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Sample records for continental thermal regime

  1. CSDP: The seismology of continental thermal regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1990-05-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 3 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. The past year has been extremely productive especially in the area of interpretation theory, including the following two major break-throughs. One is the derivation of an integral equation for time-dependent power spectra, which unified all the existing theories on seismic scattering (including the radiative transfer theory for total energy and single and multiple scattering theories based on the ray approach) and offers more complete and economical solutions to the problems of seismic scattering and attenuation. The other is the new formula for synthetic seismograms for layered media with irregular interfaces, combining the T-matrix method for an arbitrary shaped inclusion and the method of global generalized reflection/transmission coefficients for layered media. Both breakthroughs will enable us to deal with seismic observations in complex earth structures more efficiently and accurately. In the area of experimental studies, we discovered seismic guided waves trapped in the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. 54 refs., 14 figs.

  2. CSDP: Seismology of continental thermal regime

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1989-04-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 2 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. During the past year, two Ph.D. thesis works were completed under the present project. One is a USC thesis on seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media with application to defining fractures in the earth. The other is a MIT thesis on seismic Q and velocity structure for the magma-hydrothermal system of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The P.I. co-organized the first International Workshop on Volcanic Seismology at Capri, Italy in October 1988, and presented the keynote paper on the state-of-art of volcanic seismology''. We presented another paper at the workshop on Assorted Seismic Signals from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Another international meeting, namely, the Chapman Conference on seismic anisotropy in the earth's crust at Berkeley, California in May 1988, was co-organized by the co-P.I. (P.C.L), and we presented our work on seismic waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media. Adding the publications and presentations made in the past year to the list for the preceding year, the following table lists 21 papers published, submitted or presented in the past two years of the present project. 65 refs., 334 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Continental Scientific Drilling (CSD): Technology Barriers to Deep Drilling Studies in Thermal Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Kolstad, George A.; Rowley, John C.

    1987-01-16

    This report is the proceedings of a workshop. The primary thrust of these discussion was to identify the major key technology barriers to the Department of Energy (DOE) supported Thermal Regimes CSD projects and to set priorities for research and development. The major technological challenge is the high temperature to be encountered at depth. Specific problems derived from this issue were widely recognized among the participants and are reflected in this summary. A major concern for the projected Thermal Regimes CSD boreholes was the technology required for continuous coring, in contrast to that required for drilling without core or spot coring. Current commercial technology bases for these two techniques are quite different. The DOE has successfully fielded projects that used both technologies, i.e, shallow continuous coring (Inyo Domes and Valles Caldera) and deeper drilling with spot cores (Imperial Valley-SSSDP). It was concluded that future scientific objectives may still require both approaches, but continuous coring is the most likely requirement in the near term. (DJE-2005)

  4. First CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program)/thermal regimes core hole project at Valles Caldera, New Mexico (VC-1): Drilling report

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.; Hawkins, W.; Gardner, J.

    1987-02-01

    This report is a review and summary of the core drilling operations of the first Valles Caldera research borehole (VC-1) under the Thermal Regimes element of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP). The project is a portion of a broader program that seeks to answer fundamental scientific questions about magma, rock/water interactions, and volcanology through shallow (<1-km) core holes at Long Valley, California; Salton Sea, California; and the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy of the core hole, core quality description, core rig specifications, and performance. It is intended to guide future research on the core and in the borehole, as well as have applications to other areas and scientific problems in the Valles Caldera. The primary objectives of this Valles Caldera coring effort were (1) to study the hydrogeochemistry of a subsurface geothermal outflow zone of the caldera near the source of convective upflow, (2) to obtain structural and stratigraphic information from intracaldera rock formations in the southern ring-fracture zone, and (3) to obtain continuous core samples through the youngest volcanic unit in Valles Caldera, the Banco Bonito rhyolite (approximately 0.1 Ma). All objectives were met. The high percentage of core recovery and the excellent quality of the samples are especially notable. New field sample (core) handling and documentation procedures were successfully utilized. The procedures were designed to provide consistent field handling of the samples and logs obtained through the national CSDP.

  5. Thermal regime of a continental permafrost associated gas hydrate occurrence a continuous temperature profile record after drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninges, J.; Huenges, E.; Mallik Working Group

    2003-04-01

    Both the size and the distribution of natural methane hydrate occurrences, as well as the release of gaseous methane through the dissociation of methane hydrate, are affected by the subsurface pressure and temperature conditions. During a field experiment, which was carried out in the Mackenzie Delta, NWT, Canada, within the framework of the Mallik 2002 Production Research Well Program*, the variation of temperature within three 40 m spaced, 1200 m deep wells was measured deploying the Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology. An innovative experimental design for the monitoring of spatial and temporal variations of temperature along boreholes was developed and successfully applied under extreme arctic conditions. A special feature is the placement of the fibre-optic sensor cable inside the cement annulus between the casing and the wall of the borehole. Temperature profiles were recorded with a sampling interval of 0.25 m and 5 min, and temperatures can be determined with a resolution of 0.3 °C. The observed variation of temperature over time shows the decay of the thermal disturbances caused by the drilling and construction of the wells. An excellent indicator for the location of the base of the ice-bonded permafrost layer, which stands out as a result of the latent heat of the frozen pore fluid, is a sharp rise in temperature at 604 m depth during the period of equilibration. A similar effect can be detected in the depth interval between 1105 m and 1110 m, which is interpreted as an indicator for the depth to the base of the methane hydrate stability zone. Nine months after the completion of the wells the measured borehole temperatures are close to equilibrium. The mean temperature gradient rises from 9.4 K/km inside the permafrost to 25.4 K/km in the ice-free sediment layers underneath. The zone of the gas hydrate occurrences between 900 m and 1100 m shows distinct variations of the geothermal gradient, which locally rises up to 40 K/km. At the lower

  6. Thermal models pertaining to continental growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Ashwal, Lew

    1988-01-01

    Thermal models are important to understanding continental growth as the genesis, stabilization, and possible recycling of continental crust are closely related to the tectonic processes of the earth which are driven primarily by heat. The thermal energy budget of the earth was slowly decreasing since core formation, and thus the energy driving the terrestrial tectonic engine was decreasing. This fundamental observation was used to develop a logic tree defining the options for continental growth throughout earth history.

  7. CSDP: The seismology of continental thermal regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1991-05-01

    The past year continued to be extremely productive following up two major breakthroughs made in the preceding year. One of the breakthroughs was the derivation of an integral equation for time- dependent power spectra, which unified all the existing theories on seismic scattering including the radiative transfer theory for total energy and single-multiple scattering theories based on the ray approach. We successfully applied the method to the data from the USGS regional seismic arrays in central California, Long Valley and Island of Hawaii, and obtained convincing results on the scattering Q{sup {minus}1} and intrinsic Q{sup {minus}1} in these areas for the frequency range from 1 Hz to 20 Hz. The frequency dependence of scattering Q{sup {minus}1} is, then, interpreted in terms of random medium with continuous or discrete scatterers. The other breakthrough was the application of T-matrix formulation to the seismic scattering problem. We are currently working on 2-dimensional inclusions with high and low velocity contrast with the surrounding medium. In addition to the above two main lines of research, we were able to use so-called T-phase'' observed on the Island of Hawaii to map the Q value with a good spatial resolution. We found that we can eliminate remarkably well the frequency dependent recording site effect from the T-phase amplitude using the amplification factor for coda waves, further confirming the fundamental separability of source, path and site effects for coda waves, and proving the effectiveness of stochastic modeling of high-frequency seismic waves. 70 refs., 24 figs.

  8. The thermal structure and thermal evolution of the continental lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal structure and evolution of the continental lithosphere are examined. Surface heat flow data and the factors which modify them are addressed, and the diversity of thermal phenomena in the lithosphere is discussed in the framework of plate interactions. The lithosphere is divided into three sections for the purposes of discussion. In the upper, near-surface zone, temperatures can be strongly affected by near-surface processes, which must be taken into account in the measurement and evaluation of surface heat flow. The thermal structure of the middle, internal zone of the lithosphere responds to the heat balance and thermal properties of the lithosphere, which define its steady state thermal structure. Internal deformation and magmatic intrusion within this zone, and interaction between the lithosphere and the asthenosphere in the lower boundary zone of the lithosphere cause transient thermal disturbances in the lithosphere. The criteria for defining the base of the thermal lithosphere are briefly discussed.

  9. Mercury's thermal evolution and core crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoldini, A.; Van Hoolst, T.; Dumberry, M.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2015-10-01

    Unlike the Earth, where the liquid core isentrope is shallower than the core liquidus, at the lower pressures inside Mercury's core the isentrope can be steeper than the melting temperature. As a consequence, upon cooling, the isentrope may first enter a solid stability field near the core mantle boundary and produce ironrich snow that sinks under gravity and produces buoyant upwellings of iron depleted fluid. Similar to bottom up crystallization, crystallization initiated near the top might generate sufficient buoyancy flux to drive magnetic field generation by compositional convection.In this study we model Mercury's thermal evolution by taking into account the formation of iron-rich snow to assess when the conditions for an internally magnetic field can be satisfied. We employ a thermodynamic consistent description of the iron high-pressure phase diagram and thermoelastic properties of iron alloys as well as the most recent data about the thermal conductivity of core materials. We use a 1-dimensional parametrized thermal evolution model in the stagnant lid regime for the mantle (e.g. [1]) that is coupled to the core. The model for the mantle takes into account the formation of the crust due to melting at depth. Mantle convection is driven by heat producing radioactive elements, heat loss from secular cooling and from the heat supplied by the core. The heat generated inside the core is mainly provided from secular cooling, from the latent heat released at iron freezing, and from gravitational energy resulting form the release of light elements at the inner core-outer core boundary as well as from the sinking of iron-rich snow and subsequent upwellings of light elements in the snow zone. If the heat flow out of the core is smaller than the heat transported along the core isentrope a thermal boundary will from at the top of the outer core. To determine the extension of the convecting region inside the liquid core we calculate the convective power [2]. Finally, we

  10. Thermal regime of permafrost at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.; Sass, J.H.; Marshall, B.V.; Moses, T.H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Temperature measurements through permafrost in the oil field at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, combined with laboratory measurements of the thermal conductivity of drill cuttings permit an evaluation of in situ thermal properties and an understanding of the general factors that control the geothermal regime. A sharp contrast in temperature gradient at ~600 m represents a contrast in thermal conductivity caused by the downward change from interstitial ice to interstitial water at the base of permafrost under near steady-state conditions. Interpretation of the gradient contrast in terms of a simple model for the conductivity of an aggregate yields the mean ice content and thermal conductivities for the frozen and thawed sections (8.1 and 4.7 mcal/cm sec ?C, respectively). These results yield a heat flow of ~1.3 HFU which is similar to other values on the Alaskan Arctic Coast; the anomalously deep permafrost is a result of the anomalously high conductivity of the siliceous ice-rich sediments. Curvature in the upper 160 m of the temperature profiles represents a warming of ~1.8?C of the mean surface temperature, and a net accumulation of 5-6 kcal/cm 2 by the solid earth surface during the last 100 years or so. Rising sea level and thawing sea cliffs probably caused the shoreline to advance tens of kilometers in the last 20,000 years, inundating a portion of the continental shelf that is presently the target of intensive oil exploration. A simple conduction model suggests that this recently inundated region is underlain by near-melting ice-rich permafrost to depths of 300-500 m; its presence is important to seismic interpretations in oil exploration and to engineering considerations in oil production. With confirmation of the permafrost configuration by offshore drilling, heat-conduction models can yield reliable new information on the chronology of arctic shorelines.

  11. The thermal regime around buried submarine high-voltage cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emeana, C. J.; Hughes, T. J.; Dix, J. K.; Gernon, T. M.; Henstock, T. J.; Thompson, C. E. L.; Pilgrim, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The expansion of offshore renewable energy infrastructure and the need for trans-continental shelf power transmission require the use of submarine high-voltage (HV) cables. These cables have maximum operating surface temperatures of up to 70 °C and are typically buried 1-2 m beneath the seabed, within the wide range of substrates found on the continental shelf. However, the heat flow pattern and potential effects on the sedimentary environments around such anomalously high heat sources in the near-surface sediments are poorly understood. We present temperature measurements from a 2-D laboratory experiment representing a buried submarine HV cable, and identify the thermal regimes generated within typical unconsolidated shelf sediments-coarse silt, fine sand and very coarse sand. We used a large (2 × 2.5 m2) tank filled with water-saturated spherical glass beads (ballotini) and instrumented with a buried heat source and 120 thermocouples to measure the time-dependent 2-D temperature distributions. The observed and corresponding Finite Element Method simulations of the steady state heat flow regimes and normalized radial temperature distributions were assessed. Our results show that the heat transfer and thus temperature fields generated from submarine HV cables buried within a range of sediments are highly variable. Coarse silts are shown to be purely conductive, producing temperature increases of >10 °C up to 40 cm from the source of 60 °C above ambient; fine sands demonstrate a transition from conductive to convective heat transfer between cf. 20 and 36 °C above ambient, with >10 °C heat increases occurring over a metre from the source of 55 °C above ambient; and very coarse sands exhibit dominantly convective heat transfer even at very low (cf. 7 °C) operating temperatures and reaching temperatures of up to 18 °C above ambient at a metre from the source at surface temperatures of only 18 °C. These findings are important for the surrounding near

  12. The thermal regime around buried submarine high voltage cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emeana, C. J.; Hughes, T. J.; Dix, J. K.; Gernon, T. M.; Henstock, T. J.; Thompson, C. E. L.; Pilgrim, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    The expansion of offshore renewable energy infrastructure and the need for trans-continental shelf power transmission require the use of submarine High Voltage (HV) cables. These cables have maximum operating surface temperatures of up to 70°C and are typically buried 1-2 m beneath the seabed, within the wide range of substrates found on the continental shelf. However, the heat flow pattern and potential effects on the sedimentary environments around such anomalously high heat sources in the near surface sediments are poorly understood. We present temperature measurements from a 2D laboratory experiment representing a buried submarine HV cable, and identify the thermal regimes generated within typical unconsolidated shelf sediments-coarse silt, fine sand and very coarse sand. We used a large (2 × 2.5 m) tank filled with water-saturated spherical glass beads (ballotini) and instrumented with a buried heat source and 120 thermocouples, to measure the time-dependent 2D temperature distributions. The observed and corresponding Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations of the steady state heat flow regimes, and normalised radial temperature distributions were assessed. Our results show that the heat transfer and thus temperature fields generated from submarine HV cables buried within a range of sediments are highly variable. Coarse silts are shown to be purely conductive, producing temperature increases of >10°C up to 40 cm from the source of 60°C above ambient; fine sands demonstrate a transition from conductive to convective heat transfer between c. 20°C and 36°C above ambient, with >10°C heat increases occurring over a metre from the source of 55°C above ambient; and very coarse sands exhibit dominantly convective heat transfer even at very low (c. 7°C) operating temperatures and reaching temperatures of up to 18°C above ambient at a metre from the source at surface temperatures of only 18°C. These findings are important for the surrounding near surface

  13. Mercury's thermal evolution and core crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoldini, Attilio; Dumberry, Mathieu; Van Hoolst, Tim; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2015-04-01

    Unlike the Earth, where the liquid core isentrope is less steep than the core melting temperature, at the lower pressures inside Mercury's core the isentrope can be steepper than the melting temperature. As a consequence, upon cooling, the isentrope may first cross the melting temperature near the core mantle boundary and produce iron-rich snow that sinks under gravity and produces buoyant upwellings of iron depleted fluid. Similar to bottom up crystallization, top down crystallization is expected to generate sufficient buoyancy flux to drive magnetic field generation by compositional convection. In this study we model Mercury's thermal evolution by taking into account the formation of iron-rich snow to assess when the conditions for internally magnetic field can be satisfied. We employ a thermodynamic consistent description of the iron high pressure phase diagram and thermoelastic properties of iron alloys as well as the most recent data about the thermal conductivity of core materials.

  14. Vegetation management with fire modifies peatland soil thermal regime.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lee E; Palmer, Sheila M; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Holden, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    Vegetation removal with fire can alter the thermal regime of the land surface, leading to significant changes in biogeochemistry (e.g. carbon cycling) and soil hydrology. In the UK, large expanses of carbon-rich upland environments are managed to encourage increased abundance of red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scotica) by rotational burning of shrub vegetation. To date, though, there has not been any consideration of whether prescribed vegetation burning on peatlands modifies the thermal regime of the soil mass in the years after fire. In this study thermal regime was monitored across 12 burned peatland soil plots over an 18-month period, with the aim of (i) quantifying thermal dynamics between burned plots of different ages (from <2 to 15 + years post burning), and (ii) developing statistical models to determine the magnitude of thermal change caused by vegetation management. Compared to plots burned 15 + years previously, plots recently burned (<2-4 years) showed higher mean, maximum and range of soil temperatures, and lower minima. Statistical models (generalised least square regression) were developed to predict daily mean and maximum soil temperature in plots burned 15 + years prior to the study. These models were then applied to predict temperatures of plots burned 2, 4 and 7 years previously, with significant deviations from predicted temperatures illustrating the magnitude of burn management effects. Temperatures measured in soil plots burned <2 years previously showed significant statistical disturbances from model predictions, reaching +6.2 °C for daily mean temperatures and +19.6 °C for daily maxima. Soil temperatures in plots burnt 7 years previously were most similar to plots burned 15 + years ago indicating the potential for soil temperatures to recover as vegetation regrows. Our findings that prescribed peatland vegetation burning alters soil thermal regime should provide an impetus for further research to understand the consequences of thermal regime

  15. Continental warming preceding the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum.

    PubMed

    Secord, Ross; Gingerich, Philip D; Lohmann, Kyger C; Macleod, Kenneth G

    2010-10-21

    Marine and continental records show an abrupt negative shift in carbon isotope values at ∼55.8 Myr ago. This carbon isotope excursion (CIE) is consistent with the release of a massive amount of isotopically light carbon into the atmosphere and was associated with a dramatic rise in global temperatures termed the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). Greenhouse gases released during the CIE, probably including methane, have often been considered the main cause of PETM warming. However, some evidence from the marine record suggests that warming directly preceded the CIE, raising the possibility that the CIE and PETM may have been linked to earlier warming with different origins. Yet pre-CIE warming is still uncertain. Disentangling the sequence of events before and during the CIE and PETM is important for understanding the causes of, and Earth system responses to, abrupt climate change. Here we show that continental warming of about 5 °C preceded the CIE in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. Our evidence, based on oxygen isotopes in mammal teeth (which reflect temperature-sensitive fractionation processes) and other proxies, reveals a marked temperature increase directly below the CIE, and again in the CIE. Pre-CIE warming is also supported by a negative amplification of δ(13)C values in soil carbonates below the CIE. Our results suggest that at least two sources of warming-the earlier of which is unlikely to have been methane-contributed to the PETM. PMID:20962843

  16. Thermal isostasy, elevation of continental North America and intraplate stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareschal, J.; Perry, C.

    2009-12-01

    We determine variations in gravitational potential energy (GPE) in North America due to internal loads associated with lithospheric density anomalies. To constrain GPE estimates within the continental interior, we calculate the predicted elevation of North America assuming local isostatic equilibrium due to crustal density variations and thermal isostasy. The contribution of internal loads to intraplate stresses are determined and compared to other tectonic stresses. Internal horizontal stresses are calculated from the gradient of the GPE, and follow variations in topography. Transient thermal models are developed for the tectonically active zones of the Basin&Range Province, the Colorado Plateau and Canadian Cordillera, and the validity of these models is tested through comparison of the observed and predicted topography and gravity in each region. Standard steady-state thermal models are used for non-active regions. We do not calculate here the dynamic component of observed surface topography, however the misfit between the predicted and observed surface topography is largely associated with the dynamic mantle signal. The RMS difference in observed and predicted topography over all North America is found to be ~250 m which is close to the average North American dynamic component of topography inferred from seismic-geodynamic inversion techniques.

  17. Nonclassical radiation from thermal cavities in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

    PubMed

    Ridolfo, A; Savasta, S; Hartmann, M J

    2013-04-19

    Thermal or chaotic light sources emit radiation characterized by a slightly enhanced probability of emitting photons in bunches, described by a zero-delay second-order correlation function g((2))(0)=2. Here we explore photon-coincidence counting statistics of thermal cavities in the ultrastrong coupling regime, where the atom-cavity coupling rate becomes comparable to the cavity resonance frequency. We find that, depending on the system temperature and coupling rate, thermal photons escaping the cavity can display very different statistical behaviors, characterized by second-order correlation functions approaching zero or greatly exceeding two. PMID:23679600

  18. Thermal Evolution of Continental Rifting in Corsica (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, N. M.; Stockli, D. F.; Beltrando, M.; Smye, A.

    2014-12-01

    Present thermal evolution models for continental rifting are based on pure-shear extension (McKenzie 1978), in which crustal and mantle strain is co-located and all rocks cool throughout rifting. However, the multi-phase rift model of Lavier and Manatschal (2006) accommodates lithospheric extension via spatially offset crustal and mantle strains, producing depth-dependent thinning and exhumation of lithospheric mantle. Significant reheating of the upper plate is a natural consequence of this model. We seek to constrain the temperature-time history of the upper-plate Tethyan margin preserved in Corsica to discriminate between the two thermal models. A record of the conditions and timing of reheating is preserved in the age and trace element compositions of metamorphic zircon overgrowths. Zircon from the hanging wall and footwall of the Jurassic-age Belli Piani shear zone (Beltrando et al 2013) were depth-profiled for both U-Pb and trace element concentrations via LA-ICP-MS split streaming. Across both sides of the shear zone, U-Pb ages show a strong population of 275-300 Ma grains. However, a subset of footwall grains show 165-210 Ma overgrowths. These ages indicate that the margin reached temperature conditions sufficient for zircon saturation and subsequent zircon growth. These lower crustal findings are consistent with prior observations made within the sedimentary succession, which records rapid thermal uplift, karstification, and subsequent drowning of Triassic dolostones contemporaneous with the opening of the Alpine Tethys (Decarlis and Lualdis 2008). Ti-in-zircon thermometry yields temperatures of ~720°C in the hanging wall and ~830°C in the footwall. This is consistent with the appearance of overgrowths, and provides further support that the Belli Piani shear zone was active during Jurassic rifting. Collectively, these data point directly to a rift-coeval reheating event that affected the entire crustal pile and lend support to the multi-stage Lavier and

  19. Persistent Nature of Secondary Diurnal Modes of Precipitation over Oceanic and Continental Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, S.; Kuo, K.-S.; Smith, E.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation seeks a better understanding of the assorted mechanisms controlling the global distribution of precipitation diurnal variability based on the use of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) microwave radiometer and radar data. The horizontal distributions of precipitation's diurnal cycle are derived from eight years of TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) measurements involving three TRMM standard rain rate retrieval algorithms -- the resultant distributions analyzed at various spatiotemporal scales. The results reveal the prominent and expected late-evening to early-morning (LE-EM) precipitation maxima over oceans and the counterpart prominent and expected mid- to late-afternoon (MLA) maxima over continents. Moreover, and not generally recognized, the results reveal a widespread distribution of secondary maxima occurring over both oceans and continents -- maxima which generally mirror their counterpart regime's behavior. That is, many ocean regions exhibit clearcut secondary MLA precipitation maxima while many continental regions exhibit just as evident secondary LE-EM maxima. This investigation is the first comprehensive study of these globally prevalent secondary maxima and their widespread nature, a type of study only made possible when the analysis procedure is applied to a high-quality global-scale precipitation dataset. The characteristics of the secondary maxima are mapped and described on global grids using an innovative clock-face format, while a current study to be published at a later date provides physically-based explanations of the seasonal-regional distributions of the secondary maxima. In addition to an "explicit" maxima identification scheme, a "Fourier decomposition" maxima identification scheme is used to examine the amplitude and phase properties of the primary and secondary maxima -- as well as tertiary and quaternary maxima. Accordingly, the advantages, ambiguities, and pitfalls resulting from use of

  20. Effect of thermal noise on random lasers in diffusion regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini-Farzad, Mahmood; Montakhab, Afshin

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of thermal noise on the time evolution of a weak light pulse (probe) in the presence of a strong light pulse (pump) within a gain medium which includes random scatterer particles. Suitable thermal noise term is added to a set of four coupled equations including three diffusion equations for energy densities and a rate equation for the upper level population in a four-level gain medium. These equations have been solved simultaneously by Crank-Nicholson numerical method. The main result is that the back-scattered output probe light is increased as the thermal noise strength is increased and simultaneously, with the same rate, the amplified spontaneous emission is decreased. Therefore, the amplified response of the random laser in diffusion regime for the input probe pulse is enhanced due to effect of the thermal noise.

  1. Geothermal regime and thermal history of the Llanos Basin, Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Bachu, S.; Underschultz, J.R.; Ramon, J.C.; Villegas, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Llanos basin is a siliciclastic foreland sub-Andean sedimentary basin located in Columbia between the Cordillera Oriental and the Guyana Precambrian shield. Data on bottom-hole temperature, lithology, porosity, and vitrinite reflectance from all 318 wells drilled in the central and southern parts of the basin were used to analyze its geothermal regime and thermal history. Average geothermal gradients in the Llanos basin decrease generally with depth and westward toward the fold and thrust belt. The geothermal regime is controlled by a moderate, generally westward-decreasing basement heat flow, by depositional and compaction factors, and, in places, by advection by formation waters. Compaction leads to increased thermal conductivity with depth, whereas westward downdip flow in deep sandstone formations may exert a cooling effect in the central-western part of the basin. Vitrinite reflectance variation with depth shows a major discontinuity at the pre-Cretaceous unconformity. Areally, vitrinite reflectance increases southwestward in Paleozoic strata and northwestward in post-Paleozoic strata. These patterns indicate that the thermal history of the basin probably includes three thermal events that led to peaks in oil generation: a Paleozoic event in the southwest, a failed Cretaceous rifting event in the west, and an early Tertiary back-arc event in the west. Rapid cooling since the last thermal event is possibly caused by subhorizontal subduction of cold oceanic lithospheric plate.

  2. The DOE Thermal Regimes Drilling Program through 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    In response to strong endorsement from the scientific community, in the form of a report by the Continental Scientific Drilling Committee of the National Academy of Sciences (CSDC, 1984), the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the DOE undertook a program of investigations of young magmatic intrusions and their associated thermal systems. To date, the effort has encompassed the first phases of a program to investigate the roots of active hydrothermal systems and has also investigated the thermal, chemical, and mechanical behavior of geologically recent (less than 600 years) magmatic extrusions. Shallow to intermediate-depth holes have been drilled and cored into hydrothermal systems in the silicic Valles and Long Valley calderas and at the crustal spreading center of the Salton Trough. These projects are briefly summarized here and are covered in greater detail in the accompanying appendices.

  3. Laser ablation dynamics in metals: The thermal regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzapesa, F. P.; Brambilla, M.; Dabbicco, M.; Scamarcio, G.; Columbo, L. L.; Ancona, A.; Sibillano, T.

    2012-07-02

    We studied the laser ablation dynamics of steel in the thermal regime both experimentally and theoretically. The real-time monitoring of the process shows that the ablation rate depends on laser energy density and ambient pressure during the exposure time. We demonstrated that the ablation efficiency can be enhanced when the pressure is reduced with respect to the atmospheric pressure for a given laser fluence, reaching an upper limit despite of high-vacuum conditions. An analytical model based on the Hertz-Knudsen law reproduces all the experimental results.

  4. Historical thermal regimes define limits to coral acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Howells, Emily J; Berkelmans, Ray; van Oppen, Madeleine J H; Willis, Bette L; Bay, Line K

    2013-05-01

    Knowledge of the degree to which corals undergo physiological acclimatization or genetic adaptation in response to changes in their thermal environment is crucial to the success of coral reef conservation strategies. The potential of corals to acclimatize to temperatures exceeding historical thermal regimes was investigated by reciprocal transplantation of Acropora millepora colonies between the warm central and cool southern regions of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) for a duration of 14 months. Colony fragments retained at native sites remained healthy, whereas transplanted fragments, although healthy over initial months when temperatures remained within native thermal regimes, subsequently bleached and suffered mortality during seasonal temperature extremes. Corals hosting Symbiodinium D transplanted to the southern GBR bleached in winter and the majority suffered whole (40%; n=20 colonies) or partial (50%) mortality at temperatures 1.1 degrees C below their 15-year native minimum. In contrast, corals hosting Symbiodinium C2 transplanted to the central GBR bleached in summer and suffered whole (50%; n=10 colonies) or partial (42%) mortality at temperatures 2.5 degrees C above their 15-year native maximum. During summer bleaching, the dominant Symbiodinium type changed from C2 to D within corals transplanted to the central GBR. Corals transplanted to the cooler, southern GBR grew 74-80% slower than corals at their native site, and only 50% of surviving colonies reproduced, at least partially because of cold water bleaching of transplants. Despite the absence of any visual signs of stress, corals transplanted to the warmer, central GBR grew 52-59% more slowly than corals at their native site before the summer bleaching (i.e., from autumn to spring). Allocation of energy to initial acclimatization or reproduction may explain this pattern, as the majority (65%) of transplants reproduced one month earlier than portions of the same colonies retained at the southern

  5. Photopyroelectric Technique, in the Thermally Thin Regime, for Thermal Effusivity Measurements of Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Jaime-Fonseca, M. R.; Díaz-Reyes, J.; Gómez-Gómez, Y. M.; Bautista-Ramírez, M. E.; Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; Gálvez-Coyt, G.

    2016-02-01

    A photopyroelectric methodology using pyroelectric devices in the thermally thin regime, for the measurement of the thermal effusivity of liquids, is described. A commercial buzzer, taking advantage of the pyroelectric activity of the ceramic material (PZT in this case), is used to achieve this goal. Equivalence for thermal effusivity measurements between this photopyroelectric methodology and a previously reported photoacoustic technique, in the front configuration, is established. The thermal effusivity of six liquids was measured using this device, and very good agreement was found with corresponding values reported in the literature.

  6. Continental accretion: contrasting Mesozoic and Early Proterozoic tectonic regimes in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condie, Kent C.; Chomiak, Beverly

    1996-11-01

    Juvenile continental crust was accreted to southern and western North America during the Early Proterozoic and Mesozoic, respectively. Graywacke, granite, granodiorite, and basalt comprise most of the accreted Early Proterozoic crust, whereas graywacke, andesite, basalt, and granodiorite comprise most of the Mesozoic crust. In addition, carbonates, ultramafics, pelagic sediments, and tonalite/diorite are minor but important components in the juvenile Mesozoic crust, whereas rhyolites are important in the Early Proterozoic crust. Mesozoic supracrustal rocks vary significantly in chemical composition, while Early Proterozoic supracrustals have a limited compositional range and exhibit a linear relation between many element concentrations suggesting a genetic linkage between accreted terranes. Although SiO 2, Al 2O 3, FeO, and incompatible elements are more enriched in Early Proterozoic than in Mesozoic supracrustal rocks, negative Eu anomalies are typical of rocks of both ages. Early Proterozoic granitoids are enriched in LILE (large ion lithophile elements) compared to Mesozoic granitoids, and granitoids of both ages of are enriched in LILE and have larger Eu anomalies than associated supracrustal rocks. Accreted Mesozoic upper crust is similar to andesite in chemical composition, and the bulk crust is similar to basaltic andesite. In contrast, accreted Early Proterozoic upper crust and bulk crust are similar to granodiorite and andesite, respectively. Incompatible elements are depleted in the Mesozoic compared to the Early Proterozoic crust, but both crustal types have negative NbTa anomalies. Depending on the composition assumed for the lower crust, both ages of crust have either very small or negligible Eu anomalies. Lifespans of the Early Proterozoic terranes (time interval between oldest rocks in a terrane and its collision with North America) are 20-80 My, whereas lifespans of Mesozoic terranes are 50-500 My, with most falling between 50 and 200 My. Within

  7. Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: magnetotelluric constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Hermance, J.F.

    1987-11-13

    The focus of activity at this laboratory is on applying natural electromagnetic methods along with other geophysical techniques to studying the dynamical processes and thermal regimes associated with centers of major volcanic activity. We are presently emphasizing studies of the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex, the Cascades Volcanic Belt, and the Valles Caldera. This work addresses questions regarding geothermal energy, chemical transport of minerals in the crust, emplacement of economic ore deposits, and optimal siting of drill-holes for scientific purposes. In addition, since much of our work is performed in the intermontane sedimentary basins of the western US (along with testing our field-system in some of the graben structures in the Northeast), there is an application of these studies to developing exploration and interpretational strategies for detecting and delineating structures associated with hydrocarbon reserves.

  8. Numerical modeling of thermal refraction inliquids in the transient regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovsh, Dmitriy I.; Hagan, David J.; van Stryland, Eric W.

    1999-04-01

    We present the results of modeling of nanosecond pulse propagation in optically absorbing liquid media. Acoustic and electromagnetic wave equations must be solved simultaneously to model refractive index changes due to thermal expansion and/or electrostriction, which are highly transient phenomena on a nanosecond time scale. Although we consider situations with cylindrical symmetry and where the paraxial approximation is valid, this is still a computation-intensive problem, as beam propagation through optically thick media must be modeled. We compare the full solution of the acoustic wave equation with the approximation of instantaneous expansion (steady-state solution) and hence determine the regimes of validity of this approximation. We also find that the refractive index change obtained from the photo-acoustic equation overshoots its steady-state value once the ratio between the pulsewidth and the acoustic transit time exceeds a factor of unity.

  9. Thermal Evolution and Crystallisation Regimes of the Martian Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. J.; Pommier, A.

    2015-12-01

    Though it is accepted that Mars has a sulfur-rich metallic core, its chemical and physical state as well as its time-evolution are still unconstrained and debated. Several lines of evidence indicate that an internal magnetic field was once generated on Mars and that this field decayed around 3.7-4.0 Gyrs ago. The standard model assumes that this field was produced by a thermal (and perhaps chemical) dynamo operating in the Martian core. We use this information to construct parameterized models of the Martian dynamo in order to place constraints on the thermochemical evolution of the Martian core, with particular focus on its crystallization regime. Considered compositions are in the FeS system, with S content ranging from ~10 and 16 wt%. Core radius, density and CMB pressure are varied within the errors provided by recent internal structure models that satisfy the available geodetic constraints (planetary mass, moment of inertia and tidal Love number). We also vary the melting curve and adiabat, CMB heat flow and thermal conductivity. Successful models are those that match the dynamo cessation time and fall within the bounds on present-day CMB temperature. The resulting suite of over 500 models suggest three possible crystallization regimes: growth of a solid inner core starting at the center of the planet; freezing and precipitation of solid iron (Fe- snow) from the core-mantle boundary (CMB); and freezing that begins midway through the core. Our analysis focuses on the effects of core properties that are expected to be constrained during the forthcoming Insight mission.

  10. Thermal and mechanical structure of the upper mantle: A comparison between continental and oceanic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, C.; Schubert, G.; Yuen, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Temperature, velocity, and viscosity profiles for coupled thermal and mechanical models of the upper mantle beneath continental shields and old ocean basins show that under the continents, both tectonic plates and the asthenosphere, are thicker than they are beneath the oceans. The minimum value of viscosity in the continental asthenosphere is about an order of magnitude larger than in the shear zone beneath oceans. The shear stress or drag underneath continental plates is also approximately an order of magnitude larger than the drag on oceanic plates. Effects of shear heating may account for flattening of ocean floor topography and heat flux in old ocean basins.

  11. Reduced thermal quadrupole heat transport modeling in harmonic and transient regime scanning thermal microscopy using nanofabricated thermal probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodzenta, J.; Chirtoc, M.; Juszczyk, J.

    2014-08-01

    The thermal model of a nanofabricated thermal probe (NTP) used in scanning thermal microscopy is proposed. It is based on consideration of the heat exchange channels between electrically heated probe, a sample, and their surroundings, in transient and harmonic regimes. Three zones in the probe-sample system were distinguished and modeled by using electrical analogies of heat flow through a chain of quadrupoles built from thermal resistances and thermal capacitances. The analytical transfer functions for two- and three-cell quadrupoles are derived. A reduced thermal quadrupole with merged RC elements allows for thermo-electrical modeling of the complex architecture of a NTP, with a minimum of independent parameters (two resistance ratios and two time constants). The validity of the model is examined by comparing computed values of discrete RC elements with results of finite element simulations and with experimental data. It is proved that the model consisting of two or three-cell quadrupole is sufficient for accurate interpretation of experimental results. The bandwidth of the NTP is limited to 10 kHz. The performance in dc regime can be simply obtained in the limit of zero frequency. One concludes that the low NTP sensitivity to sample thermal conductivity is due, much like in dc regime, to significant heat by-pass by conduction through the cantilever, and to the presence of probe-sample contact resistance in series with the sample.

  12. Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: Magnetotelluric constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Hermance, J.F.

    1989-10-02

    The interpretation of geophysical/electromagnetic field data has been used to study dynamical processes in the crust beneath three of the major tectono-volcanic features in North America: the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex in eastern California, the Cascades Volcanic Belt in Oregon, and the Rio Grande Rift in the area of Socorro, New Mexico. Primary accomplishments have been in the area of creating and implementing a variety of 2-D generalized inverse computer codes, and the application of these codes to fields studies on the basin structures and he deep thermal regimes of the above areas. In order to more fully explore the space of allowable models (i.e. those inverse solutions that fit the data equally well), several distinctly different approaches to the 2-D inverse problem have been developed: (1) an overdetermined block inversion; (2) an overdetermined spline inverstion; (3) a generalized underdetermined total inverse which allows one to tradeoff certain attributes of their model, such as minimum structure (flat models), roughness (smooth models), or length (small models). Moreover, we are exploring various approaches for evaluating the resolution model parameters for the above algorithms. 33 refs.

  13. An objective and parsimonious approach for classifying natural flow regimes at a continental scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Kennen, Jonathan G.; Carlisle, Daren M.; Wolock, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Hydro-ecological stream classification-the process of grouping streams by similar hydrologic responses and, by extension, similar aquatic habitat-has been widely accepted and is considered by some to be one of the first steps towards developing ecological flow targets. A new classification of 1543 streamgauges in the contiguous USA is presented by use of a novel and parsimonious approach to understand similarity in ecological streamflow response. This novel classification approach uses seven fundamental daily streamflow statistics (FDSS) rather than winnowing down an uncorrelated subset from 200 or more ecologically relevant streamflow statistics (ERSS) commonly used in hydro-ecological classification studies. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the distributions of 33 tested ERSS are consistently different among the classification groups derived from the seven FDSS. It is further shown that classification based solely on the 33 ERSS generally does a poorer job in grouping similar streamgauges than the classification based on the seven FDSS. This new classification approach has the additional advantages of overcoming some of the subjectivity associated with the selection of the classification variables and provides a set of robust continental-scale classes of US streamgauges. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Numerical simulation of thermal-hydraulic generators running in a single regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chioreanu, Nicolae; Mitran, Tudor; Rus, Alexandru; Beles, Horia

    2014-06-01

    The paper presents the basis for the design of thermal-hydraulic generators running in a single regime. The thermal-hydraulic generators in a single regime running represent an absolute novelty worldwide (a pioneer invention). Based on the methodology concerning this subject, the design calculus for an experimental model was developed.

  15. Monitoring drought at continental scales using thermal remote sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing of land-surface temperature (LST) provides valuable information about the sub-surface moisture status: soil surface temperature increases with decreasing water content, while moisture depletion in the plant root zone leads to stomatal closure, reduced transpirat...

  16. Continental growth and mantle hydration as intertwined feedback cycles in the thermal evolution of Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höning, Dennis; Spohn, Tilman

    2016-06-01

    A model of Earth's continental coverage and mantle water budget is discussed along with its thermal evolution. The model links a thermal evolution model based on parameterized mantle convection with a model of a generic subduction zone that includes the oceanic crust and a sedimentary layer as carriers of water. Part of the subducted water is used to produce continental crust while the remainder is subducted into the mantle. The total length of the subduction zones is calculated from the total surface area of continental crust assuming randomly distributed continents. The mantle viscosity is dependent of temperature and the water concentration. Sediments are generated by continental crust erosion, and water outgassing at mid-oceanic ridges closes the water cycle. We discuss the strongly coupled, non-linear model using a phase plane defined by the continental coverage and mantle water concentration. Fixed points are found in the phase plane at which the rates of change of both variables are zero. These fixed points evolve with time, but in many cases, three fixed points emerge of which two are stable and an intermediate point is unstable with respect to continental coverage. With initial conditions from a Monte-Carlo scheme we calculate evolution paths in the phase plane and find a large spread of final states that all have a mostly balanced water budget. The present day observed 40% continental surface coverage is found near the unstable fixed point. Our evolution model suggests that Earth's continental coverage formed early and has been stable for at least 1.5 Gyr. The effect of mantle water regassing (and mantle viscosity depending on water concentration) is found to lower the present day mantle temperature by about 120 K, but the present day mantle viscosity is affected little. The water cycle thus complements the well-known thermostat effect of viscosity and mantle temperature. Our results further suggest that the biosphere could impact the feedback cycles by

  17. Density of the continental roots: Compositional and thermal contributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaban, M.K.; Schwintzer, P.; Artemieva, I.M.; Mooney, W.D.

    2003-01-01

    The origin and evolution of cratonic roots has been debated for many years. Precambrian cratons are underlain by cold lithospheric roots that are chemically depleted. Thermal and petrologic data indicate that Archean roots are colder and more chemically depleted than Proterozoic roots. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the degree of depletion in a lithospheric root depends mostly on its age. Here we test this hypothesis using gravity, thermal, petrologic, and seismic data to quantify differences in the density of cratonic roots globally. In the first step in our analysis we use a global crustal model to remove the crustal contribution to the observed gravity. The result is the mantle gravity anomaly field, which varies over cratonic areas from -100 to +100 mGal. Positive mantle gravity anomalies are observed for cratons in the northern hemisphere: the Baltic shield, East European Platform, and the Siberian Platform. Negative anomalies are observed over cratons in the southern hemisphere: Western Australia, South America, the Indian shield, and Southern Africa. This indicates that there are significant differences in the density of cratonic roots, even for those of similar age. Root density depends on temperature and chemical depletion. In order to separate these effects we apply a lithospheric temperature correction using thermal estimates from a combination of geothermal modeling and global seismic tomography models. Gravity anomalies induced by temperature variations in the uppermost mantle range from -200 to +300 mGal, with the strongest negative anomalies associated with mid-ocean ridges and the strongest positive anomalies associated with cratons. After correcting for thermal effects, we obtain a map of density variations due to lithospheric compositional variations. These maps indicate that the average density decrease due to the chemical depletion within cratonic roots varies from 1.1% to 1.5%, assuming the chemical boundary layer has the same

  18. Effects of rheological weakening by fluids and melts for defining geodynamic regimes of oceanic-continental subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Meilick, Irena

    2010-05-01

    The dynamics of subduction under an active margin is analyzed by using a 2D coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical model of an oceanic-continental subduction process. This model includes spontaneous slab bending, dehydration of the subducted crust, aqueous fluid transport, partial melting of both crustal and mantle rocks and melt extraction processes resulting in magmatic arc crust growth. Based on our models we identify the following five geodynamic regimes of subduction which may potentially from at active margins: (1) stable subduction with no backarc spreading center and without plumes in the mantle wedge, (2) retreating subduction with the focused backarc spreading center and without plumes, (3) retreating subduction with distributed intra-arc extension and trans-lithospheric sedimentary plumes, (4) advancing subduction with underplating (laterally extending) sub-lithospheric plumes, (5) stable to advancing subduction with stationary (laterally limited) sub-lithospheric plumes. Transitions between these different regimes are mainly caused by the concurrence of rheological weakening effects of (1) aqueous fluids percolating from the subducting slab into the mantle wedge and (2) melts propagating from the partially molten areas formed in the mantle wedge toward the surface. The aqueous fluids mainly affect the forearc region. Strong fluid-related weakening promotes plates decoupling and reduces subduction drag causing stacking of sediments in the accretion prism. In contrast, reduced weakening by fluids results in strong coupling of the plates and leads to advancing collision-like subduction with enhanced subduction erosion. Thickening of the overriding plate and large sedimentary plumes in the mantle wedge are the consequences. On the other hand, melts are extracted from the hot regions above the slab and rheologically weaken mainly the lithosphere below the arc controlling overriding plate extension/shortening processes. Strong rheological weakening

  19. The mantle wedge's transient 3-D flow regime and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, D. R.; Le Voci, G.; Goes, S.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Arc volcanism, volatile cycling, mineralization, and continental crust formation are likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure. Wedge flow is often assumed to follow a regular corner-flow pattern. However, studies that incorporate a hydrated rheology and thermal buoyancy predict internal small-scale-convection (SSC). Here, we systematically explore mantle-wedge dynamics in 3-D simulations. We find that longitudinal "Richter-rolls" of SSC (with trench-perpendicular axes) commonly occur if wedge hydration reduces viscosities to Pa s, although transient transverse rolls (with trench-parallel axes) can dominate at viscosities of Pa s. Rolls below the arc and back arc differ. Subarc rolls have similar trench-parallel and trench-perpendicular dimensions of 100-150 km and evolve on a 1-5 Myr time-scale. Subback-arc instabilities, on the other hand, coalesce into elongated sheets, usually with a preferential trench-perpendicular alignment, display a wavelength of 150-400 km and vary on a 5-10 Myr time scale. The modulating influence of subback-arc ridges on the subarc system increases with stronger wedge hydration, higher subduction velocity, and thicker upper plates. We find that trench-parallel averages of wedge velocities and temperature are consistent with those predicted in 2-D models. However, lithospheric thinning through SSC is somewhat enhanced in 3-D, thus expanding hydrous melting regions and shifting dehydration boundaries. Subarc Richter-rolls generate time-dependent trench-parallel temperature variations of up to K, which exceed the transient 50-100 K variations predicted in 2-D and may contribute to arc-volcano spacing and the variable seismic velocity structures imaged beneath some arcs.

  20. Power signatures of electric field and thermal switching regimes in memristive SET transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickel, Patrick R.; Hughart, David; Lohn, Andrew J.; Gao, Xujiao; Mamaluy, Denis; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the ‘snap-back’ regime of resistive switching hysteresis in bipolar TaO x memristors, identifying power signatures in the electronic transport. Using a simple model based on the thermal and electric field acceleration of ionic mobilities, we provide evidence that the ‘snap-back’ transition represents a crossover from a coupled thermal and electric-field regime to a primarily thermal regime, and is dictated by the reconnection of a ruptured conducting filament. We discuss how these power signatures can be used to limit filament radius growth, which is important for operational properties such as power, speed, and retention.

  1. Tracing the thermal evolution of continental lithosphere through depth-dependent extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smye, A.; Lavier, L. L.; Stockli, D. F.; Zack, T.

    2015-12-01

    Rifting of continental lithosphere requires a mechanism to reduce lithospheric thickness from 100-150 kilometers to close to zero kilometers at the point of rupture. At magma-poor continental margins, this has long-thought to be caused by uniform stretching and thinning of the lithosphere accompanied by passive upwelling of the asthenosphere [1]. For the last thirty years depth-dependent thinning has been proposed as an alternative to this model to explain the anomalously shallow environment of deposition along many continental margins [2, 3]. A critical prediction of this modification is that the lower crust and sub-continental lithospheric mantle undergo a phase of increased heat flow, potentially accompanied by heating, during thinning of the lithospheric mantle. Here, we test this prediction by applying recently developed U-Pb age depth profiling techniques [4] to lower crustal accessory minerals from the exhumed Alpine Tethys and Pyrenean margins. Inversion of diffusion-controlled U-Pb age profiles in rutile affords the opportunity to trace the thermal evolution of the lower crust through the rifting process. Resultant thermal histories are used to calculate thinning factors of the crust and lithospheric mantle by 2D thermo-kinematic models of extending lithosphere. Combined, we use the measured and modeled thermal histories to propose a mechanism to explain the initiation and growth of lithospheric instabilities that lead to depth-dependent thinning at magma-poor continental margins. [1] McKenzie, D. (1978) EPSL 40, 25-32; [2] Royden, L. & Keen, C. (1980) EPSL 51, 343-361; [3] Huismans, R. & Beaumont, C. (2014) EPSL, 407, 148-162; [4] Smye, A. and Stockli, D. (2014) EPSL, 408, 171-182.

  2. The effects of thick sediment upon continental breakup: seismic imaging and thermal modeling of the Salton Trough, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Hole, J. A.; Lowell, R. P.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kell, A. M.; Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Lázaro-Mancilla, O.

    2015-12-01

    Continental rifting ultimately creates a deep accommodation space for sediment. When a major river flows into a late-stage rift, thick deltaic sediment can change the thermal regime and alter the mechanisms of extension and continental breakup. The Salton Trough, the northernmost rift segment of the Gulf of California plate boundary, has experienced the same extension as the rest of the Gulf, but is filled to sea level by sediment from the Colorado River. Unlike the southern Gulf, seafloor spreading has not initiated. Instead, seismicity, high heat flow, and minor volcanoes attest to ongoing rifting of thin, transitional crust. Recently acquired controlled-source seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection data in the Salton Trough provide constraints upon crustal architecture and active rift processes. The crust in the central Salton Trough is only 17-18 km thick, with a strongly layered but relatively one-dimensional structure for ~100 km in the direction of plate motion. The upper crust includes 2-4 km of Colorado River sediment. Crystalline rock below the sediment is interpreted to be similar sediment metamorphosed by the high heat flow and geothermal activity. Meta-sediment extends to at least 9 km depth. A 4-5 km thick layer in the middle crust is either additional meta-sediment or stretched pre-existing continental crust. The lowermost 4-5 km of the crust is rift-related mafic magmatic intrusion or underplating from partial melting in the hot upper mantle. North American lithosphere in the Salton Trough has been almost or completely rifted apart. The gap has been filled by ~100 km of new transitional crust created by magmatism from below and sedimentation from above. These processes create strong lithologic, thermal, and rheologic layering. While heat flow in the rift is very high, rapid sedimentation cools the upper crust as compared to a linear geotherm. Brittle extension occurs within new meta-sedimentary rock. The lower crust, in comparison, is

  3. Thermal Regime of High-power Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezotosnyi, V. V.; Krokhin, O. N.; Oleshchenko, V. A.; Pevtsov, V. F.; Popov, Yu. M.; Cheshev, E. A.

    We discuss the design and application perspectives of different crystal, ceramic and composite-type submounts with thermo-compensating properties as well as submounts from materials with high thermal conductivity for overcoming thermal problem in high-power laser diodes (LD) and improving thermal management of other high-power optoelectronic and electronic semiconductor devices. Thermal fields in high-power laser diodes were calculated in 3 D thermal model at CW operation for some heatsink designs taking into account the experimental dependence of laser total efficiency against pumping current in order to extend the range of reliable operation up to thermal loads 20-30 W and corresponding output optical power up to 15-20 W for 100 μm stripe laser diodes.

  4. Changes in the 1963-2013 shallow ground thermal regime in Russian permafrost regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streletskiy, Dmitry A.; Sherstiukov, Artem B.; Frauenfeld, Oliver W.; Nelson, Frederick E.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial variability and temporal trends of the shallow ground thermal regime and permafrost active-layer thickness (ALT) were estimated over 1963-2013 using daily soil temperature data available from stations of the Russian Hydrometeorological Service. Correlation analysis was used to evaluate the role of changing climatic conditions on the ground thermal regime. ALT data collected by the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring program in Russia were used to expand the geography of ALT observations over 1999-2013, and to identify ‘hot spots’ of soil temperature and ALT change. Results indicate that a substantially higher rate of change in the thermal regime of permafrost-affected soils prevailed during 1999-2013, relative to the last fifty years. Results indicate that the thermal regime of the upper permafrost in western Russia is strongly associated with air temperature, with much weaker relationships in central and eastern Russia. The thermal regime of permafrost-affected soils shows stronger dependence on climatic conditions over the last fifteen years relative to the historical 50-year period. Geostatistical analysis revealed that the cities of Norilsk and Susuman are hot spots of permafrost degradation. Of six settlements selected for detailed analysis in various parts of the permafrost regions, all but one (Chukotka), show substantial changes in the shallow ground thermal regime. Northern locations in the continuous permafrost region show thickening of the active layer, while those farther south experienced development of residual thaw layers above the permafrost and decreases in the duration of the freezing period.

  5. Tectonic controls on hydrothermal mineralisation in hot continental crust: Thermal modelling and spatial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, K.; Porwal, A.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrothermal ore deposits provide a record of excess energy flux and mass transfer in the Earth's lithosphere. The heterogeneous distribution of ore deposits in space and time provides a challenge to uniformitarian geodynamic and tectonic concepts, but unusual thermal and structural events often coincide with high mineral endowment. In the Australian Proterozoic continental backarcs and intracratonic rifts host large resources of base metals, gold, and uranium. We present thermal models and spatial analyses of mineral occurrences within the Mount Isa Inlier, an inverted Mesoproterozoic rift in northwest Queensland, Australia, to demonstrate how thermal structure, tectonic style and crustal scale fluid flow are related. In the Mount Isa Inlier, radiogenic heat production contributes significantly to present day surface heat flow, and Mesoproterozoic geotherms of 40°C km-1 in the upper crust can be inferred from lithosphere-scale conductive models. The combination of thick continental crust and high temperatures implies that localization of deformation was limited to a thin upper crustal layer. During rifting mid-crustal rocks intruded by syn-extensional granites were exhumed as metamorphic core complexes in strike-parallel linear basement belts. The resulting horizontal strength contrast between sedimentary basins and shallow basement domains became a focus for deformation during subsequent crustal shortening. Our spatial analysis of mineral occurrences demonstrates that epigenetic copper mineralization at Mount Isa correlates positively with steep fault zones bounding linear basement domains, and granites within these domains. Mineralization potential is greatly increased, because high permeability along steep fault zones enables hydrothermal fluid flow between magmatic, metamorphic and sedimentary reservoirs. We argue that the deformation behavior of hot continental lithosphere generates a favorable environment for hydrothermal mineralization by linking shallow

  6. Thermal implications of metamorphism in greenstone belts and the hot asthenosphere-thick continental lithoshere paradox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.

    1986-01-01

    From considerations of secular cooling of the Earth and the slow decay of radiogenic heat sources in the Earth with time, the conclusion that global heat loss must have been higher in the Archean than at present seems inescapable. The mechanism by which this additional heat was lost and the implications of higher heat low for crustal temperatures are fundamental unknowns in our current understanding of Archean tectonics and geological processes. Higher heat loss implies that the average global geothermal gradient was higher in the Archean than at present, and the restriction of ultramafic komatiites to the Archean and other considerations suggests that the average temperature of the mantle was several hundred degrees hotter during the Archean than today. In contrast, there is little petrologic evidence that the conditions of metamorphism or crustal thickness (including maximum crustal thickness under mountains) were different in archean continental crust from the Phanerozoic record. Additionally, Archean ages have recently been determined for inclusions in diamonds from Cretaceous kimeberlites in South Africa, indicating temperatures of 900 to 1300 at depths of 150 to 215 km (45 to 65 kbar) in the Archean mantle, again implying relatively low geothermal gradients at least locally in the Archean. The thermal implications of metamorphism are examined, with special reference to greenstone belts, and a new thermal model of the continental lithosphere is suggested which is consistent with thick continental lithosphere and high asthenosphere temperatures in the Archean.

  7. Long-term trends and regime shifts in sea surface temperature on the continental shelf of the northeast United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, Kevin D.; Hare, Jonathan A.

    2007-11-01

    We investigated sea surface temperature (SST) variability over large spatial and temporal scales for the continental shelf region located off the northeast coast of the United States between Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, and the Gulf of Maine using the extended reconstruction sea surface temperature (ERSST) dataset. The ERSST dataset consists of 2°×2° (latitude and longitude) monthly mean values computed from in situ data derived from the International Comprehensive Ocean Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS). Nineteen 2°×2° bins were chosen that cover the shelf region of interest between the years of 1854 and 2005. Mean annual and range of SST were examined using dynamic factor analysis to estimate trends in both parameters, while chronological clustering was used to determine temporal SST patterns and breakpoints in the time series that are believed to signal regime shifts in SST. Both SST and SST trend analysis show that interannual variability of SST fluctuations shows strong coherence between bins, with declining SST at the beginning of the last century, followed by increasing SST through 1950, and then rapidly decreasing between 1950 and mid-1960s, with somewhat warmer SST thereafter to present. Annual SST range decreases in a seaward direction for all bins, with strong coherence for interannual variability of range fluctuations between bins. The trend in SST range shows a decreasing range at the beginning of the last century followed by an increase in range from 1920 to the late-1980s, remaining high through present with some spatial variability. A more detailed spatial analysis was conducted by grouping the data into 7 regions using principal component analysis. We analyzed regional trends in mean annual SST, seasonal SST range (summer SST-winter SST), and normalized SST minima and maxima. Both the summer and winter seasons were also analyzed using the length of each season and amplitude of the warming and cooling season, respectively, along with the spring

  8. Heat flow in eastern Egypt - The thermal signature of a continental breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Boulos, F. K.; Hennin, S. F.; El-Sherif, A. A.; El-Sayed, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    It is noted that the Red Sea is a modern example of continental fragmentation and incipient ocean formation. A consistent pattern of high heat flow in the Red Sea margins and coastal zone, including Precambrian terrane up to at least 30 km from the Red Sea, has emerged from the existing data. It is noted that this pattern has important implications for the mode and mechanism of Red Sea opening. High heat flow in the Red Sea shelf requires either a high extension of the crust in this zone (probably with major basic magmatic activity) or young oceanic crust beneath this zone. High heat flow in the coastal thermal anomaly zone may be caused by lateral conduction from the offshore lithosphere and/or from high mantle heat flow. It is suggested that new oceanic crust and highly extended continental crust would be essentially indistinguishable with the available data in the Red Sea margins, and are for many purposes essentially identical.

  9. Climate-induced changes in sedimentary regimes for organic matter supply on the continental shelf off northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knies, Jochen

    2005-10-01

    With this study, I suggest that changes in biogeochemical processes in northern Norwegian fjords during the last glacial/interglacial transition (14.3 to 6.3 ka B.P.) are predominantly climate induced. Variable strength in Atlantic water inflow, intrusion of Arctic waters and sea-ice coverage, various nutrient supply, as well as several re-advances of continental ice-sheets are recorded by both bulk organic and selected biomarkers in sediments of the Andfjord. Stable isotope (δ 13C org, δ 15N) and Rock-Eval pyrolysis data indicate a strong supply of terrestrial organic matter during stadials (e.g., Younger Dryas, Older Dryas) whereas enhanced input of marine organic matter prevailed during the interstadials (Bølling/Allerød). Profiles of selected biomarkers of marine origin show a characteristic climate-induced variation during the whole time interval, where relatively low concentrations of dinosterols and C 37 alkenones may indicate—similar to today—a minor contribution of their respective plankton groups (coccolithophorids, dinoflagellates). The prevalence of Arctic waters and seasonal sea-ice coverage during the Younger Dryas is indicated by a single maximum of 24-methylenecholesterol probably indicating the dominance of sea-ice diatoms and/or the prevalence of diatoms of Thalassiosiraceae in surface waters. The sediments of the Allerød, in contrast, show a pronounced maximum in dinosterols, indicating a better adaptation of dinoflagellates to an oceanic regime that is characterized by incipient intrusion of Atlantic water, highly variable sea surface temperatures, and well stratified water masses. The concentration of higher-molecular-weight n-alkanes, however, follows the deglacial-early Holocene trend of climate amelioration from the last deglaciation to the middle Holocene, with maxima during ice advances (stadials) and minima during the middle Holocene warm period. These new results significantly improve the understanding of climate

  10. Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation, and thermal structure of the continental upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.; Billien, M.; Leveque, J.-J.; Mooney, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic velocity and attenuation anomalies in the mantle are commonly interpreted in terms of temperature variations on the basis of laboratory studies of elastic and anelastic properties of rocks. In order to evaluate the relative contributions of thermal and non-thermal effects on anomalies of attenuation of seismic shear waves, QS-1, and seismic velocity, VS, we compare global maps of the thermal structure of the continental upper mantle with global QS-1 and Vs maps as determined from Rayleigh waves at periods between 40 and 150 S. We limit the comparison to three continental mantle depths (50, 100 and 150 km), where model resolution is relatively high. The available data set does not indicate that, at a global scale, seismic anomalies in the upper mantle are controlled solely by temperature variations. Continental maps have correlation coefficients of <0.56 between VS and T and of <0.47 between QS and T at any depth. Such low correlation coefficients can partially be attributed to modelling arrefacts; however, they also suggest that not all of the VS and QS anomalies in the continental upper mantle can be explained by T variations. Global maps show that, by the sign of the anomaly, VS and QS usually inversely correlate with lithospheric temperatures: most cratonic regions show high VS and QS and low T, while most active regions have seismic and thermal anomalies of the opposite sign. The strongest inverse correlation is found at a depth of 100 km, where the attenuation model is best resolved. Significantly, at this depth, the contours of near-zero QS anomalies approximately correspond to the 1000 ??C isotherm, in agreement with laboratory measurements that show a pronounced increase in seismic attenuation in upper mantle rocks at 1000-1100 ??C. East-west profiles of VS, QS and T where continental data coverage is best (50??N latitude for North America and 60??N latitude for Eurasia) further demonstrate that temperature plays a dominant, but non-unique, role in

  11. A Thermal Evolution Model of the Earth Including the Biosphere, Continental Growth and Mantle Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höning, D.; Spohn, T.

    2014-12-01

    By harvesting solar energy and converting it to chemical energy, photosynthetic life plays an important role in the energy budget of Earth [2]. This leads to alterations of chemical reservoirs eventually affecting the Earth's interior [4]. It further has been speculated [3] that the formation of continents may be a consequence of the evolution life. A steady state model [1] suggests that the Earth without its biosphere would evolve to a steady state with a smaller continent coverage and a dryer mantle than is observed today. We present a model including (i) parameterized thermal evolution, (ii) continental growth and destruction, and (iii) mantle water regassing and outgassing. The biosphere enhances the production rate of sediments which eventually are subducted. These sediments are assumed to (i) carry water to depth bound in stable mineral phases and (ii) have the potential to suppress shallow dewatering of the underlying sediments and crust due to their low permeability. We run a Monte Carlo simulation for various initial conditions and treat all those parameter combinations as success which result in the fraction of continental crust coverage observed for present day Earth. Finally, we simulate the evolution of an abiotic Earth using the same set of parameters but a reduced rate of continental weathering and erosion. Our results suggest that the origin and evolution of life could have stabilized the large continental surface area of the Earth and its wet mantle, leading to the relatively low mantle viscosity we observe at present. Without photosynthetic life on our planet, the Earth would be geodynamical less active due to a dryer mantle, and would have a smaller fraction of continental coverage than observed today. References[1] Höning, D., Hansen-Goos, H., Airo, A., Spohn, T., 2014. Biotic vs. abiotic Earth: A model for mantle hydration and continental coverage. Planetary and Space Science 98, 5-13. [2] Kleidon, A., 2010. Life, hierarchy, and the

  12. The cryptoendolithic microbial environment in the Ross Desert of Antarctica: mathematical models of the thermal regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nienow, J. A.; McKay, C. P.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Microbial activity in the Antarctic cryptoendolithic habitat is regulated primarily by temperature. Previous field studies have provided some information on the thermal regime in this habitat, but this type of information is limited by the remoteness of the site and the harsh climatic conditions. Therefore, a mathematical model of the endolithic thermal regime was constructed to augment the field data. This model enabled the parameters affecting the horizontal and altitudinal distribution of the community to be examined. The model predicts that colonization should be possible on surfaces with zenith angle less than 15 degrees. At greater zenith angles, colonization should be restricted to surfaces with azimuth angles less than 135 degrees or greater than 225 degrees. The upper elevational limit of the community should be less than 2,500 m. The thermal regime probably does not influence the zonation of the community within a rock.

  13. The cryptoendolithic microbial environment in the Ross Desert of Antarctica: mathematical models of the thermal regime.

    PubMed

    Nienow, J A; McKay, C P; Friedmann, E I

    1988-01-01

    Microbial activity in the Antarctic cryptoendolithic habitat is regulated primarily by temperature. Previous field studies have provided some information on the thermal regime in this habitat, but this type of information is limited by the remoteness of the site and the harsh climatic conditions. Therefore, a mathematical model of the endolithic thermal regime was constructed to augment the field data. This model enabled the parameters affecting the horizontal and altitudinal distribution of the community to be examined. The model predicts that colonization should be possible on surfaces with zenith angle less than 15 degrees. At greater zenith angles, colonization should be restricted to surfaces with azimuth angles less than 135 degrees or greater than 225 degrees. The upper elevational limit of the community should be less than 2,500 m. The thermal regime probably does not influence the zonation of the community within a rock. PMID:11538333

  14. The cryptoendolithic microbial environment in the Ross Desert of Antarctica: Mathematical models of the thermal regime.

    PubMed

    Nienow, J A; McKay, C P; Friedmann, E I

    1988-11-01

    Microbial activity in the Antarctic cryptoendolithic habitat is regulated primarily by temperature. Previous field studies have provided some information on the thermal regime in this habitat, but this type of information is limited by the remoteness of the site and the harsh climatic conditions. Therefore, a mathematical model of the endolithic thermal regime was constructed to augment the field data. This model enabled the parameters affecting the horizontal and altitudinal distribution of the community to be examined. The model predicts that colonization should be possible on surfaces with zenith angle less than 15°. At greater zenith angles, colonization should be restricted to surfaces with azimuth angles less than 135° or greater than 225°. The upper elevational limit of the community should be less than 2,500 m. The thermal regime probably does not influence the zonation of the community within a rock. PMID:24201713

  15. Thermal regime of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, J. H.; Williams, C. F.; Lachenbruch, Arthur H.; Galanis, S. P., Jr.; Grubb, F. V.

    1997-12-01

    Knowledge of the temperature variation with depth near the San Andreas fault is vital to understanding the physical processes that occur within the fault zone during earthquakes and creep events. Parkfield is near the southern end of the Coast Ranges segment of the San Andreas fault. This segment has higher mean heat flow than the Cape Mendocino segment to the northwest or the Mojave segment to the southeast. Boreholes were drilled specifically for the U.S. Geological Survey's Parkfield earthquake prediction experiment or converted from other uses at 25 sites within a few kilometers of the fault near Parkfield. These holes, which range in depth from 150 to over 1500m, were intended mainly for the deployment of volumetric strain meters, water-level recorders, and other downhole instruments. Temperature profiles were obtained from all the holes, and heat flow values were estimated from 17 of them. For a number of reasons, including a paucity of thermal conductivity data and rugged local topography, the accuracy of individual determinations was not sufficiently high to document local variations in heat flow. Values range from 54 to 92 mW m-2, with mean and 95% confidence limits of 74±4 mW m-2. This mean is slightly lower than the mean (83±3) of 39 previously published values from the central Coast Ranges, but it is consistent with the overall pattern of elevated heat flow in the Coast Ranges, and it is transitional to the mean of 68±2 mW m-2 that characterizes the Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault immediately to the south. The lack of a heat flow peak near the fault underscores the absence of a frictional thermal anomaly and provides additional support for a very small resolved shear stress parallel to the San Andreas fault and the nearly fault-normal maximum compressive stress observed in this region. Estimates of subsurface thermal conditions indicate that the seismicaseismic transition for the Parkfield segment corresponds to temperatures in the range of

  16. Thermal regimes in the Chukchi Sea from 1941-present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchin, Vladimir; Panteleev, Gleb

    2014-05-01

    The summer (June-October) temperature observations in the surface and subsurface (20m-bottom) Chukchi Sea layers collected from 1941-present have been analyzed using the self-consistent data recovery procedure based on correlation analysis and iterative empirical orthogonal function (EOF) decomposition. The analysis of the surface and subsurface EOFs identified "cold", "normal", and "warm" thermal states with variability of 2-4 years, and also 7-8 years. We found that the Chukchi Sea water temperature has gradually increased since 1941. Warming in the surface layer since 1941 has been minimal in the Bering Strait (0.8ºC) and maximalin Long Strait (2-2.4ºC). In the subsurface layer, the temperature increase is about half as much; minimal (0.2-0.5ºC) in Long Strait and rather uniform (0.7-1ºC) for the remaining Chukchi Sea. Analysis of the satellite sea surface height anomaly data shows that during the "warm" periods there is a stronger flow through the Bering Strait and intensification of the northwestward currents in the central Chukchi Sea. Extensive correlation analysis shows that the thermal state of the Chukchi Sea is strongly controlled by the flow of Pacific water through the Bering Strait and by an increase of the global atmospheric temperature. In addition, the typical circulation during the "warm" "warm" and "cold" periods was reconstructed using four dimensional variational (4Dvar) data assimilation into the ocean model, and estimates of volume and heat fluxes in the Chukchi Sea during "cold" and "warm" "warm" periods were derived which are consistent with EOF and correlation analyses.

