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Sample records for continuing medical education

  1. Toward Continuous Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Roni F

    2005-01-01

    While traditional continuing medical education (CME) courses increase participants' knowledge, they have minimal impact on the more relevant end points of physician behavior and patient outcomes. The interactive potential of online CME and its flexibility in time and place offer potential improvements over traditional CME. However, more emphasis should be placed on continuing education that occurs when clinicians search for answers to questions that arise in clinical practice, instead of that which occurs at an arbitrary time designated for CME. The use of learning portfolios and informationists can be integrated with self-directed CME to help foster a culture of lifelong learning. PMID:15693934

  2. Instructional Technology and Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, George E.; Harless, William G.

    How has continuing medical education fared under instructional technology? For this reappraisal, the authors review the use of tapes, slides and film, in the medical profession in the U.S. and in the British Isles; radio and telephone, television, programed instruction, and computers (in their three-fold functions as retrievers of information,…

  3. Continuing Medical Education: The Norwegian Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm, H. A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The Norwegian Medical Association is given responsibility for training and continuing medical education by the government. Government financial support enables the association to provide courses without support from the pharmaceutical industry. Current emphases include doctors as individual learners, as counselors, and as mentors. (SK)

  4. Continuing Medical Education, Perspectives, Problems, Prognosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Robert K.

    Predicting that continuing medical education (CME) will be mandatory for doctors within five years, this book traces CME's historical antecedents, analyzes the forces arrayed for and against it, and offers guidelines for its realistic use in a broad program of improving health care. An examination is made of: the evolution of undergraduate and…

  5. Online Continuing Medical Education in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwadie, Adnan D.

    2013-01-01

    As the largest country in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and its health care system are well positioned to embark on an online learning intervention so that health care providers in all areas of the country have the resources for updating their professional knowledge and skills. After a brief introduction, online continuing medical education is…

  6. Continuing medical education in Turkey: Recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Yaman, Hakan

    2002-01-01

    Background The Turkish Association of Medicine founded a Continuing Medical Education Accreditation Committee in 1993 to evaluate and accredit scientific meetings and publications. The aims of this project were to raise the standards of meetings and to introduce compulsory revalidation and re-certification for physicians in Turkey. Discussion Since the year 1994, 2348 applications to the Continuing Medical Education board have been made (mostly for scientific meetings), and 95% of these applications have been accepted. Physicians received 139.014 credits during this time. This number is increasing every year. Meeting organisers' demand for such a kind of evaluation is increasing, because participants increasingly request it. Summary Efforts for revalidation and re-certification of physicians have not been completely successful yet. In the near future the Co-ordination Council of Medical Speciality Societies is going to oblige member associations to establish speciality boards. This will be the first step to the conventional use of Continuing Medical Education credits in occupational evaluation. Time-limited re-certification of physicians is the principal goal of Turkish Medical Association. Efforts to implement this change in legislation are being made. PMID:12074763

  7. Continuing medical education: a personal view.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    Over many generations doctors have kept up to date in ways which reflect their own learning styles. The current fashion for formalised and policed continuing medical education may prove ineffective unless it is recognised that individual needs must be taken into account. Attendance at formal courses based on lectures and papers may not suit a large proportion of those who attend to acquire the necessary points to satisfy their royal college. The ability to show that health care teams are up to date should come from effective clinical audit, which should also identify local educational needs. Images p995-a PMID:7728041

  8. Continuing medical education in oncology in Europe.

    PubMed

    Armand, J P; Costa, A; Geraghty, J; O'Higgins, N; Broe, P J; Holmberg, L; Sleijfer, D T; de Toeuf, J

    1996-07-01

    A European Conference on Continuing Medical Education (CME) in Oncology was designed and organised in Dublin (Ireland), on 12th and 13th October 1995 by the European School of Oncology in collaboration with University College Dublin and with the financial support of the European Commission (Europe Against Cancer Programme). Two experts were invited from each Member State and all attended the Conference with the sole exception of the representatives of Luxembourg, who did not attend due to unexpected important commitments. Observers were invited to contribute to the discussion as representatives of organisations that were involved either directly or indirectly in CME. The Conference took the format of a plenary session coupled with the identification of five discussion groups formed to debate key areas in CME at a European level in oncology (Table 1). As a result of these discussions and subsequent consultations, an agreement was reached on the following statements: (a) Continuing Medical Education (CME) is an ethical duty and an individual responsibility for each doctor. Although CME should remain voluntary at the present time, it is nevertheless a professional obligation since almost 50% of medical knowledge becomes obsolete after ten years. It should be organised with clear guidelines for medical personnel working in hospitals, in primary health care and in private practice. (b) The CME system within the European Union (EU) should remain self-directed without the necessity for interval examinations: it should be interdisciplinary and must be driven and controlled by the profession itself. (c) A common concept and system within a CME framework may have a considerable impact on EU integration. It should certainly be developed, maintained and monitored at national level but on the basis of a common European model to ensure scientific and cultural interchange among Member States. (d) It was agree that a credit system is needed to help doctors keep track of their CME

  9. [A course for continuing medical education].

    PubMed

    Mendoza Hernández, S

    1985-01-01

    To promote continuing medical education, the Central Military Hospital of Mexico offers a course in which the student may develop his skills for finding and using sources of information, applying the scientific method to biomedical research, and communicating the results thereof in writing. The methodology is more self-instructional than expository. The course program is divided into three modules geared to the general objectives, and the duration varies between 10 and 14 weeks. The course is attended in the final stage of the professional training, when the student has just completed his specialization, or when he is beginning it, on the premise that this is the best time to make clear to the physician the need to continue studying and learning throughout life. The author of this article explains why the course is important, states its specific objectives and, in an annex, presents the content of the program. PMID:4029062

  10. Hidden Curriculum in Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Nancy; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Mann, Karen; Batty, Helen; LaForet, Karen; Rethans, Jan-Joost; Silver, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    In developing curricula for undergraduate and graduate medical education, educators have become increasingly aware of an interweaving of the formal, informal, and hidden curricula and their influences on the outcomes of teaching and learning. But, to date, there is little in the literature about the hidden curriculum of medical practice, which…

  11. The continuing medical education needs of anaesthetists.

    PubMed

    Baylon, G J; Chung, F

    1992-09-01

    Learning needs assessment is the term applied to the process of identifying or diagnosing a learner's educational needs. It is the foundation of a systematic continuing medical education (CME) programme. Needs assessment has been identified as the most pressing problem of medical education directors in North America. Furthermore, the CME learning needs, interests or motivations of anaesthetists have never been studied. The amount of time and effort required for needs assessment is probably a major deterrent to this activity. The investigators adopted simple and straightforward means of assessing the "perceived learning needs" and topic interests of anaesthetists. Questionnaires were sent by mail to anaesthetists practicing in teaching and non-teaching hospitals in the Toronto area. The questionnaire presented a list of CME content areas. The respondents were asked to indicate on scale of 1 to 10 their Current Expertise, Ideal-Desired Expertise, and Interest-Motivation levels for each content area. Need Score for each content area was calculated by taking the difference between Ideal and Current Expertise responses. A total of 101/305 anaesthetists (29%) responded to the survey. Most of the respondents had been in anaesthesia practice for less than ten years. Regional nerve block, acute pain control, and medicolegal considerations received high overall ranks in both the need and interest categories. Paediatric anaesthesia, anaesthesia for trauma surgery and thoracic anaesthesia had top ranks among the subspecialty fields. Regional anaesthesia techniques received higher need and interest ranks than intravenous and inhalational techniques. The learning needs of anaesthetists of a large urban centre have been identified, and this information is useful to CME planners. PMID:1394751

  12. Judicious Use of Simulation Technology in Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Michael T.; DiazGranados, Deborah; Feldman, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Use of simulation-based training is fast becoming a vital source of experiential learning in medical education. Although simulation is a common tool for undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula, the utilization of simulation in continuing medical education (CME) is still an area of growth. As more CME programs turn to simulation to…

  13. Medical Asepsis, Research, and Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, Patricia M.; Crow, Sue

    1977-01-01

    Emphasizes the need that continuing education programs for nurses in hospitals orient newly employed graduate nurses specifically to infection control measures as carried out in that institution and then to reinforce these learnings by regular planned programs. Points out ways that those responsible for inservice nursing education can facilitate…

  14. Patient Referrals: A Behavioral Outcome of Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahan, J. Maurice; And Others

    1978-01-01

    One method for evaluating an aspect of physician practice behavior, patient referrals, resulting from continuing medical education programs on cancer at the University of Texas Medical Branch is described. Data presented provide strong support for the effectiveness of continuing education in modifying physician practice behavior. (LBH)

  15. A New Vision for Distance Learning and Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Ronald M.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing demands on continuing medical education (CME) are taking place at a time of significant developments in educational thinking and new learning technologies. Such developments allow today's CME providers to better meet the CRISIS criteria for effective continuing education: convenience, relevance, individualization, self-assessment,…

  16. Commercial Sites Outbid Medical Schools for Instructors in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    2000-01-01

    Reports that prominent medical professors are being solicited away from medical schools by large honoraria or high remuneration offered by commercial companies that provide continuing education services to physicians on the Internet. Suggests that medical schools consider potential partnerships with dot-com companies to develop continuing…

  17. Continuing Veterinary Medical Education: Responsibilities, Support and Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, E. Dean; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Advanced Studies Committee of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges addresses these questions: What are the responsibilities of the school of veterinary science department in continuing education? How should continuing education be funded? What are the appropriate mechanisms for recognizing or rewarding faculty participation…

  18. Effect of Continuing Medical Education on Practice Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Robert C.

    1978-01-01

    Data are reported suggesting that a change in practice patterns did occur subsequent to a continuing medical education program. Twenty-eight physicians took a course in pulmonary artery pressure monitoring and followup surveys indicate its objectives were met. (LBH)

  19. The Future of Computers in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storey, Patrick B.

    1983-01-01

    This article provides an attempt to project the way in which a computer-based approach to continuing medical education might emerge based on the present perception of what patient care, teaching, and learning are like. (SSH)

  20. Evaluation of Continuing Medical Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li Wang, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A continuing medical education program is discussed that addresses chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that links primary care physicians to a source of needed clinical knowledge at a relatively low cost. The educational methods, evaluation design, diagnosis of educational needs, selection of program content and behavioral outcomes are…

  1. [Continuing medical education in Croatia and the European Union].

    PubMed

    Drazancić, A

    2000-01-01

    The Continuing Medical Education (CME), with attention to other forms of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in Croatia and the today endeavors in the European Union, are presented. In European Union the formal CME is in its starting. The "European Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education" (EACCME) of the UEMS is established, which has formulated the principles of continuing education, the credit hours and their realizing, that would enable the mutual recognition of education in all European countries. In Croatia the starting of CME was at beginning of the 20th century, when the professional societies of Croatian Medical Association were founded. CPD was almost exclusively connected to activities of "Andrija Stampar" School of Public Health, to the School of Medicine in Zagreb and partly in Rijeka, which established a great number of postgraduate studies. The CME i.e. the courses of education were tightly connected to activities of the Croatian Medical Association, of its professional societies and its Academy of Medical Sciences, but also to activities of School of Medicine in Zagreb and Rijeka, and recently in Split and Osijek. Since 1995 the third partner, the Croatian Medical Chamber joined too. The number of CME meetings during 1998 is presented. The approximate calculation for needed annual courses of CME for all medical specialties in Croatia is presented. The formation of the National Authority for CME is suggested, in which all the interested institutions should be represented. PMID:11210822

  2. Do Continuing Medical Education Articles Foster Shared Decision Making?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrecque, Michel; Lafortune, Valerie; Lajeunesse, Judith; Lambert-Perrault, Anne-Marie; Manrique, Hermes; Blais, Johanne; Legare, France

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Defined as reviews of clinical aspects of a specific health problem published in peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed medical journals, offered without charge, continuing medical education (CME) articles form a key strategy for translating knowledge into practice. This study assessed CME articles for mention of evidence-based…

  3. Cardiopulmonary Disease in Newborns: A Study in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Armin D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A film describing tachypea as an early manifestation of congenital heart disease was shown to physicians and nurses at 27 hospitals during regular continuing medical education activities. Findings from pre-test and post-test data show that need-oriented educational programs can measurably improve the quality of patient care. (Author/LBH)

  4. General practitioners' continuing medical education within and outside their practice.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, P. A.; Allery, L. A.; Harding, K. G.; Hayes, T. M.

    1989-01-01

    To study continuing medical education 96 out of 101 general practitioners chosen at random from the list held by a family practitioner committee were interviewed. The results provided little evidence of regular attendance at local postgraduate centre meetings, though practice based educational meetings were common. Thirty one of the general practitioners worked in practices that held one or more practice based educational meetings each month at which the doctors provided the main educational content. Performance review was undertaken in the practices of 51 of the general practitioners, and 80 of the doctors recognised its value. The general practitioners considered that the most valuable educational activities occurred within the practice, the most valued being contact with partners. They asked for increased contact with hospital doctors. The development of general practitioners' continuing medical education should be based on the content of the individual general practitioner's day to day work and entail contact with his or her professional colleagues. PMID:2504381

  5. Who Is Driving Continuing Medical Education for Family Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Douglas; Allan, G. Michael; Manca, Donna; Sargeant, Joan; Barnett, Carly

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Considerable time and money are invested in continuing medical education (CME) for family physicians (FPs) but the effectiveness is uncertain. The participation of FPs as coordinators and teachers is not well known. The goal of this project was to describe the role of FPs in organizing and teaching CME events that are accredited for…

  6. Revisiting "Discrepancy Analysis in Continuing Medical Education: A Conceptual Model"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Based upon a review and analysis of selected literature, the author presents a conceptual model of discrepancy analysis evaluation for planning, implementing, and assessing the impact of continuing medical education (CME). The model is described in terms of its value as a means of diagnosing errors in the development and implementation of CME. The…

  7. A Survey of Continuing Medical Education Verification for License Renewal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fore, Robert C.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 22 state medical licensing boards requiring continuing education found that 14 accept attestations; 3 require lists of activities as well; and 17 audit to verify compliance. Common problems include poor recordkeeping and documentation as well as lack of time and staff to conduct audits. (SK)

  8. Continuing Medical Education: What Delivery Format Do Physicians Prefer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stancic, Nancy; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Prokhorov, Alexander V.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; McAlister, Alfred L.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Although physicians are in a unique position to prevent life-threatening outcomes by counseling patients to stop smoking, many of them miss the opportunity to intervene in their patients' use of tobacco. Nicotine Dependence Across the Lifespan was developed as a continuing medical education (CME) program to teach and encourage…

  9. Physician Preferences for Accredited Online Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Kevin J.; Kim, Julie J.; Yeung, George; Sit, Christina; Tobe, Sheldon W.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The need for up-to-date and high-quality continuing medical education (CME) is growing while the financial investment in CME is shrinking. Despite online technology's potential to efficiently deliver electronic CME (eCME) to large numbers of users, it has not yet displaced traditional CME. The purpose of this study was to explore…

  10. Continuing Medical Education, Needs Assessment, and Program Development: Theoretical Constructs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aherne, Michael; Lamble, Wayne; Davis, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Continuing medical education needs assessment should be reconceived for a changing health-care environment. The physician-patient relationship is being changed by empowerment of health consumers and public policy concerns regarding the health care system. Needs assessment should focus on environmental scanning, identification of key forces, use of…

  11. Continuing Medical Education: Linking the Community Hospital and the Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Phil R.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A group of community hospitals has been linked to the University of Southern California School of Medicine in a continuing medical education network. An educational development team based at the school helps community hospital physicians identify educational needs and develop responses using local and medical school experts as faculty. (Author/JMD)

  12. Continuing medical education for general practitioners: a practice format

    PubMed Central

    VanNieuwenborg, Lena; Goossens, Martine; De Lepeleire, Jan; Schoenmakers, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Our current knowledge-based society and the many actualisations within the medical profession require a great responsibility of physicians to continuously develop and refine their skills. In this article, we reflect on some recent findings in the field of continuing education for professional doctors (continuing medical education, CME). Second, we describe the development of a CME from the Academic Center for General Practice (ACHG) of the KU Leuven. Methods First, we performed a literature study and we used unpublished data of a need assessment performed (2013) in a selected group of general practitioners. Second, we describe the development of a proposal to establish a CME programme for general practitioners. Results CME should go beyond the sheer acquisition of knowledge, and also seek changes in practice, attitudes and behaviours of physicians. The continuing education offerings are subject to the goals of the organising institution, but even more to the needs and desires of the end user. Conclusions Integrated education is crucial to meet the conditions for efficient and effective continuing education. The ACHG KU Leuven decided to offer a postgraduate programme consisting of a combination of teaching methods: online courses (self-study), contact courses (traditional method) and a materials database. PMID:26850504

  13. The medical-industrial complex, professional medical associations, and continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Schofferman, Jerome

    2011-12-01

    Financial relationships among the biomedical industries, physicians, and professional medical associations (PMAs) can be professional, ethical, mutually beneficial, and, most importantly, can lead to improved medical care. However, such relationships, by their very nature, present conflicts of interest (COIs). One of the greatest concerns regarding COI is continuing medical education (CME), especially because currently industry funds 40-60% of CME. COIs have the potential to bias physicians in practice, educators, and those in leadership positions of PMAs and well as the staff of a PMA. These conflicts lead to the potential to bias the content and type of CME presentations and thereby influence physicians' practice patterns and patient care. Physicians are generally aware of the potential for bias when industry contributes funding for CME, but they are most often unable to detect the bias. This may because it is very subtle and/or the educators themselves may not realize that they have been influenced by their relationships with industry. Following Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education guidelines and mandating disclosure that is transparent and complete have become the fallback positions to manage COIs, but such disclosure does not really mitigate the conflict. The eventual and best solutions to ensure evidence-based education are complete divestment by educators and leaders of PMAs, minimal and highly controlled industry funding of PMAs, blind pooling of any industry contributions to PMAs and CME, strict verification of disclosures, clear separation of marketing from education at CME events, and strict oversight of presentations for the presence of bias. PMID:22145759

  14. Continuing Medical Education, Maintenance of Certification, and Physician Reentry

    PubMed Central

    Luchtefeld, Martin; Kerwel, Therese G.

