Science.gov

Sample records for content redox potential

  1. Redox Potential of Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Marcela

    Redox potential of peroxidases greatly influences the range of oxidizable substrates: in principle, peroxidases may only catalyze the oxidation of substrates with lower redox potential. There is substantial information on the factors that modulate the redox potential of heme proteins. Both theoretical and experimental evidence highlight the most significant contributions arising from the interaction of heme iron with the axial ligands, as well as the electrostatic interactions surrounding the heme group. However, for different proteins, the factors contribute to different extents. Understanding the electrochemistry of heme peroxidases is fundamental in order to design enhanced biocatalysts. In this chapter, current knowledge of the forces influencing redox potential of heme peroxidases is reviewed.

  2. Measurement of redox potential in nanoecotoxicological investigations.

    PubMed

    Tantra, Ratna; Cackett, Alex; Peck, Roger; Gohil, Dipak; Snowden, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Redox potential has been identified by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) as one of the parameters that should be investigated for the testing of manufactured nanomaterials. There is still some ambiguity concerning this parameter, i.e., as to what and how to measure, particularly when in a nanoecotoxicological context. In this study the redox potentials of six nanomaterials (either zinc oxide (ZnO) or cerium oxide (CeO(2))) dispersions were measured using an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) electrode probe. The particles under testing differed in terms of their particle size and dispersion stability in deionised water and in various ecotox media. The ORP values of the various dispersions and how they fluctuate relative to each other are discussed. Results show that the ORP values are mainly governed by the type of liquid media employed, with little contributions from the nanoparticles. Seawater was shown to have reduced the ORP value, which was attributed to an increase in the concentration of reducing agents such as sulphites or the reduction of dissolved oxygen concentration. The lack of redox potential value contribution from the particles themselves is thought to be due to insufficient interaction of the particles at the Pt electrode of the ORP probe. PMID:22131988

  3. Seasonal variation of redox species and redox potentials in shallow groundwater: A comparison of measured and calculated redox potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh Kumar, A.; Riyazuddin, P.

    2012-06-01

    SummaryThe seasonal variation of redox potential (Eh) and redox species such as As(V)/As(III), Cr(VI)/Cr(III), Fe(III)/Fe(II), NO3-/NO2-, and Se(VI)/Se(IV) were studied in a shallow groundwater for a period of three years (May, 2004-January, 2007). The study area was Chrompet area of Chennai city, India. Groundwater samples from 65 wells were monitored for pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen (DO), and major ions during pre-(May) and post-monsoon (January) seasons. The objective of the study was to gain insight into the temporal variation of the redox species due to groundwater recharge and to identify the redox reactions controlling the measured Eh of the groundwater. The study revealed that the shallow groundwater was "oxic" with DO ranging between 0.25 and 5.00 mg L-1, and between 0.38 and 5.05 mg L-1 during pre-(May, 2004) and post-monsoon (January, 2005) seasons, respectively. The measured Eh (with respect to standard hydrogen electrode, SHE) ranged between 65 and 322 mV, and between 110 and 330 mV during pre- and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. During post-monsoon seasons, DO and Eh increased in most of the wells due to groundwater recharge. The calculated Eh using the redox couples As(V)/As(III), NO3-/NO2-, O2/H2O and Se(VI)/Se(IV) neither agreed among themselves nor with the measured Eh during all the seasons. It shows that in the shallow groundwater, the various redox couples are in disequilibrium among themselves and with the Pt electrode. However, 41% (n = 122) of the Eh values calculated from Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple agreed with the measured Eh within ±30 mV, the uncertainty of Pt-electrode measurement. The post-monsoon seasons showed higher values of As(V)/As(III) and Se(VI)/Se(IV) compared to the pre-monsoon seasons, whereas Fe(III)/Fe(II) behaved in the opposite manner. This pattern of variation is consistent with the increased oxidizing nature, as shown by the higher DO and Eh values observed during post-monsoon seasons. The results

  4. Redox potential tuning by redox-inactive cations in nature's water oxidizing catalyst and synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Krewald, Vera; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-04-20

    The redox potential of synthetic oligonuclear transition metal complexes has been shown to correlate with the Lewis acidity of a redox-inactive cation connected to the redox-active transition metals of the cluster via oxo or hydroxo bridges. Such heterometallic clusters are important cofactors in many metalloenzymes, where it is speculated that the redox-inactive constituent ion of the cluster serves to optimize its redox potential for electron transfer or catalysis. A principal example is the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of natural photosynthesis, a Mn4CaO5 cofactor that oxidizes water into dioxygen, protons and electrons. Calcium is critical for catalytic function, but its precise role is not yet established. In analogy to synthetic complexes it has been suggested that Ca(2+) fine-tunes the redox potential of the manganese cluster. Here we evaluate this hypothesis by computing the relative redox potentials of substituted derivatives of the oxygen-evolving complex with the cations Sr(2+), Gd(3+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Sc(3+), Na(+) and Y(3+) for two sequential transitions of its catalytic cycle. The theoretical approach is validated with a series of experimentally well-characterized Mn3AO4 cubane complexes that are structural mimics of the enzymatic cluster. Our results reproduce perfectly the experimentally observed correlation between the redox potential and the Lewis acidities of redox-inactive cations for the synthetic complexes. However, it is conclusively demonstrated that this correlation does not hold for the oxygen evolving complex. In the enzyme the redox potential of the cluster only responds to the charge of the redox-inactive cations and remains otherwise insensitive to their precise identity, precluding redox-tuning of the metal cluster as a primary role for Ca(2+) in biological water oxidation. PMID:26762578

  5. Imaging Mitochondrial Redox Potential and Its Possible Link to Tumor Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular redox states can regulate cell metabolism, growth, differentiation, motility, apoptosis, signaling pathways, and gene expressions etc. Growing body of literature suggest importance of redox status for cancer progression. While most studies on redox state were done on cells and tissue lysates, it is important to understand the role of redox state in tissue in vivo/ex vivo and image its heterogeneity. Redox scanning is a clinically-translatable method for imaging tissue mitochondrial redox potential with a submillimeter resolution. Redox scanning data in mouse models of human cancers demonstrate a correlation between mitochondrial redox state and tumor metastatic potential. I will discuss the significance of this correlation and possible directions for future research. PMID:22895837

  6. Structural origins of redox potentials in Fe-S proteins: electrostatic potentials of crystal structures.

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, P D; Beck, B W; Ichiye, T

    1996-01-01

    Redox potentials often differ dramatically for homologous proteins that have identical redox centers. For two types of iron-sulfur proteins, the rubredoxins and the high-potential iron-sulfur proteins (HiPIPs), no structural explanations for these differences have been found. We calculated the classical electrostatic potential at the redox site using static crystal structures of four rubredoxins and four HiPIPs to identify important structural determinants of their redox potentials. The contributions from just the backbone and polar side chains are shown to explain major features of the experimental redox potentials. For instance, in the rubredoxins, the presence of Val 44 versus Ala 44 causes a backbone shift that explains a approximately 50 mV lower redox potential in one of the four rubredoxins. This result is consistent with experimental redox potentials of five additional rubredoxins with known sequence. Also, we attribute the unusually lower redox potentials of two of the HiPIPs studied to a less positive electrostatic environment around their redox sites. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations of solvent around static rubredoxin crystal structures indicate that water alone is a major factor in dampening the contribution of charged side chains, in accord with experiments showing that mutations of surface charges produce relatively little effect on redox potentials. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8968568

  7. Artificial cytochrome b: computer modeling and evaluation of redox potentials.

    PubMed

    Popović, D M; Zarić, S D; Rabenstein, B; Knapp, E W

    2001-06-27

    We generated atomic coordinates of an artificial protein that was recently synthesized to model the central part of the native cytochrome b (Cb) subunit consisting of a four-helix bundle with two hemes. Since no X-ray structure is available, the structural elements of the artificial Cb were assembled from scratch using all known chemical and structural information available and avoiding strain as much as possible. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations applied to this model protein exhibited root-mean-square deviations as small as those obtained from MD simulations starting with the crystal structure of the native Cb subunit. This demonstrates that the modeled structure of the artificial Cb is relatively rigid and strain-free. The model structure of the artificial Cb was used to determine the redox potentials of the two hemes by calculating the electrostatic energies from the solution of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation (LPBE). The calculated redox potentials agree within 20 meV with the experimentally measured values. The dependence of the redox potentials of the hemes on the protein environment was analyzed. Accordingly, the total shift in the redox potentials is mainly due to the low dielectric medium of the protein, the protein backbone charges, and the salt bridges formed between the arginines and the propionic acid groups of the hemes. The difference in the shift of the redox potentials is due to the interactions with the hydrophilic side chains and the salt bridges formed with the propionic acids of the hemes. For comparison and to test the computational procedure, the redox potentials of the two hemes in the native Cb from the cytochrome bc(1) (Cbc(1)) complex were also calculated. Also in this case the computed redox potentials agree well with experiments. PMID:11414837

  8. Redox potential: An indicator of site productivity in forest management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajedi, Toktam; Prescott, Cindy; Lavkulich, Les

    2010-05-01

    Redox potential (Eh) is an integrated soil measurement that reflects several environmental conditions in the soil associated with aeration, moisture and carbon (organic matter) dynamics. Its measurement can be related to water table fluctuations, precipitation and landscape gradients, organic matter decomposition rates, nutrient dynamics, biological diversity and plant species distribution. Redox is an excellent indicator of soil biological processes, as it is largely a reflection of microbial activities which to a large extent govern carbon dynamics and nutrient cycling. Redox thus serves as an ecological indicator of site productivity at the ecosystem scale and may be used for management purposes as its magnitude can be altered by activities such as harvesting and drainage. A threshold value of 300 mv has been documented as the critical value below which anaerobic conditions in the soil develop. However, redox measurements and its impacts on ecosystem processes such as nutrient cycling and productivity, especially in forest ecosystems, have not received the attention that this "master" variable deserves, On northern Vancouver Island, Canada, regenerating stands of western redcedar-western hemlock (CH) sites exhibit symptoms of nutrient deficiencies and slow growth, but this phenomenon does not occur on adjacent western hemlock- amabalis fir (HA) sites. We tested the hypothesis that differences in nutrient supply and distribution of plant species was caused by differences in moisture regime and redox potential. Redox potential, pH, soil aeration depth (steel rods), organic matter thickness, bulk density, soil carbon store, plant species distribution and richness were measured at five old-growth and five 10-year-old cutover blocks. Results of investigations confirmed that CH forests were wetter, had redox values lower than the critical 300mv and a shallower aerated zone, compared with adjacent regenerating HA sites. Fifty percent of the CH plots had redox values

  9. High resolution redox potential measurements: techniques, interpretation and value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing improvement of techniques for the in situ measurement of redox potentials has led to a large number of studies on redox variability in various environments. These studies originate from a wide array of scientific disciplines, amongst which ecology (sediment biogeochemistry), environmental chemistry (degradation studies) and archaeology (in situ preservation). To gain insight in the potential applications, this paper presents three examples of studies in which a newly developed measurement technique was used in soils and where spatial and temporal variation plays an important role. The first one is a microcosm study on the effects of biota on the dynamics of redox conditions in the toplayer of aquatic sediments, showing that the presence of microbiota has a direct influence on biogeochemical parameters. The second is the study of the redox potential in the world heritage site of Bryggen (Bergen, NO) that is under threat of oxidation. The oxidation, caused by a lowered groundwater table, causes soil degradation and unstable conditions for the monumental buildings of the Medieval site. The third study shows variability in a sandy flood plain in Bangladesh, where redox processes dictate the environmental behaviour of Arsenic. This toxic metal is present in many wells used for drinking water, but shows very local variation in dissolution dynamics. In these three studies, continuous measurements of (changes in) redox conditions revealed a strong variability in these systems and consequences for the interpretation of single point measurements or low frequency sampling campaigns are discussed. In these and many other cases, the continuous measurement of the redox potential in soil media will aid in the understanding of the system under study.

  10. Measuring glutathione redox potential of HIV-1-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Ashima; Munshi, MohamedHusen; Khan, Sohrab Zafar; Fatima, Sadaf; Arya, Rahul; Jameel, Shahid; Singh, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Redox signaling plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). The majority of HIV redox research relies on measuring redox stress using invasive technologies, which are unreliable and do not provide information about the contributions of subcellular compartments. A major technological leap emerges from the development of genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFPs), which provide sensitive and compartment-specific insights into redox homeostasis. Here, we exploited a roGFP-based specific bioprobe of glutathione redox potential (E(GSH); Grx1-roGFP2) and measured subcellular changes in E(GSH) during various phases of HIV-1 infection using U1 monocytic cells (latently infected U937 cells with HIV-1). We show that although U937 and U1 cells demonstrate significantly reduced cytosolic and mitochondrial E(GSH) (approximately -310 mV), active viral replication induces substantial oxidative stress (E(GSH) more than -240 mV). Furthermore, exposure to a physiologically relevant oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), induces significant deviations in subcellular E(GSH) between U937 and U1, which distinctly modulates susceptibility to apoptosis. Using Grx1-roGFP2, we demonstrate that a marginal increase of about ∼25 mV in E(GSH) is sufficient to switch HIV-1 from latency to reactivation, raising the possibility of purging HIV-1 by redox modulators without triggering detrimental changes in cellular physiology. Importantly, we show that bioactive lipids synthesized by clinical drug-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reactivate HIV-1 through modulation of intracellular E(GSH). Finally, the expression analysis of U1 and patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells demonstrated a major recalibration of cellular redox homeostatic pathways during persistence and active replication of HIV. PMID:25406321

  11. Measuring Glutathione Redox Potential of HIV-1-infected Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Ashima; Munshi, MohamedHusen; Khan, Sohrab Zafar; Fatima, Sadaf; Arya, Rahul; Jameel, Shahid; Singh, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Redox signaling plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). The majority of HIV redox research relies on measuring redox stress using invasive technologies, which are unreliable and do not provide information about the contributions of subcellular compartments. A major technological leap emerges from the development of genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFPs), which provide sensitive and compartment-specific insights into redox homeostasis. Here, we exploited a roGFP-based specific bioprobe of glutathione redox potential (EGSH; Grx1-roGFP2) and measured subcellular changes in EGSH during various phases of HIV-1 infection using U1 monocytic cells (latently infected U937 cells with HIV-1). We show that although U937 and U1 cells demonstrate significantly reduced cytosolic and mitochondrial EGSH (approximately −310 mV), active viral replication induces substantial oxidative stress (EGSH more than −240 mV). Furthermore, exposure to a physiologically relevant oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), induces significant deviations in subcellular EGSH between U937 and U1, which distinctly modulates susceptibility to apoptosis. Using Grx1-roGFP2, we demonstrate that a marginal increase of about ∼25 mV in EGSH is sufficient to switch HIV-1 from latency to reactivation, raising the possibility of purging HIV-1 by redox modulators without triggering detrimental changes in cellular physiology. Importantly, we show that bioactive lipids synthesized by clinical drug-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reactivate HIV-1 through modulation of intracellular EGSH. Finally, the expression analysis of U1 and patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells demonstrated a major recalibration of cellular redox homeostatic pathways during persistence and active replication of HIV. PMID:25406321

  12. Quantitative mitochondrial redox imaging of breast cancer metastatic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Nioka, Shoko; Glickson, Jerry D.; Chance, Britton; Li, Lin Z.

    2010-05-01

    Predicting tumor metastatic potential remains a challenge in cancer research and clinical practice. Our goal was to identify novel biomarkers for differentiating human breast tumors with different metastatic potentials by imaging the in vivo mitochondrial redox states of tumor tissues. The more metastatic (aggressive) MDA-MB-231 and less metastatic (indolent) MCF-7 human breast cancer mouse xenografts were imaged with the low-temperature redox scanner to obtain multi-slice fluorescence images of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp). The nominal concentrations of NADH and Fp in tissue were measured using reference standards and used to calculate the Fp redox ratio, Fp/(NADH+Fp). We observed significant core-rim differences, with the core being more oxidized than the rim in all aggressive tumors but not in the indolent tumors. These results are consistent with our previous observations on human melanoma mouse xenografts, indicating that mitochondrial redox imaging potentially provides sensitive markers for distinguishing aggressive from indolent breast tumor xenografts. Mitochondrial redox imaging can be clinically implemented utilizing cryogenic biopsy specimens and is useful for drug development and for clinical diagnosis of breast cancer.

  13. Redox potential - field measurements - meassured vs. expected values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavělová, Monika; Kovář, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation and reduction (redox) potential is an important and theoretically very well defined parameter and can be calculated accurately. Its value is determinative for management of many electrochemical processes, chemical redox technologies as well as biotechnologies. To measure the redox value that would correspond with the accuracy level of theoretical calculations in field or operational conditions is however nearly impossible. Redox is in practice measured using combined argentochloride electrode with subsequent value conversion to standard hydrogen electrode (EH). Argentochloride electrode does not allow for precise calibration. Prior to the measurement the accuracy of measurement of particular electrode can only be verified in comparative/control solution with value corresponding with oxic conditions (25°C: +220 mV argentochloride electrode, i.e.. +427 mV after conversion to EH). A commercial product of stabile comparative solution for anoxic conditions is not available and therefore not used in every day practice - accuracy of negative redox is not verified. In this presentation results of two tests will be presented: a) monitoring during dynamic groundwater sampling from eight monitoring wells at a site contaminated by chlorinated ethenes (i.e. post-oxic to anoxic conditions) and b) laboratory test of groundwater contaminated by arsenic from two sites during reaction with highly oxidized compounds of iron (ferrates) - i.e. strongly oxic conditions. In both tests a simultaneous measurement by four argentochloride electrodes was implemented - all four electrodes were prior to the test maintained expertly. The redox values of testing electrodes in a comparative solution varied by max. 6 mV. The redox values measured by four electrodes in both anoxic and oxic variant varied by tens to a hundred mV, while with growing time of test the variance of measured redox values increased in both oxic and anoxic variant. Therefore the interpretation of measured redox

  14. Redox potentials of chlorophylls in the photosystem II reaction center.

    PubMed

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Loll, Bernhard; Biesiadka, Jacek; Saenger, Wolfram; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2005-03-15

    Water oxidation generating atmospheric oxygen occurs in photosystem II (PSII), a large protein-pigment complex located in the thylakoid membrane. The recent crystal structures at 3.2 and 3.5 A resolutions provide novel details on amino acid side chains, especially in the D1/D2 subunits. We calculated the redox potentials for one-electron oxidation of the chlorophyll a (Chla) molecules in PSII, considering the protein environment in atomic detail. The calculated redox potentials for the dimer Chla (P(D1/D2)) and accessory Chla (Chl(D1/D2)) were 1.11-1.30 V relative to the normal hydrogen electrode at pH 7, which is high enough for water oxidation. The D1/D2 proteins and their cofactors contribute approximately 390 mV to the enormous upshift of 470 mV compared to the redox potential of monomeric Chla in dimethylformamide. The other subunits are responsible for the remaining 80 mV. The high redox potentials of the two accessory Chla Chl(D1/D2) suggests that they also participate in the charge separation process. PMID:15751989

  15. Toward Accurate Modeling of the Effect of Ion-Pair Formation on Solute Redox Potential.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaohui; Persson, Kristin A

    2016-09-13

    A scheme to model the dependence of a solute redox potential on the supporting electrolyte is proposed, and the results are compared to experimental observations and other reported theoretical models. An improved agreement with experiment is exhibited if the effect of the supporting electrolyte on the redox potential is modeled through a concentration change induced via ion pair formation with the salt, rather than by only considering the direct impact on the redox potential of the solute itself. To exemplify the approach, the scheme is applied to the concentration-dependent redox potential of select molecules proposed for nonaqueous flow batteries. However, the methodology is general and enables rational computational electrolyte design through tuning of the operating window of electrochemical systems by shifting the redox potential of its solutes; including potentially both salts as well as redox active molecules. PMID:27500744

  16. Two Oxidation Sites for Low Redox Potential Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Morales, María; Mate, María J.; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Ángel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase shares with manganese peroxidase and lignin peroxidase the ability to oxidize Mn2+ and high redox potential aromatic compounds, respectively. Moreover, it is also able to oxidize phenols (and low redox potential dyes) at two catalytic sites, as shown by biphasic kinetics. A high efficiency site (with 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and p-hydroquinone catalytic efficiencies of ∼70 and ∼700 s−1 mm−1, respectively) was localized at the same exposed Trp-164 responsible for high redox potential substrate oxidation (as shown by activity loss in the W164S variant). The second site, characterized by low catalytic efficiency (∼3 and ∼50 s−1 mm−1 for 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and p-hydroquinone, respectively) was localized at the main heme access channel. Steady-state and transient-state kinetics for oxidation of phenols and dyes at the latter site were improved when side chains of residues forming the heme channel edge were removed in single and multiple variants. Among them, the E140G/K176G, E140G/P141G/K176G, and E140G/W164S/K176G variants attained catalytic efficiencies for oxidation of 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) at the heme channel similar to those of the exposed tryptophan site. The heme channel enlargement shown by x-ray diffraction of the E140G, P141G, K176G, and E140G/K176G variants would allow a better substrate accommodation near the heme, as revealed by the up to 26-fold lower Km values (compared with native VP). The resulting interactions were shown by the x-ray structure of the E140G-guaiacol complex, which includes two H-bonds of the substrate with Arg-43 and Pro-139 in the distal heme pocket (at the end of the heme channel) and several hydrophobic interactions with other residues and the heme cofactor. PMID:23071108

  17. Chromium Release from a COPR-Contaminated Soil at Varying Water Content and Redox Conditions.

    PubMed

    Matern, Katrin; Mansfeldt, Tim

    2016-07-01

    Many soils in the region of Kanpur, North India, are heavily affected by the leather industry and its upstream supplier sector, as indicated by elevated chromium (Cr) contents. Under reducing conditions-for instance, at water saturation after monsoon rain or flood irrigation-the dynamic and species distribution of Cr may be affected due to changes in redox potential (E). In this study, the influence of E on the speciation and release of Cr from a contaminated agricultural soil was investigated. A soil sample that was affected by hyperalkaline leachate from chromite ore processing residue, was taken and packed in soil columns, and subjected to a saturation-drainage-saturation cycle. After initial water saturation, the E dropped slowly to minimum values of around ‒100 mV (calculated to pH 7), while E was controlled by CrO/CrO(s), or CrO/(Fe,Cr)OOH redox couples. Soil drainage resulted in a quick return to oxidizing conditions; i.e., E > 300 mV. The Cr species distribution and release showed a clear trend with E. At the beginning of the experiment, under oxidizing and weakly reducing conditions (E range from >100 to 300 mV), Cr(VI) was released in particular. However, under moderately reducing conditions (E range from 100 to -100 mV), Cr was gradually immobilized and irreversible sequestered via reductive precipitation. The results presented in this study provide an improved understanding of the mobility of Cr(VI) in contaminated soils at varying water contents, which is essential for the evaluation of environmental risks in this region. PMID:27380074

  18. Redox Potentials, Laccase Oxidation, and Antilarval Activities of Substituted Phenols

    PubMed Central

    Prasain, Keshar; Nguyen, Thi D. T.; Gorman, Maureen J.; Barrigan, Lydia M.; Peng, Zeyu; Kanost, Michael R.; Syed, Lateef U.; Li, Jun; Zhu, Kun Yan; Hua, Duy H.

    2012-01-01

    Laccases are copper-containing oxidases that are involved in sclerotization of the cuticle of mosquitoes and other insects. Oxidation of exogenous compounds by insect laccases may have the potential to produce reactive species toxic to insects. We investigated two classes of substituted phenolic compounds, halogenated di- and trihydroxybenzenes and substituted di-tert-butylphenols, on redox potential, oxidation by laccase and effects on mosquito larval growth. An inverse correlation between the oxidation potentials and laccase activity of halogenated hydroxybenzenes was found. Substituted di-tert-butylphenols however were found to impact mosquito larval growth and survival. In particular, 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)phenol (15) caused greater than 98% mortality of Anopheles gambiae larvae in a concentration of 180 nM, whereas 2-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-methylpropanal oxime (13) and 6,8-di-tert-butyl-2,2-dimethyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-chromene (33) caused 93% and 92% mortalities in concentrations of 3.4 and 3.7 μM, respectively. Larvae treated with di-tert-butylphenolic compounds died just before pupation. PMID:22300888

  19. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Marcela . E-mail: maa@ibt.unam.mx; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-06-08

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple.

  20. Redox ingredients for oxidative stress prevention: the unexplored potentiality of coffee.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Mauro; Testa, Maria Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Plant-based foods (such as fruit and vegetables, wine, nuts, natural vegetable oils, and whole grains) are an important component of traditional diets in Mediterranean regions. A large, consistent body of scientific evidence demonstrates that diets rich in plant foods provide protection against degenerative diseases; however, despite the consensus of the evidence about the health effect of plant foods, it is unclear which components of plant-based foods are protective and what their mechanism of action is. One of the hypotheses postulated to explain the protective effect of plant food, the antioxidant hypothesis, is based on their high content of bioactive molecules. Recent evidence suggests that it is the variegate composition of the plant food, an optimal mixture of different antioxidants endowed with complementary mechanism of action and different redox potential, which is at the basis of their effect on health. The global antioxidant efficiency of complex matrixes can be assessed by measuring their total antioxidant capacity (TAC) representing the result of variables such as redox potentials of the compounds present in the matrix and their cumulative and synergistic interaction. In the last years different databases for TAC of plant foods have been developed. Results suggest that coffee might represent a potential contributor to dietary antioxidant intake. In this contribution after describing the main contributors to dietary TAC for different plant food group, we will discuss the potentiality of coffee as a source of "ready to drink" reducing equivalents. PMID:19168004

  1. Astatine standard redox potentials and speciation in acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Champion, J; Alliot, C; Renault, E; Mokili, B M; Chérel, M; Galland, N; Montavon, G

    2010-01-14

    A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to define astatine (At) speciation in acidic aqueous solution and to answer the two main questions raised from literature data: does At(0) exist in aqueous solution and what is the chemical form of At(+III), if it exists. The experimental approach considers that a given species is characterized by its distribution coefficient (D) experimentally determined in a biphasic system. The change in speciation arising from a change in experimental conditions is observed by a change in D value. The theoretical approach involves quasi-relativistic quantum chemistry calculations. The results show that At at the oxidation state 0 cannot exist in aqueous solution. The three oxidation states present in the range of water stability are At(-I), At(+I), and At(+III) and exist as At(-), At(+), and AtO(+), respectively, in the 1-2 pH range. The standard redox potentials of the At(+)/At(-) and AtO(+)/At(+) couples have been determined, the respective values being 0.36 +/- 0.01 and 0.74 +/- 0.01 V vs NHE. PMID:20014840

  2. Reducing capacities and redox potentials of humic substances extracted from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Du, Mengchan; Jiang, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Humic substances (HS) are redox active organic materials that can be extracted from sewage sludge generated in wastewater treatment processes. Due to the poor understanding of reducing capacity, redox potentials and redox active functional groups of HS in sewage sludge, the potential contribution of sludge HS in transformation of wastewater contaminants is unclear. In the present study, the number of electrons donated or accepted by sewage sludge HS were quantified before and after reduction by iron compounds that possess different redox potentials and defined as the reducing capacity of the sewage sludge. In contrast to previous studies of soil and commercial humic acids (HA), reduced sludge HA showed a lower reducing capacity than that of native HA, which implies formation of semiquinone radicals since the semiquinone radical/hydroquinone pair has a much higher redox potential than the quinone/hydroquinone pair. It is novel that reducing capacities of sludge HA were determined in the redox potential range from -314 to 430 mV. The formation of semiquinone radicals formed during the reduction of quinone moieties in sludge HA is shown by three-dimensional excitation/emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopies information, increasing fluorescence intensities and blue-shifting of the excitation/emission peak of reduced sludge HA. Knowledge of sludge HS redox potentials and corresponding reducing capacities makes it possible to predict the transformation of redox active pollutants and facilitate manipulation and optimization of sludge loading wastewater treatment processes. PMID:26432531

  3. Hourly and daily variation of sediment redox potential in tidal wetland sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catallo, W. James, (Edited By)

    1999-01-01

    Variation of electrochemical oxidation-reduction (redox) potential was examined in surface salt march sediments under conditions of flooding and tidal simulation in mesocosms and field sites. Time series were generated of redox potential measured in sediment profiles at 2-10 cm depth using combination Pt-Ag/AgCl (ORP) electrodes. Redox potential data were acquired at rapid rates (1-55 samples/h) over extended periods (3-104 days) along with similar times series of temperature (water, air, soil) and pH. It was found that redox potential vaired as a result of water level changes and was unrelated to diurnal changes in temperature or pH, the latter of which changed by 370 mV redox potential decrease in under 48 hours). Attenuatoin of microbial activity by [gamma] y-radiation and toxic chemicals elimintated this response. In tidal salt marsh mesocosms where the sediment-plant assemblages were exposed to a simulated diurnal tide, redox potenial oscillations of 40-300 mV amplitude were recoded that has the same periodicity as the flood-drain cycle. Periodic redoc potential time series were observed repeatedly in sediments receiving tidal pulsing but not in those sediments exposed to static hydrological conditions. Data collected over 12 days from a coastal marsh site experiencing diurnal tides showed similar fluctuations in redox potential. Data from the experimentents indicated that (a) redox potential can be a dynamic, nonlinear variable in coastal and estuarine wetland sediments over hourly and daily scales, and the designs of biogeochemical experiments should reflect this, (b) redox potential can change rapidly and signigicantly in coastal wetland sediments in response of flooding and draining, (c) microbial community processes are primarily determinants of the time course of redox potential in wetland sediments, and elimination of inhibition of microbial activity (e.g. by pollutants) can significantly alter that behavior, and (d) fast redox potential dynamics appear

  4. Control of polythiophene redox potentials based on supramolecular complexation with helical schizophyllan.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Shuichi; Tsuchiya, Youichi; Shiraki, Tomohiro; Sada, Kazuki; Shinkai, Seiji

    2009-10-28

    A novel method to control polythiophene redox potentials based on supramolecular complexation with the native polysaccharide, schizophyllan (SPG) is reported, which can importantly improve air stability for easy handling and processing. PMID:19809652

  5. Redox state and water content in the upper mantle: Linkages to the atmosphere, hydrosphere and continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengxue

    Geochemical and petrologic tools were deployed to investigate the redox state and water content of the earth's upper mantle. Study results are discussed in the context of their linkages to the atmospheric oxygen level, hydrospheric water budget and lithospheric evolution of continents. Because the partitioning of V is redox-sensitive and otherwise similar to that of Sc which is not redox sensitive, the V/Sc ratios of basalts of different ages act as a natural recorder of the redox states of the upper mantle. Through a comparison between global mid-ocean ridge basalts and Archean basalts, the fO2 of the upper mantle was inferred to have changed by no more than 0.3 log units since Archean. Combined with results from a thermodynamic model simulating the redox reactions of volcanic gases, this observation argues against the idea that the increase in oxygen in the atmosphere ˜2.3 billion years ago was caused by redox transition in the upper mantle. Through a geochemical and petrologic study at the Feather River Ophiolite (in northern California), global water recycling rates at subduction zones were estimated based on reconstructed serpentinization depths for the oceanic lithospheric mantle. Within uncertainties, the estimated water recycling rates roughly match global volcanic dewatering rates, which suggest the hydrospheric water storage is current at steady-state. Based on water contents measured in mantle xenoliths from the Colorado Plateau and vicinity, the idea that the lithospheric mantle beneath the western North America was rehydrated by the dewatering of the flat-subducting Farallon slab is confirmed. As predicted by an updated flow law for olivine aggregates, hydration might have weakened the basal lithosphere beneath the Colorado Plateau and thus induced lithospheric thinning by ˜15 km as a result of basal erosion. Extrapolation of the flow law to thick, cratonic lithosphere further suggests lithospheric thinning of much larger extents can occur if enough

  6. Microbial communities acclimate to recurring changes in soil redox potential status

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Silver, Whendee; Thompson, Andrew; Firestone, Mary K.

    2010-12-03

    Rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions can significantly stress organisms, particularly when fluctuations cross thresholds of normal physiological tolerance. Redox potential fluctuations are common in humid tropical soils, and microbial community acclimation or avoidance strategies for survival will in turn shape microbial community diversity and biogeochemistry. To assess the extent to which indigenous bacterial and archaeal communities are adapted to changing in redox potential, soils were incubated under static anoxic, static oxic or fluctuating redox potential conditions, and the standing (DNA-based) and active (RNA-based) communities and biogeochemistry were determined. Fluctuating redox potential conditions permitted simultaneous CO{sub 2} respiration, methanogenesis, N{sub 2}O production and iron reduction. Exposure to static anaerobic conditions significantly changed community composition, while 4-day redox potential fluctuations did not. Using RNA: DNA ratios as a measure of activity, 285 taxa were more active under fluctuating than static conditions, compared with three taxa that were more active under static compared with fluctuating conditions. These data suggest an indigenous microbialcommunity adapted to fluctuating redox potential.

  7. Thiol redox biology of trypanosomatids and potential targets for chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Alejandro E; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are the causative agents of African sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease, and the different forms of leishmaniasis. This family of protozoan parasite possesses a trypanothione-based redox metabolism that provides the reducing equivalents for various vital processes such as the biosynthesis of DNA precursors and the detoxification of hydroperoxides. Almost all enzymes of the redox pathway proved to be essential and therefore fulfil one crucial prerequisite for a putative drug target. Trypanothione synthetase and trypanothione reductase are present in all trypanosomatids but absent from the mammalian host which, in addition to the essentiality, renders them highly specific. The chemotherapy research on both enzymes is further supported by the availability of high-throughput screening techniques and crystal structures. In this review we focus on the recent advances and limitations in the development of lead compounds targeting trypanothione synthetase and trypanothione reductase. We present an overview of the available inhibitors and discuss future perspectives including other components of the parasite-specific redox pathway. PMID:26592324

  8. pH, redox potential and local biofilm potential microenvironments within Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms and their roles in electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome T; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Harrington, Timothy D; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-10-01

    The limitation of pH inside electrode-respiring biofilms is a well-known concept. However, little is known about how pH and redox potential are affected by increasing current inside biofilms respiring on electrodes. Quantifying the variations in pH and redox potential with increasing current is needed to determine how electron transfer is tied to proton transfer within the biofilm. In this research, we quantified pH and redox potential variations in electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms as a function of respiration rates, measured as current. We also characterized pH and redox potential at the counter electrode. We concluded that (1) pH continued to decrease in the biofilm through different growth phases, showing that the pH is not always a limiting factor in a biofilm and (2) decreasing pH and increasing redox potential at the biofilm electrode were associated only with the biofilm, demonstrating that G. sulfurreducens biofilms respire in a unique internal environment. Redox potential inside the biofilm was also compared to the local biofilm potential measured by a graphite microelectrode, where the tip of the microelectrode was allowed to acclimatize inside the biofilm. PMID:22549331

  9. pH, Redox Potential and Local Biofilm Potential Microenvironments Within Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms and Their Roles in Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Harrington, Timothy D.; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    The limitation of pH inside electrode-respiring biofilms is a well-known concept. However, little is known about how pH and redox potential are affected by increasing current inside biofilms respiring on electrodes. Quantifying the variations in pH and redox potential with increasing current is needed to determine how electron transfer is tied to proton transfer within the biofilm. In this research, we quantified pH and redox potential variations in electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms as a function of respiration rates, measured as current. We also characterized pH and redox potential at the counter electrode. We concluded that (1) pH continued to decrease in the biofilm through different growth phases, showing that the pH is not always a limiting factor in a biofilm and (2) decreasing pH and increasing redox potential at the biofilm electrode were associated only with the biofilm, demonstrating that G. sulfurreducens biofilms respire in a unique internal environment. Redox potential inside the biofilm was also compared to the local biofilm potential measured by a graphite microelectrode, where the tip of the micro-electrode was allowed to acclimatize inside the biofilm. PMID:22549331

  10. Connexin and Pannexin hemichannels are regulated by redox potential

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Mauricio A.