  17. Thermal regimes in the Chukchi Sea from 1941 to 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchin, Vladimir; Panteleev, Gleb

    2014-11-01

    The summer (June-October) temperature observations in the surface (0 m) and subsurface (20 m-bottom) Chukchi Sea layers collected from 1941 to 2008 have been analyzed using the self-consistent data recovery procedure based on correlation analysis and iterative empirical orthogonal function (EOF) decomposition. The analysis of the surface and subsurface EOFs identified "cold", "normal", and "warm" thermal states with variability of 2-3 years, and also 4-7 years. We found that the Chukchi Sea water temperature has gradually increased since 1941. Warming in the surface layer since 1941 has been minimal in the Bering Strait (0.012 °C yr-1, total 0.8 °C) and maximal in Long Strait (0.030-0.036 °C yr-1, total 2.0-2.4 °C). In the subsurface layer, temperatures have increased about half as much; minimal (0.0030-0.0075 °C yr-1, total 0.2-0.5 °C) in Long Strait and rather uniform (0.010-0.015 °C yr-1, total 0.7-1.0 °C) for the remaining Chukchi Sea. Analysis of the satellite sea-surface height anomaly data shows that during the "warm" periods there is a stronger flow through the Bering Strait and intensification of the northwestward currents in the central Chukchi Sea. Extensive correlation analysis shows that the thermal state of the Chukchi Sea agrees well with the flow of Pacific water through the Bering Strait and by an increase of the global atmospheric temperature. In addition, typical circulation during "warm" and "cold" periods was reconstructed using four-dimensional variational (4Dvar) data assimilation into the ocean model, and estimates of volume and heat fluxes in the Chukchi Sea during "cold" and "warm" periods were derived which are consistent with EOF and correlation analyses.

  18. Continental Scientific Drilling Program thermal regimes: comparative site assessment geology of five magma-hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Waters, A.C.

    1980-10-01

    The geology and salient aspects of geophysics and hydrogeochemistry of five high-grade geothermal systems in the USA are reviewed. On the basis of this information, a target location is suggested for a deep (5- to 8-km) borehole that will maximize the amount of scientific information to be learned at each of the five geothermal areas.

  19. CSDP: the seismology of continental thermal regimes. Final technical report, January 1, 1975-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1985-02-01

    Research progress is reported in the development of new seismological tools to define and characterize the geometry, mechanical construction and mass transport process of a geothermal system, and their application to various geothermal systems including the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock System, New Mexico, Kilauea and Kilauea Iki, Hawaii, Mt. St. Helens, Washington, and Long Valley, California. (ACR)

  20. Incorporating Retention Time to Refine Models Predicting Thermal Regimes of Stream Networks Across New England

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal regimes are a critical factor in models predicting effects of watershed management activities on fish habitat suitability. We have assembled a database of lotic temperature time series across New England (> 7000 station-year combinations) from state and Federal data s...

  1. Network-based Prediction of Lotic Thermal Regimes Across New England

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal regimes are a critical factor in models predicting effects of watershed management activities on fish habitat suitability. We have assembled a database of lotic temperature time series across New England (> 7000 station-year combinations) from state and Federal data sour...

  2. Predicting Thermal Regimes of Stream Networks Across New England: Natural and Anthropogenic Influences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal regime is a critical factor in models predicting joint effects of watershed management activities and climate change on habitat suitability for fish. We used a database of lotic temperature time series across New England (> 7000 station-year combinations) from state a...

  3. Asymptotic regimes for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.

    2015-04-15

    We study the asymptotic regimes for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas obtained by combining the Chester–Thellung–Kubo–Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation [Faussurier et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 092706 (2014)]. Non-degenerate and degenerate situations are considered. The Wiedemann–Franz law is obtained in the degenerate case.

  4. Asymptotic regimes for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, G.; Blancard, C.

    2015-04-01

    We study the asymptotic regimes for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas obtained by combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation [Faussurier et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 092706 (2014)]. Non-degenerate and degenerate situations are considered. The Wiedemann-Franz law is obtained in the degenerate case.

  5. Predicting thermal regimes of stream networks across the Chesapeake Bay Watershed: Natural and anthropogenic influences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal regimes are a critical factor in models predicting joint effects of watershed management activities and climate change on fish habitat suitability. We have compiled a database of lotic temperature time series across the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (725 station-year combinat...

  6. Crustal structure of Edoras Bank continental margin and mantle thermal anomalies beneath the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, A. J.; White, R. S.

    1997-02-01

    allows us to deduce the spatial extent and temporal variation of the thermal anomalies caused by the Iceland mantle plume during and following continental breakup. We find that at the time of breakup a thin layer of anomalously hot asthenospheric mantle ˜150°C hotter than normal lay beneath the 2000 km long rift, extending from the Lofoten margin off Norway in the north to the Edoras Bank margin in the south. Over a period of 5-10 m.y. following the onset of rifting, the mantle thermal anomaly decayed rapidly to only 50°C or so above normal as the thin layer of abnormally hot mantle decompressed beneath the rift and produced a large pulse of magmatism.

  7. Effective thermal conductivity of helium II: from Landau to Gorter-Mellink regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciacca, M.; Jou, D.; Mongiovì, M. S.

    2015-08-01

    The size-dependent and flux-dependent effective thermal conductivity of narrow channels filled with He II is analyzed. The classical Landau evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of quiescent He II is extended to describe the transition to fully turbulent regime, where the heat flux is proportional to the cubic root of the temperature gradient (Gorter-Mellink regime). To do so, we use an expression for the quantum vortex line density L in terms of the heat flux considering the influence of the walls. From it, and taking into account the friction force of normal component against the vortices, we compute the effective thermal conductivity as a function of the heat flux, and we discuss in detail the corresponding size dependence.

  8. Thermal effects on mass detection sensitivity of carbon nanotube resonators in nonlinear oscillation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Keun; Yang, Hyun-Ik; Kim, Chang-Wan

    2015-11-01

    A mass sensor using a nano-resonator has high detection sensitivity, and mass sensitivity is higher with smaller resonators. Therefore, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the ultimate materials for these applications and have been actively studied. In particular, CNT-based nanomechanical devices may experience high temperatures that lead to thermal expansion and residual stress in devices, which affects the device reliability. In this letter, to demonstrate the influence of the temperature change (i.e., thermal effect) on the mass detection sensitivity of CNT-based mass sensor, dynamic analysis is carried out for a CNT resonator with thermal effects in both linear and nonlinear oscillation regimes. Based on the continuum mechanics model, the analytical solution method with an assumed deflection eigenmode is applied to solve the nonlinear differential equation which involves the von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relation and the additional axial force associated with thermal effects. A thermal effect on the fundamental resonance behavior and resonance frequency shift due to adsorbed mas, i.e., mass detection sensitivity, is examined in high-temperature environment. Results indicate a valid improvement of fundamental resonance frequency by using nonlinear oscillation in a thermal environment. In both linear and nonlinear oscillation regimes, the mass detection sensitivity becomes worse due to the increasing of temperature in a high-temperature environment. The thermal effect on the detection sensitivity is less effective in the nonlinear oscillation regime. It is concluded that a temperature change of a mass sensor with a CNT-based resonator can be utilized to enhance the detection sensitivity depending on the CNT length, linear/nonlinear oscillation behaviors, and the thermal environment.

  9. Modeling transitions in the hydrologic and thermal regimes of Earth's largest lake system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronewold, A.; Anderson, E. J.; Blanken, P.; Lofgren, B. M.; Wang, J.; Stow, C.

    2014-12-01

    Starting in the late 1990s, the seasonal hydrologic and thermal regimes of Earth's largest lake system have been characterized by very high surface water temperatures, below-average ice cover, persistent low water levels and extremely high over-lake evaporation rates. However, the harsh winter conditions of 2013-2014 led to very low surface water temperatures and an exceptionally broad and persistent areal extent of ice cover. The contrast between the extreme 2013-2014 winter conditions on the Great Lakes and the conditions from the preceding 15-year period raises compelling questions about the extent to which hydrometeorological conditions have changed in the Great Lakes region, how they might be expected to change in the future, and to what extent those changes are reflected in currrent regional research-oriented and operational forecasts. Here, we analyze historical intra-seasonal relationships between late winter and subsequent late fall thermal regimes on the Great Lakes and find that, for some of the lakes, memory of seasonal heat content is strong, but can be significantly impacted by hydrometeorological conditions including wind speed and solar radiation. In fact, we find that the late 1990s, a period coinciding with one of the strongest El Ninos on record, represent a shift in the hydrologic and thermal regimes of the Great Lakes, and that projections for the fall of 2014 suggest that the regime might be offset by the recent cold winter. Our findings also provide evidence that the transition in the Great Lakes' altered thermal regime in the late 1990s was triggered by abrupt increases not only in air and water temperatures associated with the coincident El Nino, but also by a combination of reduced cloud cover and above-average summer solar radiation. The extent to which these changes are explicitly represented in regional forecasting systems is critically important to regional water resource management planning.

  10. Geophysical study of the structure and processes of the continental convergence zones: Alpine-Himalayan belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.; Molnar, P.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of the structure of the continental collision zones using seismic and body waves, theoretical modelling of the thermal regime of the convergence processes, and studies of earthquake mechanisms and deformation aspects of the model are covered.

  11. Regimes of microscale radiative transfer for exchange of thermal energy between metallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Whale, M.D.; Cravalho, E.G.

    1997-07-01

    There is ample theoretical and experimental evidence to substantiate the enhanced transfer of energy by thermal radiation between two closely-spaced surfaces when the distance of separation is on the order of the characteristic wavelength of the radiation. There is no clear agreement, however, as to the magnitude of the effect. In the present work, they consolidate these various approaches for the first time, and they show the fundamental underlying reasons for the disparate experimental results and analytical models. They identify a set of microscale radiative transfer regimes that account for the different mechanisms of absorption that occur. For the various experimental configurations, they show that the disagreement among the experimental measurements performed thus far can be traced to the different microscale regimes that govern the absorption process. Furthermore, using these regimes they are able to explain the discrepancies between the analytical models and the experimental measurements.

  12. Using mineral thermal diffusivities measured with Laser-Flash Analysis to redefine the continental geotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branlund, J. M.; Hofmeister, A.; Merriman, J. D.; Nabelek, P. I.; Whittington, A. G.

    2010-12-01

    We've created a new model for the average continental geotherm by incorporating accurate thermal conductivity values into Fourier's law. Previous geotherm models used thermal conductivities (k) with systematic errors: (1) Pores and microcracks in polycrystalline samples provide artificially low k compared to buried rocks, (2) conventional measurement techniques involve contact losses between thermocouples and samples, especially at high temperature, and/or (3) many techniques inadequately remove ballistic radiative transfer, which does not represent true heat transfer in the earth. To provide k values appropriate for Earth’s interior, we measured thermal diffusivity and its temperature derivatives using laser-flash analysis (LFA) for common rock-forming minerals. To avoid problems of pores and microcracks artificially lowering measured k values, we mathematically mixed mineral data to create synthetic rocks representative of the upper and lower crust and mantle, and checked our values against measurements of rocks least contaminated. Compared to previous models using k of rocks measured with non-LFA methods, our mixture models give higher k of crustal rocks at room temperature, but lower values at higher temperatures. Calculating a geotherm with these revised thermal conductivity values gives a lower temperature throughout the lower crust and mantle lithosphere. Altering the composition of the crust will change the geotherm; crust with more quartz, olivine and/or pyroxene has higher k and a lower geothermal gradient. Adding calcic plagioclase lowers k and steepens the geotherm. The new constraints on k allow us to set bounds on the steady-state geotherm based on ranges of possible mineralogy, chemistry, and radiogenic contents.

  13. Boundary between the thermal and statistical polarization regimes in a nuclear spin ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, B. E.; Cadeddu, D.; Xue, F.; Peddibhotla, P.; Poggio, M.

    2014-07-01

    As the number of spins in an ensemble is reduced, the statistical fluctuations in its polarization eventually exceed the mean thermal polarization. This transition has now been surpassed in a number of recent nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, which achieve nanometer-scale detection volumes. Here, we measure nanometer-scale ensembles of nuclear spins in a KPF6 sample using magnetic resonance force microscopy. In particular, we investigate the transition between regimes dominated by thermal and statistical nuclear polarization. The ratio between the two types of polarization provides a measure of the number of spins in the detected ensemble.

  14. Boundary between the thermal and statistical polarization regimes in a nuclear spin ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, B. E.; Cadeddu, D.; Xue, F.; Peddibhotla, P.; Poggio, M.

    2014-07-28

    As the number of spins in an ensemble is reduced, the statistical fluctuations in its polarization eventually exceed the mean thermal polarization. This transition has now been surpassed in a number of recent nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, which achieve nanometer-scale detection volumes. Here, we measure nanometer-scale ensembles of nuclear spins in a KPF{sub 6} sample using magnetic resonance force microscopy. In particular, we investigate the transition between regimes dominated by thermal and statistical nuclear polarization. The ratio between the two types of polarization provides a measure of the number of spins in the detected ensemble.

  15. Lunar thermal regime to 300 km. [in crust and upper mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keihm, S. J.; Langseth, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    Coupling of the global heat flow, crustal heat source enrichment, thermal conductivity, and temperature in the crust and upper mantle of the moon is examined. A steady-state moon in which conductive heat transfer dominates is assumed. Heat-flow measurements from the Apollo 15 and 17 missions and gamma-ray mapping of thorium conducted by the Apollo 15 and 16 missions provide data for the study of the lunar thermal regime. Temperatures in the range of 1100 to 1600 K are found for the 300-km depth level. In the upper mantle, temperature gradients are in the range of 1.8 to 3.2 K/km.

  16. Thermal transport in Si and Ge nanostructures in the 'confinement' regime.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonshin; Wingert, Matthew C; Zheng, Jianlin; Xiang, Jie; Chen, Renkun

    2016-07-21

    Reducing semiconductor materials to sizes comparable to the characteristic lengths of phonons, such as the mean-free-path (MFP) and wavelength, has unveiled new physical phenomena and engineering capabilities for thermal energy management and conversion systems. These developments have been enabled by the increasing sophistication of chemical synthesis, microfabrication, and atomistic simulation techniques to understand the underlying mechanisms of phonon transport. Modifying thermal properties by scaling physical size is particularly effective for materials which have large phonon MFPs, such as crystalline Si and Ge. Through nanostructuring, materials that are traditionally good thermal conductors can become good candidates for applications requiring thermal insulation such as thermoelectrics. Precise understanding of nanoscale thermal transport in Si and Ge, the leading materials of the modern semiconductor industry, is increasingly important due to more stringent thermal conditions imposed by ever-increasing complexity and miniaturization of devices. Therefore this Minireview focuses on the recent theoretical and experimental developments related to reduced length effects on thermal transport of Si and Ge with varying size from hundreds to sub-10 nm ranges. Three thermal transport regimes - bulk-like, Casimir, and confinement - are emphasized to describe different governing mechanisms at corresponding length scales. PMID:27344991

  17. Thermal transport in Si and Ge nanostructures in the `confinement' regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Soonshin; Wingert, Matthew C.; Zheng, Jianlin; Xiang, Jie; Chen, Renkun

    2016-07-01

    Reducing semiconductor materials to sizes comparable to the characteristic lengths of phonons, such as the mean-free-path (MFP) and wavelength, has unveiled new physical phenomena and engineering capabilities for thermal energy management and conversion systems. These developments have been enabled by the increasing sophistication of chemical synthesis, microfabrication, and atomistic simulation techniques to understand the underlying mechanisms of phonon transport. Modifying thermal properties by scaling physical size is particularly effective for materials which have large phonon MFPs, such as crystalline Si and Ge. Through nanostructuring, materials that are traditionally good thermal conductors can become good candidates for applications requiring thermal insulation such as thermoelectrics. Precise understanding of nanoscale thermal transport in Si and Ge, the leading materials of the modern semiconductor industry, is increasingly important due to more stringent thermal conditions imposed by ever-increasing complexity and miniaturization of devices. Therefore this Minireview focuses on the recent theoretical and experimental developments related to reduced length effects on thermal transport of Si and Ge with varying size from hundreds to sub-10 nm ranges. Three thermal transport regimes - bulk-like, Casimir, and confinement - are emphasized to describe different governing mechanisms at corresponding length scales.

  18. Mountain frozen grounds as small amplitude thermal proxy in southern continental Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Sebastian; Beriain, Eneko; Izagirre, Eñaut; Bockheim, James; Pedro, Cid-Agüero

    2015-04-01

    Frozen grounds are an important element of the cryosphere, covering between a 20-25% of the global area. Frozen grounds are becoming a relevant object of research in the southern hemisphere, being most studies focused mainly on Antarctica. With the exception of seasonally frozen grounds, perennially frozen ground is found in continental South America, for example, in high altitude terrains from 4.600m a.s.l. in central Chile. However, scarce or not information regarding permafrost on Southern Patagonia has been reported. One of the aims of this study was to establish mountain permafrost existence at 1.200m in the southern limit of the Southern Patagonian Ice-Field, a geographically active area surrounded by different kinds of glaciers on fast retreat. The area of study presents several features of past cryogenic activity such as undefined polygonal grounds with a thick clast border and sandy-loam interior. A scarce vegetal cover is limited to lichen and moss communities. The analyzed soil does not represent a thermal barrier that may avoid heat wave dynamic along the ground profile. There was neither significant snow-cover during winter nor a vegetation layer enough to consider as insulation for the analyzed ground. Oscillations above 0°C were evidenced down to 1.8m depth during winter of 2014, ruling out the existence of permafrost at that lower limit. Year round thermal dynamic down to 1.8m in the ground profile is presented as one result of the monitoring. Small amplitude temperature fluctuations were registered upon monitoring. These minimal amplitudes were stable throughout several months and as such serve as an interesting proxy for recent and long-term climatic thermal fluctuation. The influence of winds coming from nearby glaciers highly affects near-surface amplitude. This interaction was studied. The present work is part of an ongoing monitoring network along South America that intends to fill the gap between tropical Andes and the Antarctic Peninsula.

  19. Computational Modeling of Radiative, Thermal, and Kinetic Regimes of Flame Spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simsek, Aslihan

    The purpose of this thesis presented is to analyze flame spread over thermally thin solid fuels in three regimes of flame spread process; radiative, thermal, and kinetic regimes. The analyses have been performed using a comprehensive two dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model written in Fortran language developed by Bhattacharjee. Flame spread over thermally thin fuels in quiescent and opposing flow microgravity environments is investigated. An extinction study is performed with different computational domain sizes for a set of fuel thicknesses to understand the effect of domain size on the extinction velocities in the radiative and kinetic regimes. The effect of development length boundary layer is studied in both radiative and kinetic regimes. It is found that flame spread rate, flame size, flame temperature, blow-off and radiative extinction velocities depend on the development length and the boundary layer created by the opposing flow. A correlation between the extinction development length and opposed flow velocity is established. Flame spread over open cell phenolic foam is investigated in detail in a quiescent microgravity environment. The critical fuel thickness is found at different oxygen concentrations and compared to those for PMMA. Pressure, oxygen concentration, and radiation studies are also performed to analyze the flame spread over foam. To understand the effect of radiation on flame spread, the CFD model is coupled with two different radiation models in a microgravity environment. The first radiation model includes gas to surface conduction, gas to environment radiation loss, gas to surface feedback radiation, and surface to environment radiation loss. The second model only excludes gas to surface radiation feedback. The results obtained using these two models are compared with the CFD results; one with radiation completely neglected, and one with only gas to surface radiation feedback neglected. Flame spread in downward

  20. Wave theories of non-laminar charged particle beams: from quantum to thermal regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Renato; Tanjia, Fatema; Jovanović, Dusan; de Nicola, Sergio; Ronsivalle, Concetta; Ronsivalle

    2014-04-01

    The standard classical description of non-laminar charged particle beams in paraxial approximation is extended to the context of two wave theories. The first theory that we discuss (Fedele R. and Shukla, P. K. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 4045. Tanjia, F. et al. 2011 Proceedings of the 38th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics, Vol. 35G. Strasbourg, France: European Physical Society) is based on the Thermal Wave Model (TWM) (Fedele, R. and Miele, G. 1991 Nuovo Cim. D 13, 1527.) that interprets the paraxial thermal spreading of beam particles as the analog of quantum diffraction. The other theory is based on a recently developed model (Fedele, R. et al. 2012a Phys. Plasmas 19, 102106; Fedele, R. et al. 2012b AIP Conf. Proc. 1421, 212), hereafter called Quantum Wave Model (QWM), that takes into account the individual quantum nature of single beam particle (uncertainty principle and spin) and provides collective description of beam transport in the presence of quantum paraxial diffraction. Both in quantum and quantum-like regimes, the beam transport is governed by a 2D non-local Schrödinger equation, with self-interaction coming from the nonlinear charge- and current-densities. An envelope equation of the Ermakov-Pinney type, which includes collective effects, is derived for both TWM and QWM regimes. In TWM, such description recovers the well-known Sacherer's equation (Sacherer, F. J. 1971 IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-18, 1105). Conversely, in the quantum regime and in Hartree's mean field approximation, one recovers the evolution equation for a single-particle spot size, i.e. for a single quantum ray spot in the transverse plane (Compton regime). We demonstrate that such quantum evolution equation contains the same information as the evolution equation for the beam spot size that describes the beam as a whole. This is done heuristically by defining the lowest QWM state accessible by a system of non-overlapping fermions. The latter are associated with temperature values that are

  1. Thermal origin of continental red beds in SE China: An experiment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lianting; Chen, Guoneng; Grapes, Rodney; Peng, Zhuolun

    2015-04-01

    The origin of continental red beds in SE China is the result of high diagenetic temperatures, rather than an arid climate during their deposition. Here we present results from an experimental study where black mud was heated to demonstrate the formation of red beds. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) of heated samples enables determination of the relative proportion of goethite and hematite. Iron in black mud is predominantly in the form of goethite that has an initial dehydration temperature of ca.150 °C. Increasing temperature or prolonged heating time is accompanied by decreasing goethite and organic content, increasing hematite and red colouration. Heat provided to subsiding red bed basins is supplied by cooling of an intracrustal granitic magma layer. The thermal model can explain vertical colour, temperature, redox and mineral zonation in red bed sequences, from red (hematite-bearing), through green-yellow (Cu, Zn, V sulphide mineralization) to grey-black (hydrocarbon, halite-bearing) sediments. The model can also be used to help prospect for hydrocarbon and halite deposits in the SE China red bed basins.

  2. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M.; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N.; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D.; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W.; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Nardi, Damiano

    2015-01-01

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier’s law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate of heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. Finally, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations. PMID:25831491

  3. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M.; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N.; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D.; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W.; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; et al

    2015-03-23

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier’s law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate ofmore » heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. In conclusion, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations.« less

  4. Consequences of thermal pollution from a nuclear plant on lake temperature and mixing regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillin, Georgiy; Shatwell, Tom; Kasprzak, Peter

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the combined effects of thermal pollution from a nuclear power plant (NPP) and regional climate warming on the thermal regime of a lake. For this purpose, we used the lake model FLake and analyzed 50 years of temperature data from Lake Stechlin, Germany, which served as the cooling water reservoir for the Rheinsberg NPP from 1966 until 1990. Both modeling and statistical data analysis revealed a strong influence of the NPP cooling water discharge on the lake water temperatures and the vertical stability of the water column. A remarkable effect of thermal pollution consisted of strong vertical mixing in winter produced by the discharge of warm water into the lake when ambient water temperatures were below 4 °C. This effect caused a significant increase in the deep hypolimnion temperatures and a corresponding decrease of the vertical stability in the summer. In turn, climate warming had the opposite effect on the summer stability by increasing lake surface temperatures. Both the thermal pollution and climate change increased the duration of the summer stratification period. Our results suggest that industrial thermal pollution in temperate lakes during winter is stored in the deep water column until the next winter, whereas heat added in the summer dissipates relatively rapidly into the atmosphere. Accordingly, the winter thermal pollution could have a long-lasting effect on the lake ecology by affecting benthic biogeochemical processes.

  5. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D; Anderson, Erik H; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Nardi, Damiano

    2015-04-21

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier's law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate of heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. Finally, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations. PMID:25831491

  6. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M.; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N.; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D.; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W.; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Nardi, Damiano

    2015-03-23

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier’s law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate of heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. In conclusion, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations.

  7. Impact of various surface covers on water and thermal regime of Technosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodešová, Radka; Fér, Miroslav; Klement, Aleš; Nikodem, Antonín; Teplá, Daniela; Neuberger, Pavel; Bureš, Petr

    2014-11-01

    Different soil covers influence water and thermal regimes in soils within urban areas. Knowledge of these regimes is needed, particularly when assessing effectiveness of energy gathering from soils using horizontal ground heat exchangers. The goal of this study was to calibrate the model HYDRUS-1D for simulating coupled water and thermal regime in Technosol type soils with grass cover, and to use this model for predicting water and thermal regimes under different materials covering the soil surface. For this purpose soil water contents were measured at depths of 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 and 100 cm at 4 locations and temperatures were measured at depths of 20, 40, 80, 120, 150 and 180 cm at three locations (all covered by grass) from June 2011 to December 2012. In addition sensors for simultaneous measuring soil water contents and temperatures were installed under different soil covers (grass, bark chips, sand, basalt gravel and concrete paving) at a depth of 7. The parameters of soil hydraulic properties were obtained on the 100-cm3 undisturbed soil samples using the multi-step outflow experiment and numerical inversion of the measured transient flow data using HYDRUS-1D. HYDRUS-1D was then used to simulated the water regime within the soil profile under the grass cover using climatic data from June 2011 to December 2012 and some of the soil hydraulic parameters were additionally numerically optimized using soil water contents measured at all depths. Water flow and heat transport were then simulated using these parameters, measured thermal properties and temperatures measured close to the surface applied as a top boundary condition. Simulated temperatures at all depths successfully approximated the measured data. Next, water and thermal regimes under another 4 different surface covers were simulated. Soil hydraulic properties of different materials were partly measured and partly optimized when simulating soil water regime from June 2011 to December 2012 using the soil

  8. Mantle thermal structure and active upwelling during continental breakup in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, W. Steven; Larsen, H. C.; Korenaga, J.; Dahl-Jensen, T.; Reid, I. D.; Kelemen, P. B.; Hopper, J. R.; Kent, G. M.; Lizarralde, D.; Bernstein, S.; Detrick, R. S.

    2001-08-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data acquired on four transects spanning the Southeast Greenland rifted margin and Greenland-Iceland Ridge (GIR) provide new constraints on mantle thermal structure and melting processes during continental breakup in the North Atlantic. Maximum igneous crustal thickness varies along the margin from >30 km in the near-hotspot zone (<500 km from the hotspot track) to ˜18 km in the distal zone (500-1100 km). Magmatic productivity on summed conjugate margins of the North Atlantic decreases through time from 1800±300 to 600±50 km 3/km/Ma in the near-hotspot zone and from 700±200 to 300±50 km 3/km/Ma in the distal zone. Comparison of our data with the British/Faeroe margins shows that both symmetric and asymmetric conjugate volcanic rifted margins exist. Joint consideration of crustal thickness and mean crustal seismic velocity suggests that along-margin changes in magmatism are principally controlled by variations in active upwelling rather than mantle temperature. The thermal anomaly (Δ T) at breakup was modest (˜100-125°C), varied little along the margin, and transient. Data along the GIR indicate that the potential temperature anomaly (125±50°C) and upwelling ratio (˜4 times passive) of the Iceland hotspot have remained roughly constant since 56 Ma. Our results are consistent with a plume-impact model, in which (1) a plume of radius ˜300 km and Δ T of ˜125°C impacted the margin around 61 Ma and delivered warm material to distal portions of the margin; (2) at breakup (56 Ma), the lower half of the plume head continued to feed actively upwelling mantle into the proximal portion of the margin; and (3) by 45 Ma, both the remaining plume head and the distal warm layer were exhausted, with excess magmatism thereafter largely confined to a narrow (<200 km radius) zone immediately above the Iceland plume stem. Alternatively, the warm upper mantle layer that fed excess magmatism in the distal portion of the margin may have been

  9. Towards a better understanding of rock wall thermal regime and stability in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sæterdal Myhra, Kristin; Etzelmüller, Bernd

    2013-04-01

    Hazardous rock fall events caused by slope failure have drawn attention towards the physical processes that affect slope stability of rock walls. The stability of a slope is determined by the interplay between driving and resisting forces acting on the site. A typical scenario is a gravity driving force that is counteracted by friction and cohesion forces. The nature of these forces is dependent on a complex interaction between a range of factors, amongst them topography, rock mass quality and hydrology. Steep topography increases the gravitational driving force, while factors such as water pressure and discontinuities in the rock mass decrease the resisting forces. Hence, slope instabilities evolve in time and space and is dependent upon a range of factors influencing each other through feedback processes. During the past century, the number of slope failures in the European Alps have increased, leading to an increasing focus on degrading permafrost as a possible factor for slope failure. Degrading permafrost might influence both the driving shear stresses and the resisting shear forces in frozen rock faces, causing changes in the force balance of the bedrock. Though degrading permafrost is considered to have an impact on the stability of rock slopes, the physical processes behind the causality are not fully understood. For the Scandinavian mountains, a possible relationship between permafrost and rock slope stability is poorly investigated and understood. Many unstable rock faces have been mapped and some are surveyed, and in several locations temperature loggers monitor the ground thermal regime in steep slopes. It is evident that many unstable rock faces are situated in or close to the zone of mountain permafrost. This project tries to contribute to the understanding of rock wall stability with respect to the influence of ground thermal regime and changing climatic conditions. A first goal of this study is to gain a better understanding of the sensitivity of

  10. Transition from the incoherent to the coherent regime for propagative-wave based thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurimaki, Y.; Chapuis, P.-O.; Okajima, J.; Komiya, A.; Maruyama, S.; Vaillon, R.

    2016-01-01

    The transition from the incoherent to the coherent regime for thermal radiation between bodies trough a transparent medium is discussed. The canonical case of two parallel semi-infinite planar media is used as a basis to provide an insight into the physics and quantities ruling the distance at which coherent effects have an impact on the propagative component of the net heat flux exchanged. A practical criterion is proposed to define the distance below which radiation intensity framework should not be used, but instead fluctuational electrodynamics.

  11. The thermal regime beneath cultural blocky materials: Ground temperature measurements in and around the Scythian Kurgans of the Russian Altay Mountains.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Kerchove, Ruben; Goossens, Rudi

    2010-05-01

    During historical times, the Altay Mountains were repeatedly occupied by several, mainly nomadic, cultures. Among them were the Scythians who lived in the area (and far beyond), from the 8th until the 2nd century BC. This culture is widely known for their specific burial rituals, including the burying of their death in a kurgan: a burial mound consisting of a coarse debris surface layer, overlaying a burial chamber. Due to this composition, together with the continental alpine climate of the Altay Mountains, several of these graves were found frozen, thanks to the existence of ice lenses and permafrost beneath the structures. If frozen, these kurgans contained well preserved bodies, often with the tattoos on their skin intact. As nowadays a distinct temperature rising is showed in these continental mountain ranges, the hundreds of kurgans, and especially these ones located at the lower fringe of the permafrost area, are likely to defrost within decades. As a result, the valuable, frozen, organic and inorganic content will get lost, resulting in a loss of extremely valuable cultural heritage and knowledge. Therefore, extensive permafrost research regarding the thermal state of the frozen tombs and the spatial distribution of the mountain permafrost is necessary to forecast which of the tombs are endangered by thawing. In the framework of this project a first expedition was organized in the Russian Altay Mountains during the summer of 2008. During this expedition, the valleys of Dzhazator, Tarkhata, Kalanegir and Ulandryk were visited in succession and temperature installments were made in order to give an overview of the thermal regime in the area. Beside installments intended for regional modelling, special sensors were placed in order to focus on the specific thermal regime related to the Scythian kurgans. This poster gives the first results of the temperature data as recorded by sensors located in and around the burial mounds. At first attention is given to the

  12. Crystallization upon thermal annealing of a glass-forming liquid crystal in the nematic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrangelo, J.C. |; Blanton, T.N.; Chen, S.H. |

    1995-04-24

    As an example of a novel class of glass-forming liquid crystals, compound (I) was synthesized and characterized to possess a nematic mesophase between {ital T}{sub {ital g}} and {ital T}{sub {ital c}} as the pristine crystal was heated beyond its {ital T}{sub {ital m}} followed by quenching to below room temperature. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction techniques were employed to investigate its morphological stability. It was found that the nematic mesophase persists upon annealing for a period of up to 22 h without the appearance of new phases. However, after annealing in the nematic regime over a longer period of time, thermally activated phase transformations were observed, resulting in a new crystalline phase plus the pristine crystalline phase based on DSC thermal transition data and x-ray diffraction patterns.

  13. Thermal and mechanical properties of selected 3D printed thermoplastics in the cryogenic temperature regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, K.-P.; Bagrets, N.; Lange, C.; Goldacker, W.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2015-12-01

    Insulating materials for use in cryogenic boundary conditions are still limited to a proved selection as Polyamid, Glasfiber reinforced resins, PEEK, Vespel etc. These materials are usually formed to parts by mechanical machining or sometimes by cast methods. Shaping complex geometries in one piece is limited. Innovative 3D printing is now an upcoming revolutionary technology to construct functional parts from a couple of thermoplastic materials as ABS, Nylon and others which possess quite good mechanical stability and allow realizing very complex shapes with very subtle details. Even a wide range of material mixtures is an option and thermal treatments can be used to finish the material structure for higher performance. The use of such materials in cryogenic environment is very attractive but so far poor experience exists. In this paper, first investigations of the thermal conductivity, expansion and mechanical strength are presented for a few selected commercial 3D material samples to evaluate their application prospects in the cryogenic temperature regime.

  14. Regional Heat Flow Map and the Continental Thermal Isostasy Understanding of México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza-Ojeda, O. M.; Harris, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    The first heat flow values made in Mexico were reported by Von Herzen [Science, 1963] for the marine environment and Smith [EPSL, 1974] for the continent. Since that time the number of measurements has increased greatly but are mostly from oil and gas exploration and in and around geothermal areas. We have compiled published values of conductive heat flow for Mexico and the Gulf of California to generate a new regional heat flow map consisting of 261 values. In addition to those original values, published heat flow sources include, Lee and Henyey [JGR, 1975], Lawver and Williams [JGR, 1979] Smith et al. [JGR, 1979], Lachenbruch et al. [JGR, 1985], and Ziagos et al. [JGR, 1985]. Although the geographic distribution is uneven, heat flow data are present in each of the eight main tectonic provinces. Our new compilation indicates relatively high regional heat flow averages in the Gulf Extensional Province (n=114, 92±22 mW/m2) and Mexican Basin and Range (n=21, 82±20 mW/m2) and are consistent with geologic estimates of extension. Lower regional averages are found in the Baja California Microplate (n=91, 75±19 mW/m2), the Sierra Madre Occidental (n=9, 75±12 mW/m2), the Sierra Madre Oriental (n=4, 68±15 mW/m2) and Mesa Central (n=X 77±23 mW/m2). In contrast low and variable heat flow value characterize the forearc region of the Middle America Trench (n=6, 35±16 mW/m2). A higher mean heat flow is associated with the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (n=6, 78±26 mW/m2). Continental elevation results from a combination of buoyancy (i.e. compositional and thermal) and geodynamic forces. We combine these regional heat flow values with estimates of crustal thickness and density for each tectonic province and compute the thermal and compositional buoyancy following the approach of Hasterok and Chapman [JGR, 2007a,b]. We find that within uncertainties most provinces lie near the theoretical isostatic relationship with the exception of the Mesa Central and Sierra Madre del Sur

  15. Cold exposure and associated metabolic changes in adult tropical beetles exposed to fluctuating thermal regimes.

    PubMed

    Lalouette, L; Kostál, V; Colinet, H; Gagneul, D; Renault, D

    2007-04-01

    Environmental stress deleteriously affects every aspect of an ectotherm's biological function. Frequent exposure of terrestrial insects to temperature variation has thus led to the evolution of protective biochemical and physiological mechanisms. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying the positive impact of fluctuating thermal regimes (FTRs) on the fitness and survival of cold-exposed insects have not been studied. We have thus investigated the metabolic changes in adults of the beetle Alphitobius diaperinus in order to determine whether FTRs trigger the initiation of a metabolic response involving synthesis of protective compounds, such as free amino acids (FAAs) and polyols. The metabolic profile was analyzed during constant fluctuating thermal regimes (the beetles had daily pulses at higher temperatures that enabled them to recover) and compared with constant cold exposure and untreated controls. The increase of several essential amino acids (Lys, Iso, Leu, Phe and Trp) in cold-exposed beetles supports the conclusion that it results from the breakdown of proteins. Some FAAs have been shown to have cryoprotective properties in insects, but the relationship between FAAs, cold tolerance and survival has not yet been well defined. Instead of considering FAAs only as a part of the osmo- and cryoprotective arsenal, they should also be regarded as main factors involved in the multiple regulatory pathways activated during cold acclimation. Under FTRs, polyol accumulation probably contributes to the increased duration of survival in A. diaperinus. PMID:17331186

  16. New insights into the ground thermal regime of talus slopes with permafrost below the timberline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Daniel; Kneisel, Christof

    2013-04-01

    In the central Alps permafrost can be expected above 2400 m a.s.l., at altitudes where mean annual air temperatures are below -1° C. However, isolated permafrost occurrences are present in north-exposed talus slopes, far below the timberline, where mean annual air temperatures are positive. Driving factors are assumed to be a low income of solar radiation, a thick organic layer with high insulation capacities as well as the thermally induced chimney effect (Wakonigg, 1996). Investigated are three talus slopes with permafrost in the Swiss Alps that differ with regard to elevation level, talus material, humus characteristics and vegetation composition as well as the mean annual air temperatures. Aim is to achieve a deeper understanding of the factors determining the site-specific thermal regime, as well as the spatially limited and temporally highly variable permafrost occurrences in vegetated talus slopes. Focus is not solely on the question of why permafrost exists at these sites, but also why permafrost does not exist in the immediate surroundings. To detect the temporal variability and spatial heterogeneity of the permafrost occurrences, electrical resistivity tomography monitoring, seismic refraction tomography monitoring, and quasi-3D ERT were applied. To determine the ground thermal regime, air-, ground surface-, and humus temperatures, as well as temperatures within vents of the chimneys were recorded. Furthermore, humus characteristics (thickness, -temperature and -moisture) were mapped in permafrost-affected slope areas and in the immediate surroundings. To test the correlation between solar radiation, permafrost distribution, and humus/vegetation composition, digital elevation models were used to calculate the income of solar radiation. The areal extent of the permafrost bodies coincide precisely with slope sections where the organic layer is thickest, a consistent moss cover is present, and where temperatures at the transition between humus layer and

  17. Few genetic and environmental correlations between life history and stress resistance traits affect adaptation to fluctuating thermal regimes.

    PubMed

    Manenti, T; Sørensen, J G; Moghadam, N N; Loeschcke, V

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory selection in thermal regimes that differed in the amplitude and the predictability of daily fluctuations had a marked effect on stress resistance and life history traits in Drosophila simulans. The observed evolutionary changes are expected to be the result of both direct and correlated responses to selection. Thus, a given trait might not evolve independently from other traits because of genetic correlations among these traits. Moreover, different test environments can induce novel genetic correlations because of the activation of environmentally dependent genes. To test whether and how genetic correlations among stress resistance and life history traits constrain evolutionary adaptation, we used three populations of D. simulans selected for 20 generations in constant, predictable and unpredictable daily fluctuating thermal regimes and tested each of these selected populations in the same three thermal regimes. We explored the relationship between genetic correlations between traits and the evolutionary potential of D. simulans by comparing genetic correlation matrices in flies selected and tested in different thermal test regimes. We observed genetic correlations mainly between productivity, body size, starvation and desiccation tolerance, suggesting that adaptation to the three thermal regimes was affected by correlations between these traits. We also found that the correlations between some traits such as body size and productivity or starvation tolerance and productivity were determined by test regime rather than selection regime that is expected to limit genetic adaptation to thermal regimes in these traits. The results of this study suggest that several traits and several environments are needed to explore adaptive responses, as genetic and environmentally induced correlations between traits as results obtained in one environment cannot be used to predict the response of the same population in another environment. PMID:27273321

  18. Thermal history and evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin in northern Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, Daniel; Karl, Markus; Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton

    2013-04-01

    northwestern Namibia, and their relationship to continental breakup, Journal of the Geological Society of London 152: 97-104. Renne, P.R., Ernesto, M., Pacca, I.I., G. Coe, R.S., Glen, J. M., Prévot, M., Perrin, M., 1992. The age of Paraná flood volcanism, rifting of Gondwanaland, and the Jurassic -Cretaceous boundary. Science 258, 975 - 979. Stewart, K. S., Turner, S., Kelly, S., Hawkesworth, C. J., Kirstein, L. and Mantovani, M. S. M., 1996. 3D 40Ar-39Ar geochronology in the Parańa flood basalt province, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 143: 95-110. Turner, S., Hawkesworth, C., Gallagher, K., Stewart, K., Peate, D. and Mantovani, M., 1996. Mantle plumes, flood basalts, and thermal models for melt generation beneath continents: Assessment of a conductive heating model and application to the Parana, Journal of Geophysical Research 101: 11503- 11518.

  19. Descriptors of natural thermal regimes in streams and their responsiveness to change in the Pacific Northwest of North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arismendi, Ivan; Johnson, Sherri L.; Dunham, Jason B.; Haggerty, Roy

    2013-01-01

    1. Temperature is a major driver of ecological processes in stream ecosystems, yet the dynamics of thermal regimes remain poorly described. Most work has focused on relatively simple descriptors that fail to capture the full range of conditions that characterise thermal regimes of streams across seasons or throughout the year. 2. To more completely describe thermal regimes, we developed several descriptors of magnitude, variability, frequency, duration and timing of thermal events throughout a year. We evaluated how these descriptors change over time using long-term (1979–2009), continuous temperature data from five relatively undisturbed cold-water streams in western Oregon, U.S.A. In addition to trends for each descriptor, we evaluated similarities among them, as well as patterns of spatial coherence, and temporal synchrony. 3. Using different groups of descriptors, we were able to more fully capture distinct aspects of the full range of variability in thermal regimes across space and time. A subset of descriptors showed both higher coherence and synchrony and, thus, an appropriate level of responsiveness to examine evidence of regional climatic influences on thermal regimes. Most notably, daily minimum values during winter–spring were the most responsive descriptors to potential climatic influences. 4. Overall, thermal regimes in streams we studied showed high frequency and low variability of cold temperatures during the cold-water period in winter and spring, and high frequency and high variability of warm temperatures during the warm-water period in summer and autumn. The cold and warm periods differed in the distribution of events with a higher frequency and longer duration of warm events in summer than cold events in winter. The cold period exhibited lower variability in the duration of events, but showed more variability in timing. 5. In conclusion, our results highlight the importance of a year-round perspective in identifying the most responsive

  20. Thermal and water regime of green roof segments filled with Technosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínková, Vladimíra; Šácha, Jan; Dohnal, Michal; Skala, Vojtěch

    2016-04-01

    Artificial soil systems and structures comprise appreciable part of the urban areas and are considered to be perspective for number of reasons. One of the most important lies in contribution of green roofs and facades to the heat island effect mitigation, air quality improvement, storm water reduction, etc. The aim of the presented study is to evaluate thermal and water regime of the anthropogenic soil systems during the first months of the construction life cycle. Green roof test segments filled with two different anthropogenic soils were built to investigate the benefits of such systems in the temperate climate. Temperature and water balance measurements complemented with meteorological observations and knowledge of physical properties of the soil substrates provided basis for detailed analysis of thermal and hydrological regime. Water balance of green roof segments was calculated for available vegetation seasons and individual rainfall events. On the basis of an analysis of individual rainfall events rainfall-runoff dependency was found for green roof segments. The difference between measured actual evapotranspiration and calculated potential evapotranspiration was discussed on period with contrasting conditions in terms of the moisture stress. Thermal characteristics of soil substrates resulted in highly contrasting diurnal variation of soils temperatures. Green roof systems under study were able to reduce heat load of the roof construction when comparing with a concrete roof construction. Similarly, received rainfall was significantly reduced. The extent of the rainfall reduction mainly depends on soil, vegetation status and experienced weather patterns. The research was realized as a part of the University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings supported by the EU and with financial support from the Czech Science Foundation under project number 14-10455P.

  1. Influence of the seasonal snow cover on the ground thermal regime: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingjun

    2005-12-01

    The presence of seasonal snow cover during the cold season of the annual air temperature cycle has significant influence on the ground thermal regime in cold regions. Snow has high albedo and emissivity that cool the snow surface, high absorptivity that tends to warm the snow surface, low thermal conductivity so that a snow layer acts as an insulator, and high latent heat due to snowmelt that is a heat sink. The overall impact of snow cover on the ground thermal regime depends on the timing, duration, accumulation, and melting processes of seasonal snow cover; density, structure, and thickness of seasonal snow cover; and interactions of snow cover with micrometeorological conditions, local microrelief, vegetation, and the geographical locations. Over different timescales either the cooling or warming impact of seasonal snow cover may dominate. In the continuous permafrost regions, impact of seasonal snow cover can result in an increase of the mean annual ground and permafrost surface temperature by several degrees, whereas in discontinuous and sporadic permafrost regions the absence of seasonal snow cover may be a key factor for permafrost development. In seasonally frozen ground regions, snow cover can substantially reduce the seasonal freezing depth. However, the influence of seasonal snow cover on seasonally frozen ground has received relatively little attention, and further study is needed. Ground surface temperatures, reconstructed from deep borehole temperature gradients, have increased by up to 4°C in the past centuries and have been widely used as evidence of paleoclimate change. However, changes in air temperature alone cannot account for the changes in ground temperatures. Changes in seasonal snow conditions might have significantly contributed to the ground surface temperature increase. The influence of seasonal snow cover on soil temperature, soil freezing and thawing processes, and permafrost has considerable impact on carbon exchange between the

  2. Terrestrial Arctic Amplification Due to Changes in the Eurasian Soil Thermal Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauenfeld, O. W.; Chen, L.; Zhang, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Arctic amplification phenomenon suggests that due to feedbacks largely involving sea ice, increases in surface air temperature in response to greenhouse gas forcing are most pronounced in the Arctic. As the Arctic warms in response to climate change, the summer melt season lengthens and intensifies, leading to less sea ice at the end of summer. Absorption of solar radiation during summer in expanding open water areas increases the heat content of the ocean, delaying ice formation and promoting increased upward heat fluxes. Loss of sea ice thus provides a positive feedback that exacerbates the warming observed in the Arctic. The underlying premise of our study is that much like Arctic amplification due to the loss of sea ice, changes in the amount and distribution of frozen ground in Northern Hemisphere land areas represent a terrestrial analog to Arctic amplification. In response to climate warming we are observing increases in soil temperatures, deepening of the active layer, and talik formation in permafrost regions. This leads to delayed freeze-up of soils, decreased freeze depths in seasonally frozen ground regions, and earlier spring thaw. These changes in the soil thermal regime result in more and more heat storage in soils during the warm season, amplifying the frozen ground changes in high latitudes. The increased heat storage in the soil thermal regime results in a seasonal redistribution of energy, which leads to a substantially increased heat flux from the soil to the atmosphere during the cold season. It is this heat flux that represents our hypothesized feedback. We use monthly historical soil temperature observations at 423 station locations in the Eurasian high latitudes combined with soil properties based on the Harmonized World Soil Database to provide estimates of this soil heat flux. We calculate the temperature gradient based on soil temperature and, for a generalized assessment, first use a constant, estimated thermal conductivity for

  3. Thermal history and evolution of the Rio de Janeiro - Barbacena section of the southeastern Brazilian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri Gezatt, Julia; Stephenson, Randell; Macdonald, David

    2015-04-01

    The transect between the Brazilian cities of Rio de Janeiro and Barbacena (22°54'S, 43°12'W and 21°13'S, 43°46'W, respectively) runs through a segment of a complex range of N-NE/S-SW trending basement units of the Ribeira Belt and southern Sao Francisco Craton, intensely reworked during the Brasiliano-Pan-African orogenic cycle. The ortho- and paragneisses in the area have metamorphic ages between 650 and 540 Ma and are intruded by pre-, syn- and post-tectonic granitic bodies. The transect, perpendicular to the strike direction of the continental margin, crosses the Serra do Mar escarpment, where the sample density is higher in order to better constrain occasional significant age changes. For logistical reasons, the 40 samples collected were processed in two separate batches for apatite fission track (AFT) analysis. The first batch comprised 19 samples, from which 15 produced fission track ages. Analyses were carried out at University College London (UCL), following standard procedures. Preliminary results for the study show AFT ages between 85.9±6.3 and 54.1±4.2 Ma, generally with younger ages close to the coast and progressively older ages towards the continental interior. The highest area sampled, around the city of Teresopolis, ranges from 740 to 1216 m above sea level and shows ages between 85.9±6.3 and 71.3±5.3 Ma. There is no evident lithological or structural distribution control. Medium track length values range from 12.57 to 13.89 µm and distributions are unimodal. Thermal history modelling was done using software QTQt. Individual sample model cooling curves can be divided into two groups: a dominant one, showing a single, slower cooling trend, and a second one with a rapid initial cooling curve, which becomes less steep around 65 Ma. In both groups the maximum paleotemperatures are around 110 Ma. The thermal history model for the first batch of samples is compatible with a single cooling event for the area following continental rifting and

  4. Thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Schubert, Gerald; Eichelberger, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The coupling between thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes, due to temperature-dependent viscosity and dissipation, was investigated using finite element calculations of magma flow in dikelike channels with length-to-width ratios of 1000:1 or more. Solutions of the steady state equations governing magma flow are obtained for a variety of conditions ranging from idealized plane-parallel models to cases involving nonparallel geometry and two-phase flows. The implications of the numerical simulations for the dynamics of flow in a dike-reservoir system and the consequences of dike entrance conditions on magmatic storage are discussed. Consideration is also given to an unmixing/self-lubrication mechanism which may be important for the lubrication of silicic magmas rising to the earth's surface in mixed magma ascent scenarios, which naturally segregates magma mixtures of two components with differing viscosities to minimize the driving pressure gradient.

  5. Thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C. .; Schubert, G.; Eichelberger, J.C. California Univ., Los Angeles Alaska Univ., Fairbanks )

    1992-11-01

    The coupling between thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes, due to temperature-dependent viscosity and dissipation, was investigated using finite element calculations of magma flow in dikelike channels with length-to-width ratios of 1000:1 or more. Solutions of the steady state equations governing magma flow are obtained for a variety of conditions ranging from idealized plane-parallel models to cases involving nonparallel geometry and two-phase flows. The implications of the numerical simulations for the dynamics of flow in a dike-reservoir system and the consequences of dike entrance conditions on magmatic storage are discussed. Consideration is also given to an unmixing/self-lubrication mechanism which may be important for the lubrication of silicic magmas rising to the earth's surface in mixed magma ascent scenarios, which naturally segregates magma mixtures of two components with differing viscosities to minimize the driving pressure gradient. 56 refs.

  6. Sensitivity of rock slope stability in relation to thermal regime - examples from Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhra, K. S.; Etzelmuller, B.; Blikra, L. H.

    2014-12-01

    The steep topography in western and northern parts of Norway includes large unstable rock faces terminating into narrow fjords and lakes. The large number of such unstable faces lists rock slope failures as one of the bigger hazard threats in Norway. Successive studies have revealed presence of permafrost in Norway and a number of the unstable rock slope faces are located in mountain permafrost regions. It is known that thawing permafrost influences the rock-mechanical interplay in the bedrock and can hence play a role in the early stage of destabilization in rock walls. At present, both borehole measurements and several modelling studies for Norwegian mountains clearly indicate increasing ground temperatures during the last decades. As a first step in this study, a numerical study of the sensitivity of permafrost to climatic changes was performed for a number of sites along a latitudinal transect in Norway. Together with the thermal condition, lithology, structure and inclination are important conditions for the force regime in rock walls. In this study, the nature of temperature dependence on rock wall stability has been investigated through numerical modelling and the sensitivity of different factors related to these conditions has been evaluated in terms of stability, including the thermal regime. The focus has been on the initial conditions that are important for typical Norwegian rock wall sites and in particular for the sites where the simulations of the permafrost sensitivity have been performed. The analysis was applied for the Nordnes mountain in northern Norway, which is continuously surveyed due to the possible danger if large rock falls may hit the fjord water body generating tsunamis.

  7. Effect of tidal regime on the thermal tolerance of the marine gastropod Lunella smaragda (Gmelin 1791).

    PubMed

    Mortensen, B J D; Dunphy, B J

    2016-08-01

    The tidal cycle around New Zealand results in spring low tides consistently occurring during the hottest part of the day (mid-afternoon) in north-eastern New Zealand, and during the cooler dawn/dusk periods in the north-west of the country. We hypothesised that due to mid-afternoon spring low tides, intertidal populations residing at north-eastern sites would show greater thermotolerance than their north-west conspecifics. To test this we used the marine gastropod, Lunella smaragda, which were collected from sites on both the East and West coasts of the Auckland region and exposed to an acute heat shock. Thermotolerance was measured as survivorship (LT50), drop down time (time to heat coma) and thermal stability of the anaerobic energy producing enzyme Tauropine dehydrogenase. Furthermore, temperature loggers were deployed at each site so as to record and compare thermal regimes among sites. A strong temperature spike associated with spring low tide was found at all sites, and maximal temperatures of all East coast sites were higher than West coast sites (in some case by up to 10°C). In terms of thermotolerance, mortality of L. smaragda occurred at 42°C leading to 100% mortality at 45°C. However, comparison of LT50 showed snails were equally thermotolerant regardless of site of collection. Similar results were found in TDH thermal stability with animals from all sites showing an approximately 80% decrease in enzyme activity after 10min exposure to 42°C. Whilst drop down times were different among sites these were correlated with animal size as opposed to site of collection. Thus, East coast populations of L. smaragda appear no more thermotolerant than their West coast counterparts. Such a result is concerning as maximal temperatures at East coast sites already exceed the LT50 values of L. smaragda recorded in the lab suggesting these populations have less of a thermal safety margin. PMID:27503732

  8. Vegetation and climate change, fire-regime shifts and volcanic disturbance in Chiloé Continental (43°S) during the last 10,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henríquez, W. I.; Moreno, P. I.; Alloway, B. V.; Villarosa, G.

    2015-09-01

    Disentangling the roles of paleofires and explosive volcanism from climatic drivers of past vegetation change is a subject insufficiently addressed in the paleoecological literature. The coastal region of the Chiloé Continental sector of northwestern Patagonia is ideal in this regard considering its proximity to active eruptive centers and the possibility of establishing comparisons with more distal, upwind sites where volcanic influence is minimal. Here we present a fine-resolution pollen and macroscopic charcoal record from Lago Teo with the aim of documenting the local vegetation and climate history, and assessing the role of disturbance regimes as drivers of vegetation change during the last ˜10,000 years. The Lago Teo record shows a conspicuous warm/dry interval between ˜7500 and 10,000 cal yrs BP followed by a cooling trend and increase in precipitation that has persisted until the present, in agreement with previous studies in the region and interpretations of past southern westerly wind activity at multi-millennial scales. The presence of 26 tephras throughout the record allows examination of the relationship between explosive volcanism and vegetation change under contrasting climatic states of the Holocene. We found consistent statistically significant increases in Tepualia stipularis after tephra deposition over the last 10,000 years, in Eucryphia/Caldcluvia between 7500 and 10,000 cal yrs BP and in Hydrangea over the last 7500 years. Our results indicate a primary role of climate change as driver of long-term vegetation change and as a modulator of vegetation responses to volcanic disturbance at multidecadal and centennial timescales.

  9. Response of stream invertebrates to a global-warming thermal regime: An ecosystem-level manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, I.D.; Williams, D.D.

    1996-03-01

    We manipulated, in accord with global-warming predictions, the thermal regime of a permanent first-order stream near Toronto, Ontario, Canada. We examined the effects of a 2-3.5{degrees}C water-temperature increase on densities, biomass, species composition, and life histories of resident stream invertebrates. The stream was divided longitudinally at the source into two channels, one control and one experimental, and a before and after (BACI) design was employed such that one pre-manipulation year was followed by 2 yr of the temperature manipulation. Changes in the experimental channel following commencement of the manipulation included: (1) decreased total animal densities, particularly Chironomidae (Diptera); (2) earlier onset of adult insect emergence; (3) increased growth rates and precocious breeding in Hyallella azteca (Amphipoda); (4) smaller size at maturity for Nemoura trispinosa (Plecoptera) and H., azteca and (5) altered sex ratios for Lepidostoma vernale (Trichoptera). These results partially corroborate previous laboratory and field studies. However, variation in the responses of individual target species to the manipulation was unexpected and may have been influenced by the genetic structure of local populations. We conclude that levels of gene flow among habitats may be critical to the degree of impact seen as a result of large-scale thermal perturbation (e.g., global warming). 60 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The thermal regime of abandoned channels: a preliminary analysis towards a water temperature model for the Allier River, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, Ana; Peiry, Jean-Luc

    2014-05-01

    The growing recognition of the ecological and water quality significance of river water temperature led to a large number of studies assessing thermal processes in streams and rivers. Yet, thermal processes in abandoned channels, which play an important role in maintaining water quality and biological diversity in fluvial corridors, have received minor attention. This study evaluates water temperature regimes in three abandoned channels of the Allier River, France, and quantifies the regime sensitivity to climatic (air temperature) and hydrological (surface and subsurface flow) influence. Analysis was conducted at annual and daily scales, and at two distinct sections of each abandoned channel: (i) the downstream section, which is well connected to the main stream channel, and (ii) the upstream section, which is poorly connected to the main stream channel and hence subject to greater influence of subsurface flow. Annual and daily water temperature regimes for all channels and sections were classified based on relative differences in the 'shape' (timing) and the 'magnitude' (size) of the thermographs. The climatic and hydrological sensitivity of water temperature regimes was quantified using a Sensitivity Index. Analysis at the annual scale revealed relative similarity in patterns of thermal response over time, with clear differentiation between upstream and downstream channel sections in all sites. Water temperature regimes in the upstream channel sections were strongly linked to subsurface water temperature in terms of both timing and size of the annual thermograph; water temperature regimes in the downstream channel sections were more sensitive to air and river water temperature, especially regarding the timing of the annual regimes. Although annual regimes of water temperature exhibited distinct patterns that were similar across sites and over time, analysis of daily water temperature regimes revealed broad differences within and between sites. Day

  11. Monitoring the Thermal Regime at Hot Creek and Vicinity, Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clor, L. E.; Hurwitz, S.; Howle, J.

    2015-12-01

    Hot Creek Gorge contains the most obvious surface expression of the hydrothermal system in Long Valley Caldera, California, discharging 200-300 L/s of thermal water according to USGS measurements made since 1988. Formerly, Hot Creek was a popular public swimming area, but it was closed in 2006 due to unpredictable temperature fluctuations and sporadic geysering of thermal water within the creek (Farrar et al. USGS Fact Sheet2007-3045). The USGS has monitored the thermal regime in the area since the mid-1980s, including a long-term series of studies 0.6 km away at well CH-10b. Temperature measurements in the ~100 m deep well, which have been performed on an intermittent basis since it was drilled in 1983, reveal a complex temperature profile. Temperatures increase with depth to a maximum at about 45 meters below the ground surface, and then decrease steadily to the bottom of the well. The depth of the temperature maximum in the well (~45 m) corresponds to an elevation of ~2,120 m, roughly equivalent to the elevation of Hot Creek, and appears to sample the same hydrothermal flow system that supplies thermal features at the surface in the gorge. Starting in the early 1990s, the maximum temperature in CH-10b rose from 93.4°C to its peak in 2007 at 101.0°C. A cooling trend was observed beginning in 2009 and continues to present (99.3°C in June 2015). As the input into CH-10b is at the elevation of the creek, it exhibits the potential for response to thermal events at Hot Creek, and could provide a useful tool for monitoring future hazards. On short timescales, CH-10b also responds to large global earthquakes, greater than ~M7. These responses are captured with continuously logged high-frequency data (5s), and are usually characterized by a co-seismic water level drop of up to ten centimeters. Water levels tend to recover to pre-earthquake levels within a few hours to days.

  12. Enhanced thermal radiation in terahertz and far-infrared regime by hot phonon excitation in a field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Pei-Kang; Yen, Shun-Tung

    2014-11-14

    We demonstrate the hot phonon effect on thermal radiation in the terahertz and far-infrared regime. A pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor is used for efficiently exciting hot phonons. Boosting the hot phonon population can enhance the efficiency of thermal radiation. The transistor can yield at least a radiation power of 13 μW and a power conversion efficiency higher than a resistor by more than 20%.

  13. Effects of constant and cyclical thermal regimes on growth and feeding of juvenile cutthroat trout of variable sizes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeuwig, M.H.; Dunham, J.B.; Hayes, J.P.; Vinyard, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of constant (12, 18, and 24 A?C) and cyclical (daily variation of 15a??21 and 12a??24 A?C) thermal regimes on the growth and feeding of Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki henshawi) of variable sizes were examined. Higher constant temperatures (i.e., 24 A?C) and more variable daily temperatures (i.e., 12a??24 A?C daily cycle) negatively affected growth rates. As fish mass increased (from 0.24 to 15.52 g) the effects of different thermal regimes on mass growth became more pronounced. Following 14 days exposure to the thermal regimes, feeding rates of individual fish were assessed during acute exposure (40 min) to test temperatures of 12, 18, and 24 A?C. Feeding rate was depressed during acute exposure to 24 A?C, but was not significantly affected by the preceding thermal regime. Our results indicate that even brief daily exposure to higher temperatures (e.g., 24 A?C) can have considerable sublethal effects on cutthroat trout, and that fish size should be considered when examining the effects of temperature.

  14. Soil thermal regime and geomorphogenesis at Fuentes Carrionas massif (Cantabrian Range, NW Iberian Peninsula).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellitero, Ramon; Serrano Cañadas, Enrique

    2015-04-01

    Fuentes Carrionas is a massif within the Cantabrian Range, in NW Iberian Peninsula. Its altitude ranges between 1400 and 2500 meters and its climate is an oceanic/Mediterranean transition one, with cold temperatures and heavy snowfall in the winter/early spring season, and a warm and dry summer season. Due to its outstanding altitude and lithological variety in the Cantabrian Range context, Fuentes Carrionas holds some periglacial activity (gelifluction, frost shattering) which is absent elsewhere in NW Iberian Peninsula. This work is relates the soil thermal regime across the mountain gradient to landforms formation. 14 thermometers (11 i-button, protected in a plastic can, and three UTL data loggers) were buried at a shallow depth (10 cm.) between autumn 2009 and summer 2012. 12 thermometers were placed between 1900 and 2400 m.a.s.l. at 250 meters altitude interval at the four main aspects. Two additional thermometers were place in the Curavacas N face for permafrost identification. Thermometers were calibrated to yield a measurement every 6 hours starting from 8 AM during one year's time. Data was collected annually in the summer season. Some additional soil temperature data was obtained from an external project in the same area for the 2007-2009 interval. In this case thermometers were "Hobbo" model, and they were also buried to a shallow depth. Results show a permafrost free mountain range. Annual average soil temperatures range between 1 and 8 degrees Celsius. Snow pack appears as a decisive factor in winter temperatures, as the zero curtain effect can be tracked in many cases. Snow cover patterns show a distinctive behavior between S and N aspects, with a 3 months snow cover on the southern faces and between 6 and 9 at the northern analogues. This cover has a relevant impact on geomorphological processes. There is a clear relation between spring snow melt and solifluction or channelized erosion. Also, snow cover prevents the occurrence of freeze/thaw cycles

  15. Active layer thermal regime at different vegetation covers at Lions Rump, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Ivan C. C.; Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto G. R.; Fernandes, Raphael B. A.; Pereira, Thiago T. C.; Nieuwendam, Alexandre; Pereira, Antônio Batista

    2014-11-01

    Climate change impacts the biotic and abiotic components of polar ecosystems, affecting the stability of permafrost, active layer thickness, vegetation, and soil. This paper describes the active layer thermal regimes of two adjacent shallow boreholes, under the same soil but with two different vegetations. The study is location in Lions Rump, at King George Island, Maritime Antarctic, one of the most sensitive regions to climate change, located near the climatic limit of Antarctic permafrost. Both sites are a Turbic Cambic Cryosol formed on andesitic basalt, one under moss vegetation (Andreaea gainii, at 85 m a.s.l.) and another under lichen (Usnea sp., at 86 m a.s.l.), located 10 m apart. Ground temperature at same depths (10, 30 and 80 cm), water content at 80 cm depth and air temperature were recorded hourly between March 2009 and February 2011. The two sites showed significant differences in mean annual ground temperature for all depths. The lichen site showed a higher soil temperature amplitude compared to the moss site, with ground surface (10 cm) showing the highest daily temperature in January 2011 (7.3 °C) and the lowest daily temperature in August (- 16.5 °C). The soil temperature at the lichen site closely followed the air temperature trend. The moss site showed a higher water content at the bottommost layer, consistent with the water-saturated, low landscape position. The observed thermal buffering effect under mosses is primarily associated with higher moisture onsite, but a longer duration of the snowpack (not monitored) may also have influenced the results. Active layer thickness was approximately 150 cm at low-lying moss site, and 120 cm at well-drained lichen site. This allows to classify these soils as Cryosols (WRB) or Gelisols (Soil Taxonomy), with evident turbic features.

  16. Importance of soil thermal regime in terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the circumpolar north

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yueyang; Zhuang, Qianlai; Sitch, Stephen; O'Donnell, Jonathan A.; Kicklighter, David; Sokolov, Andrei; Melillo, Jerry

    2016-07-01

    In the circumpolar north (45-90°N), permafrost plays an important role in vegetation and carbon (C) dynamics. Permafrost thawing has been accelerated by the warming climate and exerts a positive feedback to climate through increasing soil C release to the atmosphere. To evaluate the influence of permafrost on C dynamics, changes in soil temperature profiles should be considered in global C models. This study incorporates a sophisticated soil thermal model (STM) into a dynamic global vegetation model (LPJ-DGVM) to improve simulations of changes in soil temperature profiles from the ground surface to 3 m depth, and its impacts on C pools and fluxes during the 20th and 21st centuries. With cooler simulated soil temperatures during the summer, LPJ-STM estimates ~ 0.4 Pg C yr- 1 lower present-day heterotrophic respiration but ~ 0.5 Pg C yr- 1 higher net primary production than the original LPJ model resulting in an additional 0.8 to 1.0 Pg C yr- 1 being sequestered in circumpolar ecosystems. Under a suite of projected warming scenarios, we show that the increasing active layer thickness results in the mobilization of permafrost C, which contributes to a more rapid increase in heterotrophic respiration in LPJ-STM compared to the stand-alone LPJ model. Except under the extreme warming conditions, increases in plant production due to warming and rising CO2, overwhelm the e nhanced ecosystem respiration so that both boreal forest and arctic tundra ecosystems remain a net C sink over the 21st century. This study highlights the importance of considering changes in the soil thermal regime when quantifying the C budget in the circumpolar north.