    2012-01-01

    Continuing medical education serves a central role in the licensure and certification for practicing physicians. This chapter explores the different modalities that constitute CME along with their effectiveness, including simulation and best education practices. The evolution to maintenance of certification and the requirements for both the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery are delineated. Further progress in the education of practicing surgeons is evidenced through the introduction of laparoscopic colectomy and the improvements made from the introduction of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Finally, reentry of physicians into practice following a voluntary leave of absence, a new and challenging issue for surgeons, is also discussed. PMID:23997673

  15. [The credit system. Post-graduate medical education and continuous medical education].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A M

    1994-04-01

    The author examines the objectives behind the possible adoption of a Credit System by the Portuguese Medical Association. Credits are units that allow physicians to keep a record of their educational and professional undertaking. The paper defines Postgraduate Medical Education and Continuing Medical Education and specifies to which group of physicians each term applies. It describes the types of activities and objectives of each form of medical education and explains the philosophy underlying both. The author also urges that the Portuguese Medical Association set up essential structures to ensure the efficient functioning of the system. The paper outlines the criteria to be used for awarding Credits and discusses the natures of credit-granting institutions. The Credits are grouped into pre-defined Categories of differing weight. The author also recommends a credit value for each activity and, taking into account the nature of each activity, assigns it to a specific Category. Several types of Forms for Applying for and Registering Credits are shown. The information on these Forms is to go on the physicians record, to be filed on a database with the Portuguese Medical Association at a place set aside for the purpose. PMID:8048362

  16. Continuing medical education challenges in chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) affects at least 4 million people in the United States, yet only 16% of people with CFS have received a diagnosis or medical care for their illness. Educating health care professionals about the diagnosis and management of CFS may help to reduce population morbidity associated with CFS. Methods This report presents findings over a 5-year period from May 2000 to June 2006 during which we developed and implemented a health care professional educational program. The objective of the program was to distribute CFS continuing education materials to providers at professional conferences, offer online continuing education credits in different formats (e.g., print, video, and online), and evaluate the number of accreditation certificates awarded. Results We found that smaller conference size (OR = 80.17; 95% CI 8.80, 730.25), CFS illness related target audiences (OR = 36.0; 95% CI 2.94, 436.34), and conferences in which CFS research was highlighted (OR = 4.15; 95% CI 1.16, 14.83) significantly contributed to higher dissemination levels, as measured by visit rates to the education booth. While print and online courses were equally requested for continuing education credit opportunities, the online course resulted in 84% of the overall award certificates, compared to 14% for the print course. This remained consistent across all provider occupations: physicians, nurses, physician assistants, and allied health professionals. Conclusion These findings suggest that educational programs promoting materials at conferences may increase dissemination efforts by targeting audiences, examining conference characteristics, and promoting online continuing education forums. PMID:19954535

  17. [Online continuing medical education in endocrinology and metabology].

    PubMed

    Preger, Claus Michael

    2005-08-01

    The World Wide Web, also known as the Internet, is an important agent of spreading human knowledge. Medical education through the web without formal presence at the classroom is a modern use of this valuable resource, characterizing the online continuous medical education (eCME). The search of videoconferences, monographs, guidelines and update courses in endocrinology and metabolism at the Internet through search mechanisms is an extremely slow and hard task due to the huge amount of sites resulting from this process. This revision aims to make this quest easier, by presenting in a rational order, according to the subspecialty, glandular organ and language, the most important web pages that deal with this subject, obtained in a previous research promoted by the author. PMID:16358089

  18. Continuing medical education, needs assessment, and program development: theoretical constructs.

    PubMed

    Aherne, M; Lamble, W; Davis, P

    2001-01-01

    Continuing medical education (CME) program development and needs assessment have historically been practiced within the tradition of Ralph Tyler's education model. In light of transformational social, political, economic, and technical forces that demand greater account-ability and responsiveness from physicians, CME units are challenged to transform their cultures and structures from models that deliver education to models that support the facilitation of learning for enhanced competence and performance. This article describes key change forces for physicians and brings program development and needs assessment into focus for the discussion. The impact of change forces on program development and needs assessment are examined, and some techniques to move beyond the traditional approach of felt needs are presented as a way of enabling strategic administrative planning and change management. PMID:11291588

  19. Council of Medical Specialty Societies: Committed to Continuing Medical Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Walter J.

    2005-01-01

    The Council of Medical Specialty Societies (CMSS) recognizes the need for continuing medical education (CME) reform and intends to be actively engaged in that process. While recognizing that CME reform must involve many organizations, the CMSS and particularly the 23 societies that make up the CMSS are in a position to affect many of the needed…

  20. Continuing Medical Education and Continuing Professional Development: a credit system for monitoring and promoting excellence.

    PubMed

    Matos-Ferreira, A

    2001-06-01

    Probably the most important demand on the career of a medical specialist is that of having to keep up-to-date both scientifically and professionally. But the onus does not fall only on the practitioner. The institutions involved in medical teaching and professional development also have a crucial role to play by providing opportunities for continuing education and assuring that the specialist carries out enough relevant, experience-enhancing tasks to ensure continuous professional growth. As upgrading medical knowledge and developing professionally is a life-long task, both the need and the obligation to learn and improve apply to doctors of all ages and at all hierarchical levels. PMID:11501708

  1. Improving continuing medical education by enhancing interactivity: lessons from Iran

    PubMed Central

    FAGHIHI, SEYED ALIAKBAR; KHANKEH, HAMID REZA; HOSSEINI, SEYED JALIL; SOLTANI ARABSHAHI, SEYED KAMRAN; FAGHIH, ZAHRA; PARIKH, SAGAR V.; SHIRAZI, MANDANA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Continuing Medical Education (CME) has been considered as a lifelong commitment for doctors to provide the optimal care for patients. Despite a long history of creating CME programs, outcomes are far from ideal. The present qualitative study aims to clarify the barriers affecting effectiveness of the CME programs in Iran based on the experiences of general practitioners. Methods Sixteen general practitioners were recruited to participate in in-depth interviews and field observations concerning experiences with CME. The study was performed using a qualitative content analysis method. The codes, categories and themes were explored through an inductive process in which the researchers moved from specific to general. Results The participants’ experiences identified a number of barriers, particularly insufficient interaction with the instructors; additional problems included the teachers’ use of an undifferentiated approach; unreal and abstract CME; and ignorance of the diverse reasons to participate in CME. Conclusion Based on the study results, there are multiple barriers to effective implementation of CME in Iran. The key barriers include insufficient interaction between the trainees and providers, which must be considered by other stakeholders and program designers. Such interactions would facilitate improved program design, invite more specific tailoring of the education to the participants, allow for more effective educational methods and set the stage for outcome evaluation from the learners actually applying their new knowledge in practice. Replication of these findings with another sample would improve confidence in these recommendations, but these findings are broadly consistent with findings in the educational literature on improving the efficacy of CME. PMID:27104199

  2. The effectiveness of continuing medical education for specialist recertification

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Kamran; Wang, Tim T.; Ashrafian, Hutan; Layer, Graham T.; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2013-01-01

    Evolving professional, social and political pressures highlight the importance of lifelong learning for clinicians. Continuing medical education (CME) facilitates lifelong learning and is a fundamental factor in the maintenance of certification. The type of CME differs between surgical and non-surgical specialties. CME methods of teaching include lectures, workshops, conferences and simulation training. Interventions involving several modalities, instructional techniques and multiple exposures are more effective. The beneficial effects of CME can be maintained in the long term and can improve clinical outcome. However, quantitative evidence on validity, reliability, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of various methods is lacking. This is especially evident in urology. The effectiveness of CME interventions on maintenance of certification is also unknown. Currently, many specialists fulfil mandatory CME credit requirements opportunistically, therefore erroneously equating number of hours accumulated with competence. New CME interventions must emphasize actual performance and should correlate with clinical outcomes. Improved CME practice must in turn lead to continuing critical reflection, practice modification and implementation with a focus towards excellent patient care. PMID:24032064

  3. Continuing education for medical students: a library model

    PubMed Central

    Swanberg, Stephanie M.; Engwall, Keith; Mi, Misa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The research assessed a three-year continuing medical education–style program for medical students in a Midwestern academic medical library. Methods A mixed methods approach of a survey and two focus groups comparing attendees versus non-attendees assessed the program. Results Eleven students participated in the focus groups. Attendance was driven by topic interest and lunch. Barriers included lack of interest, scheduling, location, and convenience. Conclusions Although attendance was a challenge, students valued opportunities to learn new skills. This study showcases a reproducible method to engage students outside the curriculum. PMID:26512222

  4. Evaluation of an Online Bioterrorism Continuing Medical Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebeer, Linda; Andolsek, Kathryn; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar; Green, Joseph; Weissman, Norman; Pryor, Erica; Zheng, Shimin; Terndrup, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Much of the international community has an increased awareness of potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear threats and the need for physicians to rapidly acquire new knowledge and skills in order to protect the public's health. The present study evaluated the educational effectiveness of an online bioterrorism continuing medical…

  5. The Cost of Postgraduate Medical Education and Continuing Medical Education: Re-Examining the Status Fifty Years Back

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the cost and value of medical education is becoming increasingly important. However, this subject is not a new one. Fifty years ago, Mr. DH Patey, Dr. OF Davies, and Dr. John Ellis published a report on the state of postgraduate medical education in the UK. The report was wide-ranging, but it made a considerable mention of cost. In this short article, I have presented the documentary research that I conducted on their report. I have analyzed it from a positivist perspective and have concentrated on the subject of cost, as it appears in their report. The authors describe reforms within postgraduate medical education; however, they are clear from the start that the issue of cost can often be a barrier to such reforms. They state the need for basic facilities for medical education, but then outline the financial barriers to their development. The authors then discuss the costs of library services for education. They state that the "annual spending on libraries varies considerably throughout the country." The authors also describe the educational experiences of newly graduated doctors. According to them, the main problem is that these doctors do not have time to attend formal educational events, and that this will not be possible until there is "a more graduated approach to responsible clinical work," something which is not possible without financial investment. While concluding their report, the authors state that the limited money invested in postgraduate medical education and continuing medical education has been well spent, and that this has had a dual effect on improving medical education as well as the standards of medical care. PMID:25802685

  6. The cost of postgraduate medical education and continuing medical education: re-examining the status fifty years back.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-03-01

    The subject of the cost and value of medical education is becoming increasingly important. However, this subject is not a new one. Fifty years ago, Mr. DH Patey, Dr. OF Davies, and Dr. John Ellis published a report on the state of postgraduate medical education in the UK. The report was wide-ranging, but it made a considerable mention of cost. In this short article, I have presented the documentary research that I conducted on their report. I have analyzed it from a positivist perspective and have concentrated on the subject of cost, as it appears in their report. The authors describe reforms within postgraduate medical education; however, they are clear from the start that the issue of cost can often be a barrier to such reforms. They state the need for basic facilities for medical education, but then outline the financial barriers to their development. The authors then discuss the costs of library services for education. They state that the "annual spending on libraries varies considerably throughout the country." The authors also describe the educational experiences of newly graduated doctors. According to them, the main problem is that these doctors do not have time to attend formal educational events, and that this will not be possible until there is "a more graduated approach to responsible clinical work," something which is not possible without financial investment. While concluding their report, the authors state that the limited money invested in postgraduate medical education and continuing medical education has been well spent, and that this has had a dual effect on improving medical education as well as the standards of medical care. PMID:25802685

  7. Defining Quality Criteria for Online Continuing Medical Education Modules Using Modified Nominal Group Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortt, S. E. D.; Guillemette, Jean-Marc; Duncan, Anne Marie; Kirby, Frances

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The rapid increase in the use of the Internet for continuing education by physicians suggests the need to define quality criteria for accredited online modules. Methods: Continuing medical education (CME) directors from Canadian medical schools and academic researchers participated in a consensus process, Modified Nominal Group…

  8. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 3, Educational Meetings.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Sajdlowska, Joanna; Bell, Mary; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; LeBlanc, Constance; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, to standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, educational meetings, which is a common intervention in health professions' education. An educational meeting is an opportunity for clinicians to assemble to discuss and apply important information relevant to patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe proper educational meeting terminology and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and to build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report educational meeting efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of educational meetings. PMID:26954004

  9. Designing effective on-line continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Zimitat, Craig

    2001-03-01

    The Internet, and new information and communication technologies available through the Internet, provides medical educators with an opportunity to develop unique on-line learning environments with real potential to improve physicians' knowledge and effect change in their clinical practice. There are approximately 100 websites offering on-line CME courses in the USA alone. However, few of these CME courses appear to be based on sound educational principles or CME research and may have little chance of achieving the broader goals of CME. The majority of these courses closely resemble their traditional counterparts (e.g. paper-based books are now electronic books) and appear to be mere substitutions for old-technology CME resources. Whilst some CME providers add unique features of the Internet to enrich their websites, they do not employ strategies to optimize the learning opportunities afforded by this new technology. The adoption of adult learning principles, reflective practice and problem-based approaches can be used as a foundation for sound CME course design. In addition, knowledge of Internet technology and the learning opportunities it affords, together with strategies to maintain participation and new assessment paradigms, are all needed for developing online CME. We argue for an evidence-based and strategic approach to the development of on-line CME courses designed to enhance physician learning and facilitate change in clinical behaviour. PMID:11371287

  10. Problem-Based Learning in Canadian Undergraduate and Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jubien, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of problem-based learning (PBL) in Canadian undergraduate medical education and continuing medical education (CME) programs. The CME field in Canada is described, and the major professional associations that require physicians to take annual courses and programs are noted. A brief history of PBL in undergraduate…

  11. Using a Quasi-Experimental Research Design to Assess Knowledge in Continuing Medical Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markert, Ronald J.; O'Neill, Sally C.; Bhatia, Subhash C.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of continuing medical education (CME) programs include knowledge acquisition, skill development, clinical reasoning and decision making, and health care outcomes. We conducted a yearlong medical education research study in which knowledge acquisition in our CME programs was assessed. Method: A randomized…

  12. Using Baldrige criteria to meet or exceed Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education Standards.

    PubMed

    Leist, James C; Gilman, Stuart C; Cullen, Robert J; Sklar, Jack

    2004-01-01

    Continuing medical education providers accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) may apply organizational assessment strategies beyond the ACCME Essential Areas, Elements, and Criteria. The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Program offers an organizational assessment strategy commonly used in business, health care, and education settings. An analysis of both standards pointed out useful associations between the ACCME Essential Areas and the Baldrige National Quality Program Education Criteria (2003). Including leadership, governance, and social responsibility, the Baldrige Education Criteria provide a more comprehensive organizational assessment and stronger emphasis on a wider variety of results. The present analysis suggests that a continuing medical education provider could meet, and possibly exceed, the ACCME standards by applying the Baldrige Education Criteria in a "self-study" process to define, measure, monitor, and document fundamental organizational responsibilities and performance. PMID:15069913

  13. The emergency physician and knowledge transfer: continuing medical education, continuing professional development, and self-improvement.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Barbara J; Binder, Louis S; Marsden, Julian

    2007-11-01

    A workshop session from the 2007 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, Knowledge Translation in Emergency Medicine: Establishing a Research Agenda and Guide Map for Evidence Uptake, focused on developing a research agenda for continuing medical education (CME) in knowledge transfer. Based on quasi-Delphi methodology at the conference session, and subsequent electronic discussion and refinement, the following recommendations are made: 1) Adaptable tools should be developed, validated, and psychometrically tested for needs assessment. 2) "Point of care" learning within a clinical context should be evaluated as a tool for practice changes and improved knowledge transfer. 3) The addition of a CME component to technological platforms, such as search engines and databases, simulation technology, and clinical decision-support systems, may help knowledge transfer for clinicians or increase utilization of these tools and should, therefore, be evaluated. 4) Further research should focus on identifying the appropriate outcomes for physician CME. Emergency medicine researchers should transition from previous media-comparison research agendas to a more rigorous qualitative focus that takes into account needs assessment, instructional design, implementation, provider change, and care change. 5) In the setting of continued physician learning, barriers to the subsequent implementation of knowledge transfer and behavioral changes of physicians should be elicited through research. PMID:17967962

  14. Targeting Continuing Medical Education on Decision Makers: Who Decides to Transfuse Blood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodnough, Lawrence T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Staff communication patterns were observed during 13 open-heart surgeries to identify the transfusion decision makers. It was determined that targeting decision makers for continuing medical education would improve the quality of transfusion practice and increase the efficiency of continuing education. (SK)

  15. Attitudes and Preferences of Pennsylvania Primary Care Physicians Regarding Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Phyllis; And Others

    Primary care physicians in Pennsylvania were asked to give their attitudes and preferences regarding continuing medical education (CME) in an effort to expand and develop physician-oriented CME programs for the Hershey Continuing Education department at Penn State. A 32-item questionnaire was mailed to 952 primary care physicians practicing in…

  16. Mandatory Continuing Veterinary Medical Education Requirements in the United States and Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dale A.; Klingborg, Donald J.; Wright, Teressa

    2003-01-01

    Lists by state and province the current continuing veterinary medical education (CVME) requirements in the United States and Canada and provides additional analysis and comment on CVME requirements. (EV)

  17. [Continuing medical education: a clinical research institutional project].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Nora A; Giunta, Diego H; Pazo, Valeria; Elizondo, Cristina M; Figar, Silvana; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2010-01-01

    In Argentina, education in clinical investigation is based on courses with theoric content. In developed countries programs with ongoing and practical content exist, generating the proper context to learn. In 2006, the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires (HIBA) created an area to train physicians, Research Area in Internal Medicine, and enable them to participate in every step of the clinical investigation process. The objective of this study is to describe this teaching area and its impact on the investigation in Internal Medicine in the HIBA, in the period 2006-2008. This area counts with fellow positions and provides training in Clinical Investigation for rotating residents. It has different activities including lectures, project counseling and 3 ongoing Institutional Registers for prevalent medical problems, 33% (6/18) of Intern staff are currently participating, with 3 fellows and 7 monitors for the Registers; 25 residents rotated in the area and generated their own research projects. 59 posters were presented in local and international congresses. Currently 6 original articles are in process of publication and 2 in peer review evaluation. A survey was carried out to evaluate the area where 76% (35/46) of the participants believed that they have acquired new skills; with 93% (44/47) using these knowledges in their every day practice. A 100% thought that they were adequately oriented in their projects, their ideas being fully respected (97%) (45/46). The inclusion of the Research Area in Internal Medicine improved the knowledge of the process of clinical Investigation and increased independent scientific production. PMID:20529773

  18. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 4, Interprofessional Education.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Sajdlowska, Joanna; Bell, Mary; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Davis, David; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; Jacobs-Halsey, Virginia; Kane, Gabrielle; LeBlanc, Constance; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Reeves, Scott; Sargeant, Joan; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, to standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, interprofessional education (IPE), which is a common intervention in health professions education. IPE is an opportunity for individuals of multiple professions to interact to learn together, to break down professional silos, and to achieve interprofessional learning outcomes in the service of high-value patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe IPE, its terminology, and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and to build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report IPE efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of IPE. PMID:26954005

  19. Television in Postgraduate and Continuing Medical Education. 4th and 5th October, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, C. E., Ed.; Meyrick, R. Ll., Ed.