    2014-01-01

    Connexins (Cxs) and Pannexins (Panxs) are two non-related protein families, having both the property to form hemichannels at the plasma membrane. There are 21 genes coding for different Cx based proteins and only 3 for Panx. Under physiological conditions, these hemichannels (Cxs and Panxs) present a low open probability, but when open, they allow the release of signaling molecules to the extracellular space. However, under pathological conditions, these hemichannels increase their open probability, inducing important lysis of metabolites, and ionic imbalance, which in turn induce the massive entry of Ca+2 to the cell. Actually, it is well recognized that Cxs and Panxs based channels play an important role in several diseases and -in many cases- this is associated with an aberrant hemichannel opening. Hemichannel opening and closing are controlled by a plethora of signaling including changes of the voltage plasma membrane, protein-protein interactions, and several posttranslational modifications, including protein cleavage, phosphorylation, glycosylation, hydroxylation and S-nitrosylation, among others. In particular, it has been recently shown that the cellular redox status modulates the opening/closing and permeability of at least Cx43, Cx46, and Panx1 hemichannels. Thus, for example, the gaseous transmitter nitric oxide (NO) can induce the S-nitrosylation of these proteins modulating in turn several of their properties. The reason is that the redox status of a cell is fundamental to set their response to the environment and also plays an important role in several pathologies. In this review, I will discuss how NO and other molecules associated with redox signaling modulate Cxs and Panx hemichannels properties. PMID:24611056

  11. Wired pyrroloquinoline quinone soluble glucose dehydrogenase enzyme electrodes operating at unprecedented low redox potential.

    PubMed

    Flexer, Victoria; Mano, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    We report unprecedented high current densities for the enzymatic oxidation of glucose already at 0 V versus Ag/AgCl. The modified electrodes were made by assembling pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-soluble glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-sGDH) from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus with osmium-based redox polymers and a cross-linker. Both redox mediators are made of a poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) polymer with Os complexes tethered to the polymer backbone via long C chains, giving the Os complexes flexibility and mobility inside the redox hydrogels. Current densities larger than 1 mA cm(-2) were measured already below 0 V with a plateau value of 4.4 mA cm(-2). Similar hydrogel electrodes comprising the same redox polymers and glucose oxidase (GOx) showed less than half the current densities of the PQQ-sGDH electrodes. The current versus potential curve dependence showed a sigmoidal shape characteristic of mediated enzyme catalysis but with a current increase versus potential less sharp than expected. Surprisingly, the midwave redox potential was positively shifted with respect to the potential of the redox mediator. PMID:24475934

  12. Potential Indexing of the Invasiveness of Breast Cancer Cells by Mitochondrial Redox Ratios.

    PubMed

    Sun, Nannan; Xu, He N; Luo, Qingming; Li, Lin Z

    2016-01-01

    The invasive/metastatic potential of cancer cells is an important factor in tumor progression. The redox ratios obtained from ratios of the endogenous fluorescent signals of NADH and FAD, can effectively respond to the alteration of cancer cells in its mitochondrial energy metabolism. It has been shown previously that the redox ratios may predict the metastatic potential of cancer mouse xenografts. In this report, we aimed to investigate the metabolic state represented by the redox ratios of cancer cells in vitro. Fluorescence microscopic imaging technology was used to observe the changes of the endogenous fluorescence signals of NADH and FAD in the energy metabolism pathways. We measured the redox ratios (FAD/NADH) of breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MCF-7, and SKBR3. We found that the more invasive cancer cells have higher FAD/NADH ratios, largely consistent with previous studies on breast cancer xenografts. Furthermore, by comparing the fluorescence signals of the breast cancer cells under different nutritional environments including starvation and addition of glutamine, pyruvate and lactate, we found that the redox ratios still effectively distinguished the highly invasive MDA-MB-231 cells from less invasive MCF-7 cells. These preliminary data suggest that the redox ratio may potentially provide a new index to stratefy breast cancer with different degrees of aggressiveness, which could have significance for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:27526133

  13. Relationships Between Redox Potential and Sediment Organic Matter Characteristics and Consequences for Restoration of Aquatic Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, J.

    2015-12-01

    Eutrophication in rivers is often characterized by sharp increases in filamentous algae and sediment organic matter and decreases in populations of native submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). Because established SAV oxygenate the rhizosphere of underlying sediments, declines in SAV and increases in sediment organic matter may result in highly reduced conditions in river bottom sediments. These reduced sediments may contain phytotoxic compounds which inhibit the establishment and early growth of SAV. In this study we measured sediment redox potential in three subtropical spring-fed rivers. For each river we compared redox potential in sediments high in organic matter with redox potential in mineral sediments and in sediments underlying SAV beds (n=9). Additionally, we collected plant biomass and sediment samples to investigate relationships between sediment redox potential and its potential drivers. Preliminary results show that sediments underlying SAV beds high in belowground biomass had higher relative redox potential than unvegetated organic and mineral sediments. These results have strong implications for SAV restoration plantings. Reducing conditions in unvegetated sites dominated by filamentous algae may cause widespread plant senescence when sediments are not properly prepared for planting.

  14. An investigation of lower oesophageal redox potentials in gastro-oesophageal reflux patients and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Washington, N; Steele, R J; Wright, J W; Bush, D; McIntosh, S L; Wilkinson, S; Washington, C

    1997-11-01

    Oesophageal electrical properties are thought to be important in the development of gastro-esophageal reflux. This study simultaneously monitored the intraoesophageal pH and redox potentials in 18 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms and 15 asymptomatic controls, for a 24 h period. The pH and redox electrodes were positioned 5 cm proximal to the lower oesophageal sphincter, the position of which had been determined by manometry. Since significantly different behaviour was observed during the day and night, the data were divided into periods of waking and sleeping. Data were analysed for acid reflux (pH < 4) and transients in the redox potential-time curve. Both patients and normal subjects showed negative redox transients which were more frequent and pronounced at night than during the day, and which were uncorrelated with acid reflux. The only parameter which was significantly different between normal and refluxing groups was the amount of nocturnal redox activity, which was lower in refluxing subjects than in normals. Some possible hypotheses for these observations, and the origin of the redox species, are discussed. PMID:9413869

  15. Application of the redox potential for controlling a sulfide oxidizing bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, A.J.H.; Meijer, S.; Lettinga, G.; Bontsema, J.

    1998-10-20

    The investigations described show that the formation of elemental sulfur from the biological oxidation of sulfide can be optimized by controlling the redox state of the solution. The nonsoluble sulfur can be removed by gravity sedimentation and re-used as a raw material, i.e., in bioleaching processes. It was shown that, by supplying an almost stoichiometrical amount of oxygen to the recirculated gas phase, the formation of sulfate is minimized. The redox potential is mainly determined by the sulfide concentration because this compound has a high standard exchange current density with the platinum electrode surface. By maintaining a particular redox set-point value, in fact, the reactor becomes a sulfide-stat. It was shown that in a sulfide-oxidizing bioreactor the measured redox potential, using a polished redox electrode, is kinetically determined rather than thermodynamically. The optimal redox value for sulfur formation is between {minus}147 and {minus}137 mV. The presented results are currently used for controlling several full-scale installations, which desulfurize biogas and high-pressure natural gas.

  16. A High Redox Potential Laccase from Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15: Potential Application for Dye Decolorization

    PubMed Central

    Zimbardi, Ana L. R. L.; Camargo, Priscila F.; Carli, Sibeli; Aquino Neto, Sidney; Meleiro, Luana P.; Rosa, Jose C.; De Andrade, Adalgisa R.; Jorge, João A.; Furriel, Rosa P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Laccase production by Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15 grown in wheat bran and corncob under solid-state fermentation was optimized by response surface methodology using a Central Composite Rotational Design. A laccase (Lacps1) was purified and characterized and the potential of the pure Lacps1 and the crude culture extract for synthetic dye decolorization was evaluated. At optimal conditions (eight days, 26 °C, 18% (w/w) milled corncob, 0.8% (w/w) NH4Cl and 50 mmol·L−1 CuSO4, initial moisture 4.1 mL·g−1), the laccase activity reached 138.6 ± 13.2 U·g−1. Lacps1 was a monomeric glycoprotein (67 kDa, 24% carbohydrate). Optimum pH and temperature for the oxidation of 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) were 4.4 and 74.4 °C, respectively. Lacps1 was stable at pH 3.0–8.0, and after two hours at 55–60 °C, presenting high redox potential (0.747 V vs. NHE). ABTS was oxidized with an apparent affinity constant of 147.0 ± 6.4 μmol·L−1, maximum velocity of 413.4 ± 21.2 U·mg−1 and catalytic efficiency of 3140.1 ± 149.6 L·mmol−1·s−1. The maximum decolorization percentages of bromophenol blue (BPB), remazol brilliant blue R and reactive blue 4 (RB4), at 25 or 40 °C without redox mediators, reached 90%, 80% and 60%, respectively, using either pure Lacps1 or the crude extract. This is the first study of the decolorization of BPB and RB4 by a P. sanguineus laccase. The data suggested good potential for treatment of industrial dye-containing effluents. PMID:27164083

  17. A High Redox Potential Laccase from Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15: Potential Application for Dye Decolorization.

    PubMed

    Zimbardi, Ana L R L; Camargo, Priscila F; Carli, Sibeli; Aquino Neto, Sidney; Meleiro, Luana P; Rosa, Jose C; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Jorge, João A; Furriel, Rosa P M

    2016-01-01

    Laccase production by Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15 grown in wheat bran and corncob under solid-state fermentation was optimized by response surface methodology using a Central Composite Rotational Design. A laccase (Lacps1) was purified and characterized and the potential of the pure Lacps1 and the crude culture extract for synthetic dye decolorization was evaluated. At optimal conditions (eight days, 26 °C, 18% (w/w) milled corncob, 0.8% (w/w) NH₄Cl and 50 mmol·L(-1) CuSO₄, initial moisture 4.1 mL·g(-1)), the laccase activity reached 138.6 ± 13.2 U·g(-1). Lacps1 was a monomeric glycoprotein (67 kDa, 24% carbohydrate). Optimum pH and temperature for the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) were 4.4 and 74.4 °C, respectively. Lacps1 was stable at pH 3.0-8.0, and after two hours at 55-60 °C, presenting high redox potential (0.747 V vs. NHE). ABTS was oxidized with an apparent affinity constant of 147.0 ± 6.4 μmol·L(-1), maximum velocity of 413.4 ± 21.2 U·mg(-1) and catalytic efficiency of 3140.1 ± 149.6 L·mmol(-1)·s(-1). The maximum decolorization percentages of bromophenol blue (BPB), remazol brilliant blue R and reactive blue 4 (RB4), at 25 or 40 °C without redox mediators, reached 90%, 80% and 60%, respectively, using either pure Lacps1 or the crude extract. This is the first study of the decolorization of BPB and RB4 by a P. sanguineus laccase. The data suggested good potential for treatment of industrial dye-containing effluents. PMID:27164083

  18. Design and fine-tuning redox potentials of metalloproteins involved in electron transfer in bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Lu, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Redox potentials are a major contributor in controlling the electron transfer (ET) rates and thus regulating the ET processes in the bioenergetics. To maximize the efficiency of the ET process, one needs to master the art of tuning the redox potential, especially in metalloproteins, as they represent major classes of ET proteins. In this review, we first describe the importance of tuning the redox potential of ET centers and its role in regulating the ET in bioenergetic processes including photosynthesis and respiration. The main focus of this review is to summarize recent work in designing the ET centers, namely cupredoxins, cytochromes, and iron-sulfur proteins, and examples in design of protein networks involved these ET centers. We then discuss the factors that affect redox potentials of these ET centers including metal ion, the ligands to metal center and interactions beyond the primary ligand, especially non-covalent secondary coordination sphere interactions. We provide examples of strategies to fine-tune the redox potential using both natural and unnatural amino acids and native and nonnative cofactors. Several case studies are used to illustrate recent successes in this area. Outlooks for future endeavors are also provided. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26301482

  19. Redox potential and survival of virulent Treponema pallidum under microaerophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Steiner, B; McLean, I; Graves, S

    1981-10-01

    A strongly reduced culture medium, capable of maintaining the virulence of Treponema pallidum (Nichols) for several days, was exposed to an atmosphere of 3% oxygen in nitrogen for 2-3 days before inoculation with T pallidum. By using various volumes of medium in uniform tubes a range of redox potentials (Ecal) from -94 mV to -325 mV was produced depending on the surface area-to-volume ratios of the medium. The anaerobic medium had an Ecal value of -387 mV. The medium was inoculated with T pallidum and incubated in an atmosphere of 3% oxygen. The survival of treponemes at different redox potentials was monitored by observing the retention of motility and by measuring the latent period of infection after inoculation of the cultures into the shaved backs of rabbits. Under these conditions T pallidum survived longest at low (electronegative) redox potential. An inverse linear relationship was observed between the redox potential of the culture medium and the survival of T pallidum, as measured by the time required for a 90% reduction of virulent organisms. No optimum redox potential was detected, the most electronegative medium (-325 mV, Ecal) giving the best survival. PMID:7028206

  20. Assessing Redox Potential and Fluid Conductivity of a Contaminant Plume from Geoelectric Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naudet, V.; Revil, A.; Rizzo, E.; Bottero, J.; Begassat, P.

    2003-12-01

    The redox potential and the fluid conductivity of a contaminant plume are two key-parameter to evaluate the plume development and to propose appropriate remediation technologies. we applied geo-electrical methods (self-potential, SP, and electrical resistivity tomography, ERT) to the Entressen landfill site (South-eastern France). From the knowledge of the piezometric head variation of the groundwater, the electrokinetic source is removed from the SP signals measured on the field. Then, a correlation (Rý=0.85) is obtained between the residual SP due to redox effect and the redox potential values measured in monitoring wells. The first-order linear relationship derived from this correlation is finally used to obtain a redox potential map of the overall contaminated site. A correlation (Rý=0.70) is observed between the electrical conductivities determined from the 3D ERT image and the conductivity of the groundwater measured in boreholes. From this correlation a map of the fluid conductivity is obtained. The maps of the redox potential and conductivity of the groundwater are both indicative of the presence of contaminants. The first one is more sensitive to the presence of organic matter and biodegradation. The second one gives information on the mineralization of the groundwater. Both maps can therefore be used to optimise the position of pumping wells for remediation.

  1. ARSENIC LEACHING FROM IRON RICH MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE: INFLUENCE OF PH AND REDOX POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the effect of pH and redox potential on the potential mobility of arsenic (As) from a contaminated mineral processing waste. The selected waste contained about 0.47 g kg-1 of As and 66.2 g kg-1 of iron (Fe). The characteristic of the wast...

  2. Effects of ph, carbonate, orthophosphate, and redox potential on cuprosolvency

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, M.R.; Lytle, D.A.; Clement, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    A comprehensive solubility model for copper in drinking water has been developed, that is consistent with available data for copper dissolution and passivation in drinking water systems. Copper solubility (cuprosolvency) is greatly affected by the redox conditions of the systems. The concentration of Cu(I) is dominated by Cu{sub 2}O(s) or CuOH(s) solid phases, plus soluble aqueous ammonia and chloride complexes. In new piping, the concentration of Cu(II) is mainly governed by Cu(OH){sub 2}(s) (cupric hydroxide), rather than CuO(s) (tenorite) or Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s)(malachite). Complexation of Cu(II) by DIC and hydroxide ion is extremely important. Increases in DIC are predicted to cause significant increases in copper solubility in the pH range of 7.5--10. Utilities may trade off increasing cuprosolvency by DIC addition for ensuring adequate buffering intensity in the finished water. Sufficient dosages of orthophosphate in the pH range of 6.5 to 7.5 may reduce cuprosolvency under oxidizing conditions. Sulfate may decrease cuprosolvency under some conditions, or may interfere with the formation of cupric hydroxide films under mildly alkaline conditions. Dissolved oxygen and chlorine residual play complicated roles in determining copper concentrations after various standing times. Frequently, 48--72 hours are necessary to reach equilibrium levels of copper in disinfected systems.

  3. Quantitative measurement of redox potential in hypoxic cells using SERS nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jing; Auchinvole, Craig; Fisher, Kate; Campbell, Colin J.

    2014-09-01

    Hypoxia is considered to be a reductive disorder of cells that is caused either by a lack of oxygen or by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways and is thought to play a role in the pathology of diseases including stroke and cancer. One aspect of hypoxia that remains poorly investigated is the dysregulation of cellular redox potential and its role in controlling biological pathway activation. Since there is currently no way of quantitatively measuring the intracellular redox potential of hypoxic cells, this provided us with the motivation to develop optical nanosensors whose Surface-Enhanced Raman (SER) spectrum provides a quantitative measure of redox potential in hypoxic cells. Our nanosensors are made from organic reporter molecules that show oxidation-state-dependent changes in the Raman spectrum and are chemically adsorbed onto gold nanoshells. These nanosensors can be taken up by cells, and by collecting the SER spectrum we can calculate the localised intracellular redox potential from single hypoxic cells in a non-invasive, reversible way.Hypoxia is considered to be a reductive disorder of cells that is caused either by a lack of oxygen or by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways and is thought to play a role in the pathology of diseases including stroke and cancer. One aspect of hypoxia that remains poorly investigated is the dysregulation of cellular redox potential and its role in controlling biological pathway activation. Since there is currently no way of quantitatively measuring the intracellular redox potential of hypoxic cells, this provided us with the motivation to develop optical nanosensors whose Surface-Enhanced Raman (SER) spectrum provides a quantitative measure of redox potential in hypoxic cells. Our nanosensors are made from organic reporter molecules that show oxidation-state-dependent changes in the Raman spectrum and are chemically adsorbed onto gold nanoshells. These nanosensors can be taken up by cells, and by collecting the SER

  4. Potential role of glutathione in evolution of thiol-based redox signaling sites in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mohanasundaram, Kaavya A.; Haworth, Naomi L.; Grover, Mani P.; Crowley, Tamsyn M.; Goscinski, Andrzej; Wouters, Merridee A.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine is susceptible to a variety of modifications by reactive oxygen and nitrogen oxide species, including glutathionylation; and when two cysteines are involved, disulfide formation. Glutathione-cysteine adducts may be removed from proteins by glutaredoxin, whereas disulfides may be reduced by thioredoxin. Glutaredoxin is homologous to the disulfide-reducing thioredoxin and shares similar binding modes of the protein substrate. The evolution of these systems is not well characterized. When a single Cys is present in a protein, conjugation of the redox buffer glutathione may induce conformational changes, resulting in a simple redox switch that effects a signaling cascade. If a second cysteine is introduced into the sequence, the potential for disulfide formation exists. In favorable protein contexts, a bistable redox switch may be formed. Because of glutaredoxin's similarities to thioredoxin, the mutated protein may be immediately exapted into the thioredoxin-dependent redox cycle upon addition of the second cysteine. Here we searched for examples of protein substrates where the number of redox-active cysteine residues has changed throughout evolution. We focused on cross-strand disulfides (CSDs), the most common type of forbidden disulfide. We searched for proteins where the CSD is present, absent and also found as a single cysteine in protein orthologs. Three different proteins were selected for detailed study—CD4, ERO1, and AKT. We created phylogenetic trees, examining when the CSD residues were mutated during protein evolution. We posit that the primordial cysteine is likely to be the cysteine of the CSD which undergoes nucleophilic attack by thioredoxin. Thus, a redox-active disulfide may be introduced into a protein structure by stepwise mutation of two residues in the native sequence to Cys. By extension, evolutionary acquisition of structural disulfides in proteins can potentially occur via transition through a redox-active disulfide state. PMID

  5. Potential role of glutathione in evolution of thiol-based redox signaling sites in proteins.

    PubMed

    Mohanasundaram, Kaavya A; Haworth, Naomi L; Grover, Mani P; Crowley, Tamsyn M; Goscinski, Andrzej; Wouters, Merridee A

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine is susceptible to a variety of modifications by reactive oxygen and nitrogen oxide species, including glutathionylation; and when two cysteines are involved, disulfide formation. Glutathione-cysteine adducts may be removed from proteins by glutaredoxin, whereas disulfides may be reduced by thioredoxin. Glutaredoxin is homologous to the disulfide-reducing thioredoxin and shares similar binding modes of the protein substrate. The evolution of these systems is not well characterized. When a single Cys is present in a protein, conjugation of the redox buffer glutathione may induce conformational changes, resulting in a simple redox switch that effects a signaling cascade. If a second cysteine is introduced into the sequence, the potential for disulfide formation exists. In favorable protein contexts, a bistable redox switch may be formed. Because of glutaredoxin's similarities to thioredoxin, the mutated protein may be immediately exapted into the thioredoxin-dependent redox cycle upon addition of the second cysteine. Here we searched for examples of protein substrates where the number of redox-active cysteine residues has changed throughout evolution. We focused on cross-strand disulfides (CSDs), the most common type of forbidden disulfide. We searched for proteins where the CSD is present, absent and also found as a single cysteine in protein orthologs. Three different proteins were selected for detailed study-CD4, ERO1, and AKT. We created phylogenetic trees, examining when the CSD residues were mutated during protein evolution. We posit that the primordial cysteine is likely to be the cysteine of the CSD which undergoes nucleophilic attack by thioredoxin. Thus, a redox-active disulfide may be introduced into a protein structure by stepwise mutation of two residues in the native sequence to Cys. By extension, evolutionary acquisition of structural disulfides in proteins can potentially occur via transition through a redox-active disulfide state. PMID

  6. A Frontier orbital energy approach to redox potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradie, Jeanet

    2015-09-01

    The prediction of the oxidation and reduction potentials of molecules is important in many research areas. A review of relationships obtained between frontier orbital energies (eV), the calculated ionization potentials (IP in eV), or adiabatic electron affinities (EA in eV) with the experimental oxidation and reduction potentials is presented, for selected series of β- diketones, rhodium-β-diketonato complexes, as well as metal-tris-β-diketonato complexes, with the metal Fe or Mn. The good linear relationships obtained for related series of complexes show that the oxidation and reduction potentials of these complexes can be predicted by their DFT-calculated energies.

  7. Redox Potential Control by Drug Binding to Cytochrome P450 3A4

    PubMed Central

    Das, Aditi; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01

    The cytochrome P450s are ubiquitous heme proteins that utilize two reducing equivalents to cleave a ferrous iron - dioxygen complex to produce a single water molecule with the insertion of one oxygen atom into a bound substrate. For the case of soluble cytochrome P450 CYP101, it has been shown that there is a linear free energy relationship between heme redox potential and the spin state of the ferric protein. However, the universality of this relationship has been challenged in the case of mammalian enzymes. Most cytochrome P450s are integral membrane proteins, and detailed redox potential measurements have proved difficult due protein aggregation or the necessary presence of detergent. In this communication we utilize a soluble nanometer scale membrane bilayer disc (Nanodisc) to stabilize monomeric human cytochrome P450 CYP3A4. The Nanodisc system allows facile redox potential measurements to be made on substrate-free CYP3A4 as well as with several drug molecules bound at the active site. We show that substrate binding can dramatically effect the redox potential of the heme protein through modulation of the ferric spin state. A linear free energy relationship is observed, analogous to that noted for the soluble P450s, indicating a common mechanism for this linkage and providing a means for control of electron input in response to the presence of a metabolizable substrate, this potentially limiting the unwanted production of reduced oxygen species. PMID:17948999

  8. Biological Redox Cycling Of Iron In Nontronite And Its Potential Application In Nitrate Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zeng, Qiang; Edelmann, Richard E.; Pentrak, Martin; Agrawal, Abinash

    2015-05-05

    Redox cycling of structural Fe in phyllosilicates provides a potential method to remediate nitrate contamination in natural environment. Past research has only studied chemical redox cycles or a single biologically mediated redox cycle of Fe in phyllosilicates. The objective of this research was to study three microbially driven redox cycles of Fe in one phyllosilicate, nontronite (NAu-2). During the reduction phase structural Fe(III) in NAu-2 served as electron acceptor, lactate as electron donor, AQDS as electron shuttle, and dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 as mediator in bicarbonate-buffered and PIPES-buffered media. During the oxidation phase, biogenic Fe(II) served an electron donor, nitrate as electron acceptor, and nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002 as mediator in the same media. For all three cycles, structural Fe in NAu-2 was able to reversibly undergo 3 redox cycles without significant reductive or oxidative dissolution. X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that NAu-2 was the dominant residual mineral throughout the 3 redox cycles with some dissolution textures but no significant secondary mineralization. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(II) in bio-reduced samples likely occurred in two distinct environments, at edges and the interior of the NAu-2 structure. Nitrate was completely reduced to nitrogen gas under both buffer conditions and this extent and rate did not change with Fe redox cycles. Mössbauer spectroscopy further revealed that nitrate reduction was coupled to predominant/preferred oxidation of edge Fe(II). These results suggest that structural Fe in phyllosilicates may represent a renewable source to continuously remove nitrate in natural environments.

  9. Relationship Between Redox Potential, Disinfectant, and pH in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work will examine the effects of pH and oxidant type (chlorine [Cl2], oxygen [O2], hydrogen peroxide [H2O2], monochloramine [MCA], and potassium permanganate [KMnO4]) and concentration (mg/L) on the redox potential of buffered test water. Also, the effects of incrementing ir...

  10. Influence of microbial growth in the redox potential of fermented cucumbers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commonly, pH measurements are used during the production of fermented cucumbers to indirectly monitor growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acid production. Redox potential (Eh) measurements, which are determined by the flux of electrons in a system, could serve as a more accurate tool to monitor...

  11. Redox reactions in mammalian spermatogenesis and the potential targets of reactive oxygen species under oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Junichi; Imai, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation (Redox) reactions are ubiquitous mechanisms for vital activities in all organisms, and they play pivotal roles in the regulation of spermatogenesis as well. Here we focus on 3 redox-involved processes that have drawn much recent attention: the regulation of signal transduction by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide, oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and sulfoxidation of protamines during sperm chromatin condensation. The first 2 of these processes are emerging topics in cell biology and are applicable to most living cells, which includes spermatogenic cells. The roles of ROS in signal transduction have been elucidated in the last 2 decades and have received broad attention, most notably from the viewpoint of the proper control of mitotic signals. Redox processes in the ER are important because this is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and proceed toward their functional structure, so that malfunction of the ER affects not only the involved cells but also the accepting cells of the secreted proteins in multicellular organisms. Sulfoxidation is the third of these processes, and the sulfoxidation of chromatin is a unique process in sperm maturation. During recent sulfoxidase research, GPX4 has emerged as a promising enzyme that plays essential roles in the production of fertile sperm, but the involvement of other redox proteins is also becoming evident. Because the molecules involved in the redox reactions are prone to oxidation, they can be sensitive to oxidative damage, which makes them potential targets for antioxidant therapy. PMID:26413390

  12. Real-Time Imaging of the Intracellular Glutathione Redox Potential in the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Kasozi, Denis; Mohring, Franziska; Rahlfs, Stefan; Meyer, Andreas J.; Becker, Katja

    2013-01-01

    In the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the cellular redox potential influences signaling events, antioxidant defense, and mechanisms of drug action and resistance. Until now, the real-time determination of the redox potential in malaria parasites has been limited because conventional approaches disrupt sub-cellular integrity. Using a glutathione biosensor comprising human glutaredoxin-1 linked to a redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein (hGrx1-roGFP2), we systematically characterized basal values and drug-induced changes in the cytosolic glutathione-dependent redox potential (EGSH) of drug-sensitive (3D7) and resistant (Dd2) P. falciparum parasites. Via confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that hGrx1-roGFP2 rapidly detects EGSH changes induced by oxidative and nitrosative stress. The cytosolic basal EGSH of 3D7 and Dd2 were estimated to be −314.2±3.1 mV and −313.9±3.4 mV, respectively, which is indicative of a highly reducing compartment. We furthermore monitored short-, medium-, and long-term changes in EGSH after incubation with various redox-active compounds and antimalarial drugs. Interestingly, the redox cyclers methylene blue and pyocyanin rapidly changed the fluorescence ratio of hGrx1-roGFP2 in the cytosol of P. falciparum, which can, however, partially be explained by a direct interaction with the probe. In contrast, quinoline and artemisinin-based antimalarial drugs showed strong effects on the parasites' EGSH after longer incubation times (24 h). As tested for various conditions, these effects were accompanied by a drop in total glutathione concentrations determined in parallel with alternative methods. Notably, the effects were generally more pronounced in the chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 strain than in the resistant Dd2 strain. Based on these results hGrx1-roGFP2 can be recommended as a reliable and specific biosensor for real-time spatiotemporal monitoring of the intracellular EGSH in P. falciparum. Applying this technique in further

  13. Redox potential dynamics in a grassed swale used for storage and treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorenhout, Michel; Boogaard, Floris Cornelis

    2016-04-01

    Treatment wetlands are used to remove pollutants from water. Most swales are designed to infiltrate stormwater into the subsurface. A combination of both functions can help to enhance water quality and reduce flooding risks in urban areas. The chemical forms and possible removal of pollutants such as nitrate and heavy metals in wetlands are highly dependent on the redox conditions. The redox conditions are expected to be highly dynamic and dependent on water levels and flow. We studied the correlation between these factors in an urban grassed swale system, and show that more factors play a role in these systems than water levels alone. The study system is located in the World Heritage site "Bryggen" in the city of Bergen, Norway. It consists of a series of SUDS, a socalled treatment train. The system is fed by storm water, which is at first stored in a rain garden then led to grassed swales. Water infiltrates into the subsurface in the swales. The reason for implementation of the system at this site is the protection of the highly organic archaeological layers at the site, which requires reduced conditions. Swales 1 and 2 were equipped with pressure loggers and multi-level redox and temperature probes (-2, -5, -10 and -20cm from surface). Redox and temperature probes were connected to a HYPNOS system. Measurements were taken for more than 1 year at 15 minute interval. A weather station supplemented the dataset with precipitation measurements. The redox potential in the swales show a strong correlation with water level. The regularly flooded swale 2 shows frequent anoxic events (Eh < 200mV) where as swale 1 shows oxic conditions (Eh = 650mV) throughout the same measurement period. Swale 1 has fewer flooding events than Swale 2 and a more coarse soil with less organic matter than swale 2. These redox results are as expected given the local conditions, and show that redox conditions are localised phenomena that depend on local soil conditions. Analysis of the redox

  14. Effect of redox potential and pH on TNT transformation in soil-water slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.B.; Brannon, J.M.; Hayes, C.A.

    1997-10-01

    The presence of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its transformation products in surface soil, the vadose zone, and ground water can present serious environmental problems. This situation is exacerbated because the processes that control the mobility and transformation of TNT are not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of redox potential (Eh) and pH on the fate and transformation of TNT in soil. An initial investigation of soil components responsible for the observed TNT transformation was also conducted. Laboratory investigations consisted of testing at four separate redox potentials and four pH levels. An 18:1 (water:soil) suspension spiked with 100 {micro}g/g TNT was used. Results indicated that TNT was unstable under all redox and pH conditions, and was least stable under highly reducing conditions at all four pH values. Greater amounts of TNT were incorporated into soil organic matter under anaerobic than under aerobic conditions. Results of the soil component study indicated that the presence of Fe{sup +2} sorbed to clay surfaces may account for the rapid disappearance of TNT at reduced redox potentials. TNT in ground water moving into areas of intense reduction would not persist for long, but would undergo transformation and binding by soil organic matter.

  15. In vitro Real-time Measurement of the Intra-bacterial Redox Potential

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Joris; Finlay, B. Brett

    2016-01-01

    All bacteria that live in oxygenated environments have to deal with oxidative stress caused by some form of exogenous or endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) (Imlay, 2013). Large quantities of ROS damage DNA, lipids and proteins which can eventually lead to bacterial cell death (Imlay, 2013). In contrast, smaller quantities of ROS can play more sophisticated roles in cellular signalling pathways affecting almost every process in the bacterial cell e.g. metabolism, stress responses, transcription, protein synthesis, etc. Previously, inadequate analytical methods prevented appropriate analysis of the intra-bacterial redox potential. Herein, we describe a method for the measurement of real-time changes to the intra-bacterial redox potential using redox-sensitive GFP (roGFP2) (van der Heijden et al., 2015). The roGFP2 protein is engineered to contain specific cysteine residues that form an internal disulfide bridge upon oxidation which results in a slight shift in protein conformation (Hanson et al., 2004). This shift results in two distinct protein isoforms with different fluorescence excitation spectra after excitation at 405 nm and 480 nm respectively. Consequently, the corresponding 405/480 nm ratio can be used as a measure for the intra-bacterial redox potential. The ratio-metric analysis excludes variations due to differences in roGFP2 concentrations and since the conformational shift is reversible the system allows for measurement of oxidizing as well as reducing conditions. In this protocol we describe the system by measuring the intra-bacterial redox potential inside Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) however this system can be adjusted for use in other Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Kinetic and biochemical properties of high and low redox potential laccases from fungal and plant origin.

    PubMed

    Frasconi, Marco; Favero, Gabriele; Boer, Harry; Koivula, Anu; Mazzei, Franco

    2010-04-01

    The electrochemical studies of laccase-mediator systems are aimed at understanding the mechanism of their redox transformation and their efficiency in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions; this topic has paramount application spanning from bleaching of paper pulp and the enzymatic degradation of lignin to the biosensors and biofuel cell development. In this paper four different laccases from Trametes hirsuta (ThL), Trametes versicolor (TvL), Melanocarpus albomyces (r-MaL) and Rhus vernicifera (RvL) were characterized from both biochemical and electrochemical points of view. Two of them (TvL and ThL) are high redox potential and two (RvL and r-MaL) are low redox potential laccases. The outline of this work is focused on the determination of catalytic and bioelectrochemical properties of these four enzymes in homogenous solution as well as immobilized onto electrode surface in the presence of a set of different redox mediators. The results measured in the homogenous reaction system correlated well with those measured with the immobilized enzymes. In addition, they are in good agreement with those reported with reference techniques, suggesting that the electrochemical methods employed in this work can be applied well in place of the traditional techniques commonly used for the kinetic characterization of laccases. These results are also discussed in terms of the known amino acid sequences and three-dimensional (3D) structures of the laccases. PMID:20056172

  17. [The influence of controlling redox potential on ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Wang, Yong-Hong; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Ying-Ping; Zhang, Si-Liang

    2007-09-01

    Redox electrode was used to control redox potential at four different levels (-50 mV, -100 mV, -150 mV, - 230mV) for the study of ethanol fermentation. The result showed that there was notably influence on the yield of ethanol, the formation of glycerol, the secretion of organic acid, biomass and the death of cell by controlling redox potential at different levels. For example: the biomass of ORP at -50 mV was 1.26, 1.86, 2.59 times higher than ORP at -100 mV, -150 mV, -230 mV respectively, the final glycerol concentration was 1.2, 1.1, 1.7 times higher but final ethanol concentration was 0.87, 0.49, 0.51 times lower compared to the latest three ORP control level. And take biomass, ethanol yield, glycerol concentration, and unconsumed glucose into consider, we get the conclusion that it is very favorable for ethanol fermentation by control ORP at 150 mV. So it give us a apocalypse that we can use redox electrode to control the ethanol fermentation exactly on bioreactor scale. PMID:18051869

  18. Entamoeba thiol-based redox metabolism: A potential target for drug development.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, Ghulam; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amebiasis is an intestinal infection widespread throughout the world caused by the human pathogen Entamoeba histolytica. Metronidazole has been a drug of choice against amebiasis for decades despite its low efficacy against asymptomatic cyst carriers and emergence of resistance in other protozoa with similar anaerobic metabolism. Therefore, identification and characterization of specific targets is urgently needed to design new therapeutics for improved treatment against amebiasis. Toward this goal, thiol-dependent redox metabolism is of particular interest. The thiol-dependent redox metabolism in E. histolytica consists of proteins including peroxiredoxin, rubrerythrin, Fe-superoxide dismutase, flavodiiron proteins, NADPH: flavin oxidoreductase, and amino acids including l-cysteine, S-methyl-l-cysteine, and thioprolines (thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids). E. histolytica completely lacks glutathione and its metabolism, and l-cysteine is the major intracellular low molecular mass thiol. Moreover, this parasite possesses a functional thioredoxin system consisting of thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, which is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase system with antioxidant and redox regulatory roles. In this review, we summarize and highlight the thiol-based redox metabolism and its control mechanisms in E. histolytica, in particular, the features of the system unique to E. histolytica, and its potential use for drug development against amebiasis. PMID:26775086

  19. Accurate standard hydrogen electrode potential and applications to the redox potentials of vitamin C and NAD/NADH.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2015-01-15

    We computationally evaluated the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) potential in aqueous phase and the Gibbs energy of a proton from the experimental pKa values of alcohol molecules. From the "golden standard" CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level calculation, we estimated the SHE potential as 4.48 V, which is very close to the IUPAC-recommended experimental value of 4.44 V. As applications to the Gaussian-3 (G3) methods, which also reproduce the "golden standard" level calculations, we computed various pKa values and redox potentials for a vitamin series. For vitamin C, we support the experimental result of +0.35 V and predict the pKa value of d-ascorbic acid to be 3.7-3.9. Using a model molecule for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), we reproduced the redox potential and determined the order of the proton/electron addition, based on both the proton affinity and redox potential. PMID:25514626

  20. Chromoselective Photocatalysis: Controlled Bond Activation through Light-Color Regulation of Redox Potentials.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrajit; König, Burkhard

    2016-06-27

    Catalysts that can be regulated in terms of activity and selectivity by external stimuli may allow the efficient multistep synthesis of complex molecules and pharmaceuticals. Herein, we report the light-color regulation of the redox potential of a photocatalyst to control the activation of chemical bonds. Light-color control of the redox power of a photocatalyst introduces a new selectivity parameter to photoredox catalysis: Instead of changing the catalyst or ligand, alteration of the color of the visible-light irradiation adjusts the selectivity in catalytic transformations. By using this principle, the selective activation of aryl-halide bonds for C-H arylation and the sequential conversion of functional groups with different reduction potentials is possible by simply applying different colors of light for excitation of the photocatalyst. PMID:27198967

  1. Proton NMR investigation into the basis for the relatively high redox potential of lignin peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banci, L.; Bertini, I.; Turano, P. ); Ming Tien ); Kirk, T.K. )

    1991-08-15

    Lignin peroxidase shares several structural features with the well-studied horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase but carries a higher redox potential. Here the heme domain of lignin peroxidase and the lignin peroxidase cyanide adduct was examined by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, including nuclear Overhauser effect and two-dimensional measurements, and the findings were compared with those for horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase. Structural information was obtained on the orientation of the heme vinyl and propionate groups and the proximal and distal histidines. The shifts of the {var epsilon}1 proton of the proximal histidine were found to be empirically related to the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} redox potentials.