  17. Regional warming and the thermal regimes of American crocodile nests in the Tempisque Basin, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christopher M; Easter, Michael; Padilla, Sergio; Marin, Mahmood Sasa; Guyer, Craig

    2016-08-01

    Spatial variation in global climate change makes population-specific responses to this enigmatic threat pertinent on a regional scale. Organisms with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) potentially possess a unique physiological susceptibility that threatens population viability if rapid environmental effects on sex ratios render populations non-viable. A heavily male-biased sex ratio for hatchling American crocodiles of the Tempisque Basin, Costa Rica requires assessment of how nest temperature affects sex determination at this site, how females might compensate for these effects when creating nests, and how current patterns of climate change might alter future sex ratios and survival in hatchling cohorts. We demonstrate high within-nest variation in temperature but predict a female bias at hatching based on nest temperatures quantified here. Further, our data suggest that egg size and metabolic heating associated with this factor outweighs microhabitat parameters and depth in influencing nest thermal regimes. Finally, we document regional warming in the Tempisque Basin over the last 15 years and project that further heating over the next 15 years will not yield hatchling sex ratios as male biased as those currently found at this site. Thus, we find no support for nest temperature or climate change as likely explanations for male-biased American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) sex ratios in the Tempisque Basin. PMID:27503716

  18. Thermal regime of active layer at two lithologically contrasting sites on James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrbáček, Filip; Nývlt, Daniel; Láska, Kamil

    2016-04-01

    Antarctic Peninsula region (AP) represents one of the most rapidly warming parts of our planet in the last 50 years. Despite increasing research activities along both western and eastern sides of AP in last decades, there is still a lot of gaps in our knowledge relating to permafrost, active layer and its thermal and physical properties. This study brings new results of active layer monitoring on James Ross Island, which is the largest island in northern AP. Its northern part, Ulu Peninsula, is the largest ice-free area (more than 200 km2) in the region. Due its large area, we focused this study on sites located in different lithologies, which would affect local thermal regime of active layer. Study site (1) at Abernethy Flats area (41 m a.s.l.) lies ~7 km from northern coast. Lithologically is formed by disintegrated Cretaceous calcareous sandstones and siltstones of the Santa Marta Formation. Study site (2) is located at the northern slopes of Berry Hill (56 m a.s.l.), about 0.4 km from northern coastline. Lithology is composed of muddy to intermediate diamictites, tuffaceous siltstones to fine grained sandstones of the Mendel Formation. Data of air temperature at 2 meters above ground and the active layer temperatures at 75 cm deep profiles were obtained from both sites in period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014. Small differences were found when comparing mean air temperatures and active temperatures at 5 and 75 cm depth in the period 2012-2014. While the mean air temperatures varied between -7.7 °C and -7.0 °C, the mean ground temperatures fluctuated between -6.6 °C and -6.1 °C at 5 cm and -6.9 °C and -6.0 °C at 75 cm at Abernethy Flats and Berry Hill slopes respectively. Even though ground temperature differences along the profiles weren't pronounced during thawing seasons, the maximum active layer thickness was significantly larger at Berry Hill slopes (80 to 82 cm) than at Abernethy Flats (52 to 64 cm). We assume this differences are affected by

  19. Subsurface hydro-thermal regime and the atmospheric hydroclimate by a climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, K.

    2009-04-01

    experiments were run for 20 years, forced by the climatological sea surface temperature and sea ice concentrations derived from the 1981-2000 period, after 150-year spin-up for the subsurface regime. The last 9 years were taken for the analysis. Different complexity of the subsurface hydro-thermal physics simulated different near-surface thermal states and seasonality. The refined physics showed warmer summer and cooler winter. The difference was most apparent in high latitudes; surface air temperature increased about 2°C in summer (zonal average, only over land), and decreased by about 5°C in winter. The improved physics and the presence of the top organic layer kept more ground ice during the warmer seasons. The total amount of soil moisture (i.e. soil wetness), however, did not change by the change of the physics. This helped mitigating the unrealistically fast and large flux of heat within the ground and at the interface between the atmosphere and the land surface, and fed back to the change in the subsurface thermal regime (e.g., active layer depth, or length of ground freezing), and affected the seasonality. It also led to improvement of the cumulative temperature indices for the atmospheric forcing in the warm and cold season (e.g. Thaw and Freezing Index). . The difference in the near-surface thermal state in high latitudes also affected snow accumulation in winter,earlier and larger for the finer physics, although precipitation did not vary largely except in the lower latitudes, at the southern flank of the Tibetan Plateau, where large precipitation differences were found during the summer monsoonal period, leading to a contrast between wetter Tibetan Plateau and drier coastal China. Land-average total annual runoff did not vary greatly between integrations at all latitudes; however, its seasonal distribution showed large difference. During the melting season, high-latitude runoff was greater for the finer physics due to shallower active layer, whereas it was

  20. Thermal regimes in bedrock and open fractures in the Nordnes rockslide, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvidtfeldt Christiansen, Hanne; Harald Blikra, Lars

    2010-05-01

    The Nordnes rockslide site is located in the arctic part of the periglacial mountain landscape of Northern Norway at 69°30'N. It consists in the upper part of 1-10 m wide and 1-10 m deep open fractures. Extensive displacements measurements using GPS surveys, crackmeters, tiltmeter and lasers establish the intermunicipality monitoring programme, which shows ongoing deformation of the rockslide. In the rather special topographical setting of the open fractures we have during the International Polar Year 2007 to 2009 recorded the thermal regime of the upper part of the bedrock and of the air in the cracks for attempting to determine whether the recorded deformation can be geomorphologically controlled by bedrock surface expansion and contraction and/or by seasonal freezing or even by permafrost, or if only normal gravitational processes control the observed displacements. The upper 40 cm bedrock thermal conditions have been investigated in different exposures to identify the seasonal freezing depth and length, for determination of the influence of potential ice segregation processes causing weathering of the bedrock surfaces. The data show generally that that the bedrock surface is in the -3 to -8C freezing window for 3 to 6 months. Likewise 250 cm deep bedrock thermal monitoring have been carried out in three boreholes during one year at 900 m, 800 m and 625 m asl. extending over the area from the upper part of the unstable area and into the stable area above, for determination of the regional permafrost zone. These results in combination with thermal evidence from other deeper boreholes from the same setting in the same region show that seasonal freezing extends 5-10 m down, and that a potential active layer also is in the order of 5-10 m deep. The air temperatures in the cracks show significant cooling during winter, when the cracks have a thick snow cover, thus demonstrating the potential existence of permafrost in deeper part of the cracks and in the ground just

  1. Active layer thermal monitoring of a Dry Valley of the Ellsworth Mountains, Continental Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto; Michel, Roberto; Souza, Karoline; Senra, Eduardo; Bremer, Ulisses

    2015-04-01

    daily average in late December 2012, reaching a minimum in mid July 2013 on P1 (10.9 °C, -37.9 °C, ± 11.1) and P2 (6.9 °C, -37.1 °C, ± 10.2). The active layer thickness reaches a maximum of 48.4 cm at P1 on January 17th 2013 and 47.8 cm at P2 on January 7th 2012. No ID were recorded for the studied period, one TD was recorded at 5 cm on P2, 143 FTD were recorded at 5 cm, 81 at 10 cm and 46 days at 30 cm on P1, on P2 118 FTD were recorded at 5 cm, 80 at 10 cm and 42 days at 30 cm. The majority of the days were classified as FD for both sites; 585 at 5 cm, 647 at 10 cm and 684 days at 30 cm on P1, on P2 611 FD were recorded at 5 cm, 650 at 10 cm and 688 days at 30 cm. Only 17 FTD were recorded for the air temperature and 713 FD. Over the 728 days of the studied period the sum of all positive daily average temperatures was 166.3 TDD at 5 cm and 23.8 TDD at 10 cm on P1, 45.0 TDD at 5 cm and 5.2 TDD at 10 cm on P2. No positive daily average was recorded at 30 cm for both sites. The sum of all negative daily average temperatures was -13504.5 FDD at 5 cm, -13389.9 FDD at 10 cm and -13381.0 FDD at 30 cm on P1, -13508.0 FDD at 5 cm, -13486.6 FDD at 10 cm and -13398.9 FDD at 30 cm on P2. Only 0.28 TDD were summed for the air temperature and -14430.7 FDD. The soil thermal regime at the dry valley of Edson Hill, Ellsworth Mountains is characteristic of polar desert affected by Dry-frozen permafrost. Although air temperature does not reach high positive values, variations in soil temperature are more intense during the year, showing the soil's response to solar radiation.

  2. Thermal regime of dune-covered sediments under gaining and losing water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani; Wilson, John L.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the effects of current-bed form induced flow and heat transport through permeable-bottom sediments overlain by a marine or terrestrial water column that is gaining or losing deep groundwater. Heat transport is forced by the diel variation of temperature in the water column. The investigation utilizes sequentially coupled simulations of turbulent flow in the water column, and Darcy flow and heat transport in the sediments. The simulations address the question when, where, and by how much are diel water column temperature variations transmitted into sediments subjected to ambient-groundwater discharge? This is crucial information for detecting, observing, and predicting temperature-sensitive biogeochemical and ecological processes in the bottom sediments. When the groundwater gain or loss is small, it has no appreciable effect on temperatures in the sediments, which are controlled by heat conduction and current-bed form induced heat advection. As losing discharge increases, the temperature signal from the water column penetrates deeper into the sediments, with the largest temperature variations found under a downwelling zone along the stoss side of the bed form and damped temperature variations found near a narrow upwelling zone below the crest. Similar patterns are observed under gaining conditions, but with temperature variations penetrating to shallower depths; the interfacial exchange zone is diminished by upward movement of deep groundwater. Large gains or losses of deep groundwater prevent the formation of an interfacial exchange zone making heat transport almost vertically one-dimensional. The sensitivity of the sediment-thermal regime to hydrodynamic conditions increases with increasing water column current (Reynolds number) and with sediment permeability.

  3. Fluid Origins, Thermal Regimes, and Fluid and Solute Fluxes in the Forearc of Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, M.; Solomon, E. A.; Harris, R. N.; Torres, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    An in-depth analysis and synthesis of published and newly acquired data on the chemical and isotopic composition of forearc fluids, fluid fluxes, and the associated thermal regimes in five well-studied, representative erosional and accretionary subduction zone (SZ) forearcs will be presented. Evidence of large-scale fluid flow, primarily focused along faults, is manifested by widespread seafloor venting, associated biological communities, authigenic carbonate formation, chemical and isotopic anomalies in pore-fluid depth-profiles, and thermal anomalies. The nature of fluid venting seems to differ at the two types of SZs. At both, fluid and gas venting sites are primarily associated with faults. At accretionary SZs, the décollement and underthrust coarser-grained stratigraphic horizons are the main fluid conduits, whereas at non-accreting and erosive margins, the fluids from compaction and dehydration reactions are to a great extent partitioned between the décollement and focused conduits through the prism. The measured fluid output fluxes at seeps are high, ~15-40 times the amount that can be produced through local steady-state compaction, suggesting additional fluid sources or non-steady-state fluid flow must be involved. Recirculation of seawater must be an important component of the overall forearc output fluid flux. The most significant chemical and isotopic characteristics of the expelled fluids relative to seawater are: Cl dilution, sulfate, Ca and Mg depletions, and enrichments in Li, B, Si, Sr, alkalinity, and hydrocarbon concentrations; they often have distinctive δ18O, δD, δ7Li, δ11B, and δ37Cl values, and variable Sr isotope ratios. These characteristics provide key insights on the source of the fluid and the temperature at the source. Using our best fluid output flux estimate and considering an ocean volume of 1340 × 106 km3, the global ocean residence time in SZs is ~100 Myr. This value is five times faster than previous estimates for SZs and

  4. Modeling the spatio-temporal variability in subsurface thermal regimes across a low-relief polygonal tundra landscape: Modeling Archive

    DOE Data Explorer

    Peter E. Thornton; Jitendra Kumar; Colleen M. Iversen; Richard T. Mills; Gautam Bisht; Nathan Collier; Vladimir Romanovsky

    2016-01-27

    This Modeling Archive is in support of an NGEE Arctic discussion paper under review and available at http://www.the-cryosphere-discuss.net/tc-2016-29/. Vast carbon stocks stored in permafrost soils of Arctic tundra are under risk of release to atmosphere under warming climate. Ice--wedge polygons in the low-gradient polygonal tundra create a complex mosaic of microtopographic features. The microtopography plays a critical role in regulating the fine scale variability in thermal and hydrological regimes in the polygonal tundra landscape underlain by continuous permafrost. Modeling of thermal regimes of this sensitive ecosystem is essential for understanding the landscape behaviour under current as well as changing climate. We present here an end-to-end effort for high resolution numerical modeling of thermal hydrology at real-world field sites, utilizing the best available data to characterize and parameterize the models. We develop approaches to model the thermal hydrology of polygonal tundra and apply them at four study sites at Barrow, Alaska spanning across low to transitional to high-centered polygon and representative of broad polygonal tundra landscape. A multi--phase subsurface thermal hydrology model (PFLOTRAN) was developed and applied to study the thermal regimes at four sites. Using high resolution LiDAR DEM, microtopographic features of the landscape were characterized and represented in the high resolution model mesh. Best available soil data from field observations and literature was utilized to represent the complex hetogeneous subsurface in the numerical model. This data collection provides the complete set of input files, forcing data sets and computational meshes for simulations using PFLOTRAN for four sites at Barrow Environmental Observatory. It also document the complete computational workflow for this modeling study to allow verification, reproducibility and follow up studies.

  5. CSDP: The seismology of continental thermal regimes: Final report for period April 1, 1986-April 1, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1987-07-01

    This report describes progress in the study of both wave propagation in complex structures and source mechanism of geothermal seismic events. The following work was accomplished in the past one-year period: (1) interpretation of long-period events observed at Mt. St. Helens and at the Fenton Hill hot-dry-rock experimental site in terms of seismic radiation from a fluid-filled crack; (2) interpretation of teleseismic data collected in and near the Valles caldera in terms of a model with irregular topography, caldera fill, and magma chamber; (3) interpretation of VSP (Vertical Seismic Profiling) data from the Oroville fault zone by ray tracing and polarization calculation for P, SV, and SH waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media containing aligned fluid-filled and/or dry cracks; and (4) development of a new powerful method for calculating seismic motions in media with irregular topography and interfaces by the superposition of Gaussian Beams.

  6. Caldera processes and magma-hydrothermal systems continental scientific drilling program: thermal regimes, Valles caldera research, scientific and management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L.

    1986-05-01

    Long-range core-drilling operations and initial scientific investigations are described for four sites in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The plan concentrates on the period 1986 to 1993 and has six primary objectives: (1) study the origin, evolution, physical/chemical dynamics of the vapor-dominated portion of the Valles geothermal system; (2) investigate the characteristics of caldera fill and mechanisms of caldera collapse and resurgence; (3) determine the physical/chemical conditions in the heat transfer zone between crystallizing plutons and the hydrothermal system; (4) study the mechanism of ore deposition in the caldera environment; (5) develop and test high-temperature drilling techniques and logging tools; and (6) evaluate the geothermal resource within a large silicic caldera. Core holes VC-2a (500 m) and VC-2b (2000 m) are planned in the Sulphur Springs area; these core holes will probe the vapor-dominated zone, the underlying hot-water-dominated zone, the boiling interface and probable ore deposition between the two zones, and the deep structure and stratigraphy along the western part of the Valles caldera fracture zone and resurgent dome. Core hole VC-3 will involve reopening existing well Baca number12 and deepening it from 3.2 km (present total depth) to 5.5 km, this core hole will penetrate the deep-crystallized silicic pluton, investigate conductive heat transfer in that zone, and study the evolution of the central resurgent dome. Core hole VC-4 is designed to penetrate deep into the presumably thick caldera fill in eastern Valles caldera and examine the relationship between caldera formation, sedimentation, tectonics, and volcanism. Core hole VC-5 is to test structure, stratigraphy, and magmatic evolution of pre-Valles caldera rocks, their relations to Valles caldera, and the influences of regional structure on volcanism and caldera formation.

  7. The dynamics of thermal regime changes of a local working zone in conditions of its heating by gas infrared radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nee, A.

    2015-10-01

    Mathematical modeling of unsteady heat transfer in a closed rectangular area with a local heat supply object in a conjugate formulation in working conditions of radiation source of energy is passed. Fields of temperatures and stream functions, illustrating the influence of a local typical object on thermal regime are received. The effect of Grashof number on dimensionless heat transfer coefficient - Nusselt number is investigated. The influence of nonconducted heat supply object on heat transfer rate in solution domain is showed.

  8. Thermal habitat constraints on zooplankton species associated with Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) on the US Northeast Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, Kevin D.; Kane, Joe; Hare, Jonathan A.; Lough, R. Gregory; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Nye, Janet A.

    2013-09-01

    The US Northeast Continental Shelf is experiencing a period of increasing temperature levels and range, which impacts the quantity of thermal habitats within the ecosystem. With increasing temperatures, the amount of warmer, surface water thermal habitats (16-27 °C) has increased while there has been a reciprocal decline in cooler water habitats (5-15 °C). These cooler water habitats are the most abundant and comprise the core habitats of the ecosystem. The coldest thermal habitats (1-4 °C), however, have increased slightly in amount or have remained constant, reflecting a discontinuity in the progression of warming along a latitudinal gradient. This discontinuity may be the result of recent changes in the circulation of water masses in the northern Gulf of Maine, potentially associated with the Labrador Current. The contraction of core thermal habitats appears to have had biological consequences on multiple trophic levels. In particular, two zooplankton species associated with the larval feeding of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, have declined in abundance in the same areas where cod populations have exhibited continually poor recruitment. The zooplankton species group Pseudocalanus spp., which is associated with winter-spawning cod, has declined on Georges Bank and in the Eastern Gulf of Maine. The zooplankton Centropages typicus has declined in the Gulf of Maine during late summer into fall, potentially affecting spring-spawning cod in that area. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that portions of the population complex of cod have lower reproductive output due to changes in zooplankton abundance, which we associate with the distribution of temperatures within the ecosystem.

  9. Thermal regime of soils in the atlantic high mountain. The central massiff of Picos de Europa (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisabarro, Alfonso; Serrano, Enrique; José González Trueba, Juan; Pellitero, Ramón

    2015-04-01

    The study of ground thermal regime has got large interest because determine significant geomorphological processes, particularly in the high mountain where do not exist vegetal cover on the ground. Picos de Europa massifs is located in the North of the Iberian Peninsula (43°18'to 43°7'N and 5°7' to 4°36'W, Spain). It is a wet and temperate high mountain environment characterized by the presence of calcareous rock, featured by karst processes and Pleistocene glaciers. The aim of this work is analyse the thermal behavior of ground along the year at different altitudes and know limits of ice presence on the ground to differentiate stages without ice, with seasonal ice or potential permafrost. Temperature data were obtained by 12 thermal micro sensors I-Bottom and UTL-Geotest AG data-logger with centesimal accuracy undertaken to 5-10 cm depth. Micro sensors distribution vary between 1110 and 2535 m a.s.l. exploiting the sites with best topoclimatic terms in order to obtain the coldest records like ancient glaciers. The period of recordings was 2003-2007. It was enough to obtain parameters like annual ground medium temperatures, freeze and thaw cycles, freeze index or number of months with temperatures below zero. Thermal phases on the ground have been obtained. The thermal regime varies according topoclimatic conditions in the sites above cryonival stage (above 1800 m a.s.l.). It was possible to determinate four phases; highest temperatures, autumn change, winter isotherm and melt. The winter isotherm is the longest phase (6-10 months) due to the intense snowfall. During this period do not exist thermal daily amplitude and the minimum and maximum temperatures are similar; always into the interval (-0.1°C to 0°C). However there are sites where the cold is enough to break the wintry isotherm during several days with records around -6°C. The days with freeze and thaw cycles are scarce and concentrated in autumn during periods without snow cover. Results show that

  10. Third-order correlation function and ghost imaging of chaotic thermal light in the photon counting regime

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yu; Simon, Jason; Liu Jianbin; Shih, Yanhua

    2010-04-15

    In a near-field three-photon correlation measurement, we observed the third-order temporal and spatial correlation functions of chaotic thermal light in the single-photon counting regime. In the study, we found that the probability of jointly detecting three randomly radiated photons from a chaotic thermal source by three individual detectors is 6 times greater if the photodetection events fall in the coherence time and coherence area of the radiation field than if they do not. From the viewpoint of quantum mechanics, the observed phenomenon is the result of three-photon interference. By making use of this property, we measured the three-photon thermal light lensless ghost image of a double spot and achieved higher visibility compared with the two-photon thermal light ghost image.

  11. Kinematic and thermal evolution of the Moroccan rifted continental margin: Doukkala-High Atlas transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouiza, M.; Bertotti, G.; Hafid, M.; Cloetingh, S.

    2010-10-01

    The Atlantic passive margin of Morocco developed during Mesozoic times in association with the opening of the Central Atlantic and the Alpine Tethys. Extensional basins formed along the future continental margin and in the Atlas rift system. In Alpine times, this system was inverted to form the High and Middle Atlas fold-and-thrust belts. To provide a quantitative kinematic analysis of the evolution of the rifted margin, we present a crustal section crossing the Atlantic margin in the region of the Doukkala Basin, the Meseta and the Atlas system. We construct a post-rift upper crustal section compensating for Tertiary to present vertical movements and horizontal deformations, and we conduct numerical modeling to test quantitative relations between amounts and distribution of thinning and related vertical movements. Rifting along the transect began in the Late Triassic and ended with the appearance of oceanic crust at 175 Ma. Subsidence, possibly related to crustal thinning, continued in the Atlas rift in the Middle Jurassic. The numerical models confirm that the margin experienced a polyphase rifting history. The lithosphere along the transect preserved some strength throughout rifting with the Effective Elastic Thickness corresponding to an isotherm of 450°C. A mid-crustal level of necking of 15 km characterized the pre-rift lithosphere.

  12. Mapping evapotranspiration and drought at local to continental scales using thermal remote sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water lost to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration (ET) has the effect of cooling the Earth’s surface. Land-surface temperature (LST), as mapped using thermal-infrared (TIR) band data, is therefore a valuable remote indicator of both ET and the surface moisture status [1]. In partially vegeta...

  13. Thermal Regime and Meteorological Parameters Monitoring in Alpine Permafrost Rockwalls: the Aiguille du Midi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra di Cella, U.; Cremonese, E.; Deline, P.; Gruber, S.; Pogliotti, P.; Ravanel, L.

    2009-04-01

    During the last decades the alpine region has revealed to be extremely sensitive to ongoing increasing temperatures and permafrost has been identified as one of six cryospheric indicators of global climate change. In high-mountain regions the permafrost evidences are scarse and punctual, while its occurrence is wide and its distribution is mainly controlled by complex topography and ground cover condition. In such environment, steep bedrock slopes are abundant and contain a significant proportion of permafrost whose thermal response is very fast compared to permafrost in gentle morphology because of its less amount of ice content. Due to logistical problems like accessibility, costs, weather conditions, etc..., monitoring sites in such environments are few, while an increase of measurements of rockwall temperature and system energy balance is fundamental for the calibration and validation of both physical and statistical permafrost models. Started in the framework of the French-Italian project PERMAdataROC (www.fondazionemontagnasicura.org/multimedia/permadataroc/) and presently developped within the EU co-funded project PermaNET (www.permanet-alpinespace.eu), several monitoring sites have been equipped during the last years in the Western Alps from a collaboration of Swiss, French and Italian researchers, with the aim to cover the widest range of climatic, topographic, morphological and geological conditions. In such network, the Aiguille du Midì can be considered one of the most advanced site in high-mountain permafrost research thanks to the convergence of several instrumental approaches, but also a "cooperation laboratory" among different research groups. The site has been choosen because of its elevation, aspects variability, steep slopes and accessibility all over the year. In details, ARPA Valle d'Aosta in collaboration with University of Zurich started in 2006 the monitoring of rockwall thermal regimes and of some meteorological parameters on the different

  14. Yellowstone National Park as an opportunity for deep continental drilling in thermal regions. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, R.O.

    1983-03-01

    The Yellowstone caldera represnets the most intense magnatic and thermal anomaly within the conterminous United States. Voluminous rhyolite ash flows, accompanied by formation of huge calderas, occurred approximately 2.0, 1.3, and 0.6 My B.P. Although the last lava flow was about 70,000 B.P., much evidence suggests that magma may still be present at relatively shallow depth. The evidence from gravity and magnetic lows, magnetotelluric soundings, seismic wave velocities, maximum depths of earthquake foci, significant recent uplift of the caldera floor, and exceptionally high heat flux suggest that magmatic temperatures may be attained 5 to 10 km beneath much of the caldera. Most of the hot-spring and geyser activity occurs within the caldera and along a fault zone that trends north from the caldera rim through Norris Geyser Basin and Mammoth Hot Springs. The thermal waters and gases have been extensively sampled and analyzed over a period of 100 years. The chemical, isotopic, and hydrologic data obtained from natural discharges and from shallow wells drilled in thermal areas, enable formulation of models of the hydrothermal system. No previous intermediate-depth drilling has been conducted at Yellowstone to help select the best location for a deep drill hole, and because Yellowstone is a National Park, no commercial drilling will be available for add-on experiments. Also, a deep drill hole in Yellowstone would have to be sited with great regard to environmental and ecological considerations. Nevertheless, the large amount of existing data is sufficient to formulate testable models. The Yellowstone thermal anomaly is so extensive and scientifically interesting that almost any suitable drilling site there may be superior to the best drilling site in any other silicic caldera complex in the United States.

  15. Adaptation to local thermal regimes by crustose coralline algae does not affect rates of recruitment in coral larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siboni, Nachshon; Abrego, David; Evenhuis, Christian; Logan, Murray; Motti, Cherie A.

    2015-12-01

    Crustose coralline algae (CCA) are well known for their ability to induce settlement in coral larvae. While their wide distribution spans reefs that differ substantially in temperature regimes, the extent of local adaptation to these regimes and the impact they have on CCA inductive ability are unknown. CCA Porolithon onkodes from Heron (southern) and Lizard (northern) islands on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (separated by 1181 km) were experimentally exposed to acute or prolonged thermal stress events and their thermal tolerance and recruitment capacity determined. A sudden onset bleaching model was developed to determine the health status of CCA based on the rate of change in the CCA live surface area (LSA). The interaction between location and temperature was significant ( F (2,119) = 6.74, p = 0.0017), indicating that thermally driven local adaptation had occurred. The southern population remained healthy after prolonged exposure to 28 °C and exhibited growth compared to the northern population ( p = 0.022), with its optimum temperature determined to be slightly below 28 °C. As expected, at the higher temperatures (30 and 32 °C) the Lizard Island population performed better that those from Heron Island, with an optimum temperature of 30 °C. Lizard Island CCA displayed the lowest bleaching rates at 30 °C, while levels consistently increased with temperature in their southern counterparts. The ability of those CCA deemed thermally tolerant (based on LSA) to induce Acropora millepora larval settlement was then assessed. While spatial differences influenced the health and bleaching levels of P. onkodes during prolonged and acute thermal exposure, thermally tolerant fragments, regardless of location, induced similar rates of coral larval settlement. This confirmed that recent thermal history does not influence the ability of CCA to induce settlement of A. millepora larvae.

  16. Estimation of lifespan and economy parameters of steam-turbine power units in thermal power plants using varying regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Shkret, A. F.; Garievskii, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    The use of potent power units in thermal and nuclear power plants in order to regulate the loads results in intense wear of power generating equipment and reduction in cost efficiency of their operation. We review the methodology of a quantitative assessment of the lifespan and wear of steam-turbine power units and estimate the effect of various operation regimes upon their efficiency. To assess the power units' equipment wear, we suggest using the concept of a turbine's equivalent lifespan. We give calculation formulae and an example of calculation of the lifespan of a steam-turbine power unit for supercritical parameters of steam for different options of its loading. The equivalent lifespan exceeds the turbine's assigned lifespan only provided daily shutdown of the power unit during the night off-peak time. We obtained the engineering and economical indices of the power unit operation for different loading regulation options in daily and weekly diagrams. We proved the change in the prime cost of electric power depending on the operation regimes and annual daily number of unloading (non-use) of the power unit's installed capacity. According to the calculation results, the prime cost of electric power for the assumed initial data varies from 11.3 cents/(kW h) in the basic regime of power unit operation (with an equivalent operation time of 166700 hours) to 15.5 cents/(kW h) in the regime with night and holiday shutdowns. The reduction of using the installed capacity of power unit at varying regimes from 3.5 to 11.9 hours per day can increase the prime cost of energy from 4.2 to 37.4%. Furthermore, repair and maintenance costs grow by 4.5% and by 3 times, respectively, in comparison with the basic regime. These results indicate the need to create special maneuverable equipment for working in the varying section of the electric load diagram.

  17. Conductive heat flux in VC-1 and the thermal regime of Valles Caldera, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, J. H.; Morgan, Paul

    1988-06-01

    Over 5% of heat in the western United States is lost through Quaternary silicic volcanic centers, including the Valles caldera in north central New Mexico. These centers are the sites of major hydrothermal activity and upper crustal metamorphism, metasomatism, and mineralization, producing associated geothermal resources. We present new heat flow data from Valles caldera core hole 1 (VC-1), drilled in the southwestern margin of the Valles caldera. Thermal conductivities were measured on 55 segments of core from VC-1, waxed and wrapped to preserve fluids. These values were combined with temperature gradient data to calculate heat flow. Above 335 m, which is probably unsaturated, heat flow is 247±16 mW m-2. The only deep temperature information available is from an uncalibrated commercial log made 19 months after drilling. Gradients, derived from uncalibrated temperature logs, and conductivities are inversely correlated between 335 and 737 m, indicating a conductive thermal regime, and component heat fluxes over three depth intervals (335-539 m, 549-628 m, and 628-737 m) are in excellent agreement with each other with an average of 504±15 mW m-2. Temperature logs to 518 m depth with well-calibrated temperature sensors result in a revised heat flow of 463±15 mW m. We use shallow thermal gradient data from 75 other sites in and around the caldera to interpret the thermal regime at the VC-1 site. A critical review of published thermal conductivity data from the Valles caldera yields an average thermal conductivity of ≥1 W m-1 K-1 for the near-surface tuffaceous material, and we assume that shallow gradient values (°C km-1) are approximately numerically equal to heat flow (mW m-2). Heat loss from the caldera is asymmetrically distributed, with higher values (400 mW m-2 or higher) concentrated in the west-southwestern quadrant of the caldera. This quadrant also contains the main drainage from the caldera and the youngest volcanism associated with the caldera. We

  18. I-scan thermal lens experiment in the pulse regime for measuring two-photon absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, L.; Echevarria, L.; Fernandez, A.

    2007-09-01

    We present a new pump-probe mode-mismatched thermal lens method for pulse excitation aimed to the measurement of nonlinear absorption coefficient in optical materials. We develop a theoretical model based on the Fresnel diffraction approximation and their predictions are verified experimentally with samples of Rhodamine 6G and Rhodamine B in ethanol solution. The principal advantage of this technique is that it does not require any mechanical movement during measurement. Below we perform the new type of thermal lens experiment in the pulse regime for the measurement of nonlinear absorption coefficient in transparent samples and we demonstrate the validity of theoretical predictions using an alternative method to the classical thermal lens technique.

  19. Thermal evolution of cratonic mantle keels: implications for buoyancy and rheology of continental lithosphere (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W.; Perry, C.

    2013-12-01

    On a billion-year timescale, post-formation cooling or heating of cratonic mantle keels predicts secular changes in lithospheric buoyancy, isopycnicity and rheology that may be expressed as an epeirogenic signal in the core regions of continents. To examine the consequences of these secular changes, we use a finite-difference approach to simulate the thermal evolution of cratonic lithosphere, starting from endmember initial states that represent hot (plume) or cool (slab) formation scenarios. Our models are axisymmetric and assume that the temperature of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) intersects the mantle adiabat. We consider secular cooling (40 K per Gyr) of the mantle as well as gradual loss of radiogenic heating in the lithosphere. Various scenarios are considered, including ';average' Archean and Proterozoic mantle compositions, as well as layering of the lithosphere with several distributions of heat-producing elements. The thermal and compositional models are used to compute seismic wavespeed, density structure, and spatially-varying mantle viscosity, which are compared with observational constraints from metamorphic P-T-t paths, diamond stability and subsidence of intractronic basins in Africa and North America.

  20. Adapting of the Background-Oriented Schlieren (BOS) Technique in the Characterization of the Flow Regimes in Thermal Spraying Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Rademacher, H. G.; Anjami, N.; Hagen, L.

    2014-01-01

    In thermal spraying technique, the changes in the in-flight particle velocities are considered to be only a function of the drag forces caused by the dominating flow regimes in the spray jet. Therefore, the correct understanding of the aerodynamic phenomena occurred at nozzle out let and at the substrate interface is an important task in the targeted improvement in the nozzle and air-cap design as well as in the spraying process in total. The presented work deals with the adapting of an innovative technique for the flow characterization called background-oriented Schlieren. The flow regimes in twin wire arc spraying (TWAS) and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) were analyzed with this technique. The interfering of the atomization gas flow with the intersected wires causes in case of TWAS process a deformation of the jet shape. It leads also to areas with different aero dynamic forces. The configurations of the outlet air-caps in TWAS effect predominantly the outlet flow characteristics. The ratio between fuel and oxygen determine the dominating flow regimes in the HVOF spraying jet. Enhanced understanding of the aerodynamics at outlet and at the substrate interface could lead to a targeted improvement in thermal spraying processes.

  1. Estimating thermal regimes of bull trout and assessing the potential effects of climate warming on critical habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Leslie A.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Marshall, Lucy A.; McGlynn, Brian L.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the vulnerability of aquatic species and habitats under climate change is critical for conservation and management of freshwater systems. Climate warming is predicted to increase water temperatures in freshwater ecosystems worldwide, yet few studies have developed spatially explicit modelling tools for understanding the potential impacts. We parameterized a nonspatial model, a spatial flow-routed model, and a spatial hierarchical model to predict August stream temperatures (22-m resolution) throughout the Flathead River Basin, USA and Canada. Model comparisons showed that the spatial models performed significantly better than the nonspatial model, explaining the spatial autocorrelation found between sites. The spatial hierarchical model explained 82% of the variation in summer mean (August) stream temperatures and was used to estimate thermal regimes for threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) habitats, one of the most thermally sensitive coldwater species in western North America. The model estimated summer thermal regimes of spawning and rearing habitats at <13 C° and foraging, migrating, and overwintering habitats at <14 C°. To illustrate the useful application of such a model, we simulated climate warming scenarios to quantify potential loss of critical habitats under forecasted climatic conditions. As air and water temperatures continue to increase, our model simulations show that lower portions of the Flathead River Basin drainage (foraging, migrating, and overwintering habitat) may become thermally unsuitable and headwater streams (spawning and rearing) may become isolated because of increasing thermal fragmentation during summer. Model results can be used to focus conservation and management efforts on populations of concern, by identifying critical habitats and assessing thermal changes at a local scale.

  2. Heat flow in eastern Egypt - The thermal signature of a continental breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Boulos, F. K.; Hennin, S. F.; El-Sherif, A. A.; El-Sayed, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    Data on the heat flow in eastern Egypt were collected to provide information related to the mode and the mechanism of the Red Sea opening. The data indicate a general increase in heat flow towards the Red Sea (75-100 mW/sq m in a zone within 40 km of the coast compared with 35-55 mW/sq m inland). Moderately high heat flow (about 70 mW/sq m) was found for the Gulf of Suez. Heat production data indicate that the coastal thermal anomaly is not primarily related to crustal radiogenic heat production. Possible causes of the anomaly (one of which could be a high mantle heat flow causing a lithospheric thinning centered beneath the Red Sea) are discussed.

  3. Thermally induced phase changes, lateral heterogeneity of the mantle, continental roots, and deep slab anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Don L.

    1987-01-01

    Factors which influence the lateral heterogeneity in density and seismic velocity with depth in the upper earth mantle are discussed. It is emphasized that most of the increases in density and seismic velocity with depth are caused by pressure-induced solid-solid phase changes in the high-density high-velocity phases of mineral assemblage, due to variations in temperature. In particular, the ilmenite form of MgSiO3 and the gamma-spinel form of Mg2SiO4 have broad stability fields in cold mantle and are not stable in hotter mantle. It is emphasized that the density and velocity anomalies associated with temperature-induced phase changes in mineral assemblage must be taken into account in the thermal models of the slabs; when these effects are accounted for, the geoid and seismic anomalies associated with subducted slabs are consistent with slab confinement to the upper mantle and with layered models of mantle convection.

  4. Morphology control on hyporheic zone hydrodynamics: implication on redox and thermal regimes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, A.; Tonina, D.; Bellin, A.

    2013-12-01

    . Through this parameter we are able to define two dimensionless Damköhler numbers DaO, and DaT, which relate river morphology, through τ50, with the redox and the thermal regime within the hyporheic zone, respectively. In particular, DaO quantifies the biogeochemical status of the hyporheic zone through the ratio between τ50 and the time needed to consume dissolved oxygen to a prescribed threshold concentration (τlim), below which reductive reactions are activated: (DaO = τ50/τlim). In addition, DaT quantifies the importance of the temperature daily oscillations of the stream water on hyporheic environment through the ratio between τ50, and the time limit for which the amplitude of daily temperature oscillations of hyporheic waters are 1/e of those at the stream water. Our analysis showed that contrary to popular models such as transient storage, our approach is able to capture the relationship between moments recently proposed by González-Pinzón et al., (2013) in a study analyzing a large dataset of experimental BTCs. Moreover, through the Damköhler numbers we are able to define a new theoretical framework for scaling results at both the morphological-unit and stream-reach scales. González-Pinzón, R., R. Haggerty, and M. Dentz (2013), Scaling and predicting solute transport processes in streams, Water Resour. Res., 49, doi:10.1002/wrcr.20280.

  5. Lattice thermal conductivity of crystalline and amorphous silicon with and without isotopic effects from the ballistic to diffusive thermal transport regime

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Minkyu; Lee, In-Ho; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2014-07-28

    Thermal conductivity of a material is an important physical parameter in electronic and thermal devices, and as the device size shrinks down, its length-dependence becomes unable to be neglected. Even in micrometer scale devices, materials having a long mean free path of phonons, such as crystalline silicon (Si), exhibit a strong length dependence of the thermal conductivities that spans from the ballistic to diffusive thermal transport regime. In this work, through non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics (NEMD) simulations up to 17 μm in length, the lattice thermal conductivities are explicitly calculated for crystalline Si and up to 2 μm for amorphous Si. The Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is solved within a frequency-dependent relaxation time approximation, and the calculated lattice thermal conductivities in the BTE are found to be in good agreement with the values obtained in the NEMD. The isotopic effects on the length-dependent lattice thermal conductivities are also investigated both in the crystalline and amorphous Si.

  6. Quantifying stream thermal regimes at management-pertinent scales: combining thermal infrared and stationary stream temperature data in a novel modeling framework.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vatland, Shane J.; Gresswell, Robert E.; Poole, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Accurately quantifying stream thermal regimes can be challenging because stream temperatures are often spatially and temporally heterogeneous. In this study, we present a novel modeling framework that combines stream temperature data sets that are continuous in either space or time. Specifically, we merged the fine spatial resolution of thermal infrared (TIR) imagery with hourly data from 10 stationary temperature loggers in a 100 km portion of the Big Hole River, MT, USA. This combination allowed us to estimate summer thermal conditions at a relatively fine spatial resolution (every 100 m of stream length) over a large extent of stream (100 km of stream) during during the warmest part of the summer. Rigorous evaluation, including internal validation, external validation with spatially continuous instream temperature measurements collected from a Langrangian frame of reference, and sensitivity analyses, suggests the model was capable of accurately estimating longitudinal patterns in summer stream temperatures for this system Results revealed considerable spatial and temporal heterogeneity in summer stream temperatures and highlighted the value of assessing thermal regimes at relatively fine spatial and temporal scales. Preserving spatial and temporal variability and structure in abiotic stream data provides a critical foundation for understanding the dynamic, multiscale habitat needs of mobile stream organisms. Similarly, enhanced understanding of spatial and temporal variation in dynamic water quality attributes, including temporal sequence and spatial arrangement, can guide strategic placement of monitoring equipment that will subsequently capture variation in environmental conditions directly pertinent to research and management objectives.

  7. Quantifying stream thermal regimes at multiple scales: Combining thermal infrared imagery and stationary stream temperature data in a novel modeling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatland, Shane J.; Gresswell, Robert E.; Poole, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Accurately quantifying stream thermal regimes can be challenging because stream temperatures are often spatially and temporally heterogeneous. In this study, we present a novel modeling framework that combines stream temperature data sets that are continuous in either space or time. Specifically, we merged the fine spatial resolution of thermal infrared (TIR) imagery with hourly data from 10 stationary temperature loggers in a 100 km portion of the Big Hole River, MT, USA. This combination allowed us to estimate summer thermal conditions at a relatively fine spatial resolution (every ˜100 m of stream length) over a large extent of stream (˜100 km of stream) during the warmest part of the summer. Rigorous evaluation, including internal validation, external validation with spatially continuous instream temperature measurements collected from a Langrangian frame of reference, and sensitivity analyses, suggests the model was capable of accurately estimating longitudinal patterns in summer stream temperatures for this system (validation RMSEs < 1°C). Results revealed considerable spatial and temporal heterogeneity in summer stream temperatures and highlighted the value of assessing thermal regimes at relatively fine spatial and temporal scales. Preserving spatial and temporal variability and structure in abiotic stream data provides a critical foundation for understanding the dynamic, multiscale habitat needs of mobile stream organisms. Similarly, enhanced understanding of spatial and temporal variation in dynamic water quality attributes, including temporal sequence and spatial arrangement, can guide strategic placement of monitoring equipment that will subsequently capture variation in environmental conditions directly pertinent to research and management objectives.

  8. Pollen and palynofacies analyses of Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum sediments from the North American continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willard, D. A.; Robinson, M. M.; Self-Trail, J. M.; Wandless, G. A.; Sluijs, A.

    2014-12-01

    Analyses of pollen and palynofacies from Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) sediments from three cores collected on the Atlantic Coastal Plain provide insights into the timing of vegetation and hydrologic changes associated with the PETM in eastern North America. The Mattawoman Creek-Billingsley Road (MCBR2), South Dover Bridge (SDB), and Bass River (ODP Site 1074AX) cores were collected at progressively greater distances from the paleoshoreline in continental shelf deposits in Maryland and New Jersey, USA. The PETM carbon isotope excursion (CIE) at each site is accompanied by sharp increases in pollen and spore concentrations, as well as changes in terrestrial palynomorph assemblage composition. In the two sites proximal to the paleoshoreline in Maryland, CIE fern spore abundance was two- to three times greater than in pre-CIE assemblages. At the distal site at Bass River, fern spores are present in CIE sediments and absent in pre-CIE sediments. Angiosperm pollen is most common in CIE sediments at all three sites. Palynofacies analyses, which quantify contributions of organic material from marine and non-marine sources, indicate that terrestrial influx increased sharply at the CIE onset. This observation is consistent with seasonally increased runoff from the continent.

  9. Variscan to Neogene thermal and exhumation history at the Moroccan passive continental margin assessed by low temperature thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehrt, M.; Glasmacher, U. A.; Stockli, D. F.; Kluth, O.; Jabour, H.

    2012-04-01

    In North Africa, a large amount of Mesozoic terrigenous sedimentary rocks are deposited in most of the basins along the continental margin indicating a major episode of erosion occurred during the rift and early post-rift period in the Central Atlantic. In the Tarfaya-Dakhla Basin, Morocco the sedimentary cover reaches thicknesses of up to 9000 m. The presence of high surface elevations in the Anti-Atlas mountain belt (2500 m) indicates a potential source area for the surrounding basins. The NE-SW oriented Anti-Atlas of Morocco is located at the northwestern fringe of the West African Craton and south of the High Atlas and represents the Phanerozoic foreland of the Late Paleozoic North African Variscides and the Cenozoic Atlas Belt. Variscan deformation affected most of Morocco. Paleozoic basins were folded and thrusted, with the major collision dated as late Devonian to Late Carboniferous. Zircon fission-track ages of 287 (±23) to 331 (±24) Ma confirmed the main exhumation referred to the Variscan folding, followed by rapid exhumation and the post-folding erosion. Currently, phases of uplift and exhumation in the Anti-Atlas during the Central Atlantic rifting and places where the associated erosion products are deposited are poorly constrained and there is little quantitative data available at present. The objective of the study is to determine the thermal and exhumation history of the Anti-Atlas and the connected Tarfaya-Dakhla Basin at the Moroccan passive continental margin. Besides zircon fission-track dating, apatite and zircon (U-Th-Sm)/He and apatite fission-track analyses and furthermore 2-D modelling with 'HeFTy' software has been carried out at Precambrian rocks of the Western Anti-Atlas and Cretaceous to Neogene sedimentary rocks from the Northern Tarfaya-Dakhla Basin. The apatite fission-track ages of 120 (±13) to 189 (±14) Ma in the Anti-Atlas and 176 (±20) to 216 (±18) Ma in the Tarfaya Basin indicate very obvious a Central Atlantic opening

  10. Operational Constraints on Hydropeaking and its Effects on the Hydrologic and Thermal Regime of a River in Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, M. A.; Guzman, C.; Rossel, V.; De La Fuente, A.

    2013-12-01

    Hydropower accounts for about 44% of installed capacity in Chile's Central Interconnected System, which serves most of the Chilean population. Hydropower reservoir projects can affect ecosystems by changing the hydrologic regime and water quality. Given its volumen regulation capacity, low operation costs and fast response to demand fluctuations, reservoir hydropower plants commonly operate on a load-following or hydropeaking scheme. This short-term operational pattern produces alterations in the hydrologic regime downstream the reservoir. In the case of thermally stratified reservoirs, peaking operations can affect the thermal structure of the reservoir, as well as the thermal regime downstream. In this study, we assessed the subdaily hydrologic and thermal alteration donwstream of Rapel reservoir in Central Chile for alternative operational scenarios, including a base case and several scenarios involving minimum instream flow (Qmin) and maximum hourly ramping rates (ΔQmax). Scenarios were simulated for the stratification season of summer 2009-2012 in a grid-wide short-term economic dispatch model which prescribes hourly power production by every power plant on a weekly horizon. Power time series are then translated into time series of turbined flows at each hydropower plants. Indicators of subdaily hydrologic alteration (SDHA) were computed for every scenario. Additionally, turbined flows were used as input data for a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model (CWR-ELCOM) of the reservoir which simulated the vertical temperature profile in the reservoir and the outflow temperature. For the time series of outflow temperatures we computed several indicators of subdaily thermal alteration (SDTA). Operational constraints reduce the values of both SDHA and SDTA indicators with respect to the base case. When constraints are applied separately, the indicators of SDHA decrease as each type of constraint (Qmin or ΔQmax) becomes more stringent. However, ramping rate

  11. Thermal radiation effects on magnetohydrodynamic free convection heat and mass transfer from a sphere in a variable porosity regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, V. Ramachandra; Vasu, B.; Bég, O. Anwar; Parshad, Rana D.

    2012-02-01

    A mathematical model is presented for multiphysical transport of an optically-dense, electrically-conducting fluid along a permeable isothermal sphere embedded in a variable-porosity medium. A constant, static, magnetic field is applied transverse to the cylinder surface. The non-Darcy effects are simulated via second order Forchheimer drag force term in the momentum boundary layer equation. The surface of the sphere is maintained at a constant temperature and concentration and is permeable, i.e. transpiration into and from the boundary layer regime is possible. The boundary layer conservation equations, which are parabolic in nature, are normalized into non-similar form and then solved numerically with the well-tested, efficient, implicit, stable Keller-box finite difference scheme. Increasing porosity ( ɛ) is found to elevate velocities, i.e. accelerate the flow but decrease temperatures, i.e. cool the boundary layer regime. Increasing Forchheimer inertial drag parameter ( Λ) retards the flow considerably but enhances temperatures. Increasing Darcy number accelerates the flow due to a corresponding rise in permeability of the regime and concomitant decrease in Darcian impedance. Thermal radiation is seen to reduce both velocity and temperature in the boundary layer. Local Nusselt number is also found to be enhanced with increasing both porosity and radiation parameters.

  12. Progeny of Osmia lignaria from distinct regions differ in developmental phenology and survival under a common thermal regime.

    PubMed

    Pitts-Singer, Theresa L; Cane, James H; Trostle, Glen

    2014-08-01

    Many insects, including some bees, have extensive subcontinental distributions that can differ in climatic conditions. Within and beyond these distributions, humans intentionally transport beneficial insects, including bees, to non-natal geographic locations. Insects also are experiencing unprecedented climatic change in their resident localities. For solitary bees, we know very little about the adaptive plasticity and geographic variation in developmental physiology that accommodates the different climates experienced within distributional ranges. Osmia lignaria Say (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) is a widely distributed North American spring-emerging bee being developed as a managed pollinator for tree fruit crops, including almonds. We examined the development and survival of O. lignaria progeny that were descended from populations sourced from southern California, western Washington, and northern Utah, and then were reared together under an hourly and weekly temperature regime simulating those of a California almond-growing region. We found that developmental physiologies of Washington and Utah progeny were generally similar. However, California progeny developed slower, were more metabolically active, and survived better under California conditions than did populations native to regions at higher latitudes. Regardless of geographic origin, cocooned adults managed under prescribed thermal regimes emerged faster and lived longer after wintering. Progeny of parents from different regions exhibited some acclimatory plasticity in developmental phenologies to a novel climatic regime, but overall their responses reflected their geographic origins. This outcome is consistent with their developmental phenologies being largely heritable adaptations to regional climates. PMID:24879969

  13. Deep observation and sampling of the earth's continental crust (DOSECC). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    The need to validate and refine concepts regarding the structure, properties, and dynamic processes of the earth's continental crust through the use of the drill was the subject of the workshop sponsored by DOSECC, Inc. and held April 29 through May 1, 1985 in Houston, Texas and attended by more than 145 scientists. Scientific objectives and targets for a program of research drilling as part of basic studies of the continental lithosphere were discussed, with over 30 scientific proposals presented. Individual drilling proposals were grouped under several themes; basement structures and deep continental basins, active fault zones, thermal regimes and fossil mineralized hydrothermal/magma systems.

  14. Contrasted thermal regimes do not influence digestion and growth rates in a snake from a temperate climate.

    PubMed

    Michel, Catherine Louise; Bonnet, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Temperature influences almost all life-history traits. For a period of 3 mo, we placed four groups of snakes under four contrasted thermal treatments: (1) a natural regime (NR), based on daily variations (24-h cycle); (2) an accelerated regime (AR), where the thermoperiod fluctuated rapidly (12-h cycle); (3) a slow regime (SR; 48-h cycle); and (4) a cool stable regime (ZR; no fluctuation). The mean temperature, set at 23°C, was identical for the four groups. For the first three groups (NR, AR, SR), ambient temperature fluctuated between 18°C and 28°C. Relative humidity and photoperiod were constant. We recorded feeding success, digestion efficiency, growth rate, activity, and ecdysis events. Differences between groups were expected because of varied exposure to the optimal temperatures, most notably in the ZR group, where the preferred body temperature for digestion (approximately 30°C) would not be reached. Surprisingly, there was no significant effect of the experimental treatment on feeding rate, digestion, body mass increase, and growth rate. Our results do not conform to the paradigm stipulating that maximal body temperature selected by ectotherms necessarily corresponds to the most efficient for resource assimilation and that temperature fluctuations are essential. We propose that increasing the digestive tract's performance through body-temperature elevation trades off against elevated (parasite) energy expenditure from the rest of the body. The main advantage of high body temperatures would be to reduce the amount of time necessary to assimilate prey rather than to improve the net mass gain during digestion. PMID:20969448

  15. The Influence of Seasonal Climatic Parameters on the Permafrost Thermal Regime in West Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, V. V.; Shmakin, A. B.

    2009-12-01

    Statistical correlations between seasonal air temperatures and snow depths and active layer depths and permafrost temperatures were analyzed for tundra (Marre-Salle) and northern taiga (Nadym) sites in Western Siberia. Interannual variations in active layer depth in the tundra zone correlated with the average air temperature of the current summer, and in peatland and humid tundra, also with summer temperatures of the preceding 1-2 years. In the northern taiga zone, the active layer depth related to current summer air temperature and to a lesser extent, to spring and/or winter air temperatures. Variations in summer permafrost temperatures at 5-10m depth were correlated with spring air temperatures in the current and preceding 1-2 years. The weather regime during the preceding 1-2 years, therefore, reinforced or weakened ground temperature variations in a given year. Overall, the most important factors influencing the permafrost regime were spring and summer air temperatures, and in one case snow depth. However, statistical links between meteorological and permafrost parameters varied between the tundra and northern taiga zones and among landscape types within each zone, emphasizing the importance of analyses at short temporal scales and for individual terrain units.

  16. Flow regimes in a vertical Taylor-Couette system with a radial thermal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillerm, R.; Kang, C.; Savaro, C.; Lepiller, V.; Prigent, A.; Yang, K.-S.; Mutabazi, I.

    2015-09-01

    A rich variety of flow regimes in a Newtonian fluid inside a vertical large-aspect ratio and a wide-gap Taylor-Couette system with a radial temperature gradient has been determined in experiments and in direct numerical simulations (DNSs). Compared to previous experiments and numerical studies, a wider range of temperature differences (i.e., of the Grashof number Gr) and of the rotation rate (the Taylor number Ta) has been covered. The combined effect of rotation and of the radial temperature gradient is the occurrence of helicoidal vortices or modulated waves at the onset. Stationary axisymmetric vortices are found for very weak temperature differences. A good agreement was found for critical states between results from experiments, linear stability analysis, and DNS. Higher instability modes have been determined for a wide range of parameters and a state diagram of observable flow regimes has been established in the plane spanned by Gr and Ta. Some higher states observed in experiments were retrieved in DNS.

  17. Detailed predictions of climate induced changes in the thermal and flow regimes in mountain streams of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, José M.; Muñoz-Mas, Rafael; García de Jalón, Diego; Solana, Joaquín; Alonso, Carlos; Martínez-Capel, Francisco; Ribalaygua, Jaime; Pórtoles, Javier; Monjo, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Streamflow and temperature regimes are well-known to influence on the availability of suitable physical habitat for instream biological communities. General Circulation Models (GCMs) have predicted significant changes in timing and geographic distribution of precipitation and atmospheric temperature for the ongoing century. However, differences in these predictions may arise when focusing on different spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, to perform substantiated mitigation and management actions detailed scales are necessary to adequately forecast the consequent thermal and flow regimes. Regional predictions are relatively abundant but detailed ones, both spatially and temporally, are still scarce. The present study aimed at predicting the effects of climate change on the thermal and flow regime in the Iberian Peninsula, refining the resolution of previous studies. For this purpose, the study encompassed 28 sites at eight different mountain rivers and streams in the central part of the Iberian Peninsula (Spain). The daily flow was modelled using different daily, monthly and quarterly lags of the historical precipitation and temperature time series. These precipitation-runoff models were developed by means of M5 model trees. On the other hand water temperature was modelled at similar time scale by means of nonlinear regression from dedicated site-specific data. The developed models were used to simulate the temperature and flow regime under two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCPs) climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) until the end of the present century by considering nine different GCMs, which were pertinently downscaled. The precipitation-runoff models achieved high accuracy (NSE>0.7), especially in regards of the low flows of the historical series. Results concomitantly forecasted flow reductions between 7 and 17 % (RCP4.5) and between 8 and 49% (RCP8.5) of the annual average in the most cases, being variable the magnitude and timing at each

  18. Thermal regime of the Escalante Desert, Utah, with an analysis of the the Newcastle Geothermal System

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.S.; Clement, M.D.; Mase, C.W.

    1981-12-10

    Twenty-five new heat flow measurements are presented for the Escalante Desert region within the Great Basin of the wester United States. Heat flow, excluding geothermal areas, ranges from 43 to 350 mW m/sup -2/, but much of the variability may be caused by deeply circulating groundwater redistributing the regional flux. A subset of 10 sites drilled specifically to characterize the heat flow of the region yielded a mean of 100 mW m/sup -2/ with a standard deviation of 22 mW m/sup -2/. A comparison of thermal conductivities of solid cylindrical discs and rock chips (rhyolite to andesite tuffs) confirmed the importance of porosity corrections to thermal conductivity measurements. A 'blind' geothermal system southwest of Newastle, Utah, situated within the Escalante Desert, has also been studied. Temperature Desert, has also been studied. Temperatures of 110/sup 0/C are observed only 75 m below the ground surface. Heat flow results from 11 drillholes in this region yield values between 163 and 3065 mW m/sup -2/. The 500 mW m/sup -2/ contour encloses an area of 9.4 km/sup 2/. By integrating the excess heat flux (above background) over the thermal anomaly, we deduce a thermal power loss of 12.8 MW for this geothermal system, which corresponds to a subsurface water discharge of 32 kg s/sup -1/.

  19. Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal regimes and their potential evolutionary consequences.

    PubMed

    Angilletta, Michael J; Ashley Steel, E; Bartz, Krista K; Kingsolver, Joel G; Scheuerell, Mark D; Beckman, Brian R; Crozier, Lisa G

    2008-05-01

    Dams designed for hydropower and other purposes alter the environments of many economically important fishes, including Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). We estimated that dams on the Rogue River, the Willamette River, the Cowlitz River, and Fall Creek decreased water temperatures during summer and increased water temperatures during fall and winter. These thermal changes undoubtedly impact the behavior, physiology, and life histories of Chinook salmon. For example, relatively high temperatures during the fall and winter should speed growth and development, leading to early emergence of fry. Evolutionary theory provides tools to predict selective pressures and genetic responses caused by this environmental warming. Here, we illustrate this point by conducting a sensitivity analysis of the fitness consequences of thermal changes caused by dams, mediated by the thermal sensitivity of embryonic development. Based on our model, we predict Chinook salmon likely suffered a decrease in mean fitness after the construction of a dam in the Rogue River. Nevertheless, these demographic impacts might have resulted in strong selection for compensatory strategies, such as delayed spawning by adults or slowed development by embryos. Because the thermal effects of dams vary throughout the year, we predict dams impacted late spawners more than early spawners. Similar analyses could shed light on the evolutionary consequences of other environmental perturbations and their interactions. PMID:25567632

  20. Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and its Effects on Continental Biotas: Evidence from Polecat Bench in Northwestern Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingerich, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    Many important environmental events in the geological past were first recognized by their effects on the associated biota, and this is true for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum or PETM global greenhouse warming event, which happened 55 million years before present. In the Southern Ocean, PETM carbon and oxygen isotope anomalies were found to coincide with a major terminal-Paleocene disappearance or extinction of benthic foraminiferans. On North America the PETM carbon isotope excursion (CIE) was found to coincide with mammalian dwarfing and a major initial-Eocene appearance or origination event of continental mammals. Linking the two records, marine and continental, resolved a long-standing disagreement over competing definitions of the Paleocene-Eocene epoch boundary, and more importantly indicated that the PETM greenhouse warming event was global. Dwarfing of herbivorous mammals can be interpreted as a response to elevated atmospheric CO2. The origin of modern orders of mammals including Artiodactyla, Perissodactyla, and Primates ('APP' taxa) is more complicated and difficult to explain but the origin of these orders may also be a response, directly or indirectly, to PETM warming. We now know from Polecat Bench and elsewhere in North America that the biotic response to PETM greenhouse warming involved the appearance of at least two new mammalian faunas distinct from previously known Clarkforkian mammals of the upper or late Paleocene and previously known Wasatchian mammals of the lower or early Eocene. Three stages and ages of the former are known (Cf-1 to Cf-3) and seven stages and ages of the latter are known (Wa-1 to Wa-7), each occupying about a hundred meters of strata representing a half-million years or so of time. Between the standard Clarkforkian and Wasatchian faunal zones is an initial 'Wa-M' faunal zone of only five or so meters in thickness and something on the order of 20 thousand years of geological time. The Wa-M fauna includes the first

  1. High power tungstate-crystal Raman laser operating in the strong thermal lensing regime.

    PubMed

    McKay, Aaron; Kitzler, Ondrej; Mildren, Richard P

    2014-01-13

    We report an investigation into a double metal tungstate Raman laser when pumped at elevated average powers. Potassium gadolinium tungstate (KGW) was placed in an external cavity configured for second-Stokes output and pumped at pulse repetition rate of 38 kHz with up to 46 W of average power. For output powers above 3 W, we observe preferential excitation of Hermite-Gaussian transverse modes whose order in the X(1)(') principal direction of the thermal expansion tensor scales linearly with Raman power. We deduce that strong astigmatic thermal lensing is induced in the Raman crystal with a negative component in the X(1)(') direction. At maximum pump power, 8.3 W of output power was obtained at a conversion efficiency of 18%. PMID:24515030

  2. Modeling thermal structure, ice cover regime and sensitivity to climate change of two regulated lakes - a Norwegian case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebre, Solomon; Boissy, Thibault; Alfredsen, Knut

    2013-04-01

    A great number of river and lakes in Norway and the Nordic region at large are regulated for water management such as hydropower production. Such regulations have the potential to alter the thermal and hydrological regimes in the lakes and rivers downstream impacting on river environment and ecology. Anticipated changes as a result of climate change in meteorological forcing data such as air temperature and precipitation cause changes in the water balance, water temperature and ice cover duration in the reservoirs. This may necessitate changes in operational rules as part of an adaptation strategy for the future. In this study, a one dimensional (1D) lake thermodynamic and ice cover model (MyLake) has been modified to take into account the effect of dynamic outflows in reservoirs and applied to two small but relatively deep regulated lakes (reservoirs) in Norway (Follsjøen and Tesse). The objective was to assess climate change impacts on the seasonal thermal characteristics, the withdrawal temperatures, and the reservoir ice cover dynamics with current operational regimes. The model solves the vertical energy balance on a daily time-step driven by meteorological and hydrological forcings: 2m air temperature, precipitation, 2m relative humidity, 10m wind speed, cloud cover, air pressure, solar insolation, inflow volume, inflow temperature and reservoir outflows. Model calibration with multi-seasonal data of temperature profiles showed that the model performed well in simulating the vertical water temperature profiles for the two study reservoirs. The withdrawal temperatures were also simulated reasonably well. The comparison between observed and simulated lake ice phenology (which were available only for one of the reservoirs - Tesse) was also reasonable taking into account the uncertainty in the observational data. After model testing and calibration, the model was then used to simulate expected changes in the future (2080s) due to climate change by considering

  3. Conductive heat flux in VC-1 and the thermal regime of Valles caldera, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Morgan, P.

    1988-01-01

    Over 5% of heat in the western USA is lost through Quaternary silicic volcanic centers, including the Valles caldera in N central New Mexico. These centers are the sites of major hydrothermal activity and upper crustal metamorphism, metasomatism, and mineralization, producing associated geothermal resources. Presents new heat flow data from Valles caldera core hole 1 (VC-1), drilled in the SW margin of the Valles caldera. Thermal conductivities were measured on 55 segments of core from VC-1, waxed and wrapped to preserve fluids. These values were combined with temperature gradient data to calculate heat flow. Above 335 m, which is probably unsaturated, heat flow is 247 + or - 16 mW m-2. Inteprets the shallow thermal gradient data and the thermal regime at VC-1 to indicate a long-lived hydrothermal (and magmatic) system in the southwestern Valles caldera that has been maintained through the generation of shallow magma bodies during the long postcollapse history of the caldera. High heat flow at the VC-1 site is interpreted to result from hot water circulating below the base of the core hole, and we attribute the lower heat flow in the unsaturated zone is attributed to hydrologic recharge. -from Authors

  4. Links between the mechanical, seismic and thermal thickness, rheological structure and mechanical stability of the continental lithosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, E.; Watts, A. B.; Francois, T.; Tesauro, M.

    2012-04-01

    To fulfill its plate-tectonics functions, the lithosphere has to remain mechanically strong over geological time spans and be capable to support important geological loads while transferring horizontal tectonic stresses at global scales. We use thermo-mechanically and thermo-dynamically coupled numerical models accounting for brittle-elastic-plastic rheology and petrologically and seismologically consistent pressure-temperature dependent density and elastic structure to obtain more robust insights on thickness of the mechanical lithosphere (Hm) and its links to the LAB depth and its seismic (Hs) and thermal thickness (Ht). Testing the mechanical stability of lithospheres with different thermo-rheological structures allows us to constrain rheological parameters needed for long-term survival of lithospheric plates and establish links between LAB,Hm,Hs and Ht. Mechanical lithosphere appears to be 1.5-2 times thinner than Hs and Ht and its mechanical thickness, Hm, is strongly dependent on thermal and rheological structure. The important contribution of inelastic components (brittle and ductile behavior) to the mechanical strength of the lithosphere suggests that Hm is also stress and strain dependent: within the same plate, it might drop by 30-50% in the areas of high strain or stress, and remain much higher in the areas where tectonic deformation is moderate. In some cases it is possible to establish direct links between the laterally variable mechanical, seismic and thermal lithosphere thickness. This is of special importance since tracking the mechanical thickness of the lithosphere allows us to put better constraints on its stress/strain dependent rheological properties. We explored relationships between Hs,Ht and Hm of the lithosphere in oceans and in more complex continental lithospheres. In oceanic plates, Hm corresponds to the observed equivalent elastic thickness (EET) multiplied by a factor of 1.2-1.5, and correlates well with Ht and Hs. In continents, the

  5. Arctic Oscillation impact on thermal regime of the Baltic region Eastern part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gecaite, Indre; Pogoreltsev, Aleksandr; Ugryumov, Aleksandr

    2016-04-01

    Statistical estimations of Arctic Oscillation (AO) impact on air temperature regime in the Eastern part of Baltic region are presented. The region is characterized by high inter-annual and inter-seasonal variabilities. It is important to note that in the region of global warming extremely low winter temperatures can be observed on the European territory of Russia. AO is one of large-scale global structures of atmospheric circulation closely associated with weather variability in Northern Europe. AO anomalies occur in the upper atmosphere (stratosphere) and only then transferred to tropospheric lower layers. The anomalies can be preserved during long period up to two months, so they can be predictors in long-range weather forecast. In turn, changes in stratospheric polar vortex and sudden stratospheric warmings can be related to the geomagnetic activity. Perhaps, the geomagnetic activity influences the meridional temperature gradient and then changes in the structure of the stratospheric zonal wind. In turn, the changes have an impact on the tropospheric circulation. The stratosphere-troposphere connection occurs during winter months. Therefore, the paper presents the analysis of extremely cold winter anomalies in the Eastern part of Baltic Sea region. At the same time, we considered atmospheric circulation peculiarities related to AO phase change. The analyzable time interval covers 1951-2014.

