} and the regional manual developed by the USACE-NYD and EPA Region II, Guidance for Performing Tests on Dredged Material to be Disposed of in Ocean Waters. The reevaluation of proposed dredged material from the Hackensack River project area consisted of benthic acute toxicity tests. Thirty-three individual sediment core samples were collected from the Hackensack River project area. Three composite sediments, representing each reach of the area proposed for dredging, were used in benthic acute toxicity testing. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia. The amphipod and mysid benthic toxicity test procedures followed EPA guidance for reduction of total ammonia concentrations in test systems prior to test initiation. Statistically significant acute toxicity was found in all three Hackensack River composites in the static renewal tests with A. abdita, but not in the static tests with M. bahia. Statistically significant acute toxicity and a greater than 20% increase in mortality over the reference sediment was found in the static renewal tests with A. abdita. Statistically significant mortality 10% over reference sediment was observed in the M. bahia static tests. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Gruendell, B.D.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1997-01-01

120

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Arthur Kill Project Area, New York  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of Arthur Kill Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material following current ammonia reduction protocols. Arthur Kill was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were recollected from the Arthur Kill Project areas in August 1995. Tests and analyses were conducted according to the manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Green Book,{close_quotes} and the regional manual developed by the USACE-NYD and EPA Region II, Guidance for Performing Tests on Dredged Material to be Disposed of in Ocean Waters. The reevaluation of proposed dredged material from the Arthur Kill project areas consisted of benthic acute toxicity tests. Thirty-three individual sediment core samples were collected from the Arthur Kill project area. Three composite sediments, representing each reach of the area proposed for dredging, was used in benthic acute toxicity testing. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia. The amphipod and mysid benthic toxicity test procedures followed EPA guidance for reduction of total ammonia concentrations in test systems prior to test initiation. Statistically significant acute toxicity was found in all Arthur Kill composites in the static renewal tests with A. abdita, but not in the static tests with M. bahia. Statistically significant acute toxicity and a greater than 20% increase in mortality over the reference sediment was found in the static renewal tests with A. abdita. M. bahia did not show statistically significant acute toxicity or a greater than 10% increase in mortality over reference sediment in static tests. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Gruendell, B.D.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1997-01-01

121

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Bronx River Project Area, New York  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Bronx River project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Bronx River project area in Bronx, New York, to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Bronx River was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USAGE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and to evaluate for dredging and disposal. Sediment samples were submitted for physical and chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic and water-column acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Fifteen individual sediment core samples collected from the Bronx River project area were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample, representing the entire reach of the area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which was prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Bronx River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

Gruendell, B.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1996-12-01

122

Chemistry and biology of solid wastes, dredge materials and mine tailings  

SciTech Connect

This book examines in 12 chapters the chemical and mineralogical trace element characteristics of dredged sediments and mine tailings, and the chemical and biological processes that determine the fate of trace elements from these two sources in the terrestrial and aquatic environment. This volume is the first of two, the second entitled Environmental Management of Dredged Material and Mine Tailings. The specific subject matter of this book is prefaced by three review chapters on the chemical and biological processes that determine trace element environmental fate. The remaining nine chapters can be classified into two types: case histories and assessment methodology.

Salomons, W.; Forstner, U. (eds.)

1988-01-01

123

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Eastchester Project Area, New York  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Eastchester project (Federal Project [FP] No. 6) was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area in the Hutchinson River to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Eastchester was one of seven waterways that the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water- column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Eighteen individual sediment core samples collected from the Eastchester project area were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Two composite sediment samples, representing the upstream and lower reaches of the area proposed for dredging, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the two Eastchester sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. An additional 1 1 composite samples were created for the USACE-New England Division (USACE-NED) using the same 18 Eastchester core samples but combined into different composites. These composites were analyzed for metals, chlorinated pesticides, PCB congeners, PAHS, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed along with bioaccumulation tests.

Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Gardiner, W.W.; Tokos, J.J.S.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1996-07-01

124

FERNANDINA BEACH OCEAN DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL SITE STATUS AND TRENDS, AUGUST 2005.  

EPA Science Inventory

This EPA Region 4 study documents the current status (2005) of the Fernandina Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site. It includes an assessment of the benthic sediment quality, water quality and benthic bilogical communities. The report is located at the following web site: http...

125

Sustainable Confined Disposal Facilities for Long-term Management of Dredged Material.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dredged material confined disposal facilities (CDFs) represent a major capital and operating investment for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). As such, they need to be managed in a manner that maximizes the useful life of the facilities, as well as...

D. E. Averett J. D. Rosati L. T. Lee T. L. Welp W. V. Gwin

2010-01-01

126

Inventory of marine biotest methods for the evaluation of dredged material and sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

An inventory of marine biotest methods for the evaluation of dredged material and sediments was compiled on behalf of the Federal Environmental Agency of Germany. Relevant assays were identified from the literature and experts from several countries contributed to a questionnaire survey on established and developing procedures. The biotest methods are applicable to whole sediment, sediment suspension, sediment elutriate, porewater

Monika Nendza

2002-01-01

127

Minimizing Impacts of Maintenance Dredged Material Disposal in the Coastal Environment: A Habitat Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

At present, coastal disposal of maintenance dredged material constitutes one of the most important problems in coastal zone management and in some coastal areas represents the major anthropogenic disturbance to the benthos. In this review we first propose, based on the classic literature, that macrofaunal communities typical of environmentally stressed habitats are more resilient than those of more environmentally stable

Stefan G. Bolam; Hubert L. Rees

2003-01-01

128

15 CFR Appendix C to Subpart M of... - Dredged Material Disposal Sites Within the Sanctuary  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Sites Within the Sanctuary C Appendix C to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations...Bay National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. C Appendix C to Subpart M of Part 922âDredged Material Disposal Sites...

2013-01-01

129

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean Disposal from Shoal Harbor\\/Compton Creek Project Area  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the Shoal Harbor\\/Compton Creek Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Shoal harbor\\/Compton Creek Project Area in Belford and Monmouth, New Jersey to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. This was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District requested the Battelle Marine

W. W. Gardiner; A. B. Borde; S. L. Nieukirk; E. S. Barrows; B. D. Gruendell; J. Q. Word

1996-01-01

130

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Bronx River Project Area, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the Bronx River project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Bronx River project area in Bronx, New York, to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Bronx River was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USAGE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL)

B. D. Gruendell; W. W. Gardiner; L. D. Antrim; M. R. Pinza; E. S. Barrows; A. B. Borde

1996-01-01

131

Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Richmond Harbor  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 1991, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was contracted to conduct sampling and testing of sediments proposed for dredging of Richmond Harbor, California. The MSL collected sediment cores to a depth of [minus]40 ft MLLW ([minus]38 ft + 2 ft overdepth) from 28 (12-in. core) and 30 (4-in. core) stations. The sediment cores were allocated to six composite samples referred to as sediment treatments, which were then subjected to physical, chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation testing. Physical and chemical parameters included grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), total volatile solids (TVS), oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyis (PCBs), priority pollutant metals, and butyltins. The results from the test treatments were compared to results from five reference treatments representative of potential in-bay and offshore disposal sites.

Pinza, M R; Ward, J A; Mayhew, H L; Word, J Q; Niyogi, D K; Kohn, N P [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1992-10-01

132

The Bioavailability of Copper and Mercury to the Common Nettle (Urtica Dioica) and the Earthworm Eisenia Fetida from Contaminated Dredge Spoil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The contaminants Hg and Cu, as well as Fe, Mn and K were sequentially extracted from upland disposed dredge spoil using DTPA and 10% nitric acid. Concentrations of these metals in aerial plant tissue and roots of Urtica dioica growing on the dredge spoil were also determined and used to correlate the biological absorption coefficients (BACs) and mobile element absorption

Sion C. Edwards; Cecilia L. MacLeod; John N. Lester

1998-01-01

133

Technologies for Hopper Dredge Production and Process Monitoring. Laboratory and Field Investigations (Dredging Research Program).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Dredging Research Program (DRP) work unit was initiated to investigate methods for monitoring hopper dredge production and operation. Hopper dredging accounts for a significant portion of the total amount of material dredged in the United States. The...

S. H. Scott J. D. Jorgeson M. B. Savage C. B. Cox

1995-01-01

134

Technologies for Hopper Dredge Production and Process Monitoring; Laboratory and Field Investigations (Dredging Research Program).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Dredging Research Program (DRP) work unit was initiated to investigate methods for monitoring hopper dredge production and operation. Hopper dredging accounts for a significant portion of the total amount of material dredged in the United States. The...

S. H. Scott J. D. Jorgeson M. B. Savage C. B. Cox

1995-01-01

135

USE OF DREDGINGS FOR LANDFILL. TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 5. BEHAVIOR OF DREDGED MATERIALS IN DIKED CONTAINMENT AREAS  

EPA Science Inventory

The behavioral characteristics of hydraulically placed maintenance dredgings were investigated during an extensive four-year field and laboratory experimental program. The field work, which took place primarily at four disposal areas near Toledo, Ohio, consisted of (a) periodic v...

136

USE OF DREDGINGS FOR LANDFILL. TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 3. MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR ONE-DIMENSIONAL DESICCATION AND CONSOLIDATION OF DREDGED MATERIALS  

EPA Science Inventory

A mathematical model has been developed to represent the physical phenomena that occur during the desiccation and one-dimensional consolidation of successive layers of dredged material as they are periodically deposited in a diked containment area. The governing boundary value pr...

137

Siting of dredged material islands in bays and estuaries along low-energy coastlines  

SciTech Connect

Bays, estuaries, and lagoons along low-energy coastlines are protected shallow water environments, which make them suitable sites for intracoastal transportation routes. Dredging operations often construct disposal islands, which are cost effective and provide protected sites for shore birds. Channel maintenance is often required because sediments are transported from the island to the channel. Studies of dredge material island changes along the Texas coast have shown that the reworking and transport of island sediments is influenced by a number of geologic, geotechnical, biological, and climatic factors. Significant factors are: wind; waves; tides, both astronomic and wind generated; currents produced by wind, fluvial, and tidal processes; physical characteristics of the dredged material; climate, including both prevailing and storm conditions; basin physiography, island design, shape, height, and location within the basin; biology, both flora and fauna; and the activities of man, ship wake, subsidence, etc. Selection of the most effective island location can be based on a process model that incorporates a recognition of the influence and interaction of the physical factors that erode and transport island sediments and those that stabilize the island. This model can be applied early in the site selection process with corresponding improvements in the design and permitting of the dredging program.

Mathewson, C.C.

1985-01-01

138

Management plan report. Unconfined open-water disposal of dredged material. Phase 2. (North and south puget sound)  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the findings of Phase II of the Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA), a comprehensive study of unconfined dredged material disposal in deep waters of Puget Sound. The study was undertaken as a cooperative effort by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Washington Departments of Natural Resources (DNR) and Ecology (Ecology). A management plan for the Phase II area (North and South Puget Sound) is presented which identifies selected unconfined, open-water disposal sites, evaluation procedures for dredged material being considered for disposal at these sites, and site management considerations including environmental monitoring.

Not Available

1989-09-01

139

Comparison of the Direct Scoring Method and Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis for Dredged Material Management Decision Making.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Decision making for complex environmental problems such as dredged material management can become overwhelming, especially when dealing with multiple conflicting objectives, alternatives, and stakeholders. A process is needed to organize the massive amoun...

B. C. Suedel C. J. Banks J. Kim

2009-01-01

140

Beneficial use of dredged material for habitat creation, enhancement, and restoration in New York–New Jersey Harbor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) has been developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers, New York District (USACE–NYD) and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANY\\/NJ). The primary objective of the DMMP is to identify cost-effective and environmentally acceptable alternatives for the placement of dredged material derived from ongoing and proposed navigation improvements within

David J. Yozzo; Pace Wilber; Robert J. Will

2004-01-01

141

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Red Hook\\/Bay Ridge project areas, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the Red HookIBay Ridge project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from these two areas to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Sediment samples were collected from the Red Hook\\/Bay Ridge project areas. Tests and analyses were conducted. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Red Hook\\/Bay Ridge project areas

M. R. Pinza; E. S. Barrows; A. B. Borde

1996-01-01

142

Waste or resource? Classifying and scoring dredged material management strategies in terms of the waste hierarchy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  A well-designed approach for the selection of dredged material (DM) management option decisions identifies the trade-offs\\u000a among various risks, costs, and benefits of multiple management alternatives. Whatever tools are applied to make and communicate\\u000a decisions, it is critical that decision criteria and the parameters or indicators that are used to score or rank them are\\u000a relevant, clear, and exhaustive, but

Sabine Elisabeth Apitz

2010-01-01

143

Burial survival of benthic macrofauna following deposition of simulated dredged material  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many coastal regions, the disposal of dredged material constitutes the largest (albeit often localised) anthropogenic disturbance\\u000a to the seabed. Impacts can be minimised by reducing the amount of sediment overburden on the bed at any one time allowing\\u000a short-term recovery to proceed via the vertical migration of resident species. However, there is currently a limited understanding\\u000a of the ability

Stefan George Bolam

144

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Eastchester Project Area, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the Eastchester project (Federal Project [FP] No. 6) was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area in the Hutchinson River to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Eastchester was one of seven waterways that the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle\\/Marine Sciences

L. D. Antrim; M. R. Pinza; E. S. Barrows; W. W. Gardiner; J. J. S. Tokos; B. D. Gruendell; J. Q. Word

1996-01-01

145

DETERMINING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DREDGING: FIELD STUDY FOR EVALUATING DREDGING RESIDUALS  

EPA Science Inventory

Dredging is a commonly selected remedy for the risk management of contaminated sediments. Even so, there are questions regarding both the short-term and long-term effectiveness of dredging. A significant aspect in the performance of dredging is dredging residuals. Post-dredging ...

146

Burial survival of benthic macrofauna following deposition of simulated dredged material.  

PubMed

In many coastal regions, the disposal of dredged material constitutes the largest (albeit often localised) anthropogenic disturbance to the seabed. Impacts can be minimised by reducing the amount of sediment overburden on the bed at any one time allowing short-term recovery to proceed via the vertical migration of resident species. However, there is currently a limited understanding of the ability of such species to successfully vertically migrate. This study presents the findings of a field experiment to investigate the vertical migratory capability of temperate macroinvertebrate species following the placement of simulated dredged material. The relationships between vertical migration success with sediment characteristics (organic carbon and sand content) and placement depth were explicitly examined. While the polychaete worms Tharyx sp. A. and Streblospio shrubsolii showed poor vertical migration with only 6 cm of sediment overburden, the oligochaete Tubificoides benedii showed some recovery while the gastropod mollusc Hydrobia ulvae exhibited good migratory success, even with 16 cm of sediment overburden. While increases in sand content from 16% to 38% had no noticeable effect on vertical migration, increased sediment organic content from 0.8% to 3.3% detrimentally affected vertical migratory activity. The results support the theory that species' survival following sediment burial is trophic group-related. The relevance of these findings with respect to dredged material disposal management is discussed. PMID:21188510

Bolam, Stefan George

2010-12-29

147

Buffalo river dredging demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Corps of Engineers Buffalo District conducted a demonstration of equipment for dredging contaminated sediments. Several thousand cubic yards of sediment were removed from outside the Buffalo River Federal navigation channel limits using three dredge types: (1) open bucket, (2) enclosed bucket, and (3) submersible pump. The effectiveness of a silt screen deployed downstream of the dredge to reduce suspended sediment transport was also evaluated. Extensive sediment and water column monitoring and sampling were conducted during the 2-week demonstration as part of the effort to determine sediment resuspension rates and contaminant releases associated with the dredging operations. Water column samples were analyzed for total suspended solids, total organic carbon, PCBs, PAHs, metals, ammonia, and pH. A water column bioassay test using Daphnia magna was also performed to assess toxicity effects of the dredging operation. Results of this study were used to assess and refine techniques and laboratory tests that have been previously developed by the Corps of Engineers to predict sediment resuspension rates and contaminant releases. In another phase of the study, the Bureau of Mines demonstrated the use of polyelectrolytes for rapid removal of suspended solids from a dilute dredged material slurry.

Averett, D.E.; Zappi, P.A.; Tatem, H.E.; Gibson, A.C.; Tominey, E.A.

1996-02-01

148

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from South Brother Island Channel, New York  

SciTech Connect

South Brother Island Channel was one of seven waterways that the US Army Crops of Engineers-New York District requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal. Tests and analyses were conducted on South Brother Island Channel sediment core samples and evaluations were performed. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from South Brother Island Channel included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Souther Brother Island Channel were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. a composite sediment sample, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate water, prepared from the suspended-particle phase of South Brother Island Channel sediment, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

Barrows, E.S.; Gardiner, W.W.; Antrim, L.D.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, Washington (United States)

1996-09-01

149

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hudson River, New York  

SciTech Connect

The Hudson River (Federal Project No. 41) was one of seven waterways that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. Sediment samples were collected from the Hudson River. Tests and analyses were conducted on Hudson River sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Hudson River included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Hudson River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). A composite sediment sample, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate water, prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of Hudson River sediment, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed with three species. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1996-09-01

150

Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Federal Projects in New York and New Jersey and the Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is authorized by Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, and by the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA) and Amendments of 1977 to permit, evaluate, and regulate the disposal of dredged material in ocean waters to minimize adverse environmental effects. Compliance with the regulations of the MPRSA calls for physical and biological testing of sediment proposed for dredging prior to its disposal in ocean waters. The testing required by the MPRSA criteria is conducted under a testing manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the `Green Book.` Testing protocols in the Green Book include bulk sediment analysis, grain size analysis, elutriate testing, and biological testing. The biological testing includes bioassays for acute toxicity as well as analysis to determine bioaccumulation of certain contaminants by marine organisms. The objective of the USACE-NYD Federal Projects Program was to evaluate sediment proposed for dredging and unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. The results of analytical measurements and bioassays performed on the test sediments were compared with analyses of sediment from the Mud Dump Reference Site to determine whether the test sediments were acutely toxic to marine organisms or resulted in statistically significantly greater bioaccumulation of contaminants in marine organisms, relative to the reference sediment. Testing for the federal project areas was performed according to the requirements.

Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Kohn, N.P.; Gruendell, B.D.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Rosman, L.B. [Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, Washington (United States)

1996-08-01

151

Laboratory Assessment of Potential Impacts to Dungeness Crabs from Disposal of Dredged Material from the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

Dredging of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about dredging-related impacts on Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) in the estuary, mouth of the estuary, and nearshore ocean areas adjacent to the Columbia River. The Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers engaged the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to review the state of knowledge and conduct studies concerning impacts on Dungeness crabs resulting from disposal during the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and annual maintenance dredging in the mouth of the Columbia River. The present study concerns potential effects on Dungeness crabs from dredged material disposal specific to the mouth of the Columbia River.

Vavrinec, John; Pearson, Walter H.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, J. R.; Lee, Cheegwan; Hall, Kathleen D.; Romano, Brett A.; Miller, Martin C.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

2007-05-07

152

Automated System for Hopper Dredge Monitoring.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The installation, testing, and analysis of data from an automated monitoring system aboard a contract hopper dredge is detailed in this report. The automated dredge monitoring system consists of sensors to monitor the dredge displacement, volume of materi...

J. D. Jorgeson S. H. Scott

1994-01-01

153

Heavy metal contents in surface soils along the Upper Scheldt river (Belgium) affected by historical upland disposal of dredged materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

For several decades, periodical dredging of river sediments has been necessary to allow for shipping traffic on the river Scheldt. Sediments were disposed along the shores in the alluvial plain without concern for the potential presence of contaminants. The aim of this study was to survey the alluvial plains of the Upper Scheldt river in Belgium for the presence of

Bart Vandecasteele; Bruno De Vos; Filip M. G. Tack

2002-01-01

154

Environmental effects of dredging: Trophic transfer and biomagnification potential of contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

The terms bioconcentration, bioaccumulation, biomagnification, trophic transfer, and trophic transfer coefficient are defined to avoid confusion, as they have been used inconsistently throughout the literature (Dallinger and others 1987). Bioconcentration is the uptake of a contaminant by aquatic organisms where water is the sole containment source. Bioaccumulation is the uptake of a contaminent from both water and dietary sources. Biomagnification refers to the processes of both bioconcentration and bioaccumulation that result in increased tissue concentrations of a contaminant as it passes through two or more trophic levels (Macek, Petrocelli, and Sleight 1979). Trophic transfer is defined as the transport of contaminants between two trophic levels (that is, prey to predator) (Swartz and Lee 1980). Trophic transfer coefficient (FTC) is the concentration of contaminant in consumer tissue divided by the concentration of contaminant in food sources (that is, preceding trophic level). A TTC is an approximate measure of the potential for a contaminant to biomagnify. Biomagnification occurs when concentrations of a material increase between two or more trophic levels (that is, TTC>1) and is a sub- set of trophic transfer, which refers to any movement of a material between trophic levels (that is, TTC can be greater than or less than 1). If trophic transfer is determined to be substantially >1, biomagnification is said to occur. If a TTC value is <1%, biomagnification is judged not to take place.

Dillon, T.M.; Suedel, B.C.; Peddicord, R.K.; Clifford, P.A.; Boraczek, J.A.

1995-01-01

155

Bacteriological water quality effects of hydraulically dredging contaminated upper Mississippi River bottom sediment.  

PubMed Central

Bacteriological effects of hydraulically dredging polluted bottom sediment in the navigation channel of the Upper Mississippi River (river mile 827.5 [about 1,332 km] to 828.1 [about 1,333 km]) were investigated. Bottom sediment in the dredging site contained high total coliform densities (about 6,800 most-probable-number total coliform index per g [dry weight] and 3,800 membrane filter total coliforms per g [dry weight]), and fecal coliforms comprised an average 32% of each total coliform count. Total coliform and fecal coliform densities in water samples taken immediately below the dredge discharge pipe were each approximately four times corresponding upstream values; fecal streptococcus densities were approximately 50 times corresponding upstream values. Correlation analysis indicated that mean turbidity values downstream to the dredging operation were directly and significantly (r greater than 0.94) related to corresponding total coliform, fecal coliform, and fecal streptococcus densities. Salmonellae and shigellae were not recovered from either upstream or downstream water samples. Turbidity and indicator bacteria levels had returned to predredge values within less than 2 km below the dredge spoil discharge area at the prevailing current velocity (about 0.15 m/s).

Grimes, D J

1980-01-01

156

Wetlands Research Program. Preliminary Feasibility Study: Transport and Distribution of Dredged Materials by Hovercraft for Wetland Nourishment and Restoration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A variety of mechanisms have resulted in the loss of coastal wetlands. Thin-layer disposal of dredged material has been proposed to maintain and restore wetland areas. Transport of this material into wetlands areas is problematic due to the sensitivity of...

T. J. Olin M. R. Palermo A. C. Gibson

1994-01-01

157

76 FR 43685 - Designation of an Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS) in the Gulf of Mexico Off the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9442-4] Designation of an Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site...Management of Disposal Sites for Ocean Dumping). DATES: Comments...behalf of the Corps in 2006. Need for Action: The Corps has requested...material from the ARBC when ocean disposal is the preferred...

2011-07-21

158

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas, New York  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Red HookIBay Ridge project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from these two areas to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Sediment samples were collected from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas. Tests and analyses were conducted. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests. Twenty-four individual sediment core samples were collected from these two areas and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Three composite sediment samples, representing Red Hook Channel and the two Bay Ridge Reaches to be dredged, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the three Red Hook Bay Ridge sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1996-09-01

159

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for discharge in waters of the US - testing manual. Inland testing manual  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Discharge in Waters of the U.S. - Testing Manual. This document is commonly referred to as the Inland Testing Manual (ITM). The purpose of the ITM is to provide guidance regarding technical protocols under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) for evaluating proposed discharges of dredged material associated with navigational dredging projects into waters of the United States. This memorandum provides background information on the ITM, describes its scope and applicability, and outlines a schedule for its implementation. In accordance with that schedule, the ITM will be phased in over the next 18 months.

NONE

1998-02-01

160

Estimating the spatial distribution of dredged material disposed of at sea using particle-size distributions and metal concentrations.  

PubMed

We present a method to estimate the spatial distribution of dredged material disposed of at sea. Using both dredged sediments and samples of sea-bed sediment from near the Rame Head disposal site, Plymouth, UK, we applied entropy analysis to the <63 microm sediment fraction and combined the results with the trace metal data in the same fraction, to form a series of groups. We interpret the distribution of sediments in one group (F1) to approximate the distribution of material affected by the disposal site. This distribution includes locations close to the disposal site, and also locations <4 km to the SE and SW, <6 km to the NW and <2 km to the N. This approach demonstrates the feasibility of using trace metal analysis of particular grain size fractions to reduce uncertainty in interpreting the spatial distribution of impacts of dredge disposal. PMID:19464703

Okada, Tomonari; Larcombe, Piers; Mason, Claire

2009-05-22

161

Colonial Bird Use and Plant Succession on Dredged Material Islands in Florida. Volume I. Sea and Wading Bird Colonies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Bird use of dredged material islands in five areas of Florida was studied. The use of these islands by birds, particularly by colonial nesting sea and wading birds, was documented with two visits to each of 40 selected islands in five study areas in 1977....

R. W. Schreiber E. A. Schreiber

1978-01-01

162

15 CFR Appendix D to Subpart M of... - Dredged Material Disposal Sites Adjacent to the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...National Marine Sanctuary D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations...Bay National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 922âDredged Material Disposal Sites...

2013-01-01

163

75 FR 39523 - Notice of Intent: Designation of an Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS) Off the Mouth of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Intent: Designation of an Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site...40 CFR 228.5 and 228.6. Need for Action: The USACE has requested...Naval Station Mayport. The need for an additional ODMDS is based...not designating an additional ocean disposal site. The...

2010-07-09

164

Understanding the physical and environmental consequences of dredged material disposal: history in New England and current perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty-five years of research in New England indicates that ocean disposal of dredged material has minimal environmental impacts when carefully managed. This paper summarizes research efforts and resulting conclusions by the US Army Corps of Engineers, New England District, beginning with the Scientific Report Series and continuing with the Disposal Area Monitoring System (DAMOS). Using a tiered approach to monitoring

T. J Fredette; G. T French

2004-01-01

165

Short- and longer-term effects of the willow root system on metal extractability in contaminated dredged sediment.  

PubMed

Willow (Salix spp.) stands are often proposed as vegetation covers for the restoration and stabilization of contaminated and derelict land. Planting willows on dredged sediment disposal sites for biomass production can be an alternative to traditional capping techniques. However, with the introduction of willow stands on dredged sediment disposal sites, the possibility of increased contaminant availability in the root zone must be acknowledged as it can increase the risk of leaching. Two trials investigated the availability of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Pb in the root zones of willows grown on contaminated sediment. To assess the effects of willow root growth on metal extractability and mobility, bulk and rhizosphere sediment samples were extracted with deionized water, ammonium acetate at pH 7, and ammonium acetate-EDTA at pH 4.65. A rhizobox experiment was used to investigate the short-term effect of willow roots on metal availability in oxic and anoxic sediment. Longer-term effects were assessed in a field trial. The rhizobox trial showed that Cd, Zn, and Cu extractability in the rhizosphere increased while the opposite was observed for Pb. This was attributed to the increased willow-induced oxidation rate in the root zone as a result of aeration and evapotranspiration, which masked the direct chemical and biological influences of the willow roots. The field trial showed that Cu and Pb, but not Cd, were more available in the root zone after water and ammonium acetate (pH 7) extraction compared with the bulk sediment. Sediment in the root zone was better structured and aggregated and thus more permeable for downward water flows, causing leaching of a fraction of the metals and significantly lower total contents of Cd, Cu, and Pb. These findings indicate that a vegetation cover strategy to stabilize sediments can increase metal availability in the root zone and that potential metal losses to the environment should be considered. PMID:15224934

Vervaeke, P; Tack, F M G; Lust, N; Verloo, M

166

The effect of phytostabilization on Zn speciation in a dredged contaminated sediment using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, EXAFS spectroscopy, and principal components analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The maintenance of waterways generates large amounts of dredged sediments, which are deposited on adjacent land surfaces. These sediments are often rich in metal contaminants and present a risk to the local environment. Understanding how the metals are immobilized at the molecular level is critical for formulating effective metal containment strategies such as phytoremediation. In the present work, the mineralogical

Frédéric Panfili; Alain Manceau; Géraldine Sarret; Lorenzo Spadini; Tatiana Kirpichtchikova; Valérie Bert; Agnès Laboudigue; Matthew A. Marcus; Noureddine Ahamdach; Marie-Françoise Libert

2005-01-01

167

Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Oakland Harbor intensive study, IC-1 and OC4-B  

SciTech Connect

Oakland Harbor is located on the eastern shoreline of central San Francisco Bay in Alameda County, between the cities of Oakland and Alameda, California. Oakland Harbor and its access channels are no longer wide or deep enough to accommodate modern deeper-draft vessels. The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District to deepen and widen the navigation channels to {minus}44 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) ({minus}42 ft MLLW plus 2 ft of overdraft) in Oakland Harbor. Several options for disposal of the material from this dredging project are under consideration by USACE. Those options include disposal within San Francisco Bay, at open-ocean sites, or at upland disposal sites. Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, specifies that all proposed disposal of dredged material into open water be evaluated to determine the potential environmental impacts to those activities. To comply with those requirements, the potential environmental impacts of the dredged material must be evaluated by chemical characterization, toxicity testing, and bioaccumulation testing prior to dredging and disposal. Test results are described.

Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Karle, L.M.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1993-11-01

168

In situ monitoring of dredged material spoil sites using the oyster Crassostrea virginica  

Microsoft Academic Search

In situ and laboratory bioassays using the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, were undertaken in the Wright River Estuary, South Carolina, to determine the toxic potential of effluent and sediment from recently dredged sediments. Current standards (ASTM, USEPA, and USACE) rely solely on laboratory-based bioassays to assess toxicity of dredge spoils prior to disposal. These bioassays do not necessarily replicate the

E. F. Wirth; G. I. Scott; M. H. Fulton; R. F. Van Dolah; P. P. Maier; N. Hadley; J. W. Daugomah; P. B. Key

1996-01-01

169

Planting woody crops on dredged contaminated sediment provides both positive and negative effects in terms of remediation.  