  2. Redox potentials of chlorophylls and beta-carotene in the antenna complexes of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2005-02-16

    Electron transfer (ET) processes in reaction centers (RC) of photosystem II (PSII) are prerequisites of oxygen generation. They are promoted by energy transfer from antenna to RC. Here, we calculated the redox potentials of chlorophylla/beta-carotene (Chla/Car) in PSII CP43/CP47 antenna complexes, solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann (LPB) equation based on the PSII crystal structure. The majority of antenna Chla redox potentials for reduction/oxidation were lower than those of RC Chla. Hence, ET events with excess electrons remain localized in the RC. Simultaneously antenna Chla can serve as an efficient cation sink to rereduce RC Chla if normal PSII function is inhibited. Especially three antenna Chla (Chl-47, Chl-18, and Chl-12) and two Car bridging the space between Chl(Z(D1)) and cytochrome (cyt) b559 have the same level of oxidation redox potential. Together with Chl(Z(D2)) they form an electron hole transfer pathway and temporary storage device guiding from the oxidized P680(+.) Chla to the cyt b559. This path may play a photoprotective role as efficient electron hole quencher. PMID:15701031

  3. Hybrid Density Functional Calculations of Redox Potentials of Transition Metal Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armiento, Rickard; Chevrier, Vincent; Ong, Shyue Ping; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2010-03-01

    Prior works have shown that density functional theory (DFT) with the DFT+U method resolves the underestimation of redox potentials calculated by conventional functionals for a number of transition metal compounds relevant for battery applications, including the olivine LixMPO4 (M = Fe, Mn, Co, Ni), layered LixMO2 (M = Co, Ni) and spinel-like LixMn2O4. We show that the redox potentials of these compounds are also well reproduced by the hybrid density functional by Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE06). Hybrid functionals combine a conventional DFT functional with a part of Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange. While the HF part increases the computational expense by at least one order of magnitude, it provides, in contrast to DFT+U, a correction for the self-interaction error that does not rely on special treatment of the occupancies of the orbital states of ions or species-specific parameters. We compare the accuracy of regular DFT, DFT+U and HSE06 for the redox potentials, lattice constants, and other properties. Examples of electron delocalization problems connected to the self-interaction error in the systems are discussed, and shown to be resolved both by the hybrid functional and DFT+U methods. Comments are made on the possibility to approach the delocalization problem with a semi-local functional.

  4. Monitoring of microbially mediated corrosion and scaling processes using redox potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Opel, Oliver; Eggerichs, Tanja; Otte, Tobias; Ruck, Wolfgang K L

    2014-06-01

    The use of redox potential measurements for corrosion and scaling monitoring, including microbially mediated processes, is demonstrated. As a case study, monitoring data from 10years of operation of an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) site located in Berlin, Germany, were examined. (Fe(2+))-activities as well as [Fe(3+)]-build up rates were calculated from redox potential, pH, conductivity, temperature and dissolved oxygen measurements. Calculations are based on assuming (Fe(3+))-activity being controlled by Fe(OH)3-solubility, the primary iron(III)-precipitate. This approach was tested using a simple log-linear model including dissolved oxygen besides major Fe(2+)-ligands. Measured redox potential values in groundwater used for thermal storage are met within ±8mV. In other systems comprising natural groundwater and in heating and cooling systems in buildings, quantitatively interpretable values are obtained also. It was possible to calculate particulate [Fe(3+)]-loads in the storage fluids in the order of 2μM and correlate a decrease in filter lifetimes to [Fe(3+)]-build up rates, although observations show clear signs of microbially mediated scaling processes involving iron and sulphur cycling. PMID:24411307

  5. Improved sulfur removal from coals by redox potential control of surfaces during grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Tampy, G.K.; Birlingmair, D.H.; Burkhart, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Control of the redox potential of an Upper Freeport run-of-mine coal slurry during wet grinding and subsequent beneficiation gave better sulfur removal, with no decrease in coal recovery, than either potential control during grinding or beneficiation alone. Sodium dithionite, a reducing agent used to depress the sulfur, also gave substantially better results than pH control alone, irrespective of whether the physical beneficiation was by oil agglomeration, foam flotation, or microbubble batch flotation. Three-phase contact angle measurements and pulp potential measurements suggest that slow electrochemical reactions at the particle surfaces may be responsible for the improved results obtained when the reductant is added at the grinding stage.

  6. An inner membrane cytochrome required only for reduction of high redox potential extracellular electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Levar, Caleb E.; Chan, Chi Ho; Mehta-Kolte, Misha G.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2014-10-28

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, transfer electrons beyond their outer membranes to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, heavy metals, and electrodes in electrochemical devices. In the environment, metal acceptors exist in multiple chelated and insoluble forms that span a range of redox potentials and offer different amounts of available energy. Despite this, metal-reducing bacteria have not been shown to alter their electron transfer strategies to take advantage of these energy differences. Disruption of imcH, encoding an inner membrane c-type cytochrome, eliminated the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, and insoluble Mn(IV) oxides, electron acceptors with potentials greater than 0.1 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE), but the imcH mutant retained the ability to reduce Fe(III) oxides with potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE. The imcH mutant failed to grow on electrodes poised at +0.24 V versus SHE, but switching electrodes to –0.1 V versus SHE triggered exponential growth. At potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE, both the wild type and the imcH mutant doubled 60% slower than at higher potentials. Electrodes poised even 100 mV higher (0.0 V versus SHE) could not trigger imcH mutant growth. These results demonstrate that G. sulfurreducens possesses multiple respiratory pathways, that some of these pathways are in operation only after exposure to low redox potentials, and that electron flow can be coupled to generation of different amounts of energy for growth. Redox potentials that trigger these behaviors mirror those of metal acceptors common in subsurface environments where Geobacter is found.

  7. Early-Late Heterobimetallic Complexes Linked by Phosphinoamide Ligands. Tuning Redox Potentials and Small Molecule Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Christine M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent attention in the chemical community has been focused on the energy efficient and environmentally benign conversion of abundant small molecules (CO2, H2O, etc.) to useful liquid fuels. This project addresses these goals by examining fundamental aspects of catalyst design to ultimately access small molecule activation processes under mild conditions. Specifically, Thomas and coworkers have targetted heterobimetallic complexes that feature metal centers with vastly different electronic properties, dictated both by their respective positions on the periodic table and their coordination environment. Unlike homobimetallic complexes featuring identical or similar metals, the bonds between metals in early/late heterobimetallics are more polarized, with the more electron-rich late metal center donating electron density to the more electron-deficient early metal center. While metal-metal bonds pose an interesting strategy for storing redox equivalents and stabilizing reactive metal fragments, the polar character of metal-metal bonds in heterobimetallic complexes renders these molecules ideally poised to react with small molecule substrates via cleavage of energy-rich single and double bonds. In addition, metal-metal interactions have been shown to dramatically affect redox potentials and promote multielectron redox activity, suggesting that metal-metal interactions may provide a mechanism to tune redox potentials and access substrate reduction/activation at mild overpotentials. This research project has provided a better fundamental understanding of how interactions between transition metals can be used as a strategy to promote and/or control chemical transformations related to the clean production of fuels. While this project focused on the study of homogeneous systems, it is anticipated that the broad conclusions drawn from these investigations will be applicable to heterogeneous catalysis as well, particularly on heterogeneous processes that occur at interfaces in

  8. An inner membrane cytochrome required only for reduction of high redox potential extracellular electron acceptors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Levar, Caleb E.; Chan, Chi Ho; Mehta-Kolte, Misha G.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2014-10-28

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, transfer electrons beyond their outer membranes to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, heavy metals, and electrodes in electrochemical devices. In the environment, metal acceptors exist in multiple chelated and insoluble forms that span a range of redox potentials and offer different amounts of available energy. Despite this, metal-reducing bacteria have not been shown to alter their electron transfer strategies to take advantage of these energy differences. Disruption of imcH, encoding an inner membrane c-type cytochrome, eliminated the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, and insoluble Mn(IV) oxides, electron acceptors with potentialsmore » greater than 0.1 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE), but the imcH mutant retained the ability to reduce Fe(III) oxides with potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE. The imcH mutant failed to grow on electrodes poised at +0.24 V versus SHE, but switching electrodes to –0.1 V versus SHE triggered exponential growth. At potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE, both the wild type and the imcH mutant doubled 60% slower than at higher potentials. Electrodes poised even 100 mV higher (0.0 V versus SHE) could not trigger imcH mutant growth. These results demonstrate that G. sulfurreducens possesses multiple respiratory pathways, that some of these pathways are in operation only after exposure to low redox potentials, and that electron flow can be coupled to generation of different amounts of energy for growth. Redox potentials that trigger these behaviors mirror those of metal acceptors common in subsurface environments where Geobacter is found.« less

  9. Redox potential of shallow groundwater by 1-month continuous in situ potentiometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioka, Seiichiro; Muraoka, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Yota

    2016-06-01

    One-month continuous in situ potentiometric measurements of redox potential (Eh) were used to investigate the dominant redox processes in the shallow groundwater (i.e., <10 m) of a Holocene aquifer, Aomori City, northern Japan. The Eh values, which were determined using a platinum electrode, were -163, -169 and -173 mV, respectively, for three monitoring campaigns. The temperatures and pH values of shallow groundwater during all three periods were approximately 12 °C and 6.6, respectively. Dissolved oxygen and sulfide ion concentrations were not detected. Chemical analyses showed that the shallow groundwater is Na-Fe-HCO3 type, and contains over 40 mg/L of Fe (the dominant cation) and over 200 mg/L of HCO3 - (the dominant anion). A good fit was found between measured Eh values and Eh values calculated using thermodynamic data of fine-grained goethite. This suggests that Fe redox system is related to the Eh values of shallow groundwater in the Aomori City aquifer.

  10. Redox Potential as a Means to Control the Treatment of Slurry to Lower H2S Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Hjorth, Maibritt; Pedersen, Christina Ø; Feilberg, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Slurry can be oxidized to eliminate undesirable emissions, including malodorous hydrogen sulfide (H2S). However, it is difficult to assess the optimal amount of oxidizing agent required. In this study, one cow and one pig manure, each in three particle size ranges were oxidized with 0–350 mg ozone/L manure. Redox and H2S concentration were measured continuously. During ozonation the manures gave equivalent redox potential curves. A relatively rapid rise in redox potential was observed within a range of −275 mV to −10 mV, with all manures changing as a minimum from −200 mV to −80 mV. The gaseous H2S emissions were decreased by 99.5% during the redox increase (−200 mV to −80 mV). This is attributed to H2S oxidation by ozone and oxygen, and is not due to H2S deprotonation or gas flushing. By identifying the initiation of the final redox level following the rise, the amount of ozone required to remove H2S from the manure samples was estimated to be in the range of 6–24 mg O3/L manure, depending on the type of manure. Hence, continuous monitoring of redox potential (termination of the redox rise) during the oxidation treatment is a simple method of achieving cost-effective minimization of H2S emissions from slurry. PMID:22778588

  11. Metabolic efficiency of Geobacter sulfurreducens growing on anodes with different redox potentials.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Julian; Lee, Keun-Young; Hong, Siang-Fu; Harnisch, Falk; Schröder, Uwe; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2014-06-01

    Microorganisms respiring Fe(III) in the environment face a range of redox potentials of the prospective terminal ferric electron acceptors, because Fe(III) can be present in different minerals or organic complexes. We investigated the adaptation of Geobacter sulfurreducens to this range by exposing the bacteria to different redox potentials between the electron donor acetate and solid, extracellular anodes in a microbial fuel-cell set-up. Over a range of anode potentials from -0.105 to +0.645 V versus standard hydrogen electrode, G. sulfurreducens produced identical amounts of biomass per electron respired. This indicated that the organism cannot utilize higher available energies for energy conservation to ATP, and confirmed recent studies. Either the high potentials cannot be used due to physiological limitations, or G. sulfurreducens decreased its metabolic efficiency, and less biomass per unit of energy was produced. In this case, G. sulfurreducens "wasted" energy at high-potential differences, most likely as heat to fuel growth kinetics. PMID:24554342

  12. Chemical and structural indicators for large redox potentials in Fe-based positive electrode materials.

    PubMed

    Melot, Brent C; Scanlon, David O; Reynaud, Marine; Rousse, Gwenaëlle; Chotard, Jean-Noël; Henry, Marc; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2014-07-23

    Li-ion batteries have enabled a revolution in the way portable consumer-electronics are powered and will play an important role as large-scale electrochemical storage applications like electric vehicles and grid-storage are developed. The ability to identify and design promising new positive insertion electrodes will be vital in continuing to push Li-ion technology to its fullest potential. Utilizing a combination of computational tools and structural analysis, we report new indicators which will facilitate the recognition of phases with the desired redox potential. Most importantly of these, we find there is a strong correlation between the presence of Li ions sitting in close-proximity to the redox center of polyanionic phases and the open circuit voltage in Fe-based cathodes. This common structural feature suggests that the bonding associated with Li may have a secondary inductive effect which increases the ionic character of Fe bonds beyond what is typically expected based purely on arguments of electronegativity associated with the polyanionic group. This correlation is supported by ab initio calculations which show the Bader charge increases (reflecting an increased ionicity) in a nearly linear fashion with the experimental cell potentials. These features are demonstrated to be consistent across a wide variety of compositions and structures and should help to facilitate the design of new, high-potential, and environmentally sustainable insertion electrodes. PMID:24588538

  13. A few key residues determine the high redox potential shift in azurin mutants.

    PubMed

    Zanetti-Polzi, Laura; Bortolotti, Carlo A; Daidone, Isabella; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea; Corni, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    The wide range of variability of the reduction potential (E(0)) of blue-copper proteins has been the subject of a large number of studies in the past several years. In particular, a series of azurin mutants have been recently rationally designed tuning E(0) over a very broad range (700 mV) without significantly altering the redox-active site [Marshall et al., Nature, 2009, 462, 113]. This clearly suggests that interactions outside the primary coordination sphere are relevant to determine E(0) in cupredoxins. However, the molecular determinants of the redox potential variability are still undisclosed. Here, by means of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and hybrid quantum/classical calculations, the mechanisms that determine the E(0) shift of two azurin mutants with high potential shifts are unravelled. The reduction potentials of native azurin and of the mutants are calculated obtaining results in good agreement with the experiments. The analysis of the simulations reveals that only a small number of residues (including non-mutated ones) are relevant in determining the experimentally observed E(0) variation via site-specific, but diverse, mechanisms. These findings open the path to the rational design of new azurin mutants with different E(0). PMID:26381463

  14. Impact of hydroquinone used as a redox effector model on potential denitrification, microbial activity and redox condition of a cultivable soil.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Elda B R

    2015-01-01

    In this microcosm study, we analyzed the effect produced by hydroquinone on the expression of soil biological denitrification, in relation to the redox state of the soil, both in terms of intensity factor (Eh') and capacity factor (amount of oxidized or reduced compounds). The supplementation of an Argiudoll soil with hydroquinone decreased the soil apparent reduction potential (Eh') and soil dehydrogenase activity (formazan production from tetrazolium chloride reduction; redox capacity factor), the relationship between both factors being highly significative, r=0.99 (p<0.001). The bacterial population (measured by colony forming units) increased, and the production of N2O was greater (p<0.001) at 200 and 400μg/g dry soil doses. Furthermore, there was an inverse relationship between soil dehydrogenase activity and the number of bacteria (r=-0.82; p<0.05), increased denitrification activity and changes in the CO2/N2O ratio value. These results suggest that hydroquinone at supplemented doses modified the soil redox state and the functional structure of the microbial population. Acetate supplementation on soil with hydroquinone, to ensure the availability of an energy source for microbial development, confirmed the tendency of the results obtained with the supplementation of hydroquinone alone. The differences observed at increased doses of hydroquinone might be explained by differences on the hydroquinone redox species between treatments. PMID:26364186

  15. Bacterial Fe(II) oxidation distinguished by long-range correlation in redox potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, Allison M. L.; Ferris, F. Grant

    2016-05-01

    The kinetics of bacterial Fe(II) oxidation was investigated 297 m underground at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (near Oskarshamn, Sweden) under steady state groundwater flow conditions in a flow-through cell containing well-developed flocculent mats of bacteriogenic iron oxides (BIOS). Pseudo first-order rate constants of 0.004 min-1 and 0.009 min-1 were obtained for chemical and bacterial Fe(II) oxidation, respectively, based on the 104 min retention time of groundwater in the flow cell, inlet Fe(II) concentration of 21.0 ± 0.5 µm, outlet Fe(II) concentration of 8.5 ± 0.7 µm, as well as constant pH = - log H+ of 7.42 ± 0.01, dissolved O2 concentration of 0.11 ± 0.01 mg/L, and groundwater temperature of 12.4 ± 0.1°C. Redox potential was lower at the BIOS-free inlet (-135.4 ± 1.16 mV) compared to inside BIOS within the flow cell (-112.6 ± 1.91 mV), consistent with the Nernst relationship and oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Further evaluation of the redox potential time series data using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) revealed power law scaling in the amplitude of fluctuations over increasing intervals of time with significantly different (p < 0.01) DFA α scaling exponents of 1.89 ± 0.03 for BIOS and 1.67 ± 0.06 at the inlet. These α values not only signal the presence of long-range correlation in the redox potential time series measurements but also distinguish between the slower rate of chemical Fe(II) oxidation at the inlet and faster rate accelerated by FeOB in BIOS.

  16. One-time intrathecal triamcinolone acetonide application alters the redox potential in cerebrospinal fluid of progressive multiple sclerosis patients: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Thomas; Herrling, Thomas; Lütge, Sven; Lohse, Lutz; Öhm, Gabi; Jung, Katinka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebrospinal fluid analysis may provide insight into the interplay between chronic inflammation and response to treatment. Objectives: To demonstrate the impact of one intrathecal triamcinolone injection on the redox potential and on ascorbyl radical appearance in the cerebrospinal fluid of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis patients. Methods: A total of 16 patients received 40 mg triamcinolone. Electron-spin resonance spectroscopy measured the oxidation range after copper ion [Cu (II)] addition and ascorbyl-radical bioavailability. Results: There was an increase of Cu (II) ion absorption, which reflects an augmented content of reduced proteins. Ascorbyl radicals were present in contrast to healthy controls according to the literature. Conclusion: Intrathecal steroid application alters the redox potential in cerebrospinal fluid. Our findings support the beneficial role of steroids on oxidative stress generally demonstrated by ascorbyl radical appearance. Reactive oxygen species decline is necessary for an upregulated production of reduced proteins. PMID:27366232

  17. Extending the essential dynamics analysis to investigate molecular properties: application to the redox potential of proteins.

    PubMed

    Zanetti-Polzi, Laura; Corni, Stefano; Daidone, Isabella; Amadei, Andrea

    2016-07-21

    Here, a methodology is proposed to investigate the collective fluctuation modes of an arbitrary set of observables, maximally contributing to the fluctuation of another functionally relevant observable. The methodology, based on the analysis of fully classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, exploits the essential dynamics (ED) method, originally developed to analyse the collective motions in proteins. We apply this methodology to identify the residues that are more relevant for determining the reduction potential (E(0)) of a redox-active protein. To this aim, the fluctuation modes of the single-residue electrostatic potentials mostly contributing to the fluctuations of the total electrostatic potential (the main determinant of E(0)) are investigated for wild-type azurin and two of its mutants with a higher E(0). By comparing the results here obtained with a previous study on the same systems [Zanetti-Polzi et al., Org. Biomol. Chem., 2015, 13, 11003] we show that the proposed methodology is able to identify the key sites that determine E(0). This information can be used for a general deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms on the basis of the redox properties of the proteins under investigation, as well as for the rational design of mutants with a higher or lower E(0). From the results of the present analysis we propose a new azurin mutant that, according to our calculations, shows a further increase of E(0). PMID:27339768

  18. Electrode effects on temporal changes in electrolyte pH and redox potential for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Ciblak, Ali; Mao, Xuhui; Padilla, Ingrid; Vesper, Dorothy; Alshawabkeh, Iyad; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-01-01

    The performance of electrochemical remediation methods could be optimized by controlling the physicochemical conditions of the electrochemical redox system. The effects of anode type (reactive or inert), current density and electrolyte composition on the temporal changes in pH and redox potential of the electrolyte were evaluated in divided and mixed electrolytes. Two types of electrodes were used: iron as a reactive electrode and mixed metal oxide coated titanium (MMO) as an inert electrode. Electric currents of 15, 30, 45 and 60 mA (37.5 mA L(-1), 75 mA L(-1), 112.5 mA L(-1) and 150 mA L(-1)) were applied. Solutions of NaCl, Na(2)SO(4) and NaHCO(3) were selected to mimic different wastewater or groundwater compositions. Iron anodes resulted in highly reducing electrolyte conditions compared to inert anodes. Electrolyte pH was dependent on electrode type, electrolyte composition and current density. The pH of mixed-electrolyte was stable when MMO electrodes were used. When iron electrodes were used, the pH of electrolyte with relatively low current density (37.5 mA L(-1)) did not show significant changes but the pH increased sharply for relatively high current density (150 mA L(-1)). Sulfate solution showed more basic and relatively more reducing electrolyte conditions compared to bicarbonate and chloride solution. The study shows that a highly reducing environment could be achieved using iron anodes in divided or mixed electrolytes and the pH and redox potential could be optimized using appropriate current and polarity reversal. PMID:22416866

  19. Electrode effects on temporal changes in electrolyte pH and redox potential for water treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ciblak, Ali; Mao, Xuhui; Padilla, Ingrid; Vesper, Dorothy; Alshawabkeh, Iyad; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of electrochemical remediation methods could be optimized by controlling the physicochemical conditions of the electrochemical redox system. The effects of anode type (reactive or inert), current density and electrolyte composition on the temporal changes in pH and redox potential of the electrolyte were evaluated in divided and mixed electrolytes. Two types of electrodes were used: iron as a reactive electrode and mixed metal oxide coated titanium (MMO) as an inert electrode. Electric currents of 15, 30, 45 and 60 mA (37.5 mA L−1, 75 mA L−1, 112.5 mA L−1 and 150 mA L−1) were applied. Solutions of NaCl, Na2SO4 and NaHCO3 were selected to mimic different wastewater or groundwater composition. Iron anodes resulted in highly reducing electrolyte conditions compared to inert anodes. Electrolyte pH was dependent on electrode type, electrolyte composition and current density. The pH of mixed-electrolyte was stable when MMO electrodes were used. When iron electrodes were used, the pH of electrolyte with relatively low current density (37.5 mA L−1) did not show significant changes but the pH increased sharply for relatively high current density (150 mA L−1). Sulfate solution showed more basic and relatively more reducing electrolyte condition compared to bicarbonate and chloride solution. The study shows that a highly reducing environment could be achieved using iron anodes in divided or mixed electrolytes and the pH and redox potential could be optimized by using appropriate current and polarity reversal. PMID:22416866

  20. Donor atom electrochemical contribution to redox potentials of square pyramidal vanadyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Vlasiou, Manolis; Drouza, Chryssoula; Kabanos, Themistoklis A; Keramidas, Anastasios D

    2015-06-01

    A simple donor atom additivity relationship has been used to calculate the donor atom electrochemical contribution (DEC) of the Oac (acetylacetonate-enolic oxygen), OPh (phenolic oxygen), SPh (mercaptophenol sulfur), Nam (deprotonate amide nitrogen), Nim (imine nitrogen) and Npy (pyridine nitrogen) to the redox processes of the square pyramidal vanadyl complexes. The study focuses on the amidate vanadyl complexes because of (a) their biological interest and (b) the existence of data from plethora complexes studied in great details. The electrochemical contributions for the vanadyl oxidation and reduction processes increase following the same order, OPh~Oac(enolic)potentials of square pyramidal vanadyl complexes with high accuracy. Octahedral complexes with the same equatorial environment show significant shift of the oxidation potentials to lower values. The DEC influence to the square pyramidal vanadyls' electrochemical potentials has been evaluated. PMID:25660671

  1. Redox probing study of the potential dependence of charge transport through Li2O2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knudsen, Kristian B.; Luntz, Alan C.; Jensen, Søren H.; Vegge, Tejs; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-11-20

    In the field of energy storage devices the pursuit for cheap, high energy density, reliable secondary batteries is at the top of the agenda. The Li–O2 battery is one of the possible technologies that, in theory, should be able to close the gap, which exists between the present state-of-the-art Li-ion technologies and the demand placed on batteries by technologies such as electrical vehicles. Here we present a redox probing study of the charge transfer across the main deposition product lithium peroxide, Li2O2, in the Li–O2 battery using outer-sphere redox shuttles. The change in heterogeneous electron transfer exchange rate as amore » function of the potential and the Li2O2 layer thickness (~depth-of-discharge) was determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the attenuation of the electron transfer exchange rate with film thickness is dependent on the probing potential, providing evidence that hole transport is the dominant process for charge transfer through Li2O2 and showing that the origin of the sudden death observed upon discharge is due to charge transport limitations.« less

  2. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-03-25

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemesb The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on hemebligand mutants of cytochromebc1in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functionalin vivo This reveals that cytochromebc1can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemesbin this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromesbact as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. PMID:26858251

  3. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer*

    PubMed Central

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-01-01

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemes b. The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on heme b ligand mutants of cytochrome bc1 in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functional in vivo. This reveals that cytochrome bc1 can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemes b in this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromes b act as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. PMID:26858251

  4. The relationship between redox enzyme activity and electrochemical potential-cellular and mechanistic implications from protein film electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gates, Andrew J; Kemp, Gemma L; To, Chun Yip; Mann, James; Marritt, Sophie J; Mayes, Andrew G; Richardson, David J; Butt, Julea N

    2011-05-01

    In protein film electrochemistry a redox protein of interest is studied as an electroactive film adsorbed on an electrode surface. For redox enzymes this configuration allows quantification of the relationship between catalytic activity and electrochemical potential. Considered as a function of enzyme environment, i.e., pH, substrate concentration etc., the activity-potential relationship provides a fingerprint of activity unique to a given enzyme. Here we consider the nature of the activity-potential relationship in terms of both its cellular impact and its origin in the structure and catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. We propose that the activity-potential relationship of a redox enzyme is tuned to facilitate cellular function and highlight opportunities to test this hypothesis through computational, structural, biochemical and cellular studies. PMID:21423952

  5. Modulating the Redox Potential of the Stable Electron Acceptor, QB, in Mutagenized Photosystem II Reaction Centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Perrine, Zoee; Sayre, Richard

    2011-02-10

    One of the unique features of electron transfer processes in photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers (RC) is the exclusive transfer of electrons down only one of the two parallel cofactor branches. In contrast to the RC core polypeptides (psaA and psaB) of photosystem I (PSI), where electron transfer occurs down both parallel redox-active cofactor branches, there is greater protein-cofactor asymmetry between the PSII RC core polypeptides (D1 and D2). We have focused on the identification of protein-cofactor relationships that determine the branch along which primary charge separation occurs (P680+/pheophytin-(Pheo)). We have previously shown that mutagenesis of the strong hydrogen-bonding residue, D1-E130, to less polar residues (D1-E130Q,H,L) shifted the midpoint potential of the PheoD1/PheoD1- couple to more negative values, reducing the quantum yield of primary charge separation. We did not observe, however, electron transfer down the inactive branch in D1-E130 mutants. The protein residue corresponding to D1-E130 on the inactive branch is D2-Q129 which presumably has a reduced hydrogen-bonding interaction with PheoD2 relative to the D1-E130 residue with PheoD1. Analysis of the recent 2.9 Å cyanobacterial PSII crystal structure indicated, however, that the D2-Q129 residue was too distant from the PheoD2 headgroup to serve as a possible hydrogen bond donor and directly impact its midpoint potential as well as potentially determine the directionality of electron transfer. Our objective was to characterize the function of this highly conserved inactive branch residue by replacing it with a nonconservative leucine or a conservative histidine residue. Measurements of Chl fluorescence decay kinetics and thermoluminescence studies indicate that the mutagenesis of D2-Q129 decreases the redox gap between QA and QB due to a lowering of the redox potential of QB. The

  6. Redox potential characterization and soil greenhouse gas concentration across a hydrological gradient in a Gulf coast forest.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kewei; Faulkner, Stephen P; Patrick, William H

    2006-02-01

    Soil redox potential (Eh), concentrations of oxygen (O2) and three greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, and N2O) were measured in the soil profile of a coastal forest at ridge, transition, and swamp across a hydrological gradient. The results delineated a distinct boundary in soil Eh and O2 concentration between the ridge and swamp with essentially no overlap between the two locations. Critical soil Eh to initiate significant CH4 production under this field conditions was about +300 mV, much higher than in the homogenous soils (about -150 mV). The strength of CH4 source to the atmosphere was strong for the swamp, minor for the transition, and negligible or even negative (consumption) for the ridge. Maximum N2O concentration in the soils was found at about Eh +250 mV, and the soil N2O emission was estimated to account for less than 4% for the ridge and transition, and almost negligible for the swamp in the cumulative global warming potential (GWP) of these three gases. The dynamic nature of this study site in response to water table fluctuations across a hydrological gradient makes it an ideal model of impact of future sea level rise to coastal ecosystems. Soil carbon (C) sequestration potential due to increasing soil water content upon sea level rise and subsidence in this coastal forest was likely limited and temporal, and at the expense of increasing soil CH4 production and emission. PMID:16043211

  7. Redox potential characterization and soil greenhouse gas concentration across a hydrological gradient in a Gulf coast forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yu, K.; Faulkner, S.P.; Patrick, W.H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Soil redox potential (Eh), concentrations of oxygen (O2) and three greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, and N2O) were measured in the soil profile of a coastal forest at ridge, transition, and swamp across a hydrological gradient. The results delineated a distinct boundary in soil Eh and O2 concentration between the ridge and swamp with essentially no overlap between the two locations. Critical soil Eh to initiate significant CH4 production under this field conditions was about +300 mV, much higher than in the homogenous soils (about -150 mV). The strength of CH4 source to the atmosphere was strong for the swamp, minor for the transition, and negligible or even negative (consumption) for the ridge. Maximum N2O concentration in the soils was found at about Eh +250 mV, and the soil N2O emission was estimated to account for less than 4% for the ridge and transition, and almost negligible for the swamp in the cumulative global warming potential (GWP) of these three gases. The dynamic nature of this study site in response to water table fluctuations across a hydrological gradient makes it an ideal model of impact of future sea level rise to coastal ecosystems. Soil carbon (C) sequestration potential due to increasing soil water content upon sea level rise and subsidence in this coastal forest was likely limited and temporal, and at the expense of increasing soil CH4 production and emission. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Design of an Os Complex-Modified Hydrogel with Optimized Redox Potential for Biosensors and Biofuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Pinyou, Piyanut; Ruff, Adrian; Pöller, Sascha; Ma, Su; Ludwig, Roland; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Multistep synthesis and electrochemical characterization of an Os complex-modified redox hydrogel exhibiting a redox potential ≈+30 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl 3 M KCl) is demonstrated. The careful selection of bipyridine-based ligands bearing N,N-dimethylamino moieties and an amino-linker for the covalent attachment to the polymer backbone ensures the formation of a stable redox polymer with an envisaged redox potential close to 0 V. Most importantly, the formation of an octahedral N6-coordination sphere around the Os central atoms provides improved stability concomitantly with the low formal potential, a low reorganization energy during the Os(3+/2+) redox conversion and a negligible impact on oxygen reduction. By wiring a variety of enzymes such as pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase and the FAD-dependent dehydrogenase domain of cellobiose dehydrogenase, low-potential glucose biosensors could be obtained with negligible co-oxidation of common interfering compounds such as uric acid or ascorbic acid. In combination with a bilirubin oxidase-based biocathode, enzymatic biofuel cells with open-circuit voltages of up to 0.54 V were obtained. PMID:26929043

  9. Effects of sulfide and low redox potential on the inhibition of nitrous oxide reduction by acetylene in Pseudomonas nautica.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K M; Cox, R P

    1992-09-01

    Membrane introduction mass spectrometry was used to investigate the inhibitory effect of acetylene on the nitrous oxide reductase activity of intact cells of Pseudomonas nautica. We studied the effects of the concentrations of nitrate and sulfide, and the redox potential, which have all been implicated in causing a decrease in the inhibitory effects of acetylene during measurements of denitrification in natural environments. There was no evidence that the concentration of nitrate influenced the effect of acetylene. Lowering the redox potential with the reductant Ti(III)-nitrilotriacetate caused a slight alleviation of acetylene inhibition. Much greater effects at the same redox potential were obtained with concentrations of sulfide in the range 1-10 microM. PMID:1526461

  10. Determination of the in vivo redox potential using roGFP and fluorescence spectra obtained from one-wavelength excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierer, S.; Elgass, K.; Bieker, S.; Zentgraf, U.; Meixner, A. J.; Schleifenbaum, F.

    2011-02-01

    The analysis of molecular processes in living (plant) cells such as signal transduction, DNA replication, carbon metabolism and senescence has been revolutionized by the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants as specific cellular markers. Many cell biological processes are accompanied by changes in the intracellular redox potential. To monitor the redox potential, a redox-sensitive mutant of GFP (roGFP) was created, which shows changes in its optical properties in response to changes in the redox state of its surrounding medium. For a quantitative analysis in living systems, it is essential to know the optical properties of roGFP in vitro. Therefore, we applied spectrally resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on purified roGFP exposed to different redox potentials to determine shifts in both the absorption and the emission spectra of roGFP. Based on these in vitro findings, we introduce a new approach using one-wavelength excitation to use roGFP for the in vivo analysis of cell biological processes. We demonstrate the ability this technique by investigating chloroplast-located Grx1-roGFP2 expressing Arabidopsis thaliana cells as example for dynamically moving intracellular compartments. This is not possible with the two-wavelength excitation technique established so far, which hampers a quantitative analysis of highly mobile samples due to the time delay between the two measurements and the consequential displacement of the investigated area.