  6. Evaluation of thermal regimes for transported ambassador ectotherms: One size does not fit all.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Sasha J; Tetzlaff, Kristin E; Connors, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    Providing appropriate environmental temperatures for captive ectotherms should be a husbandry priority. This can be especially challenging for ectotherms that are routinely transported, such as those used in education programs at zoos, because they are unable to thermoregulate while confined in non-temperature controlled, compact carriers. To assess if ectotherms used in the Fort Wayne Children's Zoo's outreach programs experienced appropriate transit temperatures during cold weather, we placed temperature loggers inside two sizes of transport carriers, half containing a heat source (bottle of hot water) and half not (control). While transport temperatures were appropriate for many ectotherms, this simple procedure failed to meet the thermal preferences of species with relatively low or high preferred temperatures such as the eastern tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) and the spiny-tailed lizard (Uromastyx maliensis), respectively. We found large heated carriers were warmer than small heated carriers, but the temperatures of control carriers did not differ. Despite considerable interspecific variation, large heated carriers provided higher thermal quality environments than both small heated and control carriers for all species except eastern tiger salamanders. We suggest further thermal monitoring of ectotherms during transit with the aim of identifying appropriate heat sources and developing efficient and effective transportation protocols. This could be achieved by modifying transport carriers so that animals are able to thermoregulate. Limiting or ceasing their use when appropriate temperatures cannot be provided may be necessary. Particular attention should be given to species with temperature preferences markedly different than the majority of others in a given collection. Zoo Biol. 35:339-345, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27007783

  7. Combination of Heat Shock and Enhanced Thermal Regime to Control the Growth of a Persistent Legionella pneumophila Strain

    PubMed Central

    Bédard, Emilie; Boppe, Inès; Kouamé, Serge; Martin, Philippe; Pinsonneault, Linda; Valiquette, Louis; Racine, Jules; Prévost, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Following nosocomial cases of Legionella pneumophila, the investigation of a hot water system revealed that 81.5% of sampled taps were positive for L. pneumophila, despite the presence of protective levels of copper in the water. A significant reduction of L. pneumophila counts was observed by culture after heat shock disinfection. The following corrective measures were implemented to control L. pneumophila: increasing the hot water temperature (55 to 60 °C), flushing taps weekly with hot water, removing excess lengths of piping and maintaining a water temperature of 55 °C throughout the system. A gradual reduction in L. pneumophila counts was observed using the culture method and qPCR in the 18 months after implementation of the corrective measures. However, low level contamination was retained in areas with hydraulic deficiencies, highlighting the importance of maintaining a good thermal regime at all points within the system to control the population of L. pneumophila. PMID:27092528

  8. Combination of Heat Shock and Enhanced Thermal Regime to Control the Growth of a Persistent Legionella pneumophila Strain.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Emilie; Boppe, Inès; Kouamé, Serge; Martin, Philippe; Pinsonneault, Linda; Valiquette, Louis; Racine, Jules; Prévost, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Following nosocomial cases of Legionella pneumophila, the investigation of a hot water system revealed that 81.5% of sampled taps were positive for L. pneumophila, despite the presence of protective levels of copper in the water. A significant reduction of L. pneumophila counts was observed by culture after heat shock disinfection. The following corrective measures were implemented to control L. pneumophila: increasing the hot water temperature (55 to 60 °C), flushing taps weekly with hot water, removing excess lengths of piping and maintaining a water temperature of 55 °C throughout the system. A gradual reduction in L. pneumophila counts was observed using the culture method and qPCR in the 18 months after implementation of the corrective measures. However, low level contamination was retained in areas with hydraulic deficiencies, highlighting the importance of maintaining a good thermal regime at all points within the system to control the population of L. pneumophila. PMID:27092528

  9. Fast Regime Fluidized Bed Machining (FR-FBM) of Thermally Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, Massimiliano; Rubino, Gianluca; Bolelli, Giovanni; Lusvarghi, Luca

    2008-12-01

    Finishing of thermally sprayed metallic, ceramic, and cermet coatings is required to meet tolerances and requirements on surface roughness in most industrial applications. Conventional machining is a costly and time-consuming process, and is difficult to automate. Therefore, this study investigates and develops a new technique highly amenable for automation: fast regime—fluidized bed machining (FR-FBM). Atmospheric plasma sprayed TiO2, Cr2O3, and HVOF-sprayed WC-17%Co and Tribaloy-800 coatings, deposited on AISI 1040 steel substrates, were subjected to FR-FBM treatment. The effects of the leading operational parameters, namely, abrasive size, jet pressure, and processing time, were evaluated on all coatings by using a two/three-levels full factorial design of experiments. The FR-FBM treated surfaces were observed by FE-SEM and their surface finishing was evaluated by contact profilometry. Significant improvements in surface finishing of all the machined thermally sprayed coatings can always be detected, with FR-FBM being able to guarantee the precision and to ensure the closest geometrical tolerances.

  10. Exploring thermal imaging variables for the detection of stress responses in grapevine under different irrigation regimes.

    PubMed

    Grant, Olga M; Tronina, Lukasz; Jones, Hamlyn G; Chaves, M Manuela

    2007-01-01

    Temperatures of leaves or canopies can be used as indicators of stomatal closure in response to soil water deficit. In 2 years of field experiments with grapevines (Vitis vinifera L., cvs Castelão and Aragonês), it was found that thermal imaging can distinguish between irrigated and non-irrigated canopies, and even between deficit irrigation treatments. Average canopy temperature was inversely correlated with stomatal conductance measured with a porometer. Variation of the distribution of temperatures within canopies was not found to be a reliable indicator of stress. A large degree of variation between images was found in reference 'wet' and 'dry' leaves used in the first year for the calculation of an index proportional to stomatal conductance. In the second year, fully irrigated (FI) (100% Et(c)) and non-irrigated (NI) canopies were used as alternatives to wet and dry leaves. A crop water stress index utilizing these FI and NI 'references', where stressed canopies have the highest values and non-stressed canopies have the lowest values, was found to be a suitable measure for detecting stress. It is suggested that the average temperatures of areas of canopies containing several leaves may be more useful for distinguishing between irrigation treatments than the temperatures of individual leaves. Average temperatures over several leaves per canopy may be expected to reduce the impact of variation in leaf angles. The results are discussed in relation to the application of thermal imaging to irrigation scheduling and monitoring crop performance. PMID:17032729

  11. A modeling assessment of the thermal regime for an urban sport fishery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholow, John M.

    1991-11-01

    Water temperature is almost certainly a limiting factor in the maintenance of a self-sustaining rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss, formerly Salmo gairdneri) and brown trout ( Salmo trutta) fishery in the lower reaches of the Cache la Poudre River near Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. Irrigation diversions dewater portions of the river, but cold reservoir releases moderate water temperatures during some periods. The US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Stream Network Temperature Model (SNTEMP) was applied to a 31-km segment of the river using readily available stream geometry and hydrological and meteorological data. The calibrated model produced satisfactory water temperature predictions ( R 2=0.88, P<0.001, N=49) for a 62-day summer period. It was used to evaluate a variety of flow and nonflow alternatives to keep water temperatures below 23.3°C for the trout. Supplemental flows or reduced diversions of 3 m3/sec would be needed to maintain suitable summer temperatures throughout most of the study area. Such flows would be especially beneficial during weekends when current irrigation patterns reduce flows. The model indicated that increasing the riparian shade would result in little improvement in water temperatures but that decreasing the stream width would result in significant temperature reductions. Introduction of a more thermally tolerant redband trout ( Oncorhynchus sp.), or smallmouth bass ( Micropterus dolomieui) might prove beneficial to the fishery. Construction of deep pools for thermal refugia might also be helpful.

  12. A modeling assessment of the thermal regime for an urban sport fishery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, John M.

    1991-01-01

    Water temperature is almost certainly a limiting factor in the maintenance of a self-sustaining rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, formerly Salmo gairdneri) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) fishery in the lower reaches of the Cache la Poudre River near Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. Irrigation diversions dewater portions of the river, but cold reservoir releases moderate water temperatures during some periods. The US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Stream Network Temperature Model (SNTEMP) was applied to a 31-km segment of the river using readily available stream geometry and hydrological and meteorological data. The calibrated model produced satisfactory water temperature predictions (R2=0.88,P3/sec would be needed to maintain suitable summer temperatures throughout most of the study area. Such flows would be especially beneficial during weekends when current irrigation patterns reduce flows. The model indicated that increasing the riparian shade would result in little improvement in water temperatures but that decreasing the stream width would result in significant temperature reductions. Introduction of a more thermally tolerant redband trout (Oncorhynchus sp.), or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) might prove beneficial to the fishery. Construction of deep pools for thermal refugia might also be helpful.

  13. Thermal regime of shallow water bodies in the coastal tundra zone of the Hudson Bay Lowlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguay, C. R.; Soliman, A. S.; Macrae, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Many shallow lakes and ponds of the Arctic/sub-Arctic contain thick, organic-rich sediments, which have the potential to release significant amounts of CO2 or CH4 to the atmosphere if sediment decomposition rates increase in response to warmer temperatures caused by global warming. This may be exacerbated by a deepening of the seasonal sediment thaw depth in small water bodies that are underlain by permafrost. An important step in linking climatic conditions to rates of organic matter decomposition and gas production from shallow water bodies is an improved understanding of the thermal properties of lake sediments and how sediment temperatures fluctuate in response to changing air temperatures. This knowledge is also important if the ratio of terrestrial to aquatic landscape units in cold regions changes under a warmer climate. One approach that has been used in terrestrial permafrost environments is the examination of how mean annual permafrost surface temperature deviates from mean annual 2-m screen height air temperature (MAAT). The offset between MAAT and the mean annual sediment surface temperature (MASST) has been found to be much larger in deep aquatic systems (greater than 10 m) than in terrestrial permafrost systems due to the presence of the water column that can efficiently transfer heat through mixing. However, the efficiency of heat transfer in shallow water bodies is expected to larger in summer (thawed) than in winter (frozen) conditions, when thermal energy must move by conduction alone. The present study examined the efficiency of sediment heat transfer in shallow water bodies (less than 3 m) during summer and winter periods. Air, sediment and water temperatures of three shallow water bodies in the coastal tundra zone of the Hudson Bay Lowlands near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada were monitored (December 2009-August 2011). Arrays of thermistors and heat pulse probes were placed at 10 cm increments between 20 cm above the water/sediment interface and

  14. Redefining thermal regimes to design reserves for coral reefs in the face of climate change.

    PubMed

    Chollett, Iliana; Enríquez, Susana; Mumby, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Reef managers cannot fight global warming through mitigation at local scale, but they can use information on thermal patterns to plan for reserve networks that maximize the probability of persistence of their reef system. Here we assess previous methods for the design of reserves for climate change and present a new approach to prioritize areas for conservation that leverages the most desirable properties of previous approaches. The new method moves the science of reserve design for climate change a step forwards by: (1) recognizing the role of seasonal acclimation in increasing the limits of environmental tolerance of corals and ameliorating the bleaching response; (2) using the best proxy for acclimatization currently available; (3) including information from several bleaching events, which frequency is likely to increase in the future; (4) assessing relevant variability at country scales, where most management plans are carried out. We demonstrate the method in Honduras, where a reassessment of the marine spatial plan is in progress. PMID:25333380

  15. Exploratory models of the earth's thermal regime during segregation of the core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    Some simple exploratory theoretical models of the thermal effects of core segregation have been investigated, assuming an initially homogeneous earth and including convective heat transport through a 'parameterized convection' approximation. The results indicate that either (1) mantle temperatures 30% or more above present values may have resulted from the gravitational energy released during core segregation, (2) the earth retained very little of its accretional energy, (3) core segregation lasted for one billion years or more, or (4) the earth accreted heterogeneously. Option 3 seems to be precluded by terrestrial lead isotope data, and the alternatives each raise substantial questions concerning the mechanics, chemistry, and petrology of the earth's early history. There is no recognized evidence for the early hot phase of option 1, and option 4 implies, among other things, an analogous early hot phase. Although it has not been favored, option 2 may be viable.

  16. Redefining Thermal Regimes to Design Reserves for Coral Reefs in the Face of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Chollett, Iliana; Enríquez, Susana; Mumby, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Reef managers cannot fight global warming through mitigation at local scale, but they can use information on thermal patterns to plan for reserve networks that maximize the probability of persistence of their reef system. Here we assess previous methods for the design of reserves for climate change and present a new approach to prioritize areas for conservation that leverages the most desirable properties of previous approaches. The new method moves the science of reserve design for climate change a step forwards by: (1) recognizing the role of seasonal acclimation in increasing the limits of environmental tolerance of corals and ameliorating the bleaching response; (2) using the best proxy for acclimatization currently available; (3) including information from several bleaching events, which frequency is likely to increase in the future; (4) assessing relevant variability at country scales, where most management plans are carried out. We demonstrate the method in Honduras, where a reassessment of the marine spatial plan is in progress. PMID:25333380

  17. Thermal regime of the Great Basin and its implications for hydrocarbon occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, J.H.; Williams, C.F.

    1995-06-01

    The Great Basin is a province of high average heat flow (92+-9 mW m{sup -2}), but it contains sub-provinces of both higher and lower heat flow. Higher heat flow (>100 mW m{sup -2}) is characteristic of the north-central Great Basin (the Battle Mountain High, BMH) and several smaller areas along its margins. There is also a large area of lower heat flow (<60 mW m{sup -2}, the Eureka Low, EL) in the south-central portion of the province. There is hydrologic and thermal evidence that the EL is a shallow ({approximately}3 km) hydrologically controlled heat sink associated with interbasin water flow. For example, the temperature profile from a 3.7 km deep hole at Pahute Mesa in the EL indicates low heat flow in the upper 1.5 km and high heat flow in the lowermost kilometer. On the other hand, seismic and magnetic studies suggest that the heat sink in the EL extends to at least mid-crustal depths. Temperatures in the deeper parts of many basins in the BMH are higher than considered favorable for generation or stability of oil. Paradoxically, temperature-gradients as high as 100{degrees}C km{sup -1} and an underlying hydrothermal system are found within the EL in Railroad Valley, the site of the most productive oil-fields in the Great Basin. The heat source driving this hydrothermal system is a combination of local upward flow from the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer and possible thermal input from nearby igneous activity. J. B. Hulen and others have suggested that the Railroad Valley hydrothermal system has enhanced hydrocarbon transport and accelerated maturation. If a hydrothermal system is required for the formation of significant hydrocarbon reservoirs in the EL, then such reservoirs will occur only where groundwater flow in the carbonate aquifer is not removing heat from the basins.

  18. Thermal regime and amplitude of lithosphere extension in the Sirte basin, Libya: Numerical estimates in the plane basin modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galushkin, Yu. I.; El Maghbi, Ali; El Gtlawi, M.

    2014-01-01

    The GALO basin modeling system has been applied for the numerical reconstruction of the subsidence history, variations in temperature, and maturity of the organic matter of sedimentary rocks composing the main tectonic structures of Sirte Basin. The reconstruction was carried out for eight sedimentary cross sections along the profile stretching from the Cyrenaica Platform on the eastern coast of the basin to the Hun Graben on its western wall. The interval of depths for temperature calculations included the sedimentary layer, consolidated crust, and the mantle to below 100 km. This extensive depth coverage made it possible to use the analysis of the variations in the tectonic subsidence of the basin for estimating the amplitudes and duration of the events of thermal activation and extension of the lithosphere of the basin in the history of its evolution. The modeling suggests that thermal activations of the lithosphere in the Albian-Cenomanian and Oligocene-Pleistocene are common for all tectonic structures of the Sirte Basin and the Cyrenaica Platform and that a relatively high temperature regime is also characteristic of the present-day conditions in the Sirte Basin and Cyrenaica Platform. To a considerable extent, such a regime is caused by the thermal activation of the lithosphere of the basin during the last 10 Ma. The intensity of this activation is highest in the western part of the basin, where it is accompanied by the highest erosion amplitudes. The analysis of the variations in tectonic subsidence of the basement also suggests a series of intervals of lithospheric extension, which accounts for the stages of relatively rapid subsidence of the basin. Two intervals of significant extension of the lithosphere in the Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene are common for all areas within the basin. Here, the total amplitudes of the crustal extension attained 1.5 in the central part of the Sirte Basin (the Ajdabiya and Maradah troughs and Zelten and Dahra platforms

  19. Lithospheric structure, composition, and thermal regime of the East European Craton: Implications for the subsidence of the Russian platform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.

    2003-01-01

    A new mechanism for Paleozoic subsidence of the Russian, or East European, platform is suggested, since a model of lithosphere tilting during the Uralian subduction does not explain the post-Uralian sedimentation record. Alternatively, I propose that the Proterozoic and Paleozoic rifting (when a platform-scale Central Russia rift system and a set of Paleozoic rifts were formed) modified the structure and composition of cratonic lithosphere, and these tectono-magmatic events are responsible for the post-Uralian subsidence of the Russian platform. To support this hypothesis, (a) the thermal regime and the thickness of the lithosphere are analyzed, and (b) lithospheric density variations of non-thermal origin are calculated from free-board constraints. The results indicate that Proterozoic and Paleozoic rifting had different effects on the lithospheric structure and composition. (1) Proterozoic rifting is not reflected in the present thermal regime and did not cause significant lithosphere thinning (most of the Russian platform has lithospheric thickness of 150-180 km and the lithosphere of the NE Baltic Shield is 250-300 km thick). Paleozoic rifting resulted in pronounced lithospheric thinning (to 120-140 km) in the southern parts of the Russian platform. (2) Lithospheric density anomalies suggest that Proterozoic-Paleozoic rifting played an important role in the platform subsidence. The lithospheric mantle of the Archean-early Proterozoic part of the Baltic Shield is ??? 1.4 ?? 0.2% less dense than the typical Phanerozoic upper mantle. However, the density deficit in the subcrustal lithosphere of most of the Russian platform is only about (0.4-0.8) ?? 0.2% and decreases southwards to ???0%. Increased densities (likely associated with low depletion values) in the Russian platform suggest strong metasomatism of the cratonic lithosphere during rifting events, which led to its subsidence. It is proposed that only the lower part of the cratonic lithosphere was

  20. Specific features of thermal regimes in rectangular laser slabs under steady-state pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Alpat'ev, A N; Smirnov, V A; Shcherbakov, Ivan A

    2010-01-31

    We continue to investigate the phenomena related to smoothing of temperature profiles in rectangular laser slabs and to an increase in the thresholds of their breakdown under optical pumping with variations in the slab optical density [the effect of smoothing of thermooptical inhomogeneities (STOI effect)]. It is found that the STOI effect is observed not only with increasing but also with decreasing optical density if this occurs due to a decrease in the sample thickness. The dependence of the maximum temperature difference inside the slab on its optical density at the instant of its thermal breakdown is calculated. It is shown that the variations in the optical density caused by variations in both the absorption coefficient and geometric dimensions of the slab differently affect the order of occurrence of two undesirable events - destruction of the slab or boiling of cooling water - with increasing pump power. The calculated relationships reveal two optical density regions corresponding to different orders of occurrence of these events. The maximum allowable temperatures in each region are determined. (active media)

  1. ACTIVE MEDIA: Specific features of thermal regimes in rectangular laser slabs under steady-state pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpat'ev, A. N.; Smirnov, V. A.; Shcherbakov, Ivan A.

    2010-01-01

    We continue to investigate the phenomena related to smoothing of temperature profiles in rectangular laser slabs and to an increase in the thresholds of their breakdown under optical pumping with variations in the slab optical density [the effect of smoothing of thermooptical inhomogeneities (STOI effect)]. It is found that the STOI effect is observed not only with increasing but also with decreasing optical density if this occurs due to a decrease in the sample thickness. The dependence of the maximum temperature difference inside the slab on its optical density at the instant of its thermal breakdown is calculated. It is shown that the variations in the optical density caused by variations in both the absorption coefficient and geometric dimensions of the slab differently affect the order of occurrence of two undesirable events — destruction of the slab or boiling of cooling water — with increasing pump power. The calculated relationships reveal two optical density regions corresponding to different orders of occurrence of these events. The maximum allowable temperatures in each region are determined.

  2. Thermal Effects in the Hydrothermal Regime of Magmatic-Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, P. A.

    2002-05-01

    Models of conductive and convective cooling of epizonal magma bodies commonly show temperatures in the country rock that are at or below 500 C. Indeed, simple conductive cooling models place the contact temperature below the midpoint of the intrusion and country rock temperatures, which for felsic magmas in cold country rock (cf. Furlong et al., 1991, Rev. in Min. v. 26), is approximately 500 C or lower. However, some vein systems record temperatures e.g. from fluid inclusions or phase equilibria that exceed 500 C. In some cases, as in some deep skarn deposits, high temperatures of ore deposition probably result from high country rock temperatures. Veins may also occur in the already cooled portions of an ore-generative pluton, which can be at any temperature below the solidus. In still other cases, high country rock temperatures may be heated by previous magmatic events (thermal ground preparation). However, high temperatures of mineral alteration or deposition may be produced in initially cold country rock by flux of high temperature magmatic volatile phase from the magma itself. This is a likely explanation when ore is associated with early stages of magmatism at shallow levels in the crust. The mass conservation equations of infiltration theory (cf. Ferry, 1991, Rev. in Min. v. 26), can be used to estimate time-integrated fluid fluxes, q, given changes in quartz solubility with temperature, geothermal and geobaric gradients in shallow magmatic environments, and order of magnitude vein quartz densities in porphyry copper deposits. The change in the silica content of the rock due to quartz veining is then given by: \\Delta cQZ =- \\int Jw dt \\times \

  3. High resolution characterization of northwest Mediterranean coastal waters thermal regimes: To better understand responses of benthic communities to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensoussan, Nathaniel; Romano, Jean-Claude; Harmelin, Jean-Georges; Garrabou, Joaquim

    2010-04-01

    In the North West Mediterranean (NWM), mass mortality events (MME) of long-lived benthic species that have occurred over the last two decades have been related to regional warming trend. Gaining robust data sets on thermal regimes is critical to assess conditions to which species have adapted, detect extreme events and critically evaluate biological impacts. High resolution temperature ( T) time series obtained during 1999-2006 from 5 to 40 m depth at four contrasted sites of the NWM were analyzed: Area Marina Protegida de les Illes Medes (NE Spain), Riou (Marseilles, France), Parc National de Port-Cros (France), and Réserve Naturelle de Scandola (Corsica, France). The seasonal pattern showed winter T around 11-13 °C, and summer T mainly around 22-24 °C near surface to 18-20 °C at depth. Stratification dynamics showed recurrent downwellings (>40 m) at Medes, frequent observation (1/3rd of the summer) of deep and cold upwelled waters at Riou, while Scandola exhibited stable summer stratification and highest suprathermoclinal T. Port-Cros showed an intermediate regime that oscillated between Riou and Scandola depending on the occurrence of northern winds. Data distribution study permitted to identify and to characterize 3 large scale positive anomalies concomitant with the mass mortality outbreaks of summers 1999, 2003 and 2006. The analysis of biological surveys on gorgonian populations showed significant impacts during the 3 years with temperature anomalies. Besides the degree of impact showed inter-annual differences which could be related to different T conditions concomitant to mortality events, from slight increase in T extreme of only 1-2 °C over short duration, to lengthened more classical summer conditions. Our results therefore support the hypothesis that shallow NWM populations of long-lived benthic species are living near their upper thermal thresholds. Given actual trends and projections in NWM, the repetition of new MMEs in the next decades is

  4. Cyclic CO2 emissions during the high temperature pulse of fluctuating thermal regime in eye-pigmented pupae of Megachile rotundata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Megachile rotundata, the primary pollinator used in alfalfa seed production, may need to be exposed to low-temperature storage to slow the bees’ development to better match spring emergence with the alfalfa bloom. It has been demonstrated that using a fluctuating thermal regime (FTR) improves the be...

  5. Phonon-engineered thermal transport in Si wires with constant and periodically modulated cross-sections: A crossover between nano- and microscale regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocemasov, A. I.; Nika, D. L.; Fomin, V. M.; Grimm, D.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2015-07-01

    The transition between nanoscale and microscale thermal transport regime at room temperature in silicon wires with constant and periodically modulated cross-section is theoretically investigated. Extrapolating the calculated thermal conductivity from the nano- to micrometer range, we find the characteristic dimensions of the wires where a crossover between nanoscale and microscale thermal transport occurs. This crossover is observed in both generic (smooth) and cross-section-modulated wires. In case of smooth silicon wires, we reveal a strong dependence of the crossing point position on the boundary roughness. For silicon wires with weak boundary roughness, the crossover occurs at cross-sections ˜60 nm × 300 nm, while for very rough boundaries it occurs at cross-sections ˜150 nm × 750 nm. In case of the periodically modulated wires, the crossover between nano- and microscale regimes occurs at typical cross-sections ˜120 nm × 120 nm of the narrow segment, and it is almost independent of boundary roughness. A strong distinction from the case of smooth wires is attributed (i) to the different trends at the nanometer scale, wherefrom the extrapolation was performed, and (ii) to the different phonon-boundary scattering due to the specific geometry. For modulated silicon wires, the influence of modulation thickness, modulation length, and cross-sectional area on the phonon thermal conductivity at the room temperature is analyzed. A possibility of thermal transport engineering in cross-section-modulated wires by resizing them is revealed in both nano- and microscale regimes. The presented results pave the way towards a better understanding of thermal transport reduction in Si nanowires with engineered diameter modulations and shed light on the crossover between nano- and microscale regimes of thermal transport.

  6. THERMAL ESCAPE IN THE HYDRODYNAMIC REGIME: RECONSIDERATION OF PARKER's ISENTROPIC THEORY BASED ON RESULTS OF KINETIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Alexey N.; Johnson, Robert E.

    2013-03-10

    The one-dimensional steady-state problem of thermal escape from a single-component atmosphere of mon- and diatomic gases is studied in the hydrodynamic (blow-off) regime using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method for an evaporative-type condition at the lower boundary. The simulations are performed for various depths into an atmosphere, indicated by a Knudsen number, Kn{sub 0}, equal to the ratio of the mean free path of molecules to the radial position of the source surface, ranging from 10 to 10{sup -5}, and for the range of the source Jeans parameter, {lambda}{sub 0}, equal to the ratio of gravitational and thermal energies, specific to blow-off. The results of kinetic simulations are compared with the isentropic model (IM) and the Navier-Stokes model. It is shown that the IM can be simplified if formulated in terms of the local Mach number and Jeans parameter. The simulations predict that at Kn{sub 0} < {approx} 10{sup -3} the flow includes a near-surface non-equilibrium Knudsen layer, a zone where the flow can be well approximated by the IM, and a rarefied far field. The corresponding IM solutions, however, only approach Parker's critical solution as {lambda}{sub 0} approaches the upper limit for blow-off. The IM alone is not capable for predicting the flow and requires boundary conditions at the top of the Knudsen layer. For small Kn{sub 0}, the scaled escape rate and energy loss rate are found to be independent of {lambda}{sub 0}. The simulation results can be scaled to any single-component atmosphere exhibiting blow-off if the external heating above the lower boundary is negligible, in particular, to sublimation-driven atmospheres of Kuiper belt objects.

  7. Testing the reference Moon model in respect of the thermal regime and chemical composition of the mantle: Thermodynamics versus seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskov, O. L.; Kronrod, V. A.; Kronrod, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    The VPREMOON seismic reference Moon model (Garcia et al., 2011) has been tested with respect to the thermal regime and chemical composition of the mantle. Based on a self-consistent thermodynamic approach and petrological models of the lunar mantle covering a wide range of concentrations of CaO, Al2O3, and FeO, we convert the P- and S-wave velocity profiles to the temperature-depth profiles. The solution procedure relies on the method of the Gibbs free energy minimization and the equations of state for the mantle material which take into account the effects of phase transformations, anharmonicity, and anelasticity. We find that regardless of the chemical composition, the positive P- and S-wave velocity gradient in the lunar mantle leads to a negative temperature gradient, which has no physical basis. For adequate mantle temperatures, the P- and S-wave velocities should remain almost constant or slightly decrease with depth (especially V S ) as a result of the effects of the temperature, which grows faster than pressure. These findings underscore the importance of the relationship of the thermodynamics and physics of minerals with seismology.

  8. Geothermal measurements in the northern Red Sea: Implications for lithospheric thermal structure and mode of extension during continental rifting

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, F.; Cochran, J.R. )

    1989-09-10

    The northern Red Sea is a continental rift in the process of transition from continental to oceanic rifting. We present 191 new heat flow measurements from the northern Red Sea forming three traverses across the water covered portion of the rift. The heat flow across the rift systematically increases from values of about 125 mW/m{sup 2} seaward of the coasts to average values greater than 250 mW/m{sup 2} in the axial depression. The heat flow measurements are evaluated for environmental disturbances. These are found to be generally small. The largest estimated disturbance results from the relief of the seafloor and of the top of a subbottom evaporite layer. The relief on these surfaces can account for the 20% point to point scatter typically observed in the heat flow measurements. Limits are placed on systematic disturbances to the heat flow pattern across the rift. The estimated largest systematic disturbance results from sediment blanketing which may cause a reduction in the heat flow on the order of 10%.

  9. Survival, development, and growth of fall Chinook salmon embryos, alevin, and fry exposed to variable thermal and dissolved oxygen regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Hand, Kristine D.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Chandler, James A.; Groves, Philip

    2006-11-15

    Some fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) initiate spawning in the Snake River downstream of Hells Canyon Dam at temperatures that exceed 13?C and at intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations that are less than 8 mg O2/L. Although water temperature declines and dissolved oxygen increases soon after spawning, these temperature and dissolved oxygen levels do not meet the water quality standards established by the states of Oregon and Idaho for salmonid spawning. Our objective was to determine if temperatures from 13 to 17 C and dissolved oxygen levels from 4 to greater than 8 mg O2/L during the first 40 days of incubation followed by declining temperature and rising dissolved oxygen affected survival, development, and growth of Snake River fall Chinook salmon embryos, alevins, and fry. During the first 40 days of incubation, temperatures were adjusted downward approximately 0.2 C/day and oxygen was increased in increments of 2 mg O2/L to mimic the thermal and oxygen regime of the Snake River where these fish spawn. At 40 days post-fertilization, embryos were moved to a common exposure regime that followed the thermal and dissolved oxygen profile of the Snake River through emergence. Mortality of fall Chinook salmon embryos increased markedly at initial incubation temperatures equal to or greater than 17?C, and a rapid decline in survival occurred between 16.5 C and 17 C, with no significant difference in survival at temperatures less than or equal to 16.5 C. Initial dissolved oxygen levels as low as 4 mg O2/L over a range of initial temperatures from 15 to 16.5 C did not affect embryo survival to emergence. There were no significant differences across the range of initial temperature exposures for alevin and fry size at hatch and emergence. The number of days from fertilization to eyed egg, hatch, and emergence was highly related to temperature and dissolved oxygen; it took from 6 to 10 days longer to reach hatch at 4 mg O2/L than at saturation and up to

  10. An epidemic model for the interactions between thermal regime of rivers and transmission of Proliferative Kidney Disease in salmonid fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Luca; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mari, Lorenzo; Gatto, Marino; Strepparava, Nicole; Hartikainen, Hanna; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Proliferative kidney disease (PKD) affects salmonid populations in European and North-American rivers. It is caused by the endoparasitic myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae, which exploits freshwater bryozoans (Fredericella sultana) and salmonids as primary and secondary hosts, respectively. Incidence and mortality, which can reach up to 90-100%, are known to be strongly related to water temperature. PKD has been present in brown trout population for a long time but has recently increased rapidly in incidence and severity causing a decline in fish catches in many countries. In addition, environmental changes are feared to cause PKD outbreaks at higher latitude and altitude regions as warmer temperatures promote disease development. This calls for a better comprehension of the interactions between disease dynamics and the thermal regime of rivers, in order to possibly devise strategies for disease management. In this perspective, a spatially explicit model of PKD epidemiology in riverine host metacommunities is proposed. The model aims at summarizing the knowledge on the modes of transmission of the disease and the life-cycle of the parasite, making the connection between temperature and epidemiological parameters explicit. The model accounts for both local population and disease dynamics of bryozoans and fish and hydrodynamic dispersion of the parasite spores and hosts along the river network. The model is time-hybrid, coupling inter-seasonal and intra-seasonal dynamics, the former being described in a continuous time domain, the latter seen as time steps of a discrete time domain. In order to test the model, a case study is conducted in river Wigger (Cantons of Aargau and Lucerne, Switzerland), where data about water temperature, brown trout and bryozoan populations and PKD prevalence are being collected.

  11. Thermal history and long-term evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin, Kaoko belt, NW Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, D. P.; Glasmacher, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    From Permo-Carboniferous to Mid Jurassic the Kaoko belt in northwestern Namibia was affected by deep erosion of the Damara Sequence, Permo-Triassic collisional processes along the southern margin of Gondwana (Coward & Daly 1984), and the deposition of the Karoo Supergroup. The lithostratigraphic units consist of Proterozoic and Cambrian metamorphosed rocks with ages of 534 (7) Ma to 481 (25) Ma (Miller 1983), as well as Mesozoic sedimentary and igneous rocks. The Early Jurassic Karoo flood basalt lavas erupted rapidly at 183 (1) Ma (Duncan et al. 1997). The Early Cretaceous Paraná-Etendeka flood basalts (132 (1) Ma) and mafic dike swarms mark the rift stage of the opening of the South Atlantic (Stewart et al. 1996). The 'passive' continental margin in northern Namibia is a perfect location to quantify exhumation and uplift rates, model the long-term landscape evolution and provide information about the major processes controlling the landscape evolution in this region. The poster will present thermochronological data, t-T-models and exhumation rates for the Kaoko belt, NW Namibia. References Coward, M. P. and Daly, M. C., 1984. Crustal lineaments and shear zones in Africa: Their relationships to plate movements, Precambrian Research 24: 27-45. Duncan, R., Hooper, P., Rehacek, J., March, J. and Duncan, A., 1997. The timing and duration of the Karoo igneous event, southern Gondwana, Journal of Geophysical Research 102: 18127-18138. Miller, R. M., 1983. Evolution of the Damara Orogen, Vol. 11, Geological Society, South Africa Spec. Pub.. Stewart, K. S., Turner, S., Kelly, S., Hawkesworth, C. J., Kirstein, L. and Mantovani, M. S. M., 1996. 3D 40Ar-39Ar geochronology in the Paraná continental flood basalt province, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 143: 95-110.

  12. The Influences of Land Surface Properties on Soil Thermal Regimes in the Low Arctic of Northwestern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, H. E.; Frost, G. V., Jr.; Matyshak, G. V.; Walker, D. A.; Meakem, V. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the feedbacks among climate, permafrost, and vegetation is crucial for assessments of arctic ecosystem vulnerability and response to climate change, and for development of sustainable engineering and management methods associated with infrastructure. Vegetation, snow cover, and near-surface soil organic layers are key determinants in regulating the energy exchange between the atmosphere and the deeper soils. Here we present high-temporal resolution soil thermal regime data over annual time extents for multiple sites at two locations in the Low Arctic of northwestern Siberia. At a location near Nadym, Russia, we measured soil temperatures at various depths in the soil profile (down to 60 cm) at three sites: 1) a boreal forest stand with lichen understory and a shallow organic layer (8 cm), 2) a young, cryoturbated Sphagnum peatland with soil organic layers to 40 cm depth, and 3) an old Sphagnum peatland with deep organic soil horizons (58+ cm). At a location near Kharp, Russia, we measured soil temperatures at 5 and 20 cm depth for sites along a chronosequence of tall alder shrub expansion, from short-statured tundra to mature and old alder stands, with deeper organic layers. The deeper snow accumulation at the Nadym forest site kept winter soil temperatures dramatically warmer than the peatland soils, up to 8 °C difference, but the shading of the forest tended to cool the surface during the summer. The overall effect of the forest was cooler summer soils in the near-surface layers, yet warmer summer soils at the deeper layers (20-60 cm). The forest location had substantially greater thawing degree days at depth (20-60 cm), compared to the Sphagnum peatlands. At the Kharp site, mature alder shrub stands cooled summer soil temperatures relative to shorter tundra by up to 8 °C (at 20 cm depth), yet warmed winter soils by greater than 10 °C. Mature and old shrubland locations had reduced thawing degree days at 20 cm depth relative to short

  13. Mapping evapotranspiration and drought at local to continental scales with a thermal-based surface energy balance model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water lost to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration (ET) has the effect of cooling the Earth’s surface. Land-surface temperature (LST), as mapped using thermal-infrared (TIR) band data, is therefore a valuable remote indicator of both ET and the surface moisture status (Moran, 2003). In partia...

  14. Thermal regime and potential bedrock weathering in alpine rockwalls of Austria: Results from eight years of monitoring (2006-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Wecht, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Bedrock temperature at sites with a minor winter snow cover gives a good indication for the effects of air temperature anomalies on ground thermal conditions as well as for the intensity of near-surface physical weathering in bedrock. In this study we present results from an ongoing bedrock temperature monitoring program initiated in 2006. Within the framework of this program nine surface boreholes in rockwalls with different slope orientations and two additional boreholes at flat bedrock sites were drilled between August and September 2006 and subsequently instrumented. The altogether eleven rock temperature sites (RTS) are located in the alpine periglacial zone of the Austrian Alps at latitude 46°55' to 47°22' and longitude 12°44' to 14°41'. All RTS have been installed in metamorphic rock (5 x mica schist; 6 x gneiss) at elevations between 1960 and 2725 m asl (mean 2491 m asl.). Three temperature sensors (PT1000) have been inserted at each borehole site at vertical depths of 3, 10 and 30-40 cm. At each RTS the three sensors are connected to a 3-channel miniature temperature datalogger (MTD) manufactured by GeoPrecision, Germany. Our analysis focussed on (a) the variation of mean and extreme daily temperatures at the rock surface and at depth, (b) the variation of the daily temperature range, (c) the number of freeze-thaw-cycles (FTC) and (d) effective freeze-thaw cycles for frost shattering (eFTC), (e) the duration and intensity of freeze-thaw-cycles (DI-FTC), (f) the number of hours and days within the so-called frost-cracking-window (FCW), and effects of (g) aspect and (h) snow cover on the thermal regimes in the bedrock. Results show for instance that the number of FTC and eFTC varied substantially during the observation period at all eleven RTS and at all sensor depths. However, this variation differs from site to site related to snow cover condition, elevation and aspect. For instance, at one lower-elevated (2255 m asl) north exposed RTS the number of

  15. The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum record in the organic matter of the Claret and Tendruy continental sections (South-central Pyrenees, Lleida, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, Laura; López-Martínez, Nieves; Leng, Melanie J.; Grimes, Stephen T.

    2009-05-01

    The Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE) associated with the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) has been detected for the first time in the total organic carbon (TOC) contained within the continental sediments of the Tremp Formation (South Central Pyrenees, Lleida, Spain). The δ13C TOC magnitude of the CIE is ~ 4.3‰ in the Claret section and ~ 3.0‰ in the Tendruy section with minimum values of - 27.6‰ and - 26.7‰, respectively. Previous studies have detected the CIE in the South Central Pyrenees in both marine carbonates and within continental soil carbonate nodules. These studies have located the onset of the CIE either above or within the Claret Conglomerate, interpreted as a megafan produced by a profound change in the precipitation regimen at the beginning of the PETM. Our higher resolution δ13C TOC study in the Claret and Tendruy sections places the onset of the CIE below the base of the Claret Conglomerate and therefore suggests a 4 to 9 kyr time lag between the onset of the CIE and an increase in intense seasonal precipitation rates. Furthermore, this study suggests that the CIE took place ~ 30-55 kyr after the deposition of important late Cernaysian Tremp mammalian sites (Claret-4, Tendruy-V, Tendruy and Palau) which contain the youngest known occurrence of endemic Paleocene mammalian taxa in Europe before the Mammalian Dispersal Event (MDE, migration of new mammal groups, such as perissodactyls, artiodactyls, primates, marsupials, carnivores, creodonts and rodents). The first immigrant mammals in Europe are recorded at Dormaal (Belgium) above a hiatus, the base of which has been dated to around the start of the CIE. Our data indicate that the MDE might have in fact occurred in Europe within a time interval of about 67 kyr around the CIE onset.

  16. Influence of Earth crust composition on continental collision style in Precambrian conditions: Results of supercomputer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, Sergey; Zakharov, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A number of issues concerning Precambrian geodynamics still remain unsolved because of uncertainity of many physical (thermal regime, lithosphere thickness, crust thickness, etc.) and chemical (mantle composition, crust composition) parameters, which differed considerably comparing to the present day values. In this work, we show results of numerical supercomputations based on petrological and thermomechanical 2D model, which simulates the process of collision between two continental plates, each 80-160 km thick, with various convergence rates ranging from 5 to 15 cm/year. In the model, the upper mantle temperature is 150-200 ⁰C higher than the modern value, while the continental crust radiogenic heat production is higher than the present value by the factor of 1.5. These settings correspond to Archean conditions. The present study investigates the dependence of collision style on various continental crust parameters, especially on crust composition. The 3 following archetypal settings of continental crust composition are examined: 1) completely felsic continental crust; 2) basic lower crust and felsic upper crust; 3) basic upper crust and felsic lower crust (hereinafter referred to as inverted crust). Modeling results show that collision with completely felsic crust is unlikely. In the case of basic lower crust, a continental subduction and subsequent continental rocks exhumation can take place. Therefore, formation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks is possible. Continental subduction also occurs in the case of inverted continental crust. However, in the latter case, the exhumation of felsic rocks is blocked by upper basic layer and their subsequent interaction depends on their volume ratio. Thus, if the total inverted crust thickness is about 15 km and the thicknesses of the two layers are equal, felsic rocks cannot be exhumed. If the total thickness is 30 to 40 km and that of the felsic layer is 20 to 25 km, it breaks through the basic layer leading to

  17. Thermal history, exhumation and long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin, Kaoko Belt, NW Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, Daniel; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.; Hackspacher, Peter C.; Schneider, Gabriele; Zentner, Henning; Karl, Markus

    2014-05-01

    After the Damara Orogeny at the end of the Neoproterozoic the Kaoko Belt in northwestern Namibia was affected by deep erosion of the Damara Sequence, followed by the depositon of the Karoo Supergroup from Permo-Carboniferous to Early Cretaceous. The lithostratigraphic units consist of Late Proterozoic to Cambrian metamorphosed rocks and intrusive complexes of the Damara Group, with ages of 534 (7) Ma to 481 (25) Ma (Miller 1983), that are unconformably overlain by terrestrial deposits of the Karoo Supergroup (Stollhofen 1999), comprising two flood basalt events: the Karoo flood basalts, at 183 (1) Ma (Duncan et al. 1997), and the Early Cretaceous Paraná-Etendeka flood basalts, at 132 (1) Ma (Renne et al. 1996). The latter marking the rift stage of the opening of the South Atlantic. The "passive" continental margin along the Kaoko Belt in northern Namibia is a perfect location to quantify exhumation and uplift rates, model the long-term landscape evolution and provide information about the major processes controlling the landscape evolution in this region. The poster/talk will present thermochronological data, t-T-models and exhumation rates for the Kaoko belt, NW Namibia. References Miller, R. M., 1983. Evolution of the Damara Orogen, Vol. 11, Geol. Soc., South Africa Spec. Pub.. Renne, P.R., Glen, J.M., Milner, S.C., Duncan, A.R., 1996. Age of Etendeka flood volcanism and associated intrusions in southwestern Africa, Geology 24 (7): 659- 662. Duncan, R., Hooper, P., Rehacek, J., March, J. and Duncan, A., 1997. The timing and duration of the Karoo igneous event, southern Gondwana, J. Geophys. Res. 102: 18127-18138. Stollhofen, H., 1999. Karoo Synrift-Sedimentation und ihre tektonische Kontrolle am entstehenden Kontinentalrand Namibias, Z.dt.geol.Ges. 149: 519-632.

  18. Location and mapping of hydrologic regimes and thermal waters in Hawai'i: the use of electrical geophysical techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, Jim

    1990-01-01

    Useful information on several different hydrologic regimes can be obtained using a combination of electrical geophysical surveys. Fresh-water lenses and laterally-confined aquifers can be located and mapped. However, more studies are required to evaluate the utility of geophysical methods for assessing perched aquifers.

  19. Observations and Modelling of Hillslope Throughflow Temperature and Its Influence on Headwater Stream Thermal Regimes in the Rain-on-Snow Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, J. A.; Moore, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Stream temperature controls a variety of biological, chemical and physical in-stream processes. A growing body of research has highlighted the importance of advection associated with surface water and groundwater interactions on stream thermal regimes, and considerable effort has focused on the thermal role of hyporheic exchange and groundwater discharge. However, few studies have focused on advection associated with hillslope throughflow inputs. Current catchment-scale coupled hydrology and stream temperature models (DHSVM, SWAT, HSPF, CEQUEAU, MIKE SHE) use a variety of approaches to estimate throughflow temperatures, but none of these approaches has been evaluated against field measurements of throughflow temperature. We monitored throughflow temperature at fifty locations along a headwater stream located in the rain-on-snow zone of the Pacific Northwest. Current approaches to estimate throughflow temperature were evaluated against field observations and were found to under- or over-predict throughflow temperatures by up to 8 °C, or not be able to represent the influence of transient snow cover. Therefore, we developed a conceptual-parametric hydrology and stream temperature model that simulates hillslope throughflow temperatures. The model successfully predicts throughflow temperatures and highlights the dominant role of throughflow advection and the influence of snow cover on stream thermal regimes during high flow periods and rain-on-snow events.

  20. Theoretical regime diagrams for thermally driven flows in a beta-plane channel in the presence of variable gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisler, J. E.; Fowlis, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of a power law gravity field on baroclinic instability is examined, with a focus on the case of inverse fifth power gravity, since this is the power law produced when terrestrial gravity is simulated in spherical geometry by a dielectric force. Growth rates are obtained of unstable normal modes as a function of parameters of the problem by solving a second order differential equation numerically. It is concluded that over the range of parameter space explored, there is no significant change in the character of theoretical regime diagrams if the vertically averaged gravity is used as parameter.

  1. Heating-frequency-dependent thermal conductivity: An analytical solution from diffusive to ballistic regime and its relevance to phonon scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Dames, Chris

    2015-04-01

    The heating-frequency dependence of the apparent thermal conductivity in a semi-infinite body with periodic planar surface heating is explained by an analytical solution to the Boltzmann transport equation. This solution is obtained using a two-flux model and gray mean free time approximation and verified numerically with a lattice Boltzmann method and numerical results from the literature. Extending the gray solution to the nongray regime leads to an integral transform and accumulation-function representation of the phonon scattering spectrum, where the natural variable is mean free time rather than mean free path, as often used in previous work. The derivation leads to an approximate cutoff conduction similar in spirit to that of Koh and Cahill [Phys. Rev. B 76, 075207 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevB.76.075207] except that the most appropriate criterion involves the heater frequency rather than thermal diffusion length. The nongray calculations are consistent with Koh and Cahill's experimental observation that the apparent thermal conductivity shows a stronger heater-frequency dependence in a SiGe alloy than in natural Si. Finally these results are demonstrated using a virtual experiment, which fits the phase lag between surface temperature and heat flux to obtain the apparent thermal conductivity and accumulation function.

  2. Review of biomaterial thermal property measurements in the cryogenic regime and their use for prediction of equilibrium and non-equilibrium freezing applications in cryobiology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeunghwan; Bischof, John C

    2010-02-01

    It is well accepted in cryobiology that the temperature history and cooling rates experienced in biomaterials during freezing procedures correlate strongly with biological outcome. Therefore, heat transfer measurement and prediction in the cryogenic regime is central to the field. Although direct measurement of temperature history (i.e. heat transfer) can be performed, accuracy is usually achieved only for local measurements within a given system and cannot be readily generalized to another system without the aid of predictive models. The accuracy of these models rely upon thermal properties which are known to be highly dependent on temperature, and in the case of significant cryoprotectant loading, also on crystallized fraction. In this work, we review the available thermal properties of biomaterials in the cryogenic regime. The review shows a lack of properties for many biomaterials in the subzero temperature domain, and especially for systems with cryoprotective agents. Unfortunately, use of values from the limited data available (usually only down to -40 degrees C) lead to an underestimation of thermal property change (i.e. conductivity rise and specific heat drop due to ice crystallization) with lower temperatures. Conversely, use of surrogate values based solely on ice thermal properties lead to an overestimation of thermal property change for most biomaterials. Additionally, recent work extending the range of available thermal properties to -150 degrees C has shown that the thermal conductivity will drop in both PBS and tissue (liver) due to amorphous/glassy phases (versus crystalline) of biomaterials with the addition of cryoprotective additives such as glycerol. Thus, we investigated the implications of using approximated or constant property values versus measured temperature-dependent values for predicting temperature history during freezing in PBS (phosphate-buffered saline) and porcine liver with and without cryoprotectants (glycerol). Using measured

  3. Thermal comfort in Quebec City, Canada: sensitivity analysis of the UTCI and other popular thermal comfort indices in a mid-latitude continental city.

    PubMed

    Provençal, Simon; Bergeron, Onil; Leduc, Richard; Barrette, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    The newly developed Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI), along with the physiological equivalent temperature (PET), the humidex (HX) and the wind chill index (WC), was calculated in Quebec City, Canada, a city with a strong seasonal climatic variability, over a 1-year period. The objective of this study is twofold: evaluate the operational benefits of implementing the UTCI for a climate monitoring program of public comfort and health awareness as opposed to relying on traditional and simple indices, and determine whether thermal comfort monitoring specific to dense urban neighborhoods is necessary to adequately fulfill the goals of the program. In order to do so, an analysis is performed to evaluate each of these indices' sensitivity to the meteorological variables that regulate them in different environments. Overall, the UTCI was found to be slightly more sensitive to mean radiant temperature, moderately more sensitive to humidity and much more sensitive to wind speed than the PET. This dynamic changed slightly depending on the environment and the season. In hot weather, the PET was found to be more sensitive to mean radiant temperature and therefore reached high values that could potentially be hazardous more frequently than the UTCI and the HX. In turn, the UTCI's stronger sensitivity to wind speed makes it a superior index to identify potentially hazardous weather in winter compared to the PET and the WC. Adopting the UTCI broadly would be an improvement over the traditionally popular HX and WC indices. The urban environment produced favorable conditions to sustain heat stress conditions, where the indices reached high values more frequently there than in suburban locations, which advocates for weather monitoring specific to denser urban areas. PMID:26349476

  4. Thermal comfort in Quebec City, Canada: sensitivity analysis of the UTCI and other popular thermal comfort indices in a mid-latitude continental city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provençal, Simon; Bergeron, Onil; Leduc, Richard; Barrette, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    The newly developed Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI), along with the physiological equivalent temperature (PET), the humidex (HX) and the wind chill index (WC), was calculated in Quebec City, Canada, a city with a strong seasonal climatic variability, over a 1-year period. The objective of this study is twofold: evaluate the operational benefits of implementing the UTCI for a climate monitoring program of public comfort and health awareness as opposed to relying on traditional and simple indices, and determine whether thermal comfort monitoring specific to dense urban neighborhoods is necessary to adequately fulfill the goals of the program. In order to do so, an analysis is performed to evaluate each of these indices' sensitivity to the meteorological variables that regulate them in different environments. Overall, the UTCI was found to be slightly more sensitive to mean radiant temperature, moderately more sensitive to humidity and much more sensitive to wind speed than the PET. This dynamic changed slightly depending on the environment and the season. In hot weather, the PET was found to be more sensitive to mean radiant temperature and therefore reached high values that could potentially be hazardous more frequently than the UTCI and the HX. In turn, the UTCI's stronger sensitivity to wind speed makes it a superior index to identify potentially hazardous weather in winter compared to the PET and the WC. Adopting the UTCI broadly would be an improvement over the traditionally popular HX and WC indices. The urban environment produced favorable conditions to sustain heat stress conditions, where the indices reached high values more frequently there than in suburban locations, which advocates for weather monitoring specific to denser urban areas.

  5. Continental aggregation, subduction initiation, and plume generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, P. J.; Lowman, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Several processes unfold during the supercontinent cycle, more than one of which might result in an elevation in subcontinental mantle temperatures through the generation of mantle plumes. Paleogeographic plate reconstructions have indicated that sub-continental mantle upwellings appear below large continents that are extensively ringed by subduction zones. Moreover, several numerical simulations of supercontinent formation and dispersal attribute the genesis of sub-continental plumes to the generation of subduction zones on the edges of the supercontinent, rather than resulting from continental insulation. However, the role of the location of downwellings in producing a return-flow upwelling, and on increasing sub-continental mantle temperatures, is not fully understood. In this mantle convection study, we examine the evolution of mantle dynamics after supercontinent accretion over a subduction zone (analogous to the formation of Pangea) for a range of continental coverage. We present 2D and 3D Cartesian geometry mantle convection simulations, featuring geotherm- and pressure-dependent viscosity with thermally and mechanically distinct oceanic and continental plates. Through changing the size of the continent we are able to analyze the factors involved in the generation of mantle plumes in purely thermal convection. Furthermore, we change the upper and lower mantle viscosity to determine their relation to plume formation in vigorous mantle convection simulations. Elevated sub-continental temperatures are analyzed in relation to continental coverage to further understand the influence of continental tectonics on the thermal evolution of the mantle.

  6. Continental magnetic anomaly constraints on continental reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies mapped by the MAGSAT satellite for North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica and adjacent marine areas were adjusted to a common elevation of 400 km and differentially reduced to the radial pole of intensity 60,000 nT. These radially polarized anomalies are normalized for differential inclination, declination and intensity effects of the geomagnetic field, so that in principle they directly reflected the geometric and magnetic polarization attributes of sources which include regional petrologic variations of the crust and upper mantle, and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. Continental anomalies demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, they suggest further fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution of the continents and their reconstructions.

  7. Controls on the Flow Regime and Thermal Structure of the Subduction Zone Mantle Wedge: A Systematic 2-D and 3-D Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Voci, Giuseppe; Davies, Rhodri; Goes, Saskia; Kramer, Stephan; Wilson, Cian

    2014-05-01

    Arc volcanism at subduction zones is likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure and, hence, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the principal controls on mantle wedge conditions. Here, we build on these previous studies by undertaking the first systematic 2-D and 3-D numerical investigation, across a wide parameter-space, into how hydration and thermal buoyancy influence the wedge's flow regime and associated thermal structure, above a kinematically driven subducting plate. We find that small-scale convection (SSC), resulting from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, or drips, off the base of the overriding lithosphere, is a typical occurrence, if: (i) viscosities are < 5×1018 Pa s; and (ii) hydrous weakening of wedge rheology extends at least 100-150 km from the trench. In 2-D models, instabilities generally take the form of 'drips'. Although along-strike averages of wedge velocities and temperature in 3-D structure are consistent with those in 2-D, fluctuations are larger in 3-D. Furthermore, in 3-D, two separate, but interacting, longitudinal Richter roll systems form (with their axes aligned perpendicular to the trench), the first below the arc region and the second below the back-arc region. These instabilities result in transient and spatial temperature fluctuations of 100-150K, which are sufficient to influence melting, the stability of hydrous minerals and the dehydration of crustal material. Furthermore, they are efficient at eroding the overriding lithosphere, particularly in 3-D and, thus, provide a means to explain observations of high heat flow and thin back-arc lithosphere at many subduction zones, if back-arc mantle is hydrated.

  8. Continental Rifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendahl, B. R.

    Continental Rifts, edited by A. M. Quennell, is a new member of the Benchmark Papers in Geology Series, edited in toto by R. W. Fairbridge. In this series the individual volume editors peruse the literature on a given topic, select a few dozen papers of ostensibly benchmark quality, and then reorder them in some sensible fashion. Some of the original papers are republished intact, but many are chopped into “McNuggets™” of information. Depending upon the volume editor, the chopping process can range from a butchering job to careful and prudent pruning. The collecting, sifting, and reorganizing tasks are, of course, equally editor-sensitive. The end product of this series is something akin to a set of Reader's Digest of Geology.

  9. Analysis of Influence of Heat Insulation on the Thermal Regime of Storage Tanks with Liquefied Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, Vyacheslav I.; Nagornova, Tatiana A.; Glazyrin, Viktor P.; Shestakov, Igor A.

    2016-02-01

    Is numerically investigated the process of convective heat transfer in the reservoirs of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The regimes of natural convection in a closed rectangular region with different intensity of heat exchange at the external borders are investigated. Is solved the time-dependent system of energy and Navier-Stokes equations in the dimensionless variables "vorticity - the stream function". Are obtained distributions of the hydrodynamic parameters and temperatures, that characterize basic regularities of the processes. The special features of the formation of circulation flows are isolated and the analysis of the temperature distribution in the solution region is carried out. Is shown the influence of geometric characteristics and intensity of heat exchange on the outer boundaries of reservoir on the temperature field in the LNG storage.

  10. No thermal anomalies in the mantle transition zone beneath an incipient continental rift: evidence from the first receiver function study across the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Liu, K. H.; Moidaki, M.; Reed, C. A.; Gao, S. S.

    2015-08-01

    Mechanisms leading to the initiation and early-stage development of continental rifts remain enigmatic, in spite of numerous studies. Among the various rifting models, which were developed mostly based on studies of mature rifts, far-field stresses originating from plate interactions (passive rifting) and nearby active mantle upwelling (active rifting) are commonly used to explain rift dynamics. Situated atop of the hypothesized African Superplume, the incipient Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) of northern Botswana is ideal to investigate the role of mantle plumes in rift initiation and development, as well as the interaction between the upper and lower mantle. The ORZ developed within the Neoproterozoic Damara belt between the Congo Craton to the northwest and the Kalahari Craton to the southeast. Mantle structure and thermal status beneath the ORZ are poorly known, mostly due to a complete paucity of broad-band seismic stations in the area. As a component of an interdisciplinary project funded by the United States National Science Foundation, a broad-band seismic array was deployed over a 2-yr period between mid-2012 and mid-2014 along a profile 756 km in length. Using P-to-S receiver functions (RFs) recorded by the stations, the 410 and 660 km discontinuities bordering the mantle transition zone (MTZ) are imaged for the first time. When a standard Earth model is used for the stacking of RFs, the apparent depths of both discontinuities beneath the Kalahari Craton are about 15 km shallower than those beneath the Congo Craton. Using teleseismic P- and S-wave traveltime residuals obtained by this study and lithospheric thickness estimated by previous studies, we conclude that the apparent shallowing is the result of a 100-150 km difference in the thickness of the lithosphere between the two cratons. Relative to the adjacent tectonically stable areas, no significant anomalies in the depth of the MTZ discontinuities or in teleseismic P- and S-wave traveltime residuals are

  11. Impacts of projected mid-century temperatures on thermal regimes for select specialty and fieldcrops common to the southwestern U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, E.; Lopez-Brody, N.; Dialesandro, J.; Steele, C. M.; Rango, A.

    2015-12-01

    The impacts of projected temperature increases in agricultural ecosystems are complex, varyingby region, cropping system, crop growth stage and humidity. We analyze the impacts of mid-century temperature increases on crops grown in five southwestern states: Arizona, California,New Mexico, Nevada and Utah. Here we present a spatial impact assessment of commonsouthwestern specialty (grapes, almonds and tomatoes) and field (alfalfa, cotton and corn)crops. This analysis includes three main components: development of empirical temperaturethresholds for each crop, classification of predicted future climate conditions according to thesethresholds, and mapping the probable impacts of these climatic changes on each crop. We use30m spatial resolution 2012 crop distribution and seasonal minimum and maximumtemperature normals (1970 to 2000) to define the current thermal envelopes for each crop.These represent the temperature range for each season where 95% of each crop is presentlygrown. Seasonal period change analysis of mid-century temperatures changes downscaled from20 CMIP5 models (RCP8.5) estimate future temperatures. Change detection maps representareas predicted to become more or less suitable, or remain unchanged. Based upon mid-centurytemperature changes, total regional suitable area declined for all crops except cotton, whichincreased by 20%. For each crop there are locations which change to and from optimal thermalenvelope conditions. More than 80% of the acres currently growing tomatoes and almonds willshift outside the present 95% thermal range. Fewer acres currently growing alfalfa (14%) andcotton (20%) will shift outside the present 95% thermal range by midcentury. Crops outsidepresent thermal envelopes by midcentury may adapt, possibly aided by adaptation technologiessuch as misters or shade structures, to the new temperature regime or growers may elect togrow alternate crops better suited to future thermal envelopes.

  12. Combining Bioenergetic Responses of Fish to Thermal Regimes and Productivity in Reservoirs: Implications for Conservation and Re-Introduction of Anadromous Salmonids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchamp, D.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature, food availability, and predation risk form vertical gradients determining growth and survival for fish in lakes and reservoirs. These gradients change on inter-annual, seasonal, and diel temporal scales and are strongly influenced by climatic variability, conflicting water demands and management. Temperatures associated with optimal growth and energy loss vary both among life stages and species of fish, but the quantity and quality of available food resources can significantly alter these thermal responses. Greater understanding of how water management affects the timing, magnitude, and duration of thermal stratification, and how key species and their supporting aquatic resources respond can improve strategies for development and operation of water storage facilities within the context of localized environmental and ecological constraints. An emerging trend for coldwater reservoirs in the Pacific Northwest has been to re-introduce anadromous salmon above historically impassable dams. Thermal regimes and the existing ecological communities in the reservoirs and tributary habitats above these dams will determine the seasonal importance of lotic and lentic habitats for rearing or migration corridors. The feasibility of reservoir rearing and migration can be evaluated by combining mass- and species-specific thermal growth response curves with temporal dynamics in the vertical and longitudinal thermal structure of reservoirs and associated distribution of food resources (primarily zooplankton). The value of reservoirs as rearing habitats or migration corridors could be compared with coincident tributary conditions to predict the likely temporal-spatial distribution of optimal conditions for growth and survival of different species or life stages of salmonids within the watershed and how these conditions might change under different climatic or water management scenarios.

  13. Simulating the thermal regime and thaw processes of ice-rich permafrost ground with the land-surface model CryoGrid 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westermann, S.; Langer, M.; Boike, J.; Heikenfeld, M.; Peter, M.; Etzelmüller, B.; Krinner, G.

    2015-08-01

    Thawing of permafrost in a warming climate is governed by a complex interplay of different processes, of which only conductive heat transfer is taken into account in most model studies. However, observations in many permafrost landscapes demonstrate that lateral and vertical movement of water can have a pronounced influence on the thaw trajectories, creating distinct landforms like thermokarst ponds and lakes even in areas where permafrost is otherwise thermally stable. Novel process parameterizations are required to include such phenomena in future projections of permafrost thaw and hereby triggered climatic feedbacks. In this study, we present a new land-surface scheme designed for permafrost applications, CryoGrid 3, which constitutes a flexible platform to explore new parameterizations for a range of permafrost processes. We document the model physics and employed parameterizations for the basis module CryoGrid 3, and compare model results with in-situ observations of surface energy balance, surface temperatures, and ground thermal regime from the Samoylov permafrost observatory in NE Siberia. The comparison suggests that CryoGrid 3 can not only model the evolution of the ground thermal regime in the last decade, but also consistently reproduce the chain of energy transfer processes from the atmosphere to the ground. In addition, we demonstrate a simple 1-D parameterization for thaw process in permafrost areas rich in ground ice, which can phenomenologically reproduce both formation of thermokarst ponds and subsidence of the ground following thawing of ice-rich subsurface layers. Long-term simulation from 1901-2100 driven by reanalysis data and climate model output demonstrate that the hydrological regime can both accelerate and delay permafrost thawing. If meltwater from thawed ice-rich layers can drain, the ground subsides while at the same time the formation of a talik is delayed. If the meltwater pools at the surface, a pond is formed which enhances heat

  14. Simulating the thermal regime and thaw processes of ice-rich permafrost ground with the land-surface model CryoGrid 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westermann, S.; Langer, M.; Boike, J.; Heikenfeld, M.; Peter, M.; Etzelmüller, B.; Krinner, G.

    2016-02-01

    Thawing of permafrost in a warming climate is governed by a complex interplay of different processes of which only conductive heat transfer is taken into account in most model studies. However, observations in many permafrost landscapes demonstrate that lateral and vertical movement of water can have a pronounced influence on the thaw trajectories, creating distinct landforms, such as thermokarst ponds and lakes, even in areas where permafrost is otherwise thermally stable. Novel process parameterizations are required to include such phenomena in future projections of permafrost thaw and subsequent climatic-triggered feedbacks. In this study, we present a new land-surface scheme designed for permafrost applications, CryoGrid 3, which constitutes a flexible platform to explore new parameterizations for a range of permafrost processes. We document the model physics and employed parameterizations for the basis module CryoGrid 3, and compare model results with in situ observations of surface energy balance, surface temperatures, and ground thermal regime from the Samoylov permafrost observatory in NE Siberia. The comparison suggests that CryoGrid 3 can not only model the evolution of the ground thermal regime in the last decade, but also consistently reproduce the chain of energy transfer processes from the atmosphere to the ground. In addition, we demonstrate a simple 1-D parameterization for thaw processes in permafrost areas rich in ground ice, which can phenomenologically reproduce both formation of thermokarst ponds and subsidence of the ground following thawing of ice-rich subsurface layers. Long-term simulation from 1901 to 2100 driven by reanalysis data and climate model output demonstrate that the hydrological regime can both accelerate and delay permafrost thawing. If meltwater from thawed ice-rich layers can drain, the ground subsides, as well as the formation of a talik, are delayed. If the meltwater pools at the surface, a pond is formed that enhances heat

  15. Three Temperature Regimes in Superconducting Photon Detectors: Quantum, Thermal and Multiple Phase-Slips as Generators of Dark Counts

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Andrew; Semenov, Alexander; Korneev, Alexander; Korneeva, Yulia; Gol’tsman, Gregory; Bezryadin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    We perform measurements of the switching current distributions of three w ≈ 120 nm wide, 4 nm thick NbN superconducting strips which are used for single-photon detectors. These strips are much wider than the diameter of the vortex cores, so they are classified as quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D). We discover evidence of macroscopic quantum tunneling by observing the saturation of the standard deviation of the switching distributions at temperatures around 2 K. We analyze our results using the Kurkijärvi-Garg model and find that the escape temperature also saturates at low temperatures, confirming that at sufficiently low temperatures, macroscopic quantum tunneling is possible in quasi-2D strips and can contribute to dark counts observed in single photon detectors. At the highest temperatures the system enters a multiple phase-slip regime. In this range single phase-slips are unable to produce dark counts and the fluctuations in the switching current are reduced. PMID:25988591

  16. Three temperature regimes in superconducting photon detectors: quantum, thermal and multiple phase-slips as generators of dark counts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Andrew; Semenov, Alexander; Korneev, Alexander; Korneeva, Yulia; Gol'tsman, Gregory; Bezryadin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    We perform measurements of the switching current distributions of three w ≈ 120 nm wide, 4 nm thick NbN superconducting strips which are used for single-photon detectors. These strips are much wider than the diameter of the vortex cores, so they are classified as quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D). We discover evidence of macroscopic quantum tunneling by observing the saturation of the standard deviation of the switching distributions at temperatures around 2 K. We analyze our results using the Kurkijärvi-Garg model and find that the escape temperature also saturates at low temperatures, confirming that at sufficiently low temperatures, macroscopic quantum tunneling is possible in quasi-2D strips and can contribute to dark counts observed in single photon detectors. At the highest temperatures the system enters a multiple phase-slip regime. In this range single phase-slips are unable to produce dark counts and the fluctuations in the switching current are reduced. PMID:25988591

  17. Thermal Regime Inferred from Magnetic Anomaly Data in the Crust beneath the Japanese Islands, and its Relationship to Focal Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2003-12-01

    One of the indicators of lithospheric strength is the focal depth distribution of earthquakes. Temperature has long been regarded as an important variable in determining the seismogenic portion of the lithosphere. The thickness of seismogenic crust layer correlates with surface heat flow in most interplate seismic areas of the world [e.g., Sibson, 1982]. However, heat flow measurements are often widely spaced, requiring an extrapolation of the data to estimate the thermal structure in the crust in some regions. The uncertainties associated with these extrapolations preclude improving on the general correlation between heat flow and depth of seismicity. We used another approach to estimate the thermal structure in the crust. The bottom of the magnetized crust determined from the spectral analysis of residual magnetic anomalies is generally interpreted as the level of the Curie point isotherm. We estimate the bottom of the magnetized crust, Zb, of squares of 2.125o subregions using the magnetic anomaly map of the Japanese Islands [Makino et al., 1992]. At the same region, the thickness of seismogrnic crust is estimated as the depth above which 90 percent of the earthquakes occur, D90, using good quality hypocenters by JMA (Japan Meteorological Agency) data. Zb and D90 range from about 11 to 32 km and 12 km to 28 km, respectively. This suggests that our analysis cannot catch a locally shallow depth. And it is consistent with the expected inverse relation between Zb and the minimum heat flow values [Yamano et al., 1997] within the subregions. The inverse relation between Zb and D90 suggests that this analysis is useful to estimate the regional thermal structure.