PubMed

There is currently a requirement for studies focusing on the long-term sustainability of phytoremediation technologies. Trace element uptake by Salix, Populus and Alnus species planted in dredged contaminated canal sediment and concentrations in sediment and pore waters were investigated, eight years after a phytoremediation trial was initiated in NW England. Soil biological activity was also measured using invertebrate and microbial assays to determine soil quality improvements. Zinc was the dominant trace metal in foliage and woody stems, and the most mobile trace element in sediment pore water (~14 mg l(-1)). Biological activity had improved; earthworm numbers had increased from 5 to 24, and the QBS index (an index of microarthropod groups in soil) had increased from 70 to 88. It is concluded that biological conditions had improved and natural processes appear to be enhancing soil quality, but there remains a potential risk of trace element transfer to the wider environment. PMID:21903313

Hartley, William; Riby, Philip; Dickinson, Nicholas M; Shutes, Brian; Sparke, Shaun; Scholz, Miklas

2011-09-07

170

Recycling Biosolids and Lake-Dredged Materials to Pasture-based Animal Agriculture: Alternative Nutrient Sources for Forage Productivity and Sustainability: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Domestic sewage sludge or biosolids and lake-dredged materials are examples of materials that can be used to cut fertilizer\\u000a costs in pasture-based animal agriculture. Sustainable biosolids and lake-dredged materials management is based upon controlling\\u000a and influencing the quantity, quality and characteristics of these materials in such a way that negative impacts to the environment\\u000a are avoided and beneficial uses are

Gilbert C. Sigua

171

Recycling biosolids and lake-dredged materials to pasture-based animal agriculture: alternative nutrient sources for forage productivity and sustainability. A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Domestic sewage sludge or biosolids and lake-dredged materials are examples of materials that can be used to cut fertilizer\\u000a costs in pasture-based animal agriculture. Sustainable biosolids and lake-dredged materials management is based upon controlling\\u000a and influencing the quantity, quality and characteristics of these materials in such a way that negative impacts to the environment\\u000a are avoided and beneficial uses are

Gilbert C. Sigua

2009-01-01

172

A sediment budget study of clamshell dredging and ocean disposal activities in the New York bight  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to quantify the dry mass of dredged material involved in each stage of typical clamshell dredging and ocean disposal activities in order to identify and quantify ``losses'' of dredged material Turbidity plumes generated at dredging sites were also observed Approximately 2% of the dredged material was lost at the dredging site Of this quantity

John F. Tavolaro

1984-01-01

173

Summary of Available Guidance and Best Practices for Determining Suitability of Dredged Material for Beneficial Uses.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Corps of Engineers has the responsibility to maintain navigation of waterways across the United States. The Corps dredges more than 300 million cubic yards of sediment annually. Subsequently, methods to evaluate and determine environmentally and econo...

D. L. Brandon R. A. Price

2007-01-01

174

Buffalo river dredging demonstration. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Corps of Engineers Buffalo District conducted a demonstration of equipment for dredging contaminated sediments. Several thousand cubic yards of sediment were removed from outside the Buffalo River Federal navigation channel limits using three dredge types: (1) open bucket, (2) enclosed bucket, and (3) submersible pump. The effectiveness of a silt screen deployed downstream of the dredge to reduce suspended

D. E. Averett; P. A. Zappi; H. E. Tatem; A. C. Gibson; E. A. Tominey

1996-01-01

175

Application of neutral red retention assay to caged clams ( Ruditapes decussatus ) and crabs ( Carcinus maenas ) in the assessment of dredged material  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dredged material management is a key issue for the protection of aquatic environments. The in situ approach using caged bioindicator\\u000a species has been chosen lately as a new methodology for the assessment of dredged material. In a tier testing approach, neutral\\u000a red retention (NRR) assay has been applied as a screening tool to detect adverse changes in health status associated

Sara Buratti; Julia Ramos-Gómez; Elena Fabbri; T. Angel DelValls; M. Laura Martín-Díaz

176

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 1, Analyses and discussion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material

N. P. Kohn; J. A. Ward; H. L. Mayhew; J. Q. Word; E. S. Barrows; S. M. Goodwin; L. F. Lefkovitz

1992-01-01

177

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 2, Appendixes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accommodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material

N. P. Kohn; J. A. Ward; H. L. Mayhew; J. Q. Word; E. S. Barrows; S. M. Goodwin; L. F. Lefkovitz

1992-01-01

178

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accommodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material

N. P. Kohn; J. A. Ward; H. L. Mayhew; J. Q. Word; E. S. Barrows; S. M. Goodwin; L. F. Lefkovitz

1992-01-01

179

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material

N. P. Kohn; J. A. Ward; H. L. Mayhew; J. Q. Word; E. S. Barrows; S. M. Goodwin; L. F. Lefkovitz

1992-01-01

180

Evaluation of the flora and fauna of a Spartina alterniflora marsh established on dredged material in Winyah Bay, South Carolina  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 35 hectares ofSpartina alterniflora marsh has, over a 14-year period, developed naturally on unconfined dredged material placed within the intertidal zone of\\u000a Winyah Bay, South Carolina. The above-and below-ground vegetative structure, benthic macrofauna, and resident fish and shellfish\\u000a assemblages of two varying-aged zones (4 and 8 years) of this marsh were evaluated and compared in September 1988. Vegetative\\u000a structure

Mark W. LaSalle; Mary C. Landin; Jerre G. Sims

1991-01-01

181

Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Richmond Harbor Deepening Project and the intensive study of the Turning Basin  

SciTech Connect

Richmond Harbor is on the eastern shoreline of central San Francisco Bay and its access channels and several of the shipping berths are no longer wide or deep enough to accommodate modem deeper-draft vessels. The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (PL99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District to deepen and widen the navigation channels in Richmond Harbor. Several options for disposal of the material from this dredging project are under consideration by USACE: disposal within San Francisco Bay, at open-ocean disposal sites, or at uplands disposal sites. Purpose of this study was to conduct comprehensive evaluations, including chemical, biological, and bioaccumulation testing of sediments in selected areas of Richmond Harbor. This information was required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and USACE. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory collected 20 core samples, both 4-in. and 12-in., to a project depth of -40 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) (-38 ft MLLW plus 2 ft of overdepth) using a vibratory-hammer core. These 20 field samples were combined to form five test composites plus an older bay mud (OBM) composite that were analyzed for physical/chemical parameters, biological toxicity, and tissue chemistry. Solid-phase tests were conducted with the amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius; the clam, Macoma nasuta; and the polychaete worm, Nephtys caecoides. Suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) tests were conducted with the sanddab, Citharichthys stigmaeus; the mysid, Holmesimysis costata; and the bivalve, Mytilus galloprovincialis. Bioaccumulation of contaminants was measured in tissues of Macoma nasuta and Nereis virens. Sediments from one ocean reference sediment, and two in-bay reference sediments, were tested concurrently. Results from analysis of the five test treatments were statistically compared with the reference sediment R-OS in the first five sections of this report.

Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Karle, L.M.; Kohn, N.P.; White, P.J.; Word, J.Q.; Michaels, L.L. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1995-06-01

182

A screening procedure for selecting the most suitable dredged material placement site at the sea. The case of the South Euboean Gulf, Greece.  

PubMed

The selection of the best site for the placement of dredged sedimentary material (?7,000 m(3)) from the Aliveri coastal area in the adjacent South Euboean Gulf (Greece) was accomplished through a screening procedure. The initial stage comprised the determination of physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the dredged sediment before the commencement of any dredging operation. Grain size measurements, geochemical analyses together with the use of pollution/toxicity indices and empirical sediment quality guidelines, and the conduct of an acute toxicity test showed that the dredged material consisted of "unpolluted to slightly polluted" silty sands and sandy silts. However, the local authorities planned to place this sediment in the neighboring open sea area, i.e., the South Euboean Gulf, due to the absence of any beneficial use or alternative dumping option (i.e., dumping on public lands). Therefore, the next stage of the screening procedure, based on criteria such as the national legislation, seabed and seawater column characteristics, influence of the water mass circulation pattern on the post-placement migration of dredged sediment, impact on living resources and human activities (i.e., aquaculture and fishing), effect on significant marine sites (i.e., sites of scientific, ecological, and historical importance, navigation routes, military zones), and seafloor engineering uses, led to the evaluation of the suitability of the South Euboean Gulf as a potential dumping area. Then, the identification of the appropriate dredged material placement sites in the South Euboean Gulf was based on a cluster analysis, which tested the physicochemical resemblance of the dredged material and the surface sediments of 19 potential placement locations in the gulf. After the statistical process, only four sites situated near the north shoreline of the South Euboean Gulf were qualified as the best dredged material placement locations. PMID:23813126

Kapsimalis, V; Panagiotopoulos, I P; Hatzianestis, I; Kanellopoulos, T D; Tsangaris, C; Kaberi, E; Kontoyiannis, H; Rousakis, G; Kyriakidou, C; Hatiris, G A

2013-06-30

183

Effect of sulphur concentration on bioleaching of heavy metals from contaminated dredged sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sulphur?based bioleaching process using sulphur?oxidizing bacteria (SOB) has been demonstrated to be a feasible technology for removing heavy metals from contaminated sediments, but the excess sulphur application will lead to the re?acidification of bioleached sediments. The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of sulphur concentration on the bioleaching of heavy metals from contaminated sediments, with

D. Fang; L. Zhao; Z. Q. Yang; H. X. Shan; Y. Gao; Q. Yang

2009-01-01

184

Zn speciation in a soil contaminated by the deposition of a dredged sediment by synchrotron X-ray techniques  

SciTech Connect

The nature and proportion of Zn species present in an agricultural soil overlaid by a dredged contaminated sediment have been untangled by the novel combination of three non-invasive synchrotron-based x-ray techniques: x-ray microfluorescence ({mu}SXRF), microdiffraction ({mu}XRD), and absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). One primary (franklinite) and two secondary (phyllomanganate and phyllosilicate) Zn-containing minerals were identified in the initial soil, and another primary (ZnS) and a new secondary (Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide) Zn species in the covered soil. The quantitative analysis of EXAFS spectra recorded on bulk samples indicated that ZnS and Zn-Fe (oxyhydr)oxides amounted to 71+-10 percent and 27+-10 percent, respectively, and the other Zn species to less than 10 percent. The two new Zn species found in the covered soil result from the gravitational migration of ZnS particles initially present in the sediment, and from their further oxidative dissolution and fixation of leached Zn on F e (oxyhydr) oxides.

Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Manceau, Alain; Laboudigue, Agnes; Tamura, Nobumichi; Marcus, Matthew A.

2003-09-01

185

Quantitative Zn speciation in a contaminated dredged sediment by ?-PIXE, ?-SXRF, EXAFS spectroscopy and principal component analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dredging and disposal of sediments onto agricultural soils is a common practice in industrial and urban areas that can be hazardous to the environment when the sediments contain heavy metals. This chemical hazard can be assessed by evaluating the mobility and speciation of metals after sediment deposition. In this study, the speciation of Zn in the coarse (500 to 2000 ?m) and fine (<2 ?m) fractions of a contaminated sediment dredged from a ship canal in northern France and deposited on an agricultural soil was determined by physical analytical techniques on raw and chemically treated samples. Zn partitioning between coexisting mineral phases and its chemical associations were first determined by micro-particle-induced X-ray emission and micro-synchrotron-based X-ray radiation fluorescence. Zn-containing mineral species were then identified by X-ray diffraction and powder and polarized extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The number, nature, and proportion of Zn species were obtained by a coupled principal component analysis (PCA) and least squares fitting (LSF) procedure, applied herein for the first time to qualitatively (number and nature of species) and quantitatively (relative proportion of species) speciate a metal in a natural system. The coarse fraction consists of slag grains originating from nearby Zn smelters. In this fraction, Zn is primarily present as sphalerite (ZnS) and to a lesser extent as willemite (Zn 2SiO 4), Zn-containing ferric (oxyhydr)oxides, and zincite (ZnO). In the fine fraction, ZnS and Zn-containing Fe (oxyhydr)oxides are the major forms, and Zn-containing phyllosilicate is the minor species. Weathering of ZnS, Zn 2SiO 4, and ZnO under oxidizing conditions after the sediment disposal accounts for the uptake of Zn by Fe (oxyhydr)oxides and phyllosilicates. Two geochemical processes can explain the retention of Zn by secondary minerals: uptake on preexisting minerals and precipitation with dissolved Fe and Si. The second process likely occurs because dissolved Zn and Si are supersaturated with respect to Zn phyllosilicate. EXAFS spectroscopy, in combination with PCA and LSF, is shown to be a meaningful approach to quantitatively determining the speciation of trace elements in sediments and soils.

Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Laboudigue, Agnès; Manceau, Alain; Sarret, Géraldine; Tiffreau, Christophe; Trocellier, Patrick; Lamble, Géraldine; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Chateigner, Daniel

2002-05-01

186

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Gravesend Bay Anchorage, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Gravesend Bay Anchorage was one of seven waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in February 1994. Sediment samples were submitted for physical and chemical analyses to provide baseline sediment chemistry data on the Gravesend Bay Anchorage. Individual sediment core

E. S. Barrows; B. D. Gruendell

1996-01-01

187

Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Port Chester, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

Port Chester was one of seven waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. Tests and analyses were conducted on Port Chester sediment core samples. Because the Port Chester area is located on the border between New York and southeast Connecticut,

E. S. Barrows; H. L. Mayhew; J. Q. Word; J. J. S. Tokos

1996-01-01

188

AGRICULTURAL EFFICANCY OF CARBONATIC LAKE-DREDGED MATERIALS IN ENHANCING PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Disposal and environmental quality of dredged sediments from navigational channels, lakes and rivers have been judged as beneficial by combinations of physical, chemical, and biological analyses for over 30 years. However, many people in the scientific community find this approach objectionable sinc...

189

Land application of carbonatic lake-dredged materials: effects on soil quality and forage productivity.  

PubMed

The ability to reuse carbonatic lake-dredged materials (CLDM) for agricultural purposes is important because it reduces offshore disposal and provides an alternative to disposal of the materials in landfills that are already overtaxed. A four-year (2001 to 2005) study on land application of CLDM as an option for disposal was conducted on a beef cattle pasture in south central Florida. The objectives of this study were (i) to assess CLDM as a soil amendment to improve quality of sandy soils in most subtropical beef cattle pastures and (ii) to determine the effect of CLDM on productivity and nutritive values of bahiagrass (BG, Paspalum notatum Flügge) in subtropical beef cattle pasture. The five treatment combinations arranged in randomized complete block design were represented by plots with different ratios (R) of natural soil (NS) to CLDM: R1 (1000 g kg(-1):0 g kg(-1)); R2 (750 g kg(-1):250 g kg(-1)); R3 (500 g kg(-1):500 g kg(-1)); R4 (250 g kg(-1):750 g kg(-1)); and R5 (0 g kg(-1):1000 g kg(-1)). Addition of CLDM had significant (p < or = 0.001) effects on soil quality and favorable influence on forage establishment and nutritive values. Compared with the control plots (0 g kg(-1)), the soils in plots amended with CLDM exhibited (i) lower penetration resistance, (ii) an increase in soil pH and exchangeable cations (Ca and Mg), and (iii) decrease in the levels of soil trace metals (Mn, Cu, Fe, Zn, and Si). Results disclosed consistently and significantly (p < or = 0.001) higher BG biomass production (forage yield = -106.3x(2) + 1015.8x - 39.2; R(2) = 0.99**) and crude protein content (CP = 1.24x + 6.48; R(2) = 0.94**) from plots amended with CLDM than those of BG planted on plots with no CLDM treatment. PMID:16899749

Sigua, Gilbert C; Coleman, Samuel W; Holtkamp, Mike L

2006-08-09

190

Physical oceanographic processes at candidate dredged-material disposal sites B1B and 1M offshore San Francisco  

SciTech Connect

The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, has identified two candidate sites for ocean disposal of material from several dredging projects in San Francisco Bay. The disposal site is to be designated under Section 103 of the Ocean Dumping Act. One of the specific criteria in the Ocean Dumping Act is that the physical environments of the candidate sites be considered. Toward this goal, the USACE requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conduct a study of physical oceanographic and sediment transport processes at the candidate sites, B1B and 1M. The results of that study are presented in this report. 40 refs., 27 figs., 10 tabs.

Sherwood, C.R.; Denbo, D.W.; Downing, J.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Coats, D.A. (Marine Research Specialists, Ventura, CA (USA))

1990-10-01

191

Dredging related metal bioaccumulation in oysters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bivalves are regularly used as biomonitors of contaminants in coastal and estuarine waters. We used oysters to assess short term changes in metal availability caused by the resuspension of contaminated sediments. Sydney Rock Oysters, Saccostrea glomerata, were deployed at multiple sites in Port Kembla Harbour and two reference estuaries for 11weeks before dredging and for two equivalent periods during dredging.

L. H. Hedge; N. A. Knott; E. L. Johnston

2009-01-01

192

Predicting release of PCBs at point of dredging  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple laboratory test, referred to here as the dredging elutriate test (DRET), was sought to predict the concentration of contaminants in the water column at the point of dredging. The DRET is procedurally similar to the modified elutriate test developed by the US Army Corps of engineers to predict concentrations of contaminants at the point of disposal of dredge

F. A. DiGiano; C. T. Miller; Jeyong Yoon

2009-01-01

193

Effect of sulphur concentration on bioleaching of heavy metals from contaminated dredged sediments.  

PubMed

The sulphur-based bioleaching process using sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) has been demonstrated to be a feasible technology for removing heavy metals from contaminated sediments, but the excess sulphur application will lead to the re-acidification of bioleached sediments. The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of sulphur concentration on the bioleaching of heavy metals from contaminated sediments, with the ultimate purpose of minimizing the sulphur addition. The results showed that the inoculation of 7% of indigenous SOB, containing 3.6 x 10(8) colony forming units (CFU) mL(-1), and addition of elemental sulphur as a substrate (0.5 to 7.0 g L(-1)) resulted in a sharp decrease in sediment pH from an initial pH 8.0 to pH 1.4-2.4 and an increase in ORP (oxidation-reduction potential) from -10 mV to 500 mV within 10 days of bioleaching. Although the increase in sulphur concentration enhanced the rates of pH reduction and ORP elevation, the bioleaching process with the addition of 3.0 g L(-1) of sulphur was already sufficient to reach conditions of acidity (pH < 2.0) and ORP (500 mV) necessary for a satisfactory removal of metals, and, at day 10, 71.8% of Cu, 58.2% of Zn, and 25.3% of Cr were removed from the sediments. During the bioleaching process, Zn removal increased with a reduction in pH, whereas the removal of Cu and Cr increased not only with a reduction in pH but also with an increase in ORP. Results of sequential selective extraction indicated that the final levels of metal removals were dependent on their speciation distribution in the original sediments, and after bioleaching those unremoved metals in the bioleached sediments mainly existed in the residual fraction. PMID:19950466

Fang, D; Zhao, L; Yang, Z Q; Shan, H X; Gao, Y; Yang, Q

2009-11-01

194

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hudson River, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hudson River (Federal Project No. 41) was one of seven waterways that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. Sediment samples were collected from the Hudson River. Tests and analyses were conducted on Hudson River sediment core samples. The

W. W. Gardiner; E. S. Barrows; L. D. Antrim; B. D. Gruendell; J. Q. Word; J. J. S. Tokos

1996-01-01

195

Heavy metal concentrations in consecutive saturation extracts of dredged sediment derived surface soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heavy metals in upland, dredged-material disposal sites are of concern. Metal mobility and availability are closely related to the composition of the liquid phase. To appraise changes in pore-water metal concentrations (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) after continued leaching, surface soil samples from abandoned metal-contaminated dredged-sediment disposal sites were subjected to consecutive saturation extracts. For an `alternating dry and wet' moisture

F. M. G Tack; S. P Singh; M. G Verloo

1998-01-01

196

Preliminary Assessment of Potential Impacts to Dungeness Crabs from Disposal of Dredged Materials from the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

Dredging of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about dredging-related impacts on Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister). The overall objectives of this effort are to synthesize what is known about disposal effects on Dungeness crabs (Phase 1) and to offer approaches to quantify the effects, including approaches to gain a population-level perspective on any effects found in subsequent studies (Phase 2). This report documents Phase 1, which included (1) development of a conceptual model to integrate knowledge about crab biology and the physical processes occurring during disposal, (2) application of physics-based numerical modeling of the disposal event to understand the physical forces and processes to which a crab might be exposed during disposal, (3) conduct of a vulnerability analysis to identify the potential mechanisms by which crabs may be injured, and (4) recommendations of topics and approaches for future studies to assess the potential population-level effects of disposal on Dungeness crabs. The conceptual model first recognizes that disposal of dredged materials is a physically dynamic process with three aspects: (1) convective descent and bottom encounter, (2) dynamic collapse and spreading, and (3) mounding. Numerical modeling was used to assess the magnitude of the potentially relevant forces and extent of mounding in single disposal events. The modeling outcomes show that predicted impact pressure, shear stress, and mound depth are greatly reduced by discharge in deep water, and somewhat reduced at longer discharge duration. The analysis of numerical modeling results and vulnerabilities indicate that the vulnerability of crabs to compression forces under any of the disposal scenarios is low. For the deep-water disposal scenarios, the maximum forces and mounding do not appear to be sufficiently high enough to warrant concern for surge currents or burial at the depths involved (over 230 ft). For the shallow-water (45 to 65 ft), short-duration disposal scenarios, the shear force and surge currents estimated from the modeling and observed previously in the field at Palos Verdes, California appear to be sufficiently high to mobilize and transport the bottom sediment and at least juvenile crab. Behavioral response to surge currents probably occurs and may reduce the occurrence and extent of movement and any associated impacts. There evidence that burial by dredged materials can effect crab survival, but confounding factors in previous experiments preclude conclusions about thresholds and extent of effects. We recommend that future studies focus on burial effects during shallow water, short duration disposal events and take into account the potential for behavioral responses to mitigate any effects.

Pearson, Walter H.; Miller, Martin C.; Williams, Greg D.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, John R.

2006-02-01

197

Properties of Portland cement made from contaminated sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hundreds of millions of cubic meters of contaminated sediments are dredged from US harbors and waterways annually for maintenance of navigation, environmental remediation, or both. In recent years, inexpensive ocean dumping has been largely eliminated as a disposal alternative causing a crisis in the management of sediment. This paper presents a new beneficial use alternative for contaminated dredged material, which

Jennifer L. Dalton; Kevin H. Gardner; Thomas P. Seager; Mindy L. Weimer; Jean C. M. Spear; Bryan J. Magee

2004-01-01

198

Utilizing gamma isotope tracers to determine sediment source at reef sites near the Charleston Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site.  

PubMed

The Charleston, South Carolina Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS) has been heavily utilized as a disposal site for dredged material resulting from maintenance and channel deepening in the Charleston Harbor. Continuous monitoring by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources at the ODMDS has indicated the presence of fine-grained sediment within the monitoring zones. However, since the Charleston Harbor is formed by the conjunction of three rivers, it has been suggested that some of the fine-grained sediment surrounding the ODMDS could be due to river transport rather than solely by disposal activities. In order to trace the outflow of sediment from the harbor, natural and man-made isotopes were utilized. (7)Be (natural cosmogenic isotope) and (137)Cs (man-made isotope) are often associated with estuarine sediments. Both isotopes were used as tracers in an attempt to determine the extent of density driven sediment flow from the Charleston Harbor. (7)Be was detected in many of the offshore sampling stations indicating a direct correlation to the harbor. (137)Cs was only found in one sediment trap sample offshore, but none the less indicated some transport from the harbor. Further study for utilizing isotopic tracers in determining offshore sediment transport is still being conducted at the disposal site. It is anticipated that further (7)Be and (137)Cs isotopic monitoring offshore Charleston will aid in determining the role that tidal and density driven sediments play in the sediment budgets at the hard bottom reef sites. PMID:16359711

Noakes, Scott E; Jutte, Pamela C

2005-12-15

199

Restoring marsh elevation in a rapidly subsiding salt marsh by thin-layer deposition of dredged material 1 Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation for use by the US Government. 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thin-layer deposition of dredged material on coastal marsh by means of high-pressure spray dredging (Jet-Spray®2Jet-Spray® is a registered trademark of Aztec Development Company, P.O. Box 3348, Orlando, FL 32802, USA.2) technology has been proposed as a mechanism to minimize wetland impacts associated with traditional bucket dredging technologies and to restore soil elevations in deteriorated marshes of the Mississippi River delta.

Mark A Ford; Donald R Cahoon; James C Lynch

1999-01-01

200

Quantitative Zn speciation in a contaminated dredged sediment by ?-PIXE, ?-SXRF, EXAFS spectroscopy and principal component analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dredging and disposal of sediments onto agricultural soils is a common practice in industrial and urban areas that can be hazardous to the environment when the sediments contain heavy metals. This chemical hazard can be assessed by evaluating the mobility and speciation of metals after sediment deposition. In this study, the speciation of Zn in the coarse (500 to 2000

Marie-Pierre Isaure; Agnès Laboudigue; Alain Manceau; Géraldine Sarret; Christophe Tiffreau; Patrick Trocellier; Géraldine Lamble; Jean-Louis Hazemann; Daniel Chateigner

2002-01-01

201

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 of 38-Foot Project)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental studies were conducted by Battelle/Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) to evaluate the suitability of sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor for dredging and ocean disposal. During the Phase 3 38-Foot Project, sediment cores were collected from mudline to {minus}39 ft mean lower low water at various locations in Oakland Inner Harbor channel and allocated to six composite samples. These composites were evaluated through physical/chemical analyses, acute toxicity to sensitive marine organisms, and bioaccumulation potential. Sediment samples from individual locations were tested for physical/chemical parameters only. The results of toxicological and bioaccumulation testing may be used by USACE to determine the amount of potential dredged material from Oakland Inner Harbor channel acceptable for open-water disposal as defined by the Draft Implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990) and consistent with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662). This is Volume 2 of a two-volume data report that represents the data gathered during the Oakland Harbor Phase 3 38-Foot Project, conducted in the Fall of 1990. This data report does not include interpretation or statistical analysis of the 38-Foot data. Volume 1 includes the project background as well as data and results presented in Appendixes A through H. Volume 2 includes the remaining data presented in Appendixes I through L.

Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Kohn, N.P.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

1992-01-01

202

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 of 38-Foot Project)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineering (USACE), environmental studies were conducted by Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to evaluate the suitability of sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor for dredging and ocean disposal. During the Phase 3 38-Foot Project, sediment cores were collected from mudline to {minus}39 ft mean lower low water at various locations in Oakland Inner Harbor channel and allocated to six composite samples. These composites were evaluated through physical/chemical analyses, acute toxicity to sensitive marine organisms, and bioaccumulation potential. Sediment samples from individual locations were tested for physical/chemical parameters only. The results of toxicological and bioaccumulation testing may be used by USACE to determine the amount of potential dredged material from Oakland Inner Harbor channel acceptable for open-water disposal as defined by the Draft Implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990) and consistent with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662). This is Volume 1 of a two-volume data report that presents the data gathered during the Oakland Harbor Phase 3 38-Foot Project, conducted in the Fall of 1990. This data report does not include interpretation or statistical analysis of the 38-Foot data. Volume 1 includes the project background as well as a full presentation of data and results in Appendixes A through H. Volume 2 contains the remaining data in Appendixes I through L.

Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Kohn, N.P.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

1992-01-01

203

Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Wilmington Harbor and Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide information required to address potential ecological effects of the proposed disposal of Wilmington Harbor and Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point (MOTSU), North Carolina, sediments in the ocean. The report is divided into five sections. Section 1.0 is the introduction containing a brief overview of the study and the study objectives. Section 2.0 describes the methods and materials used for sample collection, processing, toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, physical/chemical analysis of sediments and tissues, data analysis, and quality assurance procedures. Section 3.0 presents the results of field collections, sediment chemistry, toxicological testing, and tissue chemistry resulting from bioaccumulation exposures. Section 4.0 presents a discussion of the results and summary conclusions concerning the acceptability of the Wilmington Harbor and MOTSU dredged material for ocean disposal. Section 5.0 lists the literature cited in support of this document. A series of appendixes contain detailed data listings.

Ward, J.A.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, M.E.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (US)

1993-07-01

204

Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Future disposal of dredged material in the Puget Sound estuary of the State of Washington is of major interest to Federal, state, and local governmental regulatory agencies, as well as those responsible for maintaining existing waterways and harbors. Elev...

F. J. Urabeck K. E. Phillips

1992-01-01

205

A basin-wide approach to dredged material management in New York\\/New Jersey Harbor  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the last decade, an area of increasing estuarine research in the New York\\/New Jersey Harbor has been the identification of toxic contaminant sources, mapping of contaminant levels in water and sediments, and assessment of contaminant accumulation in biota. The accumulation of anthropogenic contamination in the harbor’s sediments has occurred for centuries, primarily from land-based municipal and industrial sources. Contaminants

Thomas H. Wakeman; Nickolas J. Themelis

2001-01-01

206

Use of elutriate tests and bottom-material analysis in simulation dredging effects on water quality of selected rivers and estuaries in Oregon and Washington, 1980-83  

Microsoft Academic Search

Native waters, elutriate-test filtrates, and bottom materials were analyzed for selected trace metals and organic compounds listed in the US Environmental Protection Agency priority pollutant list, prior to dredging and disposal activities. A single reconnaissance sampling was made at several sites located in 17 rivers and estuaries, from 1980 to 1983, in an area that extends south to the Coos

G. J. Fuhrer; D. Evans

1990-01-01

207

Aquatic Disposal Field Investigations, Duwamish Waterway Disposal Site, Puget Sound, Washington. Appendix A. Effects of Dredged Material Disposal on Demersal Fish and Shellfish in Elliott Bay, Seattle, Washington.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A cooperative research program, sponsored by the Office, Chief of Engineers, U.S. Army, was conducted in Elliott Bay near Seattle, Wash., to determine the effects of disposal of dredged material from the Duwamish Waterway in open water. The study involved...

J. R. Hughes W. E. Ames D. A. Misitano G. F. Slusser

1978-01-01

208

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 2 of -42-foot project)  

SciTech Connect

The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, was authorized by the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 to deepen and widen the navigation channels of Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, California, to accommodate modern deep-draft vessels. The recommended plan consists of deepening the harbor channels from the presently authorized water depth of {minus}35 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) to {minus}42 ft MLLW and supplying the harbor with adequate turning basins and berthing areas. Offshore ocean disposal of the dredged sediment is being considered, provided there is no evident of harmful ecological effects. It harmful ecological effects are not evident then the appropriate certifications from state environmental quality agencies and concurrence from the Environmental Protection Agency can be obtained to allow disposal of sediment. To help provide the scientific basis for determining whether Oakland Harbor sediments are suitable for offshore disposal, the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) collected sediment cores from 23 stations in Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, evaluated these sediment cores geologically, performed chemical analyses for selected contaminants in sediments, conducted a series of solid phase toxicity tests with four sensitive marine invertebrates and assessed the bioaccumulation potential of sediment-associated contaminants in the tissues of Macoma Nasuta. 43 refs., 26 figs., 61 tabs.

Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Strand, J.A.; Kohn, N.P.; Squires, A.L. (Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (USA))

1990-09-01

209

Response of benthic infauna and epifauna to ocean disposal of red clay dredged material in the New York Bight: A study using sediment-profile imaging, surface imaging and traditional methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1997, approximately 1 million cubic yards of consolidated red clay was dredged from Newark Bay in New Jersey and deposited on the seafloor at an open-water dredged material disposal site located on the inner continental shelf of the New York Bight. To address concerns about the ability of benthic organisms to colonize the seafloor deposits of this compact, organic-poor

Raymond M. Valente

2006-01-01

210

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Gravesend Bay Anchorage, New York  

SciTech Connect

The Gravesend Bay Anchorage was one of seven waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in February 1994. Sediment samples were submitted for physical and chemical analyses to provide baseline sediment chemistry data on the Gravesend Bay Anchorage. Individual sediment core samples collected at the Gravesend Bay Anchorage were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Two samples, one of composited sediment cores representing the southeast corner of the anchorage (COMP GR), and one sediment core representing the northeast corner of the anchorage (Station GR-1 0), were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene.

Barrows, E.S.; Gruendell, B.D. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1996-09-01

211

Phytoremediation as a management option for contaminated sediments in tidal marshes, flood control areas and dredged sediment landfill sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background, aim and scope  Polluted sediments in rivers may be transported by the river to the sea, spread over river banks and tidal marshes or managed,\\u000a i.e. actively dredged and disposed of on land. Once sedimented on tidal marshes, alluvial areas or control flood areas, the\\u000a polluted sediments enter semi-terrestrial ecosystems or agro-ecosystems and may pose a risk. Disposal of polluted

Valérie Bert; Piet Seuntjens; Winnie Dejonghe; Sophie Lacherez; Hoang Thi Thanh Thuy; Bart Vandecasteele

2009-01-01

212

A sediment budget study of clamshell dredging and ocean disposal activities in the New York bight  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to quantify the dry mass of dredged material involved in each stage of typical clamshell dredging\\u000a and ocean disposal activities in order to identify and quantify “losses” of dredged material Turbidity plumes generated at\\u000a dredging sites were also observed Approximately 2% of the dredged material was lost at the dredging site Of this quantity

John F. Tavolaro

1984-01-01

213

Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals and Organic Contaminants.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

State of the art chemical analysis techniques were used for characterizing the contamination of dredged material, animal tissue, and water samples. This report provides tabular summaries of all analytical work carried out to date, including concentrations...

J. M. Marquenie

1984-01-01

214

Investigation of lime stabilised contaminated material  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stabilisation of contaminated materials using inorganic cementitious agents is becoming more widely used in the UK. The method has particular advantages for bulk fill operations such as highway earthworks. Research has been carried out at the Transport Research Laboratory into the long-term durability of lime stabilised material. The trial material was a soft organic silty clay with metal contamination. Testing

J. M Reid; A. H Brookes

1999-01-01

215

Environmental effects of dredging. Use of daphnia magna to predict consequences of bioaccumulation  

SciTech Connect

Results reported herein represent a portion of the laboratory research evaluating the relationship between mercury and cadmium tissue residues and biological effects in the freshwater crustacean, Daphnia magna (commonly known as the water flea). Procedures presented here for a 28-day Daphnia magna toxicity test could be used in screening for water-column toxicity resulting from open-water disposal of a specific dredged material. As a part of its regulatory and dredging programs, the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers often conducts, or requires to be conducted, an assessment of the potential for bioaccumulation of environmental contaminants from sediment scheduled for dredging and open-water disposal. There is, at present, no generally accepted guidance available to aid in the interpretation of the biological consequences of bioaccumulation. To provide an initial basis for such guidance, the Environmental Laboratory is conducting both literature database analyses and experimental laboratory studies as part of the Long-Term Effects of Dredging Operations (LEDO) Program.

NONE

1987-03-01

216

Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Bulls Head Channel (lower Suisun Bay)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the sampling and testing program conducted for USACE by Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to address (1) exclusion from further testing for ocean disposal, (2) suitability of open-water disposal within San Francisco Bay, and (3) beneficial uses, based on open-water and upland (leaching) disposal criteria, for the estimated 1.86 million cubic yards of sediment to be dredged from Bulls Head Channel and turning basin. To meet these objectives, core samples were collected from 28 locations to a depth of -47 ft mean lower low water (MLLW), which is -45 ft MLLW plus 2 ft overdepth. One to three samples per coring location were characterized physically and chemically; sediment from groups of locations and from various depth strata were combined into composite samples for biological toxicity characterization in addition to physical and chemical characterization. The chemical and biological tests were conducted following the guidance of USACE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and state regulatory agencies.

Kohn, N.P.; White, P.J.; Gardiner, W.W.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1994-07-01

217

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 1, Analyses and discussion  

SciTech Connect

The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.

Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1992-06-01

218

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project)  

SciTech Connect

The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.

Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

1992-06-01

219

Physical oceanographic processes at candidate dredged-material disposal sites B1B and 1M offshore San Francisco  

SciTech Connect

The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, has identified two candidate sites for ocean disposal of material from several dredging projects in San Francisco Bay. The disposal site is to be designated under Section 103 of the Ocean Dumping Act. One of the specific criteria in the Ocean Dumping Act is that the physical environments of the candidate sites be considered. Toward this goal, the USACE requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conduct studies of physical oceanographic and sediment transport processes at the candidate sites. Details of the methods and complete listing or graphical representation of the results are contained in this second volume of the two-volume report. Appendix A describes the methods and results of a pre-disposal bathymetric survey of Site B1B, and provides an analysis of the accuracy and precision of the survey. Appendix B describes the moorings and instruments used to obtain physical oceanographic data at the candidate sites, and also discussed other sources of data used in the analyses. Techniques used to analyze the formation, processed data, and complete results of various analyses are provided in tabular and graphical form. Appendix C provides details of the sediment transport calculations. Appendix D describes the format of the archived current meter data, which is available through the National Oceanographic Data Center. 43 refs., 54 figs., 58 tabs.

Sherwood, C.R.; Denbo, D.W.; Downing, J.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Coats, D.A. (Marine Research Specialists, Ventura, CA (USA))

1990-10-01

220

Three-year summary report of biological monitoring at the Southwest Ocean dredged-material disposal site and additional locations off Grays Harbor, Washington, 1990--1992  

SciTech Connect

The Grays Harbor Navigation Improvement Project was initiated to improve navigation by widening and deepening the federal channel at Grays Harbor. Dredged-material disposal sites were selected after an extensive review process that included inter-agency agreements, biological surveys, other laboratory and field studies, and preparation of environmental impact statements The Southwest Site, was designated to receive materials dredged during annual maintenance dredging as well as the initial construction phase of the project. The Southwest Site was located, and the disposal operations designed, primarily to avoid impacts to Dungeness crab. The Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplement for the project incorporated a Site Monitoring Plan in which a tiered approach to disposal site monitoring was recommended. Under Tier I of the Site Monitoring Plan, Dungeness crab densities are monitored to confirm that large aggregations of newly settled Dungeness crab have not moved onto the Southwest Site. Tier 2 entails an increased sampling effort to determine whether a change in disposal operations is needed. Four epibenthic surveys using beam trawls were conducted in 1990, 1991, and 1992 at the Southwest Site and North Reference area, where high crab concentrations were found in the spring of 1985. Survey results during these three years prompted no Tier 2 activities. Epibenthic surveys were also conducted at two nearshore sites where construction of sediment berms has been proposed. This work is summarized in an appendix to this report.

Antrim, L.D.; Shreffler, D.K.; Pearson, W.H.; Cullinan, V.I. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1992-12-01

221

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project)  

SciTech Connect

The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accommodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site environments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 2 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains the Appendixes (A through N), which provide details of the data analyses and full presentation of the data and results.

Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

1992-06-01

222

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 2, Appendixes  

SciTech Connect

The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accommodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site environments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 2 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains the Appendixes (A through N), which provide details of the data analyses and full presentation of the data and results.

Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1992-06-01

223

Dredging: Technology and environmental aspects. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and environmental impacts of dredging. Equipment, including semi-submersible cutter platforms, is described. Other topics include sediment movement, factors affecting sediment movement, the disposal of dredged material, and computer models predicting the fate of the dredged materials. The environmental impacts of the dredged areas and the effects of ocean dumping of dredged material are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-10-01

224

Availability of heavy metals for uptake by Salix viminalis on a moderately contaminated dredged sediment disposal site.  

PubMed

Extractability of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in a dredged sediment disposal site was assessed using single extraction procedures (H2O; 0.01 M CaCl2; 1 M NH4OAc; NH4OAc-EDTA; CaCl2-TEA-DTPA). Only Cd and Zn were found to exceed statutory threshold values for total content. The field was planted with Salix viminalis "Orm" and accumulation of heavy metals in bark, leaves, roots, and wood was evaluated at seven sampling locations along an observed gradient in texture and pollution. Biomass production was high, ranging from 13.2 to 17.8 t ha(-1) y(-1) dry weight. Metal accumulation in aboveground plant parts was low, amounting to the following annually extracted mass of metals per ha: 5034 g Zn, 83 g Cd, 145 g Cu, 83 g Pb, 12 g Ni and 6 g Cr. The use of accumulating clones and the use of soil amendments might enhance extraction efficiency in future research. PMID:15963374

Meers, E; Lamsal, S; Vervaeke, P; Hopgood, M; Lust, N; Tack, F M G

2005-09-01

225

Dredging elutriate test (DRET) development. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The removal of contaminated sediments from waterways by dredging generates concern about the release of contaminants to the water column. The ability to predict the magnitude of these potential releases during the project planning process will improve decision making in regard to water quality impacts and controls or mitigation measures for the dredging project. This report describes the development of a simple laboratory test, the dredging elutriate test (DRET), to predict the concentration of contaminants in the water column at the point of dredging. The DRET is procedurally similar to the modified elutriate test developed by the Corps of Engineers to predict the contaminant concentrations in effluent from a confined disposal facility. The test involves mixing sediment and site water, allowing the heavier solid particles to settle, sampling and supernatant, and analyzing for dissolved and particulate bound contaminants. Results of the laboratory test compared well with field data collected while dredging New Bedford Harbor sediment, which was contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Most of the contaminated loading was associated with the suspended particles.

DiGiano, F.A.; Miller, C.T.; Yoon, J.

1995-08-01

226

Discussion of Regulatory Criteria for Ocean Disposal of Dredged Materials: Elutriate Test Rationale and Implementation Guidelines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents the rationale and guidelines for implementation of the 'Standard Elutriate Test' as authorized in Rules and Regulations, Transportation for Dumping of Material into Ocean Waters, Title 40, Chapter 1, Subchapter H, Part 227.61(c), Feder...

J. W. Keeley R. M. Engler

1974-01-01

227

Option for treatment and disposal of contaminated sediments from New York\\/New Jersey Harbor. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Army Engineer District, New York, dredges several million cubic yards of sediment annually to maintain Federal navigation channels in New York and New Jersey Harbor. Most of this dredged material has characteristics that allow its disposal into open water or ocean sites. However, contaminant concentrations in some of the materials have led to this and other investigations of

Averett

1994-01-01

228

Direct and indirect effects of simulated calcareous dredge material on eggs and larvae of pink snapper Pagrus auratus.  

PubMed

The direct and indirect effects of a simulated, calcarenite-based dredge material on eggs and larvae of pink snapper Pagrus auratus were assessed. Direct effects were assessed by measuring hatch rate or survival of eggs and pre-feeding larvae, respectively, over a range of concentrations and exposure durations. Exposure of eggs to suspended solid concentrations up to 10 000 mg l(-1) for 24 h did not affect egg buoyancy or hatch rate, despite sediment adherence occurring at the two highest concentrations tested. Newly hatched larvae, whose mouths were still closed, were relatively tolerant of suspended solids, with a 12 h lethal concentration resulting in 50% mortality, LC(50), of 2020 mg l(-1) and a first observable effect concentration of 150 mg l(-1). Once the larvae's mouths opened, tolerance was significantly reduced, with a 12 h LC(50) of 157 mg l(-1) and a first observable effect concentration of 4 mg l(-1). Tolerance of larvae to suspended solids was negatively correlated with suspended solids concentration and exposure time, with exposure durations of

Partridge, G J; Michael, R J

2010-07-01

229

Land Application of Waste Materials from Dredging, Construction, and Demolition Processes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper presents the text of a manuscript to be published as a chapter in a monograph of the symposium entitled 'Land Application of Waste Materials,' sponsored by the Soil Conservation Society of Ameria. The paper is divided into two sections: waste m...

C. R. Lee R. M. Engler J. L. Mahloch

1976-01-01

230

Zinc mobility and speciation in soil covered by contaminated dredged sediment using micrometer-scale and bulk-averaging X-ray fluorescence, absorption and diffraction techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mobility and solid-state speciation of zinc in a pseudogley soil (pH = 8.2-8.3) before and after contamination by land-disposition of a dredged sediment ([Zn] = 6600 mg kg -1) affected by smelter operations were studied in a 50 m 2 pilot-scale test site and the laboratory using state-of-the-art synchrotron-based techniques. Sediment disposition on land caused the migration of micrometer-sized, smelter-related, sphalerite (ZnS) and franklinite (ZnFe 2O 4) grains and dissolved Zn from the sediment downwards to a soil depth of 20 cm over a period of 18 months. Gravitational movement of fine-grained metal contaminants probably occurred continuously, while peaks of Zn leaching were observed in the summer when the oxidative dissolution of ZnS was favored by non-flooding conditions. The Zn concentration in the <50 ?m soil fraction increased from ˜61 ppm to ˜94 ppm in the first 12 months at 0-10 cm depth, and to ˜269 ppm in the first 15 months following the sediment deposition. Higher Zn concentrations and enrichments were observed in the fine (<2 ?m) and very fine (<0.2 ?m) fractions after 15 months (480 mg kg -1 and 1000 mg kg -1, respectively), compared to 200 mg kg -1 in the <2 ?m fraction of the initial soil. In total, 1.2% of the Zn initially present in the sediment was released to the environment after 15 months, representing an integrated quantity of ˜4 kg Zn over an area of 50 m 2. Microfocused X-ray fluorescence (XRF), diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy techniques were used to image chemical associations of Zn with Fe and Mn, and to identify mineral and Zn species in selected points-of-interest in the uncontaminated and contaminated soil. Bulk average powder EXAFS spectroscopy was used to quantify the proportion of each Zn species in the soil. In the uncontaminated soil, Zn is largely speciated as Zn-containing phyllosilicate, and to a minor extent as zincochromite (ZnCr 2O 4), IVZn-sorbed turbostratic birnessite (?-MnO 2), and Zn-substituted goethite. In the upper 0-10 cm of the contaminated soil, ˜60 ± 10% of total Zn is present as ZnS inherited from the overlying sediment. Poorly-crystalline Zn-sorbed Fe (oxyhydr)oxides and zinciferous phyllosilicate amount to ˜20-30 ± 10% each and, therefore, make up most of the remaining Zn. Smaller amounts of franklinite (ZnFe 2O 4), Zn-birnessite and Zn-goethite were also detected. Further solubilization of the Zn inventory in the sediment, and also remobilization of Zn from the poorly-crystalline neoformed Fe (oxyhydr)oxide precipitates, are expected over time. This study shows that land deposition of contaminated dredged sediments is a source of Zn for the covered soil and, consequently, presents environmental hazards. Remediation technologies should be devised to either sequester Zn into sparingly soluble crystalline phases, or remove Zn by collecting leachates beneath the sediment.

Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Manceau, Alain; Geoffroy, Nicolas; Laboudigue, Agnès; Tamura, Nobumichi; Marcus, Matthew A.

2005-03-01

231

Field verification program (aquatic disposal). A field and laboratory study using adenylate energy charge as an indicator of stress in Mytilus edulis and Nephtys incisa treated with dredged material. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to test the applicability of adenylate energy charge (AEC) and adenine nucleotide pool concentrations as measures of biological response in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and the marine polychaete, Nephtys incisa, after exposure in the laboratory an field to contaminated dredged material from Black Rock Harbor (BRH), Bridgeport, Conn. A second objective was to include field verification of laboratory results, and a third objective was to investigate residue-effect relationships between tissue concentrations of BRH contaminants and AEC and adenine nucleotide pool concentrations. Tissue residue concentrations, particularly of persistent compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls, were found to be closely related to exposure concentration. The biological responses evaluated in this report included the adenine nucleotide measures of adenosine triphosphate, adenosine diphosphate, adenosine monophosphate, adenylate pool, and AEC. Adenine nucleotides and AEC are important in energy transformation and in regulation of metabolic processes. Responses in adenine nucleotide pools correlate with tissue concentrations of BRH contaminants in exposed organisms. Measurement of the adenine nucleotide concentrations may help to characterize the energy costs incurred by organisms under stressful conditions.

Zaroogian, G.E.; Rogerson, P.F.; Hoffman, G.; Johnson, M.; Johns, D.M.

1988-06-01

232

LTFATE: A model to investigate the long-term fate and stability of dredged material disposal sites. User`s guide. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides guidance on the use of the Long-Term FATE (LTFATE) computer program and describes its use through an interface available for the personal computer. LTFATE is a site evaluation tool that estimates the dispersion characteristics of a dredged material placement site over long periods of time, ranging from days for storm events to a year or more for ambient conditions. Simulations are based on the use of local wave and current condition input. Local, site-specific hydrodynamic input information is developed from numerical model-generated databases; however, user-supplied data files can be substituted for database-generated files described in this report.

Scheffner, N.W.; Thevenot, M.M.; Tallent, J.R.; Mason, J.M.

1995-05-01

233

Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Future disposal of dredged material in the Puget Sound estuary of the State of Washington is of major interest to Federal, state, and local governmental regulatory agencies, as well as those responsible for maintaining existing waterways and harbors. Elevated levels of toxic chemicals exist in bottom sediments of all the urban bays, with tumors and other biological abnormalities found in bottom fish associated with these water bodies. Public awareness of this situation has been heightened by extensive media coverage of recent government investigations of environmental conditions in Puget Sound. These investigations and public concerns have led to three ongoing regional planning efforts, all of which deal with Puget Sound water quality and marine bottom sediments. This paper reports on the Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA), a 3-year joint Federal-state study primarily focusing on unconfined, open-water disposal of material dredged from Federal and non-Federal navigation projects. Study objectives include (a) selection of unconfined, open-water disposal sites; (b) development of sampling, testing, and test interpretation procedures to be used in evaluating the suitability of dredged material for disposal in Puget Sound waters; and (c) formulation of disposal site management plans. Preliminary findings for each of these objectives are discussed for central Puget Sound, which includes the ports of Seattle, Tacoma, and Everett.

Urabeck, F.J.; Phillips, K.E.

1992-04-01

234

Characteristics of Coral and Coral Dredging.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report was prepared to fill the information gap for civil engineers involved with the dredging of coral and its use as construction material. Eighteen kinds of coral are discussed and illustrated in terms of engineering properties, excavation data, c...

B. R. Schlapak J. B. Herbich

1978-01-01

235

Maintenance Dredging, Buttermilk Channel, New York.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project proposes dredging Buttermilk Channel to authorized Federal project dimensions. Disposal of the excavated material would be in the approved dumping ground in the New York Bight. Environmental impacts include excavation and disposal of 500,000 c...

1972-01-01

236

AIR EMISSIONS FROM EXPOSED SEDIMENTS AND CONTAMINATED DREDGED MATERIAL. (R825513C017)  

EPA Science Inventory

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

237

Ultrasound to decontaminate heavy metals in dredged sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sediments contaminated with heavy metals due to past disposal practices threaten the environment and require remediation. This study was an attempt to develop a technology to decontaminate heavy metals in dredged sediments using ultrasound coupled with vacuum pressure. A set of laboratory scale experiments were conducted using dredged sediments obtained from New York\\/New Jersey harbor. This sediment sample is considered

Jay N Meegoda; Ruvini Perera

2001-01-01

238

Development and verification of numerical models for predicting the initial fate of dredged material disposed in open water. Report 2. Theoretical developments and verification results. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A numerical model called STFATE for computing the short-term fate of dredged material disposed in open water has been developed. STFATE builds upon work of earlier researchers to provide a more realistic simulation of real disposal operations from split-hull barges and multi-bin hopper dredges. New developments allow for multiple-convecting clouds and stripping of solids/ fluid from those clouds to better represent water column effects. Other developments include the use of the total energy approach for computing the bottom surge and computations that make the model more applicable at dispersive disposal sites. STFATE has been applied to simulate disposal tests conducted at a 1:50 scale in a large laboratory facility at the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. Comparison of computed and measured results on decent and bottom surge speeds, bottom deposition, and suspended sediment concentrations have been made. The results show that STFATE can be used to reliably predict the fate of material disposed at open water disposal sites. However, an uncertainty analysis is needed to place accuracy bounds on model results.

Johnson, B.H.; Fong, M.T.

1995-02-01

239

Bioleaching of Heavy Metals from Abandoned Mangrove Dredged Spoils in the Niger Delta; A Laboratory Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

3 Abstract: A laboratory scale study was carried out using Starkey medium to demonstrate the feasibility of using microbial methods for the bioleaching of heavy metals from contaminated spoils. Acidophilic bacteria, Acidithiobacillus species were isolated from abandoned dredged spoils that were produced during the dredging of oil well access canals in the Niger Delta. Two different composite dredged spoil samples

Elijah I. Ohimain; Daniel S. Olu; Steve O. Abah

2009-01-01

240

Minimizing dredging disposal via sediment management in New York Harbor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Port of New York\\/New Jersey is naturally shallow, and therefore dredging is required to maintain depths necessary for\\u000a navigation. About six million cubic yards of material must be dredged annually to maintain navigation channels and berthing\\u000a areas. Opportunities for disposal of dredged materials in the metropolitan region are limited. The existing ocean disposal\\u000a site that has, until recently, received

Karim A. Abood; Susan G. Metzger; Donald F. Distante

1999-01-01

241

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 of 38-Foot Project). Volume 2, Appendixes I through L  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental studies were conducted by Battelle/Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) to evaluate the suitability of sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor for dredging and ocean disposal. During the Phase 3 38-Foot Project, sediment cores were collected from mudline to {minus}39 ft mean lower low water at various locations in Oakland Inner Harbor channel and allocated to six composite samples. These composites were evaluated through physical/chemical analyses, acute toxicity to sensitive marine organisms, and bioaccumulation potential. Sediment samples from individual locations were tested for physical/chemical parameters only. The results of toxicological and bioaccumulation testing may be used by USACE to determine the amount of potential dredged material from Oakland Inner Harbor channel acceptable for open-water disposal as defined by the Draft Implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990) and consistent with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662). This is Volume 2 of a two-volume data report that represents the data gathered during the Oakland Harbor Phase 3 38-Foot Project, conducted in the Fall of 1990. This data report does not include interpretation or statistical analysis of the 38-Foot data. Volume 1 includes the project background as well as data and results presented in Appendixes A through H. Volume 2 includes the remaining data presented in Appendixes I through L.

Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Kohn, N.P.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1992-01-01

242

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 of 38-Foot Project). Volume 1, Background and appendixes A through H  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineering (USACE), environmental studies were conducted by Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to evaluate the suitability of sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor for dredging and ocean disposal. During the Phase 3 38-Foot Project, sediment cores were collected from mudline to {minus}39 ft mean lower low water at various locations in Oakland Inner Harbor channel and allocated to six composite samples. These composites were evaluated through physical/chemical analyses, acute toxicity to sensitive marine organisms, and bioaccumulation potential. Sediment samples from individual locations were tested for physical/chemical parameters only. The results of toxicological and bioaccumulation testing may be used by USACE to determine the amount of potential dredged material from Oakland Inner Harbor channel acceptable for open-water disposal as defined by the Draft Implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990) and consistent with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662). This is Volume 1 of a two-volume data report that presents the data gathered during the Oakland Harbor Phase 3 38-Foot Project, conducted in the Fall of 1990. This data report does not include interpretation or statistical analysis of the 38-Foot data. Volume 1 includes the project background as well as a full presentation of data and results in Appendixes A through H. Volume 2 contains the remaining data in Appendixes I through L.

Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Kohn, N.P.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1992-01-01

243

Bird use and heavy metal accumulation in waterbirds at dredge disposal impoundments, Corpus Christi, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The disposal of dredged material resulting from the creation and maintenance of navigation waterways and harbors has become a matter of national concern. In recent years, the search for new energy reserves in bays and estuaries has increased dramatically, thereby compounding the problem of what to do with dredged material. There are several alternatives for disposal of dredged material including

Donald H. White; Eugene Cromartie

1985-01-01

244

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 A of -42-foot project). Volume 1, Analyses and discussion  

SciTech Connect

The Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted a study to detemine whether dredged sediments from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors were, suitable for ocean disposal. Nineteen test treatments, six reference treatments, and control treatments were tested for physical/chemical parameters, water column effects, dredged sediment-toxicity, and bioaccumulation potential. Physical/chemical parameters were analyzed at each site and each composite sediment to a depth of -44 ft MLLW. These parameters included analysis for geological characteristics, conventional sediment measurements (grain size, total volatile solids, total organic carbon, oil and grease, and total petroleum hydrocarbons), metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pesticides, butyltins, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Physical/chemical data were used in support of the toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, but were not used in the decision-making criteria described iti the Draft Implementation Manual under Tier III testing. To evaluate water column effects, MSL conducted suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) tests using the mysid shrimp Holmesimysis sculpta, speckled sanddab Citharichtys stigmaeus, and larvae of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas- Both a 48-h and a 96-h test were performed. The MSL evaluated dredgedsediment toxicity by conducting a total of eight solid-phase toxicity tests using the following organisms: the bivalve clam Macoma nasuta, the polychaste worm Nepthys caecoides, the speckled sanddab C. stigmaeus, and the arnphipod Rhepoxynius abronius. Test duration ranged From 10 to 28 days. Bioaccumulation potential was evaluated in the 28-day M. nasuta and N. caecoides solid-phase exposures by measuring the Contaminants of concern present in their tissues after exposure to test, reference, and control sediments.

Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1992-09-01

245

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 A of -42-foot project)  

SciTech Connect

The Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted a study to detemine whether dredged sediments from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors were, suitable for ocean disposal. Nineteen test treatments, six reference treatments, and control treatments were tested for physical/chemical parameters, water column effects, dredged sediment-toxicity, and bioaccumulation potential. Physical/chemical parameters were analyzed at each site and each composite sediment to a depth of -44 ft MLLW. These parameters included analysis for geological characteristics, conventional sediment measurements (grain size, total volatile solids, total organic carbon, oil and grease, and total petroleum hydrocarbons), metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pesticides, butyltins, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Physical/chemical data were used in support of the toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, but were not used in the decision-making criteria described iti the Draft Implementation Manual under Tier III testing. To evaluate water column effects, MSL conducted suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) tests using the mysid shrimp Holmesimysis sculpta, speckled sanddab Citharichtys stigmaeus, and larvae of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas- Both a 48-h and a 96-h test were performed. The MSL evaluated dredgedsediment toxicity by conducting a total of eight solid-phase toxicity tests using the following organisms: the bivalve clam Macoma nasuta, the polychaste worm Nepthys caecoides, the speckled sanddab C. stigmaeus, and the arnphipod Rhepoxynius abronius. Test duration ranged From 10 to 28 days. Bioaccumulation potential was evaluated in the 28-day M. nasuta and N. caecoides solid-phase exposures by measuring the Contaminants of concern present in their tissues after exposure to test, reference, and control sediments.

Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

1992-09-01

246

Heavy Metal Immobilization Through Phosphate and Thermal Treatment of Dredged Sediments  

SciTech Connect

Disposal of dredged sediments is expensive and poses a major challenge for harbor dredging projects. Therefore beneficial reuse of these sediments as construction material is highly desirable assuming contaminants such as heavy metals are immobilized and organics are mineralized. In this research, the effect of the addition of 2.5% phosphate, followed by thermal treatment at 700 C, was investigated for metal contaminants in dredged sediments. Specifically, Zn speciation was evaluated, using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), by applying principal component analysis (PCA), target transformation (TT), and linear combination fit (LCF) to identify the main phases and their combination from an array of reference compounds. In dredged sediments, Zn was present as smithsonite (67%) and adsorbed to hydrous manganese oxides (18%) and hydrous iron oxides (15%). Phosphate addition resulted in precipitation of hopeite (22%), while calcination induced formation of spinels, gahnite (44%), and franklinite (34%). Although calcination was previously used to agglomerate phosphate phases by sintering, we found that it formed sparingly soluble Zn phases. Results from the U.S. EPA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) confirmed both phosphate addition and calcination reduced leachability of heavy metals with the combined treatment achieving up to an 89% reduction.

Ndiba,P.; Axe, L.; Boonfueng, T.

2008-01-01

247

A Comparative Screening-Level Ecological and Human Health Risk Assessment for Dredged Material Management Alternatives in New York\\/New Jersey Harbor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Managers of New York and New Jersey Harbor dredging projects are developing strategies to dispose and manage the large volumes of sediment that must be dredged to maintain passable waterways. The various management alternatives include aquatic containment facilities, upland containment, and treatment with beneficial reuse. An important consideration in the selection of an appropriate alternative is the evaluation of potential

Susan B. Kane Driscoll; W. Theodore Wickwire; Jerome J. Cura; Donna J. Vorhees; Cheri L. Butler; David W. Moore; Todd S. Bridges

2002-01-01

248

Direct comparison of amphipod sensitivities to dredged sediments from Spanish ports.  