  11. Dietary Sulfur Amino Acid Effects on Fasting Plasma Cysteine/Cystine Redox Potential in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.; Park, Youngja; Gletsu-Miller, Nana; Liang, Yongliang; Yu, Tianwei; Accardi, Carolyn Jonas; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Oxidation of plasma cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) redox potential (EhCySS) has been associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease in humans. Cys and CySS are derived from dietary sulfur amino acids (SAA), but the specific effects of SAA depletion and repletion on Cys/CySS redox indices are unknown. The present study examined the effect of dietary SAA intake level on free Cys, free CySS and EhCySS in human plasma under fasting conditions. Research Methods and Procedures Healthy individuals aged 18–36 y (n=13) were equilibrated to foods providing the RDA for SAA and then fed chemically defined diets without SAA (0 mg·kg−1·d−1; n=13) followed by SAA at levels approximating the mean (56 mg·kg−1·d−1; n=8) or 99th percentile (117 mg·kg−1·d−1; n=5) intake levels of Americans. Fasting plasma samples were collected daily during 4-d study periods and analyzed for free Cys, free CySS and the EhCySS. Results The SAA-free diet significantly (p<0.05) decreased plasma free Cys concentrations and oxidized EhCySS values after 4 days of SAA depletion. With SAA repletion at 56 mg·kg−1·d− 1, plasma free Cys increased significantly and values for EhCySS became more reducing. Administration of a diet providing a higher dose of SAA (117 mg·kg−1·d−1) resulted in a significantly higher level of free Cys and a more reducing EhCySS. Conclusions These results show that free Cys and Cys/CySS redox potential (EhCySS) in fasting plasma are affected by dietary SAA intake level in humans. Significant changes occur slowly over 4 days with insufficient SAA intake, but rapidly (after 1 day) with repletion. PMID:20471805

  12. Effect of Oxygen and Redox Potential on Glucose Fermentation in Thermotoga maritima under Controlled Physicochemical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lakhal, Raja; Auria, Richard; Davidson, Sylvain; Ollivier, Bernard; Dolla, Alain; Hamdi, Moktar; Combet-Blanc, Yannick

    2010-01-01

    Batch cultures of Thermotoga maritima were performed in a bioreactor equipped with instruments adapted for experiments performed at 80°C to mimic the fluctuating oxidative conditions in the hot ecosystems it inhabits. When grown anaerobically on glucose, T. maritima was shown to significantly decrease the redox potential (Eh) of the culture medium down to about −480 mV, as long as glucose was available. Addition of oxygen into T. maritima cultures during the stationary growth phase led to a drastic reduction in glucose consumption rate. However, although oxygen was toxic, our experiment unambiguously proved that T. maritima was able to consume it during a 12-hour exposure period. Furthermore, a shift in glucose metabolism towards lactate production was observed under oxidative conditions. PMID:21461371

  13. First-principles prediction of redox potentials in transition-metal compounds with LDA+U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Cococcioni, M.; Marianetti, C. A.; Morgan, D.; Ceder, G.

    2004-12-01

    First-principles calculations within the local density approximation (LDA) or generalized gradient approximation (GGA), though very successful, are known to underestimate redox potentials, such as those at which lithium intercalates in transition metal compounds. We argue that this inaccuracy is related to the lack of cancellation of electron self-interaction errors in LDA/GGA and can be improved by using the DFT+U method with a self-consistent evaluation of the U parameter. We show that, using this approach, the experimental lithium intercalation voltages of a number of transition metal compounds, including the olivine LixMPO4 ( M=Mn , Fe Co, Ni), layered LixMO2 ( x=Co , Ni) and spinel-like LixM2O4 ( M=Mn , Co), can be reproduced accurately.

  14. Redox Potential Ultrasensitive Nanoparticle for the Targeted Delivery of Camptothecin to HER2-Positive Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ideal “smart” nanoparticles for drug delivery should enhance therapeutic efficacy without introducing side effects. To achieve that, we developed a drug delivery system (HCN) based on a polymer–drug conjugate of poly[2-(pyridin-2-yldisulfanyl)]-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) and camptothecin with an intracellularly cleavable linker and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) targeting ligands. An in vitro drug release study found that HCN was stable in the physiological environment and supersensitive to the stimulus of elevated intracellular redox potential, releasing all payloads in less than 30 min. Furthermore, confocal microscopy revealed that HCN could specifically enter HER2-positive cancer cells. As a consequence, HCN could effectively kill HER2-positive cancer cells while not affecting HER2-negative cells. PMID:24779647

  15. Semi-continuum electrostatic calculations of redox potentials in photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Ptushenko, Vasily V; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Krishtalik, Lev I; Semenov, Alexey Yu

    2008-07-01

    The midpoint redox potentials (E(m)) of all cofactors in photosystem I from Synechococcus elongatus as well as of the iron-sulfur (Fe(4)S(4)) clusters in two soluble ferredoxins from Azotobacter vinelandii and Clostridium acidiurici were calculated within the framework of a semi-continuum dielectric approach. The widely used treatment of proteins as uniform media with single dielectric permittivity is oversimplified, particularly, because permanent charges are considered both as a source for intraprotein electric field and as a part of dielectric polarizability. Our approach overcomes this inconsistency by using two dielectric constants: optical epsilon(o)=2.5 for permanent charges pre-existing in crystal structure, and static epsilon(s) for newly formed charges. We also take into account a substantial dielectric heterogeneity of photosystem I revealed by photoelectric measurements and a liquid junction potential correction for E(m) values of relevant redox cofactors measured in aprotic solvents. We show that calculations based on a single permittivity have the discrepancy with experimental data larger than 0.7 V, whereas E(m) values calculated within our approach fall in the range of experimental estimates. The electrostatic analysis combined with quantum chemistry calculations shows that (i) the energy decrease upon chlorophyll dimerization is essential for the downhill mode of primary charge separation between the special pair P(700) and the primary acceptor A(0); (ii) the primary donor is apparently P(700) but not a pair of accessory chlorophylls; (iii) the electron transfer from the A branch quinone Q(A) to the iron-sulfur cluster F(X) is most probably downhill, whereas that from the B branch quinone Q(B) to F(X) is essentially downhill. PMID:18483776

  16. Hybrid density functional calculations of redox potentials and formation energies of transition metal compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrier, V. L.; Ong, S. P.; Armiento, R.; Chan, M. K. Y.; Ceder, G.

    2010-08-01

    We compare the accuracy of conventional semilocal density functional theory (DFT), the DFT+U method, and the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE06) hybrid functional for structural parameters, redox reaction energies, and formation energies of transition metal compounds. Conventional DFT functionals significantly underestimate redox potentials for these compounds. Zhou [Phys. Rev. B 70, 235121 (2004)]10.1103/PhysRevB.70.235121 addressed this issue with DFT+U and a linear-response scheme for calculating U values. We show that the Li intercalation potentials of prominent Li-ion intercalation battery materials, such as the layered LixMO2 ( M=Co and Ni), LixTiS2 ; olivine LixMPO4 ( M=Mn , Fe, Co, and Ni); and spinel-like LixMn2O4 , LixTi2O4 , are also well reproduced by HSE06, due to the self-interaction error correction from the partial inclusion of Hartree-Fock exchange. For formation energies, HSE06 performs well for transition metal compounds, which typically are not well reproduced by conventional DFT functionals but does not significantly improve the results of nontransition metal oxides. Hence, we find that hybrid functionals provide a good alternative to DFT+U for transition metal applications when the large extra computational effort is compensated by the benefits of (i) avoiding species-specific adjustable parameters and (ii) a more universal treatment of the self-interaction error that is not exclusive to specific atomic orbital projections on selected ions.

  17. Redox chemistry of copper-amyloid-beta: the generation of hydroxyl radical in the presence of ascorbate is linked to redox-potentials and aggregation state.

    PubMed

    Guilloreau, Luc; Combalbert, Sarah; Sournia-Saquet, Alix; Mazarguil, Honoré; Faller, Peter

    2007-07-23

    Aggregation of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) to amyloid plaques is a key event in Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid-cascade hypothesis, Abeta aggregates are toxic to neurons through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Copper ions play an important role, because they are able to bind to Abeta and influence its aggregation properties. Moreover, Cu-Abeta is supposed to be directly involved in ROS production. To get a better understanding of these reactions, we measured the production of HO(.) and the redox potential of Cu-Abeta. The results were compared to other biological copper-peptide complexes in order to get an insight into the biological relevance. Cu-Abeta produced more HO(.) than the complex of copper with Asp-Ala-His-Lys (Cu-DAHK), but less than with Gly-His-Lys (Cu-GHK). Cyclic voltammetry revealed that the order for reduction potential is Cu-GHK>Cu-Abeta>Cu-DAHK, but for the oxidation potential the order is reversed. Thus, easier copper redox cycling correlated to higher HO(.) production. The copper complex of the form Abeta1-42 showed a HO(.) production five-times higher than that of the form Abeta1-40. Time-dependence and aggregation studies suggest that an aggregation intermediate is responsible for this increased HO(.) production. PMID:17577900

  18. Discharging a Li-S battery with ultra-high sulphur content cathode using a redox mediator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwi Ryong; Lee, Kug-Seung; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Yu, Seung-Ho; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-sulphur batteries are under intense research due to the high specific capacity and low cost. However, several problems limit their commercialization. One of them is the insulating nature of sulphur, which necessitates a large amount of conductive agent and binder in the cathode, reducing the effective sulphur load as well as the energy density. Here we introduce a redox mediator, cobaltocene, which acts as an electron transfer agent between the conductive surface and the polysulphides in the electrolyte. We confirmed that cobaltocene could effectively convert polysulphides to Li2S using scanning electron microscope, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and in-situ X-ray diffraction studies. This redox mediator enabled excellent electrochemical performance in a cathode with ultra-high sulphur content (80 wt%). It delivered 400 mAh g(-1)cathode capacity after 50 cycles, which is equivalent to 800 mAh g(-1)S in a typical cathode with 50 wt% sulphur. Furthermore, the volumetric capacity was also dramatically improved. PMID:27573528

  19. Discharging a Li-S battery with ultra-high sulphur content cathode using a redox mediator

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwi Ryong; Lee, Kug-Seung; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Yu, Seung-Ho; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-sulphur batteries are under intense research due to the high specific capacity and low cost. However, several problems limit their commercialization. One of them is the insulating nature of sulphur, which necessitates a large amount of conductive agent and binder in the cathode, reducing the effective sulphur load as well as the energy density. Here we introduce a redox mediator, cobaltocene, which acts as an electron transfer agent between the conductive surface and the polysulphides in the electrolyte. We confirmed that cobaltocene could effectively convert polysulphides to Li2S using scanning electron microscope, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and in-situ X-ray diffraction studies. This redox mediator enabled excellent electrochemical performance in a cathode with ultra-high sulphur content (80 wt%). It delivered 400 mAh g−1cathode capacity after 50 cycles, which is equivalent to 800 mAh g−1S in a typical cathode with 50 wt% sulphur. Furthermore, the volumetric capacity was also dramatically improved. PMID:27573528

  20. Rapid and Automated Analytical Methods for Redox Species Based on Potentiometric Flow Injection Analysis Using Potential Buffers

    PubMed Central

    Ohura, Hiroki; Imato, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Two analytical methods, which prove the utility of a potentiometric flow injection technique for determining various redox species, based on the use of some redox potential buffers, are reviewed. The first is a potentiometric flow injection method in which a redox couple such as Fe(III)-Fe(II), Fe(CN)6 3−-Fe(CN)(CN)6 4−, and bromide-bromine and a redox electrode or a combined platinum-bromide ion selective electrode are used. The analytical principle and advantages of the method are discussed, and several examples of its application are reported. Another example is a highly sensitive potentiometric flow injection method, in which a large transient potential change due to bromine or chlorine as an intermediate, generated during the reaction of the oxidative species with an Fe(III)-Fe(II) potential buffer containing bromide or chloride, is utilized. The analytical principle and details of the proposed method are described, and examples of several applications are described. The determination of trace amounts of hydrazine, based on the detection of a transient change in potential caused by the reaction with a Ce(IV)-Ce(III) potential buffer, is also described. PMID:21584280

  1. Characterization of apoplast phenolics: Invitro oxidation of acetosyringone results in a rapid prolonged increase in the redox potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study we observed that if tobacco cell suspensions were inoculated with certain bacterial strains, several hours later the redox potential of the suspensions would increase (oxidative), as much as 100 mV, and in some cases last more than an hour. To discover possible contributors to t...

  2. Correlation between mammalian cell cytotoxicity of flavonoids and the redox potential of phenoxyl radical/phenol couple.

    PubMed

    Marozienė, Audronė; Nemeikaitė-Čėnienė, Aušra; Vidžiūnaitė, Regina; Čėnas, Narimantas

    2012-01-01

    Flavonoids exhibit prooxidant cytotoxicity in mammalian cells due to the formation of free radicals and oxidation products possessing quinone or quinomethide structure. However, it is unclear how the cytotoxicity of flavonoids depends on the ease of their single-electron oxidation in aqueous medium, i.e., the redox potential of the phenoxyl radical/phenol couple. We verified the previously calculated redox potentials for several flavonoids according to their rates of reduction of cytochrome c and ferricyanide, and proposed experimentally-based values of redox potentials for myricetin, fisetin, morin, kaempferol, galangin, and naringenin. We found that the cytotoxicity of flavonoids (n=10) in bovine leukemia virus-transformed lamb kidney fibroblasts (line FLK) and murine hepatoma (line MH-22a) increases with a decrease in their redox potential of the phenoxyl radical/phenol couple and an increase in their lipophilicity. Their cytotoxicity was decreased by antioxidants and inhibitors of cytochromes P-450, α-naphthoflavone and isoniazide, and increased by an inhibitor of catechol-O-methyltransferase, 3,5-dinitrocatechol. It shows that although the prooxidant action of flavonoids may be the main factor in their cytotoxicity, the hydroxylation and oxidative demethylation by cytochromes P-450 and O-methylation by catechol-O-methyltransferase can significantly modulate the cytotoxicity of the parent compounds. PMID:22696302

  3. The effect of bicarbonate on menadione-induced redox cycling and cytotoxicity: potential involvement of the carbonate radical.

    PubMed

    Aljuhani, Naif; Michail, Karim; Karapetyan, Zubeida; Siraki, Arno G

    2013-10-01

    We have investigated the effect of NaHCO3 on menadione redox cycling and cytotoxicity. A cell-free system utilized menadione and ascorbic acid to catalyze a redox cycle, and we utilized murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells for in vitro experiments. Experiments were performed using low (2 mmol/L) and physiological (25 mmol/L) levels of NaHCO3 in buffer equilibrated to physiological pH. Using oximetry, ascorbic acid oxidation, and ascorbyl radical detection, we found that menadione redox cycling was enhanced by NaHCO3. Furthermore, Hepa 1c1c7 cells treated with menadione demonstrated cytotoxicity that was significantly increased with physiological concentrations of NaHCO3 in the media, compared with low levels of NaHCO3. Interestingly, the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) with 2 different metal chelators was associated with a protective effect against menadione cytotoxicity. Using isolated protein, we found a significant increase in protein carbonyls with menadione-ascorbate-SOD with physiological NaHCO3 levels; low NaHCO3 or SOD-free reactions produced lower levels of protein carbonyls. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the hydrogen peroxide generated by menadione redox cycling together with NaHCO3-CO2 are potential substrates for SOD peroxidase activity that can lead to carbonate-radical-enhanced cytotoxicity. These findings demonstrate the importance of NaHCO3 in menadione redox cycling and cytotoxicity. PMID:24144048

  4. Electron acceptor redox potential globally regulates transcriptomic profiling in Shewanella decolorationis S12.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yingli; Yang, Yonggang; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaojing; Fang, Yun; Gan, Lixia; Xu, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    Electron acceptor redox potential (EARP) was presumed to be a determining factor for microbial metabolism in many natural and engineered processes. However, little is known about the potentially global effects of EARP on bacteria. In this study, we compared the physiological and transcriptomic properties of Shewanella decolorationis S12 respiring with different EARPs in microbial electrochemical systems to avoid the effects caused by the other physicochemical properties of real electron acceptor. Results showed that the metabolic activities of strain S12 were nonlinear responses to EARP. The tricarboxylic acid cycle for central carbon metabolism was down-regulated while glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated at 0.8 V compared to 0.2 and -0.2 V, which suggested that EARP is an important but not the only determinant for metabolic pathways of strain S12. Moreover, few cytochrome c genes were differentially expressed at different EARPs. The energy intensive flagella assembly and assimilatory sulfur metabolism pathways were significantly enriched at 0.8 V, which suggested strain S12 had stronger electrokinesis behavior and oxidative stress-response at high EARP. This study provides the first global information of EARP regulations on microbial metabolism, which will be helpful for understanding microorganism respiration. PMID:27503002

  5. Electron acceptor redox potential globally regulates transcriptomic profiling in Shewanella decolorationis S12

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Yingli; Yang, Yonggang; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaojing; Fang, Yun; Gan, Lixia; Xu, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    Electron acceptor redox potential (EARP) was presumed to be a determining factor for microbial metabolism in many natural and engineered processes. However, little is known about the potentially global effects of EARP on bacteria. In this study, we compared the physiological and transcriptomic properties of Shewanella decolorationis S12 respiring with different EARPs in microbial electrochemical systems to avoid the effects caused by the other physicochemical properties of real electron acceptor. Results showed that the metabolic activities of strain S12 were nonlinear responses to EARP. The tricarboxylic acid cycle for central carbon metabolism was down-regulated while glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated at 0.8 V compared to 0.2 and −0.2 V, which suggested that EARP is an important but not the only determinant for metabolic pathways of strain S12. Moreover, few cytochrome c genes were differentially expressed at different EARPs. The energy intensive flagella assembly and assimilatory sulfur metabolism pathways were significantly enriched at 0.8 V, which suggested strain S12 had stronger electrokinesis behavior and oxidative stress-response at high EARP. This study provides the first global information of EARP regulations on microbial metabolism, which will be helpful for understanding microorganism respiration. PMID:27503002

  6. Electron acceptor redox potential globally regulates transcriptomic profiling in Shewanella decolorationis S12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yingli; Yang, Yonggang; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaojing; Fang, Yun; Gan, Lixia; Xu, Meiying

    2016-08-01

    Electron acceptor redox potential (EARP) was presumed to be a determining factor for microbial metabolism in many natural and engineered processes. However, little is known about the potentially global effects of EARP on bacteria. In this study, we compared the physiological and transcriptomic properties of Shewanella decolorationis S12 respiring with different EARPs in microbial electrochemical systems to avoid the effects caused by the other physicochemical properties of real electron acceptor. Results showed that the metabolic activities of strain S12 were nonlinear responses to EARP. The tricarboxylic acid cycle for central carbon metabolism was down-regulated while glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated at 0.8 V compared to 0.2 and ‑0.2 V, which suggested that EARP is an important but not the only determinant for metabolic pathways of strain S12. Moreover, few cytochrome c genes were differentially expressed at different EARPs. The energy intensive flagella assembly and assimilatory sulfur metabolism pathways were significantly enriched at 0.8 V, which suggested strain S12 had stronger electrokinesis behavior and oxidative stress-response at high EARP. This study provides the first global information of EARP regulations on microbial metabolism, which will be helpful for understanding microorganism respiration.

  7. Relationship between Water Content and Osmotic Potential of Lentinula edodes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Young

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to understand how osmotic potentials in Lentinula edodes tissues are related to water contents and how they change while a mushroom matures. Water content and osmotic potential of L. edodes mushroom tissues from log cultivation and sawdust cultivation were measured and the relationships were analyzed. Osmotic potentials in the tissues were exponentially proportional to their moisture contents and there were strain differences in the potentials. Strain 290 has lower osmotic potential than strain 302, in the tissues at the same water content. As the mushrooms mature, tissue water content maintained ca 94% in head tissues and ca 90% in gills, but significantly decreased from ca 90% to 82% in the stipe tissues. Osmotic potential changes were similar to the tissue water content changes as the mushrooms mature. While osmotic potentials maintained -0.25 to -0.45 MPa in head and gill tissues, the potentials greatly decreased from -0.65 to -1.33MPa in stipe tissues. Our results show that osmotic potentials in L. edodes tissues are exponentially proportional to tissue water contents, that strains differ in osmotic potential related to water, and that stipe tissues can still have nutritional value when they mature. PMID:23997603

  8. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at −150, −100 and −50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation. PMID:27161047

  9. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at -150, -100 and -50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation. PMID:27161047

  10. Combined Quantum Chemistry and Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of the Electronic Structure and Reduction Potentials of Rubredoxin Redox Site Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Shuqiang; Wang, Xue B.; Nichols, J. A.; Wang, Lai S.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2003-04-24

    Iron-sulfur proteins are an important class of electron carriers in a wide variety of biological reactions. Determining the intrinsic contribution of the metal site to the redox potential is crucial in understanding how the protein environment influences the overall redox properties of the Fe-S proteins. Here we combine density functional theory and coupled cluster methods with photodetachment spectroscopy to study the electronic structures and gas-phase redox potentials of the [Fe(SCH3)(4)](2-/-/0) and [Fe(SCH3)(3)](-/0) analogues of the rubredoxin redox site. The calculations show that oxidations of [Fe(SCH3)(4)](2-) and [Fe(SCH3)(4)](-) involve mainly the Fe 3d and S 3p orbitals, respectively. The calculated adiabatic and vertical detachment energies are in good agreement with the experiment for [Fe(SCH3)(3)](-) and [Fe(SCH3)(4)](-). The current results further confirm the "inverted level scheme" for the high-spin [1Fe] systems. The redox couple, [Fe(SCH3)(4)](- /2), which is the one found in rubredoxin, but cannot be accessed experimentally in the gas phase, was investigated using a thermodynamic cycle that relates it to the [Fe(SCH3)(3)](-/0) couple and the ligand association reaction, [Fe(SCH3)(3)](0/-) + SCH3- --> [Fe(SCH3)(4)](-/2-). The calculated reduction energy of [Fe(SCH3)(4)](-) (1.7 eV) compares well with the value (1.6 eV) estimated from the calculated bond energies and the experimental detachment energy of [Fe(SCH3)(3)](-). Thus, this thermodynamic cycle method can be used to estimate metal-ligand bonding energies and determine intrinsic reduction potentials from photodetachment experiments when the reduced forms are not stable in the gas phase.

  11. Brassinosteroid Ameliorates Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles-Induced Oxidative Stress by Improving Antioxidant Potential and Redox Homeostasis in Tomato Seedling.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengqi; Ahammed, Golam J; Li, Caixia; Bao, Xiao; Yu, Jingquan; Huang, Chunlei; Yin, Hanqin; Zhou, Jie

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades use of metal-based nanoparticles (MNPs) has been increased significantly that eventually contaminating agricultural land and limiting crop production worldwide. Moreover, contamination of food chain with MNPs has appeared as a matter of public concern due to risk of potential health hazard. Brassinosteroid has been shown to play a critical role in alleviating heavy metal stress; however, its function in relieving zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs)-induced phytotoxicity remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential role of 24-epibrassinolide (BR) in mitigating ZnO NPs-induced toxicity in tomato seedlings. Seedling growth, biomass production, and root activity gradually decreased, but Zn accumulation increased with increasing ZnO NPs concentration (10-100 mg/L) in growth media (½ MS). The augmentation of BR (5 nM) in media significantly ameliorated 50 mg/L ZnO NPs-induced growth inhibition. Visualization of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and quantification of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in tomato roots confirmed that ZnO NPs induced an oxidative stress. However, combined treatment with BR and ZnO NPs remarkably reduced concentration of H2O2 and MDA as compared with ZnO NPs only treatment, indicating that BR supplementation substantially reduced oxidative stress. Furthermore, the activities of key antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase were increased by combined treatment of BR and ZnO NPs compared with ZnO NPs only treatment. BR also increased reduced glutathione (GSH), but decreased oxidized glutathione (GSSG)] and thus improved cellular redox homeostasis by increasing GSH:GSSG ratio. The changes in relative transcript abundance of corresponding antioxidant genes such as Cu/Zn SOD, CAT1, GSH1, and GR1 were in accordance with the changes in those antioxidants under different treatments. More importantly, combined application of BR and ZnO NPs significantly

  12. Brassinosteroid Ameliorates Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles-Induced Oxidative Stress by Improving Antioxidant Potential and Redox Homeostasis in Tomato Seedling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengqi; Ahammed, Golam J.; Li, Caixia; Bao, Xiao; Yu, Jingquan; Huang, Chunlei; Yin, Hanqin; Zhou, Jie

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades use of metal-based nanoparticles (MNPs) has been increased significantly that eventually contaminating agricultural land and limiting crop production worldwide. Moreover, contamination of food chain with MNPs has appeared as a matter of public concern due to risk of potential health hazard. Brassinosteroid has been shown to play a critical role in alleviating heavy metal stress; however, its function in relieving zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs)-induced phytotoxicity remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential role of 24-epibrassinolide (BR) in mitigating ZnO NPs-induced toxicity in tomato seedlings. Seedling growth, biomass production, and root activity gradually decreased, but Zn accumulation increased with increasing ZnO NPs concentration (10–100 mg/L) in growth media (½ MS). The augmentation of BR (5 nM) in media significantly ameliorated 50 mg/L ZnO NPs-induced growth inhibition. Visualization of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and quantification of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in tomato roots confirmed that ZnO NPs induced an oxidative stress. However, combined treatment with BR and ZnO NPs remarkably reduced concentration of H2O2 and MDA as compared with ZnO NPs only treatment, indicating that BR supplementation substantially reduced oxidative stress. Furthermore, the activities of key antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase were increased by combined treatment of BR and ZnO NPs compared with ZnO NPs only treatment. BR also increased reduced glutathione (GSH), but decreased oxidized glutathione (GSSG)] and thus improved cellular redox homeostasis by increasing GSH:GSSG ratio. The changes in relative transcript abundance of corresponding antioxidant genes such as Cu/Zn SOD, CAT1, GSH1, and GR1 were in accordance with the changes in those antioxidants under different treatments. More importantly, combined application of BR and ZnO NPs

  13. Cerium stable isotope ratios in ferromanganese deposits and their potential as a paleo-redox proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Yoshio; Tanimizu, Masaharu

    2016-05-01

    The cerium (Ce) anomaly observed in rare earth element (REE) patterns has been used to estimate the redox state of paleo-marine environments. Cerium is unique because it forms tetravalent cations under oxic conditions, in contrast to the other REEs that occur in a trivalent state. This characteristic leads to anomalously high or low Ce concentrations relative to neighboring REEs. However, the use of Ce anomaly as a paleo-redox proxy is not well calibrated. This study shows that coupling of the Ce anomaly and Ce stable isotope ratio (δ142Ce) is more quantitative redox proxy to distinguish suboxic and oxic redox conditions. Our results revealed a progressive enrichment in heavy Ce isotopes in consecutive formations of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) precipitate from hot spring water without any associated change in REE patterns. The δ142Ce values of Mn precipitates were approximately 0.35‰ heavier than those of the Fe precipitates, which was consistent with experiment-based predictions. The δ142Ce values of marine ferromanganese deposits with three different formation processes were hydrogenetic (+0.25‰) > diagenetic (+0.10‰) ⩾ hydrothermal (+0.05‰), which also reflects redox conditions of their formation environment. These observations suggest that the Ce stable isotope ratios yield more quantitative information regarding redox state than REE patterns alone. We thus suggest that this novel proxy can be successfully utilized to reconstruct marine redox states, particularly from slightly oxic to highly oxic conditions such as the Great Oxidation Event (GOE).

  14. Improving the Oxidative Stability of a High Redox Potential Fungal Peroxidase by Rational Design

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Acebes, Sandra; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103) near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme. PMID:25923713

  15. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Acebes, Sandra; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103) near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme. PMID:25923713

  16. Redox potential of the Khibiny magmatic system and genesis of abiogenic hydrocarbons in alkaline plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, I. D.; Kogarko, L. N.

    2009-12-01

    The temperature and redox conditions of the crystallization of rocks from the Khibiny alkaline pluton have been estimated based on an analysis of coexisting magnetite, ilmenite, titanite, and pyroxene. Under redox conditions characteristic of the Khibiny Complex, CO2 is contained in fluid and carbonate anions are contained in melt at high temperature; then graphite is released and an appreciable amount of hydrocarbons appear at a lower temperature as products of reaction of graphite with fluid. Abiogenic hydrocarbons can arise in igneous complexes owing to a processes distinct from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

  17. Redox-Active Sensing by Bacterial DksA Transcription Factors Is Determined by Cysteine and Zinc Content

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Matthew A.; Tapscott, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Liam F.; Liu, Lin; Reyes, Aníbal M.; Libby, Stephen J.; Trujillo, Madia; Fang, Ferric C.; Radi, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The four-cysteine zinc finger motif of the bacterial RNA polymerase regulator DksA is essential for protein structure, canonical control of the stringent response to nutritional limitation, and thiol-based sensing of oxidative and nitrosative stress. This interdependent relationship has limited our understanding of DksA-mediated functions in bacterial pathogenesis. Here, we have addressed this challenge by complementing ΔdksA Salmonella with Pseudomonas aeruginosa dksA paralogues that encode proteins differing in cysteine and zinc content. We find that four-cysteine, zinc-bound (C4) and two-cysteine, zinc-free (C2) DksA proteins are able to mediate appropriate stringent control in Salmonella and that thiol-based sensing of reactive species is conserved among C2 and C4 orthologues. However, variations in cysteine and zinc content determine the threshold at which individual DksA proteins sense and respond to reactive species. In particular, zinc acts as an antioxidant, dampening cysteine reactivity and raising the threshold of posttranslational thiol modification with reactive species. Consequently, C2 DksA triggers transcriptional responses in Salmonella at levels of oxidative or nitrosative stress normally tolerated by Salmonella expressing C4 orthologues. Inappropriate transcriptional regulation by C2 DksA increases the susceptibility of Salmonella to the antimicrobial effects of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, and attenuates virulence in macrophages and mice. Our findings suggest that the redox-active sensory function of DksA proteins is finely tuned to optimize bacterial fitness according to the levels of oxidative and nitrosative stress encountered by bacterial species in their natural and host environments. PMID:27094335

  18. ELECTRODE MEASUREMENT OF REDOX POTENTIAL IN ANAEROBIC FERRIC/FERROUS CHLORIDE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behaviour of two inert redox electrodes (Pt and wax-impregnated graphite) was investigated in anaerobic ferrous and ferric chloride solutions in order to establish if these electrodes respond to the Fe3+/Fe2+ couple in a Nernstian manner. A new method fo...

  19. REDOX DISRUPTING POTENTIAL OF TOXCAST CHEMICALS RANKED BY ACTIVITY IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To gain insight regarding the adverse outcome pathways leading to developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals, we evaluated ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay and identified a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with al...

  20. Redox Disrupting Potential of ToxCast™Chemicals Ranked by Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known regarding the adverse outcome pathways responsible for developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals. An evaluation of Toxoast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay revealed a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with...

  1. ELECTRODE MEASUREMENT OF REDOX POTENTIAL IN ANAEROBIC FERRIC/FERROUS CHLORIDE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behavior of two inert redox electrodes (Pt and wax-impregnated graphite) was investigated in anaerobic ferrous and ferric chloride solutions in order to establish if these electrodes respond to the FE3/Fe2+ couple in a Nernstian nanner. ew method for determining dissolved fer...

  2. AN EVALUATION OF ELECTRODE INSERTION TECHNIQUES FOR MEASUREMENT OF REDOX POTENTIAL IN ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eh measurements by electrodes are commonly used to characterize redox status of sediments in freshwater, marine and estuarine studies, due to the relative ease and rapidity of data collection. In our studies of fine-grained estuarine seabeds, we observed that Eh values measured i...

  3. Effect of the L499M mutation of the ascomycetous Botrytis aclada laccase on redox potential and catalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, Evgeny; Kittl, Roman; Shleev, Sergey; Dorovatovsky, Pavel; Tikhonova, Tamara; Popov, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    The structures of the ascomycetous B. aclada laccase and its L499M T1-site mutant have been solved at 1.7 Å resolution. The mutant enzyme shows a 140 mV lower redox potential of the type 1 copper and altered kinetic behaviour. The wild type and the mutant have very similar structures, which makes it possible to relate the changes in the redox potential to the L499M mutation Laccases are members of a large family of multicopper oxidases that catalyze the oxidation of a wide range of organic and inorganic substrates accompanied by the reduction of dioxygen to water. These enzymes contain four Cu atoms per molecule organized into three sites: T1, T2 and T3. In all laccases, the T1 copper ion is coordinated by two histidines and one cysteine in the equatorial plane and is covered by the side chains of hydrophobic residues in the axial positions. The redox potential of the T1 copper ion influences the enzymatic reaction and is determined by the nature of the axial ligands and the structure of the second coordination sphere. In this work, the laccase from the ascomycete Botrytis aclada was studied, which contains conserved Ile491 and nonconserved Leu499 residues in the axial positions. The three-dimensional structures of the wild-type enzyme and the L499M mutant were determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.7 Å resolution. Crystals suitable for X-ray analysis could only be grown after deglycosylation. Both structures did not contain the T2 copper ion. The catalytic properties of the enzyme were characterized and the redox potentials of both enzyme forms were determined: E{sub 0} = 720 and 580 mV for the wild-type enzyme and the mutant, respectively. Since the structures of the wild-type and mutant forms are very similar, the change in the redox potential can be related to the L499M mutation in the T1 site of the enzyme.

  4. Relationship between redox potentials, the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and the production of toxic oxygen species by flavonoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hodnick, W.F.; Milosavljevic, E.B.; Nelson, J.H.; Pardini, R.S.

    1986-05-01

    Flavonoids have been shown to inhibit mitochondrial respiration and produce oxy-radicals. They have also been shown to possess diverse biological activities, some of which have been speculated to be dependent upon their redox activity. The authors have investigated the redox behavior of a series of structurally related flavonoids employing cyclic voltammetry under physiological conditions. The flavonoids that autoxidized and produced oxygen radicals had reduction potentials (E 1/2) significantly lower (-30 to +60 mV) than those that didn't autoxidize (+130 to +340 mV). The E 1/2 values for the autoxidizable flavonoids compare to the E 1/2 range of -70 to +30 mv (le/sup -/ reduction potential) for optimum quinone induced production of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) in mitochondrial NADH-CoQ reductase (complex I). The authors reported that the most potent flavonoid inhibitors of mitochondrial succinate-CoQ reductase (complex II) possessed hydroxyl configurations capable of supporting redox reactions. For a series of 3,5,7-trihydroxyflavones which differed by b-ring hydroxylation it was found that decreasing E 1/2 of the flavonoids was associated with decreasing I/sub 50/ values towards succinoxidase. These findings suggest that the electrochemical properties of the flavonoids may contribute to their biological activity.

  5. Peptidyl anthraquinones as potential antineoplastic drugs: synthesis, DNA binding, redox cycling, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Gatto, B; Zagotto, G; Sissi, C; Cera, C; Uriarte, E; Palù, G; Capranico, G; Palumbo, M

    1996-08-01

    A series of new compounds containing a 9,10-anthracenedione moiety and one or two peptide chains at position 1 and/or 4 have been synthesized. The amino acid residues introduced are glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys), and tryptophan (Trp), the latter two in both the L- and D-configurations. The peptidyl anthraquinones maintain the ability of intercalating efficiently into DNA, even though the orientation within the base-pair pocket may change somewhat with reference to the parent drugs mitoxantrone (MX) and ametantrone (AM). The interaction constants of the mono-, di-, and triglycyl derivatives are well comparable to those found for AM but 5-10 times lower than the value reported for MX. On the other hand, the glycyl-lysyl compounds bind DNA to the same extent as (L-isomer) or even better than (D-isomer) MX. As for the parent drugs without peptidyl chains, the new compounds prefer alternating CG binding sites, although to different extents. The bis-Gly-Lys derivatives are the least sensitive to base composition, which may be due to extensive aspecific charged interactions with the polynucleotide backbone. As far as redox properties are concerned, all peptidyl anthraquinones show a reduction potential very close to that of AM and 60-80 mV less negative than that of MX; hence, they can produce free-radical-damaging species to an extent similar to the parent drugs. The biological activity has been tested in human tumor and murine leukemia cell lines. Most of the test anthraquinones exhibit cytotoxic properties close to those of AM and considerably lower than those of MX. Stimulation of topoisomerase-mediated DNA cleavage is moderately present in representatives of the glycylanthraquinone family, whereas inhibition of the background cleavage occurs when Lys is present in the peptide chain. For most of the test anthraquinones, the toxicity data are in line with the DNA affinity scale and the topoisomerase II stimulation activity. However, in the lysyl derivatives, for which

  6. The redox potential of the plastoquinone pool of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis species strain PCC 6803 is under strict homeostatic control.