  18. Structural controls, alteration, permeability and thermal regime of Dixie Valley from new-generation MT/galvanic array profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Philip E. Wannamaker

    2007-11-30

    State-of-the-art MT array measurements in contiguous bipole deployments across the Dixie Valley thermal area have been integrated with regional MT transect data and other evidence to address several basic geothermal goals. These include 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as indicated by low resistivity; 3), infer ultimate heat and fluid sources for the thermal area; and 4), from a generic technique standpoint, investigate the capability of well-sampled electrical data for resolving subsurface structure. Three dense lines cross the Senator Fumaroles area, the Cottonwood Creek and main producing area, and the low-permeability region through the section 10-15 area, and have stand-alone MT soundings appended at one or both ends for local background control. Regularized 2-D inversion implies that shallow pediment basement rocks extend for a considerable distance (1-2 km) southeastward from the topographic scarp of the Stillwater Range under all three dense profiles, but especially for the Senator Fumaroles line. This result is similar to gravity interpretations in the area, but with the intrinsic depth resolution possible from EM wave propagation. Low resistivity zones flank the interpreted main offsetting fault especially toward the north end of the field which may be due to alteration from geothermal fluid outflow and upflow. The appended MT soundings help to substantiate a deep, subvertical conductor intersecting the base of Dixie Valley from the middle crust, which appears to be a hydrothermal conduit feeding from deep crustal magmatic underplating. This may supply at least part of the high temperature fluids and explain enhanced He-3 levels in those fluids.

  19. Impact of climate change on soil thermal and moisture regimes in Serbia: An analysis with data from regional climate simulations under SRES-A1B.

    PubMed

    Mihailović, D T; Drešković, N; Arsenić, I; Ćirić, V; Djurdjević, V; Mimić, G; Pap, I; Balaž, I

    2016-11-15

    We considered temporal and spatial variations to the thermal and moisture regimes of the most common RSGs (Reference Soil Groups) in Serbia under the A1B scenario for the 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 periods, with respect to the 1961-1990 period. We utilized dynamically downscaled global climate simulations from the ECHAM5 model using the coupled regional climate model EBU-POM (Eta Belgrade University-Princeton Ocean Model). We analysed the soil temperature and moisture time series using simple statistics and a Kolmogorov complexity (KC) analysis. The corresponding metrics were calculated for 150 sites. In the future, warmer and drier regimes can be expected for all RSGs in Serbia. The calculated soil temperature and moisture variations include increases in the mean annual soil temperature (up to 3.8°C) and decreases in the mean annual soil moisture (up to 11.3%). Based on the KC values, the soils in Serbia are classified with respect to climate change impacts as (1) less sensitive (Vertisols, Umbrisols and Dystric Cambisols) or (2) more sensitive (Chernozems, Eutric Cambisols and Planosols). PMID:27473773

  20. Electronic transport regimes through an alkoxythiolated diphenyl-2,2'-bithiophene-based molecular junction diodes: critical assessment of the thermal dependence.

    PubMed

    Pace, Giuseppina; Caranzi, Lorenzo; Bucella, Sadir G; Canesi, Eleonora V; Dell'Erba, Giorgio; Bertarelli, Chiara; Caironi, Mario

    2015-02-01

    The detailed understanding of electronic transport through a single molecule or an ensemble of self-assembled molecules embedded between two metallic leads is still a matter of controversy. Multiple factors influence the charge transport in the molecular junction, with particular attention to be given to the band states of the electrodes, molecular orbital energies, bias potential and importantly molecule-electrode electronic coupling. Moreover it is not trivial to disentangle molecular contributions from other possible conduction pathways directly coupling the opposite electrodes. We here investigate the electronic transport properties of an ensemble molecular junction embedding an alkylthiol derivative of a diphenol substituted bithiophene (DPBT) by means of current vs. voltage and temperature dependent measurements. We explored different junction configurations using: micropores (Au//DPBT//Au and Au//DPBT-polymer conductor//Au) and conductive-atomic force microscopy (c-AFM). In all cases, we found a transition voltage V(T) of ∼0.35 V. The consistent presence of a similar V(T) in all the tested configurations is a strong, but not conclusive, indication of a molecular signature in the charge transport, which we assessed and confirmed by temperature dependent measurements. We found a transition from an incoherent resonant tunneling at low biases and close to room temperature, where transport is thermally activated with an activation energy of ∼85 meV, to a coherent tunneling at voltages higher than V(T). Unlike many other molecular junctions reported in the literature, resonant conditions commonly attributed to a hopping transport regime can be found already at room temperature and very low biases for a molecule only ∼1.5 nm long. This paper is the first report to clearly show temperature activated transport through a short and not fully conjugated molecule. Moreover, we could clearly identify a regime at low temperatures and low bias where the transport

  1. Simulation of characteristics of thermal and hydrologic soil regimes in equilibrium numerical experiments with a climate model of intermediate complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzhanov, M. M.; Demchenko, P. F.; Eliseev, A. V.; Mokhov, I. I.

    2008-10-01

    The IAP RAS CM (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, climate model) has been extended to include a comprehensive scheme of thermal and hydrologic soil processes. In equilibrium numerical experiments with specified preindustrial and current concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, the coupled model successfully reproduces thermal characteristics of soil, including the temperature of its surface, and seasonal thawing and freezing characteristics. On the whole, the model also reproduces soil hydrology, including the winter snow water equivalent and river runoff from large watersheds. Evapotranspiration from the soil surface and soil moisture are simulated somewhat worse. The equilibrium response of the model to a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide shows a considerable warming of the soil surface, a reduction in the extent of permanently frozen soils, and the general growth of evaporation from continents. River runoff increases at high latitudes and decreases in the subtropics. The results are in qualitative agreement with observational data for the 20th century and with climate model simulations for the 21st century.

  2. Constraints on the thermal evolution of the Adriatic margin during Jurassic continental break-up from U-Pb dating of rutile (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, T. A.; Rubatto, D.; Hermann, J.; Beltrando, M.

    2015-12-01

    U­-Pb dating of rutile is an ideal tool for exploring the cooling and exhumation history of the lower crust, given its moderate closure temperature and the occurrence of rutile in relevant lithologies. We present an example from the Ivrea-Verbano Zone (IVZ, Italy), a classic section through the Permian lower crust that records high-temperature metamorphism followed by extension and exhumation associated partly with the Jurassic opening of the Alpine Tethys ocean. Granulite facies metapelites collected across ~35 km have Zr-in-rutile temperatures that record crystallisation during Permian metamorphism and anatexis, but SHRIMP U-Pb dating of rutile records cooling through 650-550 °C in the Jurassic. Rutile age distributions are dominated by a peak at ~160 Ma, with a subordinate peak at ~175 Ma. Both age populations show excellent agreement between samples, indicating that the two distinctive cooling stages they record were synchronous on a regional scale. The ~175 Ma population is interpreted to record cooling in the footwall of rift-related faults and shear zones, for which widespread activity in the Lower Jurassic has been documented along the western margin of the Adriatic plate. The ~160 Ma age population postdates the activity of all known rift-related structures within the Adriatic margin, but coincides with extensive gabbroic magmatism and exhumation of sub-continental mantle to the floor of the Alpine Tethys, west of the IVZ. We propose that this ~160 Ma early post-rift age population records regional cooling following episodic heating of the distal Adriatic margin. The partial preservation of the ~175 Ma age cluster suggests that the post-rift (~160 Ma) heating pulse was of short duration. The regional consistency of the rutile U-Pb data is in contrast to many other thermochronometers in the IVZ, demonstrating the value of this technique for probing the thermal evolution of high-grade metamorphic terranes. The decoupling between Zr-in-rutile temperatures

  3. Monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil by circularly polarized laser pulse in RPA regime without thermal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Khudik, V.; Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2012-12-21

    A kinetic model of the monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil irradiated by the circularly polarized laser pulse is developed. The target moves without thermal heating with constant acceleration which is provided by chirping the frequency of the laser pulse and correspondingly increasing its intensity. In the accelerated reference frame, bulk plasma in the target is neutral and its parameters are stationary: cold ions are immobile while nonrelativistic electrons bounce back and forth inside the potential well formed by ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. It is shown that a positive charge left behind of the moving target in the ion tail and a negative charge in front of the target in the electron sheath form a capacitor whose constant electric field accelerates the ions of the target. The charge separation is maintained by the radiation pressure pushing electrons forward. The scalings of the target thickness and electromagnetic radiation with the electron temperature are found.

  4. The influence of stream thermal regimes and preferential flow paths on hyporheic exchange in a glacial meltwater stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzetto, Karen D.; Bencala, Kenneth E.; Gooseff, Michael N.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2013-09-01

    Given projected increases in stream temperatures attributable to global change, improved understanding of relationships between stream temperatures and hyporheic exchange would be useful. We conducted two conservative tracer injection experiments in a glacial meltwater stream, to evaluate the effects of hyporheic thermal gradients on exchange processes, including preferential flow paths (PFPs). The experiments were conducted on the same day, the first (a stream injection) during a cool, morning period and the second (dual stream and hyporheic injections) during a warm, afternoon period. In the morning, the hyporheic zone was thermally uniform at 4°C, whereas by the afternoon the upper 10 cm had warmed to 6-12°C and exhibited greater temperature heterogeneity. Solute transport modeling showed that hyporheic cross-sectional areas (As) at two downstream sites were two and seven times lower during the warm experiment. Exchange metrics indicated that the hyporheic zone had less influence on downstream solute transport during the warm, afternoon experiment. Calculated hyporheic depths were less than 5 cm, contrasting with tracer detection at 10 and 25 cm depths. The hyporheic tracer arrival at one downstream site was rapid, comparable to the in-stream tracer arrival, providing evidence for PFPs. We thus propose a conceptual view of the hyporheic zone in this reach as being dominated by discrete PFPs weaving through hydraulically isolated areas. One explanation for the simultaneous increase in temperature heterogeneity and As decrease in a warmer hyporheic zone may be a flow path preferentiality feedback mechanism resulting from a combination of temperature-related viscosity decreases and streambed heterogeneity.

  5. Survival, development, and growth of Snake River fall Chinook salmon Embryos, Alevins, and Fry Exposed to Variable Thermal and Dissolved Oxygen Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Hand, Kristine D.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Chandler, James A.; Groves, Philip

    2006-11-01

    Fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) initiate spawning in the Hells Canyon reach of the Snake River, Idaho (rkm 240-397), at water temperatures above 16 C. This temperature exceeds the states of Idaho and Oregon water quality standards for salmonid spawning. These standards are consistent with results from studies of embryos exposed to a constant thermal regime, while salmon eggs in the natural environment are rarely exposed to a constant temperature regime. The objective of this study was to assess whether variable temperatures (i.e., declining after spawning) affected embryo survival, development, and growth of Snake River fall Chinook salmon alevins and fry. In 2003, fall Chinook salmon eggs were exposed to initial incubation temperatures ranging from 11-19 C in 2 C increments, and in 2004 eggs were exposed to initial temperatures of 13 C, 15 C, 16 C, 16.5 C, and 17 C. In both years, temperatures were adjusted downward approximately 0.2 C/day to mimic the thermal regime of the Snake River where these fish spawn. At 37-40 days post-fertilization, embryos were moved to a common exposure regime that followed the thermal profile of the Snake River through emergence. Mortality of fall Chinook salmon embryos increased markedly at initial incubation temperatures >17 C in both years. A logistic regression model estimated that a 50% reduction in survival from fertilization to emergence would occur at an initial incubation temperature of {approx}16 C. The laboratory results clearly showed a significant reduction in survival between 15 C and 17 C, which supported the model estimate. Results from 2004 showed a rapid decline in survival occurred between 16.5 C and 17 C, with no significant differences in survival at initial incubation temperatures <16.5 C. There were no significant differences across the range of initial temperature exposures for alevin and fry size at hatch and emergence. Differences in egg mass among females (notably 2003) most likely masked any

  6. Thermal regime in the central Alpine Fault zone, New Zealand: Constraints from microstructures, biotite chemistry and fluid inclusion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toy, Virginia G.; Craw, Dave; Cooper, Alan F.; Norris, Richard J.

    2010-04-01

    The thermal state within plate boundary fault zones is likely to influence the dimensions of large co-seismic fault ruptures, and strain localisation in underlying mylonitic shear zones. Vein microstructures, biotite chemistry and fluid inclusion data offer new insights into the thermal structure of the mylonitic shear zone down dip of the Alpine Fault, the main Pacific-Australian plate boundary structure through southern New Zealand. Quartz veins within the fault rocks were formed and deformed at temperatures ranging from > 500 °C to immediately above that of the brittle-viscous transition (˜ 325 °C), illustrating that fluids are present throughout the fault zone. Microthermometric data from primary, mixed CO 2-H 2O fluid inclusions in boudin-neck quartz-carbonate veins indicate that these inclusions were trapped at temperatures of 325 ± 15 °C and pressures of c. 40 MPa. Vein microstructures indicate that fluid temperatures were equal to rock temperatures. Assuming hydrostatic fluid pressure, the veins were trapped at depths of < 8 km for an average density of mixed H 2O-CO 2 fluids in the shallower crust of > 500 kg m - 3 . Biotite grains in the mylonites are a mixture of porphyroclastic grains with high R = Ti/Mg# inherited from the parent Alpine Schist, and smaller, low R grains that recrystallised during mylonitisation, particularly those that are found within syn-mylonitic shear bands. Assuming a simple step-function model approximating diffusive equilibration, the changes in biotite chemistry indicate Δ T during mylonitic deformation of ˜-340 °C according to the Ti-in-biotite thermometer of Henry et al. (2005). A best-fit uplift P- T path to existing data and these new results indicate that the uplift path P- T gradient of fault zone rocks above the brittle-viscous transition is of the order of 40 °C km - 1 . Below the brittle-viscous transition, the uplift path P- T gradient is 10 °C km - 1 . The P- T profile within the fault rocks is comparable

  7. Influence of thermal regime and land use on benthic invertebrate communities inhabiting headwater streams exposed to contrasted shading.

    PubMed

    Dohet, Alain; Hlúbiková, Daša; Wetzel, Carlos E; L'Hoste, Lionel; Iffly, Jean François; Hoffmann, Lucien; Ector, Luc

    2015-02-01

    Headwaters account for a high proportion of total freshwater stream-channel length in a drainage basin and are critical habitats for rare, endangered, and specialized species. In the context of climate warming, increasing water temperatures may be an ultimate threat to cold-adapted species even in temperate ecosystems. Climate change effects on streams may interact with other pressures such as pollution or habitat fragmentation, confounding their real impact on biological communities. Three headwater streams exposed to contrasted shading and land use conditions were sampled over a three-year period in spring and autumn (2010-2012). Five stations distributed along the longitudinal continuum were chosen in the upstream part of each stream. In addition to benthic invertebrate sampling, water temperature was recorded continuously using data loggers. Results showed that the riparian woodland associated with forested land use throughout the catchment clearly moderated winter temperature minima, summer temperature maxima and thermal variability compared to open river channels with narrow or absent riparian tree cover. Although, the variability in macroinvertebrate species distribution was mainly attributed to anthropogenic land use in the catchment, a significant part of the variability was explained by temperature descriptors such as the number of cumulative degree-days in summer and extremes in winter temperature. Trichoptera species preferring headwaters and cold water temperatures were found exclusively in the forested unimpacted stream. Conservation issues are discussed in relation to the predicted loss of the potential future distributions of these Trichoptera cold-adapted species. PMID:25461112

  8. Random walks with thermalizing collisions in bounded regions: Physical applications valid from the ballistic to diffusive regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swank, C. M.; Petukhov, A. K.; Golub, R.

    2016-06-01

    The behavior of a spin undergoing Larmor precession in the presence of fluctuating fields is of interest to workers in many fields. The fluctuating fields cause frequency shifts and relaxation which are related to their power spectrum, which can be determined by taking the Fourier transform of the auto-correlation functions of the field fluctuations. Recently we have shown how to calculate these correlation functions for all values of mean-free path (ballistic to diffusive motion) in finite bounded regions by using the model of persistent continuous time random walks (CTRW) for particles subject to scattering by fixed (frozen) scattering centers so that the speed of the moving particles is not changed by the collisions. In this work we show how scattering with energy exchange from an ensemble of scatterers in thermal equilibrium can be incorporated into the CTRW. We present results for 1, 2, and 3 dimensions. The results agree for all these cases contrary to the previously studied "frozen" models. Our results for the velocity autocorrelation function show a long-time tail (˜t-1 /2 ), which we also obtain from conventional diffusion theory, with the same power, independent of dimensionality. Our results are valid for any Markovian scattering kernel as well as for any kernel based on a scattering cross section ˜1 /v .

  9. The continental drift convection cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. A.; Behn, Mark D.

    2015-06-01

    Continents on Earth periodically assemble to form supercontinents and then break up again into smaller continental blocks (the Wilson cycle). Previous highly developed numerical models incorporate fixed continents while others indicate that continent movement modulates flow. Our simplified numerical model suggests that continental drift is fundamental. A thermally insulating continent is anchored at its center to mantle flow on an otherwise stress-free surface for infinite Prandtl number cellular convection with constant material properties. Rayleigh numbers exceed 107, while continent widths and chamber lengths approach Earth's values. The Wilson cycle is reproduced by a unique, rugged monopolar "continental drift convection cell." Subduction occurs at the cell's upstream end with cold slabs dipping at an angle beneath the moving continent (as found in many continent/subduction regions on Earth). Drift enhances vertical heat transport up to 30%, especially at the core-mantle boundary, and greatly decreases lateral mantle temperature differences.

  10. Hesperian polythermal glaciation in Isidis Planitia, Mars - Ice sheet dynamics and thermal regime inferred from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souček, Ondřej; Bourgeois, Olivier; Pochat, Stéphane; Guidat, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    We test the hypothesis that the Thumbprint Terrain observed on the floor of Isidis Planitia, a giant impact crater located close to the martian equator, is a landform assemblage inherited from a glaciation during the Hesperian. For this purpose, we perform numerical simulations with a coupled thermo-mechanical model of ice sheet dynamics. We use surface temperatures and ice accumulation/ablation patterns predicted by a climatic Global Circulation Model, and values of the geothermal heat flux provided by a global model of planetary thermal evolution. We find that, with atmospheric physical properties similar to the current ones and under favorable orbital conditions, net ice accumulation in the northwestern part of Isidis Planitia leads within a few Ma to the development of a massive ice sheet, as much as 4.9 km in thickness, over the entire basin. The modeled ice sheet is polythermal: its center and its periphery are permanently frozen to the base, while the pressure melting point is reached episodically in an intermediate ring. Our simulations suggest that the propagation of thermo-mechanical melting waves in this ring is responsible for the formation of the Thumbprint Terrain, a probable martian equivalent of terrestrial ribbed moraines. They support the interpretation that sinuous ridges and linear valleys observed at the periphery of the basin are parts of a subglacial network of eskers and tunnel valleys that drained glacial meltwater outwards, across the cold-based outer part of the ice sheet. This work strengthens the hypothesis that massive glaciers covered large portions of the martian surface before the Amazonian and that basal melting below the wet-based portions of these ice sheets contributed significantly to the production and flow of liquid water in the ancient martian history.

  11. A 3 Ga old polythermal ice sheet in Isidis Planitia, Mars: Dynamics and thermal regime inferred from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souček, Ondřej; Bourgeois, Olivier; Pochat, Stéphane; Guidat, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Isidis Planitia is a 1350 km wide impact crater located close to the martian equator. To test the hypothesis that the 2.8 to 3.4 Ga old Thumbprint Terrain preserved on the floor of this basin is a glacial landform assemblage, we perform a numerical simulation of glaciation with a thermo-mechanically coupled model of ice sheet dynamics. As model inputs, we use surface temperatures and ice accumulation patterns predicted by a General Circulation Model based on the present-day atmospheric characteristics, and values of the geothermal heat flux provided by a global model of planetary thermal evolution. We find that, under favorable orbital conditions, an ice sheet covering the entire basin can develop in 2 to 5 Ma, with a maximum thickness of 4.9 km. The modeled ice sheet is polythermal: it is permanently cold-based in the periphery and, due to a negative heat-flux anomaly, also in the center, while the pressure melting point is reached in an intermediate ring. Our simulation is consistent with the interpretation that the Thumbprint Terrain is a martian equivalent of terrestrial ribbed moraines and has formed below a wet-based ice sheet. It supports also the interpretation that sinuous ridges and linear valleys observed at the periphery of the basin are parts of a subglacial network of eskers and tunnel valleys that drained the glacial meltwater outwards, across the cold-based periphery of the ice sheet. This work strengthens the hypothesis that glaciers thick as much as several km may have existed on Mars several Ga ago and that glacial basal melting may have contributed to the production and flow of surface liquid water at that time, under an atmosphere no thicker than the present-day one.

  12. Investigation of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade volcanic arc: First phase of a program for scientific drilling in the Cascade Range

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    A phased, multihole drilling program with associated science is proposed as a means of furthering our understanding of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade Range of Washington, Oregon, and northern California. The information obtained from drilling and ancillary geological and geophysical investigations will contribute to our knowledge in the following general areas: (1) the magnitude of the regional background heat flow of parts of the Quaternary volcanic belt dominated by the most abundant volcanic rock types, basalt and basaltic andesite; (2) the nature of the heat source responsible for the regional heat-flow anomaly; (3) the characteristics of the regional hydrothermal and cold-water circulation; the rates of volcanism for comparison with models for the rate and direction of plate convergence of the Cascades; (5) the history of deformation and volcanism in the volcanic arc that can be related to subduction; (6) the present-day stress regime of the volcanic arc and the relation of these stresses to plate interactions and possible large earthquakes; and the current geometry of the subducted oceanic plate below the Cascade Range and the relationship of the plate to the distribution of heat flow, Quaternary volcanism, and Quaternary deformation. Phase I research will be directed toward a detailed investigation of the Santiam Pass segment. In concert with the Santiam Pass research, a detailed study of the nearby Breitenbush Hot Springs area is also recommended as a component of Phase I. The object of the Breitenbush research is to study one of the hottest known Cascade hydrothermal systems, which coincidentally also has a good geological and geophysical data base. A coordinated program of drilling, sampling, subsurface measurements, and surface surveys will be associated with the drilling of several holes.

  13. Thermal structure of the lithosphere: a petrologic model.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, I D; Basu, A R

    1974-09-20

    A preliminary evaluation of the thermal history of the upper mantle as determined by petrologic techniques indicates a general correspondence with theoretically derived models. The petrologic data supply direct information which may be used as an independent calibration of calculated models, serve as a base for evaluating the assumptions of the theoretical approach, and allow more careful selection of the variables describing mantle thermal properties and processes. Like the theoretical counterpart, the petrological approach indicates that the lithosphere is dominated by two thermal regimes: first, there is a continental regime which cools at rates of the order of 10(9) years and represents the longterm cooling of the earth. Secondly, superimposed on the continental evolution is the thermal event associated with the formation of an oceanic basin, and which may be thought of as a 10(8) year convective perturbation on the continental cycle. Of special interest is petrologic evidence for a sudden steepening of the thermal gradients across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary not seen in the theoretical models. The unexpected change of slope points to the need for a critical reevaluation of the thermal processes and properties extant in the asthenosphere. The potential of the petrologic contribution has yet to be fully realized. For a start, this article points to an important body of independent evidence critical to our understanding of the earth's thermal history. PMID:17738235

  14. Thermal regime of the Costa Rican convergent margin: 1. Along-strike variations in heat flow from probe measurements and estimated from bottom-simulating reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robert N.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Ranero, CéSar R.; Villinger, Heinrich; Barckhausen, Udo; Henke, Thomas; Mueller, Christian; Neben, Soenke

    2010-12-01

    The thermal structure of convergent margins provides information related to the tectonics, geodynamics, metamorphism, and fluid flow of active plate boundaries. We report 176 heat flow measurements made with a violin bow style probe across the Costa Rican margin at the Middle America Trench. The probe measurements are collocated with seismic reflection lines. These seismic reflection lines show widespread distribution of bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs). To extend the spatial coverage of heat flow measurements we estimate heat flow from the depth of BSRs. Comparisons between probe measurements and BSR-derived estimates of heat flow are generally within 10% and improve with distance landward of the deformation front. Together, these determinations provide new information on the thermal regime of this margin. Consistent with previous studies, the margin associated with the northern Nicoya Peninsula is remarkably cool. We define better the southern boundary of the cool region. The northern extent of the cool region remains poorly determined. A regional trend of decreasing heat flow landward of the deformation front is apparent, consistent with the downward advection of heat by the subducting Cocos Plate. High wave number variability at a scale of 5-10 km is significantly greater than the measurement uncertainty and is greater south of the northern Nicoya Peninsula. These heat flow anomalies vary between approximately 20 and 60 mW m-2 and are most likely due to localized fluid flow through mounds and faults on the margin. Simple one-dimensional models show that these anomalies are consistent with flow rates of 7-15 mm yr-1. Across the margin toe variability is significant and likely due to fluid flow through deformation structures associated with the frontal sedimentary prism.

  15. Electronic transport regimes through an alkoxythiolated diphenyl-2,2'-bithiophene-based molecular junction diodes: critical assessment of the thermal dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Giuseppina; Caranzi, Lorenzo; Bucella, Sadir G.; Canesi, Eleonora V.; Dell'Erba, Giorgio; Bertarelli, Chiara; Caironi, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The detailed understanding of electronic transport through a single molecule or an ensemble of self-assembled molecules embedded between two metallic leads is still a matter of controversy. Multiple factors influence the charge transport in the molecular junction, with particular attention to be given to the band states of the electrodes, molecular orbital energies, bias potential and importantly molecule-electrode electronic coupling. Moreover it is not trivial to disentangle molecular contributions from other possible conduction pathways directly coupling the opposite electrodes. We here investigate the electronic transport properties of an ensemble molecular junction embedding an alkylthiol derivative of a diphenol substituted bithiophene (DPBT) by means of current vs. voltage and temperature dependent measurements. We explored different junction configurations using: micropores (Au//DPBT//Au and Au//DPBT-polymer conductor//Au) and conductive-atomic force microscopy (c-AFM). In all cases, we found a transition voltage VT of ~0.35 V. The consistent presence of a similar VT in all the tested configurations is a strong, but not conclusive, indication of a molecular signature in the charge transport, which we assessed and confirmed by temperature dependent measurements. We found a transition from an incoherent resonant tunneling at low biases and close to room temperature, where transport is thermally activated with an activation energy of ~85 meV, to a coherent tunneling at voltages higher than VT. Unlike many other molecular junctions reported in the literature, resonant conditions commonly attributed to a hopping transport regime can be found already at room temperature and very low biases for a molecule only ~1.5 nm long. This paper is the first report to clearly show temperature activated transport through a short and not fully conjugated molecule. Moreover, we could clearly identify a regime at low temperatures and low bias where the transport mechanism is

  16. Mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease across the range of the threatened Mojave Desert tortoise: associations with thermal regime and natural antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sandmeier, Franziska C; Tracy, C Richard; Hagerty, Bridgette E; DuPré, Sally; Mohammadpour, Hamid; Hunter, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    Most research of upper respiratory tract disease (mycoplasmal URTD) in the threatened Mojave Desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) has worked under the hypothesis that the pathogen, Mycoplasma agassizii, has a relatively consistent and predictable effect on tortoise populations across their natural range. In contrast, we hypothesized that multiple factors influence the prevalence of disease and analyzed biological and environmental variables that vary significantly across the Mojave Desert. We used multiple regression models to analyze associations between mycoplasmal URTD and the genetic structure of 24 tortoise populations, levels of natural antibody (NAb) to M. agassizii in tortoises (one component of the innate immune system), precipitation, and colder thermal regimes. We detected a significant, positive association between mean levels of NAb and seroprevalence to M. agassizii. We hypothesized that NAbs may provide tolerance to mycoplasmal infections and that more tolerant populations may act as host reservoirs of disease. We also detected significant associations between colder winters and mycoplasmal URTD, suggesting that colder winters may depress tortoise immune resistance against M. agassizii or enhance conditions for the growth of M. agassizii. PMID:23579813

  17. Regime change?

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F.; Budlong-Sylvester, K. W.

    2004-01-01

    Following the 1998 nuclear tests in South Asia and later reinforced by revelations about North Korean and Iraqi nuclear activities, there has been growing concern about increasing proliferation dangers. At the same time, the prospects of radiological/nuclear terrorism are seen to be rising - since 9/11, concern over a proliferation/terrorism nexus has never been higher. In the face of this growing danger, there are urgent calls for stronger measures to strengthen the current international nuclear nonproliferation regime, including recommendations to place civilian processing of weapon-useable material under multinational control. As well, there are calls for entirely new tools, including military options. As proliferation and terrorism concerns grow, the regime is under pressure and there is a temptation to consider fundamental changes to the regime. In this context, this paper will address the following: Do we need to change the regime centered on the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)? What improvements could ensure it will be the foundation for the proliferation resistance and physical protection needed if nuclear power grows? What will make it a viable centerpiece of future nonproliferation and counterterrorism approaches?

  18. Characteristics of the thermal regime in steep bedrock permafrost in the European Alps described by borehole temperatures and heat conduction modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noetzli, J.; Deline, P.; Phillips, M.; von Poschinger, A.

    2012-04-01

    ) the influence of different climatic conditions on the thermal regime, b) the influence of the surface geometry (steep topography) on the three-dimensional temperature field, b) the accelerating effect of steep topography on the pace at which changes at the surface are propagated into the subsurface (multi-lateral warming), c) the cooling effect of a thin snow cover, which is often present in such terrain, and d) the cooling effect of ventilation in clefts.

  19. Use of the subsurface thermal regime as a groundwater-flow tracer in the semi-arid western Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Zenhom E.; Bayumy, Dina A.

    2016-02-01

    Temperature profiles from 25 boreholes were used to understand the spatial and vertical groundwater flow systems in the Western Nile Delta region of Egypt, as a case study of a semi-arid region. The study area is located between the Nile River and Wadi El Natrun. The recharge areas, which are located in the northeastern and the northwestern parts of the study area, have low subsurface temperatures. The discharge areas, which are located in the western (Wadi El Natrun) and southern (Moghra aquifer) parts of the study area, have higher subsurface temperatures. In the deeper zones, the effects of faults and the recharge area in the northeastern direction disappear at 80 m below sea level. For that depth, one main recharge and one main discharge area are recognized. The recharge area is located to the north in the Quaternary aquifer, and the discharge area is located to the south in the Miocene aquifer. Two-dimensional groundwater-flow and heat-transport models reveal that the sealing faults are the major factor disturbing the regional subsurface thermal regime in the study area. Besides the main recharge and discharge areas, the low permeability of the faults creates local discharge areas in its up-throw side and local recharge areas in its down-throw side. The estimated average linear groundwater velocity in the recharge area is 0.9 mm/day to the eastern direction and 14 mm/day to the northwest. The average linear groundwater discharge velocities range from 0.4 to 0.9 mm/day in the southern part.

  20. Use of the subsurface thermal regime as a groundwater-flow tracer in the semi-arid western Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Zenhom E.; Bayumy, Dina A.

    2016-06-01

    Temperature profiles from 25 boreholes were used to understand the spatial and vertical groundwater flow systems in the Western Nile Delta region of Egypt, as a case study of a semi-arid region. The study area is located between the Nile River and Wadi El Natrun. The recharge areas, which are located in the northeastern and the northwestern parts of the study area, have low subsurface temperatures. The discharge areas, which are located in the western (Wadi El Natrun) and southern (Moghra aquifer) parts of the study area, have higher subsurface temperatures. In the deeper zones, the effects of faults and the recharge area in the northeastern direction disappear at 80 m below sea level. For that depth, one main recharge and one main discharge area are recognized. The recharge area is located to the north in the Quaternary aquifer, and the discharge area is located to the south in the Miocene aquifer. Two-dimensional groundwater-flow and heat-transport models reveal that the sealing faults are the major factor disturbing the regional subsurface thermal regime in the study area. Besides the main recharge and discharge areas, the low permeability of the faults creates local discharge areas in its up-throw side and local recharge areas in its down-throw side. The estimated average linear groundwater velocity in the recharge area is 0.9 mm/day to the eastern direction and 14 mm/day to the northwest. The average linear groundwater discharge velocities range from 0.4 to 0.9 mm/day in the southern part.

  1. Cyclic CO(2) emissions during the high temperature pulse of fluctuating thermal regime in eye-pigmented pupae of Megachile rotundata.

    PubMed

    Yocum, George D; Greenlee, Kendra J; Rinehart, Joseph P; Bennett, Meghan M; Kemp, William P

    2011-12-01

    Megachile rotundata (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae), the primary pollinator used in alfalfa seed production, may need to be exposed to low-temperature storage to slow the insects' development to better match spring emergence with the alfalfa bloom. It has been demonstrated that using a fluctuating thermal regime (FTR) improves the tolerance of pupae to low temperatures. Carbon dioxide emission rates were compared between four different FTRs, all with a base temperature of 6°C and a daily high-temperature pulse. Four different high-temperature pulses were examined, 15 or 25°C for 2h and 20°C for 1 or 2h. A subset of pupae at the FTR base temperature of 6°C exhibited continuous gas exchange and, once ramped to 20 or 25°C, shifted to cyclic gas exchange. As temperatures were ramped down from the high-temperature pulse to 6°C, the pupae reverted to continuous gas exchange. The following conclusions about the effect of FTR on the CO(2) emissions of M. rotundata pupae exposed to low-temperature storage during the spring incubation were reached: 1) the high temperature component of the FTR was the best predictor of respiratory pattern; 2) neither pupal body mass nor days in FTR significantly affected which respiratory pattern was expressed during FTRs; 3) cyclic gas exchange was induced only in pupae exposed to temperatures greater than 15°C during the FTR high temperature pulse; and 4) a two hour pulse at 25°C doubled the number of CO(2) peaks observed during the FTR pulse as compared to a two hour pulse at 20°C. PMID:21854865

  2. Use and usability of experimental monitoring data and temperature modeling to inform adaptive management of the Colorado River's thermal regime for native fish conservation below Glen Canyon Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    Seasonal thermal variability of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon was severely decreased by closure of Glen Canyon Dam and filling of Lake Powell reservoir that was achieved in 1980. From 1973 to 2002, downstream summer river temperatures at Lees Ferry were about 18°C below pre-dam conditions, and limited juvenile native fish growth and survival. A large-scale flow experiment to improve the river's thermal regime for spawning and rearing habitat of endangered native humpback chub and other native fish in eastern Grand Canyon was conducted in Water Year 2000. Monitoring revealed warming, but well below the 16-18°C optimum for chub 124 km below the dam near the Little Colorado River confluence, and no measurable chub population increase in Grand Canyon. Fall-timed stable flow experiments to improve shoreline chub nursery habitat (2008-12) were also inconclusive relative to juvenile chub growth and recruitment. Field studies also showed that daytime warming of shoreline habitats used by fish under steady flows is limited by high daily exchange rates with main channel water. Monthly averaged and higher resolution temperature models have also been developed and used to support more recent experimental management planning. Temperature simulations have been useful for screening dam release scenarios under varied reservoir storage conditions with and without use of previously proposed but never constructed multilevel intake structures on the dam's hydroelectric units. Most importantly, modeling revealed the geophysical limits on downstream warming under existing water management and dam operating policies. Hourly unsteady flow simulations in 2006 predicted equivalent levels of average downstream river warming under either fluctuating or steady flows for a given monthly release volume. River warming observed since 2002, has resulted from reduced Lake Powell storage resulting from drier upper basin hydrology. In support of new environmental compliance on dam operations

  3. Heat-Flow at the edges of continental lithosphere and implications for the evolution of extensional margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutorbe, B.; Lucazeau, F.; Perry, C.; Bonneville, A.

    2007-12-01

    Heat-Flow variations across continental rifted margins are difficult to obtain for methodological reasons: direct measurements are not possible below a certain water depth and values derived from oil exploration are often biased by perturbations on temperature records and unreliable conductivity estimates. We have developed recently a methodology that provides better estimates of thermal conductivity in oil exploration wells, based on neural networks linking this physical property to geophysical well logs. The method has been applied systematically on a large number of wells on Atlantic and Australian margins, providing almost 1,000 new heat- flow estimates. In all cases, the mantle heat-flow below the margins is comparable to that of oceanic domain, and in some cases higher. These conclusions arise from old margins (>50 Ma), but measurements on young margins (e.g. Red Sea, Aden) show unexpected high values. This is interpreted as a consequence of temperature differences at depth between continental and oceanic lithospheres. Several 2D numerical experiments show that such anomalies are likely to develop with variable amplitude and pattern depending on the temperature regime of the continental lithosphere, rheology of the mantle and geometry of the interface. It seems that such anomalies can appear rapidly after the break-up of continents and maintain permanently. This changes significantly the subsidence evolution and the relations with the pre-existing thermal regime of the continent.

  4. Snowpack regimes of the Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ernesto; Molotch, Noah P.

    2014-07-01

    Snow accumulation and melt patterns play a significant role in the water, energy, carbon, and nutrient cycles in the montane environments of the Western United States. Recent studies have illustrated that changes in the snow/rainfall apportionments and snow accumulation and melt patterns may occur as a consequence of changes in climate in the region. In order to understand how these changes may affect the snow regimes of the region, the current characteristics of the snow accumulation and melt patterns must be identified. Here we characterize the snow water equivalent (SWE) curve formed by the daily SWE values at 766 snow pillow stations in the Western United States, focusing on several metrics of the yearly SWE curves and the relationships between the different metrics. The metrics are the initial snow accumulation and snow disappearance dates, the peak snow accumulation and date of peak, the length of the snow accumulation season, the length of the snowmelt season, and the snow accumulation and snowmelt slopes. Three snow regimes emerge from these results: a maritime, an intermountain, and a continental regime. The maritime regime is characterized by higher maximum snow accumulations reaching 300 cm and shorter accumulation periods of less than 220 days. Conversely, the continental regime is characterized by lower maximum accumulations below 200 cm and longer accumulation periods reaching over 260 days. The intermountain regime lies in between. The regions that show the characteristics of the maritime regime include the Cascade Mountains, the Klamath Mountains, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The intermountain regime includes the Eastern Cascades slopes and foothills, the Blue Mountains, Northern and Central basins and ranges, the Columbia Mountains/Northern Rockies, the Idaho Batholith, and the Canadian Rockies. Lastly, the continental regime includes the Middle and Southern Rockies, and the Wasatch and Uinta Mountains. The implications of snow regime

  5. Structural, igneous and metamorphic footprints of Pangea break-up preserved in the subducted Austroalpine continental lithosphere of the European Alps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalla, M. I.; Gosso, G.; Rebay, G.; Roda, M.; Zanoni, D.; Zucali, M.

    2015-12-01

    Although in the Alps a large amount of continental lithosphere from both European (lower plate) and Adriatic (upper plate) continental margins was absorbed in the sub-lithospheric mantle during Alpine subduction, relict metamorphic and igneous imprints of the Variscan convergence and the successive Pangea break-up are preserved in the continental crust of both margins. These pre-Alpine signatures are preserved either in small volumes within the exhumed continental crust slivers of the axial belt or in the Alpine hinterland and foreland crusts that were never reworked in deep-seated conditions. Because of the common occurrence of metamorphic and igneous markers of the Variscan convergence in the pre-Alpine continental crust, the Permian-Triassic high thermal regime, which left widespread metamorphic and igneous imprints, can be interpreted as the effect of lithospheric thinning leading to continental rifting and subsequent Tethyan ocean opening. In addition, even Permian igneous activity and related basin formation may be interpreted as linked to lithospheric extension leading to the Pangaea break-up and to subsequent oceanization, predating the marine transgression from the east, where the Neotethys Ocean was opening. Permian-Triassic HT-LP metamorphic imprints recorded in the Austroalpine continental units are correlatable to this scenario; these peculiar metamorphic patterns have been widely recognized in lower, intermediate and upper continental crust. HT assemblages mark newly differentiated foliations locally associated with discrete shear zones, mainly in metapelites. Ages inferred for Tmax conditions are comprised between 220 and 295 Ma and Jurassic mineral ages are obtained where LP-LT metamorphic imprints, recorded during uplift and associated with fluid circulation, are dominant. The uplift paths are usually characterized by a high T/P ratio and wide parts of the uplift paths occurred under high thermal regime and the exhumation of some of the deep

  6. A Climatological Study of Evapotranspiration and Moisture Stress Across the Continental U.S. Based on Thermal Remote Sensing. II. Surface Moisture Climatology.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Robust satellite-derived moisture stress indices will be beneficial to operational drought monitoring, both in the US and globally. Using thermal infrared imagery from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and vegetation information from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spect...

  7. A Climatological Study of Evapotranspiration and Moisture Stress Across the Continental U.S. Based on Thermal Remote Sensing.I.Model Formulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the influence of evaporation on land-surface temperature, thermal remote sensing data provide valuable information regarding the surface moisture status. The Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) model uses the morning surface temperature rise, as measured from a geostationary satellite p...

  8. Deep continental margin reflectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewing, J.; Heirtzler, J.; Purdy, M.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1985-01-01

    In contrast to the rarity of such observations a decade ago, seismic reflecting and refracting horizons are now being observed to Moho depths under continental shelves in a number of places. These observations provide knowledge of the entire crustal thickness from the shoreline to the oceanic crust on passive margins and supplement Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP)-type measurements on land.

  9. Freshly brewed continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Caddick, M. J.; Madrigal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's crust is the life-sustaining interface between our planet's deep interior and surface. Basaltic crusts similar to Earth's oceanic crust characterize terrestrial planets in the solar system while the continental masses, areas of buoyant, thick silicic crust, are a unique characteristic of Earth. Therefore, understanding the processes responsible for the formation of continents is fundamental to reconstructing the evolution of our planet. We use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American Land Bridge (Costa Rica and Panama) over the last 70 Ma. We also include new preliminary data from a key turning point (~12-6 Ma) from the evolution from an oceanic arc depleted in incompatible elements to a juvenile continental mass in order to evaluate current models of continental crust formation. We also discovered that seismic P-waves (body waves) travel through the crust at velocities closer to the ones observed in continental crust worldwide. Based on global statistical analyses of all magmas produced today in oceanic arcs compared to the global average composition of continental crust we developed a continental index. Our goal was to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust. We suggest that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone, a process probably more common in the Achaean where most continental landmasses formed, can produce the starting material necessary for juvenile continental crust formation.

  10. Continental Lower-crustal Flow: Channel Flow and Laminar Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Dewei

    , covering continental intraplate deformation, ductile extrusion of middle to lower crust, synchronous transition from orogenic extrusion to extension, ductile deformation and exhumation of deep metamorphic rocks, partial melting, magmatism, etc. However, radical differences exist between the two models, such as in tectonic setting, flow domain, flow surface, flow scale, flow pattern, flow regime, flow direction, flow substance, flow behavior or flow effects, flow time, and flow mechanism. Channel flow can be regarded as part of a spatial-temporal structure of laminar flow, but lower crustal laminar flow is actually driven by thermal energy and gravity and not by surface processes such as denudation or topographic loading. Therefore, from a global viewpoint, laminar flow is only a small part of multi-grade or multi-scale circulative flow system of the earth.

  11. The basins on the Argentine continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Urien, C.M.

    1996-08-01

    After the stabilization of the central Gondwana Craton, orogenic belts were accreted, as a result of convergence events and an extensive passive margin developed in southwestern Gondwana. Thermal subsidence in Parana, Karoo-Ventania basins and the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic rifts, were modified by the Gondwana breakup and the South Atlantic opening. Early Paleozoic marine transgressions deposited the Table Mountain Group in Ventania. In southwestern Patagonia foreland clastics were deposited. Magmatic arcs and marine units indicate a tectonic trough was formed, alternating with continental sequences, over Late Paleozoic metamorphics and intrusives, resulting from plastered terrains along the Gondwana margin. In Patagonia, Permo-Carboniferous continental and glacio marine clastics infill the basins, while in Ventania, paralic sequences, grade from neritic to continental to the northeast, extending beneath the continental margin. The Triassic-Jurassic rift basins progressed onto regional widespread acid lavas and were infilled by lagoonal organic-rich sequences. Early drift phase built basins transverse to the margin, with fluvio-lacustrine sequences: Salado, Colorado, Valdes-Rawson, San Julian and North Malvinas intracratonic basins, which underwent transtensional faulting. Post-Oxfordian to Neocomian brackish sequences, onlapped the conjugate basins during the margin`s drift, with petroleum systems, as in Austral and Malvinas. In the Valanginian, basic extrusions commenced to form on the continental border, heralding the oceanic phase. Due to thermal subsidence, offlaping sediments prograded onto the remaining half-grabens. Several petroleum systems, proven and hypothetical, are identified in this region.

  12. Organic geochemistry of outer continental margins and deep ocean sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the activities and progress made in the study of continental margins and deep ocean sediments. Topics discussed are the calibration of thermal maturation markers, hydrous pyrolysis studies and sample collection. (KS)

  13. Regular Thermal Regime and Influence of Heat and Mass Transfer Similarity Criteria on the Process of Convective Drying of Porous Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol‧shanskii, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    The results of investigations of the drying kinetics of porous ceramics on the basis of the regular regime theory are presented. The influence of the main heat and mass transfer criteria on the drying process of porous ceramics has been considered. The main thermophysical characteristics of porous ceramics have been determined.

  14. Role of Acclimatization in Weather-Related Human Mortality During the Transition Seasons of Autumn and Spring in a Thermally Extreme Mid-Latitude Continental Climate

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Christopher R.; Grigorieva, Elena A.

    2015-01-01

    Human mortality is closely related to natural climate-determined levels of thermal environmental stress and the resulting thermophysiological strain. Most climate-mortality research has focused on seasonal extremes during winter and summer when mortality is the highest, while relatively little attention has been paid to mortality during the transitional seasons of autumn and spring. The body acclimatizes to heat in the summer and cold in winter and readjusts through acclimatization during the transitions between the two during which time the body experiences the thermophysiological strain of readjustment. To better understand the influences of weather on mortality through the acclimatization process, the aim here is to examine the periods that link very cold and very warms seasons. The study uses the Acclimatization Thermal Strain Index (ATSI), which is a comparative measure of short-term thermophysiological impact on the body. ATSI centers on heat exchange with the body’s core via the respiratory system, which cannot be protected. The analysis is based on data for a major city in the climatic region of the Russian Far East characterized by very hot summers and extremely cold winters. The results show that although mortality peaks in winter (January) and is at its lowest in summer (August), there is not a smooth rise through autumn nor a smooth decline through spring. A secondary peak occurs in autumn (October) with a smaller jump in May. This suggests the acclimatization from warm-to-cold produces more thermophysiological strain than the transition from cold-to-warm. The study shows that ATSI is a useful metric for quantifying the extent to which biophysical adaptation plays a role in increased strain on the body during re-acclimatization and for this reason is a more appropriate climatic indictor than air temperature alone. The work gives useful bioclimatic information on risks involved in transitional seasons in regions characterized by climatic extremes. This

  15. Role of Acclimatization in Weather-Related Human Mortality During the Transition Seasons of Autumn and Spring in a Thermally Extreme Mid-Latitude Continental Climate.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Christopher R; Grigorieva, Elena A

    2015-12-01

    Human mortality is closely related to natural climate-determined levels of thermal environmental stress and the resulting thermophysiological strain. Most climate-mortality research has focused on seasonal extremes during winter and summer when mortality is the highest, while relatively little attention has been paid to mortality during the transitional seasons of autumn and spring. The body acclimatizes to heat in the summer and cold in winter and readjusts through acclimatization during the transitions between the two during which time the body experiences the thermophysiological strain of readjustment. To better understand the influences of weather on mortality through the acclimatization process, the aim here is to examine the periods that link very cold and very warms seasons. The study uses the Acclimatization Thermal Strain Index (ATSI), which is a comparative measure of short-term thermophysiological impact on the body. ATSI centers on heat exchange with the body’s core via the respiratory system, which cannot be protected. The analysis is based on data for a major city in the climatic region of the Russian Far East characterized by very hot summers and extremely cold winters. The results show that although mortality peaks in winter (January) and is at its lowest in summer (August), there is not a smooth rise through autumn nor a smooth decline through spring. A secondary peak occurs in autumn (October) with a smaller jump in May. This suggests the acclimatization from warm-to-cold produces more thermophysiological strain than the transition from cold-to-warm. The study shows that ATSI is a useful metric for quantifying the extent to which biophysical adaptation plays a role in increased strain on the body during re-acclimatization and for this reason is a more appropriate climatic indictor than air temperature alone. The work gives useful bioclimatic information on risks involved in transitional seasons in regions characterized by climatic extremes. This

  16. From rifting to continental collision, new insights on the Atlas Mountains building using low thermal chronometries (High Atlas of Marrakech, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbal, B.; Stuart, F.; Bertotti, G.; Andriessen, P. A. M.

    2009-04-01

    We present apatite (U-Th)/He and fission track results in order to constrain the vertical movement's history of the western and central High Atlas Mountains of Morocco. Samples were collected along a 200 km long transect stretching from the Jebilet Massif in the North to the northern border of the Central Anti-Atlas chain in the south thereby traversing the Old Massif of Marrakech and the Siroua Plateau. Fission track and (U-Th)/He ages range from 10 to 163 Ma and from 8 to 152 Ma, respectively. Thermal modeling using this data as input resulted in five heating and/or cooling phases in the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous, Eocene, Miocene and post-Miocene. Ages generally display an overall trend of rejuvenated ages from both margins (13-162 Ma) towards the axial zone (8-73 Ma) of the orogenic belt. Following the end of rift-related subsidence in the Liassic, extension stopped in the north margin but continued until the Dogger to Late Jurassic in the southern edges of the belts. Thermal modeling of samples collected from the northern external zones of the High Atlas suggests an unexpected phase of Middle-Late Jurassic exhumation (with a rate of 150-300m/Ma), which is generalized to the whole Atlas system from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, bringing rocks at the Earth's surface before the Late Cretaceous. Exhumation that brought rocks at the Earth's surface before the Late Cretaceous, is followed by a quiet tectonic period with little vertical movements (110 to 90Ma). After a quiet tectonic period in the Cenomanian-Turonian time, vertical movements renewed with subsidence (~120m/Myr) throughout the entire Atlas domains before the Senonian. From the end of the Late Cretaceous onwards, inversion take place, signaling the onset of a final exhumation phase. Exhumation began in the external domains (Jebilet, Northern Sub-Atlas zone and Siroua) at rates of 33-130m/Ma affecting the Axial zone of the belt somewhat later, where higher amounts and rates of

  17. The 3-D dynamics of slab break-off and implications for continental collision zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hunen, Jeroen; Allen, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Some of the world best studied mountain ranges are a result of continental collision, such as the Himalayas, Zagros mountains, and the Alps. Continental collision forms the last stage of the closure of an oceanic basin, and leads to the slow-down or complete cessation of the subduction process. Previously subducted slab material will experience a period of thermal warming (Gerya et al., 2004) and/or a larger tensile stress, and will eventually weaken, yield and sink into the mantle. This process has potentially important implications for the thermal and stress regime of the overlying convergence zone, and has been held responsible for various phenomena such as late-stage magmatism (Davies and von Blanckenburg, 1995) and surface uplift or depression (van der Meulen et al., 1998, Buiter et al., 2002). Even though the collision process itself is relatively short-lived compared to the preceding oceanic subduction, its remnants are often preserved, and probably provide a valuable window into the plate tectonic process during the Proterozoic and perhaps the Archaean (e.g. Calvert et al., 1995). The three-dimensional nature of this break-off process has previously been discussed with conceptual models. E.g. slab break-off has been suggested to propagate laterally through an advancing tear (Wortel and Spakman, 2000). In this study we present 3D numerical results of the evolution of slab break-off. We focus on the development and evolution of a laterally migrating slab tear, and present results on the sensitivity of this process to the geometry of the closing oceanic basin, the tensile stresses in and the rheological properties of the slab, and the thermal state of the surrounding mantle. By comparing our numerical results to previously published analogue results (Regard et al., 2004) and various tomographic, structural, and magmatic observations of well-studied subduction collision systems, we are able to extract valuable insights in to the dynamics and strength of

  18. Continental rift jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Charles A.

    1983-05-01

    Continental rift jumps, analogous to jumps of oceanic spreading ridges, are here proposed to be common. Good examples exist in Iceland and Afar (both transitional from ridge to rift jumps), West Africa (Benue Trough and Cameroon Volcanic Line), and Kenya. Indeed, the Kenya rift appears to have jumped c. 100 km eastward c. 10 m.y. ago and is currently jumping further to the east. Possible jumps exist in the Baikal rift, the Limagne-Bresse rift pair, and parallel to ancient continental margins (e.g., the Triassic basins of the eastern U.S. to Baltimore Canyon and Georges Bank). Continental rifts jump distances that are approximately equal to local lithosphere thickness, suggesting that jumped rifts are controlled by lithosphere fracturing, but there appears to be no reason for the fracturing except migration of hot spots.

  19. Applications of a New England stream temperature model to evaluate distribution of thermal regimes and sensitivity to change in riparian condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have applied a statistical stream network (SSN) model to predict stream thermal metrics (summer monthly medians, growing season maximum magnitude and timing, and daily rates of change) across New England nontidal streams and rivers, excluding northern Maine watersheds that ext...

  20. Visco-elastic effects with simultaneous thermal and mass diffusion in MHD free convection flow near an oscillating plate in the slip flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bandita; Choudhury, Rita

    2016-06-01

    The present study analyzes the influence of visco-elastic flow of fluid through a porous medium bounded by an oscillating porous plate with heat source in the slip flow regime. Effects of heat transfer, mass transfer and chemical reaction are also taken into account. The porous plate is subjected to a transverse suction velocity. The dimensionless governing equations of the problem are solved by regular perturbation technique. The analytical expressions for the velocity, temperature, concentration, and Shearing stress have been obtained and illustrated graphically for different values of physical parameters involved in the problem. The investigation reveals that the visco-elastic fluid has significant effects on the considered flow field in comparison with Newtonian fluid flow phenomenon.

  1. The Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchfiel, B. Clark

    1983-01-01

    Continental crust underlies the continents, their margins, and also small shallow regions in oceans. The nature of the crust (much older than oceanic crust) and its dynamics are discussed. Research related to and effects of tectonics, volcanism, erosion, and sedimentation on the crust are considered. (JN)

  2. Continental Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Continental flood basalts have been receiving considerable scientific attention lately. Recent publications have focused on several particular flood-basalt provinces (Brito-Arctic, Karoo, Parana', Deccan, and Columbia Plateau), and much attention has been given to the proposed connection between flood-basalt volcanism, bolide impacts, and mass extinctions. The editor of Continental Flood Basalts, J. D. Macdougall, conceived the book to assemble in a single volume, from a vast and scattered literature, an overview of each major post-Cambrian flood-basalt province.Continental Flood Basalts has 10 chapters; nine treat individual flood-basalt provinces, and a summary chapter compares and contrasts continental flood-basalts and mid-oceanic ridge basalts. Specifically, the chapters address the Columbia River basalt, the northwest United States including the Columbia River basalt, the Ethiopian Province, the North Atlantic Tertiary Province, the Deccan Traps, the Parana' Basin, the Karoo Province, the Siberian Platform, and Cenozoic basaltic rocks in eastern China. Each chapter is written by one or more individuals with an extensive background in the province.

  3. Continental drift before 1900.

    PubMed

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event. PMID:16057953

  4. Limiting thermal regimes of active disk elements under steady-state pumping and two-dimensional temperature distribution inside the disk

    SciTech Connect

    Alpat'ev, A N; Lis, Denis A; Smirnov, V A; Shcherbakov, Ivan A

    2010-09-10

    An analytic expression describing the stationary two-dimensional axially symmetric temperature distribution in a disk active element (AE) is derived upon pumping the entire disk whose thickness is 0.01 cm {<=} h {<=} 0.3 cm and the diameter-to-thickness ratio is 1 {<=} d/h {<=} 100. Thermomechanical stresses are calculated. It is shown that from the point of view of the disk damage, the tangential stress on the disk side face constitutes the major threat. For different scaling parameters x =d/h, the limiting lasing powers P{sub las} are estimated in multimode approximation, which can be obtained using a disk AE in the case of end and side cooling for different heat exchange coefficients a (by the example of an Nd : YAG crystal). It is found that the side cooling can decrease P{sub las} in some situations. The priority regions are established in the space of the parameters h, x, and a which, while increasing the pump intensity, are accompanied by one of the three events violating the normal operation of the laser: deterioration of spectral and luminescent AE parameters due to heating, malfunctioning of the cooling regime, or thermomechanical damage of the disk. It is shown that an increase in the scaling parameter x smoothes the radial temperature profile and the thermoelastic stress distribution profile. (lasers)

  5. Post subduction thermal regime of the western North America and effects on the Great Valley, Sierra Nevada and northern Baja California provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkan, Kamil

    Tectonic evolution of the transform margin of western North America has attracted great interest. This boundary formed as the fault-fault-trench type Mendocino triple junction has moved north. The tectonic transition is expected to have a significant thermal signature because the subduction zones are quite distinct from any other plate boundary zones with their depressed heat flow in the outer arc regions. There is a significant amount of heat flow data in most of California covering the Great Valley and Sierra Nevada regions where were part of the outer arc of the Farallon subduction was located. The heat flow in a very large area covering all over the Great Valley and western Sierra Nevada shows the consistent pattern of a recent subduction. The unique pattern of the heat flow distribution indicates the tectonic origin of the data which has a potential to reveal the nature of the tectonic transition after the cessation of subduction 30 Ma. In this collection, the first two papers deal with the interpretation of heat flow data using forward thermal models of the lithosphere. The two proposed tectonic scenarios, namely the slab window and the stalled slab models, were compared in terms of the thermal consequences. The low heat flow in the Great Valley and the narrow transition zone toward the Coast Ranges rules out opening of a slab window in a conventional sense and is therefore indicative of a stalled slab type transition. Therefore, the high heat flow in the Coast Ranges must be explained by a mechanism other than opening of a slab window beneath the Coast Ranges. The low (reduced) heat flow in the Western Sierra Nevada which extends to the south end of the region where the subduction ceased more than 15 My ago is important in understating the thermal history of the lithosphere after the cessation of subduction. The thermal data are also in close agreement with the seismic cut-out depth where sufficient seismic activity is present. The numerical thermal model of

  6. Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Imperial Valley, California as a site for continental scientific drilling. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.

    1983-03-01

    The Salton Trough, where seafloor spreading systems of the East Pacific Rise transition into the San Andreas transform fault system, is the site of such continental rifting and basin formation today. The largest thermal anomaly in the trough, the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), is of interest to both thermal regimes and mineral resources investigators. At this site, temperatures >350/sup 0/C and metal-rich brines with 250,000 mg/L TDS have been encountered at <2 km depth. Republic Geothermal Inc. will drill a new well to 3.7 km in the SSGF early in 1983; we propose add-on experiments in it. If funded, we will obtain selective water and core samples and a large-diameter casing installed to 3.7 km will permit later deepening. In Phase 2, the well would be continuously cored to 5.5 km and be available for scientific studies until July 1985. The deepened well would encounter hydrothermal regimes of temperature and pressure never before sampled.

  7. Continental rifting - Progress and outlook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, B. H.; Morgan, P.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that in spite of the flood of new data on continental rifts in the last 15 years, there is little consensus about the basic mechanisms and causes of rifting. The remarkable similarities in rift cross sections (shown in a figure), are considered to suggest that the anomalous lithospheric structure of rifts is more dependent on lithosphere properties than the mode of rifting. It is thought that there is a spectrum of rifting processes for which two fundamental mechanisms can be postulated: an active mechanism, whereby thermal energy is transmitted into the lithosphere from the underlying asthenosphere, and a passive mechanism by which mechanical energy is transmitted laterally through the lithosphere as a consequence of plate interactions at a distance. In order to permit the concept of the two fundamentally different mechanisms to be tested, a tentative classification is proposed that divides rifts into two basic categories: active rifting and passive rifting. Here, the magnitude of active rifting will depend on the rate at which lithosphere moves over the thermal source, with rifts being restricted to stationary or slow-moving plates.

  8. RECIPES FOR WRITING ALGORITHMS FOR ATMOSPHERIC CORRECTIONS AND TEMPERATURE/EMISSIVITY SEPARATIONS IN THE THERMAL REGIME FOR A MULTI-SPECTRAL SENSOR

    SciTech Connect

    C. BOREL; W. CLODIUS

    2001-04-01

    This paper discusses the algorithms created for the Multi-spectral Thermal Imager (MTI) to retrieve temperatures and emissivities. Recipes to create the physics based water temperature retrieval, emissivity of water surfaces are described. A simple radiative transfer model for multi-spectral sensors is developed. A method to create look-up-tables and the criterion of finding the optimum water temperature are covered. Practical aspects such as conversion from band-averaged radiances to brightness temperatures and effects of variations in the spectral response on the atmospheric transmission are discussed. A recipe for a temperature/emissivity separation algorithm when water surfaces are present is given. Results of retrievals of skin water temperatures are compared with in-situ measurements of the bulk water temperature at two locations are shown.

  9. Moroccan crustal response to continental drift.

    PubMed

    Kanes, W H; Saadi, M; Ehrlich, E; Alem, A

    1973-06-01

    The formation and development of a zone of spreading beneath the continental crust resulted in the breakup of Pangea and formation of the Atlantic Ocean. The crust of Morocco bears an extremely complete record of the crustal response to this episode of mantle dynamics. Structural and related depositional patterns indicate that the African margin had stabilized by the Middle Jurassic as a marine carbonate environment; that it was dominated by tensile stresses in the early Mesozoic, resulting in two fault systems paralleling the Atlantic and Mediterranean margins and a basin and range structural-depositional style; and that it was affected by late Paleozoic metamorphism and intrusion. Mesozoic events record the latter portion of African involvement in the spreading episode; late Paleozoic thermal orogenesis might reflect the earlier events in the initiation of the spreading center and its development beneath significant continental crust. In that case, more than 100 million years were required for mantle dynamics to break up Pangea. PMID:17735922

  10. Fission track analysis, rift shoulder uplift, and tectonic modeling of the Norwegian Continental Margin

    SciTech Connect

    Andriessen, P.; Van Der Beek, P.; Cloetingh, S.; Rohrman, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Apatite fission track analysis from southern Norway and Sweden, across the Permian Carboniferous Oslo rift, are presented and discussed in relation to different rifting scenarios. Vertical and horizontal apatite fission tack profiles in middle and southern Norway unravel the post-Carboniferous history of the Fennoscandian shield. Fission track apatite ages range from 240 Ma in the south to 160 Ma in the north, and according to spontaneous fission track length measurements, they must be interpreted as mixed ages, indicating minor amounts of Paleozoic-Mesozoic sedimentary cover. Apatite fission track length and age modeling suggest rapid cooling and uplift in the Tertiary for the southernmost part of Norway, suggesting a differential uplift of the basement. the obtained data are important for the reconstruction of burial and thermal histories of Cenozoic sedimentary basins of the Norwegian continental margin in the northern North Sea, where diverse rifting events, intraplate stress regimes, and inversion tectonics are involved. Fission track analysis puts constraints on tectonic modeling of uplift of rift flanks and the Norwegian continental margin and yields information for these assessment of hydrocarbon potentials of the sedimentary basins.

  11. Introduction - Processes of continental rifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Baker, B. H.

    1983-01-01

    It is thought likely that thermal thinning and/or diapirism can cause the extensional stress required for rifting. The rifting, however, will not occur unless the regional tectonic regime permits the sides of the rift to diverge. Whereas passive plate extension could cause rifting in isolation, the extension and rifting are likely to be localized where the lithosphere is weakest over an existing thermal anomaly. In those cases where asthenospheric diapirism occurs, which is essentially a response to thinning of the lithosphere by thermal thinning or plate extension, the effects of diapirism may completely mask the initiating mechanism. It is believed that anomalous heat transfer into the lithosphere, diapirism, and magmatism must all figure in rifting, along with a deviatoric stress field that will permit extension in a developing rift. Even though the models are useful in permitting idealized processes to be quantified and tested, better knowledge of lithosphere properties is considered necessary, in particular knowledge of mantle viscosity and its temperature dependence.

  12. The Brazilian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, L. R.; Coutinho, P. N.

    1981-04-01

    The Brazilian continental margin, with its interesting morphology, structure and sediments, has become better known only during the last two decades. Six physiographical provinces can be recognized at the continental margin and the adjacent coast: (1) Cabo Orange-Parnaiba delta; (2) Parnaiba delta-Cabo Sa˜o Roque; (3) Cabo Sa˜o Roque-Belmonte; (4) Belmonte-Cabo Frio; (5) Cabo Frio-Cabo Santa Marta; and (6) Cabo Santa Marta-Chui. The shelf is rather wide near the Amazon Mouth, becoming narrower eastwards, continuing very narrow along the northeastern and eastern coast, and becoming wider again in the south towards the Plate River. Prominent morphological features along the margin are the Amazon cone, the marginal plateaus off northeastern Brazil, the Sa˜o Francisco cone and canyon, the Abrolhos Bank, and the deep-sea plateaus of Pernambuco and Sa˜o Paulo. On the shelf proper a number of relief elements exist, such as sand waves east of the Amazon, submarine terraces at various places, and irregularities of structural origin. The shelf break is rather smooth in the far north and south, more abrupt in the remainder. Surface sediments of the Brazilian shelf show five distinct facies types: littoral quartz sands, mud, transition sand-mud, coralline algae, and biodetrital. The terrigenous elastic fractions dominate off the Amazon and in southern Brazil; between these areas they occupy a very narrow strip near the coast. The carbonate facies, predominantly composed of calcareous algae, is abundant between the Parnaiba delta and Cabo Frio; to the south this facies is more biodetrital and restricted to the outer shelf. Economically important on the Brazilian continental margin besides oil, are sands and gravels, carbonate deposits, evaporites and some subsurface coal. Other possible mineral resources could be phosphate, heavy minerals and clays for ceramics.

  13. Converting your Continental

    SciTech Connect

    Wirz, B.M.