PubMed

The sensitivity of the benthic amphipod species Ampelisca brevicornis and Corophium volutator to dredged sediments was compared through simultaneous testing on the standard 10 days sediment toxicity test. The results of mortality obtained for 22 harbor sediments sampled at several Spanish ports were studied together with the physico-chemical characteristics of the samples to obtain the incidence of toxicity in terms of dredged material categories and to identify possible differences in the amphipod mortality results when using one or another test species. The results showed a similar incidence of toxicity for medium-high and highly contaminated sediments for both amphipod species, similar to that obtained through the comparison of the chemical concentrations measured in sediments with the single limit values used in Spain for dredged material characterization and management. On the contrary, C. volutator presented a higher mortality and a higher incidence of toxicity when exposed to low and medium-low contaminated sediments, which may have been caused by the lower sensitivity of A. brevicornis when exposed to sediments from its natural environment. When compared to other amphipod species used for whole sediment toxicity assessment, both amphipod species used in this study reported slightly higher sensitivities although these differences could have been associated to the different set of chemical compounds considered when characterizing the sediment samples. In this sense, the amphipod mortality results were better predicted through the use of mean quotients than just by comparing the measured chemical concentrations with the single limit values used in Spain, which indicates that the toxic response of both species was caused by the cocktail of contaminants present in the sediments. Finally, the correlation analysis identified a higher association between A. brevicornis mortality and the metallic contaminants while C. volutator was more correlated with the organic micro-pollutants. Despite these differences, the results indicate that Ampelisca brevicornis can be used as test organism for dredged material characterization when enough individuals of other recommended species such as Corophium volutator are not available. PMID:17382371

Casado-Martinez, M C; Forja, J M; DelValls, T A

2007-03-26

249

Satellite contamination and materials outgassing effects databases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a program for consolidating data from quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) that will enable one to rapidly locate previous measurements on specific materials and data from past space flight experiments. When complete, the databases will contain information on materials outgassing obtained using the ASTM-E-1559 standard, and flight observations of mass accumulations. Once established, these databases will be available to the entire community and will provide a valuable source of material outgassing information. The data should be useful to those working in the Contamination area for mission design and materials specification. Data are being accumulated from both national and international sources. The space flight database will include data from past NASA missions, as well as DOD [including the BMDO-sponsored Mid-course Space Experiment (MSX) program], Canadian Space Agency, European Space Agency, Russian MIR space station, and eventually, the International Space Station. A website is being generated which will be the vehicle for storing the data that are accumulated. Once completed, the databases will be managed by the NASA/Space and Environmental Effects (SEE) Program Office at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

Wood, Bob E.; Green, B. D.; Uy, O. M.; Cain, Russell P.; Thorpe, Jason

1999-10-01

250

Effects of Black Rock Harbor dredged material on the scope for growth of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, after laboratory and field exposures  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to investigate residue-effect relationships between tissue residue concentrations and the scope for growth of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, after exposure in the laboratory and the field to dredged material from Black Rock Harbor (BRH), Bridgeport, Connecticut. A second objective included field verification of the laboratory results. Residue concentrations in mussels, particularly stable compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls, were found to be closely related to exposure concentration. Scope for growth, clearance rates, and shell growth measurements were inversely related to BRH exposure and subsequent tissue residues, with concentration as low as 1.5 mg/L of BRH material causing negative biological effects. In the field, mussels were placed along a transect from the center of the disposal mound to a clean area distant from the disposal mound. Exposure estimates indicated that the maximum concentration BRH material occurred during the disposal operation, after which both exposure and tissue residue concentrations decreased dramatically. Of the measurements made at the four field stations during the course of the study, a reduction in the scope for growth of mussels, attributable to BRH material, was observed only once. The estimated concentration of BRH suspended material during that collection was very close to the lowest concentration affecting the scope for growth in the laboratory experiments. 33 refs., 30 figs., 17 tabs.

Nelson, W.G.; Phelps, D.K.; Galloway, W.B.; Rogerson, P.F.; Pruell, R.J.

1987-01-01

251

Environmental effects of dredging: Naturally occurring levels of ammonia and sulfide in pore water: An assessment of the literature. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia and sulfide are natural constituents of sediment. Both are very toxic to aquatic organisms. Consequently, their presence may bias dredged material toxicity bioassays that are designed to evaluate the toxicity of persistent contaminants such as heavy metals and petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The purpose of this technical note is to summarize published information on sediment pore water ammonia and sulfide concentrations that occur in situ. In a subsequent technical note, this exposure information will be coupled with ammonia and sulfide toxicity data to estimate the potential influence of these constituents on dredged material toxicity bioassays.

NONE

1995-05-01

252

USE OF DREDGINGS FOR LANDFILL: SUMMARY TECHNICAL REPORT  

EPA Science Inventory

This research program was initiated with the overall objective of evaluating the usefulness of dredged sediments as landfill material. The study is limited to the deposition of polluted fresh water dredgings from the Great Lakes area, and the major effort was centered around four...

253

Dredging, environmental issues and port experience in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the regulatory and operational issues which have recently confronted a number of U.S. ports as a result of their dredging programmers. It describes the environmental concerns which have led community groups to raise legal objections to the traditional practice of ocean dumping of dredged material, the federal\\/state regulatory framework within which these objections have been considered and

Blair Gibb

1997-01-01

254

Field Evaluation of Hopper Dredge Overflow for the Delaware River.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hopper dredges are often loaded past the point of overflow for economic reasons. As the hopper is filled, dredged material is stored in the hopper until overflow begins. The density of the hopper contents is increased by allowing the low-density supernata...

J. L. Miller M. R. Palemo T. W. Groff

2002-01-01

255

Maintenance Dredging, FY 1974, Mare Island Channel and Turning Basin, Solano County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project proposes maintenance dredging of 1,200,000 cubic yards from the Mare Island Channel and Turning Basin. Dredged material will be placed in the Carquinex Strait Disposal Area and monitoring of water quality will be carried out during dredging an...

1973-01-01

256

Automated dredging and disposal alternatives management system (ADDAMS). Environmental effects of dredging. Technical note  

SciTech Connect

This technical note describes the current capabilities and availability of the Automated Dredging and Disposal Alternatives Management System (ADDAMS). The technical note replaces the earlier Technical Note EEDP-06-12, which should be discarded. Planning, design, and management of dredging and dredged material disposal projects often require complex or tedious calculations or involve complex decision-making criteria. In addition, the evaluations often must be done for several disposal alternatives or disposal sites. ADDAMS is a personal computer (PC)-based system developed to assist in making such evaluations in a timely manner. ADDAMS contains a collection of computer programs (applications) designed to assist in managing dredging projects. This technical note describes the system, currently available applications, mechanisms for acquiring and running the system, and provisions for revision and expansion.

NONE

1995-01-01

257

Dredging Operations Technical Support Program. Evaluation of Clamshell Dredging and Barge Overflow, Military Ocean Terminal Sunny Point, North Carolina.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1987 maintenance dredging for the Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point (MOTSU), project was performed by mechanical clamshell dredge, with material placed in barges and transported to an open-water ocean disposal site. This work was the first major us...

A. M. Teeter J. Homziak M. R. Palermo

1990-01-01

258

Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material  

SciTech Connect

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-11-16

259

Application of biomarkers for assessing the biological impact of dredged materials in the Mediterranean: the relationship between antioxidant responses and susceptibility to oxidative stress in the red mullet ( Mullus barbatus)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the period 1997–2000, approximately 1,800,000 m3 of material dredged from the Port of Leghorn was discharged into a sea dumping site located 14 miles from the coast. The red mullet (Mullus barbatus) was used as a bioindicator species for monitoring the biological impact of these discharges on a geographical and temporal scale. Organisms were sampled over three years (1998–2000)

Francesco Regoli; David Pellegrini; Gary W. Winston; Stefania Gorbi; Silvia Giuliani; Claudia Virno-Lamberti; Stefano Bompadre

2002-01-01

260

Hydrogeologic framework, hydrology, and water quality in the Pearce Creek Dredge Material Containment Area and vicinity, Cecil County, Maryland, 2010-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2009, to support an evaluation of the feasibility of reopening the Pearce Creek Dredge Material Containment Area (DMCA) in Cecil County, Maryland, for dredge-spoil disposal, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began to implement a comprehensive study designed to improve the understanding of the hydrogeologic framework, hydrology, and water quality of shallow aquifers underlying the DMCA and adjacent communities, to determine whether or not the DMCA affected groundwater quality, and to assess whether or not groundwater samples contained chemical constituents at levels greater than maximum allowable or recommended levels established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Safe Drinking Water Act. The study, conducted in 2010-11 by USGS in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, included installation of observation wells in areas where data gaps led earlier studies to be inconclusive. The data from new wells and existing monitoring locations were interpreted and show the DMCA influences the groundwater flow and quality. Groundwater flow in the two primary aquifers used for local supplies-the Magothy aquifer and upper Patapsco aquifer (shallow water-bearing zone)-is radially outward from the DMCA toward discharge areas, including West View Shores, the Elk River, and Pearce Creek Lake. In addition to horizontal flow outward from the DMCA, vertical gradients primarily are downward in most of the study area, and upward near the Elk River on the north side of the DMCA property, and the western part of West View Shores. Integrating groundwater geochemistry data in the analysis, the influence of the DMCA is not only a source of elevated concentrations of dissolved solids but also a geochemical driver of redox processes that enhances the mobilization and transport of redox-sensitive metals and nutrients. Groundwater affected by the DMCA is in the Magothy aquifer and upper Patapsco aquifer (shallow water-bearing zone). Based on minimal data, the water quality in the upper Patapsco aquifer deep water-bearing zone does not seem to have been impacted by the DMCA.

Dieter, Cheryl A.; Koterba, Michael T.; Zapecza, Otto S.; Walker, Charles W.; Rice, Donald E.

2013-01-01

261

Sediment Quality Values Refinement. Volume 2. Evaluation of PSDDA (Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis) Quality Values. (Appendices A and B).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report contains a detailed evaluation of the predictive reliability of dredged material disposal guidelines developed by the Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis program. These guidelines were developed for use in evaluating the acceptability of dred...

R. Barrick L. Brown S. Becker

1988-01-01

262

Satellite Contamination and Materials Outgassing Knowledge base.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Satellite contamination continues to be a design problem that engineers must take into account when developing new satellites. To help with this issue, NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program funded the development of the Satellite Contaminati...

J. L. Minor

2001-01-01

263

33 CFR 336.2 - Transportation of dredged material for the purpose of disposal into ocean waters.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...material for the purpose of disposal into ocean waters. 336.2 Section 336.2 ...MATERIAL INTO WATERS OF THE U.S. AND OCEAN WATERS § 336.2 Transportation of...material for the purpose of disposal into ocean waters. (a) Applicable law....

2009-07-01

264

33 CFR 336.2 - Transportation of dredged material for the purpose of disposal into ocean waters.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...material for the purpose of disposal into ocean waters. 336.2 Section 336.2 ...MATERIAL INTO WATERS OF THE U.S. AND OCEAN WATERS § 336.2 Transportation of...material for the purpose of disposal into ocean waters. (a) Applicable law....

2010-07-01

265

The use of Daphnia magna immobilization tests and soil microcosms to evaluate the toxicity of dredged sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  This paper evaluates the feasibility of using the buffering capacity of natural soil for the remediation of dredged material\\u000a before being disposed in soil landfills. To achieve that, an Integrated Soil Microcosms (ISM) system was designed to produce\\u000a elutriates and leachates from the sediment\\/soil percentage mixtures. Furthermore, to investigate the biological effects of\\u000a the contaminated sediments, the toxicity behavior of

Ana F. Pereira Miranda; José M. L. Rodrigues; Carlos Barata; Carmen Riva; Dayanthi Nugegoda; Amadeu M. V. M. Soares

2011-01-01

266

Effect of ditch dredging on the fate of nutrients in deep drainage ditches of the Midwestern United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dredging of drainage ditches is necessary to ensure that agricultural fields are drained adequately. This study compared the potential impacts of dredging on water quality. Using a fluvarium (stream simulator), bed material collected from drainage ditches prior to dredging was better able to remove NO3-N, NH4-N, and soluble P from water than material collected from the bed of the ditches

D. R. Smith; E. A. Pappas

267

A novel multiple batch extraction test to assess contaminant mobilization from porous waste materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contaminated porous materials, like soils, dredged sediments or waste materials must be tested before they can be used as filling materials in order to minimize the risk of groundwater pollution. We applied a multiple batch extraction test at varying liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios to a demolition waste material and a municipal waste incineration product and investigated the release of chloride, sulphate, sodium, copper, chromium and dissolved organic carbon from both waste materials. The liquid phase test concentrations were used to estimate parameters of a relatively simple mass balance model accounting for equilibrium partitioning. The model parameters were estimated within a Bayesian framework by applying an efficient MCMC sampler and the uncertainties of the model parameters and model predictions were quantified. We tested isotherms of the linear, Freundlich and Langmuir type and selected the optimal isotherm model by use of the Deviance Information Criterion (DIC). Both the excellent fit to the experimental data and a comparison between the model-predicted and independently measured concentrations at the L/S ratios of 0.25 and 0.5 L/kg demonstrate the applicability of the model for almost all studied substances and both waste materials. We conclude that batch extraction tests at varying L/S ratios provide, at moderate experimental cost, a powerful complement to established test designs like column leaching or single batch extraction tests. The method constitutes an important tool in risk assessments, because concentrations at soil water contents representative for the field situation can be predicted from easier-to-obtain test concentrations at larger L/S ratios. This helps to circumvent the experimental difficulties of the soil saturation extract and eliminates the need to apply statistical approaches to predict such representative concentrations which have been shown to suffer dramatically from poor correlations.

Iden, S. C.; Durner, W.; Delay, M.; Frimmel, F. H.

2009-04-01

268

Multicriteria decision analysis to assess options for managing contaminated sediments: Application to Southern Busan Harbor, South Korea.  

PubMed

Many years of untreated effluent discharge from residential areas, a shipyard, a marina, and a large fish market resulted in substantial contamination of bottom sediment in Southern Busan Harbor, South Korea. Contaminants in these sediments include heavy metals and organic compounds. Newly introduced regulations for ocean disposal of dredged material in South Korea pose significant challenges, because the previous practice of offshore disposal of contaminated dredged material was no longer possible after August 2008. The South Korean government has mandated that such sediments be assessed in a way that identifies the most appropriate dredged material management alternative, addressing environmental, social, and cost objectives. An approach using multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) in combination with comparative risk assessment was used as a systematic and transparent framework for prioritizing several dredged sediment management alternatives. We illustrate how MCDA can recognize the multiple goals of contaminated sediment management. Values used in weighting decision criteria were derived from surveys of stakeholders who were sediment management professionals, business owners, or government decision makers. The results of the analysis showed that land reclamation was the preferred alternative among cement-lock, sediment washing, 3 contained aquatic disposal alternatives (one in combination with a hopper dredge), geotextile tubes, solidification, and land reclamation after solidification treatment. Land reclamation was the preferred alternative, which performed well across all MCDA objectives, because of the availability of a near-shore confined disposal facility within a reasonable distance from the dredging area. PMID:20821674

Kim, Jongbum; Kim, Suk Hyun; Hong, Gi Hoon; Suedel, Burton C; Clarke, Joan

2010-01-01

269

Long-term effects of dredging operations program. Collation and interpretation of data for Times Beach confined disposal facility, Buffalo, New York. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This interim report, collates all data gathered for the Times Beach confined disposal facility (CDF), Buffalo, New York. This purpose of the studies at the CDF was to determine the mobility and potential hazard of contaminants known to be in the dredged material placed at Times Beach by sampling and analyzing various components of the developing ecosystems. Upland, wetland, and aquatic areas are represented within the CDF and, for each area, inventories of colonizing biota were made and samples collected for measurement of heavy metals and organic compound contaminants. Samples of dredged material, vegetation, and soil-dwelling invertebrates, and vertebrates have been collected and heavy metal concentrations measured. Results suggest that the persistent contaminants, particularly cadmium, are concentrating in the leaf litter zone and moving into the detritivorous invertebrates. Highest concentrations of heavy metals were noted in earthworms. Earth worms, millipedes, woodlice, and spiders appeared to be target organisms for accumulation of heavy metals, and these groups contained higher concentrations of copper and cadmium than the other groups. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants in the dredged material were below machine detection limits in the vertebrate top-predators. Contaminant concentrations in water from ground water wells were below guidance limits.

Stafford, E.A.; Simmers, J.W.; Rhett, R.G.; Brown, C.P.

1991-06-01

270

Implications of aerated stabilization basin dredging on potential effluent toxicity to fish.  

PubMed

Benthal solids accumulated in aerated stabilization basins (ASBs) must be dredged to regain treatment capacity. While dredging restores treatment performance, it has been associated occasionally with the failure to meet regulatory effluent toxicity limits at the time of dredging. A first study of its kind was undertaken to investigate the implications of ASB dredging on potential effluent toxicity to fish. The study showed that benthal solid slurry removed from the quiescent zone of an ASB with a hydraulic dredge was toxic to rainbow trout with a 96-hour median lethal concentration (LC50) of 2.2%. The high ammonia concentration in the sample was the main cause of fish mortality. Hydrogen sulfide and resin and fatty acids also were present in the dredged material at concentrations that could cause fish mortality. These findings have led to best management practices that can be used to mitigate or eliminate fish toxicity issues during dredging operations. PMID:20480765

Mahmood, Talat; Kovacs, Tibor; Gibbons, Sharon; Paradis, Jean-Claude

2010-05-01

271

PROCESS OF DECONTAMINATING MATERIAL CONTAMINATED WITH RADIOACTIVITY  

DOEpatents

A process is described for decontaminating metallic objects, such as stainless steel equipment, which consists in contacting such objects with nltric acid in a concentration of 35 to 60% to remove the major portion of the contamination; and thereafter contacting the partially decontaminated object with a second solution containing up to 20% of alkali metal hydroxide and up to 20% sodium tartrate to remove the remaining radioactive contaminats.

Overholt, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.; Acken, M.F.

1958-09-16

272

Dredging-induced near-field resuspended sediment concentrations and source strengths. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Dredging in riverine, lacustrine, and estuarine environments introduces bottom sediments into overlying waters because of imperfect entrainment and incomplete capture of sediments resuspended during the dredging process and the spillage or leakage of sediments during subsequent transportation and disposal of the dredged sediments. Resuspension of bottom sediments and resulting dispersal may pose water quality problems in waters near dredging operations. Interest in this issue increases when the sediment being dredged is highly contaminated. Resuspension of sediments by dredging is affected by dredge characteristics, dredge operating conditions, properties of bottom and suspended sediments, and site-specific conditions such as bottom topography, ambient current, and depth. This report summarizes field studies conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to assess the suspended sediment concentrations in the water column in the vicinity of various dredge types. These concentration data are combined with conceptual models for resuspended sediment source strength geometries and velocity patterns to estimate sediment source strengths for cutterhead and clamshell dredges. Although unverified, these models provide a starting point for a more thorough analytical evaluation of the entire resuspension, transport, and deposition process.

Collins, M.A.

1995-08-01

273

Restoration of dredged canals in wetlands: a comparison of methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparison of two methods for restoring dredged canals to wetlands was examined at the Jean Lafitte National Historical\\u000a Park and Preserve’s Barataria Preserve Unit near New Orleans, LA. Both northern and southern canals had the remnant dredged\\u000a spoil material returned to the canal, but the southern canal had additional sediment pumped in from a nearby lake. The water\\u000a depth

Joseph J. Baustian; R. Eugene Turner; Nancy F. Walters; David P. Muth

2009-01-01

274

Dredging Operations Technical Support Program. Comparison of the Heavy-Metal Uptake of Cyperus esculentus and of Agronomic Plants Grown on Contaminated Dutch Sediments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Heavy-metal uptake by Cyperus esculentus from three highly contaminated fluvial sediments and from two uncontaminated substrates under reduced (flooded) and oxidized (upland) disposal conditions was studied in the greenhouse. Heavy-metal uptake by lettuce...

W. van Driel K. W. Smilde B. van Luit

1985-01-01

275

Response of benthic infauna and epifauna to ocean disposal of red clay dredged material in the New York Bight: A study using sediment-profile imaging, surface imaging and traditional methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1997, approximately 1 million cubic yards of consolidated red clay was dredged from Newark Bay in New Jersey and deposited on the seafloor at an open-water dredged material disposal site located on the inner continental shelf of the New York Bight. To address concerns about the ability of benthic organisms to colonize the seafloor deposits of this compact, organic-poor red clay, monitoring surveys were conducted in 1998 (1 year after disposal) and 2002 (5 years after disposal). The surveys used a combination of sediment imaging and traditional grab sampling methods to characterize physical and biological conditions over the surface of the red clay deposits in comparison to nearby reference areas consisting of either naturally-occurring, sandy surface sediments or deposits of unconsolidated, muddy dredged material. Sediment-surface and sediment-profile images (SPI) collected in summer 2002 indicated that the surface of the red clay deposits had become much smoother and more heterogeneous in texture compared to images collected in 1998. The images also indicated that these deposits had become colonized to a much greater degree by relatively abundant and diverse infaunal and epifaunal communities compared to 1998. Taxonomic analysis of benthic grab samples confirmed the imaging results and indicated relatively high infaunal organism abundance and diversity over the red clay deposits in 2002 compared to the reference areas. However, the structure of the benthic community inhabiting the red clay was fundamentally different from the communities in the reference areas, due to the differences in sediment texture and composition. The combination of imaging and traditional taxonomic approaches used in this study provided much greater insight on the red clay colonization process than either approach by itself.

Valente, Raymond M.

2006-10-01

276

Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project  

SciTech Connect

This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

Reynolds, T. D.; Easterling, S. D.

2010-10-01

277

Environmental effects of dredging on sediment nutrients, carbon and granulometry in a tropical estuary.  

PubMed

This monitoring study encompassed a period prior to dredging, during dredging and post dredging between July 1999 to June 2000 in Ponggol estuary located along the northeastern coast of Singapore. Mean concentrations of sediment nutrients in mg x Kg(-1) (+/- standard error of means) prior to dredging, during dredging and post dredging were 9.75 +/- 4.24, 8.18 +/- 4.29 and 11.46 +/- 4.74 for ammonium, 0.08 +/- 0.05, 0.06 +/- 0.02 and 0.09 +/- 0.01 for nitrite, 0.04 +/- 0.04, 0.11 +/- 0.17 and 0.25 +/- 0.30 for nitrate, 4.83 +/- 3.48, 0.77 +/- 0.48 and 8.33 +/- 9.73 for phosphate respectively. Pre dredge, dredge and post dredge levels of total carbon (TC) were 18.5 +/- 3.7, 20.2 +/- 3.5 and 34.6 +/- 12.0, of total organic carbon (TOC) were 10.5 +/- 2.9, 19.5 +/- 3.6 and 34.6 +/- 12.0 and of total inorganic carbon (TIC) were 7.9 +/- 1.0, 0.7 +/- 0.4 and non detectable in the sediments, respectively. Both, sediment nutrients and carbon registered lower concentrations with onset of dredging, with the exception of nitrate and TOC. A shift in sedimentary carbon from inorganic carbon to organic carbon was also observed with the onset of the dredging activities when the organically enriched historically contaminated layer was exposed. Sediment granulometry showed that the sediments in the estuary were predominantly silt and clay prior to dredging, which changed to sand with onset of dredging. Silt load in the sediments was highest post-dredge. Sediment nutrients and sediment organic carbon were observed to associate with the finer fractions (silt and clay) of sediments. Finer fractions of sediments get resuspended during a dredging event and are dispersed spatially as the result of tides and water movements. Prior to this study, the potential for nutrient release and sediment granulometry due to dredging have been suggested, but there have been few studies of it, especially in the tropics. The baseline information gathered from this study could be used to work out effective management strategies to protect similar tropical ecosystems elsewhere, should there be no other alternative to dredging. PMID:16897509

Nayar, S; Miller, D J; Hunt, A; Goh, B P L; Chou, L M

2006-08-01

278

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF REMEDIAL DREDGING AT THE NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, MA, SUPERFUND SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

New Bedford Harbor (NBH), MA, is a Superfund site due to high sediment polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations. An initial remedial dredging operation removed the most contaminated sediments from the upper harbor ("Hot Spot"). During remediation, a monitoring program assess...

279

Impacts of aggregate dredging on sediment composition and associated benthic fauna at an offshore dredge site in the southern North Sea.  

PubMed

Dredging and associated screening at a dredge site in the southern North Sea (Area 408) is associated with areas of well-sorted fine sand that extend for up to 3 km to the south-east of the dredged area and overlay sediments with a more variable particle size composition. This well-sorted fine sand may reflect deposition and transport of material mobilised by the dredging and screening processes at the dredge site. Multivariate analysis of the benthic community structure suggests that marine aggregate dredging, at the level of intensity employed in the study area prior to sample collection, has had a limited impact on benthic community composition compared with that reported from studies elsewhere. This is ascribed to the likely rapid rates of recolonisation by the mobile opportunistic polychaetes and crustaceans that dominate the macrofauna of the sandy gravel deposits at this particular dredge site. Analysis of variance showed, however, that significant differences existed between the sample treatments in terms of species evenness (Pielou's J). Dredged samples were found to have the lowest mean species evenness (0.71) when compared to controls (0.77). The present study highlights the inherent difficulties in the application of general impact/recovery predictions to dredged sites with varying environmental characteristics. PMID:15649527

Robinson, J E; Newell, R C; Seiderer, L J; Simpson, N M

2005-07-01

280

Pilot dredging study, New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, Superfund project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Testing of sediment from the northern portion of New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, has revealed that most of the area is contaminated by polychlorinated. biphenyls (PCBs). In August 1984, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published a Feasibility Study of Remedial Action Alternatives for this area, which proposed five cleanup alternatives. Four of these dealt specifically with dredging the area to

Andreliunas

1992-01-01

281

VEGETATIVE MODEL FOR RESTORATION, CONSERVATION AND HABITAT ENHANCEMENT ON BENEFICIAL USE DREDGE SEDIMENTS MX974606  

EPA Science Inventory

The proposed study site for this project is approximately 230 acres of confined dredge materials located north of Port Fourchon, LA. The specific objectives of the study are 1) to implement a comprehensive program of dredge materials/plant species research; 2) to initiate steps ...

282

Elutriate–primary productivity bioassays of dredge spoil disposal in Lake Erie  

Microsoft Academic Search

The standard sediment elutriate procedure was combined with radioactive primary productivity methods to evaluate impacts of dredged material disposal on pelagic primary producers. Seven treatment levels suggested that dredged material disposal inhibited algal photosynthesis at higher concentrations. The procedure developed reflected the ‘bioavailability’ of dissolved constituents released during deposition. The results also implied that particle formation within the water column

R. Warren Flint; George J. Lorefice

1978-01-01

283

Long-term effects of dredging operations program. Effects of sediment organic-matter composition on bioaccumulation of sediment organic contaminants: Interim results. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship of sediment-bound polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 153 and fluoranthene to bioaccumulation by worms and clams and the relationship of sediment-bound PCB 153 and fluoranthene to concentrations in the interstitial water were examined. Bioaccumulation by both worms and clams was observed in all sediments. Apparent preference factor (APF) values showed that steady state was reached between sediment-bound contaminants and organism

J. M. Brannon; C. B. Price; F. J. Reilly; J. C. Pennington; V. A. McFarland

1991-01-01

284

STABILITY AND TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC COLLOIDS THROUGH CONTAMINATED AQUIFER MATERIAL  

EPA Science Inventory

Laboratory columns using contaminated natural aquifer material from Globe, Arizona, were used to investigate the transport of inorganic colloids under saturated flow conditions. e2O3 radio-labeled spherical colloids of various diameters were synthesized and introduced into the co...

285

25. Plutonium Recovery From Contaminated Materials, Architectural Plans & Details, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

25. Plutonium Recovery From Contaminated Materials, Architectural Plans & Details, Building 232-Z, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Hanford Atomic Products Operation, General Electric Company, Dwg. No. H-2-23105, 1959. - Plutonium Finishing Plant, Waste Incinerator Facility, 200 West Area, Richland, Benton County, WA

286

26. Plutonium Recovery From Contaminated Materials, Architectural Elevations, Sections & ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

26. Plutonium Recovery From Contaminated Materials, Architectural Elevations, Sections & Dets., Building 232-Z, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Hanford Atomic Products Operation, General Electric Company, Dwg. No. H-2-23106, 1959. - Plutonium Finishing Plant, Waste Incinerator Facility, 200 West Area, Richland, Benton County, WA

287

FTIR Study on Molecular Contamination on Surface of Optical Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The IR spectra of the molecular contaminants on surface of optical materials were measured. The optical disks used were SiO2, BK7 (SiO2 70%, B2O3 10%, K2O 8%, N2O 8%), CaF2, ZnSe and Al2O3. N2, O2, H2O, and CO2 were adopted as contamination gases. IR spectra of H2O (2.7kPa) on BK7 at 373K showed two absorption bands (OH stretching vibration: around

Masahiro Katoh; Nobuaki Okano; Toshihide Horikawa; Tahei Tomida; Nobunari Itoh

2006-01-01

288

Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials  

DOEpatents

A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

1996-02-13

289

MAINTAINING ACCESS TO AMERICA'S INTERMODAL PORTS\\/TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED SEDIMENT: NEW YORK\\/NEW JERSEY HARBOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the greatest drivers for maintaining access to America's Intermodal ports and related infrastructure redevelopment efforts over the next several years will be the control and treatment of contaminated sediments dredged from the nation's waterways. More than 306 million cubic meters (m³) (400 million cubic yards [cy]) of sediments are dredged annually from US waterways, and each year close

Eric A. Stern; Keith W. Jones; Kerwin Donato; John D. Pauling; J. G. SONTAG; N. L. CLESCERI; M. C. MENSINGER; C. L. WILDE

1998-01-01

290

Cadmium and Zinc uptake by volunteer willow species and elder rooting in polluted dredged sediment disposal sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Salix species and Sambucus nigra L. (elder) naturally invade dredged sediment landfills and are commonly encountered on substrates contaminated with heavy metals. Foliar concentrations of Cd and Zn in four Salix species and elder were explored in the field. Metal contents in dredged sediment derived soils were elevated compared to baseline concentration levels reported for Flanders. To evaluate foliar concentrations,

Bart Vandecasteele; Bruno De Vos; Filip M. G Tack

2002-01-01

291

Effects of Suction Dredging on Streams: a Review and an Evaluation Strategy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suction dredging for gold in river channels is a small-scale mining practice whereby streambed material is sucked up a pipe, passed over a sluice box to sort out the gold, and discarded as tail- ings over another area of bed. Natural resource managers should be concerned about suction dredging because it is common in streams in western North America that

Bret C. Harvey; Thomas E. Lisle

1998-01-01

292

Enzyme-enabled responsive surfaces for anti-contamination materials.  