    PubMed

    Schuurmans, R Milou; Schuurmans, J Merijn; Bekker, Martijn; Kromkamp, Jacco C; Matthijs, Hans C P; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2014-05-01

    A method is presented for rapid extraction of the total plastoquinone (PQ) pool from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 cells that preserves the in vivo plastoquinol (PQH2) to -PQ ratio. Cells were rapidly transferred into ice-cold organic solvent for instantaneous extraction of the cellular PQ plus PQH2 content. After high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of the organic phase extract, the PQH2 content was quantitatively determined via its fluorescence emission at 330 nm. The in-cell PQH2-PQ ratio then followed from comparison of the PQH2 signal in samples as collected and in an identical sample after complete reduction with sodium borohydride. Prior to PQH2 extraction, cells from steady-state chemostat cultures were exposed to a wide range of physiological conditions, including high/low availability of inorganic carbon, and various actinic illumination conditions. Well-characterized electron-transfer inhibitors were used to generate a reduced or an oxidized PQ pool for reference. The in vivo redox state of the PQ pool was correlated with the results of pulse-amplitude modulation-based chlorophyll a fluorescence emission measurements, oxygen exchange rates, and 77 K fluorescence emission spectra. Our results show that the redox state of the PQ pool of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is subject to strict homeostatic control (i.e. regulated between narrow limits), in contrast to the more dynamic chlorophyll a fluorescence signal. PMID:24696521

  7. Monolayer to MTS: using SEM, HIM, TEM and SERS to compare morphology, nanosensor uptake and redox potential in MCF7 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, L. E.; Bell, A. P.; Harrison, D. J.; Campbell, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    Cellular redox potential is important for the control and regulation of a vast number of processes occurring in cells. When the fine redox potential balance within cells is disturbed it can have serious consequences such as the initiation or progression of disease. It is thought that a redox gradient develops in cancer tumours where the peripheral regions are well oxygenated and internal regions, further from vascular blood supply, become starved of oxygen and hypoxic. This makes treatment of these areas more challenging as, for example, radiotherapy relies on the presence of oxygen. Currently techniques for quantitative analysis of redox gradients are limited. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanosensors (NS) have been used to detect redox potential in a quantitative manner in monolayer cultured cells with many advantages over other techniques. This technique has considerable potential for use in multicellular tumour spheroids (MTS) - a three dimensional (3D) cell model which better mimics the tumour environment and gradients that develop. MTS are a more realistic model of the in vivo cellular morphology and environment and are becoming an increasingly popular in vitro model, replacing traditional monolayer culture. Imaging techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM) were used to investigate differences in morphology and NS uptake in monolayer culture compared to MTS. After confirming NS uptake, the first SERS measurements revealing quantitative information on redox potential in MTS were performed.

  8. Effect of the L499M mutation of the ascomycetous Botrytis aclada laccase on redox potential and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Evgeny; Polyakov, Konstantin; Kittl, Roman; Shleev, Sergey; Dorovatovsky, Pavel; Tikhonova, Tamara; Hann, Stephan; Ludwig, Roland; Popov, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    Laccases are members of a large family of multicopper oxidases that catalyze the oxidation of a wide range of organic and inorganic substrates accompanied by the reduction of dioxygen to water. These enzymes contain four Cu atoms per molecule organized into three sites: T1, T2 and T3. In all laccases, the T1 copper ion is coordinated by two histidines and one cysteine in the equatorial plane and is covered by the side chains of hydrophobic residues in the axial positions. The redox potential of the T1 copper ion influences the enzymatic reaction and is determined by the nature of the axial ligands and the structure of the second coordination sphere. In this work, the laccase from the ascomycete Botrytis aclada was studied, which contains conserved Ile491 and nonconserved Leu499 residues in the axial positions. The three-dimensional structures of the wild-type enzyme and the L499M mutant were determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.7 Å resolution. Crystals suitable for X-ray analysis could only be grown after deglycosylation. Both structures did not contain the T2 copper ion. The catalytic properties of the enzyme were characterized and the redox potentials of both enzyme forms were determined: E0 = 720 and 580 mV for the wild-type enzyme and the mutant, respectively. Since the structures of the wild-type and mutant forms are very similar, the change in the redox potential can be related to the L499M mutation in the T1 site of the enzyme. PMID:25372682

  9. Effect of the L499M mutation of the ascomycetous Botrytis aclada laccase on redox potential and catalytic properties

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Evgeny; Polyakov, Konstantin; Kittl, Roman; Shleev, Sergey; Dorovatovsky, Pavel; Tikhonova, Tamara; Hann, Stephan; Ludwig, Roland; Popov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Laccases are members of a large family of multicopper oxidases that catalyze the oxidation of a wide range of organic and inorganic substrates accompanied by the reduction of dioxygen to water. These enzymes contain four Cu atoms per molecule organized into three sites: T1, T2 and T3. In all laccases, the T1 copper ion is coordinated by two histidines and one cysteine in the equatorial plane and is covered by the side chains of hydrophobic residues in the axial positions. The redox potential of the T1 copper ion influences the enzymatic reaction and is determined by the nature of the axial ligands and the structure of the second coordination sphere. In this work, the laccase from the ascomycete Botrytis aclada was studied, which contains conserved Ile491 and nonconserved Leu499 residues in the axial positions. The three-dimensional structures of the wild-type enzyme and the L499M mutant were determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.7 Å resolution. Crystals suitable for X-ray analysis could only be grown after deglycosylation. Both structures did not contain the T2 copper ion. The catalytic properties of the enzyme were characterized and the redox potentials of both enzyme forms were determined: E 0 = 720 and 580 mV for the wild-type enzyme and the mutant, respectively. Since the structures of the wild-type and mutant forms are very similar, the change in the redox potential can be related to the L499M mutation in the T1 site of the enzyme. PMID:25372682

  10. Using UV-absorbance of intrinsic dithiothreitol (DTT) during RP-HPLC as a measure of experimental redox potential in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seo, Angie; Jackson, Janelle L; Schuster, Jolene V; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

    2013-07-01

    Many in-vitro experiments performed to study the response of thiol-containing proteins to changes in environmental redox potentials use dithiothreitol (DTT) to maintain a preset redox environment throughout the experiments. However, the gradual oxidation of DTT during the course of the experiments, and the interaction between DTT and other components in the system, can significantly alter the initial redox potential and complicate data interpretation. Having an internal reporter of the actual redox potential of the assayed sample facilitates direct correlation of biochemical findings with experimental redox status. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) is a widely used, well-established tool for analysis and purification of biomolecules, including proteins and peptides. Here, we describe a simple, robust, and quantitative RP-HPLC method we developed and tested for determination of the experimental redox potential of an in-vitro sample at the time of the experiment. It exploits the specific UV-absorbance of the oxidized intrinsic DTT in the samples and retains the high resolving power and high sensitivity of RP-HPLC with UV detection. PMID:23743664

  11. Increasing the redox potential of isoform 1 of yeast cytochrome c through the modification of select haem interactions.

    PubMed

    Lett, C Marc; Guillemette, J Guy

    2002-03-01

    The oxidation-reduction potential of eukaryotic cytochromes c varies very little from species to species. We have introduced point mutations into isoform 1 of yeast cytochrome c (iso-1-cytochrome c) to selectively engineer a protein with a higher redox potential. Of the ten different mutant proteins generated for the present investigation Y67R, Y67K and W59H were found to be non-functional. Three other mutant proteins, L32M, L32T and T49K, were functional, but too unstable for biophysical studies. Mutant cytochromes c K79S, K79T, Y48H and Y48K were purified and characterized. The Y48K mutant is the only one that exhibits a significant increase of +117 mV in redox potential compared with the wild-type protein while still supporting oxidative phosphorylation in vivo. Low temperature difference spectroscopy confirmed the formation of the holoprotein, while adsorption and CD spectroscopy reveal perturbations in the structure of Y48K iso-1-cytochrome c. PMID:11853535

  12. The redox potential of Pu containing acidic solutions and the fate of "Pu(IV)-colloids": Direct measurement versus optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icker, M.; Walther, C.; Neck, V.; Geckeis, H.

    2010-03-01

    Redox potentials were measured in acidic aqueous solutions (-log10[H+]=0.7) containing different fractions of tri- and tetravalent plutonium. Eh values measured directly by a Pt electrode vs Ag/AgCl reference electrode agree very well with the redox potential calculated from the oxidation state distribution Pu(III)/Pu(IV). By monitoring the solutions over 120 days the kinetics of redox state distribution and dissolution of initially present Pu(IV)-colloids were studied. In solutions of Eh>950mV colloids dissolve and form Pu(VI), whereas at lower Eh the dissolution of colloids leads to formation of Pu(III). These findings corroborate the assumption that colloids are an integral part of the aqueous Pu redox chemistry and that formation and dissolution can be fully understood by means of Eh / pH stability calculations.

  13. An Assessment of Potential Efficiency Gains through Online Content Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creaser, Claire; Hamblin, Yvonne; Davies, J. Eric

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Online content has largely replaced traditional print-based resources as the primary tool for literature searching throughout much of the academic and research community. This paper presents the results of a small-scale study, commissioned by the JISC in 2004, to assess the potential efficiency gains that may be achieved through the use…

  14. Exploring the Electron Transfer Properties of Neuronal Nitric-oxide Synthase by Reversal of the FMN Redox Potential*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiying; Das, Aditi; Sibhatu, Hiruy; Jamal, Joumana; Sligar, Stephen G.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    In nitric-oxide synthase (NOS) the FMN can exist as the fully oxidized (ox), the one-electron reduced semiquinone (sq), or the two-electron fully reduced hydroquinone (hq). In NOS and microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase the sq/hq redox potential is lower than that of the ox/sq couple, and hence it is the hq form of FMN that delivers electrons to the heme. Like NOS, cytochrome P450BM3 has the FAD/FMN reductase fused to the C-terminal end of the heme domain, but in P450BM3 the ox/sq and sq/hq redox couples are reversed, so it is the sq that transfers electrons to the heme. This difference is due to an extra Gly residue found in the FMN binding loop in NOS compared with P450BM3. We have deleted residue Gly-810 from the FMN binding loop in neuronal NOS (nNOS) to give ΔG810 so that the shorter binding loop mimics that in cytochrome P450BM3. As expected, the ox/sq redox potential now is lower than the sq/hq couple. ΔG810 exhibits lower NO synthase activity but normal levels of cytochrome c reductase activity. However, unlike the wild-type enzyme, the cytochrome c reductase activity of ΔG810 is insensitive to calmodulin binding. In addition, calmodulin binding to ΔG810 does not result in a large increase in FMN fluorescence as in wild-type nNOS. These results indicate that the FMN domain in ΔG810 is locked in a unique conformation that is no longer sensitive to calmodulin binding and resembles the “on” output state of the calmodulin-bound wild-type nNOS with respect to the cytochrome c reduction activity. PMID:18852262

  15. Importance of Hydrogen Bonding in Fine Tuning the [2Fe-2S] Cluster Redox Potential of HydC from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Birrell, James A; Laurich, Christoph; Reijerse, Edward J; Ogata, Hideaki; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters form one of the largest and most diverse classes of enzyme cofactors in nature. They may serve as structural factors, form electron transfer chains between active sites and external redox partners, or form components of enzyme active sites. Their specific role is a consequence of the cluster type and the surrounding protein environment. The relative effects of these factors are not completely understood, and it is not yet possible to predict the properties of iron-sulfur clusters based on amino acid sequences or rationally tune their properties to generate proteins with new desirable functions. Here, we generate mutations in a [2Fe-2S] cluster protein, the TmHydC subunit of the trimeric [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Thermotoga maritima, to study the factors that affect its redox potential. Saturation mutagenesis of Val131 was used to tune the redox potential over a 135 mV range and revealed that cluster redox potential and electronic properties correlate with amino acid hydrophobicity and the ability to form hydrogen bonds to the cluster. Proline scanning mutagenesis between pairs of ligating cysteines was used to remove backbone amide hydrogen bonds to the cluster and decrease the redox potential by up to 132 mV, without large structural changes in most cases. However, substitution of Gly83 with proline caused a change of HydC to a [4Fe-4S] cluster protein with a redox potential of -526 mV. Together, these results confirm the importance of hydrogen bonding in tuning cluster redox potentials and demonstrate the versatility of iron-sulfur cluster protein folds at binding different types of clusters. PMID:27396836

  16. Transcriptome analysis of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis during milk acidification as affected by dissolved oxygen and the redox potential.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Nadja; Moslehi-Jenabian, Saloomeh; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Jensen, Maiken Lund; Garrigues, Christel; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2016-06-01

    Performance of Lactococcus lactis as a starter culture in dairy fermentations depends on the levels of dissolved oxygen and the redox state of milk. In this study the microarray analysis was used to investigate the global gene expression of L. lactis subsp. lactis DSM20481(T) during milk acidification as affected by oxygen depletion and the decrease of redox potential. Fermentations were carried out at different initial levels of dissolved oxygen (dO2) obtained by milk sparging with oxygen (high dO2, 63%) or nitrogen (low dO2, 6%). Bacterial exposure to high initial oxygen resulted in overexpression of genes involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidation-reduction processes, biosynthesis of trehalose and down-regulation of genes involved in purine nucleotide biosynthesis, indicating that several factors, among them trehalose and GTP, were implicated in bacterial adaptation to oxidative stress. Generally, transcriptional changes were more pronounced during fermentation of oxygen sparged milk. Genes up-regulated in response to oxygen depletion were implicated in biosynthesis and transport of pyrimidine nucleotides, branched chain amino acids and in arginine catabolic pathways; whereas genes involved in salvage of nucleotides and cysteine pathways were repressed. Expression pattern of genes involved in pyruvate metabolism indicated shifts towards mixed acid fermentation after oxygen depletion with production of specific end-products, depending on milk treatment. Differential expression of genes, involved in amino acid and pyruvate pathways, suggested that initial oxygen might influence the release of flavor compounds and, thereby, flavor development in dairy fermentations. The knowledge of molecular responses involved in adaptation of L. lactis to the shifts of redox state and pH during milk fermentations is important for the dairy industry to ensure better control of cheese production. PMID:27015296

  17. Investigation of potential analytical methods for redox control of the vitrification process. [Moessbauer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.S.

    1985-11-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate several analytical techniques to measure ferrous/ferric ratios in simulated and radioactive nuclear waste glasses for eventual redox control of the vitrification process. Redox control will minimize the melt foaming that occurs under highly oxidizing conditions and the metal precipitation that occurs under highly reducing conditions. The analytical method selected must have a rapid response for production problems with minimal complexity and analyst involvement. The wet-chemistry, Moessbauer spectroscopy, glass color analysis, and ion chromatography techniques were explored, with particular emphasis being placed on the Moessbauer technique. In general, all of these methods can be used for nonradioactive samples. The Moessbauer method can readily analyze glasses containing uranium and thorium. A shielded container was designed and built to analyze fully radioactive glasses with the Moessbauer spectrometer in a hot cell environment. However, analyses conducted with radioactive waste glasses containing /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs were unsuccessful, presumably due to background radiation problems caused by the samples. The color of glass powder can be used to analyze the ferrous/ferric ratio for low chromium glasses, but this method may not be as precise as the others. Ion chromatography was only tested on nonradioactive glasses, but this technique appears to have the required precision due to its analysis of both Fe/sup +2/ and Fe/sup +3/ and its anticipated adaptability for radioactivity samples. This development would be similar to procedures already in use for shielded inductively coupled plasma emission (ICP) spectrometry. Development of the ion chromatography method is therefore recommended; conventional wet-chemistry is recommended as a backup procedure.

  18. The hmc operon of Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a potential transmembrane redox protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M; Pollock, W B; Reij, M W; Keon, R G; Fu, R; Voordouw, G

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the hmc operon from Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Hildenborough indicated the presence of eight open reading frames, encoding proteins Orf1 to Orf6, Rrf1, and Rrf2. Orf1 is the periplasmic, high-molecular-weight cytochrome (Hmc) containing 16 c-type hemes and described before (W. B. R. Pollock, M. Loutfi, M. Bruschi, B. J. Rapp-Giles, J. D. Wall, and G. Voordouw, J. Bacteriol. 173:220-228, 1991). Orf2 is a transmembrane redox protein with four iron-sulfur clusters, as indicated by its similarity to DmsB from Escherichia coli. Orf3, Orf4, and Orf5 are all highly hydrophobic, integral membrane proteins with similarities to subunits of NADH dehydrogenase or cytochrome c reductase. Orf6 is a cytoplasmic redox protein containing two iron-sulfur clusters, as indicated by its similarity to the ferredoxin domain of [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio species. Rrf1 belongs to the family of response regulator proteins, while the function of Rrf2 cannot be derived from the gene sequence. The expression of individual genes in E. coli with the T7 system confirmed the open reading frames for Orf2, Orf6, and Rrf1. Deletion of 0.4 kb upstream from orf1 abolished the expression of Hmc in D. desulfuricans G200, indicating this region to contain the hmc operon promoter. The expression of two truncated hmc genes in D. desulfuricans G200 resulted in stable periplasmic c-type cytochromes, confirming the domain structure of Hmc. We propose that Hmc and Orf2 to Orf6 form a transmembrane protein complex that allows electron flow from the periplasmic hydrogenases to the cytoplasmic enzymes that catalyze the reduction of sulfate. The domain structure of Hmc may be required to allow interaction with multiple hydrogenases. Images PMID:8335628

  19. Polarization curve measurements combined with potential probe sensing for determining current density distribution in vanadium redox-flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Maik; Bredemeyer, Niels; Tenhumberg, Nils; Turek, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Potential probes are applied to vanadium redox-flow batteries for determination of effective felt resistance and current density distribution. During the measurement of polarization curves in 100 cm2 cells with different carbon felt compression rates, alternating potential steps at cell voltages between 0.6 V and 2.0 V are applied. Polarization curves are recorded at different flow rates and states of charge of the battery. Increasing compression rates lead to lower effective felt resistances and a more uniform resistance distribution. Low flow rates at high or low state of charge result in non-linear current density distribution with high gradients, while high flow rates give rise to a nearly linear behavior.

  20. Redox potential evolution of nitric species and plutonium in HNO{sub 3}-HNO{sub 2} system

    SciTech Connect

    Larabi-Gruet, N.; Gwinner, B.; Robin, R.; Fauvet, P.; Buravand, E.

    2012-07-01

    In France, the reprocessing process of spent fuel is carried out using the Purex process. The first chemical step of this process is the dissolution of the spent fuel in aqueous concentrated nitric acid. This dissolution solution is composed of many oxidizing species and it is necessary to understand the chemistry of these species to apprehend the behavior of structural materials. The redox potential is a useful discriminate variable to differentiate the effect of each species. In this framework, only the effect of NO{sub 3}{sup -}/HNO{sub 2} couple and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/Pu{sup 4+} couple were investigated. These species were chosen because one is the main couple of medium and the other has a high standard potential. Their influence was investigated from the Nernst's equation. (authors)

  1. Redox-active charge carriers of conducting polymers as a tuner of conductivity and its potential window.

    PubMed

    Park, Han-Saem; Ko, Seo-Jin; Park, Jeong-Seok; Kim, Jin Young; Song, Hyun-Kon

    2013-01-01

    Electric conductivity of conducting polymers has been steadily enhanced towards a level worthy of being called its alias, "synthetic metal". PEDOT:PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonate)), as a representative conducting polymer, recently reached around 3,000 S cm(-1), the value to open the possibility to replace transparent conductive oxides. The leading strategy to drive the conductivity increase is solvent annealing in which aqueous solution of PEDOT:PSS is treated with an assistant solvent such as DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide). In addition to the conductivity enhancement, we found that the potential range in which PEDOT:PSS is conductive is tuned wider into a negative potential direction by the DMSO-annealing. Also, the increase in a redox-active fraction of charge carriers is proposed to be responsible for the enhancement of conductivity in the solvent annealing process. PMID:23949091

  2. Redox-active charge carriers of conducting polymers as a tuner of conductivity and its potential window

    PubMed Central

    Park, Han-Saem; Ko, Seo-Jin; Park, Jeong-Seok; Kim, Jin Young; Song, Hyun-Kon

    2013-01-01

    Electric conductivity of conducting polymers has been steadily enhanced towards a level worthy of being called its alias, “synthetic metal”. PEDOT:PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonate)), as a representative conducting polymer, recently reached around 3,000 S cm−1, the value to open the possibility to replace transparent conductive oxides. The leading strategy to drive the conductivity increase is solvent annealing in which aqueous solution of PEDOT:PSS is treated with an assistant solvent such as DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide). In addition to the conductivity enhancement, we found that the potential range in which PEDOT:PSS is conductive is tuned wider into a negative potential direction by the DMSO-annealing. Also, the increase in a redox-active fraction of charge carriers is proposed to be responsible for the enhancement of conductivity in the solvent annealing process. PMID:23949091

  3. Effects of Moisture Content and Redox Potential on in situ Kd Values for Radiodine in Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the processes that determine the solid-liquid partitioning (Kd value) of Se are of fundamental importance in assessing the risk associated with the disposal of radioselenium-containing waste. Using a mini-column approach, in-situ Kd values for 75Se were determined over time in relation...

  4. Factors controlling the redox potential of ZnCe6 in an engineered bacterioferritin photochemical 'reaction centre'.

    PubMed

    Mahboob, Abdullah; Vassiliev, Serguei; Poddutoori, Prashanth K; van der Est, Art; Bruce, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) of photosynthesis has the unique ability to photochemically oxidize water. Recently an engineered bacterioferritin photochemical 'reaction centre' (BFR-RC) using a zinc chlorin pigment (ZnCe6) in place of its native heme has been shown to photo-oxidize bound manganese ions through a tyrosine residue, thus mimicking two of the key reactions on the electron donor side of PSII. To understand the mechanism of tyrosine oxidation in BFR-RCs, and explore the possibility of water oxidation in such a system we have built an atomic-level model of the BFR-RC using ONIOM methodology. We studied the influence of axial ligands and carboxyl groups on the oxidation potential of ZnCe6 using DFT theory, and finally calculated the shift of the redox potential of ZnCe6 in the BFR-RC protein using the multi-conformational molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann approach. According to our calculations, the redox potential for the first oxidation of ZnCe6 in the BRF-RC protein is only 0.57 V, too low to oxidize tyrosine. We suggest that the observed tyrosine oxidation in BRF-RC could be driven by the ZnCe6 di-cation. In order to increase the efficiency of tyrosine oxidation, and ultimately oxidize water, the first potential of ZnCe6 would have to attain a value in excess of 0.8 V. We discuss the possibilities for modifying the BFR-RC to achieve this goal. PMID:23935866

  5. Electron Flow in Multiheme Bacterial Cytochromes is a Balancing Act Between Heme Electronic Interaction and Redox Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen

    2014-01-14

    The naturally widespread process of electron transfer from metal reducing bacteria to extracellular solid metal oxides entails unique biomolecular machinery optimized for long-range electron transport. To perform this function efficiently microorganisms have adapted multi-heme c-type cytochromes to arrange heme cofactors into wires that cooperatively span the cellular envelope, transmitting electrons along distances greater than 100 Angstroms. Implications and opportunities for bionanotechnological device design are self-evident. However, at the molecular level how these proteins shuttle electrons along their heme wires, navigating intraprotein intersections and interprotein interfaces effciently, remains a mystery so far inaccessible to experiment. To shed light on this critical topic, we carried out extensive computer simulations to calculate Marcus theory quantities for electron transfer along the ten heme cofactors in the recently crystallized outer membrane cytochrome MtrF. The combination of electronic coupling matrix elements with free energy calculations of heme redox potentials and reorganization energies for heme-to-heme electron transfer allows the step-wise and overall electron transfer rate to be estimated and understood in terms of structural and dynamical characteristics of the protein. By solving a master equation for electron hopping, we estimate an intrinsic, maximum possible electron flux through solvated MtrF of 104-105 s-1, consistent with recently measured rates for the related MtrCAB protein complex. Intriguingly, this flux must navigate thermodynamically uphill steps past low potential hemes. Our calculations show that the rapid electron transport through MtrF is the result of a clear correlation between heme redox potential and the strength of electronic coupling along the wire: Thermodynamically uphill steps occur only between electronically well connected stacked heme pairs. This suggests that the protein evolved to harbor low potential

  6. Establishing the redox potential of Tibouchina pulchra (Cham.) Cogn., a native tree species from the Atlantic Rain Forest, in the vicinity of an oil refinery in SE Brazil.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Marisia Pannia; Domingos, Marisa

    2014-04-01

    The present study aimed to establish the seasonal variations in the redox potential ranges of young Tibouchina pulchra plants growing in the Cubatão region (SE Brazil) under varying levels of oxidative stress caused by air pollutants. The plants were exposed to filtered air (FA) and non-filtered air (NFA) in open-top chambers installed next to an oil refinery in Cubatão during six exposure periods of 90 days each, which included the winter and summer seasons. After exposure, several analyses were performed, including the foliar concentrations of ascorbic acid and glutathione in its reduced (AsA and GSH), total (totAA and totG) and oxidized forms (DHA and GSSG); their ratios (AsA/totAA and GSH/totG); the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR); and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The range of antioxidant responses in T. pulchra plants varied seasonally and was stimulated by high or low air pollutant concentrations and/or air temperatures. Glutathione and APX were primarily responsible for increasing plant tolerance to oxidative stress originating from air pollution in the region. The high or low air temperatures mainly affected enzymatic activity. The content of MDA increased in response to increasing ozone concentration, thus indicating that the pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance may not have been reached. PMID:24407781

  7. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested. PMID:26593894

  8. Redox Modulating NRF2: A Potential Mediator of Cancer Stem Cell Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, In-geun; Lee, Sang-hwan; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Tumors contain a distinct small subpopulation of cells that possess stem cell-like characteristics. These cells have been called cancer stem cells (CSCs) and are thought to be responsible for anticancer drug resistance and tumor relapse after therapy. Emerging evidence indicates that CSCs share many properties, such as self-renewal and quiescence, with normal stem cells. In particular, CSCs and normal stem cells retain low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can contribute to stem cell maintenance and resistance to stressful tumor environments. Current literatures demonstrate that the activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and forkhead box O3 (FoxO3) is associated with the maintenance of low ROS levels in normal stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells. However, the importance of ROS signaling in CSC biology remains poorly understood. Recent studies demonstrate that nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defense system, is involved in the maintenance of quiescence, survival, and stress resistance of CSCs. Here, we review the recent findings on the roles of NRF2 in maintenance of the redox state and multidrug resistance in CSCs, focusing on how NRF2-mediated ROS modulation influences the growth and resistance of CSCs. PMID:26682001

  9. Influence of DOM and redox potential on the leaching of As and Cr from coal fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deonarine, A.; Kolker, A.; Huggins, F.; Foster, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Coal ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants, contains toxic trace elements such as arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr). Coal ash has recently been scrutinized as a potential source of toxic trace elements to aquatic systems and potable water sources, and the legislation pertinent to coal ash management is currently under revision. Coal ash is currently stored in surface impoundments and landfills that are poorly regulated and at risk of failure. Impoundment failure can result in the mobilization of coal ash and leachates into aquatic systems and potable water-sources. The current understanding of the environmental fate (i.e., transformation, toxicity and mobility) of As and Cr in coal ash is largely limited to leaching protocols that are not environmentally relevant, as they exclude parameters such as redox potential and dissolved organic matter (DOM) that are prevalent in aquatic systems. Furthermore, the relationship between coal-ash particle size and the speciation and leaching behavior of As and Cr has not been well investigated. The size of host particles may influence the speciation and coordination environment of trace elements, and may be a critical factor in the leaching/dissolution behavior of As and Cr from coal ash into solution. In this study, coal ash samples from three different coal-fired power plants using different coal sources and different combustion processes were segregated into size fractions (< 1 mm to ≥ 100 μm, < 100 μm to ≥ 10 μm, < 10 μm to ≥ 1 μm, and < 1 μm) using a combination of dry sieving and particle impaction. Coal ash size fractions were examined using synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES/ EXAFS) to determine whether there were any differences in As and Cr concentration and speciation/coordination environment as a function of particle size. Coal-ash size fractions were also exposed to a buffered solution (pH ~7) with varying DOM concentration (1 to 30 mg/L) and redox potential (reducing, oxic). Dissolved

  10. The effect of hydrazine dosing on high temperature pH{sub T} and redox potentials under PWR environments

    SciTech Connect

    Maekelae, K.; Aaltonen, P.; Buddas, T.

    1995-10-01

    The release and deposit of corrosion products, which play a key role in activity transport, are controlled by the properties of the primary water and oxides present on component surfaces. Some of the VVER 440 type reactors have started to use hydrazine dosing to primary coolant instead of ammonia, because it has been shown to be efficient in reducing activity transport. On the other hand, some other studies have shown that there is no significant difference between new VVER units using hydrazine dosing and the ones operating with standard potassium/ammonia water chemistry. In this paper the results are presented concerning the out-of-core high temperature water chemistry and incore redox potential measurements at Rez research reactor in Czech Republic during hydrazine/ammonia water chemistries.

  11. Heme Trafficking and Modifications during System I Cytochrome c Biogenesis: Insights from Heme Redox Potentials of Ccm Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Molly C; Rankin, Joel A; Kranz, Robert G

    2016-06-01

    Cytochromes c require covalent attachment of heme via two thioether bonds at conserved CXXCH motifs, a process accomplished in prokaryotes by eight integral membrane proteins (CcmABCDEFGH), termed System I. Heme is trafficked from inside the cell to outside (via CcmABCD) and chaperoned (holoCcmE) to the cytochrome c synthetase (CcmF/H). Purification of key System I pathway intermediates allowed the determination of heme redox potentials. The data support a model whereby heme is oxidized to form holoCcmE and subsequently reduced by CcmF/H for thioether formation, with Fe(2+) being required for attachment to CXXCH. Results provide insight into mechanisms for the oxidation and reduction of heme in vivo. PMID:27198710

  12. An experimental and theoretical method for determination of standard electrode potential for the redox couple diphenyl sulfone/diphenyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. Z.; Wei, K. X.; Lv, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    DFT calculations were performed for diphenyl sulfide and diphenyl sulfone. The electrochemistry of diphenyl sulfide on the gold electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammety and the results show that standard electrode potential for redox couple diphenyl sulfone/diphenyl sulfide is 1.058 V, which is consistent with that of 1.057 calculated at B3LYP/6-31++G( d, p)-IEFPCM level. The front orbit theory and Mulliken charges of molecular explain well on the oxidation of diphenyl sulfide in oxidative desulfurization. According to equilibrium theory the experimental equilibrium constant in the oxidative desulfurization of H2O2, is 1.17 × 1048, which is consistent with the theoretical equilibrium constant is 2.18 × 1048 at B3LYP/6-31++G( d, p)-IEFPCM level.

  13. Hole scavenger redox potentials determine quantum efficiency and stability of Pt-decorated CdS nanorods for photocatalytic hydrogen generation

    SciTech Connect

    Berr, Maximilian J.; Wagner, Peter; Fischbach, Stefan; Schneider, Julian; Jaeckel, Frank; Feldmann, Jochen; Vaneski, Aleksandar; Susha, Andrei S.; Rogach, Andrey L.

    2012-05-28

    We use Pt-decorated CdS nanorods for photocatalytic hydrogen generation in the presence of sacrificial hole scavengers. Both the quantum efficiency for hydrogen generation and the stability of the colloidal nanocrystals in solution improve with increasing redox potential of the hole scavenger. The higher redox potential leads to faster hole scavenging, which increases quantum efficiency and stability since electron hole recombination and oxidation of the CdS become less important. The quantum efficiencies can be tuned over more than an order of magnitude. This finding is important for choosing hole scavengers and for comparing efficiencies and stabilities for different photocatalytic nanosystems.

  14. Effects of dynamic redox zonation on the potential for natural attenuation of trichloroethylene at a fire-training-impacted aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skubal, K.L.; Haack, S.K.; Forney, L.J.; Adriaens, P.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogeochemical and microbiological methods were used to characterize temporal changes along a transect of an aquifer contaminated by mixed hydrocarbon and solvent wastes from fire training activities at Wurtsmith Air Force Base (Oscoda, MI). Predominant terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) as measured by dissolved hydrogen indicated reoxygenation along the transect between October 1995 and October 1996, possibly because of recharge, fluctuations in water table elevation, or microbial activity. Microbiological analyses using universal and archaeal probes revealed a relationship between groundwater hydrogen concentration, TEAP, and predominant bacterial phylogeny. Specifically, a raised water table level and evidence of methanogenesis corresponded to an order of magnitude increase in archaeal 16S rRNA relative to when this zone was unsaturated. Spatial microbial and geochemical dynamics did not result in measurable differences in trichloroethylene (TCE) mineralization potential in vadose, capillary fringe, and saturated zone soils during a 500-day microcosm experiment using unprocessed contaminated soil and groundwater. Aerobic systems indicated that methane, but not toluene, may serve as cosubstrate for TCE cometabolism. Anaerobic microcosms demonstrated evidence for methanogenesis, CO2 production and hydrogen consumption, yet dechlorination activity was only observed in a microcosm with sulfate-reduction as the dominant TEAP. Mass balance calculations indicated less than 5% mineralization, regardless of redox zone or degree of saturation, at maximum rates of 0.01-0.03 ??mol/g soil??d. The general lack of dechlorination activity under laboratory conditions corroborates the limited evidence for natural dechlorination at this site, despite abundant electron donor material and accumulated organic acids from microbial degradation of alkylbenzenes. Thus, the short-term temporal dynamics in redox conditions is unlikely to have measurable effects on the long

  15. Uranium isotopes as a potential global-ocean redox proxy: a test from the Upper Pennsylvanian Hushpuckney Shale (Kansas, U.S.A.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, A. D.; Algeo, T. J.; Gordon, G. W.; Anbar, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Uranium (U) isotope variation in marine sediments has been proposed as a proxy for changes in average global-ocean redox conditions. Here, we investigate U isotope variation in the black shale (BS) member of the Hushpuckney Shale (Swope Formation) at two sites ~400 km apart within the Late Paleozoic Midcontinent Sea (LPMS) of North America, with the goal of testing whether sediment δ238U records a global-ocean redox signal or local environmental influences. Our results document a spatial gradient of at least 0.25‰ in δ238U within the LPMS, demonstrating that local (probably redox) controls have overprinted any global U-isotope signal. Furthermore, the pattern of stratigraphic variation in δ238U in both study cores, with low values (‒0.4 to ‒0.2‰) at the base and top and peak values (+0.4 to +0.65‰) in the middle of the BS, is inconsistent with dominance of a global-ocean redox signal because (1) the middle of the BS was deposited at maximum eustatic highstand when euxinic conditions existed most widely within the LPMS and coeval epicontinental seas, and (2) more extensive euxinia should have shifted global-ocean seawater δ238U to lower values based on mass-balance principles. On the other hand, the observed δ238U pattern is consistent with a dominant local redox control, with larger U-isotope fractionations associated with more reducing bottom waters. We therefore conclude that U was not removed quantitatively to euxinic facies of the LPMS, and that sediment U-isotope compositions were controlled mainly by local redox and hydrographic factors. Our results imply that U-isotope signals from epicontinental-sea sections must be vetted carefully through analysis of high-resolution datasets at multiple sites in order to validate their potential use as a global-seawater redox proxy.

  16. On the effect of ion pairing of Keggin type polyanions with quaternary ammonium cations on redox potentials in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Neumann, Ronny

    2016-08-10

    The electrochemical properties of Keggin type polyoxometalates Qn[XW12O40] (X = P, Si, B; Q = n-tetraoctylammonium and n-trioctylmethylammonium) in organic solvents were investigated in order to understand the interrelation between the redox potentials, solvents and ion pairing. A logarithmic correlation between the dielectric constant of the solvent (ε ranged from 4.8 to 46.6) and the reduction potential of the [PW12O4](3-)/[PW12O4](4-) couple was found. This reduction potential increased significantly when the surface charge of the polyoxometalate went from 3- to 5-. The investigation of the ion pairing properties by diffusion NMR revealed the presence of intimate ion pairs in less polar solvents (e.g. dichloromethane) and less compact ion pairs in more polar solvents (e.g. DMSO). Using a V atom within the polyoxometalate an NMR experiment showed that a n-trioctylmethyl ammonium cation bonded to the polyoxometalate anion more intimately than a n-tetraoctyl ammonium cation. PMID:27465599

  17. Scanning electrochemical microscopy: using the potentiometric mode of SECM to study the mixed potential arising from two independent redox processes.