    1981-07-01

    Inflation and higher fuel and environmental costs make conventional-generated power as unaffordable (as a Lincoln Continental in the automobile market) for retail and industrial customers, many of whom are looking for alternatives to purchase electric power. The loss of revenue from competing energy sources eliminates the monopoly status that utilities have enjoyed and is forcing utilities to provide what customers want and do it better than the competition. Utilities have only research and development or fuel switching to improve efficiency unless they rethink their approach and come up with new alternatives. 1 table. (DCK)

  14. Thermo-mechanical controls on the mode of continental collision in the SE Carpathians (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloetingh, S. A. P. L.; Burov, E.; Matenco, L.; Toussaint, G.; Bertotti, G.; Andriessen, P. A. M.; Wortel, M. J. R.; Spakman, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Carpathians orogenic system, with its along-arc variations in topography developed in the aftermath of continental collision, is associated with unusual foredeep basins, large-scale strain and seismicity concentration and high-velocity mantle bodies. The East Carpathians continental collision was non-cylindrical, leading to large-scale variations in thrust nappe kinematics, orogenic uplift patterns and foredeep subsidence, controlled by the mechanics and geometry of the lower plate. Thermo-mechanical modelling demonstrates that in this low-rate convergence regime, the subducted lithosphere had enough time to interact with the mantle to advance towards a thermal resettlement. This is favored by the low degree of metamorphism, mechanical weakness of the lower plate and the lack of active surface processes at the contact with and in the upper plate. In contrast, low-buoyant, thick lower crust and active surface processes keep the continuity of the slab intact and promote the development of typical foredeep basins. The model explains in a self-consistent manner the unusual geometry of the Vrancea seismogenic slab in the bend zone of the Romanian Carpathians. The model is also consistent with the presence of two high-velocity bodies inferred from seismic tomography studies and explains the depth zonation of seismicity in the Vrancea area. Differences between the northern part of East Carpathians and the southeastern bend of the Carpathians arc are largely controlled by lateral variations in crustal structure, topography emplacement and surface processes along the arc. Mechanical heterogeneity of the Carpathians subduction leads to the development of two end member modes of collision, allowing a study of these states and their transition. Lithospheric configuration and tectonic topography appear to be prime factors controlling variations in slab behavior. In the SE Carpathians, at the terminal phase of continental convergence, slab delamination, roll-back and

  15. Sedimentary sequences of the Pacific-Indian Ocean sector of the Antarctic continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A.; Eittreim, S. ); Anderson, J. ); Stagg, H. )

    1990-06-01

    Seismic-reflection data across the Pacific-Indian Ocean sector of the Antarctic continental margin commonly reveal preglacial and glacial sedimentary sections up to 14 km thick. In this sector, diverse tectonic regimes have controlled the locations of preglacial rift deposits as well as glacial-till deltas. These regimes include major rift embayments, passive margins, formerly active and presently active margins, and active rifts. The sedimentary sections are principally of Mesozoic and Cenozoic age, although Paleozoic strata may exist at great depth. The upper parts of these sections commonly comprise prograding and aggrading sigmoidal sequences that are separated by unconformities and are up to 6 km thick. Where drilled in Prydz Bay and the Ross Sea, these upper sequences are solely glacial marine rocks of early Oligocene and younger age. The lower portions of the sections are commonly well-layered sequences that infill structural basins. The evolution of these sedimentary sequences is strongly controlled by extensional tectonic processes. Depocenters are located primarily within rift structures that formed initially during Gondwana breakup and later during magmatic-arc development. Rift-related deposits fill the basement grabens and are unconformably covered by glacial-till deltas. The till deltas apparently have been deposited beneath and at the front of former grounded ice sheets that selectively moved through rift embayments and over thermally subsiding margins. Since initial Cenozoic glaciation, these thick till deltas have prograded the continental shelf edge up to 70 km seaward to its present location. The sedimentary sequences underlying the Antarctic margin hold a record of Antarctic (Gondwana) rifting and glaciation - a record that would, if drilled, greatly improve their understanding of global climate and sea-level changes.

  16. Effective elastic thickness of the continental lithosphere in China from heat flow: Implications for the lithospheric rheology and active tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Wang, L.

    2009-04-01

    The effective elastic thickness (Te) of continental lithosphere is one important parameter that describes the response of the lithosphere to long-term loads. However, the estimation of Te is still controversial and various forward and inverse methods have been proposed since the last 20 years. Besides the general application of gravity-topography based inverse method, thermal aspect and related technique is more emphasized, since the mechanical behavior of lithosphere is obviously influenced by temperature. Here we present the effective elastic thickness of the continental lithosphere in China from heat flow data by the method proposed by Burov et al, J. Geophys. Res., 1995, 100(B3):3905-3927. Our results show that Te varies much in different areas of China due to diverse and complicated geological evolution and associated change in thermal regime. Te is much larger than the crustal thickness in the regions where the heat flow is really low (usually less than 50mW/m2) and the lithosphere is relatively thick, indicating much more contribution from the upper mantle to the whole strength of lithosphere. Under this condition, the rheology of the mantle with olivine dominates the deformation manner and processes of the lithosphere and the typical cases in China are those blocks (Tarim, Junggar, Ordos and Sichuan) in central-western China. For instance, the Te of the Tarim basin is 66

  17. Subduction-driven recycling of continental margin lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Levander, A; Bezada, M J; Niu, F; Humphreys, E D; Palomeras, I; Thurner, S M; Masy, J; Schmitz, M; Gallart, J; Carbonell, R; Miller, M S

    2014-11-13

    Whereas subduction recycling of oceanic lithosphere is one of the central themes of plate tectonics, the recycling of continental lithosphere appears to be far more complicated and less well understood. Delamination and convective downwelling are two widely recognized processes invoked to explain the removal of lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts. Here we relate oceanic plate subduction to removal of adjacent continental lithosphere in certain plate tectonic settings. We have developed teleseismic body wave images from dense broadband seismic experiments that show higher than expected volumes of anomalously fast mantle associated with the subducted Atlantic slab under northeastern South America and the Alboran slab beneath the Gibraltar arc region; the anomalies are under, and are aligned with, the continental margins at depths greater than 200 kilometres. Rayleigh wave analysis finds that the lithospheric mantle under the continental margins is significantly thinner than expected, and that thin lithosphere extends from the orogens adjacent to the subduction zones inland to the edges of nearby cratonic cores. Taking these data together, here we describe a process that can lead to the loss of continental lithosphere adjacent to a subduction zone. Subducting oceanic plates can viscously entrain and remove the bottom of the continental thermal boundary layer lithosphere from adjacent continental margins. This drives surface tectonics and pre-conditions the margins for further deformation by creating topography along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. This can lead to development of secondary downwellings under the continental interior, probably under both South America and the Gibraltar arc, and to delamination of the entire lithospheric mantle, as around the Gibraltar arc. This process reconciles numerous, sometimes mutually exclusive, geodynamic models proposed to explain the complex oceanic-continental tectonics of these subduction zones

  18. The Effect of Temperature Dependent Rheology on a Kinematic Model of Continental Breakup and Rifted Continental Margin Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymms, V. J.; Kusznir, N. J.

    2004-12-01

    The effect of temperature dependent rheology has been examined for a model of continental lithosphere thinning by an upwelling divergent flow field within continental lithosphere and asthenosphere leading to continental breakup and rifted continental margin formation. The model uses a coupled FE fluid flow and thermal solution and is kinematically driven using a half divergence rate Vx and upwelling velocity Vz. Viscosity structure is modified by the evolving temperature field of the model through the temperature dependent Newtonian rheology. Continental lithosphere and asthenosphere material are advected by the fluid-flow field in order to predict crustal and mantle lithosphere thinning leading to rifted continental margin formation. The results of the temperature dependent rheology model are compared with those of a simple isoviscous model. The temperature dependent rheology model predicts continental lithosphere thinning and depth dependent stretching, similar to that predicted by the uniform viscosity model. However compared with the uniform viscosity model the temperature dependent rheology predicts greater amounts of thinning of the continental crust and lithospheric mantle than the isoviscous solutions. An important parameter within the kinematic model of continental lithosphere breakup and rifted continental margin development is the velocity ratio Vz/Vx. For non-volcanic margins, Vz/Vx is thought to be around unity. Applying a velocity ratio Vz/Vx of unity gives a diffuse ocean-continent transition and exhumation of continental lithospheric mantle. For volcanic margins, Vz/Vx is of order 10, falling to unity with a half-life of order 10 Ma, leading to a more sharply defined ocean-continent transition. While Vx during continental breakup may be estimated, Vz can only be inferred. FE fluid flow solutions, in which Vz is not imposed and without an initial buoyancy driven flow component, predict a velocity ratio Vz/Vx of around unity for both temperature

  19. Finite-element models of continental extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. David; Morgan, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Numerical models of the initial deformation of extending continental lithosphere, computed to investigate the control of preexisting thermal and mechanical heterogeneities on the style of deformation, are presented. The finite element method is used to calculate deformation with a viscoelastic-plastic model for the lithosphere. Comparisons of the results of analytic models and finite-element models using this method show that good results may be obtained by the numerical technique, even with elements containing both brittle and viscoelastic sampling points. It is shown that the gross style of initial extensional deformation is controlled by the depth and width of the initial heterogeneity which localizes deformation.

  20. Effective Elastic Thickness of the Lithosphere in Continental China from Heat Flow: Implications for the Lithospheric Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Wang, L.

    2006-12-01

    The effective elastic thickness (Te) of lithosphere is one parameter describing the responses of the lithosphere to long term forces, and is still controversial in estimation by different methods. Here we present the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere in continental China from heat flow data by the method proposed by Burov et al, J.G.R., 1995,100(B3):3905-3927. Our results show that Te varies much in different sub-areas in continental China due to different geological evolution and associated thermal regimes. Te is much greater than the crustal thickness in the area where the heat flow is really low and the lithosphere is really thick, indicating much more contribution from the lithospheric mantle and the dominative control of the mantle with olivine on the rheology of the lithosphere, and the major basins (Tarim, Junggar, Ordos and Sichuan basins) in central-western China share this characteristic. For instance, the Te of the Tarim basin is 66km with crustal thickness of 45km. Te is less than the crustal thickness in the region where the heat flow is relatively high, and approximates to the crustal brittle-ductile transition depth, suggesting more contribution from the crust and the dominative control of the felsic crust on the rheology of the lithosphere, and this phenomenon is obvious in the SE coastal China, eastern North China and the orogenic belts. Compared the estimated Te with the seismogenic layer thickness (Ts) available in China, it is also found that the Te is much greater than Ts in the major basins with low heat flow, and is similar to Ts in the active zones with high heat flow, which is inconsistent with that Te is usually smaller than Ts proposed by Maggi et al., Geology,2000,28(6):495-498. Generally, two end elements rheological modes for continental lithosphere of the strong crust-weak mantle and the weak crust-strong mantle are all available in continental China considering different thermal regime, composition and geological

  1. Anorthosite belts, continental drift, and the anorthosite event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herz, N.

    1969-01-01

    Most anorthosites lie in two principal belts when plotted on a predrift continental reconstruction. Anorthosite ages in the belts cluster around 1300 ?? 200 million years and range from 1100 to 1700 million years. This suggests that anorthosites are the product of a unique cataclysmic event or a thermal event that was normal only during the earth's early history.

  2. Anorthosite belts, continental drift, and the anorthosite event.

    PubMed

    Herz, N

    1969-05-23

    Most anorthosites lie in two principal belts when plotted on a predrift continental reconstruction. Anorthosite ages in the belts cluster around 1300 +/- 200 million years and range from 1100 to 1700 million years. This suggests that anorthosites are the product of a unique cataclysmic event or a thermal event that was normal only during the earth's early history. PMID:17775597

  3. Dynamics of Continental Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to swallow buoyant exotic crust. Accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins are the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North and South American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific. The geologic record is riddled with accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana and the Altaides that formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. Both the modern and ancient examples are characterised by episodic switches between extension and shortening associated with transitions from collision of exotic crust and subduction related rollback. We present three-dimensional dynamic models that show for the first time how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back arc region. The complexity of the morphology and evolution of the system are driven by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonal to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, but infer that this is a global phenomena throughout Earth's evolution.

  4. Dynamics of continental accretion.

    PubMed

    Moresi, L; Betts, P G; Miller, M S; Cayley, R A

    2014-04-10

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon. PMID:24670638

  5. Dynamics of the Precambrian Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perchuk, L. L.; Gerya, T. V.; van Reenen, D. D.; Smit, C. A.

    2003-04-01

    The Precambrian continental crust is mainly composed of (1) granite greenstone belts (GGB) and (2) granulite facies complexes (GFC). The GFC are often separated from GGB by inward dipping crustal scale shear zones with characteristic sense of movements reflecting thrusting of GFC onto cratonic rocks. The isotope age of the shear zones is identical to GFC, while the latter are always younger than the granite greenstone belts. The dynamics relationships between these two geological units strongly determine tectonic evolution of the Precambrian continental crust. Numerous thermobarometric studies of magmatic and metamorphic rocks show that the Archaean to Early Protorozoic crust as well as the Mantle were hot and therefore relatively soft. Such geothermal regimes may limit separation and movement of micro continents, limiting collisional mechanisms in evolution of the Precambrian crust. The goal of this paper is to show evidence for an alterative model that is based on the mechanism of gravitational redistribution of rocks within the Precambrian continental crust, which might be initiated by a fluid/heat flow related to mantle plumes. The model is tested on the basis of geological, geochemical, geophysical and petrologic data for many paired GFT GGB complexes around the word. Studied granulite complexes are located in between Archaean GGB from which they are separated by inward dipping crustal scale shear zones with reverse sense of movements. The most important evidence for this mechanism is: (i) the near isobaric cooling (IC) and (ii) decompression cooling (DC) shapes of the retrograde P T paths recorded in GFC, while rocks from the juxtaposed GGB in footwalls of the bounding shear zones record P T loops. The Pmax of the loops corresponds to the Pmin, recorded in GFC. Thus the GGB P T loop reflects the burial and ascending of the juxtaposed GGB while the GFC P T path records the exhumation only. The identical isotopic age of GFC and contacting rocks from the shear

  6. Coordination: Southeast continental shelf studies

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1989-01-26

    The objective of this investigation is to obtain model descriptions of the flow modifications in the Southeast Atlantic continental shelf due to Gulf Stream fluctuations and topographic effects. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  7. -induced continental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

  8. Early mantle differentiation and its thermal consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Galer, S.J.G. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz ); Goldstein, S.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Initial positive {epsilon}{sub Nd} values of early Archean continental crust imply derivation from depleted mantle sources. A balancing enriched region is therefore required to exist contemporaneously somewhere on the Earth during the early Archean. It is shown that the enriched reservoir must contain a large proportion ({approximately}30-70%) of the total Nd budget of the differentiated system, even it is was formed only shortly after the accretion of the Earth. This amount of Nd is comparable to or greater than the present-day continental inventory relative to the upper mantle. If this enriched reservoir was continental crust, the small proportion of surviving early Archean continent requires that nearly all of it was destroyed. However, surviving Archean metasediments and granites, in general, have primitive or depleted initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions, and this does not suggest the existence of a large continental crust at this time. Therefore, there is considerable difficulty reconciling this with a plate tectonic regime in which isentropic melting due to plate spreading occurred to the near surface. The authors propose that no significant plate spreading occurred. In this case, an alkalic crust of basalt would be produced because any isentropic melting in the mantle would be of much more limited extent than occurs beneath ocean ridges. A crust built up serially in this way, rather than laterally, appears the most likely candidate for the enriched reservoir balancing the positive {epsilon}{sub Nd} values of the depleted mantle in the early to middle Archean. The existence of such a layer has important implications for the thermal and tectonic history of the Earth.

  9. Extreme Temperature Regimes during the Cool Season and their Associated Large-Scale Circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In the cool season (November-March), extreme temperature events (ETEs) always hit the continental United States (US) and provide significant societal impacts. According to the anomalous amplitudes of the surface air temperature (SAT), there are two typical types of ETEs, e.g. cold waves (CWs) and warm waves (WWs). This study used cluster analysis to categorize both CWs and WWs into four distinct regimes respectively and investigated their associated large-scale circulations on intra-seasonal time scale. Most of the CW regimes have large areal impact over the continental US. However, the distribution of cold SAT anomalies varies apparently in four regimes. In the sea level, the four CW regimes are characterized by anomalous high pressure over North America (near and to west of cold anomaly) with different extension and orientation. As a result, anomalous northerlies along east flank of anomalous high pressure convey cold air into the continental US. To the middle troposphere, the leading two groups feature large-scale and zonally-elongated circulation anomaly pattern, while the other two regimes exhibit synoptic wavetrain pattern with meridionally elongated features. As for the WW regimes, there are some patterns symmetry and anti-symmetry with respect to CW regimes. The WW regimes are characterized by anomalous low pressure and southerlies wind over North America. The first and fourth groups are affected by remote forcing emanating from North Pacific, while the others appear mainly locally forced.

  10. Arctic circulation regimes.

    PubMed

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L

    2015-10-13

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. PMID:26347536

  11. Arctic circulation regimes

    PubMed Central

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. PMID:26347536

  12. The thermal conditions of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zharkov, Vladimir N.; Solomatov, V. S.

    1991-01-01

    Models of Venus' thermal evolution are examined. The following subject areas are covered: (1) modified approximation of parameterized convection; (2) description of the model; (3) numerical results and asymptotic solution of the MAPC equations; (4) magnetism and the thermal regime of the cores of Earth and Venus; and (5) the thermal regime of the Venusian crust.

  13. The northern Egyptian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Mohamed, Gad; Omar, Khaled; Farid, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Africa displays a variety of continental margin structures, tectonics and sedimentary records. The northern Egyptian continental margin represents the NE portion of the North African passive continental margin. Economically, this region is of great importance as a very rich and productive hydrocarbon zone in Egypt. Moreover, it is characterized by remarkable tectonic setting accompanied by active tectonic processes from the old Tethys to recent Mediterranean. In this article, seismicity of the northern Egyptian continental margin has been re-evaluated for more than 100-years and the source parameters of three recent earthquakes (October 2012, January 2013 and July 2013) have been estimated. Moment tensor inversions of 19th October 2012 and 17th January 2013 earthquakes reveal normal faulting mechanism with strike-slip component having seismic moment of 3.5E16 N m and 4.3E15 N m respectively. The operation of the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) since the end of 1997 has significantly enhanced the old picture of earthquake activity across northern Egyptian continental margin whereas; the record-ability (annual rate) has changed from 2-events/year to 54-event/year before and after ENSN respectively. The spatial distribution of earthquakes foci indicated that the activity tends to cluster at three zones: Mediterranean Ridge (MR), Nile Cone (NC) and Eratosthenes Seamount (ERS). However, two seismic gaps are reported along Levant Basin (LEV) and Herodotus Basin (HER).

  14. Dependency of continental crustal rupture, decompression melt initiation and OCT architecture on lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup: Numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, L.; Kusznir, N. J.; Manatschal, G.

    2012-12-01

    During the continental breakup process, the initiation of sea-floor spreading requires both the rupture of the continental crust and the initiation of decompression melting. Using numerical experiments, we investigate how the deformation mode of continental lithosphere thinning and stretching controls the rupture of continental crust and lithospheric mantle, the onset of decompression melting and their relative timing. We use a two dimensional finite element viscous flow model to describe lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation. This flow field is used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere material and temperature. Decompression melting is predicted using the parameterization scheme of Katz et al. (2003). Consistent with the observations of deformation processes occurring at slow spreading ocean ridges (Cannat, 1996), we assume that the topmost continental and oceanic lithosphere, corresponding to the cooler brittle seismogenic layer, deforms by extensional faulting (which we approximate to pure-shear deformation) and magmatic intrusion. Beneath this topmost lithosphere layer approximately 15-20 km thick, we assume that deformation occurs in response to passive upwelling and thermal and melt buoyancy driven small-scale convection. The relative contribution of these deformation components is parameterised by the ratio Vz/Vx, where Vx is the half spreading rate applied to the topmost lithosphere deformation and Vz is the upwelling velocity associated with the small scale convection. We use a series of numerical experiments to investigate the dependency of continental crust and lithosphere rupture, decompression melt initiation, rifted margin ocean-continent transition architecture and subsidence history on the half-spreading rate Vx, buoyancy driven upwelling rate Vz, the ratio Vz/Vx and upper lithosphere pure-shear width W. Based on the numerical experiment results we explore a polyphase evolution of deformation modes leading to continental breakup, sea

  15. Oceanic and terrestrial sources of continental precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, Luis; Stohl, Andreas; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Dominguez, Francina; Yoshimura, Kei; Yu, Lisan; Drumond, Anita; DuráN-Quesada, Ana MaríA.; Nieto, Raquel

    2012-12-01

    The most important sources of atmospheric moisture at the global scale are herein identified, both oceanic and terrestrial, and a characterization is made of how continental regions are influenced by water from different moisture source regions. The methods used to establish source-sink relationships of atmospheric water vapor are reviewed, and the advantages and caveats associated with each technique are discussed. The methods described include analytical and box models, numerical water vapor tracers, and physical water vapor tracers (isotopes). In particular, consideration is given to the wide range of recently developed Lagrangian techniques suitable both for evaluating the origin of water that falls during extreme precipitation events and for establishing climatologies of moisture source-sink relationships. As far as oceanic sources are concerned, the important role of the subtropical northern Atlantic Ocean provides moisture for precipitation to the largest continental area, extending from Mexico to parts of Eurasia, and even to the South American continent during the Northern Hemisphere winter. In contrast, the influence of the southern Indian Ocean and North Pacific Ocean sources extends only over smaller continental areas. The South Pacific and the Indian Ocean represent the principal source of moisture for both Australia and Indonesia. Some landmasses only receive moisture from the evaporation that occurs in the same hemisphere (e.g., northern Europe and eastern North America), while others receive moisture from both hemispheres with large seasonal variations (e.g., northern South America). The monsoonal regimes in India, tropical Africa, and North America are provided with moisture from a large number of regions, highlighting the complexities of the global patterns of precipitation. Some very important contributions are also seen from relatively small areas of ocean, such as the Mediterranean Basin (important for Europe and North Africa) and the Red Sea

  16. 76 FR 2919 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and...

  17. Bioenergetics of Continental Serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Serpentinization is the aqueous alteration of ultramafic (Fe- and Mg-rich) rocks, resulting in secondary mineral assemblages of serpentine, brucite, iron oxyhydroxides and magnetite, talc, and possibly carbonate and silica-rich veins and other minor phases-all depending on the evolving pressure-temperature-composition of the system. The abiotic evolution of hydrogen and possibly organic compounds via serpentinization (McCollom and Bach, 2009) highlights the relevance of this geologic process to carbon and energy sources for the deep biosphere. Serpentinization may fuel life over long stretches of geologic time, throughout the global seabed and in exposed, faulted peridotite blocks (as at Lost City Hydrothermal Field, Kelley et al., 2005), and in obducted oceanic mantle units in ophiolites (e.g., Tiago et al., 2004). Relatively little work has been published on life in continental serpentinite settings, though they likely host a unique resident microbiota. In this work, we systematically model the serpentinizing fluid as an environmental niche. Reported field data for high and moderate pH serpentinizing fluids were modeled from Cyprus, the Philippines, Oman, Northern California, New Caledonia, Yugoslavia, Portugal, Italy, Newfoundland Canada, New Zealand, and Turkey. Values for Gibbs Energy of reaction (ΔGr), kJ per mole of electrons transferred for a given metabolism, are calculated for each field site. Cases are considered both for (1) modest assumptions of 1 nanomolar hydrogen and 1 micromolar methane, based on unpublished data for a similar northern California field site (Cardace and Hoehler, in prep.) and (2) an upper estimate of 10 nanomolar hydrogen and 500 micromolar methane. We survey the feasibility of microbial metabolisms for key steps in the nitrogen cycle, oxidation of sulfur in pyrite, iron oxidation or reduction reactions, sulfate reduction coupled to hydrogen or methane oxidation, methane oxidation coupled to the reduction of oxygen, and

  18. Continental crust: a geophysical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book develops an integrated and balanced picture of present knowledge of the continental crust. Crust and lithosphere are first defined, and the formation of crusts as a general planetary phenomenon is described. The background and methods of geophysical studies of the earth's crust and the collection of related geophysical parameters are examined. Creep and friction experiments and the various methods of radiometric age dating are addressed, and geophysical and geological investigations of the crustal structure in various age provinces of the continents are studied. Specific tectonic structures such as rifts, continental margins, and geothermal areas are discussed. Finally, an attempt is made to give a comprehensive view of the evolution of the continental crust and to collect and develop arguments for crustal accretion and recycling. 647 references.

  19. How the insulating properties of snow affect soil carbon distribution in the continental pan-Arctic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouttevin, I.; Menegoz, M.; Dominé, F.; Krinner, G.; Koven, C.; Ciais, P.; Tarnocai, C.; Boike, J.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate the effect of an ecosystem differentiated insulation by snow on the soil thermal regime and on the terrestrial soil carbon distribution in the pan-Arctic area. This is done by means of a sensitivity study performed with the land surface model ORCHIDEE, which furthermore provides a first quantification of this effect. Based on field campaigns reporting higher thermal conductivities and densities for the tundra snowpack than for taiga snow, two distributions of near-equilibrium soil carbon stocks are computed, one relying on uniform snow thermal properties and the other using ecosystem-differentiated snow thermal properties. Those modeled distributions strongly depend on soil temperature through decomposition processes. Considering higher insulation by snow in taiga areas induces warmer soil temperatures by up to 12 K in winter at 50 cm depth. This warmer soil signal persists over summer with a temperature difference of up to 4 K at 50 cm depth, especially in areas exhibiting a thick, enduring snow cover. These thermal changes have implications on the modeled soil carbon stocks, which are reduced by 8% in the pan-Arctic continental area when the vegetation-induced variations of snow thermal properties are accounted for. This is the result of diverse and spatially heterogeneous ecosystem processes: where higher soil temperatures lift nitrogen limitation on plant productivity, tree plant functional types thrive whereas light limitation and enhanced water stress are the new constrains on lower vegetation, resulting in a reduced net productivity at the pan-Arctic scale. Concomitantly, higher soil temperatures yield increased respiration rates (+22% over the study area) and result in reduced permafrost extent and deeper active layers which expose greater volumes of soil to microbial decomposition. The three effects combine to produce lower soil carbon stocks in the pan-Arctic terrestrial area. Our study highlights the role of snow in combination with

  20. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry in continental tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Katharine W.; Lechler, Alex R.

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the thermal history of minerals and fluids in continental environments is a cornerstone of tectonics research. Paleotemperature constraints from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry have provided important tests of geodynamic, structural, topographic and basin evolution models. The thermometer is based on the 13C-18O bond ordering in carbonates (mass-47 anomaly, Δ47) and provides estimates of the carbonate formation temperature independent of the δ18O value of the water from which the carbonate grew; Δ47 is measured simultaneously with conventional measurements of carbonate δ13C and δ18O values, which together constrain the isotopic composition of the parent water. Depending on the geologic setting of carbonate growth, this information can help constrain paleoenvironmental conditions or basin temperatures and fluid sources. This review examines how clumped isotope thermometry can shed new light on problems in continental tectonics, focusing on paleoaltimetry, basin evolution and structural diagenesis applications. Paleoaltimetry is inherently difficult, and the precision in carbonate growth temperature estimates is at the limit of what is useful for quantitative paleoelevation reconstruction. Nevertheless, clumped isotope analyses have enabled workers to address previously intractable problems and in many settings offer the best chance of understanding topographic change from the geologic record. The portion of the shallow crust residing at temperatures up to ca. 200 °C is important as host to economic resources and records of tectonics and climate, and clumped isotope thermometry is one of the few proxies that can access this critical range with sensitivity to temperature alone. Only a handful of studies to date have used clumped isotopes to investigate diagenesis and other sub-surface processes using carbonate crystallization temperatures or the sensitivity of Δ47 values to a sample's thermal history. However, the thermometer is

  1. Regimes of Helium Burning

    SciTech Connect

    Timmes, F. X.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2000-07-10

    The burning regimes encountered by laminar deflagrations and Zeldovich von Neumann Doering [ZND] detonations propagating through helium-rich compositions in the presence of buoyancy-driven turbulence are analyzed. Particular attention is given to models of X-ray bursts that start with a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a neutron star and to the thin-shell helium instability of intermediate-mass stars. In the X-ray burst case, turbulent deflagrations propagating in the lateral or radial direction encounter a transition from the distributed regime to the flamelet regime at a density of {approx}108 g cm-3. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than {approx}106 g cm-3. Self-sustained laminar deflagrations traveling in the radial direction cannot exist below this density. Similarly, the planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at {approx}107 g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. In the thin helium shell case, turbulent deflagrations traveling in the lateral or radial direction encounter the distributed regime at densities below {approx}107 g cm-3 and the flamelet regime at larger densities. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than {approx}104 g cm-3, indicating that steady state laminar deflagrations cannot form below this density. The planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at {approx}5x10{sup 4} g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  2. Signs of continental rifting in the southwestern Japanese Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, E. A.; Eroshenko, D. V.

    2016-03-01

    The southwestern margin of the Japan Arc evolved in the geodynamic regime of continental rifting during the Miocene-Pleistocene. This has been verified by broad manifestations of metasomatosis of mantle peridotites that underlie the lithosphere of the Japan Islands and by episodes of deep magmatism (kimberlites and melilitites) in the region. The high enrichment of deep melts in incompatible rare and rare earth elements is partially preserved in melts of regional basalts from smaller depths. In contrast, spreading basalts of the Sea of Japan and subduction basalts from the Nankai trench at the boundary with the Philippine Plate are extremely depleted in rare elements.

  3. Geothermal regime and Jurassic source rock maturity of the Junggar basin, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nansheng, Qiu; Zhihuan, Zhang; Ershe, Xu

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the thermal gradient distribution of the Junggar basin based on oil-test and well-logging temperature data. The basin-wide average thermal gradient in the depth interval of 0-4000 m is 22.6 °C/km, which is lower than other sedimentary basins in China. We report 21 measured terrestrial heat flow values based on detailed thermal conductivity data and systematical steady-state temperature data. These values vary from 27.0 to 54.1 mW/m 2 with a mean of 41.8 ± 7.8 mW/m 2. The Junggar basin appears to be a cool basin in terms of its thermal regime. The heat flow distribution within the basin shows the following characteristics. (1) The heat flow decreases from the Luliang Uplift to the Southern Depression; (2) relatively high heat flow values over 50 mW/m 2 are confined to the northern part of the Eastern Uplift and the adjacent parts of the Eastern Luliang Uplift and Central Depression; (3) The lowest heat flow of smaller than 35 mW/m 2 occurs in the southern parts of the basin. This low thermal regime of the Junggar basin is consistent with the geodynamic setting, the extrusion of plates around the basin, the considerably thick crust, the dense lithospheric mantle, the relatively stable continental basement of the basin, low heat generation and underground water flow of the basin. The heat flow of this basin is of great significance to oil exploration and hydrocarbon resource assessment, because it bears directly on issues of petroleum source-rock maturation. Almost all oil fields are limited to the areas of higher heat flows. The relatively low heat flow values in the Junggar basin will deepen the maturity threshold, making the deep-seated widespread Permian and Jurassic source rocks in the Junggar basin favorable for oil and gas generation. In addition, the maturity evolution of the Lower Jurassic Badaowan Group (J 1b) and Middle Jurassic Xishanyao Group (J 2x) were calculated based on the thermal data and burial depth. The maturity of the Jurassic

  4. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases.

  5. Dynamic Treatment Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Bibhas; Murphy, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic treatment regime consists of a sequence of decision rules, one per stage of intervention, that dictate how to individualize treatments to patients based on evolving treatment and covariate history. These regimes are particularly useful for managing chronic disorders, and fit well into the larger paradigm of personalized medicine. They provide one way to operationalize a clinical decision support system. Statistics plays a key role in the construction of evidence-based dynamic treatment regimes – informing best study design as well as efficient estimation and valid inference. Due to the many novel methodological challenges it offers, this area has been growing in popularity among statisticians in recent years. In this article, we review the key developments in this exciting field of research. In particular, we discuss the sequential multiple assignment randomized trial designs, estimation techniques like Q-learning and marginal structural models, and several inference techniques designed to address the associated non-standard asymptotics. We reference software, whenever available. We also outline some important future directions. PMID:25401119

  6. Non-climatic factors and long-term, continental-scale changes in seasonally frozen ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiklomanov, Nikolay I.

    2012-03-01

    ). In their recent paper entitled 'An observational 71-year history of seasonally frozen ground changes in Eurasian high latitudes', Frauenfeld and Zhang (2011) provided detailed analysis of soil temperature data to assess 1930-2000 trends in seasonal freezing depth. The data were obtained from 387 Soviet non-permafrost meteorological stations. The authors performed systematic, quality-controlled, integrative analysis over the entire former Soviet Union domain. The long-term changes in depth of seasonal freezing were discussed in relation to such forcing variables as air temperature, degree days of freezing/thawing, snow depth and summer precipitation as well as modes of the North Atlantic Oscillation. The spatially average approach adopted for the study provides a generalized continental-scale trend. The study greatly improves, expands and extends previous 1956-90 analysis of the ground thermal regime over the Eurasian high latitudes (Frauenfeld et al 2004). Although the work of Frauenfeld and Zhang (2011) is the most comprehensive assessment of the continental-scale long-term trends in seasonal freezing available to date, more detailed analysis is needed to determine the effect of climate change on seasonally frozen ground. It should be noted that, in addition to the variables considered for analysis, other non-climatic factors affect the depth of freezing propagation. Unlike the surface, which is influenced by the climate directly, the ground even at shallow depth receives a climatic signal that is substantially modified by edaphic processes, contributing to highly localized thermal sensitivities of the ground to climatic forcing. Subsurface properties, soil moisture, and snow and vegetation covers influence the depth of freezing. Topography also plays an important role in establishing the ground thermal regime. It is an important determinant of the amount of heat received by the ground surface, affects the distribution of snow and vegetation, and influences the

  7. Continental Subduction: Mass Fluxes and Interactions with the Wider Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuthbert, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    it causing metasomatism and refertilisation. Partitioning also takes place by solid-fluid and melt-fluid partitioning. Dehydration may take place both during subduction and exhumation, and fluxes between dehydrating and hydrating rock masses influence the internal fluid budget of the orogen (essential for eclogitisation and densification of mafic lithologies). Ascending granitic melts advect dissolved water to shallow levels, or even the atmosphere. Irreversible subduction of PCM sediment carries water plus nitrogen species to the deeper mantle. Decarbonation of voluminous PCM carbonates depends on thermal regime and may release a pulse of CO2 to the atmosphere, but is limited in colder subduction zones hence transferring large volumes of carbon to the deep mantle. This may ultimately be mobilised by melting or dissolution to form fluid media for diamond formation.

  8. Evolution of magma-poor continental margins from rifting to seafloor spreading.

    PubMed

    Whitmarsh, R B; Manatschal, G; Minshull, T A

    2001-09-13

    The rifting of continents involves faulting (tectonism) and magmatism, which reflect the strain-rate and temperature dependent processes of solid-state deformation and decompression melting within the Earth. Most models of this rifting have treated tectonism and magmatism separately, and few numerical simulations have attempted to include continental break-up and melting, let alone describe how continental rifting evolves into seafloor spreading. Models of this evolution conventionally juxtapose continental and oceanic crust. Here we present observations that support the existence of a zone of exhumed continental mantle, several tens of kilometres wide, between oceanic and continental crust on continental margins where magma-poor rifting has taken place. We present geophysical and geological observations from the west Iberia margin, and geological mapping of margins of the former Tethys ocean now exposed in the Alps. We use these complementary findings to propose a conceptual model that focuses on the final stage of continental extension and break-up, and the creation of a zone of exhumed continental mantle that evolves oceanward into seafloor spreading. We conclude that the evolving stress and thermal fields are constrained by a rising and narrowing ridge of asthenospheric mantle, and that magmatism and rates of extension systematically increase oceanward. PMID:11557977

  9. An accreted continental terrane in northwestern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourier, T.; Laj, C.; Mégard, F.; Roperch, P.; Mitouard, P.; Farfan Medrano, A.

    1988-04-01

    A paleomagnetic study of over 250 cores from 26 sites sampled in Early to Late Cretaceous and Paleogene volcanic, plutonic and sedimentary formations of the Lancones basin in the Piura province of northern Peru, indicates that most of these lithologies carry a stable primary remanent magnetization whose direction is significantly different from that of coeval formations of stable South America. A clockwise rotation ranging from 90° for the lowermost units to 35° for the uppermost ones has been documented, although the lack of precise chronology has not allowed a detailed temporal description. Four sites from Late Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian) formations in the Amotape-Tahuin Range also show a 110° clockwise rotation and yield evidence for a northward displacement. When considered together with previous geological studies, these data are consistent with the hypothesis of the accretion of an Amotape-Tahuin continental terrane to the Peruvian margin in Neocomian times. The accretion was followed by in situ rotation, suggesting a dextral shear regime. These results indicate that the geodynamical evolution of northern Peru is more closely related to the processes observed in Ecuador than to those classically assumed for the Central Andes of Peru.

  10. Non-climatic factors and long-term, continental-scale changes in seasonally frozen ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiklomanov, Nikolay I.

    2012-03-01

    ). In their recent paper entitled 'An observational 71-year history of seasonally frozen ground changes in Eurasian high latitudes', Frauenfeld and Zhang (2011) provided detailed analysis of soil temperature data to assess 1930-2000 trends in seasonal freezing depth. The data were obtained from 387 Soviet non-permafrost meteorological stations. The authors performed systematic, quality-controlled, integrative analysis over the entire former Soviet Union domain. The long-term changes in depth of seasonal freezing were discussed in relation to such forcing variables as air temperature, degree days of freezing/thawing, snow depth and summer precipitation as well as modes of the North Atlantic Oscillation. The spatially average approach adopted for the study provides a generalized continental-scale trend. The study greatly improves, expands and extends previous 1956-90 analysis of the ground thermal regime over the Eurasian high latitudes (Frauenfeld et al 2004). Although the work of Frauenfeld and Zhang (2011) is the most comprehensive assessment of the continental-scale long-term trends in seasonal freezing available to date, more detailed analysis is needed to determine the effect of climate change on seasonally frozen ground. It should be noted that, in addition to the variables considered for analysis, other non-climatic factors affect the depth of freezing propagation. Unlike the surface, which is influenced by the climate directly, the ground even at shallow depth receives a climatic signal that is substantially modified by edaphic processes, contributing to highly localized thermal sensitivities of the ground to climatic forcing. Subsurface properties, soil moisture, and snow and vegetation covers influence the depth of freezing. Topography also plays an important role in establishing the ground thermal regime. It is an important determinant of the amount of heat received by the ground surface, affects the distribution of snow and vegetation, and influences the

  11. Convective Regimes in Crystallizing Basaltic Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Holness, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Cooling through the chamber walls drives crystallisation in crustal magma chambers, resulting in a cumulate pile on the floor and mushy regions at the walls and roof. The liquid in many magma chambers, either the bulk magma or the interstitial liquid in the mushy regions, may convect, driven either thermally, due to cooling, or compositionally, due to fractional crystallization. We have constructed a regime diagram of the possible convective modes in a system containing a basal mushy layer. These modes depend on the large-scale buoyancy forcing characterised by a global Rayleigh number and the proportion of the chamber height constituting the basal mushy region. We have tested this regime diagram using an analogue experimental system composed of a fluid layer overlying a pile of almost neutrally buoyant inert particles. Convection in this system is driven thermally, simulating magma convection above and within a porous cumulate pile. We observe a range of possible convective regimes, enabling us to produce a regime diagram. In addition to modes characterised by convection of the bulk and interstitial fluid, we also observe a series of regimes where the crystal pile is mobilised by fluid motions. These regimes feature saltation and scouring of the crystal pile by convection in the bulk fluid at moderate Rayleigh numbers, and large crystal-rich fountains at high Rayleigh numbers. For even larger Rayleigh numbers the entire crystal pile is mobilised in what we call the snowglobe regime. The observed mobilisation regimes may be applicable to basaltic magma chambers. Plagioclase in basal cumulates crystallised from a dense magma may be a result of crystal mobilisation from a plagioclase-rich roof mush. Compositional convection within such a mush could result in disaggregation, enabling the buoyant plagioclase to be entrained in relatively dense descending liquid plumes and brought to the floor. The phenocryst load in porphyritic lavas is often interpreted as a

  12. Continental collisions and seismic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Wever, Th.; Sadowiak, P.

    1991-04-01

    Reflection seismics in compressional belts has revealed the structure of crustal shortening and thickening processes, showing complex patterns of indentation and interfingering of colliding crusts and subcrustal lithospheres. Generally, in the upper crust large zones of detachments develop, often showing duplexes and 'crocodile' structures. The lower crust from zones of active collision (e.g. Alps, Pyrenees) is characterized by strongly dipping reflections. The base of the crust with the Moho must be continuously equilibrating after orogenic collapse as areas of former continental collision exhibit flat Mohos and subhorizontal reflections. The depth to the Moho increases during collision and decreases after the onset of post-orogenic extension, until finally the crustal root disappears completely together with the erosion of the mountains. Processes, active during continental collisions and orogenic collapse, create distinct structures which are imaged by reflection seismic profiling. Examples are shown and discussed.

  13. Modes of continental decretion in western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, F. A.

    2010-12-01

    Between the Archean Slave Province and the Pacific Ocean, the North American continent in Canada appears to have ‘grown’ westward during Paleoproterozoic (Wopmay) and Paleozoic-Mesozoic (Cordilleran) orogenesis. However, results from geological observations combined with regional geophysical surveys lead to interpretations in which pre-orogenic basement in both the Wopmay and the Cordillera projects far beneath proposed ‘accreted’ terranes. In the Wopmay orogen (1.89-1.84 Ga), deep geophysical images indicate that Archean Slave basement projects in the subsurface up to 50 km west of the Medial zone (formerly Wopmay fault), a boundary that was previously interpreted as the transition from Slave basement to accreted terrane basement. The Slave basement appears as a west-tapering tectonic wedge into accreted(?) rocks, consistent with an interpretation by Hildebrand and Bowring (Geology, 1999) that the Archean lithosphere that was formerly west of the wedge broke off and was recycled. In the Cordillera, cross sections of the lithosphere illustrate that lower crustal and upper mantle rocks as much as 2/3 of the distance across the orogen can be stratigraphically, geologically and seismically correlated to the ancient cratonic margin. Retrodeformation of rocks that were deposited on or adjacent to the craton leads to the conclusion that, prior to the onset of terrane accretion, the North American margin and associated rocks projected even farther west (today’s coordinates) - at least as far as the modern margin. Apparently, as flakes of terranes were added to the surface in the western regions of the Cordillera, the North American lithosphere, which may have been foreshortened during contraction, was tectonically and/or thermally eroded from below. As a result, terrane accretion in the Cordillera apparently resulted in a net decretion of continental lithosphere. Together, these observations lead to the interpretation that the processes responsible for

  14. Why does continental convergence stop

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

  15. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland.

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Trond H; Amundsen, Hans E F; Trønnes, Reidar G; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D; Griffin, William L; Werner, Stephanie C; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-04-14

    The magmatic activity (0-16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland--and especially the Öræfajökull volcano--is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (207)Pb/(204)Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr-Nd-Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2-6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  16. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Torsvik, Trond H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Griffin, William L.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    The magmatic activity (0–16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland—and especially the Öræfajökull volcano—is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr–Nd–Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2–6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  17. The Magnetic Signature of Zones of Continental Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purucker, M. E.; Whaler, K. A.

    2007-12-01

    Near-surface and satellite maps of the crustal component of the magnetic field can be interpreted in terms of thermal conditions at depth because the magnetic properties of rocks depend on their temperature. Observations related to continental deformation at diffuse plate boundaries are often considered in relation to three length scales: the thickness of the seismogenic upper crust, the entire continental crust, and the mechanical lithosphere. The lower boundary of the magnetic crust coincides with the Moho, or in the presence of an elevated geotherm, with the Curie isotherm. New global perspectives on the magnetic signature of zones of continental collision are afforded by the recently published Magnetic Anomaly Map of the World (Purucker, 2007, EOS, 88, 263), the MF-5 satellite magnetic field (Maus et al., 2007, Gcubed), and NASA's ST-5 constellation mission in 2006. The thickness of the magnetic crust can be estimated by integrating the MF-5 satellite magnetic field into the 3SMAC compositional and thermal model of the lithosphere, and a minimum estimate of the magnetization can be estimated using a Greens function approach. We compare our magnetic maps with the diffuse plate boundary maps of Gordon (1998) and Dumoulin et al. (1998). The diffuse plate boundary zones exhibit intermediate (22-31 km) magnetic thicknessses, significantly less than those of the adjacent stable plate. The diffuse NE Asia plate boundary zone, from the Lena River delta to the Sea of Okhotsk, is especially well- expressed in both satellite and near-surface magnetic maps.

  18. Equatorial atmospheric weather regimes: Their structure and role

    SciTech Connect

    Connors, V.S.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared radiance measurements by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-6) from April 1986 through April 1987 are used to characterize and identify distinct regimes of persistent, large-scale cloudiness patterns over the Amazon Basin. These tropical weather regimes are responsible for the continental-scale atmospheric processes that transport air, trace gases, and heat from the Amazon Basin. The cloud patterns are represented by both scene-scale parameters, such as the cloud-free area and the value of the 'clear sky peak' in a histogram, and textural measures, such as contrast of cloudy area and homogeneity or cloudy area. Correlation analyses of the attribute arrays determined that only 9 of the original 15 cloud pattern descriptors are required for the cluster analyses. Seventy-six percent of the satellite images are classified into 1 of 14 weather regimes which persist for periods that range from 3 to 15 days each. The dominant weather regimes are described by the recurrence and duration of the events, by the rainfall produced and energy released to the tropical atmosphere, and by the composite kinematic and thermodynamic analyses. While the classification analyses identified a range of organized weather conditions in the Amazon Basin, two weather regimes, each occurring in separate seasons, dominate the year. The prominent dry season regime (A) occurs 11 times, persists for 25 percent of the year, produces 81 percent of the dry season rainfall, and 7 percent of the energy export necessary to balance the global heat budget. The prominent wet season regime (B) occurs 8 times, persists for 18 percent of the year, delivers about 30 percent of the wet season rainfall, and 16 percent of the energy export requirement. Because the dry season regime (A) draws nearly half of its water vapor supply from local sources, a vital link may exist between the rainforest ecosystem and the dry season rainfall.

  19. The Hadley and Rossby regimes in a spherical atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, S. B.; Clark, J. H. E.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of the steady Hadley and Rossby regimes for a thermally forced rotating fluid on a sphere are studied. The two layer modified geostrophic model is employed which allows for thermal advection by the divergent wind and time dependent static stability. Heating processes are parameterized using the Newtonian approximation and Rayleigh friction is accounted for. The equations are transformed to spectral form using spherical harmonics and then truncated retaining a simple axisymmetric state and initial, one wave. A time independent Hadley circulation is obtained which is neutral to axisymmetric disturbances but unstable to wave like perturbations for intermediate values of the meridional temperature gradient, indicating the existence of both an upper and lower symmetric Hadley regime. An analytical solution for the steady Rossby circulation is determined for values of the meridional temperature gradient where the Hadley regime is unstable. Linear perturbation theory is used to show that within the steady Rossby regime two or more waves cannot exist simultaneously.

  20. The Davie Ridge: a Marginal Transform Ridge not Formed During Continental Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phethean, J. J. J.; Van Hunen, J.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.; Davies, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The breakup of Gondwana translated Madagascar southwards relative to Africa along the Davie Fracture Zone (DFZ). This fracture zone now forms the Transform Passive Continental Margin (TPCM) from Kenya to Mozambique. The Davie Ridge (DR), a transform marginal ridge, has formed along the DFZ between 5 and 2°S and 22 and 11°S, but with little expression in-between. It has been proposed that this marginal ridge was formed by the thermal effects of a passing Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR) during the separation of Gondwana. Plate kinematic reconstructions, however, constrained by ocean magnetic anomalies, show that the MOR only passed between the north and south expressions of the DR. Therefore the positive linear gravity anomalies of the DR cannot be attributed to the effects of a passing MOR, and some other mechanism must be found to explain their formation. Interpretation of seismic reflection profiles along the DR shows that the gravity highs occur adjacent to large basin structures. In the north this correlates with a basin-bounding basement high of ~Albian age, and in the south with the rift flank uplifts of the currently active Quirimbas graben. This suggests that the northern and southern DR segments are instead shoulder uplifts resulting from two separate extensional episodes during different stress regimes. These are the Cretaceous NE-SW extension during the breakup of the south Atlantic, and the E-W extension of the Neogene-recent Afar-East Africa rift system, respectfully. The lack of deformation and DR formation along the region of the TPCM passed by the MOR suggests it has been coupled by thermal effects and/or the injection of magma.

  1. Lithospheric records of orogeny within the continental U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Ryan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Holt, William E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand the tectonic evolution of the North American continent, we utilize data from the EarthScope Transportable Array network to calculate a three-dimensional shear velocity model for the continental United States. This model was produced through the inversion of Rayleigh wave phase velocities calculated using ambient noise tomography and wave gradiometry, which allows for sensitivity to a broad depth range. Shear velocities within this model highlight the influence of orogenic and postorogenic events on the evolution of the lithosphere. Most notable is the contrast in crustal and upper mantle structure between the relatively slow western and relatively fast eastern North America. These differences are unlikely to stem solely from thermal variations within the lithosphere and highlight both the complexities in lithospheric structure across the continental U.S. and the varying impacts that orogeny can have on the crust and upper mantle.

  2. Contrasting convective regimes over the Amazon: Implications for cloud electrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E.; Rosenfeld, D.; Madden, N.; Gerlach, J.; Gears, N.; Atkinson, L.; Dunnemann, N.; Frostrom, G.; Antonio, M.; Biazon, B.; Camargo, R.; Franca, H.; Gomes, A.; Lima, M.; Machado, R.; Manhaes, S.; Nachtigall, L.; Piva, H.; Quintiliano, W.; Machado, L.; Artaxo, P.; Roberts, G.; Renno, N.; Blakeslee, R.; Bailey, J.; Boccippio, D.; Betts, A.; Wolff, D.; Roy, B.; Halverson, J.; Rickenbach, T.; Fuentes, J.; Avelino, E.

    2002-10-01

    Four distinct meteorological regimes in the Amazon basin have been examined to distinguish the contributions from boundary layer aerosol and convective available potential energy (CAPE) to continental cloud structure and electrification. The lack of distinction in the electrical parameters (peak flash rate, lightning yield per unit rainfall) between aerosol-rich October and aerosol-poor November in the premonsoon regime casts doubt on a primary role for the aerosol in enhancing cloud electrification. Evidence for a substantial role for the aerosol in suppressing warm rain coalescence is identified in the most highly polluted period in early October. The electrical activity in this stage is qualitatively peculiar. During the easterly and westerly wind regimes of the wet season, the lightning yield per unit of rainfall is positively correlated with the aerosol concentration, but the electrical parameters are also correlated with CAPE, with a similar degree of scatter. Here cause and effect are difficult to establish with available observations. This ambiguity extends to the "green ocean" westerly regime, a distinctly maritime regime over a major continent with minimum aerosol concentration, minimum CAPE, and little if any lightning.

  3. Development of topography in 3-D continental-collision models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, A. E.; Kaus, Boris J. P.

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the formation and evolution of high mountain belts, such as the Himalayas and the adjacent Tibetan Plateau, has been the focus of many tectonic and numerical models. Here we employ 3-D numerical simulations to investigate the role that subduction, collision, and indentation play on lithosphere dynamics at convergent margins, and to analyze the conditions under which large topographic plateaus can form in an integrated lithospheric and upper mantle-scale model. Distinct dynamics are obtained for the oceanic subduction side (trench retreat, slab rollback) and the continental-collision side (trench advance, slab detachment, topographic uplift, lateral extrusion). We show that slab pull alone is insufficient to generate high topography in the upper plate, and that external forcing and the presence of strong blocks such as the Tarim Basin are necessary to create and shape anomalously high topographic fronts and plateaus. Moreover, scaling is used to predict four different modes of surface expression in continental-collision models: (I) low-amplitude homogeneous shortening, (II) high-amplitude homogeneous shortening, (III) Alpine-type topography with topographic front and low plateau, and (IV) Tibet-Himalaya-type topography with topographic front and high plateau. Results of semianalytical models suggest that the Argand number governs the formation of high topographic fronts, while the amplitude of plateaus is controlled by the initial buoyancy ratio of the upper plate. Applying these results to natural examples, we show that the Alps belong to regime (III), the Himalaya-Tibet to regime (IV), whereas the Andes-Altiplano fall at the boundary between regimes (III) and (IV).

  4. Deformation of plate boundaries associated with subduction of continental margins: insights from 3D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, D. A.; Cruden, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    The general sequence of tectonic events leading to the formation of collisional mountain belts includes closure of an ocean basin through oceanic subduction, subduction of a continental margin and deformation of the lithosphere. Laboratory experiments reproducing this fundamental chain of events investigate the three-dimensional and thermo-mechanical mechanics of the associated processes. Experiments reveal that this basic scenario can be considerably modified at the beginning of continental subduction. The buoyancy of the subducted passive margin causes a strong horizontal compression in the plates, which can lead to the formation of new thrusts in the magmatic arc or back-arc spreading center if the collision was preceded by oceanic subduction in the tensile regime. Several complex scenarios can develop, depending on the polarity of the new thrusts. If the new thrust in the arc or back-arc has the same polarity as the main subduction zone, the entire area located between the trench and the new thrust can be subducted, leaving little evidence of its former existence in the geological record. This process also modifies the thermal and mechanical regime of the subducted lithosphere, resulting in lower temperatures in the subducted crust thereby allowing deeper subduction. If the polarity of the new thrust is opposite to that of the existing subduction zone, the two slabs collide at depth, with the new slab generally cutting through the pre-existing slab. The distribution of convergence across several thrusts necessarily leads to a reduction of the convergence rate on the pre-existing subduction thrust. This leads to a reduction of the viscous coupling supporting the subducted lithosphere, causing an increase in downdip tension in the slab, and a rapid decrease of the slab strength due to temperature increase, eventually leading to slab break-off. Finally, the deformation caused by the subduction of the buoyant continental crust is fundamentally three

  5. The geodynamic province of transitional crust adjacent to magma-poor continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, J.; Tucholke, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    Two types of 'transitional crust' have been documented along magma-poor rifted margins. One consists of apparently sub-continental mantle that has been exhumed and serpentinized in a regime of brittle deformation during late stages of rifting. A second is highly thinned continental crust, which in some cases is known to have been supported near sea level until very late in the rift history and thus is interpreted to reflect depth-dependent extension. In both cases it is typically assumed that formation of oceanic crust occurs shortly after the breakup of brittle continental crust and thus that the transitional crust has relatively limited width. We here examine two representative cases of transitional crust, one in the Newfoundland-Iberia rift (exhumed mantle) and one off the Angola-Gabon margin (highly thinned continental crust). Considering the geological and geophysical evidence, we propose that depth-dependent extension (riftward flow of weak lower/middle continental crust and/or upper mantle) may be a common phenomenon on magma-poor margins and that this can result in a much broader zone of transitional crust than has hitherto been assumed. Transitional crust in this extended zone may consist of sub-continental mantle, lower to middle continental crust, or some combination thereof, depending on the strength profile of the pre-rift continental lithosphere. Transitional crust ceases to be emplaced (i.e., final 'breakup' occurs) only when emplacement of heat and melt from the rising asthenosphere becomes dominant over lateral flow of the weak lower lithosphere. This model implies a two-stage breakup: first the rupture of the brittle upper crust and second, the eventual emplacement of oceanic crust. Well-defined magnetic anomalies can form in transitional crust consisting of highly serpentinized, exhumed mantle, and they therefore are not diagnostic of oceanic crust. Where present in transitional crust, these anomalies can be helpful in interpreting the rifting

  6. Discussion of Continental Rifts and Their Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    When continental crust rifts, two chief modifications of that crust occur: 1)stretching of older, existing crust; 2)addition of new rift mass--sediments and mantle mafic units. However, paleorifts, such as the Cambrian Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen differ from neorifts, such as the East African. Much of this difference may be reflected in the nature of the lower rift crust. Stretching of the upper crust is accomplished primarily through faulting while the lower crust flows. Concurrently addition of sediments occurs in downdropped faulted blocks in the upper crust, and of mafic magmas risen and emplaced as intrusive layered complexes through the rift and as extrusive flows. All this happens in a regime of higher temperatures and higher heat flow. Consequences of this can include either melting of the stretched existing crust, or direct fractionation of rising mafic magma or melting of already crystallized mafic complexes, forming new silicic magmas. Geochemistry of these different magmatic bodies elucidates which of these possible processes seems dominant. Most geophysical studies of rifts have two results: 1)higher gravity anomalies indicating addition of new mafic masses, usually interpreted to be concentrated in the upper rift crust; and 2)seismic characteristics indicating crustal mottling and layering of the upper rift crust. What is not clearly indicated is nature of the lower crust, and of the mantle-crust contact (M discontinuity). Comparison of paleorifts and neorifts, and later geological history of paleorifts, suggests interesting interpretations of lower rift crust,especially in paleorifts, and some of the difficulties in sorting out answers.

  7. Extension during continental convergence, with application to the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Philip; Houseman, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    An explanation in terms of the thermal evolution of thickened continental lithosphere is offered to explain the transition, in the late Tertiary to Quaternary, from north-south compression to east-west extension in the strain rate field of the Tibetan Plateau. The lower part of the lithosphere consists of a thermal boundary layer which, when thickened by horizontal shortening, is colder and denser than its surroundings. Convective instability of the thickened thermal boundary layer and its replacement by hot asthenosphere would rapidly raise the surface elevation and gravitational potential energy of the overlying part of the lithosphere. The convective instability would happen in a time brief compared with the collision time scale but would only occur after there had already been substantial thickening of the lithosphere. The increase in surface height and of potential energy are sufficient for east-west extension to replace north-south compression as the dominant feature of the stress field.

  8. Continental rifting: a planetary perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlberger, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The only inner planet that has abundant evidence of regional extension, and the consequent generation of rifts in the earth. The absence of plate motion on the other inner planets limits their rifts to localized bulges or subsidence areas. The rifting of oceanic lithosphere is seldom preserved in the geological record. Thus, such rifting must be inferred via plate tectonic interpretation: if there is rifting, then there must be subduction whose results are commonly well preserved. Modern continental rifts are found in many tectonic settings: continental breakup, extension transverse to collisional stresses, or wide regions of nearly uniform extension. Recognition of these settings in older rocks becomes more difficult the farther back in geologic time you travel. Rift basin fillings typically show rapid lateral and vertical facies and thickness changes, bimodal volcanism, and distinctive rift-drift sequences. Proterozoic rifts and aulacogens are well-documented in North America; ex. Keweenawan, western margin of Labrador fold belt, Belt-Uinta and the Wopmay-Athapuscow regions. Documented Archean rifts are rare. In Quebec, the truncated margin of the Minto craton bounded on the south by a 2.8 Ga greenstone belt implies an earlier rift event. The oldest proposed rift dated at 3.0 Ga contains the Pongola Supergroup in southeastern Africa. The presence of Archean dikes demonstrates a rigid crust and andesites as old as 3.5 Ga imply plate tectonics and thus, at least, oceanic rifting.

  9. Craton stability and continental lithosphere dynamics during plume-plate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Van Hunen, J.; Pearson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Survival of thick cratonic roots in a vigorously convecting mantle system for billions of years has long been studied by the geodynamical community. A high cratonic root strength is generally considered to be the most important factor. We first perform and discuss new numerical models to investigate craton stability in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheology in the stagnant lid regime. The results show that only a modest compositional rheological factor of Δη=10 with non-Newtonian rheology is required for the survival of cratonic roots in a stagnant lid regime. A larger rheological factor (100 or more) is needed to maintain similar craton longevity in a Newtonian rheology environment. Furthermore, chemical buoyancy plays an important role on craton stability and its evolution, but could only work with suitable compositional rheology. During their long lifespan, cratons experienced a suite of dynamic, tectonothermal events, such as nearby subduction and mantle plume activity. Cratonic nuclei are embedded in shorter-lived, more vulnerable continental areas of different thickness, composition and rheology, which would influence the lithosphere dynamic when tectonothermal events happen nearby. South Africa provides a very good example to investigate such dynamic processes as it hosts several cratons and there are many episodic thermal events since the Mesozoic as indicated by a spectrum of magmatic activity. We numerically investigate such an integrated system using the topographic evolution of cratons and surrounding lithosphere as a diagnostic observable. The post-70Ma thinning of pericratonic lithosphere by ~50km around Kaapvaal craton (Mather et al., 2011) is also investigated through our numerical models. The results show that the pericratonic lithosphere cools and grows faster than cratons do, but is also more likely to be effected by episodic thermal events. This leads to surface topography change that is significantly larger around the craton than within

  10. Flux and budget of BC in the continental shelf seas adjacent to Chinese high BC emission source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yin; Chen, Yingjun; Tian, Chongguo; Lin, Tian; Hu, Limin; Huang, Guopei; Tang, Jianhui; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2015-07-01

    This study conducted the first comprehensive investigation of sedimentary black carbon (BC) concentration, flux, and budget in the continental shelves of "Bohai Sea (BS) and Yellow Sea (YS)," based on measurements of BC in 191 surface sediments, 36 riverine water, and 2 seawater samples, as well as the reported data set of the atmospheric samples from seven coastal cities in the Bohai Rim. BC concentrations in these matrices were measured using the method of thermal/optical reflectance. The spatial distribution of the BC concentration in surface sediments was largely influenced by the regional hydrodynamic conditions, with high values mainly occurring in the central mud areas where fine-grained particles (median diameters > 6 Φ (i.e., <0.0156 mm)) were deposited. The BC burial flux in the BS and YS ranged from 4 to 1100 µg/cm2 yr, and averaged 166 ± 200 µg/cm2 yr, which was within the range of burial fluxes reported in other continental shelf regimes. The area-integrated sedimentary BC sink flux in the entire BS and YS was ~325 Gg/yr, and the BS alone contributed ~50% (~157 Gg/yr). The BC budget calculated in the BS showed that atmospheric deposition, riverine discharge, and import from the Northern Yellow Sea (NYS) each contributed ~51%, ~47%, and ~2%. Therefore, atmospheric deposition and riverine discharge dominated the total BC influx (~98%). Sequestration to bottom sediments was the major BC output pattern, accounting for ~88% of the input BC. Water exchange between the BS and the NYS was also an important BC transport route, with net BC transport from the BS to the NYS.

  11. 26 CFR 1.638-1 - Continental Shelf areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Continental Shelf areas. 1.638-1 Section 1.638-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Continental Shelf Areas § 1.638-1 Continental Shelf areas. (a) General rule. For.... The terms Continental Shelf of the United States and Continental Shelf of a possession of the...

  12. 26 CFR 1.638-1 - Continental Shelf areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Continental Shelf areas. 1.638-1 Section 1.638-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Continental Shelf Areas § 1.638-1 Continental Shelf areas. (a) General rule. For.... The terms Continental Shelf of the United States and Continental Shelf of a possession of the...

  13. 26 CFR 1.638-1 - Continental Shelf areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continental Shelf areas. 1.638-1 Section 1.638-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Continental Shelf Areas § 1.638-1 Continental Shelf areas. (a) General rule. For.... The terms Continental Shelf of the United States and Continental Shelf of a possession of the...

  14. 26 CFR 1.638-1 - Continental Shelf areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Continental Shelf areas. 1.638-1 Section 1.638-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Continental Shelf Areas § 1.638-1 Continental Shelf areas. (a) General rule. For.... The terms Continental Shelf of the United States and Continental Shelf of a possession of the...

  15. 26 CFR 1.638-1 - Continental Shelf areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Continental Shelf areas. 1.638-1 Section 1.638-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Continental Shelf Areas § 1.638-1 Continental Shelf areas. (a) General rule. For.... The terms Continental Shelf of the United States and Continental Shelf of a possession of the...

  16. Earth's continental crustal gold endowment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, H. E.

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of the temporal distribution of gold deposits, combined with gold production data as well as reserve and resource estimates for different genetic types of gold deposit, revealed that the bulk of the gold known to be concentrated in ore bodies was added to the continental crust during a giant Mesoarchaean gold event at a time (3 Ga) when the mantle temperature reached a maximum and the dominant style of tectonic movement changed from vertical, plume-related to subhorizontal plate tectonic. A magmatic derivation of the first generation of crustal gold from a relatively hot mantle that was characterized by a high degree of partial melting is inferred from the gold chemistry, specifically high Os contents. While a large proportion of that gold is still present in only marginally modified palaeoplacer deposits of the Mesoarchaean Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa, accounting for about 40% of all known gold, the remainder has been recycled repeatedly on a lithospheric scale, predominantly by plate-tectonically induced magmatic and hydrothermal fluid circulation, to produce the current variety of gold deposit types. Post-Archaean juvenile gold addition to the continental crust has been limited, but a mantle contribution to some of the largest orogenic or intrusion-related gold deposits is indicated, notably for the Late Palaeozoic Tien Shan gold province. Magmatic fluids in active plate margins seem to be the most effective transport medium for gold mobilization, giving rise to a large proportion of volcanic-arc related gold deposits. Due to their generally shallow crustal level of formation, they have a low preservation potential. In contrast, those gold deposits that form at greater depth are more widespread also in older rocks. This explains the high proportion of orogenic (including intrusion-related) gold (32%) amongst all known gold deposits. The overall proportion of gold concentrated in known ore bodies is only 7 × 10- 7 of the estimated total

  17. TRMM Observations of Convective Regimes in the Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, W. A.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Blakeslee, Robert J.; Hein, P.; Cifelli, R.; Rutledge, S. A.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study utilizes TRMM satellite precipitation radar, lightning imaging sensor, and passive microwave imager data together with ground-based lightning data to investigate the vertical structure, lightning, and rainfall characteristics of Amazonian and central South American convection for three separate wet-seasons. These characteristics are partitioned as a function of 850 mb zonal wind direction, motivated by observations collected during the six-week TRMM-LBA field campaign. The TRMM-LBA field campaign observations suggest that systematic variations in Amazonian convective vertical structure, lightning, and rainfall are all linked to bimodal variations in the low-level zonal wind (e.g., easterly and westerly regimes). The more spatially and temporally comprehensive TRMM dataset used in this study extends the TRMM-LBA observations by examining regime variability in Amazonian and South American convective structure over a continental scale domain. On a continental-scale, patterns of east and west regime 850 mb winds combined with LIS lightning flash densities suggest the presence of synoptic-scale controls (e.g., intrusion of extratropical frontal systems and interaction with the SACZ) on regional-scale variability in convective vertical structure. TRMM PR, TMI and ground-based lightning data suggest that regional variability in wet-season convective structure is most evident over the southern Amazon, Mato Grosso, Altiplano, southern Brazil, and eastern coastal regions of central and southern South America. Convective vertical structure, rain fall rates, and lightning activity are all more pronounced during easterly (westerly) regimes over the southern Amazon and Mato Grosso (Altiplano, and southern Brazil). Importantly, when considered with case-study results from TRMM-LBA, the systematic differences in convective structure that occur as a function of regime suggest that associated regime-differences may exist in the vertical distribution of diabatic heating

  18. How does the lithosphere deformation mode during continental breakup affect mantle exhumation and subsidence history?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, L.; Kusznir, N.; Manatschal, G.

    2012-04-01

    asthenosphere deformation as flow, which is used to determine material and thermal advection, and subsequent thermal equilibration and melting. Melting is predicted using the parameterisation of Katz et al. (2003). Melt extraction is assumed to be perfectly efficient. Numerical experiments carried out with the kinematic hybrid model show that melt generation is predicted to occur after continental crustal rupture only if the half-spreading rate, the "corner flow" Vz/Vx ratio, the decoupling depth between pure-shear and upwelling divergent flow, the pure-shear half-width and the potential temperature are low. Combination of low values of these parameters enhances crustal rupture before melt generation and leads to mantle exhumation. The sensitivity of subsidence history during continental breakup to lithosphere deformation mode and melting is also examined.