PubMed

Many real-life stains have origins from biological matters including proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates that act as gluing agents binding along with other particulates or microbes to exposed surfaces of automobiles, furniture, and fabrics. Mimicking naturally occurring self-defensive processes, we demonstrate in this work that a solid surface carrying partially exposed enzyme granules protected the surface in situ from contamination by biological stains and fingerprints. Attributed to the activities of enzymes which can be made compatible with a wide range of materials, such anti-contamination and self-cleaning functionalities are highly selective and efficient toward sticky chemicals. This observation promises a new mechanism in developing smart materials with desired anti-microbial, self-reporting, self-cleaning, or self-healing functions. PMID:23335427

Wu, Songtao; Buthe, Andreas; Jia, Hongfei; Zhang, Minjuan; Ishii, Masahiko; Wang, Ping

2013-02-09

293

Characterization of outgassed contaminants from polymeric spacecraft materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Silicones and polyolefins are versatile polymeric materials that are often used for spacecraft applications but can produce considerable amounts of non-volatile residue (NVR) contamination. Outgassing properties of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) polyolefin tubing and GE RTV615 silicone potting, both of which are known to outgas at high levels, were characterized using ASTM E595 testing and infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy. The

Randy M. Villahermosa; Paul L. Joseph

2004-01-01

294

Application of biomarkers for assessing the biological impact of dredged materials in the Mediterranean: the relationship between antioxidant responses and susceptibility to oxidative stress in the red mullet (Mullus barbatus).  

PubMed

In the period 1997-2000, approximately 1,800,000 m3 of material dredged from the Port of Leghorn was discharged into a sea dumping site located 14 miles from the coast. The red mullet (Mullus barbatus) was used as a bioindicator species for monitoring the biological impact of these discharges on a geographical and temporal scale. Organisms were sampled over three years (1998-2000) at different stations and several biomarkers, both of exposure and effect, were analyzed. Bioavailability of specific classes of pollutants was evaluated by analyzing levels of metallothioneins, the activity of cytochrome P450 1A (CYPIA) and of glutathione S-transferases. Among biomarkers of effect, special attention was paid to the balance between prooxidant challenge and antioxidant defenses, and to the appearance of damage caused by oxidative stress. The analyses of the main components of the antioxidant system included superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidases, glutathione reductase, glyoxalase I and II, and total glutathione. These data were integrated with the measurement of total oxyradical scavenging capacity (TOSC) as an indication of the overall biological resistance to toxicity of different forms of oxyradicals (peroxyl radicals, hydroxyl radicals and peroxynitrite). Results indicated a biological impact in organisms sampled near the disposal site; the impact was particularly evident during 1999 and mainly related to organic chemicals such as PAH. Exposure to these pollutants also caused variations in the levels and activity of several antioxidants. The analysis of TOSC, however, revealed that the overall capacity of specific tissues of organisms to absorb various oxidants was not seriously compromised when challenged with increased prooxidant pressures. Variations of single antioxidants were useful in revealing early warning "biological responses", while integration with TOSC analyses indicated if such changes also reflect a more integrated and functional "biological effect" with possible consequences at the organisms level. The red mullet appears to be a useful sentinel species for a biomarker approach to monitoring impact caused by dredged materials. PMID:12405216

Regoli, Francesco; Pellegrini, David; Winston, Gary W; Gorbi, Stefania; Giuliani, Silvia; Virno-Lamberti, Claudia; Bompadre, Stefano

2002-09-01

295

Application of Dredge Monitoring Systems to Dredge Contract Administration Quality Assurance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Monitoring technology is available for providing dredge process data to dredge contract administrators during the course of a dredging contract. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) contracts out more than 80 percent of all dredging under their jurisd...

S. Scott

2000-01-01

296

Sister Chromatid Exchange in a Marine Polychaete Exposed to a Contaminated Harbor Sediment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report evaluates the use of SCE to measure DNA-damaging activity associated with contaminated dredged material. The primary objectives were to test the applicability of the SCE technique and to field verify any responses observed in the laboratory. Th...

G. G. Pesch C. Mueller C. E. Pesch G. R. Gardner J. Heltshe

1987-01-01

297

Maintenance Dredging, Bullocks Point Cove, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project consists of maintenance dredging of channels, and mooring and turning basins in Bullocks Point Cove, Providence River, Rhode Island. Dredging, and turbidity created by the proposal might produce localized, short-term damages to the marine biot...

1972-01-01

298

Silent Inspector for Hydraulic Pipeline Dredges.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This technical note (TN) describes the Silent Inspector (SI) for Hydraulic Pipeline Dredges (HPD) and documents field experiences of the work unit. The SI work unit of the Dredging Operations and Environmental Research (DOER) Program was established to de...

J. Rosati R. M. Engler

2000-01-01

299

Contaminant Transport Through Subsurface Material from the DOE Hanford Reservation  

SciTech Connect

Accelerated migration of contaminants in the vadose zone has been observed beneath tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation. This paper focuses on the geochemical processes controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in the sediments beneath the Hanford tank farms. Laboratory scale batch sorption experiments and saturated transport experiments were conducted using reactive tracers U(VI), Sr, Cs, Co and Cr(VI) to investigate geochemical processes controlling the rates and mechanisms of sorption to Hanford subsurface material. Results indicate that the rate of sorption is influenced by changes in solution chemistry such as ionic strength, pH and presence of competing cations. Sediment characteristics such as mineralogy, iron content and cation/anion exchange capacity coupled with the dynamics of flow impact the number of sites available for sorption. Investigative approaches using a combination of batch and transport experiments will contribute to the conceptual and Hanford vadose zone.

Pace, M.N.; Mayes, M.A.; Jardine, P.M.; Fendorf, S.E.; Nehlhorn, T.L.; Yin, X.P.; Ladd, J.; Teerlink, J.; Zachara, J.M.

2003-03-26

300

MAINTAINING ACCESS TO AMERICA'S INTERMODAL PORTS/TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED SEDIMENT: NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR.  

SciTech Connect

One of the greatest drivers for maintaining access to America's Intermodal ports and related infrastructure redevelopment efforts over the next several years will be the control and treatment of contaminated sediments dredged from our nation's waterways. More than 306 million cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (400 million cubic yards [cy]) of sediments are dredged annually from U.S. waterways, and each year close to 46 million m{sup 3} (60 million cy) of this material is disposed of in the ocean (EPA 842-F-96-003). The need to protect our environment against undesirable effects from sediment dredging and disposal practices is gaining increased attention from the public and governmental agencies. Meeting this need is a challenging task not only from the standpoint of solving formidable scientific and engineering problems, but also, and more importantly, from the need to implement complex collaborations among the many different parties concerned with the problem. Some 40 years ago, C.P. Snow pointed out the problems involved in communicating between the two cultures of the sciences and the humanities (Snow, 1993). Today, it is necessary to extend Snow's concept to a multicultural realm with groups that include governmental, industrial, environmental, academic, and the general public communicating in different languages based on widely different fundamental assumptions.

STERN,E.A.; JONES,K.; DONATO,K.; PAULING,J.D.; SONTAG,J.G.; CLESCERI,N.L.; MENSINGER,M.C.; WILDE,C.L.

1998-05-01

301

Characterization of contaminant removal by an optical strip material  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Department of Chemistry and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Platteville, Platteville, WI 53818 Advanced Photon Source, X-Ray Facilities Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source, User Program Division, Argonne National Laboratory, *Electron Microscopy Center, Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne IL 60439-4856 USA A novel optical strip coating material, Opticlean, has been shown to safely remove fingerprints, particles and contamination from a variety of optical surfaces including coated glass, Si and first surface mirrors. Contaminant removal was monitored by Nomarski, Atomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Sub-micron features on diffraction gratings and silicon wafers were also cleaned without leaving light scattering particles on the surface. **This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences-Materials Sciences, under contract no. W-31-109-ENG-38. The authors acknowledge the support and facilities provided by the Advanced Photon Source and the Electron Microscopy Center at Argonne National Laboratory.

Hamilton, James P.; Frigo, S. P.; Caroll, Brenden J.; Assoufidyen, L.; Lewis, Matthew S.; Cook, Russell E.; de Carlo, F.

2001-03-01

302

TOXICITY TESTING, RISK ASSESSMENT, AND OPTIONS FOR DREDGED MATRIAL MANAGEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), in conjunction with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (U.S. ACE), has lead responsibility for developing guidelines that provide environmental criteria for evaluating proposed discharges of dredged material into U.S. waters. To ...

303

Estuarine dredge and fill activities: A review of impacts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dredge and fill activities in estuaries have many environmental effects, most, although not all, of them deleterious. These effects include reduced light penetration by increased turbidity; altered tidal exchange, mixing, and circulation; reduced nutrient outflow from marshes and swamps; increased saltwater intrusion; and creation of an environment highly susceptible to recurrent low dissolved oxygen levels. Coral, oysters, and barnacles are particularly vulnerable to the effects of siltation. Both estuarine flora and fauna may be harmed by contaminants released into the water column by dredging operations. Ways to mitigate the effects of dredge and fill operations include careful pre- and post-construction environmental studies; use of bridging to create roadbeds where coastal wetlands cannot be avoided; use of a turbidity diaper and other means to control turbidity; dredging during periods of low benthic populations or during tides that would carry coarser sediments away from productive areas such as oyster reefs; and thoughtful disposal of spoil, such as locating spoil sites on the uplands with proper diking.

Johnston, Sam A.

1981-09-01

304

Effects of surfactants on the desorption of organic contaminants from aquifer materials. Doctoral thesis  

SciTech Connect

The efficiency of removing organic contaminants from groundwater aquifers by the pump and treat process is adversely affected by the retardation of the contaminant's mobility due to adsorption onto aquifer material. The use of surfactants in conjunction with the pump and treat process has the potential for improving contaminant mobility by solubilizing the adsorbed contaminant.

Brickell, J.L.

1989-08-01

305

Decontaminating materials used in ground water sampling devices: Organic contaminants  

SciTech Connect

In these studies, the efficiency of various decontamination protocols was tested on small pieces of materials commonly used in ground water sampling devices. Three materials, which ranged in ability to sorb organic solutes, were tested: stainless steel (SS), rigid polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The test pieces were exposed to two aqueous test solutions: One contained three volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and one nitroaromatic compound, and the other contained four pesticides. Also, three types of polymetic tubing were exposed to pesticide solutions. Generally, the contact times were 10 minutes and 24 hours for sorption and desorption. The contaminants were removed from the nonpermeable SS and the less-sorptive rigid PVC test pieces simply by washing with a hot detergent solution and rinsing with hot water. Additional treatment was required for the PTFE test pieces exposed to the VOCs and for the low-density polyethylene (LDPE) tubing exposed to the pesticide test solution. Solvent rinsing did not improve removal of the three VOCs form the PTFE and only marginally improved removal of the residual pesticides from the LDPE. However, a hot water and detergent wash and rinse followed by oven drying at approximately 105 C was effective for removing the VOCs from the PTFE and substantially reduced pesticide contamination from the LDPE.

Parker, L.V.; Ranney, T.A.

2000-12-31

306

Dredge Disposal Study San Francisco Bay and Estuary. Appendix K. Marshland Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Marsh development study was initiated to formulate workable procedures for the artificial propagation of intertidal marsh land plants upon a dredge material substrate. on the intertidal margins of San Francisco Bay are two dominant marshland plants: C...

1976-01-01

307

FTIR Study on Molecular Contamination on Surface of Optical Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The IR spectra of the molecular contaminants on surface of optical materials were measured. The optical disks used were SiO2, BK7 (SiO2 70%, B2O3 10%, K2O 8%, N2O 8%), CaF2, ZnSe and Al2O3. N2, O2, H2O, and CO2 were adopted as contamination gases. IR spectra of H2O (2.7kPa) on BK7 at 373K showed two absorption bands (OH stretching vibration: around 4000cm-1-3500cm-1 and OH bending vibration: around 2000cm-1-1500cm-1). The absorption intensity decreased with a decrease in temperature and a new band (around 3250cm-1) appeared at 173K. The new band was attributed to phase transition of H2O. These phenomena were also observed on the other three discs, except for SiO2. IR spectra of SiO2 showed OH stretching band (3676cm-1). The absorption intensity decreased with a decrease in temperature. But two new bands (3720cm-1 and 3620cm-1) appeared under an atmosphere of N2 (66.5kPa), O2 (66.5kPa), H2O (2.7kPa) or CO2 (0.7 or 13.3kPa). A similar phenomenon was also observed for BK7, which has OH group. These results suggested the functional group of SiOH interacted with contamination molecules.

Katoh, Masahiro; Okano, Nobuaki; Horikawa, Toshihide; Tomida, Tahei; Itoh, Nobunari

308

MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

2001-01-01

309

The mobilisation of sediment and benthic infauna by scallop dredges.  

PubMed

We present the results of experiments to assess the immediate impact of scallop dredging on the seabed sediment and on the inhabiting infauna. The passage of the scallop dredge is shown to homogenise the seabed, flattening sand ripples. The turbulent wake entrains up to the equivalent of a 1 mm layer of sediment per unit of swept width, although an analysis of the finer particles material implies that the suspended silt material must originate from depths of at least 10 mm. The species most abundant in the sediment plume either swim actively in the water column or are found in, or on, the upper layers of the substrate, whereas those most abundant in core samples taken from the sediment, but not present in the net samples, are almost all tube-building or deep burrowing. The vertical stratification of sediment concentration and of animal numbers in the water column suggests that even if some of these species respond actively to the presence of the dredge, once entrained, they are transported more or less passively in the same way as the larger sediment particles. There was no difference between the core samples taken before or after towing suggesting that animals mobilised by the dredge resettle in the tow path. Our analysis does not provide any information regarding the fate of these animals. PMID:23871519

O'Neill, F G; Robertson, M; Summerbell, K; Breen, M; Robinson, L A

2013-07-05

310

The dredging dilemma: System problems and management solutions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contents: (1) understanding the dredging process; (2) what's wrong with dredging--A system assessment; (3) improving the dredging management system; (4) how dredging management planning could work in New England; (5) Federal cost recovery legislation--prospects and effects; and (6) West Coast experiments with dredging management planning.

1981-09-01

311

Volatile contaminant materials: relationship between condensate, effluent and bulk composition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

DC-93-500, SCV-2590 and SCV-2590-2 silicone/siloxane based co-polymers serve as adhesive components of satellites and other spacecraft. It is well known that out gassing of these materials is a major source of contamination. For the past several years we have been optically characterizing the condensates and their photofixed films via in-situ ellipsometry and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. We have identified several common outgassed components in each of these materials via FTIR, including polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and Tetra-n-propylsilicate (NPS). We have studied the optical properties of the photofixed films produced at various wavelengths of incident light , as well as when mixtures of these films are employed as the outgassing source via variable angle spectroscopy ellipsometry. We can relate the photofixed material optical properties to the bulk liquids and to the films produced by the outgassssing of the actual co-polymers mentioned above. This work may lead to the evaluation of the optical properties of the photofixed effluents of actual adhesives by evaluating a few basic components

Ianno, N. J.; Pu, J.; Zhou, F.

2012-10-01

312

Geotechnical characteristics of shallow ocean dredge spoil disposal mounds  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the data obtained from site surveying and sediment sampling of dredge spoil disposal mounds at the Central Long Island Sound site. Emphasis is placed on the geotechnical and geological features of the mound and natural seabed. Since some of the spoil is contaminated, cappings of clean spoil have been used to isolate the spoil mounds from fauna and flora in the water column. Because of the contaminated spoil, improvements in the disposal techniques are needed and methodologies must be developed for evaluating short-term and long-term stability of these shallow ocean deposits which are subjected to loadings from waves, spoil disposal and capping operations.

Demars, K.R.; Dowling, J.J.; Long, R.P.; Morton, R.W.

1984-05-01

313

Environmental effects of dredging. Long-term management strategy (LTMS) national forum: Corps of Engineers summary and findings. Technical notes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Technical Note summarizes the `National Forum on Implementation Strategies of Long-Term Management of Dredged Material` held January 28-31, 1991, at Baltimore, MD. The findings of the Forum have been documented in a report to be published by the Environmental Effects of Dredging Programs (EEDP) in FY 92. The information gained from the Forum participants is also being incorporated into

D. B. Mathis; N. R. Francingues

1991-01-01

314

In situ remediation of contaminated sediments using carbonaceous materials.  

PubMed

Carbonaceous materials (CM), such as activated carbons or biochars, have been shown to significantly reduce porewater concentrations and risks by binding hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) present in aquatic sediments. In the present study, the authors review the current state-of-the-art use of CM as an extensive method for sediment remediation, covering both technical and ecological angles. The review addresses how factors such as CM type, particle size and dosage, sediment characteristics, and properties of contaminants affect the effectiveness of CM amendment to immobilize HOCs in aquatic sediments. The authors also review the extent to which CM may reduce bioaccumulation and toxicity of HOCs and whether CM itself has negative effects on benthic species and communities. The review is based on literature and datasets from laboratory as well as field trials with CM amendments. The presence of phases such as natural black carbon, oil, or organic matter in the sediment reduces the effectiveness of CM amendments. Carbonaceous material additions appear to improve the habitat quality for benthic organisms by reducing bioavailable HOC concentrations and toxicity in sediment. The negative effects of CM itself on benthic species, if any, have been shown to be mild. The beneficial effects of reducing toxicity at low CM concentrations most probably outweigh the mild negative effects observed at higher CM concentrations. PMID:22389227

Rakowska, M I; Kupryianchyk, D; Harmsen, J; Grotenhuis, T; Koelmans, A A

2012-03-02

315

Bioremediation of soils, sludges, and materials contaminated with toxic metals or radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Bioremediation stabilizes and reclaims radionuclide or toxic metal-contaminated materials, soils, sediments, or wastes; it then recovers the contaminating radionuclides and metals. Waste materials are stabilized and reduced in volume using anaerobic bacteria; or alternatively, materials are treated with citric acid before bioremediation begins. Photolysis is used after bioremediation to release radionuclides.

Francis, A.J.

1993-04-01

316

Environmental effects of dredging: Predicting and monitoring dredge-induced dissolved oxygen reduction. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

This note summarizes the results of research into the potential for dissolved oxygen (DO) reduction associated with dredging operations. Efforts toward development of a simple computational model for predicting the degree of dredge-induced DO reduction are described along with results of a monitoring program around a bucket dredge operation.

Houston, L.; LaSalle, M.W.; Lunz, J.D.

1989-11-01

317

MAINTAINING ACCESS TO AMERICA'S INTERMODAL PORTS/TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED SEDIMENT: NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR  

SciTech Connect

One of the greatest drivers for maintaining access to America's Intermodal ports and related infrastructure redevelopment efforts over the next several years will be the control and treatment of contaminated sediments dredged from the nation's waterways. More than 306 million cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (400 million cubic yards [cy]) of sediments are dredged annually from US waterways, and each year close to 46 million m{sup 3} (60 million cy) of this material is disposed of in the ocean (EPA 842-F-96-003). The need to protect the environment against undesirable effects from sediment dredging and disposal practices is gaining increased attention from the public and governmental agencies. Meeting this need is a challenging task not only from the standpoint of solving formidable scientific and engineering problems, but also, and more importantly, from the need to implement complex collaborations among the many different parties concerned with the problem. Some 40 years ago, C.P. Snow pointed out the problems involved in communicating between the two cultures of the sciences and the humanities (Snow, 1993). Today, it is necessary to extend Snow's concept to a multicultural realm with groups that include governmental, industrial, environmental, academic, and the general public communicating in different languages based on widely different fundamental assumptions. The handling of contaminated sediments in the Port of New York/New Jersey (Port) exemplifies this problem. This paper describes a multicultural team that has formed as the result of a Congressional mandate for the development of procedures suitable for the decontamination of sediments in the Port under the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 1992 (Section 405C) and 1996 (Section 226).

STERN,E.A.; JONES,K.; DONATO,K.; PAULING,J.D.; SONTAG,J.G.; CLESCERI,N.L.; MENSINGER,M.C.; WILDE,C.L.

1998-05-01

318

Mercury Concentration and Monomethylmercury Production in Sediment: Effect of Dredged Sediment Reuse on Bioconcentration for Ragworms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of dredged sediment reuse on the production and bioconcentration of monomethylmercury (MMHg) was investigated by\\u000a examining sediments and ragworms found in dredge material banks and surrounding sites in the Venice Lagoon, Italy. Total Hg\\u000a concentrations in the surface 20 cm of sediments were higher in the banks than in the surrounding sites, but MMHg concentrations\\u000a were similar, which suggests

Seunghee Han; Magali Porrachia; Elisa Volpato; Joris Gieskes; Dimitri D. Deheyn

2011-01-01

319

Long-term changes in polychaete assemblages of Botany Bay (NSW, Australia) following a dredging event  

Microsoft Academic Search

The long-term effects of marine aggregate dredging on near-shore benthic assemblages are still largely unknown, despite a global increase in demand for, and extraction of, marine aggregates. This study assessed the state of recovery of polychaete assemblages in Botany Bay, temperate NSW, Australia, at sites dredged for aggregate material more than 10years previously. Sedimentary and faunal samples were collected from

Ceridwen Fraser; Pat Hutchings; Jane Williamson

2006-01-01

320

Preliminary Evaluation of the Economic Risk for Cleanup of Nuclear Material Licensee Contamination Incidents.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report documents an analysis of the economic risks from nuclear material licensee contamination incidents. The results of the analyses are intended to provide a technical basis for an NRC rulemaking that would require nuclear material licensees to dem...

R. M. Ostmeyer D. J. Skinner

1987-01-01

321

Investigation of contact vacuuming for remediation of fungally contaminated duct materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental fungi become a potential Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) problem when adequate moisture and nutrients are present in building materials. Because of their potential to rapidly spread contamination throughout a building, ventilation system materials are of particular significance as potential microbial contamination sources. Current recommendations are to discard fibrous glass insulation that appears to be wet or moldy. Unfortunately, this

John Chang; D VANOSDELL; E MEYERS

1997-01-01

322

Radiological surveys of properties contaminated by residual radioactive materials from uranium processing sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report examines methods for determining the extent and nature of contamination on properties contaminated by residual radioactive materials from uranium processing sites. Methods are also examined for verifying the success of remedial actions in removing the residual radioactive materials. Using literature review and practical experiences from the Edgemont, South Dakota survey program a critical review is made of sampling

J. A. Young; P. O. Jackson; V. W. Thomas

1983-01-01

323

Low-contamination digestion bomb method using a Teflon double vessel for biological materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through the NIES (National Institute for Environmental Studies) CRM (certified reference material), it has been required to investigate and develop a contamination-free digestion system for biological materials, since trace element levels in these matrices are so low that contamination during sample dissolution procedure often became a limiting factor for trace analysis. At an earlier stage, a Teflon bomb developed by

Kensaku. Okamoto; Keiichiro. Fuwa

1984-01-01

324

Treatment of dredged sludge by mechanical dehydration  

SciTech Connect

Sludge deposits in the water area damage the ecosystems and environments; their elimination has always been an urgent task for human communities. Generally, sludge deposits are dredged out of the bottom of the water area, transported to, and discharged at a large disposal area on land. Recently, however, it has become increasingly difficult to secure disposal areas and routes of speedy transportation for disposal of dredged sludge. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to reduce both the volume of dredged sludge and the size of the disposal area. This mechanical method is different from the conventional engineering dehydration by loading, consolidation, and drainage in that the dredged sludge is separated into sludge cakes and clean water that can be returned to the water area through mechanical centrifugal dehydration. Sludge deposits are distributed thin and wide on the bottom of the water area, and a pump dredge has been proved effective in many cases for dredging the upper layers of sludge deposits accurately and without creating turbidity in water. This mechanical sludge treatment technique can be most efficient when used in combination with a pump dredge. This method offers the following advantages: (a) It requires smaller space for treatment and disposal of dredged sludge than the conventional method. (b) Facilities and costs for transportation can be reduced. (c) Various systems can be adopted for transportation of sludge cakes. (d) This system is transportable and compact and can be constructed anywhere either on land or on water.

Maekawa, T.

1992-03-01

325

An evaluation of technologies for the heavy metal remediation of dredged sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sediments dewatering is frequently necessary after dredging to remediate and treat contaminants. Methods include draining of the water in lagoons with or without coagulants and flocculants, or using presses or centrifuges. Treatment methods are similar to those used for soil and include pretreatment, physical separation, thermal processes, biological decontamination, stabilization\\/solidification and washing. However, compared to soil treatment, few remediation techniques

Catherine N. Mulligan; Raymond N. Yong; Bernard F. Gibbs

2001-01-01

326

Heavy metal concentrations in organisms from an actively dredged Texas Bay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conclusions Organisms from San Antonio Bay have been shown to have low heavy metal concentrations. This is most likely the result of low natural metal levels in the area and minimal man-introduced contamination due to the bay's location far from any dense industrial or population centers. In addition, vigorous shell dredging activity in the bay for more than 50 years

R. R. Jr. Sims; B. J. Presley

1976-01-01

327

Guidelines for Handling Decedents Contaminated with Radioactive Materials.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Detonation of a nuclear weapon or activation of a radiological dispersal device could cause radioactively contaminated decedents. These guidelines are designed to address both of these scenarios. They could also be applicable in other instances where dece...

C. M. Wood F. DePaolo R. D. Whitaker

2007-01-01

328

Investigation of Contamination Effects on Thermal Control Materials.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contamination kinetics studied on thick films from DC-704 and RTV-602 (commercial grade) using both infrared ellipsometry and quartz crystal microbalances, confirmed that monomers experience constant deposition rates and reevaporation rates, while polymer...

T. A. Hughes T. E. Bonham T. H. Allen R. M. F. Linford

1976-01-01

329

Long-term dredged material management plan within the context of Maumee river watershed sediment management strategy. Phase 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This technical report draws several preliminary conclusions about the Investigations needed to develop specific management options. It recommends moving ahead to the Phase 2 Study to address these options that would meet the goals of sediment load reduction, improvement in sediment and water quality, beneficial uses of the material, and a reduced dependency on constriction of new Confined Disposal Facilities (CDF).

NONE

1993-03-01

330

Simulation of resuspended sediments resulting from dredging operations by a numerical flocculent transport model.  

PubMed

Environmental remediations such as dredging operations cause contaminated sediments from the bottom of water bodies to become suspended into the water column. These resuspended particles are significant water quality concerns and cause adverse effects to aquatic organisms. In this paper, we present a vertically integrated two-dimensional flocculent sediment transport model to better model concentration changes of resuspended bottom sediments. The flocculent transport model has been applied to the Savannah River cutterhead dredge field study involving the resuspension of bottom sediments. The results showed that the model predictions correlate reasonably well with field data. These comparisons suggest that the flocculent sediment transport model can be used to predict the concentration profiles of a plume of toxic compounds resulting from cutterhead dredge operation. PMID:17697700

Je, Chung-hwan; Hayes, Donald F; Kim, Kyung-sub

2007-08-13

331

BUILDING MATERIAL CHARACTERIZATION USING A CONCRETE FLOOR AND WALL CONTAMINATION PROFILING TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

Certain radioisotopes can penetrate concrete and contaminate the concrete well below the surface. The challenge is to determine the extent and magnitude of the contamination problem in real-time. The concrete profiling technology, TRUPROSM in conjunction with portable radiometric instrumentation produces a profile of radiological or chemical contamination through the material being studied. The data quality, quantity, and representativeness may be used to produce an activity profile from the hot spot surface into the material being sampled. This activity profile may then be expanded to ultimately characterize the facility and expedite waste segregation and facility closure at a reduced cost and risk. Performing a volumetric concrete or metal characterization safer and faster (without lab intervention) is the objective of this characterization technology. This way of determining contamination can save considerable time and money. Currently, concrete core bores are shipped to certified laboratories where the concrete residue is run through a battery of tests to determine the contaminants. The existing core boring operation volatilizes or washes out some of the contaminants (like tritium) and oftentimes cross-contaminates the area around the core bore site. The volatilization of the contaminants can lead to airborne problems in the immediate vicinity of the core bore. Cross-contamination can increase the contamination area and thereby increase the amount of waste generated. The goal is to avoid those field activities that could cause this type of release.

Aggarwal, Dr. S.,; Charters, G.; Thacker, Dr. D.

2003-02-27

332

IMPROVED TECHNIQUES FOR REMOVAL OF SEDIMENTS CONTAMINATED WITH HAZARDOUS MATERIALS  

EPA Science Inventory

Realizing the need to improve the capabilities of response personnel in dealing with cleanup operations involving contaminated sediments, the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have jointly funded a research project to: (a) identify, characterize, and c...

333

Beneficial effects of plants in the remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with organic materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of plants in remediation of soil and unconfined groundwater contaminated with organic materials is appealing for a variety of reasons: (1) plants provide a remediation strategy that utilizes solar energy; (2) vegetation is aesthetically pleasing; (3) plant samples can be harvested and tested as indicators of the level of remediation; (4) plants help contain the region of contamination

J. F. Shimp; J. C. Tracy; L. C. Davis; E. Lee; W. Huang; L. E. Erickson; J. L. Schnoor

1993-01-01

334

A multi-layer capping of a coastal area contaminated with materials dangerous to health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental protection efforts in coastal areas recognise contaminated materials as a critical element of the aquatic ecosystem requiring careful evaluation for their potential remediation. This article considers aspects related to the design of a multi-layer capping for a contaminated coastal area. The area is located just south of the urbanised region of Bari, Puglia Region, along the Adriatic coast of

Giuseppe R. Tomasicchio; Felice DAlessandro; Fausta Musci

2010-01-01

335

Effects of exposure time, material type, and granular pesticide on glove contamination.  