    PubMed

    Serrapede, Mara; Denuault, Guy; Sosna, Maciej; Pesce, Giovanni Luca; Ball, Richard J

    2013-09-01

    This study demonstrates how the potentiometric mode of the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) can be used to sensitively probe and alter the mixed potential due to two independent redox processes provided that the transport of one of the species involved is controlled by diffusion. This is illustrated with the discharge of hydrogen from nanostructured Pd hydride films deposited on the SECM tip. In deareated buffered solutions the open circuit potential of the PdH in equilibrium between its β and α phases (OCP(β→α)) does not depend on the tip-substrate distance while in aerated conditions it is found to be controlled by hindered diffusion of oxygen. Chronopotentiometric and amperometric measurements at several tip-substrate distances reveal how the flux of oxygen toward the Pd hydride film determines its potential. Linear sweep voltammetry shows that the polarization resistance increases when the tip approaches an inert substrate. The SECM methodology also demonstrates how dissolved oxygen affects the rate of hydrogen extraction from the Pd lattice. Over a wide potential window, the highly reactive nanostructure promotes the reduction of oxygen which rapidly discharges hydrogen from the PdH. The flux of oxygen toward the tip can be adjusted via hindered diffusion. Approaching the substrate decreases the flux of oxygen, lengthens the hydrogen discharge, and shifts OCP(β→α) negatively. The results are consistent with a mixed potential due to the rate of oxygen reduction balancing that of the hydride oxidation. The methodology is generic and applicable to other mixed potential processes in corrosion or catalysis. PMID:23919805

  18. Electrochemistry of cations in diopsidic melt - Determining diffusion rates and redox potentials from voltammetric curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.; Crane, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on determinations of reduction potentials and their temperature dependence of selected ions in diopsidic melt, by using linear sweep voltammetry. Diffusion coefficients were measured for cations of Eu, Mn, Cr, and In. Enthalpies and entropies of reduction were determined for the cations V(V), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Mn(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Mo(VI), Sn(IV), and Eu(3+). Reduction potentials were used to study the structural state of cations in the melt.

  19. Current-potential response and concentration profiles of redox polymer-mediated enzyme catalysis in biofuel cells - Estimation of Michaelis-Menten constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanakumar, K.; Rajendran, L.; Sangaranarayanan, M. V.

    2015-02-01

    The current-potential response of the enzyme-catalyzed, redox polymer mediated kinetic scheme pertaining to biofuel cells is analyzed. The ping-pong reaction scheme is solved analytically using the homotopy method for estimating the current density. The validity of the approach is demonstrated using the known experimental data for a series of osmium based redox polymers, involving oxygen as the substrate with laccase being the enzyme for biocathode fuel cell reactions. The significance of the results has been demonstrated by suggesting two new graphical procedures for estimating the Michaelis-Menten constants and catalytic rate constants from the experimental current densities.

  20. Redox Signal-mediated Enhancement of the Temperature Sensitivity of Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) Elevates Glucose-induced Insulin Secretion from Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Kashio, Makiko; Tominaga, Makoto

    2015-05-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a thermosensitive Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel expressed by pancreatic β cells where channel function is constantly affected by body temperature. We focused on the physiological functions of redox signal-mediated TRPM2 activity at body temperature. H2O2, an important molecule in redox signaling, reduced the temperature threshold for TRPM2 activation in pancreatic β cells of WT mice but not in TRPM2KO cells. TRPM2-mediated [Ca(2+)]i increases were likely caused by Ca(2+) influx through the plasma membrane because the responses were abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). In addition, TRPM2 activation downstream from the redox signal plus glucose stimulation enhanced glucose-induced insulin secretion. H2O2 application at 37 °C induced [Ca(2+)]i increases not only in WT but also in TRPM2KO β cells. This was likely due to the effect of H2O2 on KATP channel activity. However, the N-acetylcysteine-sensitive fraction of insulin secretion by WT islets was increased by temperature elevation, and this temperature-dependent enhancement was diminished significantly in TRPM2KO islets. These data suggest that endogenous redox signals in pancreatic β cells elevate insulin secretion via TRPM2 sensitization and activity at body temperature. The results in this study could provide new therapeutic approaches for the regulation of diabetic conditions by focusing on the physiological function of TRPM2 and redox signals. PMID:25817999

  1. Redox Signal-mediated Enhancement of the Temperature Sensitivity of Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) Elevates Glucose-induced Insulin Secretion from Pancreatic Islets*

    PubMed Central

    Kashio, Makiko; Tominaga, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a thermosensitive Ca2+-permeable cation channel expressed by pancreatic β cells where channel function is constantly affected by body temperature. We focused on the physiological functions of redox signal-mediated TRPM2 activity at body temperature. H2O2, an important molecule in redox signaling, reduced the temperature threshold for TRPM2 activation in pancreatic β cells of WT mice but not in TRPM2KO cells. TRPM2-mediated [Ca2+]i increases were likely caused by Ca2+ influx through the plasma membrane because the responses were abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. In addition, TRPM2 activation downstream from the redox signal plus glucose stimulation enhanced glucose-induced insulin secretion. H2O2 application at 37 °C induced [Ca2+]i increases not only in WT but also in TRPM2KO β cells. This was likely due to the effect of H2O2 on KATP channel activity. However, the N-acetylcysteine-sensitive fraction of insulin secretion by WT islets was increased by temperature elevation, and this temperature-dependent enhancement was diminished significantly in TRPM2KO islets. These data suggest that endogenous redox signals in pancreatic β cells elevate insulin secretion via TRPM2 sensitization and activity at body temperature. The results in this study could provide new therapeutic approaches for the regulation of diabetic conditions by focusing on the physiological function of TRPM2 and redox signals. PMID:25817999

  2. Density functional theory calculations of the redox potentials of actinide(VI)/actinide(V) couple in water.

    PubMed

    Steele, Helen M; Guillaumont, Dominique; Moisy, Philippe

    2013-05-30

    The measured redox potential of an actinide at an electrode surface involves the transfer of a single electron from the electrode surface on to the actinide center. Before electron transfer takes place, the complexing ligands and molecules of solvation need to become structurally arranged such that the electron transfer is at its most favorable. Following the electron transfer, there is further rearrangement to obtain the minimum energy structure for the reduced state. As such, there are three parts to the total energy cycle required to take the complex from its ground state oxidized form to its ground state reduced form. The first part of the energy comes from the structural rearrangement and solvation energies of the actinide species before the electron transfer or charge transfer process; the second part, the energy of the electron transfer; the third part, the energy required to reorganize the ligands and molecules of solvation around the reduced species. The time resolution of electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry is inadequate to determine to what extent bond and solvation rearrangement occurs before or after electron transfer; only for a couple to be classed as reversible is it fast in terms of the experimental time. Consequently, the partitioning of the energy theoretically is of importance to obtain good experimental agreement. Here we investigate the magnitude of the instantaneous charge transfer through calculating the fast one electron reduction energies of AnO2(H2O)n(2+), where An = U, Np, and Pu, for n = 4-6, in solution without inclusion of the structural optimization energy of the reduced form. These calculations have been performed using a number of DFT functionals, including the recently developed functionals of Zhao and Truhlar. The results obtained for calculated electron affinities in the aqueous phase for the AnO2(H2O)5(2+/+) couples are within 0.04 V of accepted experimental redox potentials, nearly an order of magnitude

  3. Single-step versus stepwise two-electron reduction of polyarylpyridiniums: insights from the steric switching of redox potential compression.

    PubMed

    Fortage, Jérôme; Peltier, Cyril; Perruchot, Christian; Takemoto, Yohei; Teki, Yoshio; Bedioui, Fethi; Marvaud, Valérie; Dupeyre, Grégory; Pospísil, Lubomír; Adamo, Carlo; Hromadová, Magdaléna; Ciofini, Ilaria; Lainé, Philippe P

    2012-02-01

    Contrary to 4,4'-dipyridinium (i.e., archetypal methyl viologen), which is reduced by two single-electron transfers (stepwise reduction), the 4,1'-dipyridinium isomer (so-called "head-to-tail" isomer) undergoes two electron transfers at apparently the same potential (single-step reduction). A combined theoretical and experimental study has been undertaken to establish that the latter electrochemical behavior, also observed for other polyarylpyridinium electrophores, is due to potential compression originating in a large structural rearrangement. Three series of branched expanded pyridiniums (EPs) were prepared: N-aryl-2,4,6-triphenylpyridiniums (Ar-TP), N-aryl-2,3,4,5,6-pentaphenylpyridiniums (Ar-XP), and N-aryl-3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6-triphenylpyridinium (Ar-DMTP). The intramolecular steric strain was tuned via N-pyridinio aryl group (Ar) phenyl (Ph), 4-pyridyl (Py), and 4-pyridylium (qPy) and their bulky 3,5-dimethyl counterparts, xylyl (Xy), lutidyl (Lu), and lutidylium (qLu), respectively. Ferrocenyl subunits as internal redox references were covalently appended to representative electrophores in order to count the electrons involved in EP-centered reduction processes. Depending on the steric constraint around the N-pyridinio site, the two-electron reduction is single-step (Ar = Ph, Py, qPy) or stepwise (Ar = Xy, Lu, qLu). This steric switching of the potential compression is accurately accounted for by ab initio modeling (Density Functional Theory, DFT) that proposes a mechanism for pyramidalization of the N(pyridinio) atom coupled with reduction. When the hybridization change of this atom is hindered (Ar = Xy, Lu, qLu), the first reduction is a one-electron process. Theory also reveals that the single-step two-electron reduction involves couples of redox isomers (electromers) displaying both the axial geometry of native EPs and the pyramidalized geometry of doubly reduced EPs. This picture is confirmed by a combined UV-vis-NIR spectroelectrochemical and time

  4. Electrochemical response of a biofilm community to changes in electron-acceptor redox potential elucidated using microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbour, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Mullin, S. W.; Luef, B.; Gilbert, B.; Banfield, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Currently, we have limited insight into how mineral properties affect dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) or the microbial communities that contain them. Advances in our understanding of DMRB metabolism have been achieved using microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which exploit the ability of these organisms to transfer electrons extracellularly. By replacing the mineral electron acceptor with a conductive electrode under potentiostat control, the activity of microorganisms capable of interfacial electron transfer can be quantified by the current flowing through the electrode and related to the thermodynamics of respiration. We seek to understand how communities and their individual members respond to changes in mineralogy, and expect mineral redox potential to be a primary control. The ability to precisely control the redox potential of the electron-accepting anodic electrode is our primary motivation for using MFCs. We inoculated duplicate MFCs containing 10 mM acetate in phosphate buffered media with a slurry of subsurface sediment and groundwater obtained from the Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site at Rifle, CO. Electroactive biofilms were established on graphite anodes poised at a favorable potential (0.0 V vs. SHE) before poising at -0.2 V—a potential representative of natural iron reduction. The current was stable across both anodes over more than 100 days of operation, and the percentage of the electrons in acetate recovered as current ("Coulombic efficiency") was typically 70 to >90%. Current density reached 0.4 A/m2 at -0.2 V, to a max of over 1.0 A/m2 at or above ~0.0 V (based on geometric electrode surface area). Media exchanges and biofilm cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments indicate that electrode-attached microbial communities were responsible for primary electron transfer. Cryo-electron and confocal fluorescence microscopies of the biofilm reveal numerous morphologies of viable microorganisms that are currently being characterized

  5. Effect of charge distribution over a chlorophyll dimer on the redox potential of P680 in photosystem II as studied by density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryouta; Hasegawa, Koji; Noguchi, Takumi

    2008-06-17

    The effect of charge distribution over a chlorophyll dimer on the redox potential of P680 in photosystem II was studied by density functional theory calculations using the P680 coordinates in the X-ray structure. From the calculated ionization potentials of the dimer and the monomeric constituents, the decrease in the redox potential by charge delocalization over the dimer was estimated to be approximately 140 mV. Such charge delocalization was previously observed in the isolated D1-D2-Cyt b 559 complexes, whereas the charge was primarily localized on P D1 in the core complexes. The calculated potential decrease of approximately 140 mV can explain the inhibition of Y Z oxidation in the former complexes and in turn implies that the charge localization on P D1 upon formation of the core complex increases the P680 potential to the level necessary for water oxidation. PMID:18500822

  6. CRISPR Content Correlates with the Pathogenic Potential of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    García-Gutiérrez, Enriqueta; Almendros, Cristóbal; Mojica, Francisco J. M.; Guzmán, Noemí M.; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Guide RNA molecules (crRNA) produced from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) arrays, altogether with effector proteins (Cas) encoded by cognate cas (CRISPR associated) genes, mount an interference mechanism (CRISPR-Cas) that limits acquisition of foreign DNA in Bacteria and Archaea. The specificity of this action is provided by the repeat intervening spacer carried in the crRNA, which upon hybridization with complementary sequences enables their degradation by a Cas endonuclease. Moreover, CRISPR arrays are dynamic landscapes that may gain new spacers from infecting elements or lose them for example during genome replication. Thus, the spacer content of a strain determines the diversity of sequences that can be targeted by the corresponding CRISPR-Cas system reflecting its functionality. Most Escherichia coli strains possess either type I-E or I-F CRISPR-Cas systems. To evaluate their impact on the pathogenicity of the species, we inferred the pathotype and pathogenic potential of 126 strains of this and other closely related species and analyzed their repeat content. Our results revealed a negative correlation between the number of I-E CRISPR units in this system and the presence of pathogenicity traits: the median number of repeats was 2.5-fold higher for commensal isolates (with 29.5 units, range 0–53) than for pathogenic ones (12.0, range 0–42). Moreover, the higher the number of virulence factors within a strain, the lower the repeat content. Additionally, pathogenic strains of distinct ecological niches (i.e., intestinal or extraintestinal) differ in repeat counts. Altogether, these findings support an evolutionary connection between CRISPR and pathogenicity in E. coli. PMID:26136211

  7. Microbial redox processes in deep subsurface environments and the potential application of (per)chlorate in oil reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Liebensteiner, Martin G.; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lomans, Bartholomeus P.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms to thrive under oxygen-free conditions in subsurface environments relies on the enzymatic reduction of oxidized elements, such as sulfate, ferric iron, or CO2, coupled to the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. A broad phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms from subsurface environments has been described using isolation-based and advanced molecular ecological techniques. The physiological groups reviewed here comprise iron-, manganese-, and nitrate-reducing microorganisms. In the context of recent findings also the potential of chlorate and perchlorate [jointly termed (per)chlorate] reduction in oil reservoirs will be discussed. Special attention is given to elevated temperatures that are predominant in the deep subsurface. Microbial reduction of (per)chlorate is a thermodynamically favorable redox process, also at high temperature. However, knowledge about (per)chlorate reduction at elevated temperatures is still scarce and restricted to members of the Firmicutes and the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus. By analyzing the diversity and phylogenetic distribution of functional genes in (meta)genome databases and combining this knowledge with extrapolations to earlier-made physiological observations we speculate on the potential of (per)chlorate reduction in the subsurface and more precisely oil fields. In addition, the application of (per)chlorate for bioremediation, souring control, and microbial enhanced oil recovery are addressed. PMID:25225493

  8. Microbial redox processes in deep subsurface environments and the potential application of (per)chlorate in oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Liebensteiner, Martin G; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Stams, Alfons J M; Lomans, Bartholomeus P

    2014-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms to thrive under oxygen-free conditions in subsurface environments relies on the enzymatic reduction of oxidized elements, such as sulfate, ferric iron, or CO2, coupled to the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. A broad phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms from subsurface environments has been described using isolation-based and advanced molecular ecological techniques. The physiological groups reviewed here comprise iron-, manganese-, and nitrate-reducing microorganisms. In the context of recent findings also the potential of chlorate and perchlorate [jointly termed (per)chlorate] reduction in oil reservoirs will be discussed. Special attention is given to elevated temperatures that are predominant in the deep subsurface. Microbial reduction of (per)chlorate is a thermodynamically favorable redox process, also at high temperature. However, knowledge about (per)chlorate reduction at elevated temperatures is still scarce and restricted to members of the Firmicutes and the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus. By analyzing the diversity and phylogenetic distribution of functional genes in (meta)genome databases and combining this knowledge with extrapolations to earlier-made physiological observations we speculate on the potential of (per)chlorate reduction in the subsurface and more precisely oil fields. In addition, the application of (per)chlorate for bioremediation, souring control, and microbial enhanced oil recovery are addressed. PMID:25225493

  9. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  10. Complexation Effect on Redox Potential of Iron(III)-Iron(II) Couple: A Simple Potentiometric Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Syed, Raashid Maqsood; Khan, Badruddin

    2011-01-01

    A titration curve with multiple inflection points results when a mixture of two or more reducing agents with sufficiently different reduction potentials are titrated. In this experiment iron(II) complexes are combined into a mixture of reducing agents and are oxidized to the corresponding iron(III) complexes. As all of the complexes involve the…

  11. Heme redox potential control in de novo designed four-alpha-helix bundle proteins.

    PubMed

    Shifman, J M; Gibney, B R; Sharp, R E; Dutton, P L

    2000-12-01

    The effects of various mechanisms of metalloporphyrin reduction potential modulation were investigated experimentally using a robust, well-characterized heme protein maquette, synthetic protein scaffold H10A24 [¿CH(3)()CONH-CGGGELWKL.HEELLKK.FEELLKL.AEERLKK. L-CONH(2)()¿(2)](2). Removal of the iron porphyrin macrocycle from the high dielectric aqueous environment and sequestration within the hydrophobic core of the H10A24 maquette raises the equilibrium reduction midpoint potential by 36-138 mV depending on the hydrophobicity of the metalloporphyrin structure. By incorporating various natural and synthetic metalloporphyrins into a single protein scaffold, we demonstrate a 300-mV range in reduction potential modulation due to the electron-donating/withdrawing character of the peripheral macrocycle substituents. Solution pH is used to modulate the metalloporphyrin reduction potential by 160 mV, regardless of the macrocycle architecture, by controlling the protonation state of the glutamate involved in partial charge compensation of the ferric heme. Attempts to control the reduction potential by inserting charged amino acids into the hydrophobic core at close proximity to the metalloporphyrin lead to varied success, with H10A24-L13E lowering the E(m8.5) by 40 mV, H10A24-E11Q raising it by 50 mV, and H10A24-L13R remaining surprisingly unaltered. Modifying the charge of the adjacent metalloporphyrin, +1 for iron(III) protoporphyrin IX or neutral for zinc(II) protoporphyrin IX resulted in a loss of 70 mV [Fe(III)PPIX](+) - [Fe(III)PPIX](+) interaction observed in maquettes. Using these factors in combination, we illustrate a 435-mV variation of the metalloporphyrin reduction midpoint potential in a simple heme maquette relative to the about 800-mV range observed for natural cytochromes. Comparison between the reduction potentials of the heme maquettes and other de novo designed heme proteins reveals global trends in the E(m) values of synthetic cytochromes. PMID

  12. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Method Combined with Hybrid All-Atom and Coarse-Grained Model: Theory and Application on Redox Potential Calculations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Yang, Weitao

    2016-04-12

    We developed a new multiresolution method that spans three levels of resolution with quantum mechanical, atomistic molecular mechanical, and coarse-grained models. The resolution-adapted all-atom and coarse-grained water model, in which an all-atom structural description of the entire system is maintained during the simulations, is combined with the ab initio quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics method. We apply this model to calculate the redox potentials of the aqueous ruthenium and iron complexes by using the fractional number of electrons approach and thermodynamic integration simulations. The redox potentials are recovered in excellent accordance with the experimental data. The speed-up of the hybrid all-atom and coarse-grained water model renders it computationally more attractive. The accuracy depends on the hybrid all-atom and coarse-grained water model used in the combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical method. We have used another multiresolution model, in which an atomic-level layer of water molecules around redox center is solvated in supramolecular coarse-grained waters for the redox potential calculations. Compared with the experimental data, this alternative multilayer model leads to less accurate results when used with the coarse-grained polarizable MARTINI water or big multipole water model for the coarse-grained layer. PMID:26930454

  13. Interference Reduction in Glucose Detection by Redox Potential Tuning: New Glucose Meter Development.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong Je; Cho, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kwang Bok; Lee, Min-Hyoung; Kim, Jae Hong; Lee, Suho; Cho, Jaegeol; Jung, Suntae; Kim, Dong-Min; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2015-01-01

    A new glucose meter was developed employing a novel disposable glucose sensor strip comprising a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-glucose dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and a mixture of Fe compounds as a mediator. An iron complex, 5-(2,5-di(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)-1,10-phenanthroline iron(III) chloride (Fe-PhenTPy), was synthesized as a new mediator for the NAD-GDH system. Due to the high oxidation potential of the mediator, the detection potential was tuned to be more closely fitted toward the enzyme reaction potential, less than 400 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl), by mixing with an additional iron mediator. The impedance spectrometry for the enzyme sensor containing the mixed mediators showed an enhanced charge transfer property. In addition, a new cartridge-type glucose meter was manufactured using effective aligned-electrodes, which showed an enhanced response compared with conventional electrode alignment. The proposed glucose sensor resulted in a wide dynamic range in the concentration range of 30 - 500 mg dL(-1) with a reduced interference effect and a good sensitivity of 0.57 μA mM(-1). PMID:26165295

  14. Effect of dissolved oxygen on redox potential and milk acidification by lactic acid bacteria isolated from a DL-starter culture.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Nadja; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-03-01

    Milk acidification by DL-starter cultures [cultures containing Lactococcus lactis diacetylactis (D) and Leuconostoc (L) species] depends on the oxidation-reduction (redox) potential in milk; however, the mechanisms behind this effect are not completely clear. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of dissolved oxygen on acidification kinetics and redox potential during milk fermentation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Fermentations were conducted by single strains isolated from mixed DL-starter culture, including Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. cremoris, by the DL-starter culture, and by the type strains. High and low levels of oxygen were produced by flushing milk with oxygen or nitrogen, respectively. The kinetics of milk acidification was characterized by the maximum rate and time of acidification (Vamax and Tamax), the maximum rate and time of reduction (Vrmax and Trmax), the minimum redox potential (Eh7 final), and time of reaching Eh7 final (Trfinal). Variations in kinetic parameters were observed at both the species and strain levels. Two of the Lc. lactis ssp. lactis strains were not able to lower redox potential to negative values. Kinetic parameters of the DL-starter culture were comparable with the best acidifying and reducing strains, indicating their additive effects. Acidification curves were mostly diauxic at all oxygen levels, displaying 2 maxima of acidification rate: before (aerobic maximum) and after (anaerobic maximum) oxygen depletion. The redox potential decreased concurrently with oxygen consumption and continued to decrease at slower rate until reaching the final values, indicating involvement of both oxygen and microbiological activity in the redox state of milk. Oxygen flushing had a negative effect on reduction and acidification capacity of tested LAB. Reduction was significantly delayed at high initial oxygen, exhibiting longer Trmax, Trfinal, or both

  15. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jason Z.; Ke, Yuebin; Misra, Hara P.; Trush, Michael A.; Li, Y. Robert; Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-12-15

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  16. Redox-active compounds with a history of human use: antistaphylococcal action and potential for repurposing as topical antibiofilm agents

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, N.; Eady, E. A.; Cove, J. H.; O'Neill, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the antistaphylococcal/antibiofilm activity and mode of action (MOA) of a panel of redox-active (RA) compounds with a history of human use and to provide a preliminary preclinical assessment of their potential for topical treatment of staphylococcal infections, including those involving a biofilm component. Methods Antistaphylococcal activity was evaluated by broth microdilution and by time–kill studies with growing and slow- or non-growing cells. The antibiofilm activity of RA compounds, alone and in combination with established antibacterial agents, was assessed using the Calgary Biofilm Device. Established assays were used to examine the membrane-perturbing effects of RA compounds, to measure penetration into biofilms and physical disruption of biofilms and to assess resistance potential. A living skin equivalent model was used to assess the effects of RA compounds on human skin. Results All 15 RA compounds tested displayed antistaphylococcal activity against planktonic cultures (MIC 0.25–128 mg/L) and 7 eradicated staphylococcal biofilms (minimum biofilm eradication concentration 4–256 mg/L). The MOA of all compounds involved perturbation of the bacterial membrane, whilst selected compounds with antibiofilm activity caused destructuring of the biofilm matrix. The two most promising agents [celastrol and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA)] in respect of antibacterial potency and selective toxicity against bacterial membranes acted synergistically with gentamicin against biofilms, did not damage artificial skin following topical application and exhibited low resistance potential. Conclusions In contrast to established antibacterial drugs, some RA compounds are capable of eradicating staphylococcal biofilms. Of these, celastrol and NDGA represent particularly attractive candidates for development as topical antistaphylococcal biofilm treatments. PMID:25368206

  17. Correlation and Prediction of Redox Potentials of Hydrogen Evolution Mononuclear Cobalt Catalysts via Molecular Electrostatic Potential: A DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Anjali, Bai Amutha; Sayyed, Fareed Bhasha; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2016-02-25

    Reduction potentials (E(0)) of six mononuclear cobalt catalysts (1-6) for hydrogen evolution reaction and electron donating/withdrawing effect of nine X-substituents on their macrocyclic ligand are reported at solvation effect-included B3P86/6-311+G** level of density functional theory. The electrostatic potential at the Co nucleus (VCo) is found to be a powerful descriptor of the electronic effect experienced by Co from the ligand environment. The VCo values vary substantially with respect to the nature of macrocycle, type of apical ligands, nature of substituent and oxidation state of the metal center. Most importantly, VCo values of both the oxidized and reduced states of all the six complexes show strong linear correlation with E(0). The correlation plots between VCo and E(0) provide an easy-to-interpret graphical interpretation and quantification of the effect of ligand environment on the reduction potential. Further, on the basis of a correlation between the relative VCo and relative E(0) values of a catalyst with respect to the CF3-substituted reference system, the E(0) of any X-substituted 1-6 complexes is predicted. PMID:26836251

  18. Use of redox potential modification by gas improves microbial quality, color retention, and ascorbic acid stability of pasteurized orange juice.

    PubMed

    Alwazeer, Duried; Delbeau, Carole; Divies, Charles; Cachon, Rémy

    2003-12-15

    The aim of this paper was to study the effect of both redox potential (Eh) and pasteurization of orange juice on stability of color and ascorbic acid, and growth recovery of microorganisms during storage at 15 degrees C for 7 weeks. Three conditions of Eh, +360 mV (ungassed), +240 mV (gassed with N2), and -180 mV (gassed with N2-H2) were applied to orange juice. Both thermal destruction and recovery of sublethally heat-injured cells of Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. While oxidizing conditions were the most effective for thermal destruction of L. plantarum and S. cerevisiae, reducing conditions decreased recovery of heated cells of S. cerevisiae. In addition, gassing the juice with N2 or N2-H2 increased color retention and ascorbic acid stability. The present study demonstrated that juice must be reduced just after the heat treatment in order, firstly, to maximize microbial destruction during pasteurization, and secondly, to prevent the development of microorganisms and stabilize color and ascorbic acid during storage. PMID:14580970

  19. Redox potential of the terminal quinone electron acceptor QB in photosystem II reveals the mechanism of electron transfer regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yuki; Nagao, Ryo; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) extracts electrons from water at a Mn4CaO5 cluster using light energy and then transfers them to two plastoquinones, the primary quinone electron acceptor QA and the secondary quinone electron acceptor QB. This forward electron transfer is an essential process in light energy conversion. Meanwhile, backward electron transfer is also significant in photoprotection of PSII proteins. Modulation of the redox potential (Em) gap of QA and QB mainly regulates the forward and backward electron transfers in PSII. However, the full scheme of electron transfer regulation remains unresolved due to the unknown Em value of QB. Here, for the first time (to our knowledge), the Em value of QB reduction was measured directly using spectroelectrochemistry in combination with light-induced Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy. The Em(QB−/QB) was determined to be approximately +90 mV and was virtually unaffected by depletion of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. This insensitivity of Em(QB−/QB), in combination with the known large upshift of Em(QA−/QA), explains the mechanism of PSII photoprotection with an impaired Mn4CaO5 cluster, in which a large decrease in the Em gap between QA and QB promotes rapid charge recombination via QA−. PMID:26715751

  20. Enhancement of acidogenic fermentation for volatile fatty acid production from food waste: Effect of redox potential and inoculum.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Yu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Yeer; Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Meizhen; Long, Yuyang; Chen, Ting

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of redox potential (ORP) and inoculum on volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production from food waste by acidogenic fermentation. Four experimental conditions with two ORP levels were tested: limited aeration conditions with ORP level of -100 to -200mV inoculating anaerobic sludge (LA+AnS) or aerobic sludge (LA+AeS), and anaerobic conditions with ORP level of -200 to -300mV inoculating anaerobic sludge with 2-bromoethanosulfophate (AN+BES) and without BES (AN). The maximal VFA yield (0.79g COD/g VS) was attained in LA+AnS reactor due to enhanced hydrolysis of substrates, especially proteins (degradation efficiency 78.3%). A higher frequency of phylum Firmicutes under limited aeration conditions (42.2-48.2%) was observed than that under anaerobic conditions (21.1%). The microbial community was more diverse in LA+AnS reactors than LA+AeS. We conclude that appropriate ORP level (from -100 to -200mV) and inoculum play essential roles in VFA production. PMID:27343452

  1. Different Contribution of Redox-Sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Channels to Acetaminophen-Induced Death of Human Hepatoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Heba; Kozai, Daisuke; Sakaguchi, Reiko; Numata, Tomohiro; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe analgesic antipyretic drug at prescribed doses. Its overdose, however, can cause life-threatening liver damage. Though, involvement of oxidative stress is widely acknowledged in APAP-induced hepatocellular death, the mechanism of this increased oxidative stress and the associated alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis are still unclear. Among members of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels activated in response to oxidative stress, we here identify that redox-sensitive TRPV1, TRPC1, TRPM2, and TRPM7 channels underlie Ca2+ entry and downstream cellular damages induced by APAP in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. Our data indicate that APAP treatment of HepG2 cells resulted in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) depletion, and Ca2+ entry leading to increased apoptotic cell death. These responses were significantly suppressed by pretreatment with the ROS scavengers N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonic acid disodium salt monohydrate (Tiron), and also by preincubation of cells with the glutathione inducer Dimethylfumarate (DMF). TRP subtype-targeted pharmacological blockers and siRNAs strategy revealed that suppression of either TRPV1, TRPC1, TRPM2, or TRPM7 reduced APAP-induced ROS formation, Ca2+ influx, and cell death; the effects of suppression of TRPV1 or TRPC1, known to be activated by oxidative cysteine modifications, were stronger than those of TRPM2 or TRPM7. Interestingly, TRPV1 and TRPC1 were labeled by the cysteine-selective modification reagent, 5,5′-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid)-2biotin (DTNB-2Bio), and this was attenuated by pretreatment with APAP, suggesting that APAP and/or its oxidized metabolites act directly on the modification target cysteine residues of TRPV1 and TRPC1 proteins. In human liver tissue, TRPV1, TRPC1, TRPM2, and TRPM7 channels transcripts were localized mainly to hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. Our findings strongly suggest that APAP

  2. Arsenic exposure, inflammation, and renal function in Bangladeshi adults: effect modification by plasma glutathione redox potential

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brandilyn A.; Liu, Xinhua; Hall, Megan N.; Ilievski, Vesna; Slavkovich, Vesna; Siddique, Abu B.; Alam, Shafiul; Islam, Tariqul; Graziano, Joseph H.; Gamble, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic (As) in drinking water is a widespread public health problem leading to increased risk for multiple outcomes such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and possibly renal disease; potential mechanisms include inflammation and oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that As exposure is associated with increased inflammation and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and examined whether the effects of As were modified by plasma glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG), or the reduction potential of the GSSG/2GSH pair (EhGSH). In a cross-sectional study of N = 374 Bangladeshi adults having a wide range of As exposure, we measured markers of inflammation (plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), α-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP)), renal function (eGFR), GSH, and GSSG. In covariate-adjusted models, a 10% increase in water As, urinary As adjusted for specific gravity (uAs), or blood As (bAs) was associated with a 0.74% (p = 0.01), 0.90% (p = 0.16), and 1.39% (p = 0.07) increase in CRP, respectively; there was no association with AGP. A 10% increase in uAs or bAs was associated with an average reduction in eGFR of 0.16 (p = 0.12) and 0.21 ml/min/1.73 m2 (p = 0.08), respectively. In stratified analyses, the effect of As exposure on CRP was observed only in participants having EhGSH > median (uAs pWald = 0.03; bAs pWald = 0.05). This was primarily driven by stronger effects of As exposure on CRP in participants with lower plasma GSH. The effects of As exposure on eGFR were not modified significantly by EhGSH, GSH, or GSSG. These data suggest that participants having lower plasma GSH and a more oxidized plasma EhGSH are at increased risk for As-induced inflammation. Future studies should evaluate whether antioxidant treatment lowers plasma EhGSH and reduces risk for As-induced diseases. PMID:25916185

  3. A cobalt complex redox shuttle for dye-sensitized solar cells with high open-circuit potentials

    PubMed Central

    Yum, Jun-Ho; Baranoff, Etienne; Kessler, Florian; Moehl, Thomas; Ahmad, Shahzada; Bessho, Takeru; Marchioro, Arianna; Ghadiri, Elham; Moser, Jacques-E.; Yi, Chenyi; Nazeeruddin, Md. K.; Grätzel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells are a promising alternative to traditional inorganic semiconductor-based solar cells. Here we report an open-circuit voltage of over 1,000 mV in mesoscopic dye-sensitized solar cells incorporating a molecularly engineered cobalt complex as redox mediator. Cobalt complexes have negligible absorption in the visible region of the solar spectrum, and their redox properties can be tuned in a controlled fashion by selecting suitable donor/acceptor substituents on the ligand. This approach offers an attractive alternate to the traditional I3−/I− redox shuttle used in dye-sensitized solar cells. A cobalt complex using tridendate ligands [Co(bpy-pz)2]3+/2+(PF6)3/2 as redox mediator in combination with a cyclopentadithiophene-bridged donor-acceptor dye (Y123), adsorbed on TiO2, yielded a power conversion efficiency of over 10% at 100 mW cm−2. This result indicates that the molecularly engineered cobalt redox shuttle is a legitimate alternative to the commonly used I3−/I− redox shuttle. PMID:22252555

  4. Electron flow in multiheme bacterial cytochromes is a balancing act between heme electronic interaction and redox potentials

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The naturally widespread process of electron transfer from metal reducing bacteria to extracellular solid metal oxides entails unique biomolecular machinery optimized for long-range electron transport. To perform this function efficiently, microorganisms have adapted multiheme c-type cytochromes to arrange heme cofactors into wires that cooperatively span the cellular envelope, transmitting electrons along distances greater than 100 Å. Implications and opportunities for bionanotechnological device design are self-evident. However, at the molecular level, how these proteins shuttle electrons along their heme wires, navigating intraprotein intersections and interprotein interfaces efficiently, remains a mystery thus far inaccessible to experiment. To shed light on this critical topic, we carried out extensive quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations to calculate stepwise heme-to-heme electron transfer rates in the recently crystallized outer membrane deca-heme cytochrome MtrF. By solving a master equation for electron hopping, we estimate an intrinsic, maximum possible electron flux through solvated MtrF of 104–105 s−1, consistent with recently measured rates for the related multiheme protein complex MtrCAB. Intriguingly, our calculations show that the rapid electron transport through MtrF is the result of a clear correlation between heme redox potential and the strength of electronic coupling along the wire: thermodynamically uphill steps occur only between electronically well-connected stacked heme pairs. This observation suggests that the protein evolved to harbor low-potential hemes without slowing down electron flow. These findings are particularly profound in light of the apparently well-conserved staggered cross-heme wire structural motif in functionally related outer membrane proteins. PMID:24385579

  5. Electrochemical behaviour of bacterial nitric oxide reductase-evidence of low redox potential non-heme Fe(B) gives new perspectives on the catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cordas, Cristina M; Duarte, Américo G; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2013-03-01

    Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) is a membrane bound enzyme involved in the metabolic denitrification pathway, reducing nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N(2)O), subsequently promoting the formation of the NN bond. Three types of bacterial NOR are known, namely cNOR, qNOR and qCuNOR, that differ on the physiological electron donor. cNOR has been purified as a two subunit complex, the NorC, anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane, with a low-spin heme c, and the NorB subunit showing high structural homology with the HCuO subunit I, comprising a bis-histidine low-spin heme b and a binuclear iron centre. The binuclear iron centre is the catalytic site and it is formed by a heme b(3) coupled to a non-heme iron (Fe(B)) through a μ-oxo bridge. The catalytic mechanism is still under discussion and three hypotheses have been proposed: the trans-mechanism, the cis-Fe(B) and the cis-heme b(3) mechanisms. In the present work, the Pseudomonas nautica cNOR electrochemical behaviour was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), using a pyrolytic graphite electrode modified with the immobilised protein. The protein redox centres were observed and the formal redox potentials were determined. The binuclear iron centre presents the lowest redox potential value, and discrimination between the heme b(3) and Fe(B) redox processes was attained. Also, the number of electrons involved and correspondent surface electronic transfer rate constants were estimated. The pH dependence of the observed redox processes was determined and some new insights on the NOR catalytic mechanism are discussed. PMID:23142527

  6. Insights in the electronic structure and redox reaction energy in LiFePO{sub 4} battery material from an accurate Tran-Blaha modified Becke Johnson potential

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, Rafael B.; Almeida, J. de S; Ferreira da Silva, A.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-09-28

    The main goals of this paper are to investigate the accuracy of the Tran-Blaha modified Becke Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential to predict the electronic structure of lithium iron phosphate and the related redox reaction energy with the lithium deintercalation process. The computed electronic structures show that the TB-mBJ method is able to partially localize Fe-3d electrons in LiFePO{sub 4} and FePO{sub 4} which usually is a problem for the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) due to the self interaction error. The energy band gap is also improved by the TB-mBJ calculations in comparison with the GGA results. It turned out, however, that the redox reaction energy evaluated by the TB-mBJ technique is not in good agreement with the measured one. It is speculated that this disagreement in the computed redox energy and the experimental value is due to the lack of a formal expression to evaluate the exchange and correlation energy. Therefore, the TB-mBJ is an efficient method to improve the prediction of the electronic structures coming form the standard GGA functional in LiFePO{sub 4} and FePO{sub 4}. However, it does not appear to have the same efficiency for evaluating the redox reaction energies for the investigated system.