    The proceedings of a conference on television in postgraduate and continuing medical education for general practitioners are presented in this three-part report. Part One contains papers on medical broadcast television which examine the problems of informing the isolated doctor and groups of doctors of new developments; the usefulness and…

  20. Guidelines for Effective Teleconference Presentations in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raszkowski, Robert R.; Chute, Alan G.

    Designing teleconference programs for the physician learner puts unique demands on the teleconferencing medium. Typically, physicians expect a 1-hour lecture presentation with high information density. To effectively present the medical content material in an audio medium, strategies which structure and organize the content material are necessary.…

  1. Disruptive Technologies: A Credible Threat to Leading Programs in Continuing Medical Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Clayton M.; Armstrong, Elizabeth G.

    1998-01-01

    Disruptive technologies are simple convenient innovations that have triggered failures of some well-managed companies. They may threaten continuing medical-education programs so focused on leading-edge technology they lose sight of the very different educational needs of growing numbers of health care providers, who are turning to consultants, the…

  2. Measuring Continuing Medical Education Effectiveness and Its Ramification in a Community Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazirandeh, Mahmood

    2000-01-01

    Cholesterol measurements of 328 volunteers were taken before and after continuing medical education interventions (lectures and information dissemination to physicians, patient education). Although 50% reduced their serum cholesterol, the only practice change was an increase in physicians giving dietary instructions. (SK)

  3. Three Strategies for Delivering Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics to General Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikkert, Marcel G. M.; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2004-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) need advanced skills in geriatric assessment to be competent to treat the increasing number of elderly patients. Continuing medical education in geriatrics for GPs is heterogeneous, and not assessed for effectiveness. In this study we compared the educational effects of three geriatric post-graduate training methods on…

  4. Continuing medical education: experience and opinions of consultants.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, D N; Jones, S A; Easmon, C S

    1993-01-01

    The right of consultants to study leave and expenses is not binding on trusts and has been eroded in directly managed units. Complaints led to a survey of consultants in North West Thames region. This showed that most consultants use their own time and money to maintain their knowledge by buying and consulting journals and textbooks, attending local meetings, and using their annual leave for study, but they feel the need for study leave to attend meetings of specialist societies and courses. Leave is usually granted readily but without cover provided by a locum and with a very limited contribution to expenses. To maintain quality of medical care both the right and obligation to take study leave should be contractual. PMID:8518610

  5. No to mandatory continuing medical education, Yes to mandatory practice auditing and professional educational development

    PubMed Central

    Donen, N

    1998-01-01

    The issue of mandatory continuing medical education (CME) is controversial. Traditional measures mandate only attendance, not learning, and have no measurable performance end points. There is no evidence that current approaches to CME, mandatory or voluntary, produce sustainable changes in physician practices or application of current knowledge. Ongoing educational development is an important value in a professional, and there is an ethical obligation to keep up to date. Mandating self-audit of the effect of individual learning on physician's practices and evaluation by the licensing authority are effective ways of ensuring the public are protected. The author recommends the use of a personal portfolio to document sources of learning, the effect of learning and the auditing of their applications on practice patterns and patient outcomes. A series of principles are proposed to govern its application. PMID:9580734

  6. [Continuing medical education: how to write multiple choice questions].

    PubMed

    Soler Fernández, R; Méndez Díaz, C; Rodríguez García, E

    2013-06-01

    Evaluating professional competence in medicine is a difficult but indispensable task because it makes it possible to evaluate, at different times and from different perspectives, the extent to which the knowledge, skills, and values required for exercising the profession have been acquired. Tests based on multiple choice questions have been and continue to be among the most useful tools for objectively evaluating learning in medicine. When these tests are well designed and correctly used, they can stimulate learning and even measure higher cognitive skills. Designing a multiple choice test is a difficult task that requires knowledge of the material to be tested and of the methodology of test preparation as well as time to prepare the test. The aim of this article is to review what can be evaluated through multiple choice tests, the rules and guidelines that should be taken into account when writing multiple choice questions, the different formats that can be used, the most common errors in elaborating multiple choice tests, and how to analyze the results of the test to verify its quality. PMID:23489769

  7. Advancing educational continuity in primary care residencies: an opportunity for patient-centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Judith L; Hirsh, David; Aagaard, Eva; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Smith, Marie; Hardman, Joseph; Chheda, Shobhina G

    2015-05-01

    Continuity of care is a core value of patients and primary care physicians, yet in graduate medical education (GME), creating effective clinical teaching environments that emphasize continuity poses challenges. In this Perspective, the authors review three dimensions of continuity for patient care-informational, longitudinal, and interpersonal-and propose analogous dimensions describing continuity for learning that address both residents learning from patient care and supervisors and interprofessional team members supporting residents' competency development. The authors review primary care GME reform efforts through the lens of continuity, including the growing body of evidence that highlights the importance of longitudinal continuity between learners and supervisors for making competency judgments. The authors consider the challenges that primary care residency programs face in the wake of practice transformation to patient-centered medical home models and make recommendations to maximize the opportunity that these practice models provide. First, educators, researchers, and policy makers must be more precise with terms describing various dimensions of continuity. Second, research should prioritize developing assessments that enable the study of the impact of interpersonal continuity on clinical outcomes for patients and learning outcomes for residents. Third, residency programs should establish program structures that provide informational and longitudinal continuity to enable the development of interpersonal continuity for care and learning. Fourth, these educational models and continuity assessments should extend to the level of the interprofessional team. Fifth, policy leaders should develop a meaningful recognition process that rewards academic practices for training the primary care workforce. PMID:25470307

  8. Continuing medical education methodology: current trends and applications in wound care.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Alan

    2010-07-01

    The field of professional medical continuing education is changing rapidly. The traditional format for continuing education for health care professionals has long been classroom learning. This form of learning has been found to be relatively ineffective in changing learners' practice patterns. The reasons most often cited are that there is little interaction and that the learning does not occur when the learner is ready to learn. Interaction greatly enhances retention and the tendency for the learner to later apply the learning in actual clinical encounters. There are a growing number of online continuing medical education (CME) Web sites that combine on-demand didactic presentations with the ability to discuss the content with peers. The easy access and interaction potential of this new CME media promises to improve the effectiveness of future CME. PMID:20663448

  9. Marketing to Increase Participation in a Web-Based Continuing Medical Education Cultural Competence Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Carlos A.; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. Online advertisements for recruiting participants into activities such as clinical trials, public health programs, and continuing medical education (CME) have been effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of…

  10. Perceptions of Continuing Medical Education, Professional Development, and Organizational Support in the United Arab Emirates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younies, Hassan; Berham, Belal; Smith, Pamela C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This paper investigates the views of health care providers on continuous medical education (CME). To our knowledge, this is one of the first surveys to examine perspectives of CME in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: A 6-part questionnaire focused on the following areas of CME: the workshop leaders/trainers, the training…

  11. Viability of the Commitment-for-Change Evaluation Strategy in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Deborah L.

    1990-01-01

    Several features of a two-day national nephrology continuing medical education conference were analyzed using commitments for change and subsequent self-reports of implementation of change as the dependent variables. Subjects were those physician participants (N=84) who completed demographic information forms and agreed to participate in the…

  12. eLearning: A Review of Internet-Based Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wutoh, Rita; Boren, Suzanne Austin; Balas, E. Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The objective was to review the effect of Internet-based continuing medical education (CME) interventions on physician performance and health care outcomes. Methods: Data sources included searches of MEDLINE (1966 to January 2004), CINAHL (1982 to December 2003), ACP Journal Club (1991 to July/August 2003), and the Cochrane Database…

  13. Contents of a Core Library in Continuing Medical Education: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Curtis A.; Tooman, Tricia R.; Leist, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: In developing their professional competence, those who are interested in the practice of continuing medical education (CME) should recognize the knowledge base that defines their field. This study systematically identifies and organizes a list of books and journals comprising a core library (100 books/15 journals) for CME…

  14. Motivating Learning and Assessing Outcomes in Continuing Medical Education Using a Personal Learning Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Virginia A.; Schifferdecker, Karen E.; Turco, Mary G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Although there is increasing focus on provider behavior change as an outcome of continuing medical education (CME), it has long been known that an increase in knowledge alone is rarely sufficient to induce such change. The Personal Learning Plan (PLP), designed to motivate and assess CME learning, was partly derived from SMART goals…

  15. Interactive On-Line Continuing Medical Education: Physicians' Perceptions and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargeant, Joan; Curran, Vernon; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Ferrier, Suzanne; Allen, Michael; Kirby, Frances; Ho, Kendall

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Although research in continuing medical education (CME) demonstrates positive outcomes of on-line CME programs, the effectiveness of and learners' satisfaction with interpersonal interaction in on-line CME are lower. Defined as faculty-learner or learner-learner interpersonal interaction, this study explores physicians' perceptions…

  16. A Standardized Approach to Assessing Physician Expectations and Perceptions of Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewchuk, Richard M.; Schmidt, Hilary J.; Benarous, Alexandra; Bennett, Nancy L.; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar; Casebeer, Linda L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Rapidly expanding science and mandates for maintaining credentials place increasing demands on continuing medical education (CME) activities to provide information that is current and relevant to patient care. Quality may be seen as the perceived level of service measured against consumer expectations. Standard tools have not been…

  17. Assessing the Impact of Continuing Medical Education through Structured Physician Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.; And Others

    A method for evaluating physicians' practice behavior after undertaking continuing medical education (CME) conducted by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) was developed and tested during 1983-1985. The literature on CME effectiveness and physician behavior change was reviewed. Physicians who were trained interviewers conducted telephone…

  18. Expecting Understanding, Understanding Expectations: Continuing Medical Education and the Doctor-Patient Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frenette, Jacques; Sindon, Andre; Jacques, Andre; Lalonde, Viateur; Belisle, Claude

    1998-01-01

    A continuing medical education course on the physician-patient relationship used on such topics as patient-centered interviews. A majority of 406 respondents (including 205 in a follow-up survey) were using what they learned in practice. Additional workshops on issues of intimacy and difficult relationships were developed. (SK)

  19. Standardizing Evaluation of On-Line Continuing Medical Education: Physician Knowledge, Attitudes, and Reflection on Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebeer, Linda; Kristofco, Robert E.; Strasser, Sheryl; Reilly, Michael; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Rabin, Andrew; Zheng, Shimin; Karp, Simone; Myers, Lloyd

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Physicians increasingly earn continuing medical education (CME) credits through on-line courses, but there have been few rigorous evaluations to determine their effects. The present study explores the feasibility of implementing standardized evaluation templates and tests them to evaluate 30 on-line CME courses. Methods: A time…

  20. Continuing Medical Education and Professional Revalidation in Europe: Five Case Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maisonneuve, Herve; Matillon, Yves; Negri, Alfonso; Pallares, Luis; Vigneri, Ricardo; Young, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Since reliable information is scarce to describe continuing medical education (CME) and revalidation in Europe, we carried out a survey in 5 selected countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom). Methods: A tested questionnaire was sent to 2 experts per country (except in Germany), during August-September 2004.…

  1. Abstracts from the Proceedings of the Research in Continuing Medical Education Session of the 2007 Spring Meeting, Copper Mountain, Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Craig M.

    2007-01-01

    The following abstracts were peer-reviewed for presentation and publication. They were edited by Craig M. Campbell, MD, chairman, Research Committee, Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education.

  2. Information technology and its role in anaesthesia training and continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Chu, Larry F; Erlendson, Matthew J; Sun, John S; Clemenson, Anna M; Martin, Paul; Eng, Reuben L

    2012-03-01

    Today's educators are faced with substantial challenges in the use of information technology for anaesthesia training and continuing medical education. Millennial learners have uniquely different learning styles than previous generations of students. These preferences distinctly incorporate the use of digital information technologies and social technologies to support learning. To be effective teachers, modern educators must be familiar with these new information technologies and understand how to use them for medical education. Examples of new information technologies include learning management systems, lecture capture, social media (YouTube, Flickr), social networking (Facebook), Web 2.0, multimedia (video learning triggers and point-of-view video) and mobile computing applications. The information technology challenges for educators in the twenty-first century include: (a) understanding how technology shapes the learning preferences of today's anaesthesia residents, (b) distinguishing between the function and properties of new learning technologies and (c) properly using these learning technologies to enhance the anaesthesia curriculum. PMID:22559955

  3. Physician management of hypercholesterolemia. A randomized trial of continuing medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Browner, W S; Baron, R B; Solkowitz, S; Adler, L J; Gullion, D S

    1994-01-01

    To determine the effect of continuing medical education (CME) on compliance with the recommendations of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on high serum cholesterol levels in adults, we randomly assigned primary physicians in 174 practices to 3 groups, 2 that underwent either standard or intensive CME and a control group. The standard CME group was offered a free 3-hour seminar on high serum cholesterol levels; the intensive CME group was offered in addition follow-up seminars and free office materials. After 18 months, we audited 13,099 medical records from the 140 practices that remained in the study. There were no significant differences (P > .15) in screening for high serum cholesterol or compliance with guidelines between the groups receiving continuing medical education (51% screening; 33% compliance) and the control group (57% screening; 37% compliance). In the prespecified subgroup of patients with hypercholesterolemia, there was a trend toward a modest benefit from the continuing medical education interventions: compliance was 21% in the control group, 23% in the standard CME group, and 27% in the intensive CME group (P = .07 overall). These results emphasize the need for better ways to change behavior in practicing physicians and the importance of studying the implementation of preventive health recommendations. PMID:7856157

  4. The transformation of continuing medical education (CME) in the United States.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Jann Torrance

    2013-01-01

    This article describes five major themes that inform and highlight the transformation of continuing medical education in the USA. Over the past decade, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and other national entities have voiced concern over the cost of health care, prevalence of medical errors, fragmentation of care, commercial influence, and competence of health professionals. The recommendations from these entities, as well as the work of other regulatory, professional, academic, and government organizations, have fostered discussion and development of strategies to address these challenges. The five themes in this paper reflect the changing expectations of multiple stakeholders engaged in health care. Each theme is grounded in educational, politico-economic priorities for health care in the USA. The themes include (1) a shift in expectation from simple attendance or a time-based metric (credit) to a measurement that infers competence in performance for successful continuing professional development (CPD); (2) an increased focus on interprofessional education to augment profession-specific continuing education; (3) the integration of CPD with quality improvement; (4) the expansion of CPD to address population and public health issues; and (5) identification and standardization of continuing education (CE) professional competencies. The CE profession plays an essential role in the transformation of the US CPD system for health professionals. Coordination of the five themes described in this paper will foster an improved, effective, and efficient health system that truly meets the needs of patients. PMID:24101887

  5. The transformation of continuing medical education (CME) in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Balmer, Jann Torrance

    2013-01-01

    This article describes five major themes that inform and highlight the transformation of continuing medical education in the USA. Over the past decade, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and other national entities have voiced concern over the cost of health care, prevalence of medical errors, fragmentation of care, commercial influence, and competence of health professionals. The recommendations from these entities, as well as the work of other regulatory, professional, academic, and government organizations, have fostered discussion and development of strategies to address these challenges. The five themes in this paper reflect the changing expectations of multiple stakeholders engaged in health care. Each theme is grounded in educational, politico-economic priorities for health care in the USA. The themes include (1) a shift in expectation from simple attendance or a time-based metric (credit) to a measurement that infers competence in performance for successful continuing professional development (CPD); (2) an increased focus on interprofessional education to augment profession-specific continuing education; (3) the integration of CPD with quality improvement; (4) the expansion of CPD to address population and public health issues; and (5) identification and standardization of continuing education (CE) professional competencies. The CE profession plays an essential role in the transformation of the US CPD system for health professionals. Coordination of the five themes described in this paper will foster an improved, effective, and efficient health system that truly meets the needs of patients. PMID:24101887

  6. The Need for Specialty Curricula Based on Core Competencies: A White Paper of the Conjoint Committee on Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Marcia J.; Gallis, Harry A.; Gilman, Stuart C.; Grossman, Michael; Holzman, Gerald B.; Marquis, Damon; Trusky, Sandra K.