PubMed

Chemical-resistant gloves are recommended for pesticide applicators to reduce their exposure to agricultural chemicals. In this research, three chemical-resistant glove materials-nitrile, neoprene, and barrier laminate-were studied in relation to contamination with granular terbufos and tefluthrin. Surfaces of specimens backed with alpha cellulose were contaminated with 300 mg of either granular terbufos or tefluthrin for 1-, 2-, 4-, 8-, 16-, and 24-h time periods in petri dishes in the laboratory. Residues were extracted using ethyl acetate for terbufos and iso-octane for tefluthrin in test tubes for 24 h. Analysis of extracts by gas chromatograph and statistical analysis of the data showed that contamination levels varied with the time of exposure, material type, and pesticide used. Pesticide was not detected in the alpha cellulose even after 24 h contamination time. A linear relationship was found between contamination level and exposure time for terbufos in the three materials, with longer exposure times causing higher contamination levels. Contamination of nitrile was significantly less than neoprene or barrier laminate. Exposed glove materials contained higher levels of contamination of terbufos than tefluthrin. PMID:11598792

Guo, C; Stone, J; Stahr, H M; Shelley, M

2001-11-01

336

Combustion aerosols formed during burning of radioactively contaminated materials: Experimental results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases. Radioactive aerosols generated by fires were investigated in experiments in which combustible solids and liquids were contaminated with radioactive materials and burned. Uranium in powder and liquid form was used to contaminate five fuel types: polychloroprene, polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate, cellulose, and a mixture

M. A. Halverson; M. Y. Ballinger; G. W. Dennis

2010-01-01

337

Laboratory Investigation into the Contribution of Contaminants to Ground Water from Equipment Materials Used in Sampling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Benzene contamination was detected in well water samples from the Ogallala Aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. This study assessed whether or not the materials used in multilevel sampling equipment at this site could have contributed to the contaminants found in well water samples. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of

Tyler J. Gilmore; Alexandre V. Mitroshkov; P Evan Dresel; Debbie S. Sklarew

2004-01-01

338

Categorizing and Transporting Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The primary purpose of this guidance is to assist shippers in preparing low specific activity materials (LSA) and surface contaminated objects (SCOs) for shipment in compliance with Federal regulations. Guidance is provided in question and answer format o...

J. Cook R. Lewis E. Easton R. Boyle R. Pope

1998-01-01

339

Comments on California Department of Water Resources July 26, 2004 News Release and Report on the Potential Impacts of Depositing Polluted Dredged Sediments on the Trapper Slough Levee  

Microsoft Academic Search

In late July 2004 the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) purchased Deep Water Ship Channel sediments that were in a dredged material disposal area owned by the Port of Stockton to enhance the Trapper Slough levee in the Delta. When questions were raised about the potential for these dredged sediments to lead to surface water pollution associated with runoff

G. Fred Lee

340

Documentation of the runqual module for ADDAMS: Comparison of predicted runoff water quality with standards. Environmental effects of dredging. Technical notes  

SciTech Connect

This technical note has a twofold purpose: to describe a technique for comparing the predicted quality of surface runoff from confined dredged material disposal areas with applicable water quality standards and to document a computer program called RUNQUAL, written for that purpose as a part of the Automated Dredging and Disposal Alternatives Management System (ADDAMS).

Schroeder, P.R.; Gibson, A.C.; Dardeau, E.A.

1995-01-01

341

TOOLS FOR ASSESSING MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Management of contaminated sediments poses many challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches at this time for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how we...

342

Effect of distribution coefficient, contaminated area, and the depth contamination of the guildelines for uranium residual radoiactive material in soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup guidelines for uranium applicable to remedial actions at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites are derived on a site-specific basis. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline Computer code, RESRAD, is used in these evaluations. This analysis investigates the effect of site-specific parameters on the guideline values (specifically distribution coefficient, depth of contamination,

S. Kamboj; M. Nimmagadda; E. Faillace; C. Yu; W. A. Williams

1996-01-01

343

Geostatistical Analysis of PCB-Contaminated Sediment in a Commercial Dock, Swansea, UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Dredge materials are now regarded as a resource and are being promoted for beneficial uses such as beach, saltmarsh and wetland\\u000a restoration. Such a variety of end-uses requires more complex risk assessments, particularly with regard to contaminant loadings\\u000a and their likely fate in sensitive receiving environments. A case study of Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) concentrations\\u000a in the sediments of a large

J. Reed; A. Chappell; J. R. French; M. A. Oliver

344

46 CFR 44.330 - Obtaining working freeboards for hopper dredges.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Obtaining working freeboards for hopper dredges. 44.330 Section 44.330 Shipping...Assigning Working Freeboards to Hopper Dredges § 44.330 Obtaining working freeboards for hopper dredges. A hopper dredge may be...

2009-10-01

345

46 CFR 44.330 - Obtaining working freeboards for hopper dredges.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Obtaining working freeboards for hopper dredges. 44.330 Section 44.330 Shipping...Assigning Working Freeboards to Hopper Dredges § 44.330 Obtaining working freeboards for hopper dredges. A hopper dredge may be...

2010-10-01

346

Ultraviolet stability and contamination analysis of Spectralon diffuse reflectance material  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A detailed chemical analysis was carried out on Spectralon, a highly Lambertian, diffuse reflectance material. Results of this investigation unambiguously identified the presence of an organic (hydrocarbon) impurity intrinsic to the commercial material. This impurity could be removed by a vacuum bake-out procedure and was identified as the cause of optical changes (degradation) that occur in the material when exposed to UV light. It was found that when this impurity was removed, the Spectralon material was photochemically stable and maintained its reflectance properties even after extensive solar UV exposure.

Stiegman, Albert E.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Springsteen, Arthur W.

1993-04-01

347

AIR EMISSIONS FROM EXPOSED SEDIMENTS AND CONTAMINATED DREDGED MATERIAL 1. EXPERIMENTAL DATA IN LABORATORY MICROCOSMS AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING. (R825513C017)  

EPA Science Inventory

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

348

AIR EMISSIONS FROM EXPOSED SEDIMENTS AND CONTAMINATED DREDGED MATERIAL 2. DIFFUSION FROM LABORATORY-SPIKED AND AGED FIELD SEDIMENTS. (R825513C017)  

EPA Science Inventory

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

349

External contamination of hair with cocaine: evaluation of external cocaine contamination and development of performance-testing materials.  

PubMed

The National Laboratory Certification Program undertook an evaluation of the dynamics of external contamination of hair with cocaine (COC) while developing performance testing materials for Federal Drug-Free Workplace Programs. This characterization was necessary to develop performance materials that could evaluate the efficacy of hair testing industry's decontamination procedures. Hair locks (blonde to dark brown/black) from five different individuals were contaminated with cocaine HCl. Hair locks were then treated with a synthetic sweat solution and hygienic treatments to model real-life conditions. Hair locks were shampooed daily (Monday through Friday) for 10 weeks, and samples of the hair locks were analyzed for COC, benzoylecgonine (BE), cocaethylene (CE), and norcocaine (NCOC). Three commercial analytical laboratories analyzed samples under three protocols: no decontamination procedure, individual laboratory decontamination, or decontamination by an extended buffer procedure at RTI International. Results indicated substantial and persistent association of all four compounds with all hair types. Hair that was not decontaminated had significantly greater quantities of COC and BE than did hair that was decontaminated. The only hair samples below detection limits for all four compounds were those decontaminated 1 h after contamination. Additionally, BE/COC ratios increased significantly over the 10-week study (regardless of decontamination treatment). From 21 days postcontamination until the end of the study, the mean BE/COC ratio for all hair types exceeded 0.05, the proposed Federal Mandatory Guidelines requirement. The largest variability in results was observed for samples decontaminated by participant laboratories. This suggests that current laboratory decontamination strategies will increase variability of performance testing sample results. None of the decontamination strategies used in the study were effective at removing all contamination, and some of the contaminated hair in this study would have been reported as positive for cocaine use based on the proposed Federal Mandatory Guidelines. PMID:17132242

Stout, Peter R; Ropero-Miller, Jeri D; Baylor, Michael R; Mitchell, John M

2006-10-01

350

USE OF DREDGINGS FOR LANDFILL. TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 1. ENGINEERING CHARACTERISTICS OF POLLUTED DREDGINGS  

EPA Science Inventory

The engineering properties of most dredgings were found to be quite similar to those of fine-grained, organic soils, and the general notion that maintenance dredgings are soft and weak is only partially due to their inherent nature; the primary reason for this condition seems to ...

351

An Equation That Describes Material Outgassing for Contamination Modeling.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A generalization of the Clausius-Claperon equation for vapor pressure is made for an outgassing material. The expression is derived using Langmuir's equation for the outgassing rate of a material and using an empirical equation for the vapor pressure of a...

T. M. Heslin

1977-01-01

352

Bacterial, fungal and yeast contamination in six brands of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials.  

PubMed

This study assessed the level of contamination of six commercially available irreversible hydrocolloids (two containing chlorhexidine) and identified the contamination present in the materials. Petri dishes containing selective and enriched culture media were inoculated with alginate powder (0.06 g), in triplicate. After incubation (37 degrees C/7 days), the colony-forming units (CFU) were counted and Gram stained. Biochemical identification of the different morphotypes was also performed. The contamination levels for the materials were: Jeltrate--389 CFU/g; Jeltrate Plus--516 CFU/g; Jeltrate Chromatic--135 CFU/g; Hydrogum--1,455 CFU/g; Kromopan--840 CFU/g; and Greengel--59 CFU/g. Gram staining revealed the presence of Gram-positive bacillus and Gram-positive cocci. The bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus sp., Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus cereus, Micrococcus luteus, and Nocardia sp.; the filamentous fungi Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Rhizopus sp., Neurospora sp.; and the yeast Candida sp. were isolated. The contamination detected in the impression materials points out the need for adopting measures to improve the microbiological quality of these materials. The use of contaminated materials in the oral cavity goes against the basic principles for controlling cross-contamination and may represent a risk for debilitated or immunocompromised patients. PMID:17589644

Casemiro, Luciana Assirati; Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; de Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri Pires; Panzeri, Heitor; Ito, Isabel Yoko

353

TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON DETERMINATIONS IN NATURAL AND CONTAMINATED AQUIFER MATERIALS  

EPA Science Inventory

Quantifying the total organic carbon (TOC) content of soils and aquifer materials is essential for understanding subsurface chemistry during environmental site characterization. ontaminant fate and transport, microbial ecology, and effective treatment methodology are all influenc...

354

The effect of skin disinfection materials on reducing blood culture contamination.  

PubMed

Contaminated blood cultures may cause results to be misinterpreted, create unnecessary work for the laboratory, and increase costs. Disinfection of the venipuncture site is considered to be necessary for preventing contamination, although there is little information about the effectiveness of using different disinfection materials. The use of 70% isopropyl pads and povidone iodine saturated swabs (conventional method) was compared with the use of a 70% isopropyl/10% acetone scrub and povidone iodine dispenser (PREP method) for skin disinfection. Blood culture "kits" were prepared--bags containing collection tubes, instructions, and either conventional or PREP materials and were distributed randomly. The contents were concealed by a cover to prevent the user from selecting a specific type of decontamination kit. The kits were identified in the laboratory by color-coded labels on the collection tubes. Among 1,546 specimens evaluated, the contamination rate observed with conventional disinfection was significantly higher (4.6%; N = 763) than with PREP materials (2.2%; N = 783, P = 0.011) and was equivalent to the preceding 6-month contamination rate (4.7%). The lower contamination rate may be associated with greater effectiveness of a scrub or isopropyl/acetone solution, or both. Decontamination materials may have a significant impact on reducing blood culture contaminants from skin flora. PMID:8493946

Schifman, R B; Pindur, A

1993-05-01

355

Hospital preparedness for hazardous materials incidents and treatment of contaminated patients.  

PubMed Central

Hospital-based facilities providing emergency care in the state of Washington were surveyed to determine their level of preparedness for hazardous materials incidents including the treatment of contaminated patients. Responses to a faxed questionnaire were received from 95 (94%) of the 101 emergency care facilities in Washington State. Only 42 (44%) of the facilities reported the ability to receive any chemically exposed patient. Of the 95 responding emergency care facilities, 39 (41%) had no designated decontamination facilities; 67 (70%) had protocols for handling chemical contamination and possible evacuation from hazardous materials spills, and 52 (55%) had protocols for handling medical facility contamination and possible evacuation from treating chemically contaminated patients. Twelve (13%) facilities had evacuated their emergency department or other part of the hospital for contamination incidents in the past 5 years. Despite the frequent occurrence of hazardous materials incidents, most emergency care facilities in Washington State are not fully prepared to handle contaminated patients and chemical spills. This may have important implications for the care of persons with exposure to hazardous materials and for implementing Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations standards and federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations.

Burgess, J L; Blackmon, G M; Brodkin, C A; Robertson, W O

1997-01-01

356

Combustion aerosols formed during burning of radioactively contaminated materials: Experimental results  

SciTech Connect

Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases. Radioactive aerosols generated by fires were investigated in experiments in which combustible solids and liquids were contaminated with radioactive materials and burned. Uranium in powder and liquid form was used to contaminate five fuel types: polychloroprene, polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate, cellulose, and a mixture of 30% tributylphosphate (TBP) in kerosene. Heat flux, oxygen concentration, air flow, contaminant concentration, and type of ignition were varied in the experiments. The highest release (7.1 wt %) came from burning TBP/kerosene over contaminated nitric acid. Burning cellulose contaminated with uranyl nitrate hexahydrate liquid gave the lowest release (0.01 wt %). Rate of release and particle size distribution of airborne radioactive particles were highly dependent on the type of fuel burned.

Halverson, M.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Dennis, G.W.

1987-03-01

357

Disinfection of textile materials contaminated with E. coli in liquid carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new environmental friendly way to disinfect textile materials in liquid carbon dioxide is presented and discussed. As contaminated material, E. coli on cotton fabric is used. Pure liquid carbon dioxide at 20°C and 70bar has a slightly disinfecting effect, which is caused by the carbonic acid formed in the presence of the natural moisture content of cotton and in

A. Schmidt; K. Beermann; E. Bach; E. Schollmeyer

2005-01-01

358

REAL-TIME IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ASBESTOS AND CONCRETE MATERIALS WITH RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Concrete and asbestos-containing materials were widely used in DOE building construction in the 1940s and 1950s. Over the years, many of these porous materials have been contaminated with radioactive sources, on and below the surface. Current practice to identify hazardous asbe...

359

Innovations in Dredging Technology: Equipment, Operations and Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This technical note describes the management approach used to identify currently existing innovative dredging technologies that may be suitable for use by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in navigation and dredging activities. A summary of current develop...

N. R. Francingues R. G. Vann T. D. Woodward

2000-01-01

360

Jones Inlet, Nassau County, New York. (Maintenance Dredging).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project proposes maintenance action consisting of dredging the existing Federal channel in Jones Inlet, Nassau County, New York to its authorized project dimentions. The work will be done by a contractor or government owned dredge with spoil disposal ...

1974-01-01

361

Nanostructured Materials for Environmental Remediation of Organic Contaminants in Water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nanostructured materials have opened new avenues in various scientific fields and are providing novel opportunities in environmental science. The increased surface area-to-volume ratio of nanoparticles, quantum size effects, and the ability to tune surface properties through molecular modification make nanostructures ideal for many environmental remediation applications. We describe herein the fabrication of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles for environmental remediation applications,

Sherine O. Obare; Gerald J. Meyer

2004-01-01

362

Contamination rates of optical surfaces at 157 nm: impurities outgassed from construction materials and from photoresists  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photo-induced contamination rates on 157-nm optical surfaces have been studied in controlled experiments with contaminants containing fluorocarbon, sulfur and iodine. The compounds investigated represent species generated in controlled outgassing studies of common construction materials and photoresists used in 157 nm steppers. No photocontamination was measured for highly fluorinated alkanes and ethers on an anti-reflective coating, at levels exceeding 10 ppm.

Theodore M. Bloomstein; Jan H. C. Sedlacek; Stephen T. Palmacci; Dennis E. Hardy; Vladimir Liberman; Mordechai Rothschild

2003-01-01

363

A study of gas contaminants and interaction with materials in RPC closed loop systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Resistive Plate Counters (RPC) detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments use gas recirculation systems to cope with large gas mixture volumes and costs. In this paper a long-term systematic study about gas purifiers, gas contaminants and detector performance is discussed. The study aims at measuring the lifetime of purifiers with new and used cartridge material along with contaminants release in the gas system. During the data-taking the response of several RPC double-gap detectors was monitored in order to characterize the correlation between dark currents, filter status and gas contaminants.

Colafranceschi, S.; Aurilio, R.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Passamonti, L.; Piccolo, D.; Pierluigi, D.; Russo, A.; Ferrini, M.; Greci, T.; Saviano, G.; Vendittozzi, C.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Verwilligen, P.; Sharma, A.

2013-03-01

364

Analysis of electrokinetic sedimentation of dredged Welland River sediment.  

PubMed

The Welland River is a tributary of the Niagara River. In the late 1980s it was discovered that a section of the Welland River was contaminated with heavy metals as a results of two sewer outfalls that has been used by a steel plant and local industrial and municipal operations for the last 50-60 years. One of the major problems encountered in the treatment of the dredged Welland River sediment is a slow rate of sedimentation due to the large proportion of fine solids in the sediment. In this study, the results of electrokinetic sedimentation of the Welland River sediment are analyzed based on the principles of gravitational and electrokinetic sedimentation. It was found that the effects of electric field intensity and the initial solid concentration of the suspension are the dominating factors governing the average particle settling velocity, the coefficient of free settling in the free settling stage and the coefficient of sedimentation in the hindered settling stage. The electrokinetic treatment is proven to be effective in terms of increasing the free and hindered settling velocities, reducing the overall sedimentation time and increasing the final solid concentration of the sediment. Thus, electrokinetics can be used to accelerate sedimentation of dilute solid suspensions, such as dredged sediment, wastewater and mine tailings. PMID:11463505

Mohamedelhassan, E; Shang, J Q

2001-07-30

365

33 CFR 88.15 - Lights on dredge pipelines.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Lights on dredge pipelines. 88.15 Section 88.15 Navigation...RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.15 Lights on dredge pipelines. Dredge pipelines that are floating or supported on...

2009-07-01

366

33 CFR 88.15 - Lights on dredge pipelines.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights on dredge pipelines. 88.15 Section 88.15 Navigation...RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.15 Lights on dredge pipelines. Dredge pipelines that are floating or supported on...

2010-07-01

367

Hydraulic dredging, a sediment removal technique  

SciTech Connect

Sediment was successfully removed from a Peabody Coal Company pond near Macon, Missouri, by a Mud Cat Model SP-810 hydraulic dredge. Previous attempts using land-based equipment had been unsatisfactory. The hydraulic-powered auger and submerged pump easily removed 882 m/sup 3/ (1154 yd/sup 3/) and pumped the slurry a distance of 305 m (1000 ft) to a disposal area. The hydraulic dredge was more effective and cheaper to operate than land-based equipment. The dredge cost was $1.31/m/sup 3/ ($1.00/yd/sup 3/), the dragline cost was $6.54/m/sup 3/ ($5.00/yd/sup 3/) and the front-end loader cost was $15.70/m/sup 3/ ($12.00/yd/sup 3/), under optimum conditions.

Spotts, J.W.

1980-12-01

368

Basalts dredged from the northeastern Pacific Ocean  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volcanic rocks dredged from seamounts, fault ridges, and other major geological features of the northeast Pacific Ocean include a wide variety of basalts. Most of these are vesicular, porphyritic types with near analogues in the Hawaiian and other oceanic islands. in addition, aluminous basalts and diabasic tholeiites impoverished in potassium also occur. There is no simple correlation of composition, degree of oxidation, vesiculation, or hydration of these basalts with texture, or depth of dredge site. Most samples appear to have been extruded at much shallower depths than those now pertaining at the dredge site. the distribution of these basalts suggests that the andesite line coincides with or lies on the continent side of the foot of the continental slope.

Engel, C. G.; Engel, A. E. J.

1963-01-01

369

Confined Disposal Program for Polluted Maintenance Dredging in the Great Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prior to 1970, the decision of whether open lake disposal or confined disposal would be used for the ultimate disposition of dredged material was based primarily on economic considerations. However, rapid industrial growth in areas adjoining the waterways and resulting pollution raised concerns over the possible adverse effects open lake disposal might have on water quality and lake ecology. In

P. McCallister; R. Kavalar

1982-01-01

370

Assessment of resist outgassing related EUV optics contamination for CAR and non-CAR material chemistries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

EUV lithography is expected to be the key lithography option for sub-22nm device manufacturing. In order to meet the required imaging capability, resist performance improvements are being investigated by exploring both chemically amplified resists (CAR) and non-CAR chemistries. Another critical item related to resist chemistry is the EUV irradiation induced outgassing and its risk for optics contamination, especially towards high source power (pre-) productions tools. In this area it is important to characterize for the different chemistries which resist components are critical for EUV induced outgassing and - more important - which can result in non-cleanable mirror contamination. In this paper, we will explore the outgassing and contamination behavior of CAR and non-CAR resist by using Residual Gas Analysis (RGA) for identifying the resist outgassing characteristics, and by Witness Sample (WS) testing to evaluate the tendency for contamination. For CAR resists, it has been found that the PAG cation is a key component contributing to the contamination, but its impact can be changed by changing the resist formulation. In this investigation several model resists have been evaluated in order to understand which chemical components have - or don't have - an impact on the contamination. This has led to a proposal of a definition for a resist family. For non-CAR materials, the investigation has focused to a number of example resists. Most results are related to poly(-olefin sulfones), which have been proven to be good candidate materials for outgassing and contamination learning. The tests have confirmed that aromatic groups present in resist outgassing are playing an important role. As an opposite example of non-CAR material, the inorganic Inpria resist was tested, which revealed that its resist outgassing (water and oxygen) can remove carbon contamination. The combined work on CAR and non-CAR outgassing and contamination has learned significantly on the relationship between resist chemistry, its outgassing and contamination, and provided understanding on how to design good performing EUV resists with minimal risk for optics contamination in EUV device manufacturing.

Pollentier, I.; Neira, I.; Gronheid, R.

2011-03-01

371

The total amounts of radioactively contaminated materials in forests in Fukushima, Japan.  

PubMed

There has been leakage of radioactive materials from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A heavily contaminated area (? ¹³?,¹³?Cs 1000?kBq m?²) has been identified in the area northwest of the plant. The majority of the land in the contaminated area is forest. Here we report the amounts of biomass, litter (small organic matter on the surface of the soil), coarse woody litter, and soil in the contaminated forest area. The estimated overall volume and weight were 33?Mm³ (branches, leaves, litter, and coarse woody litter are not included) and 21 Tg (dry matter), respectively. Our results suggest that removing litter is an efficient method of decontamination. However, litter is being continuously decomposed, and contaminated leaves will continue to fall on the soil surface for several years; hence, the litter should be removed promptly but continuously before more radioactive elements are transferred into the soil. PMID:22639724

Hashimoto, Shoji; Ugawa, Shin; Nanko, Kazuki; Shichi, Koji

2012-05-25

372

REAL-TIME IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ASBESTOS AND CONCRETE MATERIALS WITH RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

Concrete and asbestos-containing materials were widely used in DOE building construction in the 1940s and 1950s. Over the years, many of these porous materials have been contaminated with radioactive sources, on and below the surface. To improve current practice in identifying hazardous materials and in characterizing radioactive contamination, an interdisciplinary team from Rensselaer has conducted research in two aspects: (1) to develop terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging system that can be used to analyze environmental samples such as asbestos in the field, and (2) to develop algorithms for characterizing the radioactive contamination depth profiles in real-time in the field using gamma spectroscopy. The basic research focused on the following: (1) mechanism of generating of broadband pulsed radiation in terahertz region, (2) optimal free-space electro-optic sampling for asbestos, (3) absorption and transmission mechanisms of asbestos in THz region, (4) the role of asbestos sample conditions on the temporal and spectral distributions, (5) real-time identification and mapping of asbestos using THz imaging, (7) Monte Carlo modeling of distributed contamination from diffusion of radioactive materials into porous concrete and asbestos materials, (8) development of unfolding algorithms for gamma spectroscopy, and (9) portable and integrated spectroscopy systems for field testing in DOE. Final results of the project show that the combination of these innovative approaches has the potential to bring significant improvement in future risk reduction and cost/time saving in DOE's D and D activities.

XU, X. George; Zhang, X.C.

2002-05-10

373

Standard reference materials (SRMs) for determination of organic contaminants in environmental samples.  

PubMed

For the past 25 years the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed certified reference materials (CRMs), known as standard reference materials (SRMs), for determination of organic contaminants in environmental matrices. Assignment of certified concentrations has usually been based on combining results from two or more independent analytical methods. The first-generation environmental-matrix SRMs were issued with certified concentrations for a limited number (5 to 10) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Improvements in the analytical certification approach significantly expanded the number and classes of contaminants determined. Environmental-matrix SRMs currently available include air and diesel particulate matter, coal tar, marine and river sediment, mussel tissue, fish oil and tissue, and human serum, with concentrations typically assigned for 50 to 90 organic contaminants, for example PAHs, nitro-substituted PAHs, PCBs, chlorinated pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). PMID:17047949

Wise, Stephen A; Poster, Dianne L; Kucklick, John R; Keller, Jennifer M; Vanderpol, Stacy S; Sander, Lane C; Schantz, Michele M

2006-09-19

374

Real-Time Identification and Characterization of Asbestos and Concrete Materials with Radioactive Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Concrete and asbestos-containing materials were widely used in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) building construction in the 1940s and 1950s. Over the years, many of these porous building materials have been contaminated with radioactive sources, on and below the surface. This intractable radioactive-and-hazardous-asbestos mixed-waste stream has created a tremendous challenge to DOE decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project managers. The current practice to identify asbestos and to characterize radioactive contamination depth profiles in based solely on bore sampling, which is inefficient, costly, and unsafe. A three-year research project was started 1998 at Rensselaer with the following ultimate goals: (1) development of novel non-destructive methods for identifying the hazardous asbestos in real-time and in-situ, and (2) development of new algorithms and apparatus for characterizing the radioactive contamination depth profile in real-time and in-situ.

Xu, George; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

2000-06-01

375

Real-Time Identification and Characterization of Asbestos and Concrete Materials with Radioactive Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Concrete and asbestos-containing materials were widely used in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) building construction in the 1940s and 1950s. Over the years, many of these porous building materials have been contaminated with radioactive sources, on and below the surface. This intractable radioactive-and-hazardous- asbestos mixed-waste-stream has created a tremendous challenge to DOE decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project managers. The current practice to identify asbestos and to characterize radioactive contamination depth profiles involve bore sampling, and is inefficient, costly, and unsafe. A three-year research project was started on 10/1/98 at Rensselaer with the following ultimate goals: (1) development of novel non-destructive methods for identifying the hazardous asbestos in real-time and in-situ, and (2) development of new algorithms and apparatus for characterizing the radioactive contamination depth profile in real-time and in-situ.

Xu, George; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

1999-06-01

376

Regeneration of sand waves after dredging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sand waves are large bed waves on the seabed, being a few metres high and lying hundreds of metres apart. In some cases, these sand waves occur in navigation channels. If these sand waves reduce the water depth to an unacceptable level and hinder navigation, they need to be dredged. It has been observed in the Bisanseto Channel in Japan

M. A. F. Knaapen; S. J. M. H. Hulscher

2002-01-01

377

A Optimum Method for Designing Dredging System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to try to reach a suitable design method for dredging systems, using a large amount of experimental data of the author and others. A theoretical model was derived and adopted, then tested against the chosen experimental data. The mostly used theories in sediment transport with special emphasis on pipe roughness have been investigated and

Zaher Kuhail

378

Restoration Study of Dredging in Lake Kasumigaura.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Lake Kasumigaura is the second largest lake in Japan and is eutrophic. The sediment has adverse effects upon water quality and has a thickness of about 40 - 50 cm. In order to remove sediment as a link in the chain of restoration, dredging is now partly u...

F. Kodama T. Fukushima

1982-01-01

379

Dredged Rocks from Hatton Bank, Rockall Plateau.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three dredge hauls were obtained in 1973 by R/V Vema from the northern slopes of Hatton Bank. The most common rock types in each haul are arkosic and subarkosic arenite. The arkosic arenite is associated with other sedimentary rocks which include fossilif...

A. B. Watts B. C. Schreiber D. Habib

1975-01-01

380

Dredging and Management Problems in Lake Suwa.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dredging in Lake Suwa (Nagano Prefecture) commenced in 1969 and is still in progress. The first stage work, which aimed to remove sediment from shallow zones below 2.5 m, was finished in 1980. However, it brought about no remarkable improvement in water q...

K. Nikaido M. Akabane

1982-01-01

381

Determination of contamination in rare earth materials by promptgamma activation analysis (PGAA)  

SciTech Connect

Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) has been used to detect and quantify impurities in the analyses of rare earth (RE) oxides. The analytical results are discussed with respect to the importance of having a thorough identification and understanding of contaminant elements in these compounds regarding the function of the materials in their various applications. Also, the importance of using PGAA to analyze materials in support of other physico-chemical studies of the materials is discussed, including the study of extremely low concentrations of ions such as the rare earth ions themselves in bulk material matrices.

Perry, D.L.; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay,Zs.

2004-11-09

382

Effect of Organic Residues and Liming Materials on Metal Extraction from a Mining-Contaminated Soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Incubation tests were used to assess the effectiveness of three different organic residues and three different liming materials, alone or in combination, in the remediation of a mine contaminated soil. The organic residues tested were sewage sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (SS), compost from the organic fraction of unsorted municipal solid waste (MSWC), and garden waste compost (GWC),

Paula M. L. F. Alvarenga; Ana P. Gonçalves; Rosa M. C. S. C. Fernandes; Amarilis P. A. de Varennes; Elizabeth C. N. F. A. Duarte; Giovanni Vallini; Cristina F. Cunha-Queda

2008-01-01

383

Moegellukt fran Jordkontaminerat Byggnadsvirke (Bad Odor from Soil-Contaminated Building Material).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Pieces of sapwood of pine were buried in soil outdoors for two weeks. Thereafter, the samples were incubated at a high relative humidity for four weeks. The aim of the study was to show the microbiological consequences of soil-contaminated building materi...

P. Johansson

1999-01-01

384

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION MATERIALS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

During an evaluation of field portable gas chromatographs (GC), site-specific performance evaluation materials (PEM) were prepared and used as quality control samples. lean soils from two contaminated sites were spiked with various volatile organic compounds. he PEM were shipped ...