  7. Insights in the electronic structure and redox reaction energy in LiFePO4 battery material from an accurate Tran-Blaha modified Becke Johnson potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B. Araujo, Rafael; S. de Almeida, J.; Ferreira da Silva, A.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-09-01

    The main goals of this paper are to investigate the accuracy of the Tran-Blaha modified Becke Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential to predict the electronic structure of lithium iron phosphate and the related redox reaction energy with the lithium deintercalation process. The computed electronic structures show that the TB-mBJ method is able to partially localize Fe-3d electrons in LiFePO4 and FePO4 which usually is a problem for the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) due to the self interaction error. The energy band gap is also improved by the TB-mBJ calculations in comparison with the GGA results. It turned out, however, that the redox reaction energy evaluated by the TB-mBJ technique is not in good agreement with the measured one. It is speculated that this disagreement in the computed redox energy and the experimental value is due to the lack of a formal expression to evaluate the exchange and correlation energy. Therefore, the TB-mBJ is an efficient method to improve the prediction of the electronic structures coming form the standard GGA functional in LiFePO4 and FePO4. However, it does not appear to have the same efficiency for evaluating the redox reaction energies for the investigated system.

  8. Tuning redox potentials of bis(imino)pyridine cobalt complexes: an experimental and theoretical study involving solvent and ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Moyses Araujo, C.; Doherty, Mark D.; Konezny, Steven J.; Luca, Oana R.; Usyatinsky, Alex; Grade, Hans; Lobkovsky, Emil; Soloveichik, Grigorii L.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Batista, Victor S.

    2012-01-01

    The structure and electrochemical properties of a series of bis(imino)pyridine CoII complexes (NNN)CoX₂ and [(NNN)₂Co][PF₆]₂ (NNN = 2,6-bis[1-(4-R-phenylimino)ethyl]pyridine, with R = CN, CF₃, H, CH₃, OCH₃, N(CH₃)₂; NNN = 2,6-bis[1-(2,6-(iPr)₂-phenylimino)ethyl]pyridine and X = Cl, Br) were studied using a combination of electrochemical and theoretical methods. Cyclic voltammetry measurements and DFT/B3LYP calculations suggest that in solution (NNN)CoCl₂ complexes exist in equilibrium with disproportionation products [(NNN)₂Co]²⁺ [CoCl₄]²⁻ with the position of the equilibrium heavily influenced by both the solvent polarity and the steric and electronic properties of the bis(imino)pyridine ligands. In strong polar solvents (e.g., CH₃CN or H₂O) or with electron donating substituents (R = OCH₃ or N(CH₃)₂) the equilibrium is shifted and only oxidation of the charged products [(NNN)₂Co]²⁺ and [CoCl₄]²⁻ is observed. Conversely, in nonpolar organic solvents such as CH₂Cl₂ or with electron withdrawing substituents (R = CN or CF₃), disproportionation is suppressed and oxidation of the (NNN)CoCl₂ complexes leads to 18e⁻ CoIII complexes stabilized by coordination of a solvent moiety. In addition, the [(NNN)₂Co][PF₆]₂ complexes exhibit reversible CoII/III oxidation potentials that are strongly dependent on the electron withdrawing/donating nature of the N-aryl substituents, spanning nearly 750 mV in acetonitrile. The resulting insight on the regulation of redox properties of a series of bis(imino)pyridine cobalt(II) complexes should be particularly valuable to tune suitable conditions for reactivity.

  9. Green chemistry methods in sulfur dyeing: application of various reducing D-sugars and analysis of the importance of optimum redox potential.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Richard S; Harvey, Anna

    2004-07-15

    The importance of sulfur dyeing of cellulosic fibers, particularly cotton, is realized economically throughout the dyeing industry. At the present time, dyeing with sulfur dyes requires the use of various auxiliaries, many of which have adverse effects on the environment. The most damaging of these is the reducing agent sodium sulfide, required to reduce the dye molecules to a water-soluble leuco form to enable adsorption and diffusion into the fiber. In this study, attempts have been made to replace the sodium sulfide used within the sulfur dyeing process with a variety of environmentally friendly reducing sugars. The redox potential of various hexose and pentose monosaccharides and reducing disaccharides was recorded and compared. Subsequently, cotton was dyed with the world's most important sulfur dye, C. I. Sulfur Black 1, using the reducing sugars under alkaline conditions, and compared to dyeings secured by employing commercial sulfide reducing agents. It was observed that reducing sugars gave comparable, and in many cases superior, color strength and wash fastness results, with respect to the commercial sulfide-based reducing agents, which still account for the vast majority of sulfur dyeing processes and that pose significant environmental concern. Employment of reducing sugars in sulfur dyeing could provide a sustainable, nontoxic, biodegradable, cost-effective alternative to sodium polysulfide and sodium hydrogen sulfide. Comparison of the redox potential of reducing sugars against the color strength of the dyeings secured demonstrated that there was an optimum redox potential of around -650 mV for maximum color strength achieved. The same redox potential also conferred the lowest color loss upon washing. These observations were attributed to reduction of the polymeric dye molecules to an optimum size for fiber affinity and diffusion into the fiber, but which would also confer maximum wash fastness upon oxidation. PMID:15298216

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis WhiB3 Responds to Vacuolar pH-induced Changes in Mycothiol Redox Potential to Modulate Phagosomal Maturation and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Mansi; Rajmani, Raju S; Singh, Amit

    2016-02-01

    The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to resist intraphagosomal stresses, such as oxygen radicals and low pH, is critical for its persistence. Here, we show that a cytoplasmic redox sensor, WhiB3, and the major M. tuberculosis thiol, mycothiol (MSH), are required to resist acidic stress during infection. WhiB3 regulates the expression of genes involved in lipid anabolism, secretion, and redox metabolism, in response to acidic pH. Furthermore, inactivation of the MSH pathway subverted the expression of whiB3 along with other pH-specific genes in M. tuberculosis. Using a genetic biosensor of mycothiol redox potential (EMSH), we demonstrated that a modest decrease in phagosomal pH is sufficient to generate redox heterogeneity in EMSH of the M. tuberculosis population in a WhiB3-dependent manner. Data indicate that M. tuberculosis needs low pH as a signal to alter cytoplasmic EMSH, which activates WhiB3-mediated gene expression and acid resistance. Importantly, WhiB3 regulates intraphagosomal pH by down-regulating the expression of innate immune genes and blocking phagosomal maturation. We show that this block in phagosomal maturation is in part due to WhiB3-dependent production of polyketide lipids. Consistent with these observations, MtbΔwhiB3 displayed intramacrophage survival defect, which can be rescued bypharmacological inhibition of phagosomal acidification. Last, MtbΔwhiB3 displayed marked attenuation in the lungs of guinea pigs. Altogether, our study revealed an intimate link between vacuolar acidification, redox physiology, and virulence in M. tuberculosis and discovered WhiB3 as crucial mediator of phagosomal maturation arrest and acid resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:26637353

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis WhiB3 Responds to Vacuolar pH-induced Changes in Mycothiol Redox Potential to Modulate Phagosomal Maturation and Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Mansi; Rajmani, Raju S.; Singh, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to resist intraphagosomal stresses, such as oxygen radicals and low pH, is critical for its persistence. Here, we show that a cytoplasmic redox sensor, WhiB3, and the major M. tuberculosis thiol, mycothiol (MSH), are required to resist acidic stress during infection. WhiB3 regulates the expression of genes involved in lipid anabolism, secretion, and redox metabolism, in response to acidic pH. Furthermore, inactivation of the MSH pathway subverted the expression of whiB3 along with other pH-specific genes in M. tuberculosis. Using a genetic biosensor of mycothiol redox potential (EMSH), we demonstrated that a modest decrease in phagosomal pH is sufficient to generate redox heterogeneity in EMSH of the M. tuberculosis population in a WhiB3-dependent manner. Data indicate that M. tuberculosis needs low pH as a signal to alter cytoplasmic EMSH, which activates WhiB3-mediated gene expression and acid resistance. Importantly, WhiB3 regulates intraphagosomal pH by down-regulating the expression of innate immune genes and blocking phagosomal maturation. We show that this block in phagosomal maturation is in part due to WhiB3-dependent production of polyketide lipids. Consistent with these observations, MtbΔwhiB3 displayed intramacrophage survival defect, which can be rescued bypharmacological inhibition of phagosomal acidification. Last, MtbΔwhiB3 displayed marked attenuation in the lungs of guinea pigs. Altogether, our study revealed an intimate link between vacuolar acidification, redox physiology, and virulence in M. tuberculosis and discovered WhiB3 as crucial mediator of phagosomal maturation arrest and acid resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:26637353

  12. Impact of Proximal and Distal Pocket Site-Directed Mutations on the Ferric/Ferrous Heme Redox Potential of Yeast Cytochrome-c-Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Jensen, G M; Goodin, D B

    2011-12-01

    Cytochrome-c-peroxidase (CCP) contains a five-coordinate heme active site. The reduction potential for the ferric to ferrous couple in CCP is anomalously low and pH dependent (Eo = ~-180 mV vs. S.H.E. at pH 7). The contribution of the protein environment to the tuning of the redox potential of this couple is evaluated using site directed mutants of several amino acid residues in the environment of the heme. These include proximal pocket mutation to residues Asp-235, Trp-191, Phe-202 and His-175, distal pocket mutation to residues Trp-51, His-52, and Arg-48; and a heme edge mutation to Ala-147. Where unknown, the structural changes resulting from the amino acid substitution have been studied by X-ray crystallography. In most cases, ostensibly polar or charged residues are replaced by large hydrophobic groups or alternatively by Ala or Gly. These latter have been shown to generate large, solvent filled cavities. Reduction potentials are measured as a function of pH by spectroelectrochemistry. Starting with the X-ray derived structures of CCP and the mutants, or with predicted structures generated by Molecular Dynamics (MD), predictions of redox potential changes are modeled using the Protein Dipoles Langevin Dipoles (PDLD) method. These calculations serve to model an electrostatic assessment of the redox potential change with simplified assumptions about heme iron chemistry, with the balance of the experimentally observed shifts in redox potential being thence attributed to changes in the ligand set and heme coordination chemistry, and/or other changes in the structure not directly evident in the X-ray structures (e.g. ionization states, specific roles played by solvent species, or conformationally flexible portions of the protein). Agreement between theory and experiment is good for all mutant proteins with the exception of the mutation Arg 48 to Ala, and His 52 to Ala. In the former case, the influence of phosphate buffer is adduced to account for the discrepancy

  13. Antizyme suppression leads to an increment of the cellular redox potential and an induction of HIF-1alpha: its involvement in resistance to gamma-radiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Sik; Kim, Tae Lim; Cho, Eun Wie; Paik, Sang Gi; Chung, Hai Won; Kim, In Gyu

    2008-06-01

    The mammalian antizyme (AZ) promotes ubiqutin-independent degradation of ornithine decarboxylase, a key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. This study shows that AZ suppression in human lung carcinoma A549 cells caused growth defects and death, but made the cells resistant to DNA damaging agents such as gamma-radiation and cisplatin. In these cells, the cellular redox potential (glutathione/glutathione disulfide [GSH/GSSG] ratio) was increased and thus intracellular reactive oxygen species were severely diminished, which might cause growth defects and cell death. The increase of cellular redox potential was mainly caused by dramatic increase of the cytoplasmic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, which generates the reducing equivalents NADPH. In the AZ-suppressed cells, the hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) was also increased. As in other cases which showed an increment of HIF-1alpha and the cellular redox potential, the AZ-suppressed cells showed resistance to gamma-radiation and anticancer drugs. Therefore, these facts might be considered as important for the use of radio- and chemotherapy on tumor cells which show an unbalance in their polyamine levels. PMID:18484090

  14. Real-time monitoring of the extracellular redox potential of cell suspensions during plant/bacterial interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants and animals, there has been a strong focus on reactive oxygen species/antioxidants in regard to stress responses. This has lead to an awareness of the importance of ‘redox potential’ as a prime regulatory determinant of cellular function and responses to internal and external stimuli. I...

  15. Potential application of microbial iron redox cycles in nitrate removal and their effects on clay mineral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Dong, H.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Briggs, B. R.; Zeng, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Phyllosilicates that are ubiquitous in subsurface can serve as an iron source for microbial respiration. The objective of this research is to determine the ability of the phyllosilicate Fe to remove nitrate in subsurface undergoing microbial-driven redox cycles. In this study, thus, a well-characterized reference clay (NAu-2; nontronite), was subjected to redox cycles in a system containing dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, and nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002. Three redox cycles were conducted in bicarbonate- and PIPES-buffered medium. The extents of Fe(III) reduction, Fe(II) oxidation, nitrate reduction, and its various intermediate products were measured by wet chemical methods. For each cycle, Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and Mossbauer spectroscopy confirmed Fe oxidation state. Mineralogical changes were identified by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, and infrared absorption spectroscopy. For all three cycles, nitrate was completely reduced to nitrogen gas under both bicarbonate- and PIPES- buffered conditions. As redox cycle increased, bio-reduction extents of Fe(III) in NAu-2 decreased by 33% and 48% in PIPES- and bicarbonate-buffered medium, respectively; however, bio-oxidation extents increased by 66% and 55% in the same medium, respectively. Despite the change of OH-stretching vibration band and OH-bending vibration bands in NAu-2 structure along Fe redox cycles, XRD data showed interlayer spacing of NAu-2 to be constant along the same Fe redox cycle. 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy indicated complex reduction and re-oxidation pathways. For example, a distinct Fe(II) doublet and a Fe2.5+ feature due to interfacial Fe(II)-Fe(III) electron transfer on clay mineral are prominent in their RT spectra. Both these Fe(II) are partially oxidized by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The result of this study shows that Fe in biogenically reduced or oxidized NAu-2

  16. Redox potential of quinones in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides: dependence on protonation of Glu-L212 and Asp-L213.

    PubMed

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Morra, Giulia; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2003-04-01

    The absolute values of the one-electron redox potentials of the two quinones (Q(A) and Q(B)) in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were calculated by evaluating the electrostatic energies from the solution of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation at pH 7.0. The redox potential for Q(A) was calculated to be between -173 and -160 mV, which is close to the lowest measured values that are assumed to refer to nonequilibrated protonation patterns in the redox state Q(A)(-). The redox potential of quinone Q(B) is found to be about 160-220 mV larger for the light-exposed than for the dark-adapted structure. These values of the redox potentials are obtained if Asp-L213 is nearly protonated (probability 0.75-1.0) before and after electron transfer from Q(A) to Q(B), while Glu-L212 is partially protonated (probability 0.6) in the initial state Q(A)(-)Q(B)(0) and fully protonated in the final state Q(A)(0)Q(B)(-). Conversely, if the charge state of the quinones is varied from Q(A)(-)Q(B)(0) to Q(A)(0)Q(B)(-) corresponding to the electron transfer from Q(A) to Q(B), Asp-L213 remains protonated, while Glu-L212 changes its protonation state from 0.15 H(+) to fully protonated. In agreement with results from FTIR spectra, there is proton uptake at Glu-L212 going along with the electron transfer, whereas Asp-L213 does not change its protonation state. However, in our simulations Asp-L213 is considered to be protonated rather than ionized as deduced from FTIR spectra. The calculated redox potential of Q(A) shows little dependence on the charge state of Asp-L213, which is due to a strong coupling with the protonation state of Asp-M17 but increases by 50 mV if Glu-L212 changes from the ionized to the protonated charge state. Both are in agreement with fluorescence measurements observing the decay of SP(+)Q(A)(-) in a wide pH regime. The computed difference in redox potential of Q(B) in the light-exposed and dark-adapted structure was traced back

  17. The formal redox potential of the Ti(IV, III) couple at 25 degrees C in 1 M HCl 2 M NaCl medium.

    PubMed

    Amorello, Diana; Gambino, Vincenzo; Romano, Vincenzo; Zingales, Roberto

    2007-08-01

    The formal redox potential of the Ti(IV, III) couple has been determined at 25 degrees C in 1 M HCl, 2 M NaCl aqueous medium, by emf measurements of a junction-free cell with glass and mercury electrodes. Ti(III) and Ti(IV) concentrations were changed by controlled electrolysis. The mean value of the searched formal potential, in a large range of total titanium concentration, is 9 +/- 1 mV against the molar hydrogen electrode in the same ionic medium. PMID:17899884

  18. Electronegativity and redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón Alain; Martínez González, Marco; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-08-10

    Using the maximum hardness principle, we show that the oxidation potential of a molecule increases as its electronegativity increases and also increases as its electronegativity in its oxidized state increases. This insight can be used to construct a linear free energy relation for the oxidation potential, which we train on a set of 31 organic redox couples and test on a set of 10 different redox reactions. Better results are obtained when the electronegativity of the oxidized/reduced reagents are adjusted to account for the reagents' interaction with their chemical environment. PMID:27451962

  19. Temperature dependence of the electrode potential of a cobalt-based redox couple in ionic liquid electrolytes for thermal energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    He, Jiangjing; Al-Masri, Danah; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Pringle, Jennifer M

    2016-08-15

    Increasing the application of technologies for harvesting waste heat could make a significant contribution to sustainable energy production. Thermoelectrochemical cells are one such emerging technology, where the thermal response of a redox couple in an electrolyte is used to generate a potential difference across a cell when a temperature gradient exists. The unique physical properties of ionic liquids make them ideal for application as electrolytes in these devices. One of the keys to utilizing these media in efficient thermoelectrochemical cells is achieving high Seebeck coefficients, Se: the thermodynamic quantity that determines the magnitude of the voltage achieved per unit temperature difference. Here, we report the Se and cell performance of a cobalt-based redox couple in a range of different ionic liquids, to investigate the influence of the nature of the IL on the thermodynamics and cell performance of the redox system. The results reported include the highest Se to-date for an IL-based electrolyte. The effect of diluting the different ILs with propylene carbonate is also reported, which results in a significant increase in the output powers and current densities of the device. PMID:27200437

  20. Postnatal exposure to trichloroethylene alters glutathione redox homeostasis, methylation potential, and neurotrophin expression in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Blossom, Sarah J.; Melnyk, Stepan; Cooney, Craig A.; Gilbert, Kathleen M.; James, S. Jill

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that continuous exposure throughout gestation until the juvenile period to environmentally-relevant doses of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the drinking water of MRL+/+ mice promoted adverse behavior associated with glutathione depletion in the cerebellum indicating increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to extend our findings and further characterize the impact of TCE exposure on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in the hippocampus, a brain region prone to oxidative stress. Instead of a continuous exposure, the mice were exposed to water only or two environmentally relevant doses of TCE in the drinking water postnatally from birth until 6 weeks of age. Biomarkers of plasma metabolites in the transsulfuration pathway and the transmethylation pathway of the methionine cycle were also examined. Gene expression of neurotrophins was examined to investigate a possible relationship between oxidative stress, redox imbalance and neurotrophic factor expression with TCE exposure. Our results show that hippocampi isolated from male mice exposed to TCE showed altered glutathione redox homeostasis indicating a more oxidized state. Also observed was a significant, dose dependent increase in glutathione precursors. Plasma from the TCE treated mice showed alterations in metabolites in the transsulfuration and transmethylation pathways indicating redox imbalance and altered methylation capacity. 3-Nitrotyrosine, a biomarker of protein oxidative stress, was also significantly higher in plasma and hippocampus of TCE-exposed mice compared to controls. In contrast, expression of key neurotrophic factors in the hippocampus (BDNF, NGF, and NT-3) was significantly reduced compared to controls. Our results demonstrate that low-level postnatal and early life TCE exposure modulates neurotrophin gene expression in the mouse hippocampus and may provide a mechanism for TCE-mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:22421312

  1. Phenolic contents and bioactive potential of peach fruit extracts.

    PubMed

    Mokrani, Abderrahmane; Krisa, Stéphanie; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Da Costa, Grégory; Temsamani, Hamza; Renouf, Elodie; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Madani, Khodir; Mesnil, Marc; Monvoisin, Arnaud; Richard, Tristan

    2016-07-01

    Several cultivars of peach fruit (Prunus persica L.) were investigated. Their phenolic composition and concentration were assessed by LC-MS. Concentrations were calculated in mg per g of dry weight extract. Their antioxidant capacity (Folin-Ciocalteu, ORAC, DPPH, ABTS, PFRAP and ICA), inhibitory property against β-amyloid and α-synuclein fibril formation and protective capacity against Aβ-induced toxicity on PC12 cell lines (viability assessed by MTT assay and intracellular ROS production by DCFH-DA assay) were evaluated. Fifteen different phenolic compounds were identified and quantified. In particular, new isorhamnetin derivatives were identified. Phenolic contents were ranged between 19 and 82mg/g. Spring Belle extract had the highest content and Romea the lowest. Except for the ICA assay, a good correlation between phenolic content and the antioxidant capacities of peach fruit extracts was found, indicating that phenolic compounds are major contributors to their antioxidant capacity. Results indicate that the phenolic extract of peach cultivars inhibits Aβ and αS fibril formation and protects PC12 cell lines against Aβ-induced toxicity. PMID:26920287

  2. Self-consistent parametrization of DFT + U framework using linear response approach: Application to evaluation of redox potentials of battery cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, Maxim; Sato, Hirofumi

    2016-02-01

    The accuracy of DFT +U calculations, applied to the study of electronic structure and energetics of strongly correlated materials, heavily depends on U parameters, chosen for adequate treatment of d and f states. Computational evaluation of U parameters, which does not require fitting to experimental measurements or results of computationally expensive schemes, is highly desirable for the study of novel materials and even more so for materials not yet synthesized to date. Within this work, we show that the linear response method could provide U parameters which can yield redox potentials of battery cathode materials in much better agreement with experiment than conventional density functional theory (DFT). In our approach, we evaluate U values self-consistently, ensuring agreement between U calculated using linear response with the value used for DFT +U calculations. We find that such self-consistency is necessary for determination of adequate values of U . We also studied the impact of using various PAW (projector augmented wave) potentials for transition-metal ions, that differ by the number of electrons treated as valence. We find that redox potentials are reasonably well reproduced for all cases, although a slightly higher degree of accuracy corresponds to PAW potentials with semicore electrons treated as valence. Importantly, we find that converged values of U are substantially different for various PAW potentials of transition-metal ions of the same material. Overall, we find that self-consistent DFT +U /linear response calculations provide quite accurate values of redox potentials for materials with purely ionic bonding (e.g., LiFePO4, LiCoPO4, LiCoO2, LiMnPO4, NaFePO4), whereas for materials with covalent p d hybridization (e.g., LiNiO2) or conducting materials (e.g., LiTiS2) the agreement with experimental redox voltage is lower. This emphasizes the need for application of more advanced techniques (e.g., DFT +U +V method) for accurate study of partially

  3. Effect of redox potential and pH status on degradation and adsorption behavior of tylosin in dairy lagoon sediment suspension.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Wang, Jim J; DeLaune, Ronald D; Seo, Dong Cheol; Dodla, Syam K; Hernandez, Amy B

    2013-06-01

    Veterinary antibiotics are the most heavily used pharmaceuticals in intensive animal farming operation. Their presence in the environment through application of manure and lagoon water as fertilizer in agricultural fields has generated a growing concern in recent years due to potential threat to the ecosystem and the risk they pose to human and animal health. Among the antibiotics, tylosin, a macrolide class of antibiotics, has been widely used for disease prevention and growth promotion in swine, cattle/dairy, and poultry production. To understand degradation and sorption behavior of tylosin A, a laboratory microcosm incubation study was conducted on dairy lagoon sediments suspension under different pH (5.5, 7.0, 8.5) and redox potentials (Eh at -100 mV, 0 mV, +250 mV, +350 mV). Sorption and degradation of tylosin was strongly influenced by sediment pH and redox conditions. Under acidic (pH 5.5) and reduced (Eh -100 mV) condition, tylosin persisted in the solution phase of dairy lagoon sediment suspension much longer with resident time of 77 d. Under oxidized (Eh +350 mV) condition, microbial degradation was much greater causing 68-75% of tylosin loss from the solution at pH 5.5 and 32-75% at pH 7.0 during the 20 d incubation. At pH 8.5, abiotic transformation of tylosin A into unknown degradates rather than sediment adsorption and microbial degradation was the major mechanism controlling tylosin disappearance from the solution regardless of the status of redox potentials. Overall, the results suggested that under reduced condition with low pH, tylosin will be persisted in the lagoon effluents and residue of tylosin may enter agricultural fields through the application of lagoon slurry as fertilizer. PMID:23352520

  4. The formal redox potential of the Yb(III, II) couple at 0 degrees C in 3.22 molal Nacl medium.

    PubMed

    Amorello, Diana; Romano, Vincenzo; Zingales, Roberto

    2004-03-01

    Following our previous investigations on aqueous solutions of hypooxidized and iperoxidized species, we managed, by lowering the temperature of the solutions to 0 degrees C, to obtain, by electrochemical methods, Yb(II) and Yb(III) mixtures, enough stable to determine by a potentiometric method the formal redox potential of the Yb(IlI, II) couple. Its value, in a large range of total Ytterbium concentration, is -1233 +/- 3 mV against the molal hydrogen electrode in the 3.22 m NaCl medium. PMID:15206833

  5. Redox Redone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, John T.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an extension of the change in oxidation number method that is used for balancing skeletal redox reactions in aqueous solutions. Retains most of the simplicity of the change in oxidation number method but provides the additional step-by-step process necessary for the beginner to balance an equation. (JRH)

  6. Redox control of teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jason M; Harris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    A number of human teratogens elicit their deleterious effects through mechanisms involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. However, classic definitions of oxidative stress do not fully coincide with basic fundamental principles of teratology. Newer definitions of oxidative stress focus on the targeted redox modification of cysteine/thiol functional groups found in the regulatory domains of critical signaling pathway proteins, suggesting that the targeted disruption of signaling through specific redox couples may account for the specificity of teratogen-induced malformations which previously could not be rationalized. Here, we review examples of teratogens that induce ROS and oxidative injury, describe oxidative stress-related teratogenic mechanisms, and provide rationale for developmental periods of sensitivity and species susceptibility. Understanding how chemicals disrupt redox status, induce oxidative stress leading to dysmorphogenesis becomes important to identify potential teratogens and develop therapeutic interventions for attenuation of harmful chemical effects in utero following exposure. PMID:23089153

  7. Design, synthesis and evaluation of redox radiopharmaceuticals: a potential new approach for the development of brain imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The fabrication and complete evaluation are described of a dihydropyridine in equilibrium pyridinium salt type redox system for the delivery of radioiodinated agents to the brain. The pivotal intermediate, N-succinimidyl (1-methylpyridinium iodide)-3-carboxylate was prepared by condensation of nicotinic acid and N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of dicyclohexylcarbodimide, followed by quaternization of III with methyl iodide. Tissue distribution studies of /sup 125/I-labeled 4-iodoaniline and the redox agents were performed in rats. (/sup 125/I)Iodoaniline initially showed moderate (0.58% dose/gm) brain uptake with subsequent release of the radioactivity from the brain. (/sup 125/I)Iodoaniline, when coupled to a dihydropyridine carrier showed higher uptake and retention in the brain. The (/sup 125/I)iodophenylethyl analogue showed uptake and retention in the brain to be very similar. Apparently the lipophilic agents cross the blood-brain barrier and are oxidized (quaternized) within the brain. The blood-brain barrier then prevents their release resulting in high uptake and retention in the brain and high brain:blood ratios. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Redox regulated peroxisome homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Shuo; Liu, Yu; Ma, Changle

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Conserved functions of peroxisomes encompass beta-oxidation of fatty acids and scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated from diverse peroxisomal metabolic pathways. Peroxisome content, number, and size can change quickly in response to environmental and/or developmental cues. To achieve efficient peroxisome homeostasis, peroxisome biogenesis and degradation must be orchestrated. We review the current knowledge on redox regulated peroxisome biogenesis and degradation with an emphasis on yeasts and plants. PMID:25545794

  9. Redox regulated peroxisome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Shuo; Liu, Yu; Ma, Changle

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Conserved functions of peroxisomes encompass beta-oxidation of fatty acids and scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated from diverse peroxisomal metabolic pathways. Peroxisome content, number, and size can change quickly in response to environmental and/or developmental cues. To achieve efficient peroxisome homeostasis, peroxisome biogenesis and degradation must be orchestrated. We review the current knowledge on redox regulated peroxisome biogenesis and degradation with an emphasis on yeasts and plants. PMID:25545794

  10. A Density Functional Theory Based Protocol to Compute the Redox Potential of Transition Metal Complex with the Correction of Pseudo-Counterion: General Theory and Applications.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Okumura, Mitsutaka

    2013-07-01

    We propose an accurate scheme to evaluate the redox potential of a wide variety of transition metal complexes by adding a charge-dependent correction term for a counterion around the charged complexes, which is based on Generalized Born theory, to the solvation energy. The mean absolute error (MAE) toward experimental redox potentials of charged complexes is considerably reduced from 0.81 V (maximum error 1.22 V) to 0.22 V (maximum error 0.50 V). We found a remarkable exchange-correlation functional dependence on the results rather than the basis set ones. The combination of Wachters+f (for metal) and 6-31++G(d,p) (for other atoms) with the B3LYP functional gives the least MAE 0.15 V for the test complexes. This scheme is applicable to other solvents, and heavier transition metal complexes such as M1(CO)5(pycn) (M1 = Cr, Mo, W), M2(mnt)2 (M2 = Ni, Pd, Pt), and M3(bpy)3 (M3 = Fe, Ru, Os) with the same quality. PMID:26583980

  11. Redox probing study of the potential dependence of charge transport through Li2O2

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Kristian B.; Luntz, Alan C.; Jensen, Søren H.; Vegge, Tejs; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-11-20

    In the field of energy storage devices the pursuit for cheap, high energy density, reliable secondary batteries is at the top of the agenda. The Li–O2 battery is one of the possible technologies that, in theory, should be able to close the gap, which exists between the present state-of-the-art Li-ion technologies and the demand placed on batteries by technologies such as electrical vehicles. Here we present a redox probing study of the charge transfer across the main deposition product lithium peroxide, Li2O2, in the Li–O2 battery using outer-sphere redox shuttles. The change in heterogeneous electron transfer exchange rate as a function of the potential and the Li2O2 layer thickness (~depth-of-discharge) was determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the attenuation of the electron transfer exchange rate with film thickness is dependent on the probing potential, providing evidence that hole transport is the dominant process for charge transfer through Li2O2 and showing that the origin of the sudden death observed upon discharge is due to charge transport limitations.

  12. Evaluation of the relative redox capacity of molybdenum-containing silicas obtained by molecular stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Bodyagin, B.O.; Olifirenko, V.V.; Pak, V.N.

    1989-02-01

    Redox titrations have been used to evaluate the redox properties of Mo-containing silicas obtained by molecular stratification. The Fe/sup 3+/-Fe/sup 2+/ pair has been chosen as the mediator. The changes in the content of Mo(V) and Mo(VI) in the surface layer over the course of the titration have been calculated for three series of samples. The curves obtained together with the values of the half-oxidation potentials attest to the significant dependencies of the redox properties on the degree of filling of the surface by modifying groupings.

  13. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Matheus P; Correa Soares, Juliana B R; Oliveira, Marcus F

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  14. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Matheus P.; Correa Soares, Juliana B. R.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  15. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  16. Ionization Energies and Aqueous Redox Potentials of Organic Molecules: Comparison of DFT, Correlated ab Initio Theory and Pair Natural Orbital Approaches.

    PubMed

    Isegawa, Miho; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-05-10

    The calculation of redox potentials involves large energetic terms arising from gas phase ionization energies, thermodynamic contributions, and solvation energies of the reduced and oxidized species. In this work we study the performance of a wide range of wave function and density functional theory methods for the prediction of ionization energies and aqueous one-electron oxidation potentials of a set of 19 organic molecules. Emphasis is placed on evaluating methods that employ the computationally efficient local pair natural orbital (LPNO) approach, as well as several implementations of coupled cluster theory and explicitly correlated F12 methods. The electronic energies are combined with implicit solvation models for the solvation energies. With the exception of MP2 and its variants, which suffer from enormous errors arising at least partially from the poor Hartree-Fock reference, ionization energies can be systematically predicted with average errors below 0.1 eV for most of the correlated wave function based methods studies here, provided basis set extrapolation is performed. LPNO methods are the most efficient way to achieve this type of accuracy. DFT methods show in general larger errors and suffer from inconsistent behavior. The only exception is the M06-2X functional which is found to be competitive with the best LPNO-based approaches for ionization energies. Importantly, the limiting factor for the calculation of accurate redox potentials is the solvation energy. The errors in the predicted solvation energies by all continuum solvation models tested in this work dominate the final computed reduction potential, resulting in average errors typically in excess of 0.3 V and hence obscuring the gains that arise from choosing a more accurate electronic structure method. PMID:27065224

  17. D1-arginine257 mutants (R257E, K, and Q) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have a lowered QB redox potential: analysis of thermoluminescence and fluorescence measurements

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Stuart; Minagawa, Jun; Seufferheld, Manfredo; Padden, Sean; Svensson, Bengt; Kolling, Derrick R. J.; Crofts, Antony R.; Govindjee

    2009-01-01

    Arginine257 (R257), in the de-helix that caps the QB site of the D1 protein, has been shown by mutational studies to play a key role in the sensitivity of Photosystem II (PS II) to bicarbonate-reversible binding of the formate anion. In this article, the role of this residue has been further investigated through D1 mutations (R257E, R257Q, and R257K) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We have investigated the activity of the QB site by studying differences from wild type on the steady-state turnover of PS II, as assayed through chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence yield decay after flash excitation. The effects of p-benzoquinone (BQ, which oxidizes reduced QB, QB−) and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU, which blocks electron flow from QA− to QB) were measured. The equilibrium constants of the two-electron gate were obtained through thermoluminescence measurements. The thermoluminescence properties were changed in the mutants, especially when observed after pretreatment with 100 μM BQ. A theoretical analysis of the thermoluminescence data, based mainly on the recombination pathways model of Rappaport et al. (2005), led to the conclusion that the free-energy difference for the recombination of QB− with S2 was reduced by 20–40 mV in the three mutants (D1-R257K, D1-R257Q, and D1-R257E); this was interpreted to be due to a lowering of the redox potential of QB/QB−. Further, since the recombination of QA− with S2 was unaffected, we suggest that no significant change in redox potential of QA/QA− occurred in these three mutants. The maximum variable Chl a fluorescence yield is lowered in the mutants, in the order R257K > R257Q > R257E, compared to wild type. Our analysis of the binary oscillations in Chl a fluorescence following pretreatment of cells with BQ showed that turnover of the QB site was relatively unaffected in the three mutants. The mutant D1-R257E had the lowest growth rate and steady-state activity and showed the weakest binary oscillations

  18. Wiring of the aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC to electrode surfaces via entrapment in low potential phenothiazine-modified redox polymers.

    PubMed

    Pinyou, Piyanut; Ruff, Adrian; Pöller, Sascha; Alsaoub, Sabine; Leimkühler, Silke; Wollenberger, Ulla; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Phenothiazine-modified redox hydrogels were synthesized and used for the wiring of the aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC to electrode surfaces. The effects of the pH value and electrode surface modification on the biocatalytic activity of the layers were studied in the presence of vanillin as the substrate. The enzyme electrodes were successfully employed as bioanodes in vanillin/O2 biofuel cells in combination with a high potential bilirubin oxidase biocathode. Open circuit voltages of around 700 mV could be obtained in a two compartment biofuel cell setup. Moreover, the use of a rather hydrophobic polymer with a high degree of crosslinking sites ensures the formation of stable polymer/enzyme films which were successfully used as bioanode in membrane-less biofuel cells. PMID:26775204

  19. Single-crystal electron paramagnetic resonance study of cytochrome c3 from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Norway Strain. Assignment of the heme midpoint redox potentials.