  19. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  20. A Facies Model for Temperate Continental Glaciers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Gail Mowry

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the presence and dynamics of continental glaciers in the domination of the physical processes of erosion and deposition in the mid-latitudes during the Pleistocene period. Describes the use of a sedimentary facies model as a guide to recognizing ancient temperate continental glacial deposits. (TW)

  1. How Continental Bank outsourced its "crown jewels.".

    PubMed

    Huber, R L

    1993-01-01

    No industry relies more on information than banking does, yet Continental, one of America's largest banks, outsources its information technology. Why? Because that's the best way to service the customers that form the core of the bank's business, says vice chairman Dick Huber. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Continental participated heavily with Penn Square Bank in energy investments. When falling energy prices burst Penn Square's bubble in 1982, Continental was stuck with more than $1 billion in bad loans. Eight years later when Dick Huber came on board, Continental was working hard to restore its once solid reputation. Executives had made many tough decisions already, altering the bank's focus from retail to business banking and laying off thousands of employees. Yet management still needed to cut costs and improve services to stay afloat. Regulators, investors, and analysts were watching every step. Continental executives, eager to focus on the bank's core mission of serving business customers, decided to outsource one after another in-house service--from cafeteria services to information technology. While conventional wisdom holds that banks must retain complete internal control of IT, Continental bucked this argument when it entered into a ten-year, multimillion-dollar contract with Integrated Systems Solutions Corporation. Continental is already reaping benefits from outsourcing IT. Most important, Continental staffers today focus on their true core competencies: intimate knowledge of customers' needs and relationships with customers. PMID:10124146

  2. Sulfur and metal fertilization of the lower continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locmelis, Marek; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Rushmer, Tracy; Arevalo, Ricardo; Adam, John; Denyszyn, Steven W.

    2016-02-01

    Mantle-derived melts and metasomatic fluids are considered to be important in the transport and distribution of trace elements in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. However, the mechanisms that facilitate sulfur and metal transfer from the upper mantle into the lower continental crust are poorly constrained. This study addresses this knowledge gap by examining a series of sulfide- and hydrous mineral-rich alkaline mafic-ultramafic pipes that intruded the lower continental crust of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone in the Italian Western Alps. The pipes are relatively small (< 300 m diameter) and primarily composed of a matrix of subhedral to anhedral amphibole (pargasite), phlogopite and orthopyroxene that enclose sub-centimeter-sized grains of olivine. The 1 to 5 m wide rim portions of the pipes locally contain significant blebby and disseminated Fe-Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide mineralization. Stratigraphic relationships, mineral chemistry, geochemical modeling and phase equilibria suggest that the pipes represent open-ended conduits within a large magmatic plumbing system. The earliest formed pipe rocks were olivine-rich cumulates that reacted with hydrous melts to produce orthopyroxene, amphibole and phlogopite. Sulfides precipitated as immiscible liquid droplets that were retained within a matrix of silicate crystals and scavenged metals from the percolating hydrous melt. New high-precision chemical abrasion TIMS U-Pb dating of zircons from one of the pipes indicates that these pipes were emplaced at 249.1 ± 0.2 Ma, following partial melting of lithospheric mantle pods that were metasomatized during the Eo-Variscan oceanic to continental subduction (~ 420-310 Ma). The thermal energy required to generate partial melting of the metasomatized mantle was most likely derived from crustal extension, lithospheric decompression and subsequent asthenospheric rise during the orogenic collapse of the Variscan belt (< 300 Ma). Unlike previous models, outcomes from this study suggest a

  3. Density Sorting During the Evolution of Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Behn, M. D.; Hacker, B. R.

    2015-12-01

    We consider two settings - in addition to "delamination" of arc lower crust - in which dense, mafic eclogites founder into the convecting mantle while buoyant, felsic lithologies accumulate at the base of evolving continental crust. Arc processes play a central role in generating continental crust, but it remains uncertain how basaltic arc crust is transformed to andesitic continental crust. Dense, SiO2-poor products of fractionation may founder from the base of arc crust by "delamination", but lower arc crust after delamination has significantly different trace elements compared to lower continental crust (LCC). In an alternative model, buoyant magmatic rocks generated at arcs are first subducted, mainly via subduction erosion. Upon heating, these buoyant lithologies ascend through the mantle wedge or along a subduction channel, and are "relaminated" at
the base of overlying crust (e.g., Hacker et al EPSL 11, AREPS 15). Average buoyant lavas and plutons
for the Aleutians, Izu-Bonin-Marianas, Kohistan and Talkeetna arcs fall within the range of estimated LCC major and trace elements. Relamination is more efficient in generating continental crust than delamination. Himalayan cross-sections show Indian crust thrust beneath Tibetan crust, with no intervening mantle. There is a horizontal Moho at ca 80 km depth, extending from thickened Indian crust, across the region where Tibetan crust overlies Indian crust, into thickened Tibetan crust. About half the subducted Indian crust is present, whereas the other half is missing. Data (Vp/Vs; Miocene lavas formed by interaction of continental crust with mantle; xenolith thermometry) indicate 1000°C or more from ca 50 km depth to the Moho since the Miocene. We build on earlier studies (LePichon et al Tectonics 92, T'phys 97; Schulte-Pelkum et al Nature 05; Monsalve et al JGR 08) to advance the hypothesis that rapid growth of garnet occurs at 70-80 km and 1000°C within subducting Indian crust. Dense eclogites founder

  4. Assessment of East Antarctic ice flow directions, ice grounding events, and glacial thermal regime across the middle Miocene climate transition from the ANDRILL-SMS and CRP drill holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, S.; Hauptvogel, D.; Hansen, M.; Falk, C.; Martin, L.

    2010-12-01

    Here we present a synthesis of early and middle Miocene ice sheet development based on facies analyses and multiple compositional studies on the AND-2A and CRP drillcores from the Ross Sea, ca. 10 km off the coast of East Antarctica. The middle Miocene is characterized by one of the three largest shifts in deep-sea oxygen isotope records. During this time the East Antarctic ice sheet became dry-based at high elevation in the Transantarctic Mountains and advanced across the Ross Sea continental shelf to create widespread glacial unconformities. However, detailed proxy records also indicate that ice development was complex and may have occurred in a stepwise fashion, instead of one major episode. Our analyses of “grounded ice” diamictites from both the CRP and AND-2A cores show a significant change in composition across the middle Miocene transition. More detailed analyses of the stratigraphic distribution of facies, heavy mineral provenance, particle size, and major and trace element geochemistry in AND-2A show that relatively large polythermal ice-sheets similar in size to the modern were already present between 17.6 and 17.1 Ma. These results are in agreement with proxy records suggesting that Antarctic ice volumes were larger than today’s volume during the Mi-1b glaciation. Between 17.1 and 15.6-14.9 Ma, a predominance of iceberg debris sourced from the Ferrar Group in the Transantarctic Mountains suggests vigorous glacial erosion and fjord incision by East Antarctic outlet glaciers. The facies characteristics and comparison with compositional data from Neogene tills in the Transantarctic Mountains further suggest that the East Antarctic ice sheet may have been smaller than today during the Miocene climatic optimum (~17-15 Ma) with ice possibly reaching sea level only near the central Transantarctic Mountains. Advance of the grounding line and the development of glacial flow patterns compatible with a larger ice sheet than the modern commenced between 15

  5. Continental Growth and the Sedimentary Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuime, B.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Robinson, R. A. J.; Cawood, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Detrital sedimentary rocks provide average samples of the continental crust formed at different times and in different places. Some materials are more susceptible to erosion and/or to preservation bias than others, and one issue is to understand how the compositions of a range of source rocks are then recorded in the sediments. Here we considered two different approaches to model the growth of the continental crust: (i) The variation of Nd isotopes in continental shales with different deposition ages, which requires a correction of the bias induced by preferential erosion of younger rocks through an erosion parameter usually referred to as 'K'. The determination of K, and the extent to which it varies in different erosion systems, thus have fundamental implications for the models of continental growth based on radiogenic isotopes in continental sediments. (ii) The variations in U-Pb, Hf and O isotopes in detrital zircons, from 'modern' sediments sampled worldwide. In this approach, O isotopes are used to screen 'hybrid' Hf model ages (i.e. ages resulting from mixing processes of crustal material from different ages) from Hf model ages that represent actual crust formation ages. These two approaches independently suggest that the continental crust has been generated continuously, but with a marked decrease in the continental growth rate at ~3 Ga. The >4 Ga to ~3 Ga period is characterised by relatively high net rates of continental growth (~3.0 km3.a-1), which are similar to the rates at which new crust is generated, and destroyed, at the present time. Net growth rates are much lower since 3 Ga (~0.8 km3.a-1), which may be attributed to higher rates of destruction of continental crust. The inflexion in the continental growth curve at ~3 Ga indicates a change in the way the crust was generated and preserved. This change may be linked to onset of subduction-driven plate tectonics and discrete subduction zones.

  6. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas, with... informational purposes only. Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams in the North Atlantic,...

  7. Dynamics of continental rift propagation: the end-member modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wijk, J. W.; Blackman, D. K.

    2005-01-01

    An important aspect of continental rifting is the progressive variation of deformation style along the rift axis during rift propagation. In regions of rift propagation, specifically transition zones from continental rifting to seafloor spreading, it has been observed that contrasting styles of deformation along the axis of rift propagation are bounded by shear zones. The focus of this numerical modeling study is to look at dynamic processes near the tip of a weak zone in continental lithosphere. More specifically, this study explores how modeled rift behavior depends on the value of rheological parameters of the crust. A three-dimensional finite element model is used to simulate lithosphere deformation in an extensional regime. The chosen approach emphasizes understanding the tectonic forces involved in rift propagation. Dependent on plate strength, two end-member modes are distinguished. The stalled rift phase is characterized by absence of rift propagation for a certain amount of time. Extension beyond the edge of the rift tip is no longer localized but occurs over a very wide zone, which requires a buildup of shear stresses near the rift tip and significant intra-plate deformation. This stage represents a situation in which a rift meets a locked zone. Localized deformation changes to distributed deformation in the locked zone, and the two different deformation styles are balanced by a shear zone oriented perpendicular to the trend. In the alternative rift propagation mode, rift propagation is a continuous process when the initial crust is weak. The extension style does not change significantly along the rift axis and lengthening of the rift zone is not accompanied by a buildup of shear stresses. Model predictions address aspects of previously unexplained rift evolution in the Laptev Sea, and its contrast with the tectonic evolution of, for example, the Gulf of Aden and Woodlark Basin.

  8. Two contrasting modes of continental break-up associated with the formation of the Paleo- and Neo-Tethys in Iran: Implications for petrological and geodynamic evolution at a regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccani, Emilio; Marroni, Michele; Pandolfi, Luca; Allahyari, Khalil; Azimzadeh, Zohreh

    2014-05-01

    contrast with the Ligurian Tethys model, the Neo-Tethys rift stage was also associated with volcanism featuring a marked influence of plume-type components. Nonetheless, no geological evidence (e.g. regional doming, anomalous thermal regime, basaltic plateaux, magmatic evolution from more depleted to more enriched rocks, etc.) supporting the existence of a Triassic mantle plume activity in this area has been documented. Therefore, the plume-type geochemical signature observed in the Kermanshah CMO sequences can likely be explained with the re-activation of portions of enriched mantle (mantle heterogeneities) that were inherited from the Paleozoic mantle plume associated with the opening of Paleo-Tethys.

  9. Development of the New Zealand and San Andreas Continental Transforms: From Plate Kinematics to Lithospheric Geodynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, K. P.

    2009-12-01

    Although oftentimes compared as being two similar continental transforms, the development of the San Andreas and Alpine Fault plate boundary systems reflect two distinctly different geodynamic paths to formation, localization, and evolution. Characteristics that lead to fundamental differences in their present-day tectonic behavior. The San Andreas system has formed in response to the migration of two triple junctions, and it lengthens over time at these transitions from subduction to translation. The San Andreas system forms within the region of thin lithosphere left in the wake of slab removal or subduction cessation, and therefore thermal processes dominate in the development of a localized plate boundary. There are associated short-lived deformational events including significant crustal thickening and subsequent crustal thinning that serve to substantially modify the overlying North American crust during this 3-5 million year transition time. In contrast the development of the Alpine Fault plate boundary system through New Zealand follows a different geodynamic path, and this transform boundary reflects an intermediate point in the overall transition of that Australia-Pacific plate boundary through New Zealand from an extensional to convergent boundary. Since approximately 25 Ma, with rapid changes in Australia-Pacific plate interactions, the plate boundary structure through continental New Zealand rapidly changed from extensional to translation/transpression. This transpression was accommodated by the initiation of two subduction regimes, whose positions were controlled by continent-ocean transitions linked by the translational/transpressional (proto) Alpine Fault system. This trench-transform-trench plate boundary system has migrated southward, maintaining essentially a constant length, but not constant localization, and along the way, ephemerally incorporating segments of the Australia and Pacific plates into the boundary - modifying, exhuming, and removing

  10. Seismically Imaging the Destruction of Continental Lithosphere beneath Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychert, C. A.; Hammond, J. O.; Kendall, J. M.; Harmon, N.; Keir, D.; Ebinger, C. J.; Stuart, G. W.; Belachew, M.

    2011-12-01

    The onset of continental rifting is often accompanied by production of large volumes of molten rock. However, the influence of magmatism on the deforming lithosphere during the breakup process is not well understood. In particular, whether lithosphere is predominantly thinned by mechanical stretching or thermal destruction from melt infiltration, and how this impacts melt production during the breakup process remains unconstrained. Here we use S-to-P (Sp) receiver functions to image the onset of decompression melting beneath Afar, Ethiopia; a region where continental breakup gives way to oceanic spreading. We analyze three broadband datasets using S-to-p (Sp) imaging, which provide high resolution imaging beneath the rift and surrounding regions: the Ethiopia/Kenya Broadband Seismic Experiment (EKBSE), the Ethiopia Afar Geophysical Lithospheric Experiment (EAGLE), and a new UK/US led deployment of 46 stations in the Afar depression and surrounding area. We use two methodologies to investigate structure and locate robust features: 1) binning by conversion point and then simultaneous deconvolution in the frequency domain, and 2) extended multitaper followed by migration and stacking. At ~75 km depth we image a strong, sharp, velocity reduction on the flank of the rift that likely represents the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, versus a strong velocity increase with depth beneath the rift. The sharpness of the negative gradient can only be explained by melt ponded at the base of the lithosphere. The depth and magnitude of the positive gradient resemble those expected from numerical estimates for the onset of decompression melting in a mid-ocean ridge environment where ~1% melt is retained in the mantle. This implies that the mantle lithosphere beneath Afar has been destroyed; melt intrusion likely played a key role in the initial destruction of continental lithosphere, but the degree of influence from a thermal plume today in Afar is minimal.

  11. The difference between oceanic and continental tholeiites: a fluid dynamic explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, I. H.

    1985-09-01

    Continental tholeiites have higher SiO2, K2O and light rare earth element contents and more evolved isotopic characteristics than their oceanic counterparts. These differences can be explained if the compositions of the parent magmas to both types of tholeiites are similar but if continental magmas assimilate significant amounts of continental crust en route to the surface. Although there is little doubt that most continental tholeiites have assimilated crustal material, the lcoation and mechanism of assimilation remain uncertain. Longhi (1981) has argued that magmas derived directly from the mantle should crystallize little orthopyroxene. The abundance of orthopyroxene in most continental layered intrusions suggests that they have crystallized from magmas which have assimilated continental crust. Since orthopyroxene is an early crystallizing phase in layered intrusions, this assimilation must occur early, before the magma enters the chamber. Assimilation can occur at the margins of the dykes which feed magma chambers, depending on the nature of the flow. If the flow is turbulent the high temperatures at the centre of the dyke will extend to the margins and the magma will erode the dyke walls. If the flow is laminar, a conductive profile develops at the margin and the flowing magma chills against the walls, protecting them from thermal erosion. The nature of flow in a dyke can be predicted from the Reynolds number, the criteria for turbulence. Reynolds number calculations suggest that the flow of primitive magmas in continental dykes will be fully turbulent and, if this is the case, assimilation of low melting point components in the walls of the dyke is inevitable. It is therefore suggested that many of the geochemical characteristics of continental tholeiites result from melting at the walls of dykes as primitive magmas ascend through the crust.

  12. Mapping Evaporative Stress at Continental Scales Using GOES Thermal Imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Robust, operational methodologies for mapping daily evapotranspiration (ET), soil moisture, and moisture stress over large areas using satellite remote sensing will have widespread utility in applications such as drought detection, crop yield forecasting, irrigation scheduling, water resource manage...

  13. Alpha Ridge: Oceanic or Continental Crust? Constraints from Crustal Thickness Mapping using Gravity Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusznir, N. J.; Alvey, A.

    2010-12-01

    The ocean basins of the Arctic formed during the Late Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary as a series of small distinct ocean basins leading to a complex distribution of oceanic crust, thinned continental crust and rifted continental margins. The structure and origin of the Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges within the Amerasia Basin are contentious; possibilities include thick oceanic crust formed by ocean ridge - mantle plume interaction, micro-continents or thinned continental crust with mantle plume volcanic addition. We use gravity inversion, incorporating a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction, to map Moho depth, crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning factor for the Amerasia Basin in order to determine the distribution of oceanic and continental lithosphere and the ocean-continent transition location. Data used in the gravity inversion are gravity data from the NGA (U) Arctic Gravity Project, IBCAO bathymetry and sediment thickness from Laske et al. (1997). Our gravity inversion predicts thin crust (5-10 km thickness) and high continental lithosphere thinning factors in the Makarov, Podvodnikov, Nautilus and Canada Basins consistent with these basins being oceanic or highly thinned continental crust. Larger crustal thicknesses, in the range 20-30 km, are predicted for the Alpha, Mendeleev and Lomonosov Ridges. Moho depths predicted by gravity inversion compare well with estimates from the TransArctica-Arctica seismic profiles. Moho depths from the gravity inversion are dependent on the age of oceanic lithosphere and continental breakup because of the lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction; these ages are uncertain for the Amerasia Basin. Gravity inversion sensitivities to break-up ages between 150 Ma (late Jurassic Triassic) and 60 Ma (early Tertiary) have been examined. Alpha Ridge has in its centre a crustal thickness of 25-30 km and possesses sharp angular edges. While Alpha Ridge has been compared with Iceland for structure and

  14. Continental volume and freeboard through geological time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Reymer, A. P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences of approximately constant freeboard for continental growth are explored using a model that relates the volumes of isostatically compensated continents and oceans to the secular decline in terrestrial heat flow. It is found that a post-Archean increase in freeboard by 200 m requires continental growth of only 10 percent, while a decrease in freeboard by 200 m during this same period necessitates a crustal growth of 40 percent. Shrinkage of the continental crust since the end of the Archean can be ruled out. Changes of more than 10 percent in post-Archean crustal thickness are highly unlikely.

  15. Macrofaunal production along the UK continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolam, S. G.; Barrio-Frojan, C. R. S.; Eggleton, J. D.

    2010-10-01

    Estimates of secondary production ( P/ B ratio and total production) by macrobenthic communities across the UK continental shelf are presented. Values for individual sampling stations varied from 0.21 to 4.1 y - 1 for community P/ B and 3.1 to 897.2 kJ m - 2 y - 1 for total production. Such data fills an important gap pertaining to our understanding of the spatial variation in production estimates for this region. Benthic production estimates varied primarily at small (inter-station) scales (24 nm), although larger-scale differences were observed. In general, the highest production estimates were exhibited by benthic communities in Cardigan Bay (Irish Sea) and East English Channel, while the lowest estimates were observed for the mid- and northern North Sea areas. The former were typified by shallow, gravelly areas of seabed which exhibit high bed tidal stress and do not thermally stratify during the summer months. On average, annelids contribute an overwhelming majority of the total production with different regions varying in the relative contributions from other phyla such as molluscs, crustaceans and echinoderms. Spatial heterogeneity of sediment granulometric variables occurred primarily between stations while those of other variables (e.g., depth, stratification, and tidal bed stress) were more regional. Although a large proportion of the spatial variation in secondary production estimates was not explained by environmental characteristics, the data indicate that such relationships are scale-dependent. Average bed temperature was a significant factor in creating some of the observed differences at large spatial scales. The possible reasons why a larger proportion of the variation in production estimates was not explained by the present study are presented.

  16. Magmatic expressions of continental lithosphere removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huilin; Currie, Claire A.

    2015-10-01

    Gravitational lithosphere removal in continental interior has been inferred from various observations, including anomalous surface deflections and magmatism. We use numerical models and a simplified theoretical analysis to investigate how lithosphere removal can be recognized in the magmatic record. One style of removal is a Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability, where removal occurs through dripping. The associated magmatism depends on the lithosphere thermal structure. Four types of magmatism are predicted: (1) For relatively hot lithosphere (e.g., back arcs), the lithosphere can be conductively heated and melted during removal, while the asthenosphere upwells and undergoes decompression melting. If removal causes significant lithospheric thinning, the deep crust may be heated and melted. (2) For moderately warm lithosphere (e.g., average Phanerozoic lithosphere) in which the lithosphere root has a low density, only the lithosphere may melt. (3) If the lithosphere root has a high density in moderately warm lithosphere, only asthenosphere melt is predicted. (4) For cold lithosphere (e.g., cratons), no magmatism is induced. An alternate style of removal is delamination, where dense lithosphere peels along Moho. In most cases, the lithosphere sinks too rapidly to melt. However, asthenosphere can upwell to the base of the crust, resulting in asthenospheric and crustal melts. In delamination, magmatism migrates laterally with the detachment point; in contrast, magmatism in Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability has a symmetric shape and converges toward the drip center. The models may explain the diversity of magmatism observed in areas with inferred lithosphere removal, including the Puna Plateau and the southern Sierra Nevada.

  17. Flux of energy and essential elements through the continental shelf ecosystem. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1981-11-30

    There are three distinct but not mutually exclusive areas of research in this contract, studies of intrusions of the west wall of the Gulf Stream onto the outer continental shelf, studies of the flux of materials across nearshore density fronts, and advances in understanding of the planktonic food web of the continental shelf. Studies of frontal events on the outer and inner continental shelf involve distinctive physical and chemical regimes and have proven to require distinctive biological approaches. The studies of the food web run through our work on both of the frontal regimes, but certain aspects have become subjects in their own right. We have developed a simulation model of the flux of energy through the continental shelf food web which we believe to be more realistic than previous ones of its type. We have examined several of the many roles of dissolved organic compounds in sea water which originate either from release by phytoplankton, digestive processes or metabolites of zooplankton, or extracellular digestion of microorganisms. Methods have been developed under this contract to measure both the chelating capacity of naturally occurring organic materials and the copper concentration in the water. It has been possible to characterize the effects, both toxic and stimulatory, of copper on photosynthesis of naturally occurring phytoplankton populations. It is possible to characterize in considerable detail the course of biological events associated with meanders of the Gulf Stream. We are now in a position to explain the limits to biological productivity of the outer continental shelf of the southeastern US and the reasons why that biological production moves through the food web in the characteristic way that it does.

  18. Late-Archean continental emergence: consequences for the rise of atmospheric oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, N. E.; Coltice, N.; Rey, P. F.

    2008-12-01

    The balance between the secular cooling of the Earth's mantle and the growth of the continental crust implies changes in the isostatic equilibrium between continents and oceans, in the oceanic bathymetry, and in the area of emerged continental crust. The evolution of the latter is of fundamental importance to the geochemical coupling between the continental crust, the atmosphere and the oceans. The area of emerged land can be estimated from models that depend on mantle temperature, continental area and continental hypsometry. In the Archean, the mantle was probably 150-200°C hotter than present and the continental area could have increased from 20% of present at ~~3.5Ga to 80% of present by ~~2.5Ga. Using these values, and comparing different thermal evolution models for the Earth, we calculate that the area of emerged continental crust would be reduced to 1-12% of the Earth's area during the Archean (compared to 27.5% for present-day Earth). As for the continental hypsometry, a greater radiogenic crustal heat production and a greater mantle heat flow would have reduced the strength of the continental lithosphere in the Archean, thus limiting the crustal thickening due to mountain building processes and the maximum elevation in the Earth's topography [Rey and Coltice, Geology 36, 635-638 (2008)]. Taking this into account, we show that the continents were mostly flooded until the end of the Archean and that less than 3% of the Earth's area (which is roughly the superficy of South America) consisted of emerged continental crust by ~~2.5~Ga. These results are consistent with widespread Archean submarine continental flood basalts, and with the emergence of a sialic geochemical reservoir recorded from ~~2.5~Ga in (a) the composition of shales, (b) the isotopic ratio 87Sr/86Sr of marine carbonates and (c) the δ18O signature of igneous zircons. The progressive emergence of the continents as shown by our models from the late

  19. Mantle exhumation and OCT architecture dependency on lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup: Numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Kusznir, Nick; Manatschal, Gianreto; Cowie, Leanne

    2013-04-01

    The initiation of sea-floor spreading, during the continental breakup process, requires both the rupture of the continental crust and the initiation of decompression melting. This process results in mantle upwelling and at some point decompressional melting which creates new oceanic crust. Using numerical experiments, we investigate how the deformation mode of continental lithosphere thinning and stretching controls the rupture of continental crust and lithospheric mantle, the onset of decompression melting, their relative timing, and the circumstances under which mantle exhumation may occur. We assume that the topmost continental and ocean lithosphere, corresponding to the cooler brittle seismogenic layer, deforms by extensional faulting (pure-shear deformation) and magmatic intrusion, consistent with the observations of deformation processes occurring at slow spreading ocean ridges (Cannat, 1996). We assume that deformation beneath this topmost lithosphere layer (approximately 15-20 km thick) occurs in response to passive upwelling and thermal and melt buoyancy driven small-scale convection. We use a 2D finite element viscous flow model (FeMargin) to describe lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation. This flow field is used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere temperature and material. The finite element model is kinematically driven by Vx for the topmost upper crust inducing passive upwelling beneath that layer. A vertical velocity Vz is defined for buoyancy enhanced upwelling as predicted by Braun et al. (2000). Melt generation is predicted by decompression melting using the parameterization and methodology of Katz et al. (2003). Numerical experiments have been used to investigate the dependency of continental crust and lithosphere rupture, decompression melt initiation, rifted margin ocean-continent transition architecture and subsidence history on the half-spreading rate Vx, buoyancy driven upwelling rate Vz, the relative contribution of these deformation

  20. Plasma confinement regimes and collective modes characterizing them

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Zhou, T.

    2012-10-15

    A unified theory is presented for the modes that are excited at the edge of the plasma column and are important signatures of the advanced confinement regimes into which magnetically confined plasmas can be driven. In particular, the so-called EDA H-Regime, the Elmy H-Regime, and the I-Regime are considered. The modes that are identified theoretically have characteristics that are consistent with or have anticipated those of the modes observed experimentally for each of the investigated regimes. The phase velocities, the produced transport processes, the frequencies, the wavelengths, and the consistency with the direction of spontaneous rotation are the factors considered for comparison with the relevant experiments. The quasi-coherent mode [I. Cziegler, Ph.D. dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2011] that is present in the EDA H-Regime has a phase velocity in the direction of the ion diamagnetic velocity in the plasma reference frame. Consequently, this is identified as a ballooning mode near finite Larmor radius marginal stability involving the effects of transverse ion viscosity and other dissipative effects. In this regime, impurities are driven outward by the combined effects of the local temperature gradients of the impurities and their thermal conductivity, while in the Elmy H-Regime impurities are driven toward the center of the plasma column. In the I-Regimes, the excited 'Heavy Particle' modes [B. Coppi and T. Zhou, Phys. Plasmas 19, 012302 (2012); Phys. Lett. A 375, 2916 (2011)] are not of the ballooning kind and are shown to expel the impurities toward the plasma edge in the presence of significant fluctuations. These modes can have a finite frequency of oscillation with a phase velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic velocity or they can be nearly purely growing, explaining why there are I-Regimes where fluctuations are not observed. Instead, the modes considered for the Elmy H-Regime are of the ballooning

  1. The Continental Plates are Getting Thicker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews seismological studies that provide evidence of the existence of continental roots beneath the continents. Suggests, that through the collisions of plate tectonics, continents stabilized part of the mobile mantle rock beneath them to form deep roots. (ML)

  2. Volatile components and continental material of planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, K. P.; Nikolayeva, O. V.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the continental material of the terrestrial planets varies in composition from planet to planet according to the abundances and composition of true volatiles (H20, CO2, etc.) in the outer shells of the planets. The formation of these shells occurs very early in a planet's evolution when the role of endogenous processes is indistinct and continental materials are subject to melting and vaporizing in the absence of an atmosphere. As a result, the chemical properties of continental materials are related not only to fractionation processes but also to meltability and volatility. For planets retaining a certain quantity of true volatile components, the chemical transformation of continental material is characterized by a close interaction between impact melting vaporization and endogeneous geological processes.

  3. Modeling the dynamics of continental shelf carbon.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Eileen E; Cahill, Bronwyn; Fennel, Katja; Friedrichs, Marjorie A M; Hyde, Kimberly; Lee, Cindy; Mannino, Antonio; Najjar, Raymond G; O'Reilly, John E; Wilkin, John; Xue, Jianhong

    2011-01-01

    Continental margin systems are important contributors to global nutrient and carbon budgets. Effort is needed to quantify this contribution and how it will be modified under changing patterns of climate and land use. Coupled models will be used to provide projections of future states of continental margin systems. Thus, it is appropriate to consider the limitations that impede the development of realistic models. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of modeling carbon cycling on continental margins as well as the processes and issues that provide the next challenges to such models. Our overview is done within the context of a coupled circulation-biogeochemical model developed for the northeastern North American continental shelf region. Particular choices of forcing and initial fields and process parameterizations are used to illustrate the consequences for simulated distributions, as revealed by comparisons to observations using quantitative statistical metrics. PMID:21329200

  4. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

  5. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-12-31

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

  6. A change in stress regime along the Eskisehir Fault, central northwestern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozden, S.; Gundogdu, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Eskisehir Fault (EF) which is one of the active main faults in central northwestern Turkey elongated a 150 km long with the WNW-ENE to E-W trending between Bursa and SE Eskisehir. EF is representing a right lateral widespread intra-continental fault zone which has separated from central Anatolian block than Aegean extensional province. Kinematic evolution of this fault determined from inversion of both measured fault-slip vectors (by 209 fault-striae) and earthquake focal mechanism solutions (by 13 earthquakes). The inversion of slip vectors measured on fault planes indicate that a right lateral strike-slip stress regime is dominant having a consistent NW-trending Hmax(1) and NE-trending Hmin(3) axes. This stress regime changes old transpressional to young transtensional probably in Plio-Pleistocene time. Also, the earthquake focal mechanism inversions confirm that the regional transtensional stress regime continues into recent time. These stress states are characterized by NW and NE-trending 1 and 3 axes, respectively. However, local consistent NE-trending Hmin(3) extension directed normal faulting regime shows in relation with the development of the Eskisehir basins. Kinematic evolution and/or change in the stress regime probably resulted from (1) coeval influence of the forces due to subduction processes along the Cyprus and Hellenic arc in the south, (2) continental collision Anatolia/Arabian plate in the east, (3) anti-clockwise rotation and (4) westward escape and/or extrusion of the Anatolian Block.

  7. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    The objectives are to identify important physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the transfer of materials on the southeast continental shelf, determine important parameters which govern observed temporal and spatial varibility on the continental shelf, determine the extent and modes of coupling between events at the shelf break and nearshore, and determine physical, chemical and biological exchange rates on the inner shelf. Progress in meeting these research objectives is presented. (ACR)

  8. Freshwater peat on the continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emery, K.O.; Wigley, R.L.; Bartlett, A.S.; Rubin, M.; Barghoorn, E.S.

    1967-01-01

    Freshwater peats from the continental shelf off northeastern United States contain the same general pollen sequence as peats from ponds that are above sea level and that are of comparable radiocarbon ages. These peats indicate that during glacial times of low sea level terrestrial vegetation covered the region that is now the continental shelf in an unbroken extension from the adjacent land areas to the north and west.

  9. Freshwater peat on the continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Emery, K O; Wigley, R L; Bartlett, A S; Rubin, M; Barghoorn, E S

    1967-12-01

    Freshwater peats from the continental shelf off northeastern United States contain the same general pollen sequence as peats from ponds that are above sea level and that are of comparable radiocarbon ages. These peats indicate that during glacial times of low sea level terrestrial vegetation covered the region that is now the continental shelf in an unbroken extension from the adjacent land areas to the north and west. PMID:17801856

  10. Phonon wave propagation in ballistic-diffusive regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dao-Sheng; Hua, Yu-Chao; Nie, Ben-Dian; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2016-03-01

    Wide applications of ultra-short pulse laser technique in micromachining and thermophysical properties' measurements make the study on ultrafast transient thermal transport necessarily essential. When the characteristic time is comparable to the phonon relaxation time, phonons propagate in ballistic-diffusive regime and thermal wave occurs. Here, ultrafast transient phonon transport is systematically investigated based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, the Cattaneo-Vernotte (C-V) model, and the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). It is found that remarkable differences exist between the C-V model and the MC simulations when describing the evolution of the thermal wave excited by the ultra-short heat pulse. The C-V model predicts a non-dispersive dissipative thermal wave, while the MC simulation with Lambert emission predicts a dispersive dissipative thermal wave. Besides, different phonon emissions can significantly influence the evolution of the thermal wave in the MC simulations. A modified C-V model with a time- and position-dependent effective thermal conductivity is derived based on the phonon BTE to characterize the evolution of the transport regime from ballistic to diffusive. The integrations on moments of the distribution function cause the loss of the information of the phonon distribution in wave vector space, making the macroscopic quantities incomplete when describing the ballistic transport processes and corresponding boundary conditions. Possible boundary conditions for the phonon BTE in practice are also discussed on different heating methods.

  11. Continental subduction induced tremor activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, H. J.; Chen, K. H.; Ide, S.; Mouyen, M.; Byrne, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Central Range of Taiwan, a place where deep-seated tectonic tremors (a proxy of slow slip) and earthquake swarms are closely located in space and highly correlated in time, provides rare opportunity towards the understanding of physical mechanisms governing different style of slip. To identify tremor events, we used the identification scheme similar to Ide et al. (2015) but applied slightly different techniques: (1) Higher waveform cross-correlation coefficient (>0.6) (2) careful visual inspection for excluding local earthquakes and short-lasted event (duration < 60 s) (3) Signal to noise ratio higher than 1.2 and lower than 30 (4) No spatio-temporal clustering technique used. During the study period of 2007-2012, we identified 2320 tremor events with duration ranging from 60 s to 1550 s. They are located underneath southern Central Range, forming a NS-striking and SE-dipping pipe-like structure at a depth of 20-40 km. The up-dip extension of this tremor structure reaches an aseismic zone under the western flank of Central Range at shallow depths, where is an area characterized by high heat flow, low Vp and Vs anomaly. Such seismic gap was explained by the buoyancy induced crust detachment during continental subduction of Eurasian Plate. This detachment may open a new channel for hot and ductile material ascending to shallow depth, producing high temperatures along the way. This provides a common mechanism for down-dip tremor and up-dip shallow seismic gap along the same eastern dipping channel. In addition, the tremor events are found to be mostly occurred in high tides and exhibit higher correlation with tide data from west coast of Taiwan. This may again imply the association between tremor activity and subduction of Eurasian Plate.

  12. The Continental Crust: A Geophysical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Nikolas I.

    Nearly 80 years ago, Yugoslavian seismologist Andrija Mohorovicic recognized, while studying a Balkan earthquake, that velocities of seismic waves increase abruptly at a few tens of kilometers depth , giving rise to the seismological definition of the crust. Since that discovery, many studies concerned with the nature of both the continental and oceanic crusts have appeared in the geophysical literature.Recently, interest in the continental crust has cascaded. This is largely because of an infusion of new data obtained from major reflection programs such as the Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP) and British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate (BIRPS) and increased resolution of refraction studies. In addition, deep continental drilling programs are n ow in fashion. The Continental Crust: A Geophysical Approach is a summary of present knowledge of the continental crust. Meissner has succeeded in writing a book suited to many different readers, from the interested undergraduate to the professional. The book is well documented , with pertinent figures and a complete and up-to-date reference list.

  13. Relamination and the Differentiation of Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, B. R.; Kelemen, P. B.; Behn, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Most immature crust must be refined to attain the composition of mature continental crust. This refining may take the form of weathering, delamination, or relamination. Although delamination and relamination both call upon gravity-driven separation of felsic rock into the crust and mafic rock into the mantle, delamination involves foundering of rock from the base of active magmatic arcs, whereas relamination involves the underplating/diapirism of subducted sediment, arc crust, and continent crust to the base of the crust in any convergence zone. Relamination may be more efficient than lower crustal foundering at generating large volumes of material with the major- and trace-element composition of continental crust, and may have operated rapidly enough to have refined the composition of the entire continental crust over the lifetime of Earth. If so, felsic rocks could form much of the lower crust, and the bulk continental crust may be more silica rich than generally considered. Seismic wavespeeds require that only ~10-20% of the lowermost 5-15 km of continental crust must be mafic; combined heat-flow and wavespeed constraints permit continental lower crust to have 50 to 65 wt% SiO2.

  14. Using Clustering to Establish Climate Regimes from PCM Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor); Hoffman, Forrest; Hargrove, W. W.; Erickson, D.

    2002-01-01

    A multivariate statistical clustering technique--based on the k-means algorithm of Hartigan has been used to extract patterns of climatological significance from 200 years of general circulation model (GCM) output. Originally developed and implemented on a Beowulf-style parallel computer constructed by Hoffman and Hargrove from surplus commodity desktop PCs, the high performance parallel clustering algorithm was previously applied to the derivation of ecoregions from map stacks of 9 and 25 geophysical conditions or variables for the conterminous U.S. at a resolution of 1 sq km. Now applied both across space and through time, the clustering technique yields temporally-varying climate regimes predicted by transient runs of the Parallel Climate Model (PCM). Using a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and clustering four fields of significance to the global water cycle (surface temperature, precipitation, soil moisture, and snow depth) from 1871 through 2098, the authors' analysis shows an increase in spatial area occupied by the cluster or climate regime which typifies desert regions (i.e., an increase in desertification) and a decrease in the spatial area occupied by the climate regime typifying winter-time high latitude perma-frost regions. The patterns of cluster changes have been analyzed to understand the predicted variability in the water cycle on global and continental scales. In addition, representative climate regimes were determined by taking three 10-year averages of the fields 100 years apart for northern hemisphere winter (December, January, and February) and summer (June, July, and August). The result is global maps of typical seasonal climate regimes for 100 years in the past, for the present, and for 100 years into the future. Using three-dimensional data or phase space representations of these climate regimes (i.e., the cluster centroids), the authors demonstrate the portion of this phase space occupied by the land surface at all points in space and time

  15. Predictive mapping of the natural flow regimes of France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelder, Ton H.; Lamouroux, Nicolas; Leathwick, John R.; Pella, Hervé; Sauquet, Eric; Shankar, Ude

    2009-06-01

    SummaryHydrologic variability is important in sustaining a variety of ecological processes in streams and rivers. Natural flow regime classifications group streams and rivers that are relatively homogeneous with respect to flow variability and have been promoted as a method of defining units for management of river flows. Although there has been considerable interest in classifying natural flow regimes, there has been less emphasis given to developing accurate methods of extrapolating these classifications to locations without flow data. We developed a method of mapping flow regime classes using boosted regression trees (BRT) that automatically fits non-linear functions and interactions between explanatory variables of flow regimes, both of which can be expected when comparing responses between complex systems such as watersheds. A natural flow regimes classification of continental France was developed from cluster analysis of 157 hydrological indices derived from 763 gauging stations representing unmodified flows. BRT models were used to predict the likelihood of gauging stations belonging to each class based on the watershed characteristics. These models were used to extrapolate the natural flow regime classification to all segments of a national river network. The performance of the BRT models were compared with other methods of assigning locations to flow regime classes, including the use of geographically contiguous regions, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and classification and regression trees (CART). The "fitted" misclassification rate (associated with model fits) for assignment based on the BRT models was 13% whereas the fitted misclassification rates for geographically contiguous regions, LDA and CART were 52%, 44% and 39% respectively. A "predictive" misclassification rate (calculated for new cases) was estimated for assignments based on the BRT, LDA and CART models using cross validation analysis. For assignment based on the BRT models, the mean

  16. Laboratory Exploration of Multiple Zonal Jet Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. A.; Speer, K. G.; Griffiths, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    The differentially heated, rotating annulus has classically been used to study wave interactions within a single, baroclinic jet. At high rotation rates, the baroclinic instability of the flow leads to a transition to a turbulent, eddy-dominated regime. In the presence of a topographic beta effect, the flow has been observed to produce multiple, meandering zonal jets that are qualitatively similar to those found in planetary atmospheres and in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Our study builds on previous annulus experiments [1] by making observations further within this new regime. We observe with PIV and other techniques how the structure of the flow responds to changes in various parameters such as tank geometry, gradient in the Coriolis parameter, rotation rate, and differential thermal forcing. By not employing the more typical direct forcing of small scales, but by applying a large scale forcing over the annulus gap width, this study allows the varying effects of eddy scale selection, enstrophy cascade, etc. to naturally generate flow that more closely resembles planetary atmospheres and the ACC. We seek nondimensional parameters that significantly control zonation in a real fluid. These observations will provide a metric for the comparison of various theoretical models for multiple zonal jet formation. Other properties of the jets, such as their migration, meandering, bifurcation, and merging, can also be observed in an idealized situation and compared to numerical simulations. Ultimately, this will aid the testing and development of sub-grid-scale parameterizations for the multiple zonal jet regime that remain robust in the face of multiple forcing parameters. [1] Wordsworth, R. D., Read, P. L., & Yamazaki, Y. H. (2008). Turbulence, waves, and jets in a differentially heated rotating annulus experiment Physics of Fluids, 20(12), 126602.Streak photograph of suspended particles visualizing the flow representative of multiple zonal jets

  17. Cloud regimes as phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stechmann, Samuel N.; Hottovy, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Clouds are repeatedly identified as a leading source of uncertainty in future climate predictions. Of particular importance are stratocumulus clouds, which can appear as either (i) closed cells that reflect solar radiation back to space or (ii) open cells that allow solar radiation to reach the Earth's surface. Here we show that these clouds regimes -- open versus closed cells -- fit the paradigm of a phase transition. In addition, this paradigm characterizes pockets of open cells as the interface between the open- and closed-cell regimes, and it identifies shallow cumulus clouds as a regime of higher variability. This behavior can be understood using an idealized model for the dynamics of atmospheric water as a stochastic diffusion process. With this new conceptual viewpoint, ideas from statistical mechanics could potentially be used for understanding uncertainties related to clouds in the climate system and climate predictions.

  18. Continental margin tectonics - Forearc processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, N.; Reed, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of convergent plate margins and the structural development of forearc terranes are summarized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the geometry of accretionary prisms (Coulomb wedge taper and vertical motion in response to tectonic processes), offscraping vs underplating or subduction, the response to oblique convergence, fluids in forearc settings, the thermal framework and the effects of fluid advection, and serpentinite seamounts. Also included is a comprehensive bibliography for the period.

  19. Spreading and slope instability at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna, imaged by high-resolution 2D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Felix; Krastel, Sebastian; Behrmann, Jan-Hinrich; Papenberg, Cord; Geersen, Jacob; Ridente, Domenico; Latino Chiocci, Francesco; Urlaub, Morelia; Bialas, Jörg; Micallef, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Mount Etna is the largest active volcano in Europe. Its volcano edifice is located on top of continental crust close to the Ionian shore in east Sicily. Instability of the eastern flank of the volcano edifice is well documented onshore. The continental margin is supposed to deform as well. Little, however, is known about the offshore extension of the eastern volcano flank and its adjacent continental margin, which is a serious shortcoming in stability models. In order to better constrain the active tectonics of the continental margin offshore the eastern flank of the volcano, we acquired and processed a new marine high-resolution seismic and hydro-acoustic dataset. The data provide new detailed insights into the heterogeneous geology and tectonics of shallow continental margin structures offshore Mt Etna. In a similiar manner as observed onshore, the submarine realm is characterized by different blocks, which are controlled by local- and regional tectonics. We image a compressional regime at the toe of the continental margin, which is bound to an asymmetric basin system confining the eastward movement of the flank. In addition, we constrain the proposed southern boundary of the moving flank, which is identified as a right lateral oblique fault movement north of Catania Canyon. From our findings, we consider a major coupled volcano edifice instability and continental margin gravitational collapse and spreading to be present at Mt Etna, as we see a clear link between on- and offshore tectonic structures across the entire eastern flank. The new findings will help to evaluate hazards and risks accompanied by Mt Etna's slope- and continental margin instability and will be used as a base for future investigations in this region.

  20. Quantifying the thermo-mechanical impact of plume arrival on continental break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Sascha; Popov, Anton A.; Sobolev, Stephan V.

    2013-09-01

    The arrival of a plume head at Earth's continental lithosphere is often considered to be an important factor for continental break-up. However, the impact of plume impingement on strength and duration of a rift remains unclear. In this study, we quantify the mechanical and thermal influence of a plume (i.e. lithosphere erosion) on continental break-up. To do that we apply the three-dimensional numerical code SLIM3D that features realistic elasto-visco-plastic rheology. We model the thermo-mechanical response of a segment of Earth's lithosphere that is affected both by extension as well as plume-related lithosphere erosion in order to evaluate the influence on the overall force budget. We find that lithosphere erosion leads to a moderate lithospheric strength reduction of several TN/m. In a force-limited environment, however, this strength reduction may have strong influence on the timing of continental break-up, or it may even control whether continental break-up takes place at all. Additional reduction of the lithospheric strength is likely due to the massive emplacement of dikes that follows intensive melting within the plume head.

  1. Magnetism at Depth: A view from an ancient continental collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnroe, S. A.; Purucker, M. E.; Robinson, P.

    2015-12-01

    The contribution to lithospheric magnetization from deep crustal rocks remains enigmatic. Based on models from satellite studies, the magnetic signature of the crust is best fitted using a susceptibility value of ~0.04 SI. Current models use crustal thicknesses from seismic and thermal studies, and then attempt to fit satellite magnetic data using a magnetic response in the direction of the present day field. This susceptibility is significantly higher than is found in many continental rocks. It is an open question whether there are more magnetic rocks at depth, if parts of the mantle could contribute, or if assumptions in the model are incomplete. The magnetic response of deep crustal rocks is strongly controlled by the amount and oxidation state of magnetic minerals, thermal structure of the crust, whether fluids were available during metamorphism, and at what Ts and Ps reactions occurred. Subduction zones have been proposed as areas of enhanced magnetic signal due to production of magnetite, however high-grade metamorphism to eclogite facies may destroy magnetic minerals as Fe is absorbed into garnet. Contributions from mantle rocks would depend on the compositions of olivine and pyroxene, fluid availability, and PT regimes capable of producing magnetite. 1450 samples from mafic and ultramafic bodies in the Western Gneiss Region (WGR), Norway, >300 from the Leka Ophiolite, and >350 of ultramafic rocks from the Seiland Igneous Province were studied in the Scandian collision zone. They show strong variations in petrophysical properties, oxide mineralogy and assemblages. Four groups of WGR samples, represent different metamorphic conditions and crustal depths: 1) Garnet-corona gabbros considered to have reached 600-750oC and 1-1.5 Gpa, equivalent to depths up to 60 km; 2) Normal eclogite-facies rocks that reached 700-750oC and 1.5 -2.5 Gpa, equivalent to depths of 60-90 km; 3) Ultrahigh-pressure eclogite-facies rocks that reached 750-850oC and 2.5-4 Gpa, equivalent

  2. Time-Lapse Zirconography of Continental Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    When did the continents form? Peaks in the distributions of zircon U-Pb ages around 2.7, 1.9 and 1.2 Ga have been used as evidence for increased crustal growth rates at these times (growth pulses). The pulses appear linked to the formation of super-continents, with fundamental implications for the thermal evolution of the mantle. However, the age peaks could also be produced by variations in preservation/destruction rates, in which case the implications for the deep Earth are less direct. Here I use the novel approach of examining U-Pb zircon age spectra as a function of the age of the sediment in which the zircons are preserved. This produces time-lapse sequences of zircon age distributions, and presumably, crustal evolution. The database [1] is large enough (n>200,000) that time-lapse sequences can be constructed for each continent. To my knowledge, this approach has only been applied to the Australian zircon record [2]. The results are quite clear (Figure 1; circles are positions of peaks (x-axis) in detrital zircon U-Pb age spectra in different age sediments (y-axis), size of circle is proportional to the height of the peak). There are no major zircon U-Pb age peaks in the ranges 2.2-2.4 Ga and 1.3-1.6 Ga in any sediment of any age on any continent. While some crust was produced at these times, there is no evidence in the zircon record that substantial amounts of crust of these ages ever existed, suggesting that the troughs in the age spectra are due to substantial decreases in (though not cessation of) crustal production. In contrast, U-Pb age peaks between 2.5 and 2.7 Ga appear in sediments immediately after these times and persist in subsequent sedimentary records. The peak heights decrease steadily through time, indicating that crustal destruction is a significant process in modifying the zircon record, but is not responsible for producing the peaks. The same pattern is seen for age peaks at 1.6-2.1 and 1.0-1.3 Ga. Comparing the time-lapse results with Hf

  3. Continental drift and climate change drive instability in insect assemblages.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengqing; Tierno de Figueroa, José Manuel; Lek, Sovan; Park, Young-Seuk

    2015-01-01

    Global change has already had observable effects on ecosystems worldwide, and the accelerated rate of global change is predicted in the future. However, the impacts of global change on the stability of biodiversity have not been systematically studied in terms of both large spatial (continental drift) and temporal (from the last inter-glacial period to the next century) scales. Therefore, we analyzed the current geographical distribution pattern of Plecoptera, a thermally sensitive insect group, and evaluated its stability when coping with global change across both space and time throughout the Mediterranean region--one of the first 25 global biodiversity hotspots. Regional biodiversity of Plecoptera reflected the geography in both the historical movements of continents and the current environmental conditions in the western Mediterranean region. The similarity of Plecoptera assemblages between areas in this region indicated that the uplift of new land and continental drift were the primary determinants of the stability of regional biodiversity. Our results revealed that climate change caused the biodiversity of Plecoptera to slowly diminish in the past and will cause remarkably accelerated biodiversity loss in the future. These findings support the theory that climate change has had its greatest impact on biodiversity over a long temporal scale. PMID:26081036

  4. Continental drift and climate change drive instability in insect assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengqing; Tierno de Figueroa, José Manuel; Lek, Sovan; Park, Young-Seuk

    2015-06-01

    Global change has already had observable effects on ecosystems worldwide, and the accelerated rate of global change is predicted in the future. However, the impacts of global change on the stability of biodiversity have not been systematically studied in terms of both large spatial (continental drift) and temporal (from the last inter-glacial period to the next century) scales. Therefore, we analyzed the current geographical distribution pattern of Plecoptera, a thermally sensitive insect group, and evaluated its stability when coping with global change across both space and time throughout the Mediterranean region—one of the first 25 global biodiversity hotspots. Regional biodiversity of Plecoptera reflected the geography in both the historical movements of continents and the current environmental conditions in the western Mediterranean region. The similarity of Plecoptera assemblages between areas in this region indicated that the uplift of new land and continental drift were the primary determinants of the stability of regional biodiversity. Our results revealed that climate change caused the biodiversity of Plecoptera to slowly diminish in the past and will cause remarkably accelerated biodiversity loss in the future. These findings support the theory that climate change has had its greatest impact on biodiversity over a long temporal scale.

  5. Continental drift and climate change drive instability in insect assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengqing; Tierno de Figueroa, José Manuel; Lek, Sovan; Park, Young-Seuk

    2015-01-01

    Global change has already had observable effects on ecosystems worldwide, and the accelerated rate of global change is predicted in the future. However, the impacts of global change on the stability of biodiversity have not been systematically studied in terms of both large spatial (continental drift) and temporal (from the last inter-glacial period to the next century) scales. Therefore, we analyzed the current geographical distribution pattern of Plecoptera, a thermally sensitive insect group, and evaluated its stability when coping with global change across both space and time throughout the Mediterranean region—one of the first 25 global biodiversity hotspots. Regional biodiversity of Plecoptera reflected the geography in both the historical movements of continents and the current environmental conditions in the western Mediterranean region. The similarity of Plecoptera assemblages between areas in this region indicated that the uplift of new land and continental drift were the primary determinants of the stability of regional biodiversity. Our results revealed that climate change caused the biodiversity of Plecoptera to slowly diminish in the past and will cause remarkably accelerated biodiversity loss in the future. These findings support the theory that climate change has had its greatest impact on biodiversity over a long temporal scale. PMID:26081036

  6. Heat flow and continental breakup: The Gulf of Elat (Aqaba)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Avraham, Z.; Vonherzen, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    Heat flow measurements were made in the major basins of the Gulf of Elat (Aqaba), northern Red Sea. The gulf is located at the southern portion of the Dead Sea rift which is a transform plate boundary. Gradient measurements at each site were made with a probe which allows multiple penetration of the bottom during a single deployment of the instrument. Thermal conductivity was determined by needle probe measurements on sedimentary cores. The mean heat flux, about 80 mWm(-2), is significantly above the continental mean, and probably also above that from the adjacent Sinai and Arabian continental blocks. The heat flow appears to increase from north to south. Such an increase may be related to the more advanced rifting stage of the Red Sea immediately to the south, which presently includes creation of an oceanic crust. This trend also corresponds to the general trend of the deep crustal structure in the gulf. Evidence from various geophysical fields suggest a gradual thinning of the crust towards the direction of the Red Sea where a normal oceanic crust exists. The heat flow data, together with other geophysical data, indicate a propagation of mature rifting activity from the Red Sea into the Gulf of Elat. This process is acting simultaneously with the transform motion along the Dead Sea rift.

  7. Arctic and Antarctic Crustal Thickness and Continental Lithosphere Thinning from Gravity Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusznir, Nick J.; Alvey, Andy; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom A. R. M.; Roberts, Alan M.

    2013-04-01

    Mapping crustal thickness, continental lithosphere thinning and oceanic lithosphere distribution represents a substantial challenge for the Polar Regions. The Arctic region formed as a series of small distinct ocean basins leading to a complex distribution of oceanic crust, thinned continental crust and rifted continental margins. Antarctica, both peripherally and internally, experienced poly-phase rifting and continental breakup. We determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness, continental lithosphere thinning and ocean-continent transition location for the Polar Regions using a gravity inversion method which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction. The method is carried out in the 3D spectral domain and predicts Moho depth and incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction. Ice thickness is included in the gravity inversion, as is the contribution from sediments which assumes a compaction controlled sediment density increase with depth. A correction to the predicted continental lithospheric thinning derived from gravity inversion is made for volcanic material addition produced by decompression melting during continental rifting and seafloor spreading. For the Arctic, gravity data used is from the NGA (U) Arctic Gravity Project, bathymetry is from IBCAO and sediment thickness is from a new regional compilation. For Antarctica and the Southern Oceans, data used are elevation and bathymetry, free-air gravity anomaly, ice and sediment thickness from Smith and Sandwell (2008), Sandwell and Smith (2008) and Laske and Masters (1997) respectively, supplemented by Bedmap2 data south of 60 degrees south. Using gravity anomaly inversion, we have produced the first comprehensive maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for the Arctic, Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. Our gravity inversion predicts thin crust and high continental lithosphere thinning factors in the Makarov, Podvodnikov, Nautilus and Canada

  8. Constraints on continental accretion from sedimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Dallas

    1988-01-01

    Heat loss in the ancient Earth was discussed assuming that classical sea floor spreading was the only mechanism. This may be expressed as faster spreading or longer total ridge length. These have important implications as to the size and number of cratonic plates in the distant past, the degree to which they are flooded, the kinds of sediments and volcanics that would be expected, and the amount of recycling of continental material taking place. The higher proportion of marine sedimentary rocks and oceanic volcanics in the Archean, and the relative paucity of evaporites and continental volcanics may in part be due to smaller cratonic blocks. A model was developed of the percentage of continental flooding which utilizes round continents and a constant width of the zone of flooding. This model produces a reasonable good fit to the percentage of flooding on the present day continents.

  9. Probing continental collision in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, A. H. F.

    Knowledge about the processes of continental collisional would unlock a wealth of data for the field of tectonics, but such processes have been poorly documented by academic ocean drilling. On the basis of 1993 data confirming that the easternmost Mediterranean is in the initial stages of continental collision, the Ocean Drilling Program has scheduled two legs of drilling for summer 1995 in the eastern and western parts of the Mediterranean Sea.Effects of continental collision in the easternmost Mediterranean include the Quaternary uplift of Cyprus [Poole and Robertson, 1991] and the break up and subsidence of the Eratosthenes Seamount, which is located in the easternmost Mediterranean between Cyprus and the Levantine Basin (Figure 1).

  10. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  11. Production regimes for Self-Interacting Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Nicolás; Chu, Xiaoyong; Garcia-Cely, Camilo; Hambye, Thomas; Zaldivar, Bryan

    2016-03-01

    In the context of Self-Interacting Dark Matter as a solution for the small-scale structure problems, we consider the possibility that Dark Matter could have been produced without being in thermal equilibrium with the Standard Model bath. We discuss one by one the following various dark matter production regimes of this kind: freeze-in, reannihilation and dark freeze-out. We exemplify how these mechanisms work in the context of the particularly simple Hidden Vector Dark Matter model. In contrast to scenarios where there is thermal equilibrium with the Standard Model bath, we find two regimes which can easily satisfy all the laboratory and cosmological constraints. These are dark freeze-out with 3-to-2 annihilations and freeze-in via a light mediator. In the first regime, different temperatures in the visible and the Dark Matter sectors allow us to avoid the constraints coming from cosmic structure formation as well as the use of non-perturbative couplings to reproduce the observed relic density. For the second regime, different couplings are responsible for Dark Matter relic density and self-interactions, permitting to surpass BBN, X-ray, CMB and direct detection constraints.

  12. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  13. Lithospheric buoyancy and continental intraplate stresses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.L.; Mooney, W.D.

    2003-01-01

    Lithospheric buoyancy, the product of lithospheric density and thickness, is an important physical property that influences both the long-term stability of continents and their state of stress. We have determined lithospheric buoyancy by applying the simple isostatic model of Lachenbruch and Morgan (1990). We determine the crustal portion of lithospheric buoyancy using the USGS global database of more than 1700 crustal structure determinations (Mooney et al., 2002), which demonstrates that a simple relationship between crustal thickness and surface elevation does not exist. In fact, major regions of the crust at or near sea level (0-200 m elevation) have crustal thicknesses that vary between 25 and 55 km. Predicted elevations due to the crustal component of buoyancy in the model exceed observed elevations in nearly all cases (97% of the data), consistent with the existence of a cool lithospheric mantle lid that is denser than the asthenosphere on which it floats. The difference between the observed and predicted crustal elevation is assumed to be equal to the decrease in elevation produced by the negative buoyancy of the mantle lid. Mantle lid thickness was first estimated from the mantle buoyancy and a mean lid density computed using a basal crust temperature determined from extrapolation of surface heat flow, assuming a linear thermal gradient in the mantle lid. The resulting values of total lithosphere thickness are in good agreement with thicknesses estimated from seismic data, except beneath cratonic regions where they are only 40-60% of the typical estimates (200-350 km) derived from seismic data. This inconsistency is compatible with petrologic data and tomography and geoid analyses that have suggested that cratonic mantle lids are ??? 1% less dense than mantle lids elsewhere. By lowering the thermally determined mean mantle lid density in cratons by 1%, our model reproduces the observed 200-350+ km cratonic lithospheric thickness. We then computed

  14. Tropical Continental Convection (Amazonia and the North American Monsoon): Unique Observations from GPS Meteorological Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The complex interactions/feedbacks between water vapor fields and deep atmospheric convection remain one of the outstanding problems in Tropical Meteorology. The lack of high spatial/temporal resolution, all-weather observations in the Tropics has hampered progress. In this talk, we present results employing GPS meteorology from two topographically/climatologically unique Tropical Continental regimes: Central Amazonia and the Sierra Madre Occidental of Mexico. Specifically, we presents results on the shallow-to-deep convective transition from both regimes in addition to employing water vapor convergence as a proxy variable for convective intensity. Results from both convective regimes reveal an approximately 4-hour timescale of intense water vapor convergence associated with the transition from shallow to deep precipitating convection. This water vapor convergence time scale provides a useful metric for both high resolution and global climate models to replicate. Furthermore, we examime convective intensity from both regimes (defined utilizing lightning data, cloud top temperature or precipitation), which is also characterized by the time-rate-of-change of precipitable water vapor. The relationship between the time-rate-of-change of precipitable water vapor and convective intensity is positive, however, with a large amount spread in the data and some dependence on the regime and topography.

  15. MCNP/X TRANSPORT IN THE TABULAR REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    HUGHES, H. GRADY

    2007-01-08

    The authors review the transport capabilities of the MCNP and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes in the energy regimes in which tabular transport data are available. Giving special attention to neutron tables, they emphasize the measures taken to improve the treatment of a variety of difficult aspects of the transport problem, including unresolved resonances, thermal issues, and the availability of suitable cross sections sets. They also briefly touch on the current situation in regard to photon, electron, and proton transport tables.

  16. Dynamically strained ferroelastics: Statistical behavior in elastic and plastic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X.; Lookman, T.; Zhao, Z.; Saxena, A.; Sun, J.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2013-03-01

    The dynamic evolution in ferroelastic crystals under external shear is explored by computer simulation of a two-dimensional model. The characteristic geometrical patterns obtained during shear deformation include dynamic tweed in the elastic regime as well as interpenetrating needle domains in the plastic regime. As a result, the statistics of jerk energy differ in the elastic and plastic regimes. In the elastic regime the distributions of jerk energy are sensitive to temperature and initial configurations. However, in the plastic regime the jerk distributions are rather robust and do not depend much on the details of the configurations, although the geometrical pattern formed after yield is strongly influenced by the elastic constants of the materials and the configurations we used. Specifically, for all geometrical configurations we studied, the energy distribution of jerks shows a power-law noise pattern P(E)˜E-(γ-1)(γ-1=1.3-2) at low temperatures and a Vogel-Fulcher distribution P(E) ˜ exp-(E/E0) at high temperatures. More complex behavior occurs at the crossover between these two regimes where our simulated jerk distributions are very well described by a generalized Poisson distributions P(E)˜E-(γ-1) exp-(E/E0)n with n = 0.4-0.5 and γ-1 ≈ 0 (Kohlrausch law). The geometrical mechanisms for the evolution of the ferroelastic microstructure under strain deformation remain similar in all thermal regimes, whereas their thermodynamic behavior differs dramatically: on heating, from power-law statistics via the Kohlrausch law to a Vogel-Fulcher law. There is hence no simple way to predict the local evolution of the twin microstructure from just the observed statistical behavior of a ferroelastic crystal. It is shown that the Poisson distribution is a convenient way to describe the crossover behavior contained in all the experimental data without recourse to specific scaling functions or temperature-dependent cutoff lengths.

  17. Modelling of sea floor spreading initiation and rifted continental margin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymms, V. J.; Isimm Team

    2003-04-01

    Recent observations of depth dependent (heterogeneous) stretching where upper crustal extension is much less than that of the lower crust and lithospheric mantle at both non-volcanic and volcanic margins plus the discovery of broad domains of exhumed continental mantle at non-volcanic rifted margins are not predicted by existing quantitative models of rifted margin formation which are usually based on intra-continental rift models subjected to very large stretching factors. New conceptual and quantitative models of rifted margin formation are required. Observations and continuum mechanics suggest that the dominant process responsible for rifted continental margin formation is sea-floor spreading of the young ocean ridge, rather than pre-breakup intra-continental rifting. Simple fluid flow models of ocean ridge processes using analytical iso-viscous corner-flow demonstrate that the divergent motion of the upwelling mantle beneath the ocean ridge, when viewed in the reference frame of the young continental margin, shows oceanward flow of the lower continental crust and lithospheric mantle of the young rifted margin giving rise to depth dependent stretching as observed. Single-phase fluid-models have been developed to model the initiation of sea-floor spreading and the thermal, stretching and thinning evolution of the young rifted continental margin. Finite element fluid-flow modelling incorporating the evolving temperature dependent viscosity field on the fluid flow also show depth dependent stretching of the young continental margin. Two-phase flow models of ocean ridges incorporating the transport of both solid matrix and melt fluid (Spiegelman &Reynolds 1999) predict the divergent motion of the asthenosphere and lithosphere matrix, and the focusing of basaltic melt into the narrow axial zone spreading centre at ocean ridges. We are adapting two-phase flow models for application to the initiation of sea-floor spreading and rifted continental margin formation. i

  18. Modeling Continental Growth and Mantle Hydration in Earth's Evolution and the Impact of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höning, Dennis; Spohn, Tilman

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of planets with plate tectonics is significantly affected by several intertwined feedback cycles. On Earth, interactions between atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, crust, and interior determine its present day state. We here focus on the feedback cycles including the evolutions of mantle water budget and continental crust, and investigate possible effects of the Earth's biosphere. The first feedback loop includes cycling of water into the mantle at subduction zones and outgassing at volcanic chains and mid-ocean ridges. Water is known to reduce the viscosity of mantle rock, and therefore the speed of mantle convection and plate subduction will increase with the water concentration, eventually enhancing the rates of mantle water regassing and outgassing. A second feedback loop includes the production and erosion of continental crust. Continents are formed above subduction zones, whose total length is determined by the total size of the continents. Furthermore, the total surface area of continental crust determines the amount of eroded sediments per unit time. Subducted sediments affect processes in subduction zones, eventually enhancing the production rate of new continental crust. Both feedback loops affect each other: As a wet mantle increases the speed of subduction, continental production also speeds up. On the other hand, the total length of subduction zones and the rate at which sediments are subducted (both being functions of continental coverage) affect the rate of mantle water regassing. We here present a model that includes both cycles and show how the system develops stable and unstable fixed points in a plane defined by mantle water concentration and surface of continents. We couple these feedback cycles to a parameterized thermal evolution model that reproduces present day observations. We show how Earth has been affected by these feedback cycles during its evolution, and argue that Earth's present day state regarding its mantle water

  19. Optics in the Relativistic Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2012-06-01

    Optics has extended the frontier of low energy physics. Here we present the progress in the opposite direction of relativistic intensity regime of optics. With intense and large energy laser, particles may be accelerated to high energies via laser wakefield acceleration (Tajima and Dawson, 1979) over a compact distance orders of magnitude shorter than the RF approach. We should be able to accelerate electrons (over 30m) and ions (over cm) toward TeV with an existing kJ laser. We can check Lorentz invariance in the ultrarelativistic regime. Further, laser allows us to explore the presence of weakly coupling fields such as Dark Matter and Dark Energy with an unprecedented sensitivity. We call this emerging capability as the Laser Particle Physics Paradigm (LP^3).

  20. Demystifying optimal dynamic treatment regimes.

    PubMed

    Moodie, Erica E M; Richardson, Thomas S; Stephens, David A

    2007-06-01

    A dynamic regime is a function that takes treatment and covariate history and baseline covariates as inputs and returns a decision to be made. Murphy (2003, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B 65, 331-366) and Robins (2004, Proceedings of the Second Seattle Symposium on Biostatistics, 189-326) have proposed models and developed semiparametric methods for making inference about the optimal regime in a multi-interval trial that provide clear advantages over traditional parametric approaches. We show that Murphy's model is a special case of Robins's and that the methods are closely related but not equivalent. Interesting features of the methods are highlighted using the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and through simulation. PMID:17688497

  1. The emerging climate change regime

    SciTech Connect

    Bodansky, D.M.