    2007-01-01

    At present there is no curriculum to guide physician lifelong learning in a prescribed, deliberate manner. The Conjoint Committee on Continuing Medical Education, a group representing 16 major stakeholder organizations in continuing medical education, recommends that each specialty society and corresponding board reach consensus on the…

  7. Prototype Web-based continuing medical education using FlashPix images.

    PubMed Central

    Landman, A.; Yagi, Y.; Gilbertson, J.; Dawson, R.; Marchevsky, A.; Becich, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Continuing Medical Education (CME) is a requirement among practicing physicians to promote continuous enhancement of clinical knowledge to reflect new developments in medical care. Previous research has harnessed the Web to disseminate complete pathology CME case studies including history, images, diagnoses, and discussions to the medical community. Users submit real-time diagnoses and receive instantaneous feedback, eliminating the need for hard copies of case material and case evaluation forms. This project extends the Web-based CME paradigm with the incorporation of multi-resolution FlashPix images and an intuitive, interactive user interface. The FlashPix file format combines a high-resolution version of an image with a hierarchy of several lower resolution copies, providing real-time magnification via a single image file. The Web interface was designed specifically to simulate microscopic analysis, using the latest Javascript, Java and Common Gateway Interface tools. As the project progresses to the evaluation stage, it is hoped that this active learning format will provide a practical and efficacious environment for continuing medical education with additional application potential in classroom demonstrations, proficiency testing, and telepathology. Using Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 and above, the working prototype Web-based CME environment is accessible at http://telepathology.upmc.edu/WebInterface/NewInterface/welcome.html. PMID:11079926

  8. Education for Hospital Library Personnel, Continuation of Feasibility Study for Continuing Education of Medical Librarians. Interim Report No.2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Alan M.; And Others

    This survey of Ohio hospitals and their libraries was a preliminary task in the design, implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive program of continuing education for hospital library personnel. Two basic issues explored in this report are the co-occurrence of hospital libraries and pa"ticular hospital functions and the possibility of…

  9. Aligning academic continuing medical education with quality improvement: a model for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Davis, Nancy L; Davis, David A; Johnson, Nathan M; Grichnik, Katherine L; Headrick, Linda A; Pingleton, Susan K; Bower, Elizabeth; Gibbs, Ronald

    2013-10-01

    The recent health care quality improvement (QI) movement has called for significant changes to the way that health care is delivered and taught in academic medical centers (AMCs). This movement also has affected academic continuing medical education (CME). In January 2011, to better align the CME and QI efforts of AMCs, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) launched a pilot initiative called Aligning and Educating for Quality (ae4Q). The goal of this pilot was to assist 11 AMCs as they moved to a more integrated model of continuous performance improvement by aligning their quality measurement and improvement with their continuing education endeavors. In this article, the authors describe the development of the ae4Q pilot and the resulting outcomes that have led to ongoing improvements.During the 18-month pilot, AAMC consultants conducted readiness assessments and on-site visits and provided consultation services and Web-based resources based on the AMC's needs. Following these interventions at each site, they then conducted both interviews with participants and postintervention assessment surveys to measure the impact of the pilot. Findings included demonstrated increases in the alignment of CME and QI, a greater use of quality data in CME design and delivery, and a greater use of CME as an intervention for clinical improvement. Two sites also attributed measureable improved clinical outcomes to their participation in the ae4Q pilot. The AAMC has used these findings to create resources and ongoing services to support AMCs as they pursue efforts to align QI and CME. PMID:23969360

  10. Organizational change in the Medical Library Association: evolution of the continuing education program.

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, M K; Palmer, R A

    1987-01-01

    "Change" is a critical dimension of contemporary experience. Library associations are not exempt, and they change in ways similar to other organizations. According to some authorities, four phases typify the process: diagnosis, design, implementation, and incorporation. Focusing on changes in the Medical Library Association's longstanding program of continuing education, the authors utilize the "phase framework" to chart that association's movement from a management system depending primarily upon volunteers to one in which professional staff figure prominently. The historical review serves a heuristic purpose for individuals and institutions in identifying characteristic features of the change process. PMID:3329921

  11. Mining reflective continuing medical education data for family physician learning needs.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Denice Colleen; Pluye, Pierre; Rodriguez, Charo; Grad, Roland

    2016-01-01

    A mixed methods research (sequential explanatory design) studied the potential of mining the data from the consumers of continuing medical education (CME) programs, for the developers of CME programs. The quantitative data generated by family physicians, through applying the information assessment method to CME content, was presented to key informants from the CME planning community through a qualitative description study.The data were revealed to have many potential applications including supporting the creation of CME content, CME program planning and personal learning portfolios. PMID:27348489

  12. Is a decentralized continuing medical education program feasible for Chinese rural health professionals?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Rural health professionals in township health centers (THCs) tend to have less advanced educational degrees. This study aimed to ascertain the perceived feasibility of a decentralized continuing medical education (CME) program to upgrade their educational levels. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of THC health professionals was conducted using a self-administered, structured questionnaire in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. Results: The health professionals in the THCs were overwhelmingly young with low education levels. They had a strong desire to upgrade their educational degrees. The decentralized CME program was perceived as feasible by health workers with positive attitudes about the benefit for license examination, and by those who intended to improve their clinical diagnosis and treatment skills. The target groups of such a program were those who expected to undertake a bachelor’s degree and who rated themselves as “partially capable” in clinical competency. They reported that 160-400 USD annually would be an affordable fee for the program. Conclusion: A decentralized CME program was perceived feasible to upgrade rural health workers’ education level to a bachelor’s degree and improve their clinical competency. PMID:27134005

  13. Integrating quality improvement into continuing medical education activities within a community hospital system.

    PubMed

    Eiser, Arnold R; McNamee, William B; Miller, Jean Yodis

    2013-01-01

    The integration of the Mercy Health System's quality improvement (QI) and continuing medical educational (CME) activities is described. With the implementation of computerized medical data, the opportunities for QI-focused CME are growing. The authors reviewed their regularly scheduled series and special CME programs to assess their impact on quality care processes. Clinical improvements were affected by combining national guidelines and advancements with local clinical data and interactions with physicians within interdisciplinary as well as specialty conferences. Case-based, multidisciplinary conferences lent themselves to this process to a greater extent than didactic conferences. The latter also could lead to QI when the topics were focused on specific quality initiatives that often are part of a national QI initiative. Although the authors consider these efforts to be at an intermediate stage of development, they have observed several QI/patient safety process improvements. PMID:22984092

  14. Application of International Videoconferences for Continuing Medical Education Programs Related to Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ke-Jian; Cen, Gang; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jun; Fu, Chun-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Continuing medical education (CME) is an effective way for practicing physicians to acquire up-to-date clinical information. Materials and Methods: We conducted four CME seminars in 2007–2010 endorsed by the Chinese Medical Association Council on Medical Education. Overseas telelectures and live case demonstrations were introduced in each seminar via telemedicine based on a digital video transport system. Network stability and packet loss were recorded. An anonymous mini-questionnaire was conducted to evaluate the satisfaction of attendees regarding the image and sound quality, content selection, and overall evaluation. Results: Four telelectures and five live case demonstrations were successfully conducted. Stability of the network was maintained during each videoconference. High-quality videos of 720×480 pixels at the rate of 30 frames per second were shown to the entire group of attendees. The time delay between Shanghai and Fukuoka, Japan, was only 0.3 s, and the packet loss was 0%. We obtained 129 valid responses to the mini-questionnaire from a total of 146 attendees. The majority of the attendees were satisfied with the quality of transmitted images and voices and with the selected contents. The overall evaluation was ranked as excellent or good. Conclusions: Videoconferences are excellent channels for CME programs associated with laparoscopic training. PMID:23758077

  15. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 2, Practice Facilitation.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Davis, David; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; Jacobs-Halsey, Virginia; Kane, Gabrielle; LeBlanc, Constance; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, practice facilitation, which is a common strategy in primary care to help practices develop capacity and infrastructure to support their ability to improve patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe practice facilitation, its terminology, and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report practice facilitation efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of practice facilitation. PMID:26954003

  16. Adapting continuing medical education for post-conflict areas: assessment in Nagorno Karabagh - a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges in the current century is the increasing number of post-conflict states where infrastructures are debilitated. The dysfunctional health care systems in post-conflict settings are putting the lives of the populations in these zones at increased risk. One of the approaches to improve such situations is to strengthen human resources by organizing training programmes to meet the special needs in post-conflict zones. Evaluations of these training programmes are essential to assure effectiveness and adaptation to the health service needs in these conditions. Methods A specialized qualitative evaluation was conducted to assess and improve a post-conflict continuing medical education (CME) programme that was conducted in Nagorno Karabagh. Qualitative research guides were designed for this post-conflict zone that included focus group discussions with physician programme participants and semi-structured in-depth interviews with directors of hospitals and training supervisors. Results Saturation was achieved among the three participating groups in the themes of impact of participation in the CME and obstacles to application of obtained skills. All respondents indicated that the continuing medical education programme created important physician networks absent in this post-conflict zone, updated professional skills, and improved professional confidence among participants. However, all respondents indicated that some skills gained were inapplicable in Nagorno Karabagh hospitals and clinics due to lack of appropriate medical equipment, qualified supporting human resources and facilities. Conclusion The qualitative research methods evaluation highlighted the fact that the health care human resources training should be closely linked to appropriate technologies, supplies, facilities and human resources available in post-conflict zones and identified the central importance of creating health professional networks and professional confidence

  17. Priority issues in continuing medical education show sensitivity to change in Canadian health care.

    PubMed Central

    Curry, L; Mann, K V

    1990-01-01

    The degree and scope of significant change in health care expectations, roles and delivery patterns in Canada have been widely documented. In 1988 the Sub-Committee on Research of the Standing Committee on CME [continuing medical education], Association of Canadian Medical Colleges, conducted a survey to determine whether those responsible for the CME portion of the medical school curriculum are changing their perceptions to keep pace with the changes in health care. The results were compared with those of a similar survey done in 1983. In both surveys people directly responsible for delivery of formal CME were asked to identify and rank research needs in CME. The response rates were very high. The CME issues identified in the two surveys had changed considerably, with entirely new issues being identified in 1988 and the emphasis placed on issues having changed. The identification of factors that promote or inhibit application of new knowledge by practising physicians was of lowest importance in 1983 and of primary importance in 1988, and comparison of the cost-effectiveness of CME methods was an important issue in 1983 and among the least important in 1988. The noted changes mirror developments in Canada's health care milieu. PMID:2302627

  18. A tale of Congress, continuing medical education, and the history of medicine.

    PubMed

    Partin, Clyde; Kushner, Howard I; Horton, Mary E Kollmer

    2014-04-01

    Well-intentioned attempts by the Senate Finance Committee to improve the content and quality of continuing medical education (CME) offerings had the unanticipated consequence of decimating academically oriented history of medicine conferences. New guidelines intended to keep CME courses free of commercial bias from the pharmaceutical industry were worded in a fashion that caused CME officials at academic institutions to be reluctant to offer CME credit for history of medicine gatherings. At the 2013 annual conference of the American Association for the History of Medicine, we offered a novel solution for determining CME credit in line with current guidelines. We asked attendees to provide narrative critiques for each presentation for which they desired CME credit. In this essay, we evaluate the efficacy of this approach. PMID:24688209

  19. A tale of Congress, continuing medical education, and the history of medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Howard I.; Horton, Mary E. Kollmer

    2014-01-01

    Well-intentioned attempts by the Senate Finance Committee to improve the content and quality of continuing medical education (CME) offerings had the unanticipated consequence of decimating academically oriented history of medicine conferences. New guidelines intended to keep CME courses free of commercial bias from the pharmaceutical industry were worded in a fashion that caused CME officials at academic institutions to be reluctant to offer CME credit for history of medicine gatherings. At the 2013 annual conference of the American Association for the History of Medicine, we offered a novel solution for determining CME credit in line with current guidelines. We asked attendees to provide narrative critiques for each presentation for which they desired CME credit. In this essay, we evaluate the efficacy of this approach. PMID:24688209

  20. Promoting networks between evidence-based medicine and values-based medicine in continuing medical education

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, medical practice has followed two different paradigms: evidence-based medicine (EBM) and values-based medicine (VBM). There is an urgent need to promote medical education that strengthens the relationship between these two paradigms. This work is designed to establish the foundations for a continuing medical education (CME) program aimed at encouraging the dialogue between EBM and VBM by determining the values relevant to everyday medical activities. Methods A quasi-experimental, observational, comparative, prospective and qualitative study was conducted by analyzing through a concurrent triangulation strategy the correlation between healthcare personnel-patient relationship, healthcare personnel's life history, and ethical judgments regarding dilemmas that arise in daily clinical practice. In 2009, healthcare personnel working in Mexico were invited to participate in a free, online clinical ethics course. Each participant responded to a set of online survey instruments before and after the CME program. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with healthcare personnel, focusing on their views and representations of clinical practice. Results The healthcare personnel's core values were honesty and respect. There were significant differences in the clinical practice axiology before and after the course (P <0.001); notably, autonomy climbed from the 10th (order mean (OM) = 8.00) to the 3rd position (OM = 5.86). In ethical discernment, the CME program had an impact on autonomy (P ≤0.0001). Utilitarian autonomy was reinforced in the participants (P ≤0.0001). Regarding work values, significant differences due to the CME intervention were found in openness to change (OC) (P <0.000), self-transcendence (ST) (P <0.001), and self-enhancement (SE) (P <0.019). Predominant values in life history, ethical discernment and healthcare personnel-patient relation were beneficence, respect and compassion, respectively. Conclusions The

  1. An eclectic model for evaluating web-based continuing medical education courseware systems.

    PubMed

    Curran, V R

    2000-09-01

    World Wide Web and compact disc-read only memory technologies have introduced new prospects for delivering continuing medical education (CME) to rural and remote physicians. However, evidence concerning the effectiveness of these technologies in providing CME, and approaches to their evaluation, is limited. The rationale for this study was to design a model for evaluating the effectiveness of computer-mediated CME courseware. An eclectic, evaluation-planning matrix was designed by selecting various concepts from the literature and was used in planning and developing the evaluation model. The model was field-tested by evaluating a computer-mediated courseware program on dermatological office procedures, and a meta-evaluation was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the evaluation methods and procedures. The findings suggest that the model was useful in collecting data to inform decision making and to improve the instructional product. The field test results revealed that computer-mediated instruction was effective in delivering CME at a distance. PMID:11067194

  2. Teleconferencing: Cost optimization of satellite and ground systems for continuing progressional education and medical services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, D.; Lusignan, B.

    1972-01-01

    A set of analytical capabilities that are needed to assess the role satellite communications technology will play in public and other services was developed. It is user oriented in that it starts from descriptions of user demand and develops the ability to estimate the cost of satisfying that demand with the lowest cost communications system. To ensure that the analysis could cope with the complexities of the real users, two services were chosen as examples, continuing professional education and medical services. Telecommunications costs are effected greatly by demographic factors, involving distribution of users in urban areas and distances between towns in rural regions. For this reason the analytical tools were exercised on sample locations. San Jose, California and Denver, Colorado were used to represent an urban area and the Rocky Mountain states were used to represent a rural region. In assessing the range of satellite system costs, two example coverage areas were considered, one appropriate to cover the contiguous forty-eight states, a second appropriate to cover about one-third that area.

  3. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION ON INFECTIOUS DISEASES: A SAUDI UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qurashi, Abdulrahman M.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Continuing medical education (CME) is an important and useful activity for updating knowledge in order to improve for outcome of health care. A CME update symposium on Infectious Diseases was therefore organized at the King Fahd Hospital of the University (KFHU), Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Participants included clinicians, laboratory personnel and nursing staff from different hospitals and universities in Saudi Arabia. Objectives: To report the proceedings of the first CME on Infectious Diseases in the region and to evaluate it using a questionnaire-based feedback. Methodology: This CME was evaluated on specific feedback obtained on standardized evaluation forms provided during the symposium. The responses of 194 participants were statistically analyzed for the various components of the symposium. Results and Conclusion: Salient important issues covered during the program are presented. The CME included five sessions on: hospital acquired infections, immunology, mycotic diseases, malaria, lesihmaniasis and virology. Some lacunae were also identified. The evaluation of the scientific sessions showed a satisfaction level of 3.98 ± 0.59, on a scale of five. As this CME activity proved successful on many counts, it was concluded that it was worthwhile to conduct updates on infectious diseases on a regular basis. PMID:23008630

  4. General practitioners and online continuing medical education – which factors influence its use?

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, Daniela; Kriston, Levente; Berner, Michael; Härter, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Although several online continuing medical education (CME) offers exist, the utilization of these by physicians is still low. In this study, we aimed to investigate the attitude towards and use of the Internet and online CME in German general practitioners (GPs) and to identify potential starting points to increase the use of online CME. Methods: In June 2006, a standardized 6-page questionnaire with 27 questions on the topic “Internet and online continuing education” was sent to all general practitioners in 6 districts (n=1304) of South Baden and South Württemberg in Germany. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and exploratory regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of online CME usage. Furthermore, selected barriers were investigated in detail. Results: A total of 351 questionnaires were sent back, of which 349 could be included in the analysis (27% response rate). The sample is representative of the population contacted with respect to gender and qualifications. Univariate analyses showed that users of online CME were two years younger than non-users on average. Users spent two hours more on the Internet per week than non-users, and had been using the Internet for one year longer. Finally, users had better Internet skills, more often had previous experiences with online CME, and assessed the effectiveness of online CME to be higher and perceived fewer problems than non-users. Discussion: Measures to implement and increase the use of online CME can be aimed at different levels. The most important starting points are likely to be offering GPs the possibility to gain experience with online CME and improving their attitudes towards online CME. But for some physician populations, e.g. elderly or physicians with less Internet experience, e-learning might be an inferior option in comparison to traditional CME. PMID:19718276

  5. A Correlational Study of Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Learning Activity Preference for Continuing Medical Education among Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Theresa J.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative, nonexperimental, correlational study sought to determine whether a relationship exists between family physicians' levels of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) and their preferences for continuing medical education (CME) activities. The study also sought to determine whether years in clinical practice or size of clinical…

  6. Continuing Medical Education in the United States: Why It Needs Reform and How We Propose to Accomplish It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivey, Bruce E.