    PubMed

    Guigliarelli, B; Bertrand, P; More, C; Haser, R; Gayda, J P

    1990-11-01

    A single crystal of cytochrome c3 from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Norway is studied by electron paramagnetic resonance at low temperature. The orientation of the principal axis corresponding to the largest g value is determined for the 12 heme groups in the crystal unit cell. The comparison of these directions to the normals to the heme planes, determined from the crystallographic data at 2.5 A resolution, gives strong evidence for the following assignment of the midpoint redox potentials to the heme groups H1 to H4, defined in the three-dimensional structure: -150 mV is assigned to H3, -300 mV to H4, -330 mV to H1 and -355 mV to H2. This assignment is in agreement with a partial correspondence previously established from an independent study performed on cytochrome c3 in solution. PMID:2172551

  20. Gold Nanosphere Gated Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle Responsive to Near-Infrared Light and Redox Potential as a Theranostic Platform for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bei; He, Huacheng; Huang, Tao; Berr, Stuart S; He, Jiang; Fan, Daping; Zhang, Jiajia; Xu, Peisheng

    2016-03-01

    A gold/mesoporous silica hybrid nanoparticle (GoMe), which possesses the best of both conventional gold nanoparticles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles, such as excellent photothermal converting ability as well as high drug loading capacity and triggerable drug release, has been developed. In contrast to gold nanorod and other heat generating gold nanoparticles, GoMe is photothermal stable and can be repetitively activated through NIR irradiation. Doxorubicin loaded GoMe (DOX@GoMe) is sensitive to both NIR irradiation and intracellularly elevated redox potential. DOX@GoMe coupled with NIR irradiation exhibits a synergistic effect of photothermal therapy and chemotherapy in killing cancer cells. Furthermore, 64Cu-labeled GoMe can successfully detect the existence of clinically relevant spontaneous lung tumors in a urethane-induced lung cancer mouse model through PET imaging. Altogether, GoMe can be utilized as an effective theranostic platform for cancer therapy. PMID:26949379

  1. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  2. Oxidation of plasma cysteine/cystine and GSH/GSSG redox potentials by acetaminophen and sulfur amino acid insufficiency in humans.

    PubMed

    Mannery, Yanci O; Ziegler, Thomas R; Park, Youngja; Jones, Dean P

    2010-06-01

    Variations in plasma sulfur amino acid (SAA) pools are associated with disease risks, but little information is available about the factors affecting plasma SAA pools. Drug metabolism by glutathione (GSH) and sulfate conjugation can, in principle, represent a quantitatively important burden on SAA supply. The present study was designed to determine whether therapeutic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) alter SAA metabolism in healthy human adults. A double-blind, crossover design incorporating four treatment periods with diets providing 100% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for SAA without or with APAP (15 mg/kg) and 0% RDA for SAA without or with APAP, in randomized order. After a 3-day equilibration period, chemically defined diets with 100 or 0% RDA for SAA were given for 2 complete days. On day 3, APAP or placebo was given in two successive doses (6-h interval), and timed plasma samples were collected. With SAA intake at 100% RDA, APAP administration oxidized the plasma cysteine/cystine redox potential (E(h)CySS) but not the plasma GSH/GSSG redox potential (E(h)GSSG). The extent of oxidation caused by APAP was similar to that seen with 0% SAA and no APAP. However, APAP administration with 0% SAA did not cause further oxidation beyond APAP or 0% SAA alone. In contrast, an oxidation of the plasma E(h)GSSG was apparent for SAA insufficiency only with APAP. The results suggest a need to evaluate possible effects of APAP in association with SAA insufficiency as a contributing factor in disease risk. PMID:20207721

  3. Oxidation of Plasma Cysteine/Cystine and GSH/GSSG Redox Potentials by Acetaminophen and Sulfur Amino Acid Insufficiency in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mannery, Yanci O.; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Park, Youngja

    2010-01-01

    Variations in plasma sulfur amino acid (SAA) pools are associated with disease risks, but little information is available about the factors affecting plasma SAA pools. Drug metabolism by glutathione (GSH) and sulfate conjugation can, in principle, represent a quantitatively important burden on SAA supply. The present study was designed to determine whether therapeutic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) alter SAA metabolism in healthy human adults. A double-blind, crossover design incorporating four treatment periods with diets providing 100% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for SAA without or with APAP (15 mg/kg) and 0% RDA for SAA without or with APAP, in randomized order. After a 3-day equilibration period, chemically defined diets with 100 or 0% RDA for SAA were given for 2 complete days. On day 3, APAP or placebo was given in two successive doses (6-h interval), and timed plasma samples were collected. With SAA intake at 100% RDA, APAP administration oxidized the plasma cysteine/cystine redox potential (EhCySS) but not the plasma GSH/GSSG redox potential (EhGSSG). The extent of oxidation caused by APAP was similar to that seen with 0% SAA and no APAP. However, APAP administration with 0% SAA did not cause further oxidation beyond APAP or 0% SAA alone. In contrast, an oxidation of the plasma EhGSSG was apparent for SAA insufficiency only with APAP. The results suggest a need to evaluate possible effects of APAP in association with SAA insufficiency as a contributing factor in disease risk. PMID:20207721

  4. Aging impairs induction of redox factor-1 after heat stress: a potential mechanism for heat-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Sholomskas, Leslee M; Roche, Kathryn L; Bloomer, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with reduced tolerance to physiological stressors such as hyperthermia. In animal models, heat stress is associated with increased oxidative damage in the livers of old rats. In this study, we evaluated the expression of redox factor-1 (Ref-1), a DNA repair enzyme, and thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1), an antioxidant protein. We hypothesized that these proteins would be induced by heat stress in young animals, and that aging would attenuate this response. Young (6 mo) and old (24 mo) male Fischer 344 rats were exposed to a two-heat stress protocol, and livers were harvested at several time points after the second heat stress. Ref-1 and Trx-1 were evaluated by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In young rats, Ref-1 was induced by ~50% immediately (0 h) after heat stress, and returned to control levels at 2 h. We observed no change in Ref-1 after hyperthermia in old rats; however, aging was associated with a 2-fold increase in Ref-1 expression. At 2 h after heat stress, Trx-1 was increased in old rats, but there was no change in young rats. In tissue sections, we observed frequent ductular reactions in the old rats that were positive for both Ref-1 and Trx-1. The impairment in the induction of Ref-1 suggests a mechanism for the increased oxidative injury observed in old rats after heat stress. Furthermore, the observation of ductular reactions positive for both Ref-1 and Trx-1 demonstrates a proliferative cellular niche that develops with aging. PMID:26069525

  5. A first-principle protocol for calculating ionization energies and redox potentials of solvated molecules and ions: Theory and application to aqueous phenol and phenolate

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Debashree; Roy, Anirban; Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Bradforth, Stephen; Krylov, Anna I.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the lowest vertical ionization energy (VIE) of phenol and phenolate solvated in bulk water was characterized using the equation-of-motion ionization potential coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) and effective fragment potential (EFP) methods (referred to as EOM/EFP), and determined experimentally by valence photo-emission measurements using microjets and synchrotron radiation. The computed solvent-induced shifts in VIEs (ΔVIE) are −0.66 eV and +5.72 eV for phenol and phenolate, respectively. Our best estimates of the absolute values of VIEs (7.9 and 7.7 eV for phenol and phenolate) agree reasonably well with the respective experimental values (7.8±0.1 eV and 7.1±0.1 eV). The EOM/EFP scheme was benchmarked against full EOM-IP-CCSD using micro-solvated phenol and phenolate clusters. A protocol for calculating redox potentials with EOM/EFP was developed based on linear response approximation (LRA) of free energy determination. The oxidation potentials of phenol and phenolate calculated using LRA and EOM/EFP are 1.32 V and 0.89 V, respectively; they agree well with experimental values. PMID:22497288

  6. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of thiol/disulfide redox systems: A perspective on redox systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Melissa; Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of redox elements in biologic systems remains a major challenge for redox signaling and oxidative stress research. Central redox elements include evolutionarily conserved subsets of cysteines and methionines of proteins which function as sulfur switches and labile reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) which function in redox signaling. The sulfur switches depend upon redox environments in which rates of oxidation are balanced with rates of reduction through the thioredoxins, glutathione/glutathione disulfide and cysteine/cystine redox couples. These central couples, which we term redox control nodes, are maintained at stable but non-equilibrium steady states, are largely independently regulated in different subcellular compartments and are quasi-independent from each other within compartments. Disruption of the redox control nodes can differentially affect sulfur switches, thereby creating a diversity of oxidative stress responses. Systems biology provides approaches to address the complexity of these responses. In the present review, we summarize thiol/disulfide pathway, redox potential and rate information as a basis for kinetic modeling of sulfur switches. The summary identifies gaps in knowledge especially related to redox communication between compartments, definition of redox pathways and discrimination between types of sulfur switches. A formulation for kinetic modeling of GSH/GSSG redox control indicates that systems biology could encourage novel therapeutic approaches to protect against oxidative stress by identifying specific redox-sensitive sites which could be targeted for intervention. PMID:18155672

  7. Biochemical characterization of laccase from hairy root culture of Brassica juncea L. and role of redox mediators to enhance its potential for the decolorization of textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Telke, Amar A; Kagalkar, Anuradha N; Jagtap, Umesh B; Desai, Neetin S; Bapat, Vishwas A; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2011-12-01

    In vitro transgenic hairy root cultures provide a rapid system for physiological, biochemical studies and screening of plants for their phytoremediation potential. The hairy root cultures of Brassica juncea L. showed 92% decolorization of Methyl orange within 4 days. Out of the different redox mediators that were used to achieve enhanced decolorization, 2, 2'-Azinobis, 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) was found to be the most efficient. Laccase activity of 4.5 U mg(-1) of protein was observed in hairy root cultures of Brassica juncea L., after the decolorization of Methyl orange. Intracellular laccase produced by B. juncea root cultures grown in MS basal medium was purified up to 2.0 fold with 6.62 U mg(-1) specific activity using anion-exchange chromatography. Molecular weight of the purified laccase was estimated to be 148 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified enzyme efficiently oxidized ABTS which was also required for oxidation of the other tested substrates. The pH and temperature optimum for laccase activity were 4.0 and 40°C, respectively. The purified enzyme was stable up to 50°C and was stable in the pH range of 4.0-6.0. Laccase activity was strongly inhibited by sodium azide, EDTA, dithiothreitol and L: -cysteine. The purified enzyme decolorized various textile dyes in the presence of ABTS as an efficient redox mediator. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the enzymatic process involved in phytoremediation of textile dyes by using hairy roots. PMID:21735196

  8. Redox theory of aging

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan genomes encode exposure memory systems to enhance survival and reproductive potential by providing mechanisms for an individual to adjust during lifespan to environmental resources and challenges. These systems are inherently redox networks, arising during evolution of complex systems with O2 as a major determinant of bioenergetics, metabolic and structural organization, defense, and reproduction. The network structure decreases flexibility from conception onward due to differentiation and cumulative responses to environment (exposome). The redox theory of aging is that aging is a decline in plasticity of genome–exposome interaction that occurs as a consequence of execution of differentiation and exposure memory systems. This includes compromised mitochondrial and bioenergetic flexibility, impaired food utilization and metabolic homeostasis, decreased barrier and defense capabilities and loss of reproductive fidelity and fecundity. This theory accounts for hallmarks of aging, including failure to maintain oxidative or xenobiotic defenses, mitochondrial integrity, proteostasis, barrier structures, DNA repair, telomeres, immune function, metabolic regulation and regenerative capacity. PMID:25863726

  9. INFLUENCE OF REDOX POTENTIAL ON THE ANAEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF NITROGEN-HETEROGENIC COMPOUNDS IN ANOXIC FRESHWATER SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for degradation offour nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds was investigated in freshwater sediment slurries maintained under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions. yridine (10 mg/1) was rapidly transformed within 4 weeks under denitrifying condition...

  10. Early event-related brain potentials that reflect interest for content information in the media.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Shinobu; Morikawa, Koji; Nittono, Hiroshi

    2012-03-28

    This study investigated the relationship between event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to abridged content information in the media and the subsequent decisions to view the full content. Student volunteers participated in a task that simulated information selection on the basis of the content information. Screenshots of television clips and headlines of news articles on the Web were used as content information for the image condition and the headline condition, respectively. Following presentation of a stimulus containing content information, participants decided whether or not they would view the full content by pressing a select or a reject button. When the select button was pressed, participants were presented with a television clip or a news article. When the reject button was pressed, participants continued on to the next trial, without viewing further. In comparison with rejected stimuli, selected stimuli elicited a larger negative component, with a peak latency of ∼250 ms. The increase in the negative component was independent of the type of visual stimulus. These results suggest that interest toward content information is reflected in early-stage event-related brain potential responses. PMID:22336875

  11. A point mutation in atpC1 raises the redox potential of the Arabidopsis chloroplast ATP synthase gamma-subunit regulatory disulfide above the range of thioredoxin modulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The light-dependent regulation of chloroplast ATP synthase activity depends on an intricate but ill-defined interplay between the proton electrochemical potential across the thylakoid membrane and thioredoxin-mediated redox modulation of a cysteine bridge located on the ATP synthase gamma-subunit. T...

  12. Relationship between redox activity and chemical speciation of size-fractionated particulate matter

    PubMed Central

    Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Froines, John R; Cho, Arthur K; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2007-01-01

    Background Although the mechanisms of airborne particulate matter (PM) related health effects remain incompletely understood, one emerging hypothesis is that these adverse effects derive from oxidative stress, initiated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within affected cells. Typically, ROS are formed in cells through the reduction of oxygen by biological reducing agents, with the catalytic assistance of electron transfer enzymes and redox active chemical species such as redox active organic chemicals and metals. The purpose of this study was to relate the electron transfer ability, or redox activity, of the PM samples to their content in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and various inorganic species. The redox activity of the samples has been shown to correlate with the induction of the stress protein, hemeoxygenase-1. Results Size-fractionated (i.e. < 0.15; < 2.5 and 2.5 – 10 μm in diameter) ambient PM samples were collected from four different locations in the period from June 2003 to July 2005, and were chemically analyzed for elemental and organic carbon, ions, elements and trace metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The redox activity of the samples was evaluated by means of the dithiothreitol activity assay and was related to their chemical speciation by means of correlation analysis. Our analysis indicated a higher redox activity on a per PM mass basis for ultrafine (< 0.15 μm) particles compared to those of larger sizes. The PM redox activity was highly correlated with the organic carbon (OC) content of PM as well as the mass fractions of species such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and selected metals. Conclusion The results of this work demonstrate the utility of the dithiothreitol assay for quantitatively assessing the redox potential of airborne particulate matter from a wide range of sources. Studies to characterize the redox activity of PM from various sources throughout the Los Angeles basin are currently

  13. Prediction of water content at different potentials from soil property data in Jazan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alturki, Ali; Ibrahim, Hesham

    2016-04-01

    In dry regions effective irrigation management is crucial to maintain crop production and sustain limited water resources. Effective irrigation requires good knowledge of soil water content in the root zone. However, measurement of soil water in the root zone over time is extremely expensive and time consuming. On the other hand, weather and basic soil property data are more available, either from existing databases or by direct measurement in the field. Simulation models can be used to efficiently and accurately estimate soil water content and subsequent irrigation requirements based on the available weather and soil data. In this study we investigated three hierarchical approaches to predict water content at variable potentials (0, 10, 33, 60, 100, 300, 500, 800, 1000, and 1500 kPa) using the Rosetta model: soil texture class (STC); percent of sand, silt, and clay (SSC); bulk density, percent of sand, silt, and clay, and water content measurements at 33 and 1500 kPa (SSC+WC). Estimation of soil water content at 43 locations in Jazan region using the three hierarchical approaches was compared with gravimetric water content. Results showed that the three approaches failed to describe water content accurately at saturation conditions (<10kPa). At water potentials lower than 10 kPa, good agreement was obtained, in general, between measured and simulated soil water content indicating that soil property data can be used to provide adequate estimates of the average soil water content in the root zone. The third approach gave the best results as indicated by an average NSCE value of 0.75 as compared to 0.16 and 0.18 for the first and second approaches, respectively. The ability to predict the amount of available water in the soil profile will facilitate the accurate estimate of irrigation requirements and achieve effective irrigation scheduling especially in locations where only limited weather and soil date are available.

  14. Microwave bistatic reflectivity dependence on the moisture content and matric potential of bare soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, W. P.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Scott, H. D.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental program to determine the functional dependence of the microwave reflectivity of nonvegetated soil surfaces upon volumetric soil moisture and matric potential. A combination evaporation-drainage field experiment was conducted on a bare Captina slit loam with reflectivity, soil moisture content, and matric potential monitored for extended time periods. Results show that for a restricted pressure range (approximately -0.05 to -0.75 bar) there is excellent linear correlation between the log of bistatic reflectivity and both volumetric moisture content and matric potential. Layering effects due to steep moisture content (and matric potential) gradients in the profile are demonstrated to have two distinct and significant effects on the reflectivity response. At near saturation of rough surfaces a very thin dry surface layer appears to modify the effective roughness. This leads to a saturation of reflectivity at high moisture contents. As the surface proceeds to dry further, deeper layers produce coherent interference patterns in the reflectivity response, particularly at the higher frequencies.

  15. Performance evaluation of TDT soil water content and watermark soil water potential sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the performance of digitized Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT) soil water content sensors (Acclima, Inc., Meridian, ID) and resistance-based soil water potential sensors (Watermark 200, Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, CA) in two soils. The evaluation was performed by compar...

  16. Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Science Education: Perspectives and Potential for Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kind, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), since its inception as teacher-specific professional knowledge, has been researched extensively. Drawing on a wide range of literature, this paper seeks to clarify how the potential offered by PCK could be utilised to further develop science teacher education. An analysis of PCK models proposed by various…

  17. The effect of temperature and transmembrane potentials on the rates of electron transfer between membrane-bound biological redox components.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A M; Ulstrup, J

    1981-06-12

    We have investigated rate data for the temperature and free energy dependence of the primary electron-transfer processes in bacterial photosynthesis. Rather than representing the whole electronic-nuclear coupling by a frequently applied discrete single-mode model, we have incorporated a continuum of modes characterized by a certain distribution function. In this way, we can illuminate the role of both a broad distribution of low-frequency modes representing the medium and a narrow distribution representing local nuclear modes. Furthermore, it emerges from the calculations that both sets are important in the overall scheme of primary photosynthetic electron-transfer processes. By means of this model and quantum-mechanical rate theory, we can reproduce a number of important features of the primary photosynthetic processes concerning in particular the temperature (tunnelling or thermally activated nuclear motion) and free energy dependence ('normal', 'activation-less', or 'inverted' regions) of the rate constants and estimate such parameters as nuclear-reorganization energy electron-exchange integrals and electron-transfer distances. We have finally considered some of the important factors which determine the potential drop across the membrane and estimated the extent to which variations in the potential drop affect the rate constants of the electron-transfer processes. PMID:7284345

  18. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulenova, Alena; Vandegrift, III, George F.

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  19. Redox-based epigenetic status in drug addiction: a potential contributor to gene priming and a mechanistic rationale for metabolic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Malav S.; Deth, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol and other drugs of abuse, including psychostimulants and opioids, can induce epigenetic changes: a contributing factor for drug addiction, tolerance, and associated withdrawal symptoms. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism and it is one of more than 200 methylation reactions supported by methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Levels of SAM are controlled by cellular redox status via the folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS). For example, under oxidative conditions MS is inhibited, diverting its substrate homocysteine (HCY) to the trans sulfuration pathway. Alcohol, dopamine, and morphine, can alter intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH)-based cellular redox status, subsequently affecting SAM levels and DNA methylation status. Here, existing evidence is presented in a coherent manner to propose a novel hypothesis implicating the involvement of redox-based epigenetic changes in drug addiction. Further, we discuss how a “gene priming” phenomenon can contribute to the maintenance of redox and methylation status homeostasis under various stimuli including drugs of abuse. Additionally, a new mechanistic rationale for the use of metabolic interventions/redox-replenishers as symptomatic treatment of alcohol and other drug addiction and associated withdrawal symptoms is also provided. Hence, the current review article strengthens the hypothesis that neuronal metabolism has a critical bidirectional coupling with epigenetic changes in drug addiction exemplified by the link between redox-based metabolic changes and resultant epigenetic consequences under the effect of drugs of abuse. PMID:25657617

  20. Redox-based epigenetic status in drug addiction: a potential contributor to gene priming and a mechanistic rationale for metabolic intervention.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Malav S; Deth, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and other drugs of abuse, including psychostimulants and opioids, can induce epigenetic changes: a contributing factor for drug addiction, tolerance, and associated withdrawal symptoms. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism and it is one of more than 200 methylation reactions supported by methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Levels of SAM are controlled by cellular redox status via the folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS). For example, under oxidative conditions MS is inhibited, diverting its substrate homocysteine (HCY) to the trans sulfuration pathway. Alcohol, dopamine, and morphine, can alter intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH)-based cellular redox status, subsequently affecting SAM levels and DNA methylation status. Here, existing evidence is presented in a coherent manner to propose a novel hypothesis implicating the involvement of redox-based epigenetic changes in drug addiction. Further, we discuss how a "gene priming" phenomenon can contribute to the maintenance of redox and methylation status homeostasis under various stimuli including drugs of abuse. Additionally, a new mechanistic rationale for the use of metabolic interventions/redox-replenishers as symptomatic treatment of alcohol and other drug addiction and associated withdrawal symptoms is also provided. Hence, the current review article strengthens the hypothesis that neuronal metabolism has a critical bidirectional coupling with epigenetic changes in drug addiction exemplified by the link between redox-based metabolic changes and resultant epigenetic consequences under the effect of drugs of abuse. PMID:25657617

  1. Porous media matric potential and water content measurements during parabolic flight.

    PubMed

    Norikane, Joey H; Jones, Scott B; Steinberg, Susan L; Levine, Howard G; Or, Dani

    2005-01-01

    Control of water and air in the root zone of plants remains a challenge in the microgravity environment of space. Due to limited flight opportunities, research aimed at resolving microgravity porous media fluid dynamics must often be conducted on Earth. The NASA KC-135 reduced gravity flight program offers an opportunity for Earth-based researchers to study physical processes in a variable gravity environment. The objectives of this study were to obtain measurements of water content and matric potential during the parabolic profile flown by the KC-135 aircraft. The flight profile provided 20-25 s of microgravity at the top of the parabola, while pulling 1.8 g at the bottom. The soil moisture sensors (Temperature and Moisture Acquisition System: Orbital Technologies, Madison, WI) used a heat-pulse method to indirectly estimate water content from heat dissipation. Tensiometers were constructed using a stainless steel porous cup with a pressure transducer and were used to measure the matric potential of the medium. The two types of sensors were placed at different depths in a substrate compartment filled with 1-2 mm Turface (calcined clay). The ability of the heat-pulse sensors to monitor overall changes in water content in the substrate compartment decreased with water content. Differences in measured water content data recorded at 0, 1, and 1.8 g were not significant. Tensiometer readings tracked pressure differences due to the hydrostatic force changes with variable gravity. The readings may have been affected by changes in cabin air pressure that occurred during each parabola. Tensiometer porous membrane conductivity (function of pore size) and fluid volume both influence response time. Porous media sample height and water content influence time-to-equilibrium, where shorter samples and higher water content achieve faster equilibrium. Further testing is needed to develop these sensors for space flight applications. PMID:15751144

  2. Porous media matric potential and water content measurements during parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norikane, Joey H.; Jones, Scott B.; Steinberg, Susan L.; Levine, Howard G.; Or, Dani

    2005-01-01

    Control of water and air in the root zone of plants remains a challenge in the microgravity environment of space. Due to limited flight opportunities, research aimed at resolving microgravity porous media fluid dynamics must often be conducted on Earth. The NASA KC-135 reduced gravity flight program offers an opportunity for Earth-based researchers to study physical processes in a variable gravity environment. The objectives of this study were to obtain measurements of water content and matric potential during the parabolic profile flown by the KC-135 aircraft. The flight profile provided 20-25 s of microgravity at the top of the parabola, while pulling 1.8 g at the bottom. The soil moisture sensors (Temperature and Moisture Acquisition System: Orbital Technologies, Madison, WI) used a heat-pulse method to indirectly estimate water content from heat dissipation. Tensiometers were constructed using a stainless steel porous cup with a pressure transducer and were used to measure the matric potential of the medium. The two types of sensors were placed at different depths in a substrate compartment filled with 1-2 mm Turface (calcined clay). The ability of the heat-pulse sensors to monitor overall changes in water content in the substrate compartment decreased with water content. Differences in measured water content data recorded at 0, 1, and 1.8 g were not significant. Tensiometer readings tracked pressure differences due to the hydrostatic force changes with variable gravity. The readings may have been affected by changes in cabin air pressure that occurred during each parabola. Tensiometer porous membrane conductivity (function of pore size) and fluid volume both influence response time. Porous media sample height and water content influence time-to-equilibrium, where shorter samples and higher water content achieve faster equilibrium. Further testing is needed to develop these sensors for space flight applications.

  3. Systematic Tuning of Heme Redox Potentials and Its Effects on O2 Reduction Rates in a Designed Oxidase in Myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c Oxidase (CcO) is known to catalyze the reduction of O2 to H2O efficiently with a much lower overpotential than most other O2 reduction catalysts. However, methods by which the enzyme fine-tunes the reduction potential (E°) of its active site and the corresponding influence on the O2 reduction activity are not well understood. In this work, we report systematic tuning of the heme E° in a functional model of CcO in myoglobin containing three histidines and one tyrosine in the distal pocket of heme. By removing hydrogen-bonding interactions between Ser92 and the proximal His ligand and a heme propionate, and increasing hydrophobicity of the heme pocket through Ser92Ala mutation, we have increased the heme E° from 95 ± 2 to 123 ± 3 mV. Additionally, replacing the native heme b in the CcO mimic with heme a analogs, diacetyl, monoformyl, and diformyl hemes, that posses electron-withdrawing groups, resulted in higher E° values of 175 ± 5, 210 ± 6, and 320 ± 10 mV, respectively. Furthermore, O2 consumption studies on these CcO mimics revealed a strong enhancement in O2 reduction rates with increasing heme E°. Such methods of tuning the heme E° through a combination of secondary sphere mutations and heme substitutions can be applied to tune E° of other heme proteins, allowing for comprehensive investigations of the relationship between E° and enzymatic activity. PMID:25076049

  4. Systematic tuning of heme redox potentials and its effects on O2 reduction rates in a designed oxidase in myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bhagi-Damodaran, Ambika; Petrik, Igor D; Marshall, Nicholas M; Robinson, Howard; Lu, Yi

    2014-08-27

    Cytochrome c Oxidase (CcO) is known to catalyze the reduction of O2 to H2O efficiently with a much lower overpotential than most other O2 reduction catalysts. However, methods by which the enzyme fine-tunes the reduction potential (E°) of its active site and the corresponding influence on the O2 reduction activity are not well understood. In this work, we report systematic tuning of the heme E° in a functional model of CcO in myoglobin containing three histidines and one tyrosine in the distal pocket of heme. By removing hydrogen-bonding interactions between Ser92 and the proximal His ligand and a heme propionate, and increasing hydrophobicity of the heme pocket through Ser92Ala mutation, we have increased the heme E° from 95 ± 2 to 123 ± 3 mV. Additionally, replacing the native heme b in the CcO mimic with heme a analogs, diacetyl, monoformyl, and diformyl hemes, that posses electron-withdrawing groups, resulted in higher E° values of 175 ± 5, 210 ± 6, and 320 ± 10 mV, respectively. Furthermore, O2 consumption studies on these CcO mimics revealed a strong enhancement in O2 reduction rates with increasing heme E°. Such methods of tuning the heme E° through a combination of secondary sphere mutations and heme substitutions can be applied to tune E° of other heme proteins, allowing for comprehensive investigations of the relationship between E° and enzymatic activity. PMID:25076049

  5. Should we worry about NO[sub 3]-N contamination in groundwater systems that exhibit low redox potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, W.W.; Johnson, B.L.; Ariffin, A.R. . Dept. of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Since 1988, research on the processes of agricultural chemical transport in Late Wisconsin till in central Iowa has been undertaken at the Ames Till Hydrology site (ATHS), and recently has been expanded to the Walnut Creek Drainage Basin (WCDB) as part of the Iowa Management System Evaluation Area Project. Because of the expertise of the majority of individuals on these projects, the focus has primarily been on shallow, subsurface transport of chemicals in the root zone or at the water table. Presence or absence of agricultural chemicals such as NO[sub 3]-N at or near the water table was used to assess the potential for contamination of underlying aquifers. Since 1990, the authors have investigated the groundwater geochemistry of the Pleistocene glacial sediment and Paleozoic bedrock in central Iowa. Nearly 50 m of Late Wisconsin till and loess, Pre-Illinoian till, and Pennsylvanian shale comprise the major aquitard in the region. Pre-Illinoian gravel, Pennsylvanian sandstone, and Mississippian limestone comprise the major aquifers in the basin. Twelve piezometers at the ATHS provided groundwater samples in the Late Wisconsin till and loess units to depths of 30 m. For the deeper Pleistocene and bedrock aquifer units (> 80 m), well depths, water levels, and aquifer units were identified by well construction logs followed by a house-to-house survey of residents in the WCDB. These data suggest that NO[sub 3]-N in these systems should have been reduced to N[sub 2]O or N[sub 2] gas. Detectable NO[sub 3]-N concentrations are probably due to casing leaks or sampling problems at the wellhead.

  6. Redox subpopulations and the risk of cancer progression: a new method for characterizing redox heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Li, Lin Z.

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that a malignant tumor is akin to a complex organ comprising of various cell populations including tumor cells that are genetically, metabolically and functionally different. Our redox imaging data have demonstrated intra-tumor redox heterogeneity in all mouse xenografts derived from human melanomas, breast, prostate, and colon cancers. Based on the signals of NADH and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp, including flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)) and their ratio, i.e., the redox ratio, which is an indicator of mitochondrial metabolic status, we have discovered several distinct redox subpopulations in xenografts of breast tumors potentially recapitulating functional/metabolic heterogeneity within the tumor. Furthermore, xenografts of breast tumors with higher metastatic potential tend to have a redox subpopulation whose redox ratio is significantly different from that of tumors with lower metastatic potential and usually have a bi-modal distribution of the redox ratio. The redox subpopulations from human breast cancer samples can also be very complex with multiple subpopulations as determined by fitting the redox ratio histograms with multi- Gaussian functions. In this report, we present a new method for identifying the redox subpopulations within individual breast tumor xenografts and human breast tissues, which may be used to differentiate between breast cancer and normal tissue and among breast cancer with different risks of progression.

  7. Modification of the pheophytin redox potential in Thermosynechococcus elongatus Photosystem II with PsbA3 as D1.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Miwa; Azami, Chizuko; Koyama, Kazumi; Rutherford, A William; Rappaport, Fabrice; Boussac, Alain

    2014-01-01

    In Photosystem II (PSII) of the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, glutamate 130 in the high-light variant of the D1-subunit (PsbA3) was changed to glutamine in a strain lacking the two other genes for D1, psbA1 and psbA2. The resulting PSII (PsbA3/Glu130Gln) was compared with those from the "native" high-light (PsbA3-PSII) and low-light (PsbA1-PSII) variants, which differ by 21 amino acid including Glu130Gln. H-bonding from D1-Glu130Gln to the primary electron acceptor, PheophytinD1 (PheoD1), is known to affect the Em of the PheoD1/PheoD1(-) couple. The Gln130 mutation here had little effect on water splitting, charge accumulation and photosensitivity but did slow down S2QA(-) charge recombination and up-shift the thermoluminescence while increasing its yield. These changes were consistent with a ≈-30mV shift of the PheoD1/PheoD1(-)Em, similar to earlier single site-mutation results from other species and double the ≈-17mV shift seen for PsbA1-PSII versus PsbA3-PSII. This is attributed to the influence of the other 20 amino-acids that differ in PsbA3. A computational model for simulating S2QA(-) recombination matched the experimental trend: the S2QA(-) recombination rate in PsbA1-PSII differed only slightly from that in PsbA3-PSII, while in Glu130-PsbA3-PSII there was a more pronounced slowdown of the radical pair decay. The simulation predicted a major effect of the PheoD1/PheoD1(-) potential on (1)O2 yield (~60% in PsbA1-PSII, ~20% in PsbA3-PSII and ~7% in Gln130-PsbA3-PSII), reflecting differential sensitivities to high light. PMID:24060528

  8. Variation potential-induced photosynthetic and respiratory changes increase ATP content in pea leaves.

    PubMed

    Surova, Lyubov; Sherstneva, Oksana; Vodeneev, Vladimir; Katicheva, Lyubov; Semina, Maria; Sukhov, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Local damage induces a physiological response in higher plants by means of generation and propagation of variation potential (VP). The response includes changes in photosynthesis and respiration. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of these changes on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content in pea leaves. VP was induced by local heating of the first mature leaf and registered using extracellular and intracellular electrodes. Photosynthesis and respiration were measured using Dual-PAM-100 and GFS-3000. ATP content was determined using a bioluminescence-based ATP determination kit. Two non-stimulated leaves (second and fourth) were investigated. We showed that heating induced VP that propagated into the second mature leaf, but only a slight electrical reaction was registered in the fourth mature leaf. VP-induced inactivation of photosynthesis developed in the second leaf and included two stages: short- and long-term inactivation. Local heating also caused a two-stage increase in ATP content in the second leaf, which was connected with the photosynthetic responses. Changes in photosynthesis and ATP content were not observed in the fourth leaf. The effect of VP on respiration was investigated under dark conditions. We found that variation potential induced short-term activation of respiration in the second leaf. Local heating induced ATP content increase which included only one stage under dark conditions. Changes in ATP and respiration were absent in the fourth leaf under dark conditions. Thus, VP-induced photosynthetic and respiratory changes are likely to increase ATP content in pea leaves. PMID:27450494

  9. The Redox Code

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The redox code is a set of principles that defines the positioning of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, NADP) and thiol/disulfide and other redox systems as well as the thiol redox proteome in space and time in biological systems. The code is richly elaborated in an oxygen-dependent life, where activation/deactivation cycles involving O2 and H2O2 contribute to spatiotemporal organization for differentiation, development, and adaptation to the environment. Disruption of this organizational structure during oxidative stress represents a fundamental mechanism in system failure and disease. Recent Advances: Methodology in assessing components of the redox code under physiological conditions has progressed, permitting insight into spatiotemporal organization and allowing for identification of redox partners in redox proteomics and redox metabolomics. Critical Issues: Complexity of redox networks and redox regulation is being revealed step by step, yet much still needs to be learned. Future Directions: Detailed knowledge of the molecular patterns generated from the principles of the redox code under defined physiological or pathological conditions in cells and organs will contribute to understanding the redox component in health and disease. Ultimately, there will be a scientific basis to a modern redox medicine. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 734–746. PMID:25891126

  10. Event-related potentials in response to violations of content and temporal event knowledge.

    PubMed

    Drummer, Janna; van der Meer, Elke; Schaadt, Gesa

    2016-01-01

    Scripts that store knowledge of everyday events are fundamentally important for managing daily routines. Content event knowledge (i.e., knowledge about which events belong to a script) and temporal event knowledge (i.e., knowledge about the chronological order of events in a script) constitute qualitatively different forms of knowledge. However, there is limited information about each distinct process and the time course involved in accessing content and temporal event knowledge. Therefore, we analyzed event-related potentials (ERPs) in response to either correctly presented event sequences or event sequences that contained a content or temporal error. We found an N400, which was followed by a posteriorly distributed P600 in response to content errors in event sequences. By contrast, we did not find an N400 but an anteriorly distributed P600 in response to temporal errors in event sequences. Thus, the N400 seems to be elicited as a response to a general mismatch between an event and the established event model. We assume that the expectancy violation of content event knowledge, as indicated by the N400, induces the collapse of the established event model, a process indicated by the posterior P600. The expectancy violation of temporal event knowledge is assumed to induce an attempt to reorganize the event model in working memory, a process indicated by the frontal P600. PMID:26562054