385

24. Plutonium Recovery From Contaminated Materials, Architectural Details, Building 232z, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

24. Plutonium Recovery From Contaminated Materials, Architectural Details, Building 232-z, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Hanford Atomic Products Operation, General Electric Company, Dwg. No. H-2-23106, 1959. - Plutonium Finishing Plant, Waste Incinerator Facility, 200 West Area, Richland, Benton County, WA

386

IMPACT OF TARGET MATERIAL ACTIVATION ON PERSONNEL EXPOSURE AND RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Detailed activation analyses are performed for the different materials under consideration for use in the target capsules and hohlraums used during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility. Results of the target material activation were additionally used to estimate the levels of contamination within the NIF target chamber and the workplace controls necessary for safe operation. The analysis examined the impact of using Be-Cu and Ge-doped CH capsules on the external dose received by workers during maintenance activities. Five days following a 20 MJ shot, dose rates inside the Target Chamber (TC) due to the two proposed capsule materials are small ({approx} 1 {micro}rem/h). Gold and depleted-uranium (DU) are considered as potential hohlraum materials. Following a shot, gold will most probably get deposited on the TC first wall. On the other hand, while noble-gas precursors from the DU are expected to stay in the TC, most of the noble gases are pumped out of the chamber and end up on the cryopumps. The dose rates inside the TC due to activated gold or DU, at 5 days following a 20 MJ shot, are about 1 mrem/h. Dose rates in the vicinity of the cryo-pumps (containing noble 'fission' gases) drop-off to about 1 mrem/h during the first 12 hours following the shot. Contamination from activation of NIF targets will result in the NIF target chamber exceeding DOE surface contamination limits. Objects removed from the TC will need to be managed as radioactive material. However, the results suggest that airborne contamination from resuspension of surface contamination will not be significant and is at levels that can be managed by negative ventilation when accessing the TC attachments.

Khater, H; Epperson, P; Thacker, R; Beale, R; Kohut, T; Brereton, S

2009-06-30

387

Method for the sealing and decontamination of radioactive and radioactively contaminated components and materials  

SciTech Connect

Two new processes, a sealing and a decontamination process, are presented. The sealing is an elastic synthetic material based on a two-component polyurethane system. The material is sprayed without propellant, cures within a short time, and can easily be removed. By using the newly developed sealing process, many disadvantages, which had to be tolerated up to now, can be avoided. The sealing process has already been used in nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany. For chemical decontamination of surfaces a paste containing aggressive agents is applied. After some time, the paste is stripped from the surface as a film together with the contamination without aerosol formation or secondary contamination. With this decontamination process, it is possible to avoid the use of large quantities of acid and of rinsing water.

Neupert, D.; Demtroder, P.

1983-04-01

388

A United States perspective on long-term management of areas contaminated with radioactive materials.  

PubMed

The US has far-reaching and extensive experience in the long-term management of areas contaminated with radioactive materials. This experience base includes the Department of Energy's continued follow-up with Hiroshima and Nagasaki from the 1940s at the Radiological Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan, the long-term management of the Marshall Islands Programme, the clean-up of the US nuclear weapons complex and the ongoing management of accident sites such as in Palomares, Spain. This paper discusses the lessons learnt and best practices gained from this far-reaching and extensive experience in the long-term management of areas contaminated with radioactive materials. PMID:15238660

Jones, C Rick

2004-01-01

389

Bulk Building Material Characterization and Decontamination Using a Concrete Floor and Wall Contamination Profiling Technology  

SciTech Connect

The concrete profiling technology, RadPro{trademark} has four major components: a drill with a specialized cutting and sampling head, drill bits, a sample collection unit and a vacuum pump. The equipment in conjunction with portable radiometric instrumentation produces a profile of radiological or chemical contamination through the material being studied. The drill head is used under hammer action to penetrate hard surfaces. This causes the bulk material to be pulverized as the drill travels through the radioactive media efficiently transmitting to the sampling unit a representative sample of powdered bulk material. The profiling equipment is designed to sequentially collect all material from the hole. The bulk material samples are continuously retrieved by use of a specially designed vacuumed sample retrieval unit that prevents cross contamination of the clean retrieved samples. No circulation medium is required with this profiling process; therefore, the only by-product from drilling is the sample. The data quality, quantity, and representativeness may be used to produce an activity profile from the hot spot surface into the bulk building material. The activity data obtained during the profiling process is reduced and transferred to building drawings as part of a detailed report of the radiological problem. This activity profile may then be expanded to ultimately characterize the facility and expedite waste segregation and facility closure at a reduced cost and risk.

Aggarwal, S.; Charters, G.; Blauvelt, D.

2002-02-28

390

Laboratory investigation into the contribution of contaminants to ground water from equipment materials used in sampling  

SciTech Connect

Benzene contamination was detected in water samples from the Ogallala aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. DOE assembled a Technical Assistance Team to evaluate the source of benzene. One of the team's recommendations was to assess whether the sampling equipment material could be a source of benzene and other volatile organic compounds. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory tests indicated that the equipment material did, in fact, contribute volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds to the groundwater samples. Specifically, three materials were identified as contributing contaminants to water samples. The nylon-11 tubing used contributed benzene and the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA), the urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed toluene and trace amounts of NBSA, while the sampling port "spacer" material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests are below the concentrations measured in actual groundwater samples, the equipment material was found to contribute organics to the test water rendering the results reported for the groundwater samples highly suspect.

Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P. Evan; Sklarew, Deborah S.

2004-07-31

391

Coral record of harbour dredging: Townsville, Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentrations of Ba\\/Ca, Cu\\/Ca, Sr\\/Ca and Zn\\/Ca were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry in a branching coral, Pocillopora damicornis, from a coral reef receiving suspended sediments from Townsville Harbour dredging activities. The Sr\\/Ca record correlated with observed sea surface temperatures (SST), which allowed pulse inclusions of barium, copper and zinc to be dated and compared with various environmental records.Copper

G. Esslemont; R. A. Russell; W. A. Maher

2004-01-01

392

Development of dredged ash disposal area, Paradise fossil plant  

SciTech Connect

Paradise Steam-Electric Plant coal-fired facility in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky. This project is to construct a dredge pond near the Jacobs Creek ash pond capable of storing fly ash dredged from the ash pond. This will provide approximately 10 years of additional fly ash storage in the fly ash pond. Effluent from the dredge pond will be returned to the Jacobs Creek ash pond for discharge to Jacobs Creek. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01

393

Backfilling canals to mitigate Wetland dredging in Louisiana coastal marshes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Returning canal spoil banks into canals, or backfilling, is used in Louisiana marshes to mitigate damage caused by dredging for oil and gas extraction. We evaluated 33 canals backfilled through July 1984 to assess the success of habitat restoration. We determined restoration success by examining canal depth, vegetation recolonization, and regraded spoil bank soils after backfilling. Restoration success depended on: marsh type, canal location, canal age, marsh soil characteristics, the presence or absence of a plug at the canal mouth, whether mitigation was on- or off-site, and dredge operator performance. Backfilling reduced median canal depth from 2.4 to 1.1 m, restored marsh vegetation on the backfilled spoil bank, but did not restore emergent marsh vegetation in the canal because of the lack of sufficient spoil material to fill the canal and time. Median percentage of cover of marsh vegetation on the canal spoil banks was 51.6%. Median percentage of cover in the canal was 0.7%. The organic matter and water content of spoil bank soils were restored to values intermediate between spoil bank levels and predredging marsh conditions. The average percentage of cover of marsh vegetation on backfilled spoil banks was highest in intermediate marshes (68.6%) and lowest in fresh (34.7%) and salt marshes (33.9%). Average canal depth was greatest in intermediate marshes (1.50 m) and least in fresh marshes (0.85 m). Canals backfilled in the Chenier Plain of western Louisiana were shallower (average depth = 0.61 m) than in the eastern Deltaic Plain (mean depth range = 1.08 to 1.30 m), probably because of differences in sediment type, lower subsidence rate, and lower tidal exchange in the Chenier Plain. Canals backfilled in marshes with more organic soils were deeper, probably as a result of greater loss of spoil volume caused by oxidation of soil organic matter. Canals ten or more years old at the time of backfilling had shallower depths after backfilling. Depths varied widely among canals backfilled within ten years of dredging. Canal size showed no relationship to canal depth or amount of vegetation reestablished. Plugged canals contained more marsh reestablished in the canal and much greater chance of colonization by submerged aquatic vegetation compared with unplugged canals. Dredge operator skill was important in leveling spoil banks to allow vegetation reestablishment. Wide variation in dredge performance led to differing success of vegetation restoration. Complete reestablishment of the vegetation was not a necessary condition for successful restoration. In addition to providing vegetation reestablishment, backfilling canals resulted in shallow water areas with higher habitat value for benthos, fish, and waterfowl than unfilled canals. Spoil bank removal also may help restore water flow patterns over the marsh surface. Increased backfilling for wetland mitigation and restoration is recommended.

Neill, Christopher; Turner, R. Eugene

1987-11-01

394

Environmental effects of dredging on sediment nutrients, carbon and granulometry in a tropical estuary  

Microsoft Academic Search

This monitoring study encompassed a period prior to dredging, during dredging and post dredging between July 1999 to June\\u000a 2000 in Ponggol estuary located along the northeastern coast of Singapore. Mean concentrations of sediment nutrients in mg\\u000a ? Kg?1 (± standard error of means) prior to dredging, during dredging and post dredging were 9.75 ± 4.24, 8.18 ± 4.29 and

S. Nayar; D. J. Miller; A. Hunt; B. P. L. Goh; L. M. Chou

2007-01-01

395

Studies of channel sediments contaminated with organics and heavy metals.  

PubMed

The paper discusses the geo-environmental studies carried out to revitalise a silted up channel in Guanabara Bay. A dredging operation has been planned to remove about 1.5 million cubic meters of contaminated sediment. Investigations were performed to characterise the sediment in terms of its physical and chemical properties and to evaluate the presence of heavy metals and organic compounds, particularly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAH. Finally, dredging and disposal schemes are briefly outlined based on measured contamination levels. PMID:15177724

Barbosa, Maria Claudia; de Almeida, Márcio de Souza Soares; Mariz, Digna Faria; de Almeida, José Luis Duarte Silva Serzedelo

2004-07-01

396

Laboratory Investigation into the Contribution of Contaminants to Ground Water from Equipment Materials Used in Sampling  

SciTech Connect

Benzene contamination was detected in well water samples from the Ogallala Aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. This study assessed whether or not the materials used in multilevel sampling equipment at this site could have contributed to the contaminants found in well water samples. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory test indicated three different materials from two types of multilevel samplers did, in fact, contribute volatile and semivolatile organic compounds to the ground water samples from static leach tests that were conducted during an eight week period. The nylon-11 tubing contributed trace concentrations of benzene (1.37 ?g/L) and relatively high concentrations of the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA) (764 mg/L) to the water; a urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed relatively high concentrations of toluene (278 ?g/L) and trace amounts of NBSA; and a sampling port spacer material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests were below the concentrations measured in actual ground water samples, the concentrations of organics from these equipment materials were sufficient to render the results reported for the ground water samples suspect.

Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P Evan; Sklarew, Debbie S.

2004-08-30

397

Experimental methods for evaluating the phototoxicity of heavily contaminated sediments  

SciTech Connect

Decisions concerning the dredging and disposal of contaminated sediments require information on both the toxicity and chemical composition of the material. For sediments containing complex mixtures of pollutants, it is more appropriate to measure toxicity directly rather than to estimate it from chemical analyses. Standardized solid-phase and elutriate tests are available for measuring the direct toxicity of sediment components to aquatic organisms (Nebeker et al. 1984). We have found that phototoxicity can also be an important characteristic of contaminated sediments that is not detected by conventional bioassays. Experimental methods have been developed to detect acute phototoxicity associated with aqueous elutriates from contaminated sediments. Heavily oiled sediments from the Grand Calument River, Indiana, have been used to demonstrate the phototoxic effect.

Spacie, A. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (USA)); Davenport, R. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

1990-01-01

398

Phytoremediation prospects of willow stands on contaminated sediment: a field trial.  

PubMed

Establishing fast growing willow stands on land disposed contaminated dredged sediment can result in the revaluation of this material and opens possibilities for phytoremediation. A field trial was designed to assess the impact of planting a willow stand (Salix viminalis L. 'Orm') on the dissipation of organic contaminants (mineral oil and PAHs) in dredged sediment. In addition, the accumulation of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) in the biomass was determined. After 1.5 years, a significant decrease of 57% in the mineral oil concentration in the sediment planted with willow was observed. Degradation of mineral oil in sediment which was left fallow, was only 15%. The mineral oil degradation under willow was most pronounced (79%) in the root zone of the stand. In the sediment which was left fallow there was a significant reduction of the total PAH content by 32% compared with a 23% reduction in the planted sediment. The moderate and selective metal uptake, measured in this study, limits the prospects for phytoextraction of metals from dredged sediment. PMID:12927498

Vervaeke, P; Luyssaert, S; Mertens, J; Meers, E; Tack, F M G; Lust, N

2003-01-01

399

Modeling Dissolved Oxygen in a Dredged Lake Erie Tributary  

Microsoft Academic Search

A two-dimensional numerical model was developed to study dissolved oxygen (DO) kinetics in a dredged Lake Erie tributary. The model design was aimed to specifically address the fact that many tributaries to the Great Lakes are dredged periodically for navigation, and that resultant changes in morphology and hydraulics can have significant impacts on DO. Due to the greater depths caused

Jagjit Kaur; Gopi Jaligama; Joseph F. Atkinson; Joseph V. DePinto; Adrienne D. Nemura

2007-01-01

400

Scour of Chinook Salmon Redds on Suction Dredge Tailings  

Microsoft Academic Search

We measured scour of the redds of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha on dredge tailings and natural substrates in three tributaries of the Klamath River, California. We measured maximum scour with scour chains and net scour by surveying before and after high winter flows. Scour of chinook salmon redds lo- cated on dredge tailings exceeded scour of redds on natural substrates,

Bret C. Harvey; Thomas E. Lisle

1999-01-01

401

21. DREDGING POND USED TO TEST THE ADAPTABILITY OF JET ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. DREDGING POND USED TO TEST THE ADAPTABILITY OF JET PUMPS FOR PUMPING SAND, AND WEAR RATES OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF DREDGING PIPE. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

402

The Use of Dredge Islands by Wading Birds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The dredging of channels through the estuaries of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts is a major engineering effort, resulting in the creation of many man-made islands. Such dredge islands support a variety of bird-life and are especially important as nesting si...

J. F. Parnell R. F. Soots

1978-01-01

403

Hydrogen burning and dredge-up during the major core helium flash in a Z = 0 model star  

SciTech Connect

The basic evolution of the core helium flash in a Z = 0 model star is studied, analyzing the manner in which both a hydrogen-burning and a helium-burning convective shell can form. The manner in which CN-enhanced material is dredged up to the stellar surface is addressed. A numerical experiment is presented to determine the importance of opacity during the dredge-up phase. The implications that the Z = 0 model has for understanding of Population III stars is discussed. 23 refs.

Hollowell, D.; Iben, I. Jr.; Fujimoto, M.Y. (Illinois Univ., Urbana (USA) Niigata Univ. (Japan))

1990-03-01

404

Impact of nanoscale zero valent iron on geochemistry and microbial populations in trichloroethylene contaminated aquifer materials.  

PubMed

Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles are a promising technology for reducing trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in the subsurface. Prior to injecting large quantities of nanoparticles into the groundwater it is important to understand what impact the particles will have on the geochemistry and indigenous microbial communities. Microbial populations are important not only for nutrient cycling, but also for contaminant remediation and heavy metal immobilization. Microcosms were used to determine the effects of NZVI addition on three different aquifer materials from TCE contaminated sites in Alameda Point, CA, Mancelona, MI, and Parris Island, SC. The oxidation and reduction potential of the microcosms consistently decreased by more than 400 mV when NZVI was added at 1.5 g/L concentrations. Sulfate concentrations decreased in the two coastal aquifer materials, and methane was observed in the presence of NZVI in Alameda Point microcosms, but not in the other two materials. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed significant shifts in Eubacterial diversity just after the Fe(0) was exhausted, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses showed increases of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) and Archaeal 16s rRNA genes, indicating that reducing conditions and hydrogen created by NZVI stimulate both sulfate reducer and methanogen populations. Adding NZVI had no deleterious effect on total bacterial abundance in the microcosms. NZVI with a biodegradable polyaspartate coating increased bacterial populations by an order of magnitude relative to controls. The lack of broad bactericidal effect, combined with the stimulatory effect of polyaspartate coatings, has positive implications for NZVI field applications. PMID:20350000

Kirschling, Teresa L; Gregory, Kelvin B; Minkley, Edwin G; Lowry, Gregory V; Tilton, Robert D

2010-05-01

405

Nucleosynthesis and dredge-up of carbon and s-process elements in AGB stars  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examines research undertaken recently to investigate the possibility of the formation of low-mass s-enriched stars ascending the AGB. A first approximation is made to the mechanism of the dredge-up of s-processed material during the interpulse period between two subsequent He thermal instabilites. Several peculiarities of the s-processing concerning the problems of the Kr-85 and Zr-95 branchings are

R. Gallino; M. Busso; G. Picchio; C. M. Raiteri

1990-01-01

406

Brick production with dredged harbour sediments. An industrial-scale experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A volume of 600.000 m3 harbour sediments is annually dredged out of the harbour basin of Bremen to maintain a certain water depth. Because of its perpetual availability, homogeneity and mineralogical, petrographic and chemical composition, the sediment is regarded as a suitable raw material for brick production. A pilot experiment was conducted at a full-scale industrial brickworks. During production, the

Kay Hamer; Volker Karius

2002-01-01

407

Hydrologic considerations associated with dredging spring ponds in Wisconsin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spring ponds (small spring-fed bodies of water) are natural features of some glaciated areas. The purpose of this study was to determine the hydrology of three spring ponds in northeastern Wisconsin and the effects that dredging has had on the ponds. Sediments were dredged from Sunshine and Krause Ponds. Maxwell Pond, which was not dredged, was used as a hydrologic control. Sediment accumulation since glaciation caused a 2-fold reduction in the surface area of Sunshine Pond and a 4-fold reduction in the area of Krause Pond. Volume reduction caused by sediment accumulation was 9-fold in Sunshine Pond and 28-fold in Krause Pond. Dredging 4.2 acre-feet of sediment from Sunshine Pond caused a 41-percent increase in ground-water inflow. Dredging 4.0 acre-feet of sediments from Krause Pond caused only a 2-percent increase in ground-water inflow. (Woodard-USGS)

Rose, William J.

1977-01-01

408

Estimation of Internal Radiation Dose from both Immediate Releases and Continued Exposures to Contaminated Materials  

SciTech Connect

A brief description is provided of the basic concepts related to 'internal dose' and how it differs from doses that result from radioactive materials and direct radiation outside of the body. The principles of radiation dose reconstruction, as applied to both internal and external doses, is discussed based upon a recent publication prepared by the US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Finally, ideas are introduced related to residual radioactive contamination in the environment that has resulted from the releases from the damaged reactors and also to the management of wastes that may be generated in both regional cleanup and NPP decommissioning.

Napier, Bruce A.

2012-03-26

409

Effects of willow stands on heavy metal concentrations and top soil properties of infrastructure spoil landfills and dredged sediment-derived sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of willow stand development on top soil properties of uncontaminated infrastructure spoil landfills (ISL) and contaminated dredged sediment landfills (DSL) were assessed. For the ISL, significant increases in Cd, Zn and organic C levels in the top soil (0–10 cm) were detected more than 20 years after disposal. The increases in Cd and Zn concentrations in the top soil were

Bart Vandecasteele; Paul Quataert; Gerrit Genouw; Suzanna Lettens; Filip M. G. Tack

2009-01-01

410

Enhanced Heavy Metal Phytoextraction from Marine Dredged Sediments Comparing Conventional Chelating Agents (Citric Acid and EDTA) with Humic Substances  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory experiments were carried out to examine the effects of chelating agents on heavy metal extraction from slightly\\u000a contaminated dredged sediments from the port of Livorno (Italy). Ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA), citric acid (CA) and\\u000a humic substances (HS) were tested in two different concentrations each: 120 and 480, 500 and 2,000, 500 and 1,000 mg\\/l, respectively.\\u000a Solubilisation of heavy metals (Cu

Veronica Bianchi; Grazia Masciandaro; David Giraldi; Brunello Ceccanti; Renato Iannelli

2008-01-01

411

Evaluation of the toxicity of marine sediments and dredge spoils with the Microtox (trade name) bioassay  

SciTech Connect

The MicrotoxR bioassay was used to evaluate the toxicity of sediment and dredge-spoil elutriates from several potentially contaminated sites in Mobile and Pascagoula Bays. Elutriates were prepared using either local seawater or distilled deionized water (osmotically adjusted with NaCl prior to testing), and MicrotoxR assays were performed with the elutriates and three reference toxicants. There were marked differences in the toxicity of several elutriates and reference toxicants in the two different waters, with the seawater generally resulting in the same or lesser toxicity than the osmotically adjusted distilled deionized water.

Ankley, G.T.; Hoke, R.A.; Giesy, J.P.; Winger, P.V.

1989-01-01

412

Seasonal swimming behaviour in the queen scallop ( Aequipecten opercularis) and its effect on dredge fisheries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modified dredges were used on Aequipecten opercularis (queen scallop) fishing grounds off the Isle of Man in the north Irish Sea to determine seasonal variability in swimming behaviour in queen scallops and its effect on dredge fisheries. Scallops, which evaded dredge capture by swimming up into the water column, were captured by a specially designed net deployed above the dredge

S. R. Jenkins; W. Lart; B. J. Vause; A. R. Brand

2003-01-01

413

Microfungal contamination of damp buildings--examples of risk constructions and risk materials.  

PubMed Central

To elucidate problems with microfungal infestation in indoor environments, a multidisciplinary collaborative pilot study, supported by a grant from the Danish Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs, was performed on 72 mold-infected building materials from 23 buildings. Water leakage through roofs, rising damp, and defective plumbing installations were the main reasons for water damage with subsequent infestation of molds. From a score system assessing the bioavailability of the building materials, products most vulnerable to mold attacks were water damaged, aged organic materials containing cellulose, such as wooden materials, jute, wallpaper, and cardboard. The microfungal genera most frequently encountered were Penicillium (68%), Aspergillus (56%), Chaetomium (22%), Ulocladium, (21%), Stachybotrys (19%) and Cladosporium (15%). Penicillium chrysogenum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Stachybotrys chartarum were the most frequently occurring species. Under field conditions, several trichothecenes were detected in each of three commonly used building materials, heavily contaminated with S. chartarum. Under experimental conditions, four out of five isolates of S. chartarum produced satratoxin H and G when growing on new and old, very humid gypsum boards. A. versicolor produced the carcinogenic mycotoxin sterigmatocystin and 5-methoxysterigmatocystin under the same conditions.

Gravesen, S; Nielsen, P A; Iversen, R; Nielsen, K F

1999-01-01

414

A comparison of direct macrofaunal mortality using three types of clam dredges  

Microsoft Academic Search

The white clam Spisula solida is harvested along the entire coast of Portugal using mechanical dredges. In this study, the total direct mortality of the macrobenthic community caused by three types of clam dredges (north dredge—ND, traditional dredge—TD, and the metallic grid dredge—GD) used in the S. solida fishery was determined and compared. The relationship between mortality and catching efficiency

M. B. Gaspar; F. Leitao; M. N. Santos; L. Chicharo; M. D. Dias; A. Chicharo; C. C. Monteiro

2003-01-01

415

Jamu Gendong, a kind of traditional medicine in Indonesia: the microbial contamination of its raw materials and endproduct  

Microsoft Academic Search

An examination on the microbiological quality of seven kinds of Jamu Gendong (JG) and their raw materials has been conducted according to the requirements of microbial contamination in traditional medicine, issued by the Department of Health of Indonesia in 1986. Samples of JG and their raw materials were taken from producers in three districts of Surabaya. The samples were subject

D. A Limyati; B. L. L Juniar

1998-01-01

416

Sorption on nonionic surfactant triton X-100 onto fuel-contaminated aquifer materials from Eglin AFB, FL  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of subsurface aquifers and soils by non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) such as petroleum and other hydrocarbons is widespread and is of great public concern. One of the techniques proposed for subsurface remediation of NAPL-contaminated aquifers and soils involves in-situ surfactant washing/flushing technologies. The application of surfactants to solubilize and/or mobilize the subsurface contaminants is to improve the performance of conventional pump-and-treat technologies. Specific applications of surfactants to in-situ remediation of the subsurface may significantly reduce costs and shorten the time to achieve specific cleanup levels. Although this technique has shown significant potential for application in environmental remediation practices, significant losses via surfactant sorption onto aquifer materials result in lowered efficiency. This investigation will characterize the sorption of surfactant Triton X-100 with fuel-contaminated aquifer materials from Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Florida.

Liu, Zhongbao; Hutchins, S.R.; Wilson, B.H.; West, C.C. [Environmental Protection Agency, Ada, OK (United States)

1996-12-31

417

Background in the context of land contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material.  

PubMed

The financial implications of choosing a particular threshold for clearance of radioactively contaminated land are substantial, particularly when one considers the volume of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) created each year by the production and combustion of fossil fuels and the exploitation of industrial minerals. Inevitably, a compromise needs to be reached between the level of environmental protection sought and the finite resources available for remediation. In the case of natural series radionuclides, any anthropogenic input is always superimposed on the inventory already present in the soil; this 'background' inventory is conventionally disregarded when assessing remediation targets. Unfortunately, the term is not well defined and the concept of 'background dose' is open to alternative interpretations. In this paper, we address the issue of natural background from a geochemical rather than from a solely radiological perspective, illustrating this with an example from the china clay industry. We propose a simple procedure for decision making based on activity concentrations of primordial radionuclides and their progeny. Subsequent calculations of dose need to take into account the mineralogical and chemical characteristics of the contamination, which in the case of NORM are invariably reflected in uranium series disequilibrium. PMID:23519083

Read, D; Read, G D; Thorne, M C

2013-03-21

418

Arsenic Contamination in Food-chain: Transfer of Arsenic into Food Materials through Groundwater Irrigation  

PubMed Central

Arsenic contamination in groundwater in Bangladesh has become an additional concern vis-à-vis its use for irrigation purposes. Even if arsenic-safe drinking-water is assured, the question of irrigating soils with arsenic-laden groundwater will continue for years to come. Immediate attention should be given to assess the possibility of accumulating arsenic in soils through irrigation-water and its subsequent entry into the food-chain through various food crops and fodders. With this possibility in mind, arsenic content of 2,500 water, soil and vegetable samples from arsenic-affected and arsenic-unaffected areas were analyzed during 1999–2004. Other sources of foods and fodders were also analyzed. Irrigating a rice field with groundwater containing 0.55 mg/L of arsenic with a water requirement of 1,000 mm results in an estimated addition of 5.5 kg of arsenic per ha per annum. Concentration of arsenic as high as 80 mg per kg of soil was found in an area receiving arsenic-contaminated irrigation. A comparison of results from affected and unaffected areas revealed that some commonly-grown vegetables, which would usually be suitable as good sources of nourishment, accumulate substantially-elevated amounts of arsenic. For example, more than 150 mg/kg of arsenic has been found to be accumulated in arum (kochu) vegetable. Implications of arsenic ingested in vegetables and other food materials are discussed in the paper.

Joardar, J.C.; Parvin, S.; Correll, Ray; Naidu, Ravi

2006-01-01

419

COPING WITH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS AND SOILS IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT.  

SciTech Connect

Soils and sediments contaminated with toxic organic and inorganic compounds harmful to the environment and to human health are common in the urban environment. We report here on aspects of a program being carried out in the New York/New Jersey Port region to develop methods for processing dredged material from the Port to make products that are safe for introduction to commercial markets. We discuss some of the results of the program in Computational Environmental Science, Laboratory Environmental Science, and Applied Environmental Science and indicate some possible directions for future work. Overall, the program elements integrate the scientific and engineering aspects with regulatory, commercial, urban planning, local governments, and community group interests. Well-developed connections between these components are critical to the ultimate success of efforts to cope with the problems caused by contaminated urban soils and sediments.

JONES,K.W.; VAN DER LELIE,D.; MCGUIGAN,M.; ET AL.

2004-05-25

420

The presence of asbestos-contaminated vermiculite attic insulation or other asbestos-containing materials in homes and the potential for living space contamination.  

PubMed

Asbestos-contaminated vermiculite attic insulation (VAI) produced from a mine near Libby, Montana, may be present in millions of homes along with other commercial asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The primary goal of the research described here was to develop and test procedures that would allow for the safe and effective weatherization of low-income homes with asbestos. The presence of asbestos insulation was confirmed by bulk sampling of the suspect asbestos material. The homes were then tested for the presence of asbestos fibers in the living spaces. All 40 homes containing VAI revealed the presence of amphibole asbestos in bulk samples. Asbestos (primarily chrysotile) was confirmed in bulk samples of ACM collected from 18 homes. Amphibole asbestos was detected in the living space of 12 (26%) homes, while chrysotile asbestos was detected in the living space of 45 (98%) homes. These results suggest that asbestos sources in homes can contribute to living space contamination. PMID:23091967

Spear, Terry M; Hart, Julie F; Spear, Tessa E; Loushin, Molly M; Shaw, Natalie N; Elashhab, Mohamed I

2012-10-01

421

Effect of exposure test conditions on leaching behavior of inorganic contaminants from recycled materials for roadbeds.  

PubMed

Throughout the utilization of recycled materials, weathering factors such as humidity, gas composition and temperature have the potential to change the material properties and enhance the release of inorganic contaminants. In this research, the effects of weathering factors on recycled gravel materials for roadbeds were evaluated by applying three kinds of accelerating exposure tests: freezing-melting cycle test, carbonation test, and dry-humid cycle test. The effects of exposure tests were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and serial batch leaching test, making it possible to identify the change in release mechanisms. Sixteen elements, mainly metals, were investigated. Tested samples were molten slag from municipal solid waste, molten slag from automobile shredded residue, and crushed natural stone. After the exposure tests, the increase of cumulative release in the leaching test was generally less than 2.0 times that of the samples without the exposure test. Among the three test conditions, freezing-melting showed a slightly higher effect of enhancing the release of constituents. XRD analysis showed no change in chemical species. From these results, it was determined that the stony samples were stable enough so that their properties were not significantly changed by the exposure tests. PMID:19095431

Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Osako, Masahiro; Kida, Akiko

2008-12-17

422

Solidification/stabilization of heavy metal contaminated mine tailings using polymeric materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polymeric materials in addition to Portland cement and hydrated limes were used to solidify and stabilize heavy metal contaminated tailings from five abandoned metal mines in Korea. Mine tailings were mixed separately with Portland cement and hydrated lime at a concentration of 20-30 wt% and 6-9 wt%, respectively and Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) powder was added to each specimen at a ratio of 2.5 and 5.0 wt% to binders. Polymer-added and polymer-free solidified/stabilized (s/s) forms were evaluated for their appropriateness in accordance with the suggested test methods. Regardless of addition of polymeric materials, all s/s forms satisfy the uniaxial comprehensive strength (USC) requirements (0.35MPa) for land reclamation and show remarkably reduced leaching concentrations of heavy metals such as As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn less than the toxicity criteria of Korean standard leaching test (KSLT). The addition of polymeric materials increased the USC of s/s forms to improve a long-term stability of s/s mine tailings.