    2005-01-01

    As the continuing medical education (CME) enterprise evolved over the last half century, a variety of rules, national and state regulations, and reporting requirements developed, with a resultant substantial variation in what is required of a physician. That CME needs fundamental reform is not news to those who read the literature. Yet many of the…

  7. A Comparison of Internet-Based Learning and Traditional Classroom Lecture to Learn CPR for Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmati, Nima; Omrani, Soghra; Hemmati, Naser

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL) and traditional classroom lecture (TCL) for continuing medical education (CME) programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum guidelines training…

  8. The role of the ERA-EDTA in organizing continuing medical education in Europe for nephrology, dialysis and renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Coppo, Rosanna

    2006-01-01

    Continuing medical education (CME) is a process not to be ignored by the medical profession of nephrology. Each country has already organized or is going to organize a national CME system providing individual modalities of credit distribution and control. The European Renal Association - European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) has considered the need to work together with the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) to study and to promote a unified CME system in Europe with the aim of defending the quality of a comparably high level of specialist care given to patients in the EU. To this aim, the ERA-EDTA has created a European Accreditation Council for CME in nephrology, dialysis and renal transplantation (ERA-EDTA EACCME). It acts not on-ly by accrediting European meetings providing great educational value, but aims to expand the commitment of the ERA-EDTA in educational activities everywhere in Europe. Continuous medical education activity started in 2004 with a series of residential courses. Finally, the ERA-EDTA entered the newly formed Board of Nephrology for CME, which will work to homogenize the training level of nephrologists in Europe aimed at CME, as well as continuing professional education (CPE) for nephrologists. The new ERA-EDTA activities for CME in nephrology, dialysis and renal transplantation will renew the role of this scientific society for all European nephrologists (www.era-edta.org/era-courses.asp). PMID:16736408

  9. Using Social Media to Improve Continuing Medical Education: A Survey of Course Participants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Amy T.; Sandhu, Nicole P.; Wittich, Christopher M.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine continuing medical education (CME) course participants' use of social media (SM) and their attitudes about the value of SM for enhancing CME education and to examine associations between participants' characteristics and attitudes toward SM. Participants and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey and validation study of 539 participants at a Mayo Clinic Internal Medicine CME course in November 2011. The Social Media Use and Perception Instrument (SMUPI) consisted of 10 items (5-point Likert scales) and categorical response options. The main outcome measures were psychometric characteristics of the SMUPI scale, course participants' use of SM, and their attitudes regarding the importance of SM for enhancing CME. Results Of 539 CME course participants, 327 (61%) responded to the SMUPI survey. Most respondents (291 [89%]) reported using SM, with the most common types being YouTube (189 of the 327 participants [58%]) and Facebook (163 of 327 [50%]). Factor analysis revealed a 2-dimensional assessment of course participants' attitudes. Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach α) was excellent for factor 1 (0.94), factor 2 (0.89), and overall (0.94). The CME course participants' favorable attitudes toward SM were associated with younger age (20-29 years, mean score 3.13; 30-39 years, 3.40; 40-49 years, 3.39; 50-59 years, 3.18; 60-69 years, 2.93; and ≥70 years, 2.92; P=.02), using SM frequently (never, mean score 2.49; less than once monthly, 2.75; once monthly, 3.21; weekly, 3.31; and daily, 3.81; P<.0001), and professional degree (PhD, mean score 3.00; MD, 3.05; DO, 3.35; PA, 3.42; and NP, 3.50; P=.01). Conclusion We describe the first validated measure of CME course participants' use of and attitudes toward SM. Our results suggest that CME course directors should guide SM strategies toward more youthful, technology-savvy CME participants and that SM will become increasingly worthwhile in CME as younger learners continue to enter the

  10. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and the Delivery of Continuing Medical Education: Case Study from Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dave; Ryan, David; Sibbald, Gary; Rachlis, Anita; Davies, Sharon; Manchul, Lee; Parikh, Sagar

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) struck Toronto in the spring of 2003, causing many deaths, serious morbidity, forced quarantine of thousands of individuals, and the closure of all provincial hospitals for several weeks. Given the direction by public health authorities to cancel or postpone all continuing medical education…

  11. Media Richness and Social Information Processing: Rationale for Multifocal Continuing Medical Education Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Stuart C.; Turner, Jeanine Warisse

    2001-01-01

    Media richness theory suggests that media choice results from matching characteristics with content requirements. Social information processing theory adds the influence of social norms and familiarity with media types. In applying both to continuing medical information, consideration of content and participant environment guides selection of…

  12. [Physicians and continuing medical education. The results of a survey carried out in Catalonia].

    PubMed

    Pardell Alenta, H; Ramos Torre, A; Salto Cerezuela, E; Tresserras Gaju, R

    1995-04-01

    In order to learn about opinions, behaviours and needs of continuing medical education (CME), a telephone survey was carried out with a random sample of 1,001 physicians of Catalonia. Books and journals (67.7%; IC: 64.8-70.6) are the most frequent training methods used, much more than the courses and seminars (11.5%; IC: 9.5-13.5)--which are used more often by generalists than specialists--and clinical sessions (9.2%; IC 6.6-12.4). A high proportion (59.2%; IC: 56.1-62.2) do CME out of their workplace, specially general practitioners (66%; IC: 61.5-70.5). Most participants (74.7%; IC: 72.0-77.4) consider that the main objective of CME is to increase their level of knowledge. Those who argue that CME should not be mandatory are mainly general practitioners (58.9%; IC: 54.2-63.6) of which a significant number work in private practice (63.5%; IC: 60.5-66.5). 64.7% (IC: 61.8-67.7) are in favour of cost-free CME. The majority, 80% (IC: 77.4-82.4) believe that CME has to be included in the work timetable: of the physicians who support this point, the majority work in hospitals while only a few work in private practice. Some of the achieved findings could be explained by generational, training and work place differences; as well as the increasing bureaucratic elements in the profession. PMID:7620061

  13. Impact on Clinical Behavior of Face-to-Face Continuing Medical Education Blended with Online Spaced Education: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Timothy; Long, Andrea; Chopra, Sanjiv; Kerfoot, B. Price

    2011-01-01

    Background: Spaced education (SE) is a novel, evidence-based form of online learning. We investigated whether an SE program following a face-to-face continuing medical education (CME) course could enhance the course's impact on providers' clinical behaviors. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted from March 2009 to April 2010,…

  14. Continuing Medical Education and Attitudes of Health Care Providers toward Treating Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Lisa K.; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2002-01-01

    Health care providers who attended a continuing education program on type 2 diabetes (n=315) completed pre/post assessments; 146 completed 3-month follow-ups. Physicians had significantly more positive attitude changes than physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses. All groups had more positive attitudes toward treating diabetes, but…

  15. Medical education in Greece.

    PubMed

    Georgantopoulou, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to present an overview of current medical education in Greece. Greece has a centuries-long tradition in practising and teaching medicine. Medical training, although rigorous, is particularly humane. All Medical Schools in Modern Greece are currently, undergoing a series of changes in an effort to modernize training. The medical education system is also getting harmonized to European Standards for Higher Education, relating to Undergraduate, Postgraduate and Continuous Medical Education of doctors. A specific strength of the Greek educational system is its ethos that emphasises good working conditions and excellent support and supervision at all levels. The current overhauls in Higher Education occupy students, academics and the society at large. Political issues, such as accountability, regulation and autonomy of academia are generating debate. The two-cycle, Bachelor-Master, Undergraduate Model, as described in the Bologna Declaration is still to be implemented. Quality control measures are currently introduced in all academic sectors. PMID:19253151

  16. Educational needs of family physicians in the domains of health and conformity with continuing education in Fasa University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    ZARIF SANAIEY, NAHID; KARAMNEJAD, SAHAR; REZAEE, RITA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Assessment and prioritization are the first steps of planning. According to the family physician's idea, evaluating programs in order to improve them is one of the necessities of promoting quality and increases the efficiency and effectiveness of continuing education. This study aimed to determine family physicians’ educational needs regarding health and its applicability in continuous medical education in Fasa University of Medical Sciences. Methods In this cross-sectional study, viewpoints of 45 general physicians working at Fasa University of Medical Sciences in 2013 were studied. Samples were selected through census. Data collection was done using a researcher-made questionnaire using 10-point Likert scale and a checklist with Delphi technique.  Content validity of the questionnaire and its reliability were confirmed by the experts’ opinion and Cronbach's alpha of 80%.  The data were analyzed through SPSS software version 16, using both descriptive and inferential statistics (mean and standard deviation, standard score (SQ), t-test, ANOVAs). A significance level of <0.05 was considered. Results The highest educational priority was in the field of mental health (SQ= 0.38), and environmental and professional health was the lowest priority (SQ= _0.24). Additionally, within each of the areas above specific priorities were determined. Based on the results of this study, gender, graduation date, cooperation time, and university they were educated in did not affect expressing educational needs (p>0.05). The most educational conformity with continuing education was in the diseases area (topic 27%, content 37%). In the areas of environmental and professional health and health education, compliance was zero. Conclusions The physicians stated that mental health was the first educational need and environmental and professional health was the last one. According to the results, proper continuing medical programs should be coordinated with educational

  17. Physicians' knowledge and continuing medical education regarding fitness to drive: a questionnaire-based survey in Southeast Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Pfäffli, Matthias; Thali, Michael J; Eggert, Sebastian

    2012-05-01

    Valid information for physicians in Switzerland concerning knowledge and continuing education in traffic medicine is not available. Also, their attitude to the legally prescribed periodic driving fitness examinations is unclear. In order to gain more information about these topics, 635 resident physicians in Southeast Switzerland were sent a questionnaire (response rate 52%). In a self-estimation, 79% of the queried physicians claimed to know the minimal medical requirements for drivers which are important in their specialty. Statistically significant differences existed between the specialties, whereby general practitioners most frequently claimed to know the minimal medical requirements (90%). It appears that the minimal medical requirements for drivers are well known to the queried physicians. Fifty-two percent of the physicians favored an expansion of continuing education in traffic medicine. Such an expansion was desired to a lesser extent by physicians without knowledge of the minimal requirements (p < 0.001). A clear majority of the medical professionals adjudged the legally prescribed periodic driving fitness examinations as being an expedient means to identify unfit drivers. A national standardized form for reporting potentially unfit drivers to the licensing authorities was supported by 68% of the responding physicians. Such a form could simplify and standardize the reports to the licensing authorities. PMID:22012301

  18. Shifting the culture of continuing medical education: what needs to happen and why is it so difficult?

    PubMed

    Towle, A

    2000-01-01

    A revolution in health care is occurring as a result of changes in the practice of medicine and in society. These include changing demographics and the pattern of disease; new technologies; changes in health care delivery; increasing consumerism, patient empowerment, and autonomy; an emphasis on effectiveness and efficiency; and changing professional roles. The issues raised by these changes present challenges for the content and delivery of the whole continuum of medical education. The ways in which continuing medical education (CME) needs to respond to these challenges are outlined. The Informed Shared Decision Making (ISDM) Project at the University of British Columbia is used as a case study to illustrate some of the practical problems in providing CME that address these current trends in health care, is effective, and is attractive to physicians. Two particular problems are posed: how to respond to a demonstrated need when there is no perceived need on the part of physicians and how to enable change agents on the margins to develop allies and get ownership from stakeholders and opinion leaders on the inside. Two strategies for change are discussed: the substantive incorporation of CME into the continuum of medical education and the involvement of patients in the planning and delivery of CME. A final challenge is raised for the leaders of CME to define and agree what "shifting the culture of CME" means and to make a commitment of time and energy into making it happen. PMID:11201060

  19. Commercial support of continuing medical education in the United States: the politics of doubt, the value of studies.

    PubMed

    Mazmanian, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    The continuing medical education (CME) system of the United States is being questioned for its integrity. Leaders in medicine and in government are asking about the effectiveness of CME, the influence of commercial support, and the value of CME credit and accreditation in assuring CME courses offer valid content, free of commercial bias. Nationally accredited CME organizations received $1.2B in commercial support during 2007, much of it associated with CME in formats shown to be less effective for improving clinical behavior and patient outcomes. There are few reliable data to respond to careful criticism. In 2007, U.S. expenditures for health exceed $2.2 trillion, with physicians responsible for clinical decisions that account for a large part of the spending. Approximately $4013 was spent per physician on CME. Rigorous studies are required to describe and explain relationships of CME accreditation and credit to better education and improved patient outcomes. PMID:19530200

  20. Point of care information services: a platform for self-directed continuing medical education for front line decision makers

    PubMed Central

    Moja, Lorenzo; Kwag, Koren Hyogene

    2015-01-01

    The structure and aim of continuing medical education (CME) is shifting from the passive transmission of knowledge to a competency-based model focused on professional development. Self-directed learning is emerging as the foremost educational method for advancing competency-based CME. In a field marked by the constant expansion of knowledge, self-directed learning allows physicians to tailor their learning strategy to meet the information needs of practice. Point of care information services are innovative tools that provide health professionals with digested evidence at the front line to guide decision making. By mobilising self-directing learning to meet the information needs of clinicians at the bedside, point of care information services represent a promising platform for competency-based CME. Several points, however, must be considered to enhance the accessibility and development of these tools to improve competency-based CME and the quality of care. PMID:25655251

  1. Learning Associated with Participation in Journal-Based Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Thomas B.; Glass, Richard M.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Medical journal reading is a standard method of increasing awareness among physicians of evidence-based approaches to medical care. Theories of physician learning and practice change have suggested that journal reading may be more influential at some stages of behavioral change than at others, but it is not clear how journal reading…

  2. Relations between professional medical associations and the health-care industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry. PMID:22870754

  3. Can Outcome-Based Continuing Medical Education Improve Performance of Immigrant Physicians?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castel, Orit Cohen; Ezra, Vered; Alperin, Mordechai; Nave, Rachel; Porat, Tamar; Golan, Avivit Cohen; Vinker, Shlomo; Karkabi, Khaled

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Immigrant physicians are a valued resource for physician workforces in many countries. Few studies have explored the education and training needs of immigrant physicians and ways to facilitate their integration into the health care system in which they work. Using an educational program developed for immigrant civilian physicians…

  4. Using ATS-6 for Continuing Medical Education and Health Care in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler-Paisley, Matilda; And Others

    Ten Veterans Administration hospitals in Appalachia participated in five biomedical communication experiments using the Advanced Technology Satellite (ATS-6). Material was collected and evaluated by both questionnaires and interviews with the medical staff of the 10 hospitals. The five experiments were conducted in the areas of: (1) video…

  5. Physician Internet Medical Information Seeking and On-line Continuing Education Use Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebeer, Linda; Bennett, Nancy; Kristofco, Robert; Carillo, Anna; Centor, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 2,200 physicians indicated that nearly all have Internet access and use it primarily for medical information and professional development, not for communicating with patients. Credibility of source, speed, accessibility, and searching ease were most important. Barriers included information overload and too little information…

  6. Telemedicine for Access to Quality Care on Medical Practice and Continuing Medical Education in a Global Arena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafiq, Azhar; Merrell, Ronald C.

    2005-01-01

    Health care practices continue to evolve with technological advances integrating computer applications and patient information management into telemedicine systems. Telemedicine can be broadly defined as the use of information technology to provide patient care and share clinical information from one geographic location to another. Telemedicine…

  7. Participation of French Hospital Physicians to Continuing Medical Education Events: A Survey with 300 Physicians to Assess Duration, Methods, Financing, and Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maisonneuve, Herve; Touboul, Chantal; Bonnelye, Genevieve; Bertrand, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Little data on the educational needs and practices of French hospital physicians have been obtained through surveys. Given that continuing medical education (CME) information is now available on http://www.cnfmc.fr and providers are accredited, we investigated CME practices and knowledge of the CME system with the use of a…

  8. Unanticipated Learning Outcomes Associated with Commitment to Change in Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolcourt, Jack L.; Zuckerman, Grace

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Educator-derived, predetermined instructional objectives are integral to the traditional instructional model and form the linkage between instructional design and postinstruction evaluation. The traditional model does not consider unanticipated learning outcomes. We explored the contribution of learner-identified desired outcomes…

  9. Feasibility Study for Continuing Education of Medical Librarians. Interim Report, June 1, 1967 - January 15, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Alan M.; And Others

    The objective of the research described in this report is to design, implement, and evaluate educational offerings for hospital library personnel. Survey work is providing a data bank concerning the location, facilities, resources, functions, budget, services, and personnel of all hospital libraries in Ohio. These data are being supplemented with…

  10. Does Patient Partnership in Continuing Medical Education (CME) Improve the Outcome in Osteoporosis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazirandeh, Mahmood

    2002-01-01

    Patients (n=672) were screened and instructed about osteoporosis; 53 of their physicians attended lectures, a control group did not. A survey of 258 patients showed doctor-ordered screening tests increased regardless of lecture attendance. Increased patient-initiated discussions about osteoporosis suggest that patient education is effective.…

  11. Medical Education in the Anatomical Sciences: The Winds of Change Continue to Blow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Richard L.; McBride, Jennifer M.; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    At most institutions, education in the anatomical sciences has undergone several changes over the last decade. To identify the changes that have occurred in gross anatomy, microscopic anatomy, neuroscience/neuroanatomy, and embryology courses, directors of these courses were asked to respond to a survey with questions pertaining to total course…

  12. Lab Safety and Bioterrorism Readiness Curricula Using Active Learning and Hands-on Strategies as Continuing Education for Medical Technologists

    PubMed Central

    Fiester, Steven; Redfearn, James; Helfinstine, Shannon; Meilander, Tracey; Woolverton, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Frequent reports of laboratory- (and hospital-) acquired infection suggest a deficiency in safety training or lack of compliance. To assess the need for continuing education (CE) addressing this problem, an original education needs assessment survey was designed and administered to medical technologists (med-techs) in Northeast Ohio. Survey results were used to design a learner-centered training curriculum (for example, Lab Safety and Bioterrorism Readiness trainings) that engaged med-techs in active learning, integrative peer-to-peer teaching, and hands-on exercises in order to improve microbiology safety knowledge and associated laboratory techniques. The Lab Safety training was delivered six times and the Bioterrorism Readiness training was delivered five times. Pre/posttesting revealed significant gains in knowledge and techniques specific to laboratory safety, security, risk assessment, and bioterrorism readiness amongst the majority of med-techs completing the CE trainings. The majority of participants felt that the hands-on exercises met their needs and that their personal laboratory practices would change as a result of the training course, as measured by attitudinal surveys. We conclude that active learning techniques and peer education significantly enhance microbiology learning amongst participating med-techs. PMID:23914281

  13. Use of Massive Online Open Courses as a Potential Resource to Provide Continuing Medical Education in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Masud, Sarwat; Ayub, Ayaz; Mahboob, Usman

    2016-02-01

    The Pakistan Medical and Dental Council (PM&DC) has made Continuing Medical Education (CME) mandatory for doctors, from 2015 onwards. Aminimum of 15 credit hours of CME per year for general practitioners and 30 credit hours for specialist doctors have been made mandatory for renewal of the PMDC registration. While doctors can attend conferences to earn this CME credit, the opportunities are minimum and limited to major cities across Pakistan. Webbased CME is an attractive alternative to attending conferences. It can make up for 25% of the yearly PMDC requirement. So far, only two web-based CME providers have been launched in Pakistan, which is a shortage. Could Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) be used to fill this shortage? The MOOCs are online courses that are easily accessible to all learners irrespective of geographical boundary and resources, and can be used as a tool to provide CME to physicians. The problem as to how credit from PM&DC can be obtained, will need to be explored further. PMID:26876410

  14. Commercial Influence and Learner-Perceived Bias in Continuing Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Michael A.; Boscardin, Christy K.; Aguayo, Leslie; Baron, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have directly examined the relationship between commercial support of CME and perceived bias in the content of these activities. Methods Cross-sectional study of 213 accredited live educational programs organized by a university provider of CME from 2005–2007. We used a standard question from course evaluations to determine the degree to which attendees believed that commercial bias was present. Next, we used binomial regression models to determine the association between course features that may introduce commercial bias and the extent of perceived bias at those CME activities. Results The mean response rate for attendee evaluations was 56% (SD 15%). Commercial support covered 20–49% of costs for 45 (21%) educational activities, and >=50% of costs for 46 (22%) activities. Few course participants perceived commercial bias, with a median of 97% (IQR 95%–99%) of respondents stating that the activity they attended was free of commercial bias. There was no association between extent of commercial support and the degree of perceived bias in CME activities. Similarly, perceived bias did not vary for 11 of 12 event characteristics that we hypothesized might introduce commercial bias, or by score on a risk index designed to prospectively assess risk of commercial bias. Conclusions Rates of perceived bias were low for the vast majority of CME activities in our sample, and did not differ by the degree of industry support or other event characteristics. Further study is needed to determine whether commercial influence persisted in more subtle forms that were difficult for participants to detect. PMID:20042828

  15. Reinventing Continuing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshok, Mary Lindenstein

    2012-01-01

    Re-inventing continuing higher education is about finding ways to be a more central player in a region's civic, cultural, and economic life as well as in the education of individuals for work and citizenship. Continuing higher education will require data gathering, analytical tools, convening authority, interpretive skills, new models of delivery,…

  16. Enhancing practice improvement by facilitating practitioner interactivity: new roles for providers of continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Parboosingh, I John; Reed, Virginia A; Caldwell Palmer, James; Bernstein, Henry H

    2011-01-01

    Research into networking and interactivity among practitioners is providing new information that has the potential to enhance the effectiveness of practice improvement initiatives. This commentary reviews the evidence that practitioner interactivity can facilitate emergent learning and behavior change that lead to practice improvements. Insights from learning theories provide a framework for understanding emergent learning as the product of interactions between individuals in trusted relationships, such as occurs in communities of practice. This framework helps explain why some groups respond more favorably to improvement initiatives than others. Failure to take advantage of practitioner interactivity may explain in part the disappointingly low mean rates of practice improvement reported in studies of the effectiveness of practice improvement projects. Examples of improvement models in primary care settings that explicitly use relationship building and facilitation techniques to enhance practitioner interactivity are provided. Ingredients of a curriculum to teach relationship building in communities of practice and facilitation skills to enhance learning in small group education sessions are explored. Sufficient evidence exists to support the roles of relationships and interactivity in practice improvement initiatives such that we recommend the development of training programs to teach these skills to CME providers. PMID:21671279

  17. [A continuous 4-year evaluation of medical informatics education in a graduate school of health sciences using a questionnaire survey].