    1995-11-01

    The emerging climate change regime--with the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) at its core--reflects the substantial uncertainties, high stakes and complicated politics of the greenhouse warming issue. The regime represents a hedging strategy. On the one hand, it treats climate change as a potentially serious problem, and in response, creates a long-term, evolutionary process to encourage further research, promote national planning, increase public awareness, and help create a sense of community among states. But it requires very little by way of substantive--and potentially costly--mitigation or adaptation measures. Although the FCCC parties have agreed to negotiate additional commitments, substantial progress is unlikely without further developments in science, technology, and public opinion. The FCCC encourages such developments, and is capable of evolution and growth, should the political will to take stronger international action emerge. 120 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. The operating regimes and basic control principles of SNPS Topaz''. [Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, A.N.; Volberg, M.S.; Grayznov, G.M.; Zhabotinsky, E.E.; Serbin, V.I. )

    1991-01-05

    The basic operating regimes of space nuclear power system (SNPS) Topaz'' are considered. These regimes include: prelaunch preparation and launch into working orbit, SNPS start-up to obtain desired electric power, nominal regime, SNPS shutdown. The main requirements for SNPS at different regimes are given, and the control algorithms providing these requirements are described. The control algorithms were chosen on the basis of theoretical studies and ground power tests of the SNPS prototypes. Topaz'' successful ground and flight tests allow to conclude that for SNPS of this type control algorithm providing required thermal state of cesium vapor supply system and excluding any possibility of discharge processes in current conducting elements is the most expedient at the start-up regime. At the nominal regime required electric power should be provided by maintenance of reactor current and fast-acting voltage regulator utilization. The limitation of the outlet coolant temperature should be foreseen also.

  3. The International Climate Change Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamin, Farhana; Depledge, Joanna

    2005-01-01

    Aimed at the increasing number of policy-makers, stakeholders, researchers, and other professionals working on climate change, this volume presents a detailed description and analysis of the international regime established in 1992 to combat the threat of global climate change. It provides a comprehensive accessible guide to a high-profile area of international law and politics, covering not only the obligations and rights of countries, but ongoing climate negotiations as well.

  4. Hall effect in hopping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonin, A.; Skupiński, P.; Grasza, K.

    2016-02-01

    A simple description of the Hall effect in the hopping regime of conductivity in semiconductors is presented. Expressions for the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility are derived by considering averaged equilibrium electron transport in a single triangle of localization sites in a magnetic field. Dependence of the Hall coefficient is analyzed in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values. Our theoretical result is applied to our experimental data on temperature dependence of Hall effect and Hall mobility in ZnO.

  5. Merging of Rhine flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boessenkool, Berry; Bronstert, Axel; Bürger, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    The Rhine flow regime is changing: (a) in the alpine nival regime, snow melt floods occur earlier in the year and (b) in the pluvial middle-Rhine regime, rainfall induced flood magnitudes rise. The seasonality of each is currently separated in time, but it is conceivable that this may shift due to climate change. If extremes of both flood types coincide, this would create a new type of hydrologic extreme with disastrous consequences. Quantifying the probability for a future overlap of pluvial and nival floods is therefore of high relevance to society and particularly to reinsurance companies. In order to investigate possible changes in magnitude and timing of flood types, we are developing a chain of physical models for spatio-temporal combination of flood probabilities. As input, we aim to use stochastically downscaled temperature and rainfall extremes from climate model weather projections. Preliminary research shows a six-week forward-shift of peak discharge at the nival gauge Maxau in the past century. The aim of presenting our early-stage work as a poster is to induce an exchange of ideas with fellow scientists in close research disciplines.

  6. Optimizing fluctuating thermal regime storage of developing Megachile rotundata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata, is the primary pollinator for alfalfa seed production in North America. Under current management practice developing pupae are incubated at 29ºC until the adults emerge for pollination. If unfavorable spring weather delays peak alfalfa bloom, bee m...

  7. Maritime-continental contrasts of cloud condensation nuclei in the west coast of the Korean peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, K.; Hudson, J. G.; Yum, S. S.; Choi, B.

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) were made at the Korea Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) Observatory (KGAWO) (36.32 \\deg N, 126.19 \\deg E) on the west coast of the Korean Peninsula, south of Seoul, from April 30 to May 22, 2004. This location - 500 km distance from China across the Yellow Sea - provides a unique opportunity to monitor the influence of east China's rapidly growing industrial and human activities as well as the local Korean pollution. CCN were measured with the two Desert Research Institute (DRI) instantaneous CCN spectrometers. Condensation Nuclei (CN) were also measured with a TSI 3010 counter. On some foggy days fog droplets (2 - 50 micrometer diameter) were measured with an FSSP-100. For the whole period air masses were divided into 10 maritime and 12 continental regimes according to Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model (HYSPLIT4) results. Preliminary analyses showed that the average CCN concentration at 1% supersaturation of the continental air masses was 6573 cm-3, which almost doubled the maritime average concentration of 2758 cm-3. Average total particle (i.e., CN) concentration was higher and showed similar contrast between the continental and maritime air masses (8594 cm-3 vs. 4872 cm-3). These concentrations were significantly higher than those measured in some other parts of the earth atmosphere. For example, CCN measurements in marine environment but with continental influences showed 1411 cm-3 in Florida and 1023 cm-3 in northeast Atlantic. These are even lower than the maritime CCN concentrations in this study. Therefore, maritime in this study is only in a relative sense. An Asian Dust (AD) event occurred on May 4. CN and CCN concentrations on this day, 10880 and 8835 cm-3, respectably, were higher than the average continental concentrations. However, one non-AD day also showed as high concentrations. Much more detailed analyses and comparisons will be made and presented at the conference.

  8. Thermal-mechanical response to simple shear extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlong, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of extension in the continental crust is apparently much more complex than that acting in the oceanic lithosphere. Recently, Wernicke has proposed that a significant fraction of extension in the continental lithosphere may occur by a simple shear mechanism along discrete fault/shear zones which cut the crust, and perhaps extend into the uppermost mantle. Clearly much of the surface evidence for extension supports this concept, but the depth extent of simple shear extension in the continental crust is unclear. Using numerical simulations, the thermal and associated mechanical behavior of the continental lithosphere in response to lithosphere extension along a low-angle simple shear zone which cuts through the lithospheric plate was determined in order to evaluate the resolving ability of thermal (heat flow and metamorphic P-T-time paths) and elevation observations in constraining the mode of continental extension.

  9. Geometries of hyperextended continental crust in northeastern continental brazilian margin: insights from potential field and seismic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, José; Barbosa, José; Ribeiro, Vanessa; Oliveira, Jefferson; Filho, Osvaldo; Buarque, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The study region encompasses a set of three basins located at Northeast Brazilian continental margin: Pernambuco (south sector), Paraíba and Natal platform (north sector). These basins were formed during the last stage of separation between South America and African plates during Cretaceous. The continental breakup in these regions occurred probably during the Middle-Upper Albian (~102 m.y). The adjacent basement rocks belong to Borborema Province (BP), which was formed due a complex superposition between Pre-Cambrian orogenic cycles. The structural framework of BP is dominated by large shear zones that divided this province in three main tectonic domains: South, Central and North. The Pernambuco Basin is located in the South Domain and the Paraíba and Natal platform basins are related to the Central Domain. The tectonic and magmatic evolution of the Pernambuco Basin was influenced by oblique rifting (~ 35° to rift axis) and a thermal anomaly probably caused by the Santa Helena hotspot. The north sector represents a continental shelf characterized by basement high with a narrow platform and an abrupt shelf break on transition to the abyssal plain. The continental platform break of this sector was parallel to the rift axis. In this way, we present a regional structural interpretation of these sectors of Brazilian rifted margin based on interpretation and 2D forward modeling of potential field and 2D seismic data. The magnetic maps (Reduction to magnetic pole and Analytic signal) revealed the influence of an alternating pattern of large narrow magnetic and non-magnetic lineaments, oriented NE-SW, E-W and NW-SE. In the Pernambuco Basin these lineaments (NE-SW and E-W) are related to shear zones in the hyperextended basement which is interpreted as a continuation of the granitic-gneissic and metasedimentary rocks of the South Domain of BP. The Paraíba and Natal platform basins show a slight change in the orientation of structures trending E-W (shear zones in

  10. Notice of Release of 'Continental' Basin Wildrye

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Continental' basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus [Scribn. & Merr.] A. Love) has been released as a cultivar for use in rangeland seedings. It was developed from a hybrid between an induced octoploid (2n=56), generated from the natural tetraploid 'Trailhead' (2n=28), and the natural octoploid 'Magnar' (...

  11. Eocene continental climates and latitudinal temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, David R.; Wing, Scott L.

    1995-11-01

    Global climate during the Mesozoic and early Cenozoic is thought to have been warmer than at present, but there is debate about winter temperatures. Paleontological data indicate mild temperatures even at high latitudes and in mid-latitude continental interiors, whereas computer simulations of continental paleoclimates produce winter temperatures closer to modern levels. Foliar physiognomy and floristic composition of 23 Eocene floras from the interior of North America and Australia indicate cold month means generally >2 °C, even where the mean annual temperature (MAT) was <15 °C. Reconstructed Eocene latitudinal gradients of MAT are curvilinear but are about 0.4 °C per 1° of latitude in continental interiors at mid-latitudes, much less than the 0.8 1.0 °C per 1° of latitude observed in eastern and central North America today, but similar to modern gradients in the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes and on the west coast of North America. Latitudinal temperature gradients reconstructed here are broadly representative of Eocene climates, showing that the discrepancy between proxy data and simulations will not be resolved by regional adjustments to paleogeography or reinterpretation of individual fossil assemblages. Similar discrepancies between proxy data and general circulation model simulations for other time periods suggest that there is a basic flaw with the way climate models simulate heat transport to, or loss from, continental surfaces.

  12. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  13. Coordination: Southeast Continental Shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    An overview of the Oceanograhic Program of Skidaway Institute of Oceanograhy is presented. Included are the current five year plan for studies of the Southeast Continental Shelf, a summary of research accomplishments, proposed research for 1981-1982, current status of the Savannah Navigational Light Tower, and a list of publications. (ACR)

  14. Elephant teeth from the atlantic continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitmore, F.C., Jr.; Emery, K.O.; Cooke, H.B.S.; Swift, D.J.P.

    1967-01-01

    Teeth of mastodons and mastodons have been recovered by fishermen from at least 40 sites on the continental shelf as deep as 120 meters. Also present are submerged shorelines, peat deposits, lagoonal shells, and relict sands. Evidently elephants and other large mammals ranged this region during the glacial stage of low sea level of the last 25.000 years.

  15. A numerical investigation of continental collision styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazian, Reza Khabbaz; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2013-06-01

    Continental collision after closure of an ocean can lead to different deformation styles: subduction of continental crust and lithosphere, lithospheric thickening, folding of the unsubducted continents, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities and/or slab break-off. We use 2-D thermomechanical models of oceanic subduction followed by continental collision to investigate the sensitivity of these collision styles to driving velocity, crustal and lithospheric temperature, continental rheology and the initial density difference between the oceanic lithosphere and the asthenosphere. We find that these parameters influence the collision system, but that driving velocity, rheology and lithospheric (rather than Moho and mantle) temperature can be classified as important controls, whereas reasonable variations in the initial density contrast between oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere are not necessarily important. Stable continental subduction occurs over a relatively large range of values of driving velocity and lithospheric temperature. Fast and cold systems are more likely to show folding, whereas slow and warm systems can experience RT-type dripping. Our results show that a continent with a strong upper crust can experience subduction of the entire crust and is more likely to fold. Accretion of the upper crust at the trench is feasible when the upper crust has a moderate to weak strength, whereas the entire crust can be scraped-off in the case of a weak lower crust. We also illustrate that weakening of the lithospheric mantle promotes RT-type of dripping in a collision system. We use a dynamic collision model, in which collision is driven by slab pull only, to illustrate that adjacent plates can play an important role in continental collision systems. In dynamic collision models, exhumation of subducted continental material and sediments is triggered by slab retreat and opening of a subduction channel, which allows upward flow of buoyant materials. Exhumation continues

  16. Thermal balance testing of the MSAT spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, Serge; Choueiry, Elie; Pang, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on the recently completed thermal balance/thermal vacuum testing of an MSAT satellite, the first satellite to provide mobile communications service for all of continental North America. MSAT is a two-spacecraft program, using a three-axis-stabilized HUGHES HS-601 series bus as the vehicle for the Canadian-designed payload. The thermal tests performed at the Canadian Space Agency's David Florida Laboratory in Ottawa, Canada, lasted approximately 32 days.

  17. Expanding Ice Sheets on the Antarctic Peninsula during the Plio/Pleistocene Recorded in Continental Rise Sediment Drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, E. A.; Hillenbrand, C.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment drifts on the continental rise west of the Antarctic Peninsula are located within 125 km from the continental shelf edge, the main contributor of terrigenous sediment during both glacial and interglacial periods. The composition of drift deposits continuously recorded changes in ice sheet volume and thermal regime as well as sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and sea ice extent. The coarse-grained terrigenous sediment (pebbles and coarse sand), a proxy for iceberg-rafted debris (IRD), was analyzed in sediments spanning the last 3.1 m.y. at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1101 and 1096. IRD is deposited in both glacial intervals, dominated by fine-grained laminated mud and interglacial units consisting of bioturbated muds enriched in biogenic components. Contents of biogenic opal, which reflect diatom abundance, are relatively high from 3.1-2.2 Ma. Calcareous nannofossils are present within interglacial sediments from 2.2-0.76 Ma. Both findings suggest warm SSTs and limited sea ice over the drifts during interglacial periods before the Late Pleistocene. Quartz grains picked from the IRD fraction and imaged with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) show an abrupt change in surface microtextures at 1.35 Ma. During the Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene, many quartz grains are completely weathered and only a few show signs of crushing and abrasion, indicating that glaciers were too small to inundate the Antarctic Peninsula topography. Debris shed from mountain peaks was transported supraglacially or englacially allowing weathered grains to pass unmodified through the glaciers. Glaciers expanded in size during glacial periods from 1.35-0.76 Ma. The IRD accumulation during those periods was very high and diverse dropstone lithologies document supply from sources throughout the Antarctica Peninsula. Conditions that spawned the large polar ice sheet identified at the Last Glacial Maximum have been present on the Antarctic Peninsula during glacial periods since

  18. Deep observation and sampling of the earth's continental crust (DOSECC): Continental scientific drilling workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Research summaries are presented of ongoing or proposed deep drilling programs to explore hydrothermal systems, buried astroblemes, continental crust, magma systems, mountain belt tectonics, subduction zones, and volcanoes. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  19. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  20. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  1. 75 FR 1076 - Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties AGENCY: Minerals Management Service.... SUMMARY: The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act requires the MMS to review the maximum daily civil penalty assessment for violations of regulations governing oil and gas operations in the Outer Continental Shelf...

  2. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  3. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  4. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  5. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  6. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  7. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  8. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  9. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  10. Eu Anomalies Constrain Recycling of Lower Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Rudnick, R. L.; McDonough, W. F.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Huang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Europium is fractionated from Sm and Gd during intra-crustal differentiation since Eu (II) strongly partitions into feldspar. Statistical analysis of Sm-Eu-Gd concentrations in over 2000 samples from the continental crust reveal that the bulk continental crust has a negative Eu anomaly. Samples include (1) shales, loess, and tillites which represent upper continental crust (n = 415); (2) amphibolite facies rocks, which represent the middle continental crust (n = 1325) and (3) granulite facies rocks (n = 845), which represent the lower continental crust. The upper and middle continental crust have a significant negative Eu anomaly, while the lower continental crust has a significant positive Eu anomaly. The Eu deficit in the upper and middle continental crust, however, cannot be compensated by the Eu excess in the lower continental crust, leaving the bulk continental crust with a negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.81 ± 0.04, 95% conf.). Since the building blocks of the continental crust (mantle-derived basalts or tonalitic slab melts) do not possess a negative Eu anomaly, removal of lower continental crust, which is the only crustal reservoir enriched in Eu, is required during crustal evolution. A mass balance model of the continents, based on Sm-Eu-Gd systematics, indicates that at least 2.2-3.0 crustal masses may have been added back to the mantle over Earth history via lower crustal recycling.

  11. Growth of early continental crust by partial melting of eclogite.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Robert P; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Norman, Marc D

    2003-10-01

    The tectonic setting in which the first continental crust formed, and the extent to which modern processes of arc magmatism at convergent plate margins were operative on the early Earth, are matters of debate. Geochemical studies have shown that felsic rocks in both Archaean high-grade metamorphic ('grey gneiss') and low-grade granite-greenstone terranes are comprised dominantly of sodium-rich granitoids of the tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) suite of rocks. Here we present direct experimental evidence showing that partial melting of hydrous basalt in the eclogite facies produces granitoid liquids with major- and trace-element compositions equivalent to Archaean TTG, including the low Nb/Ta and high Zr/Sm ratios of 'average' Archaean TTG, but from a source with initially subchondritic Nb/Ta. In modern environments, basalts with low Nb/Ta form by partial melting of subduction-modified depleted mantle, notably in intraoceanic arc settings in the forearc and back-arc regimes. These observations suggest that TTG magmatism may have taken place beneath granite-greenstone complexes developing along Archaean intraoceanic island arcs by imbricate thrust-stacking and tectonic accretion of a diversity of subduction-related terranes. Partial melting accompanying dehydration of these generally basaltic source materials at the base of thickened, 'arc-like' crust would produce compositionally appropriate TTG granitoids in equilibrium with eclogite residues. PMID:14534583

  12. Nicolas and Eel submarine fans, California continental borderland

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.; Gorsline, D.S.

    1987-04-01

    Nicolas and Eel Submarine Fans occur in the San Nicolas basin - an outer basin of the California continental borderland that has a low sedimentation rate. Nicolas Fan lies southeast of San Nicolas Island and the broad San Nicolas Bank. The upper fan is characterized by numerous channels. The midfan region may be divided into three distinct areas: a central midfan and two subfans. The central midfan deposition system is typical of Normark's suprafan. The subfans are essentially flat, sandy lobes. Eel Fan lies west of San Clemente Island and is fed by an erosional valley. Its midfan region may also be characterized as a flat, sandy lobe. Box-core data show that holocene turbidity currents have occurred on the central Nicolas Fan, whereas the subfans and Eel Fan are nearly inactive. The local tectonic regime influences these fans by determining slope trends, creating bathymetric obstacles, controlling canyon location, and triggering mass movements. Sea level changes affect sedimentation patterns of the fans by increasing the mean grain size and the amount of sediment delivered to the fan during lowstands. These changes may, in turn, affect the morphology of the fan. The characteristics of these fans represent variations of the generalized fan models described in the literature. 12 figures, 1 table.

  13. Breddin's graph for tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Célérier, Bernard; Séranne, Michel

    2001-05-01

    A simple graphical method is proposed to infer the tectonic regime from a fault and slip data set. An abacus is overlaid on a plot of the rake versus strike of the data. This yields the horizontal principal stress directions and a constraint on the stress tensor aspect ratio, in a manner similar to Breddin's graph for two-dimensional strain analysis. The main requirement is that one of the principal stress directions is close to the vertical. This method is illustrated on monophase synthetic and natural data, but is also expected to help sort out multiphase data sets.

  14. Ireland unveils new license regime

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-23

    Ireland has unveiled new terns designed to integrate the licensing regime for oil and gas exploration and development. They apply to new exploration and development authorizations and replace the exclusive offshore licensing terns introduced in 1975. Holders of existing licenses are still subject to the 1975 terms but can choose the new terns under appropriate circumstances. Frontier exploration licenses are currently available to complement the standard and deepwater exploration licenses in use. Rental fees are now spread evenly over the duration of the license, thereby eliminating large upfront payments. Lease extensions also have been introduced to enable operators to judge commerciality of a discovery beyond the set license period.

  15. Ground surface temperature and continental heat gain: uncertainties from underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, Hugo; Matharoo, Gurpreet S.; Smerdon, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature changes at the Earth's surface propagate and are recorded underground as perturbations to the equilibrium thermal regime associated with the heat flow from the Earth's interior. Borehole climatology is concerned with the analysis and interpretation of these downward propagating subsurface temperature anomalies in terms of surface climate. Proper determination of the steady-state geothermal regime is therefore crucial because it is the reference against which climate-induced subsurface temperature anomalies are estimated. Here, we examine the effects of data noise on the determination of the steady-state geothermal regime of the subsurface and the subsequent impact on estimates of ground surface temperature (GST) history and heat gain. We carry out a series of Monte Carlo experiments using 1000 Gaussian noise realizations and depth sections of 100 and 200 m as for steady-state estimates depth intervals, as well as a range of data sampling intervals from 10 m to 0.02 m. Results indicate that typical uncertainties for 50 year averages are on the order of ±0.02 K for the most recent 100 year period. These uncertainties grow with decreasing sampling intervals, reaching about ±0.1 K for a 10 m sampling interval under identical conditions and target period. Uncertainties increase for progressively older periods, reaching ±0.3 K at 500 years before present for a 10 m sampling interval. The uncertainties in reconstructed GST histories for the Northern Hemisphere for the most recent 50 year period can reach a maximum of +/- 0.5 K in some areas. We suggest that continuous logging should be the preferred approach when measuring geothermal data for climate reconstructions, and that for those using the International Heat Flow Commission database for borehole climatology, the steady-state thermal conditions should be estimated from boreholes as deep as possible and using a large fitting depth range (˜100 m).

  16. Ground surface temperature and continental heat gain: Uncertainties from underground.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, Hugo; Matharoo, Gurpreet S.; Smerdon, Jason E.

    2015-04-01

    Temperature changes at the Earth's surface propagate and are recorded underground as perturbations to the equilibrium thermal regime associated with heat flow from the Earth's interior. Interpretation of these downward propagating subsurface temperature anomalies in terms of surface climate is the central role of Borehole Climatology. Robust determination of the steady-state geothermal regime is nevertheless crucial for these efforts, because it is the reference against which climate induced subsurface temperature anomalies are estimated. Here we examine the effects of data noise on the determination of the subsurface steady-state geothermal regime and the subsequent impact on estimates of ground surface temperature (GST) history and heat gain. We perform sets of Monte Carlo experiments using 1000 Gaussian noise realizations and depth sections of 100 and 200 m as depth intervals for steady-state estimates, as well as a range of data sampling intervals from 10 m to 0.02 m. Results indicate that typical uncertainties for 50-year averages are on the order of +/- 0.02 K for the most recent 100-year period. These uncertainties grow with decreasing sampling interval reaching about +/- 0.1 K for a 10-m sampling interval under identical conditions and target period. Uncertainties increase for progressively older periods, reaching +/- 0.3 K at 500 years before present for a 10-m sampling interval. The uncertainties in reconstructed GST histories for the Northern Hemisphere for the most recent 50-yr period can reach a maximum of +/- 0.5 K in some areas. We suggest that continuous logging should be the preferred approach when measuring geothermal data for climate reconstructions, and that for those using the International Heat Flow Commission database for borehole climatology, the steady-state thermal conditions should be estimated from boreholes as deep as possible and using a large fitting depth range (~100 m).

  17. The Isolated Bubble Regime in Pool Nucleate Boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Y. A.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Callaway, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We consider an isolated bubble boiling regime in which vapour bubbles are intermittently produced at a prearranged set of nucleation site on an upward facing overheated wall plane. In this boiling regime, the bubbles depart from the wall and move as separate entities. Except in the matter of rise velocity, the bubbles do not interfere and are independent of one another. However, the rise velocity is dependent on bubble volume concentration in the bulk. Heat transfer properties specific to this regime cannot be described without bubble detachment size, and we apply our previously developed dynamic theory of vapour bubble growth and detachment to determine this size. Bubble growth is presumed to be thermally controlled. Two limiting cases of bubble evolution are considered: the one in which buoyancy prevails in promoting bubble detachment and the one in which surface tension prevails. We prove termination of the isolated regime of pool nucleate boiling to result from one of the four possible causes, depending on relevant parameters values. The first cause consists in the fact that the upward flow of rising bubbles hampers the downward liquid flow, and under certain conditions, prevents the liquid from coming to the wall in an amount that would be sufficient to compensate for vapour removal from the wall. The second cause is due to the lateral coalescence of growing bubbles that are attached to their corresponding nucleation sites, with ensuing generation of larger bubbles and extended vapour patches near the wall. The other two causes involve longitudinal coalescence either 1) immediately in the wall vicinity, accompanied by the establishment of the multiple bubble boiling regime, or 2) in the bulk, with the formation of vapour columns. The longitudinal coalescence in the bulk is shown to be the most important cause. The critical wall temperature and the heat flux density associated with isolated bubble regime termination are found to be functions of the physical and

  18. A surfactant film spreading regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nikishov, V.I.

    1984-06-01

    Interest has recently increased in the study of the mechanisms whereby oil spills spread over sea and ocean surfaces. In the later stages of this process, when the petroleum film thickness becomes sufficiently small, the main forces determining the growth of its horizontal dimensions are surface tension and viscosity. In this case the flow characteristics do not depend on total quantity of spreading substance nor its surface concentration distribution. However, in the final stages of the spreading process the film becomes so thin that it is necessary to consider the effect of surface concentration distribution of the material on the process. Similar problems occur in the study of the spreading of a surfactant in the case where the total quantity of material is small and the surface tension regime sets in quickly. Therefore, the author examines here the spreading of a film in a regime wherein it is necessary to consider the total quantity of surfactant present, initially located on the surface of a viscous incompressible liquid.

  19. Adaptation in Collaborative Governance Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  20. Adaptation in collaborative governance regimes.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program. PMID:25073764

  1. Different regimes of dynamic wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustav, Amberg; Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Shiomi, Junichiro; Physiochemical fluid mechanics Team; Maruyama-Chiashi Laboratory Team

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting, as observed when a droplet contacts a dry solid surface, is important in various engineering processes, such as printing, coating, and lubrication. Our overall aim is to investigate if and how the detailed properties of the solid surface influence the dynamics of wetting. Here we discuss how surface roughness influences the initial dynamic spreading of a partially wetting droplet by studying the spreading on a solid substrate patterned with microstructures just a few micrometers in size. This is complemented by matching numerical simulations. We present a parameter map, based on the properties of the liquid and the solid surface, which identifies qualitatively different spreading regimes, where the spreading speed is limited by either the liquid viscosity, the surface properties, or the liquid inertia. The peculiarities of the different spreading regimes are studied by detailed numerical simulations, in conjuction with experiments. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (J.W. and J.S) and Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (M.D.-Q. and G.A).

  2. Surface heat flow measurements from the East Siberian continental slope and southern Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Matt; Preto, Pedro; Stranne, Christian; Jakobsson, Martin; Koshurnikov, Andrey

    2016-05-01

    Surface heat flow data in the Arctic Ocean are needed to assess hydrocarbon and methane hydrate distributions, and provide constraints into the tectonic origins and nature of underlying crust. However, across broad areas of the Arctic, few published measurements exist. This is true for the outer continental shelf and slope of the East Siberian Sea, and the adjoining deep water ridges and basins. Here we present 21 new surface heat flow measurements from this region of the Arctic Ocean. On the Southern Lomonosov Ridge, the average measured heat flow, uncorrected for effects of sedimentation and topography, is 57 ± 4 mW/m2 (n = 4). On the outer continental shelf and slope of the East Siberian Sea (ESS), the average is 57 ± 10 mW/m2 (n = 16). An anomalously high heat flow of 203 ± 28 mW/m2 was measured at a single station in the Herald Canyon. With the exception of this high heat flow, the new data from the ESS are consistent with predictions for thermally equilibrated lithosphere of continental origin that was last affected by thermotectonic processes in the Cretaceous to early Cenozoic. Variability within the data likely arises from differences in radiogenic heat production within the continental crust and overlying sediments. This can be further explored by comparing the data with geophysical constraints on sediment and crustal thicknesses.

  3. The Role of the Strain History on the Modes of Continental Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, F. A.; Salerno, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    Continental rifts evolve through deformation episodes into a variety of diverse basins with complex structural styles, subsidence and thermal histories, which may include melting. Existing models have probed the role of initial lithospheric rheological layering, geothermal gradients and stretching rates on continental rifting, however continental rifts evolution often includes several extensional phases, which are not easily explained by a single rifting approach. Here, we address the role of episodic stretching on the long-term evolution of continental rifts. By means of numerical modelling we investigate the development of rifting patterns as a consequence of distinct phases of lithospheric extension under different stretching rates, modifying the lithosphere's rheological layering, and intervening cooling, during which the lithosphere regains its original thickness, and their effect on subsequent rifting. The models show that the time-dependent boundary conditions have a fundamental control on lithospheric-scale strain localization/delocalization and, consequently, on the tectonic rifting style and its evolution, resulting in a variety of basins ranging from narrow to wide rifts to hyper-thinned and with diverse melt yield in time, reproducing the first-order features of major basins on Earth. On the base of the rifting history we propose a classification that support the interpretation of rift basins and passive margins.

  4. The limits of seaward spreading and slope instability at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna, imaged by high-resolution 2D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Felix; Krastel, Sebastian; Geersen, Jacob; Behrmann, Jan Hinrich; Ridente, Domenico; Chiocci, Francesco Latino; Bialas, Jörg; Papenberg, Cord; Cukur, Deniz; Urlaub, Morelia; Micallef, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Mount Etna is the largest active volcano in Europe. Instability of its eastern flank is well documented onshore, and continuously monitored by geodetic and InSAR measurements. Little is known, however, about the offshore extension of the eastern volcano flank, defining a serious shortcoming in stability models. In order to better constrain the active tectonics of the continental margin offshore the eastern flank of the volcano, we acquired a new high-resolution 2D reflection seismic dataset. The data provide new insights into the heterogeneous geology and tectonics at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna. The submarine realm is characterized by different blocks, which are controlled by local- and regional tectonics. A compressional regime is found at the toe of the continental margin, which is bound to a complex basin system. Both, the clear link between on- and offshore tectonic structures as well as the compressional regime at the easternmost flank edge, indicate a continental margin gravitational collapse as well as spreading to be present at Mt Etna. Moreover, we find evidence for the offshore southern boundary of the moving flank, which is identified as a right lateral oblique fault north of Catania Canyon. Our findings suggest a coupled volcano edifice/continental margin instability at Mt Etna, demonstrating first order linkage between on- and offshore tectonic processes.

  5. Testing Predictions of Continental Insulation using Oceanic Crustal Thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoggard, Mark; Shorttle, Oliver; White, Nicky

    2016-04-01

    The thermal blanketing effect of continental crust has been predicted to lead to elevated temperatures within the upper mantle beneath supercontinents. Initial break-up is associated with increased magmatism and the generation of flood basalts. Continued rifting and sea-floor spreading lead to a steady reduction of this thermal anomaly. Recently, evidence in support of this behaviour has come from the major element geochemistry of mid-ocean ridge basalts, which suggest excess rifting temperatures of ˜ 150 °C that decay over ˜ 100 Ma. We have collated a global inventory of ˜ 1000 seismic reflection profiles and ˜ 500 wide-angle refraction experiments from the oceanic realm. Data are predominantly located along passive margins, but there are also multiple surveys in the centres of the major oceanic basins. Oceanic crustal thickness has been mapped, taking care to avoid areas of secondary magmatic thickening near seamounts or later thinning such as across transform faults. These crustal thicknesses are a proxy for mantle potential temperature at the time of melt formation beneath a mid-ocean ridge system, allowing us to quantify the amplitude and duration of thermal anomalies generated beneath supercontinents. The Jurassic break-up of the Central Atlantic and the Cretaceous rifting that formed the South Atlantic Ocean are both associated with excess temperatures of ˜ 50 °C that have e-folding times of ˜ 50 Ma. In addition to this background trend, excess temperatures reach > 150 °C around the region of the Rio Grande Rise, associated with the present-day Tristan hotspot. The e-folding time of this more local event is ˜ 10 Ma, which mirrors results obtained for the North Atlantic Ocean south of Iceland. In contrast, crustal thicknesses from the Pacific Ocean reveal approximately constant potential temperature through time. This observation is in agreement with predictions, as the western Pacific was formed by rifting of an oceanic plate. In summary

  6. Regional magnetic anomaly constraints on continental rifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Radially polarized MAGSAT anomalies of North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic lithospheric sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. These major magnetic features apparently preserve their integrity until a superimposed metamorphoric event alters the magnitude and pattern of the anomalies. The longevity of continental scale magnetic anomalies contrasts markedly with that of regional gravity anomalies which tend to reflect predominantly isostatic adjustments associated with neo-tectonism. First observed as a result of NASA's magnetic satellite programs, these anomalies provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans. Accordingly, satellite magnetic observations provide a further tool for investigating continental drift to compliment other lines of evidence in paleoclimatology, paleontology, paleomagnetism, and studies of the radiometric ages and geometric fit of the continents.

  7. Continental crustal composition and lower crustal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The composition of the upper crust is well established as being close to that of granodiorite. The upper crustal composition is reflected in the uniform REE abundances in shales which represent an homogenization of the various REE patterns. This composition can only persist to depths of 10-15 km, for heat flow and geochemical balance reasons. The composition of the total crust is model dependent. One constraint is that it should be capable of generating the upper granodioritic (S.L.) crust by partial melting within the crust. This composition is based on the andesite model, which assumes that the total crust has grown by accretion of island arc material. A representation of the growth rate of the continental crust is shown. The composition of the lower crust, which comprises 60-80% of the continental crust, remains a major unknown factor for models of terrestrial crustal evolution. Two approaches are used to model the lower crust.

  8. A budget for continental growth and denudation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, D.G.; Murray, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Oceanic crustal material on a global scale is re-created every 110 million years. From the data presented it is inferred that potential sialic material is formed at a rate of about 1.35 cubic kilometers per year, including hemipelagic volcanic sediments that accumulate at a rate of about 0.05 cubic kilometer per year. It is estimated that the influx of 1.65 cubic kilometers per year of terrigenous and biogenic sediment is deposited on the deep ocean, and this represents continental denudation. Because all this material is brought into a subduction zone, continental accretion rates, which could include all this material, may be as high as 3.0 cubic kilometers per year with a potential net growth for continents of 1.35 cubic kilometers per year.

  9. Distinct Impacts of Aerosols on an Evolving Continental Cloud System during the RACORO Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, R.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions have been investigated extensively but still remain high uncertainty due to the complexity of cloud microphysical processes under various dynamic and thermodynamic environments. Cloud-resolving Weather Research and Forecast (CR-WRF) model implemented with a two-moment bulk microphysics and a modified Goddard radiation scheme is employed to investigate aerosol effects on different cloud regimes and their transitions associated with a continental cloud system occurring from 25 May to 27 May, 2009 during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. The simulated cloud properties and precipitation for the three different cloud regimes, including shallow cumuli, a deep convective cloud (DCC), and a stratus exhibit overall agreements with airborne and ground-based observations. Sensitivity studies with different aerosol scenarios reveal that the responses of cloud micro- and macrophysics to aerosol loading depend on the cloud regimes with monotonic or non-monotonic trend. Aerosol radiative effects modify the atmospheric thermodynamic condition and change the atmospheric stability, which induce different response from aerosol indirect effects. Our results also indicate that the overall aerosol effects on a cloud complex are distinct from those of the individual cloud types. The aerosol-cloud interaction for the different cloud regimes should be evaluated to assess the aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings on regional and global climate.

  10. Cyclic growth in Atlantic region continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, A. M.

    1986-01-01

    Atlantic region continental crust evolved in successive stages under the influence of regular, approximately 400 Ma-long tectonic cycles. Data point to a variety of operative tectonic processes ranging from widespread ocean floor consumption (Wilson cycle) to entirely ensialic (Ampferer-style subduction or simple crustal attenuation-compression). Different processes may have operated concurrently in some or different belts. Resolving this remains the major challenge.

  11. Workshop on the Growth of Continental Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, Lewis D. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Constraints and observations were discussed on a fundamental unsolved problem of global scale relating to the growth of planetary crusts. All of the terrestrial planets were considered, but emphasis was placed on the Earth's continental crust. The title of each session is: (1) Extraterrestrial crustal growth and destruction; (2) Constraints for observations and measurements of terrestrial rocks; (3) Models of crustal growth and destruction; and (4) Process of crustal growth and destruction.

  12. Ocean processes at the Antarctic continental slope.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Karen J; Schmidtko, Sunke; Heuzé, Céline; Kaiser, Jan; Jickells, Timothy D; Queste, Bastien Y; Stevens, David P; Wadley, Martin; Thompson, Andrew F; Fielding, Sophie; Guihen, Damien; Creed, Elizabeth; Ridley, Jeff K; Smith, Walker

    2014-07-13

    The Antarctic continental shelves and slopes occupy relatively small areas, but, nevertheless, are important for global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. Processes of water mass transformation through sea ice formation/melting and ocean-atmosphere interaction are key to the formation of deep and bottom waters as well as determining the heat flux beneath ice shelves. Climate models, however, struggle to capture these physical processes and are unable to reproduce water mass properties of the region. Dynamics at the continental slope are key for correctly modelling climate, yet their small spatial scale presents challenges both for ocean modelling and for observational studies. Cross-slope exchange processes are also vital for the flux of nutrients such as iron from the continental shelf into the mixed layer of the Southern Ocean. An iron-cycling model embedded in an eddy-permitting ocean model reveals the importance of sedimentary iron in fertilizing parts of the Southern Ocean. Ocean gliders play a key role in improving our ability to observe and understand these small-scale processes at the continental shelf break. The Gliders: Excellent New Tools for Observing the Ocean (GENTOO) project deployed three Seagliders for up to two months in early 2012 to sample the water to the east of the Antarctic Peninsula in unprecedented temporal and spatial detail. The glider data resolve small-scale exchange processes across the shelf-break front (the Antarctic Slope Front) and the front's biogeochemical signature. GENTOO demonstrated the capability of ocean gliders to play a key role in a future multi-disciplinary Southern Ocean observing system. PMID:24891389

  13. Iceberg scouring on the Norwegian continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, R.

    1983-05-01

    This paper is a condensed version of parts of a Dr. ing. thesis to be presented during 1983. The first part of the paper deals with the regional distribution of iceberg scouring on the Norwegian continental shelf, and some general aspects related to it. The second part deals with iceberg scouring as a local phenomenon and its relation to the sea floor topography, sediment distribution, and geological and geotechnical properties of the sediments.

  14. Precipitation of Continental Origin over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Agudelo, J. A.; Dominguez, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Amazon forest receives high amounts of moisture from the tropical Atlantic. A significant part of this moisture is returned back to the atmosphere by the forest, and further redistributed to the rest of the continent by the meridional flow imposed by the Andes. Thus, the land-atmosphere interaction between the Amazon forest and the large-scale flow affects not only the forest itself but also the downstream regions. We develop a method to quantify the precipitation of continental origin over South America, and identify the contribution that selected source regions make to continental precipitation. The average annual cycle of precipitation of continental origin for the five-year period 2000-2004 shows a band of high values aligned along the northwest-southeast direction, from southern Peru to northeastern Argentina. The lowest values of precipitation of continental origin occur upstream, over the northeastern coast of South America. Precipitation that originates as moisture from the Amazon forest shows maximum values over the western side of the Amazon, east of the Andes, especially over southern Peru. The Amazon forest also contributes to precipitation over La Plata River Basin (LPRB) and the Pacific coast of Colombia. During its dry season, up to 29.3% of the precipitation over LPRB originates as moisture from the Amazon forest. Throughout the year, the contributions to precipitation over LPRB by the Amazon forest and LPRB (recycled precipitation) are in the same range, but out of phase. The average contribution of the rest of the continent to precipitation over LPRB is smaller but of the same order as that of the Amazon and LPRB.

  15. Ocean processes at the Antarctic continental slope

    PubMed Central

    Heywood, Karen J.; Schmidtko, Sunke; Heuzé, Céline; Kaiser, Jan; Jickells, Timothy D.; Queste, Bastien Y.; Stevens, David P.; Wadley, Martin; Thompson, Andrew F.; Fielding, Sophie; Guihen, Damien; Creed, Elizabeth; Ridley, Jeff K.; Smith, Walker

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic continental shelves and slopes occupy relatively small areas, but, nevertheless, are important for global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. Processes of water mass transformation through sea ice formation/melting and ocean–atmosphere interaction are key to the formation of deep and bottom waters as well as determining the heat flux beneath ice shelves. Climate models, however, struggle to capture these physical processes and are unable to reproduce water mass properties of the region. Dynamics at the continental slope are key for correctly modelling climate, yet their small spatial scale presents challenges both for ocean modelling and for observational studies. Cross-slope exchange processes are also vital for the flux of nutrients such as iron from the continental shelf into the mixed layer of the Southern Ocean. An iron-cycling model embedded in an eddy-permitting ocean model reveals the importance of sedimentary iron in fertilizing parts of the Southern Ocean. Ocean gliders play a key role in improving our ability to observe and understand these small-scale processes at the continental shelf break. The Gliders: Excellent New Tools for Observing the Ocean (GENTOO) project deployed three Seagliders for up to two months in early 2012 to sample the water to the east of the Antarctic Peninsula in unprecedented temporal and spatial detail. The glider data resolve small-scale exchange processes across the shelf-break front (the Antarctic Slope Front) and the front's biogeochemical signature. GENTOO demonstrated the capability of ocean gliders to play a key role in a future multi-disciplinary Southern Ocean observing system. PMID:24891389

  16. Thermal expansion in nanoresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancardo Viotti, Agustín; Monastra, Alejandro G.; Moreno, Mariano F.; Florencia Carusela, M.

    2016-08-01

    Inspired by some recent experiments and numerical works related to nanoresonators, we perform classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermal expansion and the ability of the device to act as a strain sensor assisted by thermally-induced vibrations. The proposed model consists in a chain of atoms interacting anharmonically with both ends clamped to thermal reservoirs. We analyze the thermal expansion and resonant frequency shifts as a function of temperature and the applied strain. For the transversal modes the shift is approximately linear with strain. We also present analytical results from canonical calculations in the harmonic approximation showing that thermal expansion is uniform along the device. This prediction also works when the system operates in a nonlinear oscillation regime at moderate and high temperatures.

  17. Rifting of Continental Interiors: Some New Geophysical Data and Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, G. R.

    2005-12-01

    Rifting is one of the major processes that affect the evolution of the continents. This process sometimes leads to continental breakup and the formation of new oceans, but more often does not. This is presumably due to extension not progressing sufficiently to form a new plate margin resulting in a structure, which remains isolated in an intra-plate environment. The Southern Oklahoma aulacogen is such a feature, and the continental portion of the East African rift system may be a modern example. As more detailed geophysical and geological studies of rifts have become available in recent years, a complex picture of rift structure and evolution has emerged. Global patterns that reveal the connections between lithospheric structure (deep and shallow), magmatism (amount and style), amount of extension, uplift, and older structures remain elusive. However, our geophysical studies of modern and paleo rifts in North America, East Africa, and Europe makes it possible to make some general observations: 1). Magmatism in rifts is modest without the presence of a (pre-existing?) thermal anomaly in the mantle. 2). Magmatic modification of the crust takes many forms which probably depend on the nature of older structures present and the state of the lithosphere when rifting is initiated (i.e. cold vs. hot; fertility), 3) There is no clear relation between amount of extension and the amount of magmatic modification of the crust. 4) Brittle deformation in the upper crustal is complex, often asymmetrical and older features often play important roles in focusing deformation. However on a lithospheric scale, rift structure is usually symmetrical. 5) A better understanding of rift processes is emerging as we achieve higher levels of integration of a wide variety of geoscience data.

  18. He-accreting white dwarfs: accretion regimes and final outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersanti, L.; Tornambé, A.; Yungelson, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    The behaviour of carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs) subject to direct helium accretion is extensively studied. We aim to analyse the thermal response of an accreting WD to mass deposition at different timescales. The analysis has been performed for initial WD masses and accretion rates in the range 0.60-1.02 M⊙ and 10-9-10-5 M⊙ yr-1, respectively. Thermal regimes in the parameter space MWD-dot{M}_He leading to formation of red-giant-like structures, steady burning of He, and mild, strong and dynamical flashes have been identified and the transition between these regimes has been studied in detail. In particular, the physical properties of WDs experiencing the He-flash accretion regime have been investigated to determine the mass retention efficiency as a function of the accretor total mass and accretion rate. We also discuss to what extent the building up of a He-rich layer via H burning could be described according to the behaviour of models accreting He-rich matter directly. Polynomial fits to the obtained results are provided for use in binary population synthesis computations. Several applications for close binary systems with He-rich donors and CO WD accretors are considered and the relevance of the results for interpreting He novae is discussed.

  19. Small quantum absorption refrigerator in the transient regime: Time scales, enhanced cooling, and entanglement.

    PubMed

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    A small quantum absorption refrigerator, consisting of three qubits, is discussed in the transient regime. We discuss time scales for coherent dynamics, damping, and approach to the steady state, and we study cooling and entanglement. We observe that cooling can be enhanced in the transient regime, in the sense that lower temperatures can be achieved compared to the steady-state regime. This is a consequence of coherent dynamics but can occur even when this dynamics is strongly damped by the dissipative thermal environment, and we note that precise control over couplings or timing is not needed to achieve enhanced cooling. We also show that the amount of entanglement present in the refrigerator can be much larger in the transient regime compared to the steady state. These results are of relevance to future implementations of quantum thermal machines. PMID:26764626

  20. Small quantum absorption refrigerator in the transient regime: Time scales, enhanced cooling, and entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    A small quantum absorption refrigerator, consisting of three qubits, is discussed in the transient regime. We discuss time scales for coherent dynamics, damping, and approach to the steady state, and we study cooling and entanglement. We observe that cooling can be enhanced in the transient regime, in the sense that lower temperatures can be achieved compared to the steady-state regime. This is a consequence of coherent dynamics but can occur even when this dynamics is strongly damped by the dissipative thermal environment, and we note that precise control over couplings or timing is not needed to achieve enhanced cooling. We also show that the amount of entanglement present in the refrigerator can be much larger in the transient regime compared to the steady state. These results are of relevance to future implementations of quantum thermal machines.

  1. Abrupt plate accelerations shape rifted continental margins.

    PubMed

    Brune, Sascha; Williams, Simon E; Butterworth, Nathaniel P; Müller, R Dietmar

    2016-08-11

    Rifted margins are formed by persistent stretching of continental lithosphere until breakup is achieved. It is well known that strain-rate-dependent processes control rift evolution, yet quantified extension histories of Earth's major passive margins have become available only recently. Here we investigate rift kinematics globally by applying a new geotectonic analysis technique to revised global plate reconstructions. We find that rifted margins feature an initial, slow rift phase (less than ten millimetres per year, full rate) and that an abrupt increase of plate divergence introduces a fast rift phase. Plate acceleration takes place before continental rupture and considerable margin area is created during each phase. We reproduce the rapid transition from slow to fast extension using analytical and numerical modelling with constant force boundary conditions. The extension models suggest that the two-phase velocity behaviour is caused by a rift-intrinsic strength--velocity feedback, which can be robustly inferred for diverse lithosphere configurations and rheologies. Our results explain differences between proximal and distal margin areas and demonstrate that abrupt plate acceleration during continental rifting is controlled by the nonlinear decay of the resistive rift strength force. This mechanism provides an explanation for several previously unexplained rapid absolute plate motion changes, offering new insights into the balance of plate driving forces through time. PMID:27437571

  2. The Role of Continental-scale Landmass in Monsoonal and Global Precipitation Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.

    2008-01-01

    It was argued by Chao and Chen (20011) that land-sea thermal contrast on the continental scale is not a necessary condition for monsoons and that a monsoon is an ITCZ that have moved into the subtropics in its annual cycle of latitudinal movement. Chao and Chen supported their contention by GCM experiments in which they replaced landmass by ocean and were able to generate monsoons. However, land-sea thermal contrast does exist and must play a role in monsoonal rainfall distribution. Land-sea thermal contrast is one facet of continental-scale landmass. in this article the roles of land-sea thermal contrast in monsoonal rainfall distribution and in middle latitude storm tracks are examined through GCM experiments. Comparison of a set of two GCM experiments in which the sea surface temperature (SST) from observations is prescribed from observations with and without a six-month delay reveals the role of land-sea thermal contrast. These experiments confirm that land-sea thermal contrast is not a necessary condition for monsoons and that a monsoon should be viewed as an ITCZ displaced into the subtropics, instead of a continent-sized giant sea breeze. However, land-sea thermal contrast does have influence on the distribution of monsoonal rainfall. The temperature rise over south Asia as the season moves into summer helps the Asian monsoon to start early. However, this role is not the same as that of the land-sea thermal contrast as in the conventional explanation for the cause of monsoon. The heated Landmass in summer contributes to the displacement of 1TCZ into the subtropics Also, the heated landmass in summer, by drawing moisture toward itself, limits the range of the summer storm tracks in the middle latitude oceans. On the other band, in winter the landmass does not present a competition for rainfall and thus allow middle latitude storm tracks to expand over the ocean.

  3. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  4. On the Evolution of Glaciated Continental Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverre Laberg, Jan; Rydningen, Tom Arne; Safronova, Polina A.; Forwick, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Glaciated continental margins, continental margins where a grounded ice sheet repeatedly has been at or near the shelf break, are found at both northern and southern high-latitudes. Their evolution are in several aspects different from their low-latitude counterparts where eustatic sea-level variations possess a fundamental control on their evolution and where fluvial systems provide the main sediment input. From studies of the Norwegian - Barents Sea - Svalbard and NE Greenland continental margins we propose the following factors as the main control on the evolution of glaciated continental margins: 1) Pre-glacial relief controlling the accommodation space, 2) Ice sheet glaciology including the location of fast-flowing ice streams where source area morphology exerts a fundamental control, 3) Composition of the glacigenic sediments where the clay content in previous studies have been found to be important, and 4) Sea-level controlled both by eustacy and isostacy. From three case studies, 1) the western Barents Sea, 2) part of the North Norwegian (Troms), and 3) the Mid-Norwegian margin, the influence on these factors for the sea-floor morphology, sedimentary processes of the continental slope - deep sea and continental margin architecture are discussed. The pre-glacial relief of the mid-Norwegian and Troms margins relates to the onset of rifting and plate break-up from the early Cenozoic while for the SW Barents Sea, plate shear was followed by rifting. A wide zone of extended continental crust occurs offshore mid-Norway while this zone is much narrower offshore Troms leading to a more pronounced pre-glacial relief. Regarding sediment delivery and ice sheet glaciology the western Barents Sea exemplifies very high sediment input corresponding to an estimated average erosion of the source area of ~0.4 mm/yr (SW Barents Sea), much of which is related to subglacial erosion of Mesozoic - Cenozoic sedimentary rocks from large paleo-ice streams. The mid-Norwegian margin

  5. Patterns of regional hydroclimatic shifts: An analysis of changing hydrologic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopersmith, E. J.; Minsker, B. S.; Sivapalan, M.

    2014-03-01

    Temporal shifts in precipitation and runoff regime curves appear throughout the continental United States, but differ from region to region. This paper explores these regime shifts by building upon a hydroclimatic classification system that partitions the United States into clusters of similarly behaved catchments using four simple hydroclimatic indicators. Hydroclimate data from over four hundred catchments over a 55 year period (belonging to the MOPEX data set) are analyzed to reveal how the indicators have shifted before and after 1970, before and after 1975, and before and after 1980. Statistically significant hydroclimatic changes in these indicators are explored qualitatively, suggesting which catchments today might resemble other catchments tomorrow. Thus, a preview of current locations in one class under future conditions is provided by observing existing locations of another class. The classification system structure enables organization of these data, allowing patterns of regime change to emerge without highly specified models at each individual site. Regional analyses explore changes in mean seasonal precipitation/runoff regimes, including shifts in the daily variability of precipitation and runoff. Additionally, changes in regime curves of minimum and maximum precipitation/runoff observations are analyzed and discussed. Results indicate that after 1980, classifications typically found in the southeastern quarter of the United States have expanded northward and westward. Regionally, the Midwest and Rocky Mountains seem to demonstrate more frequent, but less intense storms after 1980, while southeastern catchments receive much less water in the form of precipitation and runoff than in previous years.

  6. Spectator effects during Leptogenesis in the strong washout regime

    SciTech Connect

    Garbrecht, Björn; Schwaller, Pedro E-mail: pedro.schwaller@cern.ch

    2014-10-01

    By including spectator fields into the Boltzmann equations for Leptogenesis, we show that partially equilibrated spectator interactions can have a significant impact on the freeze-out value of the asymmetry in the strong washout regime. The final asymmetry is typically increased, since partially equilibrated spectators ''hide'' a part of the asymmetry from washout. We study examples with leptonic and non-leptonic spectator processes, assuming thermal initial conditions, and find up to 50% enhanced asymmetries compared to the limit of fully equilibrated spectators. Together with a comprehensive overview of the equilibration temperatures for various Standard Model processes, the numerical results indicate the ranges when the limiting cases of either fully equilibrated or negligible spectator fields are applicable and when they are not. Our findings also indicate an increased sensitivity to initial conditions and finite density corrections even in the strong washout regime.

  7. Regimes of strong light-matter coupling under incoherent excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, E. del; Laussy, F. P.

    2011-10-15

    We study a two-level system (atom, superconducting qubit, or quantum dot) strongly coupled to a single photonic mode of a cavity, in the presence of incoherent pumping and including detuning and dephasing. This system displays a striking quantum-to-classical transition. On the grounds of several approximations that reproduce to various degrees exact results obtained numerically, we separate five regimes of operations, that we term ''linear,''''quantum,''''lasing,''''quenching,'' and ''thermal.'' In the fully quantized picture, the lasing regime arises as a condensation of dressed states and manifests itself as a Mollow triplet structure in the direct emitter photoluminescence spectrum, which embeds fundamental features of the full-field quantization description of light-matter interaction.

  8. On the heat capacity of elements in WMD regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Sebatien

    2014-03-01

    Once thought to get simpler with increasing pressure, elemental systems have been discovered to exhibit complex structures and multiple phases at high pressure. For carbon, QMD/PIMC simulations have been performed and the results are guiding alternative modelling methodologies for constructing a carbon equation-of-state covering the warm dense matter regime. One of the main results of our new QMD/PIMC carbon equation of state is that the decay of the ion-thermal specific heat with temperature is much faster than previously expected. An important question is whether this is only found in carbon and not other element. In this presentation, based on QMD calculations for several elements, we explore trends in the transition from condensed matter to warm dense matter regime.

  9. When do jammed sphere packings have a valid linear regime?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Carl; Liu, Andrea; Nagel, Sidney

    2014-03-01

    The physics of jamming can be studied in its purest form in packings of soft spheres at zero temperature. One of the successes of this approach is that bulk material properties, such as the elastic moduli or density of normal modes, can be predicted solely from the distance of the system to the jamming transition. Such properties are both defined and measured in the linear-response regime. It is thus tacitly assumed that the harmonic approximation to the local energy landscape can capture the meaningful physics, and it is therefore essential to delineate when this assumption is valid. We will examine the regime of validity of the harmonic approximation in jammed sphere packings as a function of system size and density. We will also discuss the crossover from linear response of the zero-temperature jammed solid to thermal behavior at nonzero temperatures.

  10. Continental breakup and its effect on MORB chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, P. A.; Regelous, M.; Beier, C.; Haase, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    The formation and breakup of supercontinents has major influences on the climate, sealevel and the biosphere on a global scale. The question of possible effects of a supercontinent on mantle convection and thus spreading in the ocean basins has been recently addressed by various studies, focused on numerical modelling. These studies predict higher mantle temperatures on the order of 100°C higher due to the effect of 'continental insulation'. This temperature difference would amplify the effects on sealevel and volcanic CO2 output associated with creation of new spreading centres. However, there is as yet no direct geochemical evidence that could confirm or quantify the continental insulation effect. We have sampled 340 fresh glasses from 30 different sites drilled into old oceanic crust (6-170 Ma) and determined their chemical composition using electron microprobe and ICP-MS techniques. The oldest MORB recovered from the Atlantic and Indian Oceans have lower Na72, higher Fe72 than zero-age MORB. If interpreted as the effects of mantle potential temperature, this chemical difference indicates a mantle source hotter by 50-150°C depending on primary melt composition and applied geothermometry. Higher mantle potential temperatures during the Mesozoic are not a global phenomena but instead restricted to the proto-Atlantic and Indian Ocean. Zero-age MORB from the juvenile Red Sea - Gulf of Aden have similar major element compositions, indicating that higher mantle temperatures beneath young ocean basins result from continental insulation. A subset of about 120 samples has been also analysed for trace element composition using laser ablation and solution ICPMS techniques. These samples are representative for our ancient MORB database in terms of age and geological setting. Trace element ratios sensitive to the degree of partial melting or source fertility such as La/Sm, Sm/Yb, La/Yb or (Dy/Yb)N are positively correlated with fractionation corrected Na2O and negatively

  11. Arctic and Antarctic submarine gullies—A comparison of high latitude continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, J. A.; Forwick, M.; Laberg, J. S.; Vorren, T. O.; Larter, R. D.; Graham, A. G. C.; Baeten, N. J.; Amundsen, H. B.

    2013-11-01

    Submarine gullies are common features of high latitude continental slopes and, over the last decade, have been shown to play a key role in continental margin evolution, submarine erosion, downslope sediment transport, slope deposits, and the architecture of petroleum reservoirs. However, the processes that form these gullies, the timescales over which they develop, and the environmental controls influencing their morphology remain poorly constrained. We present the first systematic and comparative analysis between Arctic and Antarctic gullies with the aim of identifying differences in slope character, from which we infer differences in processes operating in these environments. Quantitative analysis of multibeam echosounder data along 2441 km of the continental shelf and upper slope and morphometric signatures of over 1450 gullies show that six geomorphically distinct gully types exist on high latitude continental margins. We identify distinct differences between Arctic and Antarctic gully morphologies. In the Arctic data sets, deep relief (> 30 m gully incision depth at 50 m below the shelf edge) and shelf-incising gullies are lacking. These differences have implications for the timescales over which the gullies were formed and for the magnitude of the flows that formed them. We consider two hypotheses for these differences: (1) some Antarctic gullies developed through several glacial cycles; and (2) larger Antarctic gullies were formed since the Last Glacial Maximum as a result of erosive flows (i.e., sediment-laden subglacial meltwater) being more abundant on parts of the Antarctic margin over longer timescales. A second difference is that unique gully signatures are observed on Arctic and on Antarctic margins. Environmental controls, such as the oceanographic regime and geotechnical differences, may lead to particular styles of gully erosion observed on Arctic and Antarctic margins.

  12. Detrital Zircon Record and Continental Growth: Differentiating Crustal Generation versus Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, Peter; Hawkesworth, Chris; Dhuime, Bruno; Kemp, Tony; Prave, Tony

    2010-05-01

    The detrital (and magmatic) zircon record is being increasingly used to understand the rate, duration and process of formation of continental crust. Compilations of zircons have identified peaks of ages of crystallisation and crust formation. Taken at face value these peaks suggest that continental crust formation is episodic with significant pulses of juvenile magmatism and crustal growth in the late Archean and Paleoproterozoic (2.7 Ga and 1.9 Ga), and with only subdued addition in the Phanerozoic. Punctuated crustal growth remains difficult to explain by global changes in plate tectonic regimes, and so it is typically attributed to mantle plume activity. However, the andesitic composition of continental crust and evidence that plate tectonics has been active since at least 3.0 Ga suggests magmatic arcs should be the major site of continental growth. Alternatively, we argue that peaks reflect variations in preservation potential in relation to tectonic setting and that peaks correspond with phases of supercontinent assembly: collisional belts have high preservation potential whereas magmatic arcs, which are sites for significant crustal generation, have a low preservation potential. The detrital zircon record can also be used to unravel tectonic setting. The key features of zircons sampled in different tectonic settings are (i) the time between crystallisation and incorporation into the sedimentary record, and (ii) the age distributions. The detrital record from magmatic arcs yields zircons with crystallisation ages close to that of the host sediment, and little range in ages. Other settings yield large differences between the ages of crystallisation and that of sedimentation, reflecting the history of the pre-existing crust, and the extent to which there was magmatism close to the time of sedimentation. The most marked example is for divergent margins that may be associated with little magmatism that crystallises zircon, and simply record peaks of older ages

  13. The impact of U.S. continental outflow on ozone and aerosol distributions over the western Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. E.; Gregory, G. L.; Barrick, J. D. W.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Sachse, G. W.; Bagwell, D.; Shipham, M. C.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    Aircraft measurements of selected trace gas species, aerosols, and meteorological parameters were performed in the lower troposphere off the U.S. east coast during August and September 1989 as part of the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) expedition. In this paper, we examine these data to assess the impact of continental outflow on western Atlantic O3 and small aerosol budgets. Results show that mixed layer (ML) O3 concentrations and small aerosol number densities (Np) were enhanced by factors of 3 and 6, respectively, within air masses of predominantly continental origin compared with clean maritime background air. These enhancements exhibited a marked altitude dependence, declining rapidly above the ML to the point where only slight to moderate differences in O3 and Np, respectively, were notable above 2.4 km. Within continentally influenced ML's, both O3 and Np were correlated with CO, exhibiting linear regression slopes averaging 0.4 ppbv (O3)/ppbv(CO) for O3 and 7.7 (particles/cc)/ppbv(CO) for Np and indicating a primarily anthropogenic origin for the observed enhancement of these species. Comparisons between profiles in continental and background maritime air masses suggest that photochemical production below 1.4-km altitude adds over 10% to western Atlantic tropospheric column O3 abundance in continental outflow regimes. For aerosols, eastward advection of low-level continental air contributes an average net flux of 2.8 metric tons of submicron (accumulation mode) particles per kilometer of shoreline per day to the western Atlantic troposphere.

  14. Geodynamic models of continental subduction and obduction of overriding plate forearc oceanic lithosphere on top of continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Sarah J.; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, Joao C.

    2015-07-01

    Continental subduction takes place in the final stage of subduction when all oceanic lithosphere is consumed and continental passive margin is pulled into the mantle. When the overriding plate is oceanic, dense forearc oceanic lithosphere might be obducted onto light continental crust forming an ophiolite (Tethyan-style ophiolite obduction). Four-dimensional dynamic analog subduction models have been constructed to evaluate the mechanical feasibility of continental subduction and forearc oceanic lithosphere obduction on top of continental crust. The roles of continental crust thickness, passive margin length, subducting lithosphere thickness, and overriding plate thickness were investigated to determine the maximum continental subduction depth, maximum forearc obduction distance, and forearc deformation during continental subduction. Our buoyancy-driven experiments indicate that deep continental subduction occurs in most circumstances (down to ~560 km) and that obduction of dense oceanic forearc lithosphere on top of light continental crust is mechanically feasible. Maximum obduction distances are relatively small (~26-37 km) but are sufficient to explain obduction of short ophiolite sheets, such as observed in New Caledonia. When including the thin (5-10 km thick) accretionary wedge of off-scraped deep sea sediments, oceanic crust, and mantle, then maximum obduction distances are much larger, ~60-160 km, sufficient to account for the obducted Northland Allochthon in New Zealand. Results indicate that increasing continental crust thickness decreases continental subduction depth, whereas increasing passive margin length and subducting lithosphere thickness increases continental subduction depth. Notably, during continental subduction, backarc extension continues, while forearc deformation (shortening) increases moderately compared to the preceding phase of normal (oceanic) subduction.

  15. A changing nutrient regime in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, David W.; Rebuck, Nathan D.; Thomas, Maura A.; Karp-Boss, Lee; Gettings, Rachel M.

    2010-04-01

    Recent oceanographic observations and a retrospective analysis of nutrients and hydrography over the past five decades have revealed that the principal source of nutrients to the Gulf of Maine, the deep, nutrient-rich continental slope waters that enter at depth through the Northeast Channel, may have become less important to the Gulf's nutrient load. Since the 1970s, the deeper waters in the interior Gulf of Maine (>100 m) have become fresher and cooler, with lower nitrate (NO 3) but higher silicate (Si(OH) 4) concentrations. Prior to this decade, nitrate concentrations in the Gulf normally exceeded silicate by 4-5 μM, but now silicate and nitrate are nearly equal. These changes only partially correspond with that expected from deep slope water fluxes correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, and are opposite to patterns in freshwater discharges from the major rivers in the region. We suggest that accelerated melting in the Arctic and concomitant freshening of the Labrador Sea in recent decades have likely increased the equatorward baroclinic transport of the inner limb of the Labrador Current that flows over the broad continental shelf from the Grand Banks of Newfoundland to the Gulf of Maine. That current system now brings a greater fraction of colder and fresher deep shelf waters into the Gulf than warmer and saltier offshore slope waters which were previously thought to dominate the flux of nutrients. Those deep shelf waters reflect nitrate losses from sediment denitrification and silicate accumulations from rivers and in situ regeneration, which together are altering the nutrient regime and potentially the structure of the planktonic ecosystem.

  16. H2O-fluid-saturated melting of subducted continental crust facilitates exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure rocks in continental subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrousse, L.; Duretz, T.; Gerya, T.

    2015-10-01

    We present two-dimensional numerical models of plate subduction and collision inspired by the Scandinavian Caledonian orogeny to investigate the possible impact of continental crust partial melting on the exhumation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks. Three possible reactions were tested: low temperature solidus representing H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting, and two end-member reaction curves for dehydration melting. Thermo-mechanical effects of partial melting were implemented as (1) a viscosity decrease as a determined rheologically critical melt percentage was reached (here 0.1), (2) a change in effective heat capacity and adiabatic heating/cooling accounting for a latent heat term in the heat equation. Among the 3 tested reactions, only H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting drastically modifies the collision dynamics from the non-melting reference model holding all other parameters constant. A substantially low general viscosity truncation (here 1017 Pa s) is needed to properly resolve the effect of partial melting on deep collision processes. Low temperature melting indeed induces the development of a low viscosity buoyant plume prior to slab detachment, where migmatites exhume from UHP conditions at rates and with pressure-temperature paths similar to the natural values acknowledged for the Norwegian Caledonides. High temperature melting has no drastic influence on early collision dynamics. While positive buoyancy remains the first order driver for the exhumation of buried continental rocks, exhumation initiates in these cases with eduction subsequent to slab detachment. Melting and formation of a migmatite plume can later occur along decompression path while continental crust undergoes thermal reequilibration at temperatures above 900 °C. Some of the partially molten material can also relaminate in the overriding plate rather than exhume within the collision zone. Even if minor in terms of amount of magma produced, H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting

  17. Southern African continental margin: Dynamic processes of a transform margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsiegla, N.; Stankiewicz, J.; Gohl, K.; Ryberg, T.; Uenzelmann-Neben, G.

    2009-03-01

    Dynamic processes at sheared margins associated with the formation of sedimentary basins and marginal ridges are poorly understood. The southern African margin provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the deep crustal structure of a transform margin and to characterize processes acting at these margins by studying the Agulhas-Falkland Fracture Zone, the Outeniqua Basin, and the Diaz Marginal Ridge. To do this, we present the results of the combined seismic land-sea experiments of the Agulhas-Karoo Geoscience Transect. Detailed velocity-depth models show crustal thicknesses varying from ˜42 km beneath the Cape Fold Belt to ˜28 km beneath the shelf. The Agulhas-Falkland Fracture Zone is embedded in a 50 km wide transitional zone between continental and oceanic crust. The oceanic crust farther south exhibits relatively low average crustal velocities (˜6.0 km/s), which can possibly be attributed to transform-ridge intersection processes and the thermal effects of the adjacent