Min, K.; Kim, T.; Lee, H.

2009-12-01

423

Ross Sea Mollusca from the Latitudinal Gradient Program: R/V Italica 2004 Rauschert dredge samples.  

PubMed

Information regarding the molluscs in this dataset is based on the Rauschert dredge samples collected during the Latitudinal Gradient Program (LGP) on board the R/V "Italica" in the Ross Sea (Antarctica) in the austral summer 2004. A total of 18 epibenthic dredge deployments/samplings have been performed at four different locations at depths ranging from 84 to 515m by using a Rauschert dredge with a mesh size of 500?m. In total 8,359 specimens have been collected belonging to a total of 161 species. Considering this dataset in terms of occurrences, it corresponds to 505 discrete distributional records (incidence data). Of these, in order of abundance, 5,965 specimens were Gastropoda (accounting for 113 species), 1,323 were Bivalvia (accounting for 36 species), 949 were Aplacophora (accounting for 7 species), 74 specimens were Scaphopoda (3 species), 38 were Monoplacophora (1 species) and, finally, 10 specimens were Polyplacophora (1 species). This data set represents the first large-scale survey of benthic micro-molluscs for the area and provides important information about the distribution of several species, which have been seldom or never recorded before in the Ross Sea. All vouchers are permanently stored at the Italian National Antarctic Museum (MNA), Section of Genoa, enabling future comparison and crosschecking. This material is also currently under study, from a molecular point of view, by the barcoding project "BAMBi" (PNRA 2010/A1.10). PMID:24146597

Ghiglione, Claudio; Alvaro, Maria Chiara; Griffiths, Huw J; Linse, Katrin; Schiaparelli, Stefano

2013-10-07

424

Short-term response of subadult white sturgeon to hopper dredge disposal operations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The effect of dredged-material disposal operations on the behavior of seven white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (50–101 cm fork length) was examined by analysis of the movements and depth use of these fish before, during, and after a series of hopper dredge disposal operations in the lower Columbia River. Analyses of fish locations showed that 12 flow-lane disposal operations within a 24-h period had minimal effect on subadult white sturgeon behavior; six of the seven fish showed slight attraction to the disposal area during disposals, and one fish increased its distance from the disposal area. The core area for all fish combined shifted toward the disposal area during disposals. In the 24 h after completion of the disposal operations the fish core areas shifted back toward those areas occupied before the disposals. The rates of movement, depths used, and diel movement patterns of the white sturgeon showed little change over all periods, suggesting that natural behaviors were not altered during and immediately after hopper dredge disposal operations.

Parsley, Michael J.; Popoff, Nicholas D.; Romine, Jason G.

2011-01-01

425

Dredging and disposal of fine sediments in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  

PubMed

Dredging is employed quite frequently in the state of Rio de Janeiro, especially for the installation and upkeep of commercial ports and rehabilitation of the hydraulic section of silted bodies of water. Until recently, all dredged material with no economic use was destined for marine disposal or stored at the edge of the water body. Since the 1990s, however, a new approach has been adopted for dredging as a result of pressure from the environmental organisations, encouraging closer interaction in Rio de Janeiro between the local and state public authorities and the universities on issues relating to licensing of this kind of activity. The recent experiments of the Civil and Ocean Engineering Programs of COPPE-UFRJ (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro) described herein are included in this context. The state of Rio de Janeiro has three bays, several coastal lagoon systems and a number of small and medium sized rivers in or close to urban areas, with a gentle slope as they near the sea. This is, then, a region highly susceptible to silting processes of water bodies, and therefore, to maintenance and/or environmental rehabilitation. As discussed in the article, fine and almost always organic sediments prevail, which is a considerable obstacle to the end disposal and possibility of reuse. PMID:11463501

Barbosa, M C; de Souza Soares de Almeida, M

2001-07-30

426

Ross Sea Mollusca from the Latitudinal Gradient Program: R/V Italica 2004 Rauschert dredge samples  

PubMed Central

Abstract Information regarding the molluscs in this dataset is based on the Rauschert dredge samples collected during the Latitudinal Gradient Program (LGP) on board the R/V “Italica” in the Ross Sea (Antarctica) in the austral summer 2004. A total of 18 epibenthic dredge deployments/samplings have been performed at four different locations at depths ranging from 84 to 515m by using a Rauschert dredge with a mesh size of 500?m. In total 8,359 specimens have been collected belonging to a total of 161 species. Considering this dataset in terms of occurrences, it corresponds to 505 discrete distributional records (incidence data). Of these, in order of abundance, 5,965 specimens were Gastropoda (accounting for 113 species), 1,323 were Bivalvia (accounting for 36 species), 949 were Aplacophora (accounting for 7 species), 74 specimens were Scaphopoda (3 species), 38 were Monoplacophora (1 species) and, finally, 10 specimens were Polyplacophora (1 species). This data set represents the first large-scale survey of benthic micro-molluscs for the area and provides important information about the distribution of several species, which have been seldom or never recorded before in the Ross Sea. All vouchers are permanently stored at the Italian National Antarctic Museum (MNA), Section of Genoa, enabling future comparison and crosschecking. This material is also currently under study, from a molecular point of view, by the barcoding project “BAMBi” (PNRA 2010/A1.10).

Ghiglione, Claudio; Alvaro, Maria Chiara; Griffiths, Huw J.; Linse, Katrin; Schiaparelli, Stefano

2013-01-01

427

LANDSAT ESTUARINE WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF SILVICULTURE AND DREDGING ACTIVITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

This report describes the application of Landsat multispectral scanning to estuarine water quality, with specific reference to dredging and silviculture practices. Water quality data collected biweekly since 1972 in the Apalachicola, Bay, Florida, by Florida State University, and...

428

European Dredging Industry Overview with Emphasis on Geotechnical Descriptors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report briefly describes the state of the art of dredging in The Netherlands, Belgium, and England and the results of literature searches and personal interviews in these countries regarding the present use of geotechnical descriptors in the European...

W. A. Dunlap

1993-01-01

429

5. VIEW SHOWING DREDGING OF ARIZONA CANAL NEAR THE GRANITE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. VIEW SHOWING DREDGING OF ARIZONA CANAL NEAR THE GRANITE REEF DAM. SOUTH INTAKE OF THE DAM IS IN THE BACKGROUND Photographer: Walter J. Lubken. March 1908 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

430

DISSIPATION OF PAHs IN SATURATED, DREDGED SEDIMENTS: A FIELD TRIAL  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Sediments dredged from navigable rivers often contain elevated concentrations of recalcitrant, potentially toxic organic compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The presence of these compounds often requires that the sediments be stored in fully conta...

431

Dredging displaces bottlenose dolphins from an urbanised foraging patch.  

PubMed

The exponential growth of the human population and its increasing industrial development often involve large scale modifications of the environment. In the marine context, coastal urbanisation and harbour expansion to accommodate the rising levels of shipping and offshore energy exploitation require dredging to modify the shoreline and sea floor. While the consequences of dredging on invertebrates and fish are relatively well documented, no study has robustly tested the effects on large marine vertebrates. We monitored the attendance of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) to a recently established urbanised foraging patch, Aberdeen harbour (Scotland), and modelled the effect of dredging operations on site usage. We found that higher intensities of dredging caused the dolphins to spend less time in the harbour, despite high baseline levels of disturbance and the importance of the area as a foraging patch. PMID:23816305

Pirotta, Enrico; Laesser, Barbara Eva; Hardaker, Andrea; Riddoch, Nicholas; Marcoux, Marianne; Lusseau, David

2013-06-29

432

Current State of the Art of Rock Cutting and Dredging.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Site Investigation; Physical Properties of Ground in Relation to the Dredging Operation; Assessment of Properties of Rock that Affect Excavation; Mechanical Excavation of Rock; Tools Used in Mechanical Rock Excavation; Rock Cutter Suction Dredgi...

H. J. Hignett

1984-01-01

433

Commercial Dredging in the Pennsylvania Waters of Lake Erie.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Concerns about dredging activities and subsequent effects to coastal environments have most often been considered in regard to water pollution and impacts to fish ad wildlife populations, but seldom of physical impacts to the coastal zone. There are three...

P. Knuth W. Nagel

1981-01-01

434

4. AERIAL OBLIQUE FROM EAST, SHOWING DREDGING, BULKHEAD, CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. AERIAL OBLIQUE FROM EAST, SHOWING DREDGING, BULKHEAD, CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY AT BASE IN BACKGROUND. USN PHOTO, C. SEPTEMBER, 1940. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

435

DEVELOPING TOOLS FOR MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS AT LAKE HARTWELL, SC  

EPA Science Inventory

Contaminated sediments pose a risk to human health and the environment . The management of this risk is currently limited practically to three technologies: dredging, capping, and natural recovery. Monitored natural recovery relies on the natural burial and removal mechanisms to...

436

Bioaccumulation of toxic substances associated with dredging and dredged material disposal: a literature review  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A literature review of sediment bioassessment was conducted as the first step in the development of a more standardized and ecologically sound test procedure for evaluating sediment quality. Based on the review, the authors concluded that 1) a standardized laboratory bioassessment test should consist of flowthrough exposure of at least 10 days duration using more than one aquatic organism including at least an infaunal benthic invertebrate and a fish species. 2) Before adoption of a laboratory sediment bioassessment procedure, the laboratory results should be evaluated by comparison with field conditions. 3) Most current sediment bioassessment regulatory tests measure acute toxicity or bioaccumulation. Development of tests to evaluate chronic, sublethal effects is needed.

Seelye, James G.; Mac, Michael J.

1984-01-01

437

Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the proposed removal of contaminated materials at the Elza Gate site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) has been prepared in support of the proposed removal action for cleanup of radioactive and chemically contaminated soil at the Elza Gate site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This property became contaminated as a result of storage of ore residues, equipment, and other materials for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The US Department of Energy is responsible for cleanup of portions of the site under its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. In December 1990 an area known as Pad 1 was abrasively scoured to remove surface contamination, and in March 1991 removal of Pad 1 contamination was begun under a separate EE/CA. This EE/CA is intended to cover the remaining portions of the site for which the Department of Energy has responsibility. It has been determined that an EE/CA report is appropriate documentation for the proposed removal action. This EE/CA covers removal of contaminated soils and contaminated concrete rubble from the Elza Gate site. The primary objectives of this EE/CA report are to identify and describe the preferred removal action, and to document the selection of response activities that will mitigate the potential for release of contaminants from the property into the environment and that will minimize the associated threats to human health or welfare and the environment. The preferred alternative is disposition on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 30 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1991-06-01

438

Evaluation of two bacterial delivery systems for in-situ remediation of PAH contaminated sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intention, Goal and Background  Contaminated sediments represent a significant, worldwide environmental problem since they contain a mixture of different\\u000a xenobiotics and heavy metals. The presence of mixed contamination presents a unique set of obstacles for remediation efforts.\\u000a Often sediment remediation occurs as an ex-situ application (i.e., after dredging) in an attempt to minimize some of the problems.\\u000a However, dredging poses it’s

Don C. Haddox; Teresa J. Cutright

2003-01-01

439

Identification of antistatic packaging material as a source of circuit board contamination  

SciTech Connect

Circuit boards to be used in satellites were shipped to Sandia in Richmond RCAS 4200 ESD shielding bags. Upon inspection under low magnification, a white fuzzy deposit was observed on many of the solder joints. Preliminary examination using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy identified the material as a metal salt of a long chain aliphatic carboxylic acid. The material was definitively identified as a mixture of lead di(n-octanoate) and tin di(n-octanoate) using mass spectrometry. These compounds were formed by the reaction of octanoic acid with the lead/tin solder. We have demonstrated that the solder is mechanically weakened by the formation of these compounds. Investigation has shown that the Richmond RCAS 4200 ESD shielding bags contain octanoic acid in sufficient quantities to form visually detectable quantities of lead di(n-octanoate) and tin di(n-octanoate) in less than 90 days at room temperature. Ameri-Stat Static Shield and Dow Chemical CHIPLOC ES antistatic bags do not contain carboxylic acids, and solder samples stored in these bags for several months do not exhibit evidence of lead di(n-octanoate) or tin di(n-octanoate) formation. Users of static shielding bags should be aware that the use of static shielding bags can be harmful to solder joints. Steps should be taken to ensure that all antistatic packaging in use is free from carboxylic acid contamination. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Rodacy, P.J.; Burns, F.B.; Ward, K.J.

1988-07-01

440

Cementitious encapsulation of waste materials and/or contaminated soils containing heavy metals, to render them immobile  

SciTech Connect

The present invention relates to the cementitious encapsulation of waste materials and/or contaminated soils containing heavy metals, to render them immobile, and particularly to the immobilization of metals, in regulated amounts, in the wastes. A waste product comprising the metals is provided. A mixture is prepared comprising the wastes and/or contaminated soils containing heavy metals, water, and a cementitious composition. The cementitious composition comprises magnesium oxide and magnesium chloride in proportions effective to produce, with the water, a magnesium oxychloride cement. The cementitious composition is present in an amount which, on setting, is effective to immobilize the metals in the waste and/or contaminated soils. The mixture of waste and/or contaminated soils and cementitious composition is introduced to a disposition site, and allowed to set and harden at the site. The present invention is particularly useful for the remedial treatment of landfill sites. No Drawings

Stark, J.N.

1994-01-04

441

The chemistry and parent material of urban soils in Bristol (UK): implications for contaminated land assessment.  

PubMed

An earlier survey of topsoil from parks and allotment in the city of Bristol (UK) revealed the presence of relatively high levels of "pseudo-total" Cd, As, Cu, Pb and Zn, with Cd and As exceeding present UK soil guidelines. This follow-up work aimed at (1) estimating geochemical thresholds for these elements based on "near-total" soil, bedrock and sediment heavy metals and (2) determining the genetic relationship between soil and bedrock using rare earth elements (REEs or lanthanides) as tracers. "Near-total" concentration of 34 elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Sc, Ti, V, Zn, Y and the rare earth elements Ce, Dy, Er, Eu, Gd, Ho, La, Lu, Nd, Pr, Sm, Tb, Yb) were obtained by ICP-MS and ICP-OES. The results show that the soil composition is largely controlled by the soil parent material, though extreme outliers are indicative of contamination at a few sites of parkland and allotments. Cumulative frequency plots show the presence of different data sets for which separate "background" values should be determined. The REE data provide evidence that weathering of the underlying sandstone was a determinant factor leading to the relatively high heavy metal enrichment found in soil samples and sediments. Reference to UK soil guidelines to decide on possible remediation measures could be very misleading due to the natural high background levels of some elements in the underlying bedrock. Before defining land as "contaminated", a thorough geochemical investigation is required at local scale in order to produce a more realistic and correct environmental assessment. PMID:22740127

Giusti, L

2012-06-28

442

72 FR 50332 - Intent To Prepare a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement To Analyze a Long Island...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement To Analyze a Long Island Sound Dredged Material...alternatives identified in a Long Island Sound Dredged Material...dredged material in the Long Island Sound (LIS) region...of contaminants; cultural resources; recreational...

2007-08-31

443

Experiments on the survival of six brackish macro-invertebrates from the Baltic Sea after dredged spoil coverage and its implications for the field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical disturbance by disposal of dredged materials in estuarine and coastal waters may result in burial of benthic fauna. Survival rates depend on a variety of factors including the type and amount of disposed materials and the lifestyle of the organisms. Laboratory burial experiments using six common macrobenthic invertebrates from a brackish habitat of the western Baltic Sea were performed

M. Powilleit; G. Graf; J. Kleine; R. Riethmüller; K. Stockmann; M. A. Wetzel; J. H. E. Koop

2009-01-01

444

Catalytic transformation of persistent contaminants using a new composite material based on nanosized zero-valent metal - field experiment results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new composite material based on deposition of nanosized zero valent iron (ZVI) particles and cyanocobalamine (vitamin B12) on a diatomite matrix is presented. Cyanocobalamine is known to be an effective electron mediator, having strong synergistic effects with ZVI for reductive dehalogenation reactions. This composite material also improves the reducing capacity of nanosized ZVI by preventing agglomeration of iron particles, thus increasing their active surface area. The porous structure of the diatomite matrix allows high hydraulic conductivity, which favors channeling of contaminated water to the reactive surface of the composite material and in turn faster rates of remediation. The ability of the material to degrade or transform rapidly and completely a large spectrum of water pollutants will be demonstrated, based on results from two field site experiments where polluted groundwater containing a mixture of industrial and agricultural persistent pollutants was treated. In addition a set of laboratory experiments using individual contaminant solutions to analyze chemical transformations under controlled conditions will be presented.

Dror, I.; Merom Jacov, O.; Berkowitz, B.

2010-12-01

445

Elaboration and application of mathematical model for estimation of mould contamination of some building materials based on ergosterol content determination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study presents a mathematical function describing a correlation between the amount of ergosterol and the number of colony-forming units (CFU) of mould contaminating selected building materials such as: a block of cellular concrete, gypsum—carton board and gypsum—carton board covered with emulsion paint. The dependence obtained for a particular material as well as an average dependence for all the investigated

B. Gutarowska; Z. ?akowska

2002-01-01

446

Analysis of urban particulate standard reference materials for the determination of chlorinated organic contaminants and additional chemical and physical properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

A previously issued National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material (SRM), SRM 1649, Urban\\u000a Dust\\/Organics has been analyzed for chlorinated organic contaminants (polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorinated pesticides)\\u000a to provide certified values for a new class of compounds relative to the former certification. The material will be reissued\\u000a as SRM 1649a. Four different analytical techniques were used. Specifically,

Dianne L. Poster; Michele M. Schantz; Stephen A. Wise; Mark G. Vangel

1999-01-01

447

DREDGING IMPACT ON AN URBANIZED FLORIDA BAYOU: EFFECTS ON BENTHOS AND ALGAL-PERIPHYTON.  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental effects of dredging events have been uncommonly reported for shallow, residential estuaries characteristic of the Gulf of Mexico region. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of hydraulic dredging on an urbanized estuary. Physicochemical quality, ...

448

Characterization of Boron Contamination in Fluorine Implantation using Boron Trifluoride as a Source Material  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluorine implantation process purity was considered on different types of high current implanters. It was found that implanters equipped with an indirectly heated cathode ion source show an enhanced deep boron contamination compared to a high current implanter using a cold RF-driven multicusp ion source when boron trifluoride is used for fluorine implantations. This contamination is directly related to the

Matthias Schmeide; Serguei Kondratenko

2011-01-01

449

Environmental effects of dredging. A chronic sublethal sediment bioassay with the marine polychaete nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata  

SciTech Connect

This note provides a general overview of a new 28-day chronic sublethal sediment bioassay designed for the regulatory evaluation of dredged material. The bioassay uses survival and growth rate endpoints with the polychaete Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. The primary technical reference for this new bioassay is Dillon, Moore, and Reish (in press), upon which this overview is based. Sediment bioassays are used to assess the aggregate toxicity of sediment associated anthropogenic chemicals. Historically, these bioassays have measured survival of highly sensitive species following acute exposures (10 days). A new generation of sediment bioassays is being developed in which the subtle, sublethal response of test species is measured following chronic sediment exposures (Dillon 1993).

Dillon, T.M.; Moore, D.W.; Bridges, T.S.

1995-01-01

450

Ecological-Evaluation of Organotin-Contaminated Sediment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A standard dredged material bioassay was conducted with high levels of organotins to assess the toxicity and bioavailability of organotins associated with sediment and to determine if this sediment would qualify for ocean disposal. This study concluded th...

M. H. Salazar S. M. Salazar

1985-01-01

451

Comparing Polychaete Bioaccumulation and Passive Sampler Uptake to Assess the Effect of Sediment Resuspension on Contaminant Bioavailability  

EPA Science Inventory

Increased bioavailability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from resettled sediments following remedial dredging is suspected of contributing to elevated organism tissue concentrations at contaminated sites. However, little data exists to evaluate whether increases in bioavaila...

452

Processes and mechanism of effects of sludge dredging on internal source release in lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simulated research of internal loading and collecting and analyzing the samples from the lakes were carried out before and after dredging in polluted suburb lakes, Wuli Lake (Wuxi City) and Xuanwu Lake (Nanjing City). The research results showed that dredging can inhibit internal loadings in a certain degree in a short term. The discrepancy of dredging effect and technical level,

Chengxin FAN; Lu Zhang; Jianjun Wang; Chaohai Zheng; Guang Gao; Sumin Wang

2004-01-01

453

46 CFR 170.300 - Special consideration for free surface of spoil in hopper dredge hoppers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...consideration for free surface of spoil in hopper dredge hoppers. 170.300 Section 170...consideration for free surface of spoil in hopper dredge hoppers. The calculations required...subchapter for each self-propelled hopper dredge must includeâ (a) The free...

2010-10-01

454

46 CFR 170.300 - Special consideration for free surface of spoil in hopper dredge hoppers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...consideration for free surface of spoil in hopper dredge hoppers. 170.300 Section 170...consideration for free surface of spoil in hopper dredge hoppers. The calculations required...subchapter for each self-propelled hopper dredge must includeâ (a) The free...

2009-10-01

455

The effects of marine gravel extraction on the macrobenthos: Results 2 years post-dredging  

Microsoft Academic Search

An offshore experimental dredging study was initiated off North Norfolk (UK) in 1992 to investigate the impacts of marine gravel extraction on the macrofauna. A dredged ‘treatment’ and a non-dredged ‘reference’ site were selected to evaluate the initial impacts and subsequent processes of recolonization. A survey of the benthos was conducted prior to the removal of 50 000 t of

A. J. Kenny; H. L. Rees

1996-01-01

456

Effects of Suction Gold Dredging on Fish and Invertebrates in Two California Streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

I examined the impact of small suction dredges (hose diameter, <16 cm) on fish and invertebrates in two California streams (North Fork of the American River and Butte Creek) in a 2-year study. I studied both the effect of one dredge (1980) and the effects of an average of six dredges in a 2-km section of stream (1981). Ten replicate

Bret C. Harvey

1986-01-01

457

Using Sea Turtle Carcasses to Assess the Conservation Potential of a Turtle Excluder Dredge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fisheries observers have documented interactions between sea turtles in the family Cheloniidae and the Atlantic sea scallop Placopecten magellanicus fishery. Sea turtle injuries resulting from interactions with scallop dredges are being mitigated through shifts in fishing effort and modifications to fishing gear. The standard New Bedford dredge can trap objects and crush them as they pass between the dredge frame

Ronald Smolowitz; Heather Haas; Henry O. Milliken; Eric Matzen

2010-01-01

458

Dredging: Environmental aspects. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning various environmental aspects of dredging and dredge spoil handling. The studies include the use of spoil sites, pollution control, effects on water quality, and sediment transport. Dredging operations at specific sites are discussed. Biological effects are included in a companion bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-08-01

459

Short communication Reburial time and indirect mortality of Spisula solida clams caused by dredging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clam-dredging results in the exposure of Spisula solida individuals not caught by the dredge. Subsequent survival depends on clam damage, reburial time, and the time needed by predators to reach the impacted area. We analyse these variables and discuss the importance of predation on exposed S. solida caused by dredge fishing. Sampling was performed in July 2000 off the southern

L. Chicharo; M. Chicharo; M. Gaspar; F. Alves

460

76 FR 11961 - Safety Zone, Dredging Operations; Delaware River, Marcus Hook, PA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Dredging Operations; Delaware River, Marcus Hook, PA AGENCY: Coast...temporary safety zone on the waters of the Delaware River while the Dredge Pullen conducts...berth draft in this portion of the Delaware River. The dredging action will...

2011-03-04

461

Hopper dredges applied to the Alaska oil spill, March 1989  

SciTech Connect

On March 24, 1989, the oil tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground in Prince William Sound, Alaska. This accident resulted in the largest American oil spill ever and spoiled one of the most pristine areas in North America. In April 1989, the US Army Corps of Engineers was requested to assist in the cleanup of this disastrous oil spill. Two of the Corps' minimum fleet hopper dredges, the Yaquina and the Essayons, were dispatched to assist in collecting oil. Although unmodified hopper dredges had never been used in this capacity, the Yaquina and the Essayons proved to be the most effective tools in the recovery of oil. Given proper air support, adequate containment boom, and commitment at the earliest possible time, hopper dredges can make a significant contribution to the cleanup of large oil spills.

Patterson, K.H.; Redlinger, J.F.

1992-03-01

462

Preparation and characterization of a soil reference material from a mercury contaminated site for comparability studies.  

PubMed

The preparation and characterization of a soil reference material (SOIL-1) from a site polluted with mercury due to the past mercury mining in Idrija, Slovenia is reported. Homogeneity tests and intercomparison exercises for total (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) were performed. In addition, selective sequential extraction was applied for Hg fractionation, and multielemental analyses were performed by k(0) standardization neutron activation analysis (k(0)-INAA) and inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for other trace elements. Comparison of different analytical methods, as well as the distribution of data were critically evaluated using descriptive statistics and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Due to the nugget effect (cinnabar particles representing more than 90% of the mercury), homogeneity for T-Hg determination was difficult to achieve. The intercomparison exercise indicated that in order to obtain comparable results for total mercury (T-Hg) sample decomposition by HF must be performed. These data are then in good agreement with non-destructive methods such as k(0)-INAA. Accepted reference values calculated taking into account the results obtained by six and three laboratories, respectively, were 67.1+/-11.3 mg kg(-1) for T-Hg and 4.0+/-1.3 ng g(-1) for MeHg (95% confidence intervals). However, the results obtained for Hg fractionation displayed significant differences in the organically bound fraction and elemental Hg. Results obtained by two laboratories using totally different analytical protocols for other elements showed excellent agreement for most elements. In summary, the results obtained for the SOIL-1 sample were of sufficient quality to suggest its use for quality control in laboratories dealing with mercury contaminated soils. PMID:16757094

Kocman, David; Bloom, Nicolas S; Akagi, Hirokatso; Telmer, Kevin; Hylander, Lars; Fajon, Vesna; Jereb, Vesna; Ja?imovi?, Radojko; Smodis, Borut; Ikingura, Justinian R; Horvat, Milena

2006-06-06

463

REMOVAL AND SEPARATION OF SPILLED HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FROM IMPOUNDMENT BOTTOMS  

EPA Science Inventory

A demonstration was conducted of a system for removing spilled hazardous materials from pond bottoms and separating the hazardous materials and suspended solids from the resulting dredged slurry. The removal system consisted of a MUD CAT dredge. The processing system consisted of...

464

THE EFFECTS OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS ON REPRESENTATIVE ESTUARINE SPECIES AND DEVELOPING BENTHIC COMMUNITIES. CHAPTER 21  

EPA Science Inventory

Bioassay techniques developed to examine acute and sublethal effects of dredged sediments on marine life are described. Results are reported for laboratory tests conducted to determine sublethal and acute effects of Kepone-sorbed sediment and dredged spoil material from the James...

465

16. OPERATOR STAND. OPERATOR STOOD BETWEEN RAILINGS AND CONTROLLED DREDGING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

16. OPERATOR STAND. OPERATOR STOOD BETWEEN RAILINGS AND CONTROLLED DREDGING OPERATIONS USING TWO LEVERS FROM CEILING, THREE LEVELS ON THE FLOOR, AND TWO FLOOR PEDDLES. RIGHT HAND CONTROLLED SHOT GUN SWINGER (BOOM MOVE TO RIGHT WHEN PUSHED FORWARD, LEFT WHEN PULLED BACK, AND, IF LUCKY, STOPPED WHEN IN CENTER POSITION). LEFT HAND CONTROLLED THROTTLE. FLOOR LEVER AND FLOOR PEDDLE ON LEFT CONTROLLED THE BACKING LINE FRICTION. MIDDLE LEVER AND PEDDLE, STUCK IN FLOOR CONTROLLED THE MAIN HOIST FRICTION. LEVER ON RIGHT CONTROLLED THE CYLINDER DRAIN VALVE. - Dredge CINCINNATI, Docked on Ohio River at foot of Lighthill Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

466

Tritium Contamination Studies Involving Test Materials and Jet Remote Handling Tools.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To determine the potential contamination of remote cutting and welding tools to be used in the JET torus after the introduction of tritium, experiments were performed using these tools on INCONEL pipe specimens which had been exposed to elemental tritium ...

A. Tesini R. Jalbert

1989-01-01

467

ALTERNATIVE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESSES FOR REMEDIATION OF CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED MATERIALS: BENCH-SCALE TREATABILITY STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Bench-scale biotreatability studies were performed to determine the most effective of two bioremediation application strategies to ameliorate creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated soils present at the American Creosote Works Superfund site, Pensacola, Florida: olid-ph...

468

The Use of Haz-Flote to Efficiently Remove Mercury from Contaminated Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are thousands of known contaminated sites in the United Stated, including Superfund sites (1500 to 2100 sites), RCRA corrective action sites (1500 to 3500 sites), underground storage tanks (295,000 sites), U.S. Department of Defense sites (7300 sites), U.S. Department of Energy sites (4,000 sites), mining refuse piles, and numerous other hazardous metals and organic contamination sites. Only a small

Terry Brown

2009-01-01

469

Remediation of chromium-contaminated water using biogenic nano-sized materials and metal-reducing bacteria.  

PubMed

As an environmental nanotechnology, nano-sized materials have the potential to create novel and effective in-situ and ex-situ treatments for contaminated groundwater due to its high catalytic reactivity, large surface area, and dispersibility. In this study the efficiency of Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization using biotic and abiotic nano-sized materials (NSMs) and metal-reducing bacteria (MRB) was evaluated to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater in batch and column tests. The results of this study revealed that the combination of the mixed MRB and bio-FeS/siderite performed the highest efficiency of Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. Cr(VI) reduction by MRB and NSMs could impact on solubility of Cr(VI) and geochemical changes favorable for precipitation and adsorption. PMID:23862512

Seo, Hyunhee; Sun, Eunyoung; Roh, Yul

2013-06-01

470