    PubMed

    Monzen, Satoru; Matsutani, Hideya; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the level of awareness among undergraduate students regarding medical informatics and to ascertain whether educational training has progressed with time in the Department of Health Sciences at Hirosaki University, Japan, which is a co-medical staff training institution that conducts a 4-year university course in medical informatics. The university accepts students who have completed the 3rd grade of medical licensing tests and who have attended the medical informatics lectures for 4 years (2007-2010). The ratio of first sight terminology percentage in any given fiscal year in all the 30 terminology categories varied widely from 0% to 80%, but the trend in various categories did not vary between fiscal years. The terminology of informatics under medical technology students obtained high scores of 52.5-77.3% after attending courses, which was higher compared with students from other classes. On the other hand, student nurses and occupational therapy students obtained 0-44.2%. Each class scored a high percentage of correct answers in the medical information-related terminology. Among the radiology students who attended the classes, the percentage of correct answers in categories of "digital imaging and communication in medicine" and "picture archiving and communication system" were lower than other medical terminology categories. These results reflect the gaps in educational curriculum of 1st and 2nd grades of medical licensing tests. PMID:23358336

  18. Self-assessment of need, relevance and motivation to learn as indicators of participation in continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Fox, R D; Harvill, L M

    1984-07-01

    This study examined the validity of using physicians' self-assessed needs, relevance and motivation to learn about clinical topics as a means for setting objectives and priorities for continuing medical education (CME) programmes. In an initial survey family doctors were asked to rate their need, relevance and motivation to learn about 120 different clinical topics. Eight months later, the same population was sent a second mail survey asking respondents to indicate if they had learned about a set of sixteen topics taken from the initial survey and, if so, in what kind of learning activities. Eight of the sixteen topics were highly rated and eight were low rated in the initial survey. In terms of actual participation of family doctors, self-assessed motivation to learn exhibited a strong positive relationship with actual participation. Both self-assessed need and relevance were negative to only moderately positive in their association with actual participation. This evidence contributed to the value of using self-assessed motivation as an indicator of future participation of family doctors in CME and questioned the value of using self-assessed need and relevance as indicators of future patterns of participation. PMID:6738401

  19. Themes for the Future in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    The author discusses four themes of importance in the future of continuing medical education: new knowledge, research in continuing medical education, hardware, and software. He examines advances in technology, administrative arrangements, and depersonalization in the delivery of health care services. (CT)

  20. Continuing Health Education Through Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Held, Thomas H.; Kappelman, Murray M.

    Computer assisted instruction is beginning to have an important role in the rapidly expanding field of continuing education for health science professionals. At the present time, there are 22 medical specialty boards, all of which require or are about to require some form of continuing medical education for re-certification, and studies are being…

  1. The Academic Backbone: longitudinal continuities in educational achievement from secondary school and medical school to MRCP(UK) and the specialist register in UK medical students and doctors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Selection of medical students in the UK is still largely based on prior academic achievement, although doubts have been expressed as to whether performance in earlier life is predictive of outcomes later in medical school or post-graduate education. This study analyses data from five longitudinal studies of UK medical students and doctors from the early 1970s until the early 2000s. Two of the studies used the AH5, a group test of general intelligence (that is, intellectual aptitude). Sex and ethnic differences were also analyzed in light of the changing demographics of medical students over the past decades. Methods Data from five cohort studies were available: the Westminster Study (began clinical studies from 1975 to 1982), the 1980, 1985, and 1990 cohort studies (entered medical school in 1981, 1986, and 1991), and the University College London Medical School (UCLMS) Cohort Study (entered clinical studies in 2005 and 2006). Different studies had different outcome measures, but most had performance on basic medical sciences and clinical examinations at medical school, performance in Membership of the Royal Colleges of Physicians (MRCP(UK)) examinations, and being on the General Medical Council Specialist Register. Results Correlation matrices and path analyses are presented. There were robust correlations across different years at medical school, and medical school performance also predicted MRCP(UK) performance and being on the GMC Specialist Register. A-levels correlated somewhat less with undergraduate and post-graduate performance, but there was restriction of range in entrants. General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE)/O-level results also predicted undergraduate and post-graduate outcomes, but less so than did A-level results, but there may be incremental validity for clinical and post-graduate performance. The AH5 had some significant correlations with outcome, but they were inconsistent. Sex and ethnicity also had predictive effects on

  2. Factors affecting the intention of providers to deliver more effective continuing medical education to general practitioners: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Winzenberg, Tania; Higginbotham, Nick

    2003-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of continuing medical education (CME) for GPs, there has been little research into how providers decide what types of CME to deliver to GPs. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the intention of providers to provide more effective types of CME; and to design a survey instrument which can be used to test the applicability of Triandis' model of social behaviour to the provision of CME to general practitioners. Methods This was a cross-sectional study on a convenience sample of 11 Australian providers of CME for interviews and a random sample of 25 providers for the pilot test. Open-ended interviews structured on Triandis' theory were performed with key informants who provide CME to GPs. These were used to develop a pilot survey instrument to measure the factors affecting intention, resulting in a revised instrument for use in further research. Results There was a broad range of factors affecting providers' intention to deliver more effective forms of CME identified, and these were classifiable in a manner which was consistent with Triandis' model. Key factors affecting providers' intention were the attitude toward CME within organisations and the time and extra work involved. Conclusions We identified a range of potential factors influencing the intention of providers to provide more effective forms of CME, in all categories of Triandis model. Those interested in increasing the choice of more effective CME activities available to GPs may need to broaden the methods used in working with providers to influence them to use more effective CME techniques. The interview material and questionnaire analysis of the pilot survey support the use of Triandis model. Further research is needed to validate Triandis'model for the intention to deliver more effective forms of CME. Such research will inform future strategies aimed at increasing the amount and choice of effective CME activities available for GPs. PMID:14675493

  3. CEU [Continuing Education Unit].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Basic Education Region V Staff Development Bulletin, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is a means of recording and accounting non-credit programs and activities which are professional in nature. Seven criteria have been established to assure the professionalism and quality of instruction. The criteria concern the need, objectives, and rationale of the activity; the course planning and…

  4. Continuing Education Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, K. A.; Fenwick, P. R.

    In 1978, a national survey was conducted in New Zealand to determine the extent of participation in continuing education and the level of unmet need for these activities. A questionnaire was developed dealing with respondent characteristics, spare time and interests, agency-directed learning activities (ADLAS), and unmet needs, and administered to…

  5. Continuing Education of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Education Association of U.S.A., Washington, DC.

    This annotated bibliography of about 150 items on women's continuing education begins with descriptions of a newsletter and three bibliographies, followed by documents on sex differences in ability, achievement, and role perception. Four other sections cover employment related interests and needs, women's participation in programs by universities…

  6. Overview of Geriatric Distance Education for Academic Courses and Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Helen Arleen

    2004-01-01

    Distance education technologies may be applied to academic settings, continuing education/continuing medical education settings or in combination to both. This article provides an overview of what we have learned about academic and continuing education/continuing medical education in geriatrics and gerontology. It includes information on the scope…

  7. [Critique of continuing medical education from the viewpoint of participants. Results of an evaluation of didactic seminars of the Academy of Continuing and Graduate Medical Education of the Hessen Federal Association].

    PubMed

    Fenger, H; Horn, S

    1998-04-01

    In cooperation with the chair of academy of vocational training and educational planning of the University of Technology Darmstadt the academy planned and realized a systematic evaluation concerning participants's opinion and criticism. A half-standardized questionnaire was developed, tested and applied according to the rules and recommendations of the German medical association. Between 9/94 and 11/98, feedback from 121 of the academy's seminars was received. Most seminars were judged positively in view of clarity and stimulation of thoughts while there was considerably less praise for the contribution of self-information and the possibilities of communicating and interacting. With regard to the lecture's practical relevance most seminars were judged positively. Media design and management was considered insufficient by most of the participants, as were time management and pre-information. The idea of examining the effect of learning was rejected by most of the students: Better media were desired, as were more case studies and literature references. PMID:9606889

  8. THE CONCEPT OF CONTINUATION EDUCATION IN MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Franklin D.

    1951-01-01

    The rapid increase in quantity and complexity of medical knowledge requires a redefinition of the educational aims of schools of medicine. The four formal years in medical school must be regarded as only the first four years of a “forty-year medical educational experience” and these four years must be devoted in the main to teaching principles of health and disease. There, then, must follow well-planned, realistic programs of continuation education, not in lieu of, but in addition to already established formal programs of postgraduate education. PMID:14801718

  9. Rationing medical education.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kieran

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of rationing in medical education. Medical education is expensive and there is a limit to that which governments, funders or individuals can spend on it. Rationing involves the allocation of resources that are limited. This paper discussed the pros and cons of the application of rationing to medical education and the different forms of rationing that could be applied. Even though some stakeholders in medical education might be taken aback at the prospect of rationing, the truth is that rationing has always occurred in one form or another in medical education and in healthcare more broadly. Different types of rationing exist in healthcare professional education. For example rationing may be implicit or explicit or may be based on macro-allocation or micro-allocation decisions. Funding can be distributed equally among learners, or according to the needs of individual learners, or to ensure that overall usefulness is maximised. One final option is to allow the market to operate freely and to decide in that way. These principles of rationing can apply to individual learners or to institutions or departments or learning modes. Rationing is occurring in medical education, even though it might be implicit. It is worth giving consideration to methods of rationing and to make thinking about rationing more explicit. PMID:27358649

  10. Identifying outcome-based indicators and developing a curriculum for a continuing medical education programme on rational prescribing using a modified Delphi process

    PubMed Central

    Esmaily, Hamideh M; Savage, Carl; Vahidi, Rezagoli; Amini, Abolghasem; Zarrintan, Mohammad Hossein; Wahlstrom, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Background Continuing medical education (CME) is compulsory for physicians in Iran. Recent studies in Iran show that modifications of CME elements are necessary to improve the effectiveness of the educational programmes. Other studies point to an inappropriate, even irrational drug prescribing. Based on a needs assessment study regarding CME for general physicians in the East Azerbaijan province in Iran, rational prescribing practice was recognized as a high priority issue. Considering different educational methods, outcome-based education has been proposed as a suitable approach for CME. The purpose of the study was to obtain experts' consensus about appropriate educational outcomes of rational prescribing for general physicians in CME and developing curricular contents for this education. Methods The study consisted of two phases: The first phase was conducted using a two-round Delphi consensus process to identify the outcome-based educational indicators regarding rational prescribing for general physicians in primary care (GPs). In the second phase the agreed indicators were submitted to panels of experts for assessment and determination of content for a CME program in the field. Results Twenty one learning outcomes were identified through a modified Delphi process. The indicators were used by the panels of experts and six educational topics were determined for the CME programme and the curricular content of each was defined. The topics were 1) Principles of prescription writing, 2) Adverse drug reactions, 3) Drug interactions, 4) Injections, 5) Antibiotic therapy, and 6) Anti-inflammatory agents therapy. One of the topics was not directly related to any outcome, raising a question about the need for a discussion on constructive alignment. Conclusions Consensus on learning outcomes was achieved and an educational guideline was designed. Before suggesting widespread use in the country the educational package should be tested in the CME context. PMID:18510774

  11. Improving Dairy Organizational Communication from the Veterinarian's Perspective: Results of a Continuing Veterinary Medical Education Pilot Program

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Dale A.; Sischo, William M.; Kurtz, Suzanne; Siler, Julie D.; Pereira, Richard V.; Warnick, Lorin D.; Davis, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing size and complexity of US dairy farms could make it more difficult for a veterinary practitioner to effectively communicate protocol recommendations for prevention or treatment on the farm. A continuing education workshop was set up based on the results of research on dairy organizational communication on dairy farms, which resulted in a tool to assess dairy communication structure and flow. The workshop specifically focused on communication structure and whom to talk to when implementing health care changes in calf rearing. In addition, modern methods of veterinary–client communication knowledge and skills were provided. Primary outcomes of the workshops were to obtain feedback from participants about research findings and the communication model, to improve awareness about the complexity of communication structures on dairy farms, and to change participants' knowledge and skills associated with on-farm communication by providing communication theory and skills and an approach to evaluate and improve dairy organizational communication. Of the 37 participants completing the pre-program assessment, most recognized a need for themselves or their practice to improve communication with clients and farm employees. After the program, most participants were confident in their new communication skills and would consider using them. They highlighted specific new ideas they could apply in practice, such as conducting a “communication audit”. The results from the assessment of this communication workshop, focused on dairy veterinarians, highlighted the need for communication training in this sector of the profession and practitioners' desire to engage in this type of training. PMID:26751909

  12. Improving Dairy Organizational Communication from the Veterinarian's Perspective: Results of a Continuing Veterinary Medical Education Pilot Program.

    PubMed

    Moore, Dale A; Sischo, William M; Kurtz, Suzanne; Siler, Julie D; Pereira, Richard V; Warnick, Lorin D; Davis, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    The increasing size and complexity of US dairy farms could make it more difficult for a veterinary practitioner to effectively communicate protocol recommendations for prevention or treatment on the farm. A continuing education workshop was set up based on the results of research on dairy organizational communication on dairy farms, which resulted in a tool to assess dairy communication structure and flow. The workshop specifically focused on communication structure and whom to talk to when implementing health care changes in calf rearing. In addition, modern methods of veterinary-client communication knowledge and skills were provided. Primary outcomes of the workshops were to obtain feedback from participants about research findings and the communication model, to improve awareness about the complexity of communication structures on dairy farms, and to change participants' knowledge and skills associated with on-farm communication by providing communication theory and skills and an approach to evaluate and improve dairy organizational communication. Of the 37 participants completing the pre-program assessment, most recognized a need for themselves or their practice to improve communication with clients and farm employees. After the program, most participants were confident in their new communication skills and would consider using them. They highlighted specific new ideas they could apply in practice, such as conducting a "communication audit." The results from the assessment of this communication workshop, focused on dairy veterinarians, highlighted the need for communication training in this sector of the profession and practitioners' desire to engage in this type of training. PMID:26751909

  13. Continuing Education: "Something for Everyone"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Larry W.

    1973-01-01

    New River Community College, Dublin, Virginia, has a continuing education philosophy based upon the understanding that education is never complete. They view themselves, and similar institutions, as true community education and cultural centers. (AG)

  14. Medical Information Project; A Study of an Audiovisual Device as a Technique for Continuing Education for General Practitioners. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahamson, Stephen; And Others

    The unique factor in the Medical Information Project is that working from ground zero, it undertook to design and put into operation a communication system for general medical practitioners using an individualized, programmed, audiovisual medium. The development of this system involved three general phases. Phase I, consisted of: (1) obtaining and…

  15. Medical education in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Victor K E

    2008-01-01

    Malaysia has a long history of medical education, with Singapore becoming the first medical school to serve the region after its foundation in 1905. The first school to be established in Kuala Lumpur after independence from the British was the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Malaya in 1963. Whilst today there are 21 public and private medical schools, all offering a 5 year undergraduate programme, some private schools have diversified by developing international collaboration and conduct twinning or credit-transfer programmes. All medical schools require accreditation by the National Accreditation Board and the Malaysian Medical Council. Although the criteria for accreditation is comprehensive and covers a broad range of areas of assessment, it is debatable whether it always matches the needs of the country. The dramatic increase in medical schools in the last two decades has posed challenges in terms of maintenance of quality, physical infrastructure and suitably qualified faculty. PMID:18464135

  16. Education for Hospital Library Personnel, Continuation of Feasibility Study for Continuing Education of Medical Librarians; Hospital Library Planning Data for the Northeastern Ohio Regional Medical Program. Interim Report No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Alan M.; And Others

    This document is a guide to hospital library resources in the Northeastern Ohio Regional Medical Program (NEORMP). This information is intended to provide a data base for establishment of a network of hospital libraries linked to the major resource libraries in the region. Data collected in a survey of the 73 hospitals involved in the NEORMP cover…

  17. The RAFT network: 5 years of distance continuing medical education and tele-consultations over the Internet in French-speaking Africa.

    PubMed

    Geissbuhler, Antoine; Bagayoko, Cheick Oumar; Ly, Ousmane

    2007-01-01

    Continuing education of healthcare professionals is a key element for the quality and efficiency of a health system. In developing countries, this activity is usually limited to capitals, and delocalized professionals do not have access to such opportunities, or to didactic material adapted to their needs. This limits the interest of such professionals to remain active in the periphery, where they are most needed to implement effective strategies for prevention and first-line healthcare. Telemedicine tools enable the communication and sharing of medical information in electronic form, and thus facilitate access to remote expertise. A physician located far from a reference center can consult its colleagues remotely in order to resolve a difficult case, follow a continuous education course over the Internet, or access medical information from digital libraries or knowledge bases. These same tools can also be used to facilitate exchanges between centers of medical expertise: health institutions of a same country as well as across borders. Since 2000, the Geneva University Hospitals have been involved in coordinating the development of a network for eHealth in Africa (the RAFT, Réseau en Afrique Francophone pour la Télémédecine), first in Mali, and now extending to 10 French-speaking African countries. The core activity of the RAFT is the webcasting of interactive courses. These sessions put the emphasis on knowledge sharing across care professionals, usually in the form of presentations and dialogs between experts in different countries. The technology used for the webcasting works with a slow (25 kbits/s) internet connection. Other activities of the RAFT network include visioconferences, teleconsultations based on the iPath system, collaborative knowledge bases development, support for medical laboratories quality control, and the evaluation of the use of telemedicine in rural areas (via satellite connections) in the context of multisectorial development. Finally

  18. Changes in Medical Education in Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Jose Manuel; Pujol, Ramon

    1998-01-01

    Discussion of medical education in Spain looks briefly at history and early reforms, then examines the current system, including emphasis on traditional teaching methods, focus on faculty research over teaching, inadequate resident assessment, and lack of coordination among continuing medical education providers. Ongoing reform efforts are also…

  19. Continuities in Continuing Education: A View from Community Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mace, Jane

    1993-01-01

    Open, modular, and distance forms of learning pose a risk to the continuity of the group in continuing and community education. Group sharing of learning and experience is the environment in which adult learning takes place. (SK)

  20. Slow medical education.

    PubMed

    Wear, Delese; Zarconi, Joseph; Kumagai, Arno; Cole-Kelly, Kathy

    2015-03-01

    Slow medical education borrows from other "slow" movements by offering a complementary orientation to medical education that emphasizes the value of slow and thoughtful reflection and interaction in medical education and clinical care. Such slow experiences, when systematically structured throughout the curriculum, offer ways for learners to engage in thoughtful reflection, dialogue, appreciation, and human understanding, with the hope that they will incorporate these practices throughout their lives as physicians. This Perspective offers several spaces in the medical curriculum where slowing down is possible: while reading and writing at various times in the curriculum and while providing clinical care, focusing particularly on conducting the physical exam and other dimensions of patient care. Time taken to slow down in these ways offers emerging physicians opportunities to more fully incorporate their experiences into a professional identity that embodies reflection, critical awareness, cultural humility, and empathy. The authors argue that these curricular spaces must be created in a very deliberate manner, even on busy ward services, throughout the education of physicians. PMID:25426738

  1. Changing medical education.

    PubMed

    Grant, J; Gale, R

    1989-05-01

    This paper is based on one which was prepared to support the World Conference of the World Federation for Medical Education in August 1988. It is designed to provide a broad perspective on the essential elements of an educational change process. The paper covers the stages in designing a change strategy and highlights the difficulties that any change agent is likely to encounter. A review of the history of change in education and organizations is followed by discussion of the need for change and the ability to change. Reasons for resistance to change are presented and discussed. Implementation and reinforcement of change are considered before a final section on evaluation. PMID:2725362

  2. An international dermatological image atlas on the WWW: practical use for undergraduate and continuing medical education, patient education and epidemiological research.

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, G; Bauer, J; Sager, A; Bittorf, A; Simon, M; Diepgen, T

    1998-01-01

    We describe the development of an image database DOIA (Dermatological OnlIne Atlas) and present several spin-off projects using images of the atlas, e.g. student education using the atlas including results of an questionnaire evaluating computer-literacy, prerequisites and interests of students for using computers and the World-Wide-Web (WWW), a patient information system and an experiment to collect epidemiological data from patients with dermatological diseases via WWW. The database, available on the WWW at http:@www.derma.med.uni-erlangen.de, contains about 3,000 clinical images covering more than 540 dermatological diagnoses. It is designed for worldwide use; international submissions are encouraged. One aim of the project is to compile an international reference for dermatological images, containing images of high educational quality and also covering conditions on different skin types and rare diagnoses which are not commonly illustrated in ordinary textbooks. All images were originally mapped to the Erlanger Diagnosis Code, which is a proprietary modified ICD-9 key, later also to the UMLS (Unified Medical Language System). In addition, images are described with keys for the location, physical attributes of the location and clinical and histopathological features of the lesion. In order to facilitate the integration of the atlas into other web-based medical resources and to allow easy access to additional information, the Erlanger Diagnosis Code was mapped to the CUIs (unique concept identifiers) of the UMLS Metathesaurus. One purpose of the UMLS is to allow conversion of terms from one controlled medical vocabulary to another, thus, mapping of our diagnosis code to the UMLS CUIs allows simultaneous search for a given diagnosis in a number of other databases and also access to our image database from other databases. Mapping was successful for 619 out of 1383 dermatological diagnosis terms. For images with these diagnoses we are able to provide a hyperlink to

  3. Medical education: Changes and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qin; Lee, Liming; Gruppen, Larry D.; Ba, Denian

    2013-01-01

    As medical education undergoes significant internationalization, it is important for the medical education community to understand how different countries structure and provide medical education. This article highlights the current landscape of medical education in China, particularly the changes that have taken place in recent years. It also examines policies and offers suggestions about future strategies for medical education in China. Although many of these changes reflect international trends, Chinese medical education has seen unique transformations that reflect its particular culture and history. PMID:23631405

  4. Impact of medical informatics on medical education.

    PubMed

    Hou, S M

    1999-11-01

    In recent years, medical informatics has become a well-recognized branch of medicine. It is a multidisciplinary science that combines information technology and various specialties of medicine. The impact of medical informatics on medical education is advancing along with the rapid developments in computer science. Departments of medical informatics or similar divisions have appeared in schools of medicine in Taiwan in the past 5 years. At National Taiwan University College of Medicine, we offer curricula in basic computer concepts, network concepts, operating systems, word processing, database and data processing, computer media resources, multimedia computer statistics, intelligent health information systems, medical diagnostic support systems, and electronic medical record systems. Distance learning has also been favorably accepted on this campus. Recently, we proposed the concept of a virtual medical campus, which will break the physical barriers of time and space. We expect this revolution to influence every aspect of medicine, especially medical education. PMID:10705693

  5. New Media in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agocs, Laszlo; Modis, Laszlo

    1994-01-01

    A Hungarian medical school is providing its students the means for self-education by connecting a media center to its medical education units and engaging in an instructional system which features problem-based learning. (AEF)

  6. [Medical education in Egypt].

    PubMed

    Barnard, H

    2002-06-15

    Modern medical training in Egypt was started by Antoine Clot Bey in 1837 and became part of the university programme in 1919. At present, it comprises six years of university education, followed by one year of internships and one year of compulsory employment with a state-owned hospital. There are now 13 medical faculties in Egypt, using three different curricula: traditional, Islamic and innovative. Their implementation is hampered by the large number of students (15,500 men and 7500 women), the low salaries and motivation of the instructors, the teaching in English rather than Arabic and the lack of recent study materials. It is therefore rather difficult to compare the effectiveness of the Egyptian system with that in the Netherlands. Due partly to the differences in language and culture, Dutch authorities are reluctant to recognise Egyptian medical diplomas. PMID:12092309

  7. Profit Planning in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddock, M. David, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a "profit" model for continuing education (in a university setting but applicable to all continuing education operations) based upon the organization of profit and cost centers to help develop an administrative structure and control mechanisms to achieve profit planning. Tables illustrate different elements in the model. (MF)

  8. Wanted: A Continuing Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, A. Brian

    1986-01-01

    Describes the efforts of the Triton College Continuing Education Department to develop a unified curriculum and to market the program. Includes information on developing a continuing education philosophy, providing a unified curriculum, and creating a marketing bulletin. Illustrates ways to recombine courses to provide a unified approach. (CH)

  9. Continuing Professional Education Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, James P.

    This investigation of delivery systems for continuing professional education provides an overview of current operational delivery systems in continuing professional education, drawing on experience as found in the literature. Learning theories and conclusions are woven into the descriptive text. Delivery systems profiled in the paper include the…

  10. Osteopathic Medical Education and Social Accountability.

    PubMed

    Phillips-Madson, Robyn; Dharamsi, Shafik

    2016-04-01

    The public's trust in physicians continues to decline. As a way to begin regaining this trust, stakeholders, including physicians, medical educators, patient advocacy groups, and community-based organizations, have called for medical education to meet societal health needs, particularly the needs of those members who are most vulnerable, by incorporating social accountability into the medical school curriculum. The unique attributes of the osteopath-ic medical profession provide an enabling and conducive environment for broader social accountability in the health care system. Osteopathic medical schools must actively safeguard the profession's unequivocal commitment to producing healers that are fiduciaries for their patients, communities, and populations at large. PMID:27018954

  11. Transforming Medical Education: Is Competency-Based Medical Education the Right Approach?

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Michael E

    2016-05-01

    There is growing recognition within the medical education community that medical education in this country needs to be changed to better prepare doctors for the challenges they will face in providing their patients high-quality medical care. A competency-based medical education (CBME) approach was endorsed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Medical Specialties approximately 15 years ago, and a self-designated group-the International Competency-Based Medical Education (ICBME) Collaborators-is now calling on members of the medical education community to join them in their effort to establish CBME as the approach to be used in transforming medical education, not only in the United States but also around the world.In response to an article in this issue by a group of ICBME Collaborators, the author argues that more evidence about the effectiveness of CBME is needed before a global shift to this approach is undertaken. It is time for major organizations and foundations that are committed to improving medical education to step forward and take the lead in partnering with the medical education community to conduct a critical evaluation of CBME. In addition, maintenance of certification, relicensure, and continuing medical education programs should be evaluated for their effectiveness in ensuring that physicians are clinically competent not only at the beginning of their career but also until the end. PMID:26675191

  12. Professional Acknowledgement for Continuing Education (PACE): General Information Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASMT News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    To provide a central, permanent file of continuing education credits for persons in the field of medical technology, the Professional Acknowledgement for Continuing Education (PACE) program was established by the American Society for Medical Technology. Three different types of units will be recorded: College/University credits, Continuing…

  13. Undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, L; Wass, J

    1993-01-01

    Pressures from students and teachers, from professional bodies, and from changes in the way health care is delivered are all forcing a rethink of how medical students should be taught. These pressures may be more intense in London but are not confined to it. The recommendation the Tomlinson report advocates that has been generally welcomed is for more investment in primary care in London. General practitioners have much to teach medical schools about effective ways of learning, but incentives for teaching students in general practice are currently low, organising such teaching is difficult and needs resources, and resistance within traditional medical school hierarchies needs to be overcome. Likewise, students value learning within local communities, but the effort demanded of public health departments and community organisations is great at a time when they are under greater pressure than ever before. The arguments over research that favour concentration in four multifaculty schools are less clear cut for undergraduate education, where personal support for students is important. An immediate concern is that the effort demanded for reorganising along the lines suggested by Tomlinson will not leave medical schools much energy for innovating. Images p259-a PMID:8499026

  14. Community-Oriented Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Community-orientated medicine is a topical area for debate in the current discussions about medical education, but it can be argued that medical education has always been in the community because medical practice is located therein. It is widely accepted that community settings provide a wealth of learning opportunities for students and trainees…

  15. Blended Learning in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing pedagogical advancements in medical education across the globe have gained the attention of academicians for the preparation of well-educated and competent physicians to address the healthcare issues facing today. The integration of technology into medical pedagogy has proved effective in many ways. This has made the medical education…

  16. Competitive Strategy in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baden, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Reviews strategic variables available to those planning continuing education marketing programs. Discusses generic competitive strategies: (1) overall cost leadership, (2) differentiation, and (3) specialization. Mentions several potential problems. (CH)

  17. Marketing Essentials for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Jim

    2001-01-01

    A survey of continuing education providers showed the need for greater investment in marketing, cultivation of outsourcing relationships, staff development in marketing techniques, and new ways of communicating the message to potential customers. (SK)

  18. Wright State Expands Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    By leasing the Eugene W. Kettering Engineering and Science Center in downtown Dayton, Ohio, Wright State University plans to enlarge significantly its activities in continuing education for engineers, scientists, and others. (JR)

  19. Communications Technology and Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Sheldon

    1984-01-01

    Focusing on three recent developments in communications technology--communications satellites, multichannel cable systems, and home videodisc players--the author discusses the current and potential applications of each to continuing education programs. (SK)

  20. The Engineering Societies & Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Engineer, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Gives a description of what the major engineering societies (ASCE, ASME, AICHE, and IEEE) are doing in the area of continuing education. The description includes the short courses, their costs, duration, type and scope of the content. (GA)

  1. Continuing Education Goes to Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, Elinor

    1976-01-01

    Successful marketing of continuing education involves, essentially, two things: (1) that we never confuse marketing with manipulation, and (2) that we keep our sights firmly fixed on the interests and concerns of the people we serve. (Author)

  2. The Value of Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schejbal, David; Wilson, David

    2008-01-01

    Higher education--and continuing education as one arm of that enterprise--is not just an economic engine; it contributes directly and in a multifaceted fashion to the common good. It generates and makes accessible a great deal of the knowledge that drives the economy; it helps develop an understanding of the society and the world for millions of…

  3. Continuous Education, Democracy, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filippov, Fridrikh Rafailovich

    1990-01-01

    Identifies links in Soviet continuous education from preschool to postsecondary study, and their objectives. Discusses lifelong learning as a means of keeping pace with socioeconomic and technological developments. Advocates democratic and humanistic reforms in the Soviet educational system in response to the political changes of perestroika. (CH)

  4. Simulation in medical education.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kamran; Pattison, Tim; Sherwood, Morgan

    2011-01-01

    Studies in cognitive psychology inform us that the recall of information and its application are best when it is taught and rehearsed in environments similar to workplace. The healthcare professions are heavily task- and performance-based where non-technical skills, decision making and clinical reasoning are important alongside integrity, empathy and compassion. Most of these attributes are difficult to teach and assess in the traditional classrooms. Enhanced patient safety on one hand has to be the ultimate outcome of any medical curriculum while on the other hand, it itself can be potentially compromised in an apprenticeship-based model of medical education. A range of simulation techniques are very well placed to be used alongside clinical placements. These can be employed to enhance learning of healthcare professionals in safe environments, without compromising the patient safety, while maintaining a high degree of realism. This article builds an argument for the use of simulation techniques to enhance patient safety and points the readers to the AMEE Guide No. 50 on simulation, which is written as a practical manual on building a simulation programme in healthcare education. PMID:21182376

  5. Business continuity after catastrophic medical events: the Joplin medical business continuity report.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Paul K; Bringle, Dottie

    2012-01-01

    On May 22, 2011, The St Johns Mercy Medical Center in Joplin, MO, was destroyed by an F-5 tornado. There were 183 patients in the building at that time in this 367-bed Medical Center. The preparation and response were superbly done and resulted in many lives saved. This report is focused on the reconstitution phase of this disaster response, which includes how to restore business continuity. As 95 percent of our medical capacity resides in the private sector in the United States, we must have a proper plan for how to restore business continuity or face the reality of the medical business failing and not providing critical medical services to the community. A tornado in 2007 destroyed a medical center in Sumter County, GA, and it took more than 365 days to restore business continuity at a cost of $18M. The plan executed by the Mercy Medical System after the disaster in Joplin restored business continuity in 88 days and cost a total of $6.6M, with all assets being reusable. The recommendation from these lessons learned is that every county, state, and Federal Emergency Management Agency region has a plan on the shelf to restore business continuity and the means to be able to do so. The hard work that the State of Missouri and the Mercy Medical System did after this disaster can serve as a model for the nation in how to quickly recover from any loss of medical capability. PMID:23264280

  6. A Model for Continuing Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Newlon, Carey; Dickerhofe, Jeannine

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop and implement a continuing pharmacy education (CPE) program at Kaiser Permanente Colorado (KPCO) Design To address the continuing education needs of its diverse pharmacy staff, an internal continuing pharmacy education (CPE) program was developed. The pharmacy department became an accredited provider by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). Live, interactive, and evidence-based CPE programs, presented by highly qualified internal staff members, utilized videoconferencing and a Web-based learning management system. Cross-accreditation of medical and pharmacy educational programs was offered to KPCO staff members. Assessment Annual needs assessments were conducted to ensure the provision of relevant educational topics and to assess learning needs. To demonstrate outcomes of the CPE programs, 2 methods were utilized: objective effectiveness assessment and knowledge acquisition assessment. This program met the objectives for CPE activities a large majority of the time (usually over 90%), demonstrated statistically significant (p < 0.05) improvement in knowledge from before to after the CPE activity in 11 of 13 questions asked, and minimized the cost to acquire CPE credit for both the pharmacy department and its staff members. Conclusion The KPCO continuing pharmacy education program has developed a high quality and cost-favorable system that has resulted in significant improvements in attendee knowledge. PMID:19777102

  7. Critical Issues in Continuing Education in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Signe S., Ed.

    The National Conference provides continuing education for nurse educators who are responsible for providing continuing nursing education. Papers presented at the conference are: Philosophies of Continuing Education, Theodore J. Shannon; Philosophies of Education--Implications for Continuing Education in Nursing, Edith V. Olson; Developing a Model…

  8. Continuity of medical care: conceptualization and measurement.

    PubMed

    Shortell, S M

    1976-05-01

    Continuity of medical care is conceived as the extent to which services are received as part of a coordinated and uninterrupted succession of events consistent with the medical care needs of patients. Two operational measures are proposed, based on the Gini and CON indices of concentration. Examples of their application are provided using the 1970 CHAS-NORC national study of health services utilization. The validity of the proposed measures is assessed in a preliminary fashion, and some commonly held assumptions about the relationship between access, quality, and continuity of care are challenged. Advantages of the proposed measures include their ability to summarize a distribution, the availability of data for construction, the relative ease of computation and interpretation, and their sensitivity to organizational changes in the delivery of health services. PMID:1271879

  9. The Revolution in Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Christina M; Cox, Susan M; Dalrymple, John L

    2016-02-01

    Medical education has been gradually evolving for hundreds of years, but educators are now seeking to identify ways to prepare students for the future of health care delivery. Medical education reform today focuses on creating entirely new models and is moving away from the traditional, post-Flexnerian organization of the medical school curriculum. Content is now being integrated thematically and presented along interdisciplinary lines with an interdigitation of basic and clinical sciences across all four years. Current trends indicate education should contain elements that produce a physician who is able to improve the quality of health care by taking a humanistic approach to medicine, thinks critically, and participates effectively in multidisciplinary and team approaches to patient care. Ultimately, medical education innovation should recognize the development of a physician is a lifetime process and will approach the formation of physicians from a new paradigm to better serve the educator and prepare the learner for the medical practice of tomorrow. PMID:26859376

  10. Virtual Patients in continuing medical education and residency training: a pilot project for acceptance analysis in the framework of a residency revision course in pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Ronny; Hanebeck, Benjamin; Oberle, Stephan; Simon, Anke; Choukair, Daniela; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Huwendiek, Sören

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Virtual patients (VPs) are a one-of-a-kind e-learning resource, fostering clinical reasoning skills through clinical case examples. The combination with face-to-face teaching is important for their successful integration, which is referred to as “blended learning”. So far little is known about the use of VPs in the field of continuing medical education and residency training. The pilot study presented here inquired the application of VPs in the framework of a pediatric residency revision course. Methods: Around 200 participants of a pediatric nephology lecture (‘nephrotic and nephritic syndrome in children’) were offered two VPs as a wrap-up session at the revision course of the German Society for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ) 2009 in Heidelberg, Germany. Using a web-based survey form, different aspects were evaluated concerning the learning experiences with VPs, the combination with the lecture, and the use of VPs for residency training in general. Results: N=40 evaluable survey forms were returned (approximately 21%). The return rate was impaired by a technical problem with the local Wi-Fi firewall. The participants perceived the work-up of the VPs as a worthwhile learning experience, with proper preparation for diagnosing and treating real patients with similar complaints. Case presentations, interactivity, and locally and timely independent repetitive practices were, in particular, pointed out. On being asked about the use of VPs in general for residency training, there was a distinct demand for more such offers. Conclusion: VPs may reasonably complement existing learning activities in residency training. PMID:26604993

  11. Course Evaluation in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Jennifer R.; Shea, Judy A.

    2007-01-01

    Course evaluation is integral to medical education. We discuss (1) distinctive features of medical education that impact on course evaluation, (2) a framework for course evaluations, (3) details that shape the evaluation process, (4) key measurement issues important to data gathering and interpretation, and (5) opportunities for expanding the…

  12. Financing of Graduate Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Fiscal Services, Annapolis.

    This study, conducted for the Maryland legislature, evaluated the current method for financing graduate medical education in hospital rates, particularly whether the costs of graduate education at the state's two academic medical centers are too high. The study involved discussions with the Health Services Cost Review Commission (HSCRC),…

  13. Electives in Graduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Santosh; Zayapragassarazan, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Modern curricula have both compulsory portions and electives or portions chosen by students. Electives have been a part of graduate and postgraduate general higher education. Electives are included in various standards for graduate medical education and are also included in proposed Medical Council of India Regulations on Graduate Medical…

  14. Geriatric Medical Education in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibovitz, Arthur; Baumoehl, Yehuda; Habot, Beni

    2004-01-01

    In this article we will focus on geriatric medical education in Israel and will review our experience in this field. A coordinated effort of the Ministry of Health and the Israeli Medical Association led to the establishment of a modern geriatric system and to the recognition of geriatrics as a medical specialty in the early 1980s. All four…

  15. Abraham Flexner and medical education.

    PubMed

    Ludmerer, Kenneth M

    2011-01-01

    The Flexner Report had its roots in the recognition in the mid-19th century that medical knowledge is not something fixed but something that grows and evolves. This new view of medical knowledge led to a recasting of the goal of medical education as that of instilling the proper techniques of acquiring and evaluating information rather than merely inculcating facts through rote memorization. Abraham Flexner, a brilliant educator, had the background to understand and popularize the meaning of this new view of education, and he took the unprecedented step of relating the developments in medical education to the ideas of John Dewey and the progressive education movement. Although the Flexner Report is typically viewed as a historical document--due to an understandable tendency to refer only to the second half of the report, where Flexner provides his famous critiques of the medical schools that existed at the time--this article argues that the Flexner Report is actually a living educational document of as much significance to medical educators today as in Flexner's time. The article analyzes Flexner's discussion of medical education and shows that his message--the importance of academic excellence, professional leadership, proper financial support, and service and altruism--is timeless, as applicable to the proper education of physicians today and tomorrow as in the past. PMID:21399378

  16. Implications for Veterinary Medical Education: Postprofessional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahrs, Robert F.

    1980-01-01

    Concern about delivery of veterinary medical services to animal agriculture and implications for postprofessional veterinary medical education are discussed. The individual needs and goals of livestock producers, practicing veterinarians, and veterinary academicians are so varied that actual delivery of veterinary medical services is difficult to…

  17. Marketing Continuing Education for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide presents an overview of marketing and its potential value in continuing education programs for nurses. The first portion of the guide briefly discusses the concept of marketing. It contains definitions of key marketing concepts (product, place, price, and promotion), discussion of the basic tenets of marketing (consumer needs…

  18. Continuing Education Survey, Fall 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCalle, James F.; And Others

    In fall 1981, all students attending a continuing education course at Harford Community College (HCC) were asked to complete a survey instrument designed to collect information on student demographics, reasons for attendance, tuition payment, sources of information about the non-credit courses, registration and commuting patterns, satisfaction…

  19. Continuing Education for Distance Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassner, Mary; Adams, Kate E.

    2012-01-01

    Distance librarians as engaged professionals work in a complex environment of changes in technologies, user expectations, and institutional goals. They strive to keep current with skills and competencies to support distance learners. This article provides a selection of continuing education opportunities for distance librarians, and is relevant…

  20. Continuing Education in Canadian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannell, R. L.

    Different aspects of the development of continuing education in Canadian universities and institutions were studied by the British author through visits to Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Calgary, and Banff. Short visits were also made to Massachusetts, Washington, Oregon, and California. Comparisons between Canadian and British…

  1. Integrating Patients into Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    The discussions about medical education in the public focus upon quantity. The quality of the teaching process isn’t questioned. But the professionalization of medical education should start with a close look at bedside teaching because it is the core of training medical doctors. Patient-centered teaching: German medical leicensure act (Approbationsordnung) defines the quality of medical education by standard setting for group sizes and fixing the hours of bedside teaching. Although there are some fuzzy definitions it is possible to extract some special forms of bedside teaching. The capacity act (Kapazitätsverordnung) interprets these definitions for calculating the number of students who could be enrolled each year. Types of bedside teaching: The different forms of contact with patients which are necessary for a good medical education can be transformed into distinct types of courses. Our classification of courses with specific forms of patient contact is suitable to describe each German program of medical studies. This quantitative profile offers new opportunities for comparing medical education at the different faculties. Discussion: In many German medical schools the hours of bedside teaching are allocated in a verv pragmatical way according to the medical leicensure act. A more professional curriculum planning leads to a sophisticated use of these diverse forms of patient-centered teaching. Because this professional planning is better derived from the legal basis it offers new arguments against an economically oriented hospital management. PMID:22403598

  2. The Role of Colleges and Universities in Continuing Education of Practicing Physicians in Communities Geographically Isolated from a Medical Teaching Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon Coll., Erie, PA.

    This document contains a pilot planning program in continuing physician education conducted in the Erie, Pennsylvania metropolitan area through the cooperative activities of the Erie community of physicians and Gannon College. The research and analysis conducted in the planning program included the following components: (1) Analysis of all the…

  3. Canadian medical education: 50 years of innovation and leadership.

    PubMed

    Dauphinee, W D

    1993-05-01

    Over the past 50 years, many Canadian medical educators have pursued ideas and visions, as individuals in the 1950s and 1960s and later in partnership with various national bodies. Relations between universities and national medical organizations have been productive in dealing with issues of postgraduate education and clinical assessment, in particular. From 1970 to 1990, strong education offices and formally trained educators led to many successes in the areas of research in cognition, continuing medical education and clinical assessment. Canadian medical education has now achieved international recognition for its work in all aspects of the continuum of the physician's education through vision, initiative and cooperation. PMID:8477386

  4. The Case for Continuing Education in Veterinary Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Explores why continuing veterinary medical education (CVME) programs can play a vital role in supporting the overall strategy of a veterinary college. Discusses the current and future market for CVME programs and strategies for sustainability and synergy. (EV)

  5. The Continuing Education Unit: A New Kind of Credit for Higher Education Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Grover J.

    The Continuing Education Unit (CEU) has come into the American higher educational scene as a relevant response to public needs. The need for some kind of measurement for noncredit continuing education was established at a nationwide conference. The CEU--10 contact hours of participation in an organized continuing education experience under…

  6. In Search of Coherence: A View from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, David C.

    2005-01-01

    The Conjoint Committee on Continuing Medical Education has developed a position paper, a set of recommendations, and next steps in the reform of continuing medical education (CME). The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) sets standards for and accredits residency programs in graduate medical education and is not directly…

  7. Tele-education as method of medical education.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Kulasin, Igor; Masic, Zlatan; Valjevac, Salih

    2009-01-01

    Development of computer networks and introduction and application of new technologies in all aspects of human activity needs to be followed by universities in their transformation on how to approach scientific, research, and education teaching curricula. Development and increased use of distance learning (DL) over the past decade have clearly shown the potential and efficiency of information technology applied in education. Use of information technology in medical education is where medical informatics takes its place as important scientific discipline which ensures benefit from IT in teaching and learning process involved. Definition of telemedicine as "use of technologies based on health care delivered on distance" covers areas such as electronic health, tele-health (eHealth), telematics, but also tele-education. Web based medical education today is offered in different forms--from online lectures, online exams, web based continuous education programs, use of electronic libraries, online medical and scientific databases etc. Department of Medical Informatics of Medical Faculty of University of Sarajevo has taken many steps to introduce distance learning in medical curricula--from organising professional--scientific events (congresses, workshop etc), organizing first tele-exam at the faculty and among first at the university, to offering online lectures and online education material at the Department's website (www.unsa-medinfo.org). Distance learning in medical education, as well as telemedicine, significantly influence health care in general and are shaping the future model of medical practice. Basic computer and networks skills must be a part of all future medical curricula. The impact of technical equipment on patient-doctor relationship must be taken into account, and doctors have to be trained and prepared for diagnosing or consulting patients by use of IT. Telemedicine requires special approach in certain medical fields--tele-consultation, tele

  8. Continuing education. Closing the performance gap.

    PubMed

    Petit, P

    1994-01-01

    The justifications for continuing education of health workers are: to assure adequate basic training, to update skills and techniques, to supplement skills when jobs change, and to fill what is referred to as a "performance gap." Lack of appropriate knowledge is a reason for continuing education, as lack of resources, poor motivation, and poor work organization are reasons for training health workers through continuing education. The greatest impact of continuing education occurs when there is a degree of stability in the health system and health workers remain in their positions for some time. The advantages of continuing education are the immediacy of putting skills into practice, the ability to give the practical examples and correct mistakes, the ability to reduce backlogs and bottlenecks in service, make provisions for support and motivation of health workers, function without additional need for buildings or extra teaching staff, reach numbers of people at low cost. Financial resources are needed from either national governments or donor agencies. The problem with donor support is the development of vertical programs that compete or conflict with other integrated primary health care operations. Continuing education approaches are commonly either "cascade" or "mushroom" approaches. Cascade approach refers to the construction of a body of knowledge, which is then passed through different levels of training programs until it reaches local health workers. Cascade approach is ineffective when the message gets too diluted after changing hands so many times, or when continuation is not possible after training has stopped. In contrast, the mushroom strategy begins locally with strong leadership and community participation and is extended to other areas. The same criticism can be applied to mushroom strategies. Sample strategies include Tanzania's distance education in the form of correspondence courses, and zonal continuing education centers. The African Medical

  9. The Continuing Challenge of Multicultural Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahnos, Markella L.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the currently insufficient multicultural health education, which influences health status, disease prevention, wellness, and compliance with medical protocols. The article recommends administrative policy changes, educational philosophy renewal, communication via community and parents, multicultural preservice teacher education, and…

  10. Fasa University Medical School: a novel experience in medical education

    PubMed Central

    RONAGHY, HOSSAIN A.; NASR, KHOSROW

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In early 1970`s a combination of a shortage and misdistribution of health services and growing public dissatisfaction about the health care available, along with increasing expectations, has put great strain on the mind of the staff of the Department of Medicine Shiraz University School of Medicine. The purpose of this report is to give an account of what was originally planned and what has happened since the start of Fasa Medical School in April 1978. Methods: This is a case report about an experience in medical education in Iran. At the time, two major problems were facing our country. The first was gross mal-distribution of these healthcare facilities, which were mostly concentrated in Tehran and big cities of Iran, and the second problem was continuous exodus of Iranian Medical graduates to the Western countries. Results: The main idea of creating Fasa Medical School was to create a system in which primary care in small villages are provided by VHW with the middle level health workers of “Behdar Roustaee” to be supported by local physicians who  reside in small towns. Conclusion: For Fasa Medical School, education was emphasized on community based, student centered, and problem based medical education located in the community and based on teamwork and cooperation. PMID:25512919

  11. Research and Evaluation in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Helena A.; Collins, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of medical education is continuously evolving, as are the needs of the learner. The appropriate use of research and evaluation is key when assessing the need for change and instituting one's innovative endeavours. This paper demonstrates how research seeks to generate new knowledge, whereas evaluation uses information acquired from…

  12. Podiatric Medical Education: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, George P.

    1980-01-01

    The basic curricular structure and courses deemed necessary to podiatric medical education are outlined and their rationale explained. Specialties appropriate to podiatric practice, such as electrophysiology and cardiovascular physiology, are noted, and the sequence of coursework suggested. (MSE)

  13. Computers for the continuing education of practicing physicians.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, E P

    1989-01-01

    Computer-based medical education became practical with the wide-spread availability of personal computers and the ease of dialing in to a central computer via standard telephone lines with a modem. Continuing education credits can now be earned from the privacy and convenience of the physician's home or office via the computer. A variety of courses are available from national medical organizations, medical schools, and medical publishers. While examples can give a flavor of the type of courseware available, only hands-on use can help you decide if this style of education fits yours. PMID:10304121

  14. The Marvelous Medical Education Machine or How Medical Education can be 'Unstuck' in Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Charles P.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the effectiveness of medical education and argues for the appropriate use of emerging technology in training. Suggests using a "marvelous machine" concept for trainees and continuing education working on computer-based simulations for a comprehensive practice experience. (Contains 26 references.) (YDS)

  15. Applying adult learning practices in medical education.

    PubMed

    Reed, Suzanne; Shell, Richard; Kassis, Karyn; Tartaglia, Kimberly; Wallihan, Rebecca; Smith, Keely; Hurtubise, Larry; Martin, Bryan; Ledford, Cynthia; Bradbury, Scott; Bernstein, Henry Hank; Mahan, John D

    2014-07-01

    The application of the best practices of teaching adults to the education of adults in medical education settings is important in the process of transforming learners to become and remain effective physicians. Medical education at all levels should be designed to equip physicians with the knowledge, clinical skills, and professionalism that are required to deliver quality patient care. The ultimate outcome is the health of the patient and the health status of the society. In the translational science of medical education, improved patient outcomes linked directly to educational events are the ultimate goal and are best defined by rigorous medical education research efforts. To best develop faculty, the same principles of adult education and teaching adults apply. In a systematic review of faculty development initiatives designed to improve teaching effectiveness in medical education, the use of experiential learning, feedback, effective relationships with peers, and diverse educational methods were found to be most important in the success of these programs. In this article, we present 5 examples of applying the best practices in teaching adults and utilizing the emerging understanding of the neurobiology of learning in teaching students, trainees, and practitioners. These include (1) use of standardized patients to develop communication skills, (2) use of online quizzes to assess knowledge and aid self-directed learning, (3) use of practice sessions and video clips to enhance significant learning of teaching skills, (4) use of case-based discussions to develop professionalism concepts and skills, and (5) use of the American Academy of Pediatrics PediaLink as a model for individualized learner-directed online learning. These examples highlight how experiential leaning, providing valuable feedback, opportunities for practice, and stimulation of self-directed learning can be utilized as medical education continues its dynamic transformation in the years ahead. PMID

  16. Professional medical education and genomics.

    PubMed

    Demmer, Laurie A; Waggoner, Darrel J

    2014-01-01

    Genomic medicine is a relatively new concept that involves using individual patients' genomic results in their clinical care. Genetic technology has advanced swiftly over the past decade, and most providers have been left behind without an understanding of this complex field. To realize its full potential, genomic medicine must be both understood and accepted by the greater medical community. The current state of professional medical education in genomics and genomic medicine is reviewed, including ongoing plans to expand educational efforts for medical students, clinical geneticists, and nongeneticist physicians. PMID:24635717

  17. Learning Experiences in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leggat, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the learning experience from both traditional and computer-assisted instructional methods. Describes the environments in which these methods are effective. Focuses on learning experiences in medical education and describes educational strategies, particularly the 'SPICES' model. Discusses the importance of mentoring in the psychosocial…

  18. 31 CFR 10.9 - Continuing education providers and continuing education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. 10.9 Section 10.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. (a) Continuing education providers—(1)...

  19. 31 CFR 10.9 - Continuing education providers and continuing education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. 10.9 Section 10.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. (a) Continuing education providers—(1)...

  20. 31 CFR 10.9 - Continuing education providers and continuing education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. 10.9 Section 10.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. (a) Continuing education providers—(1)...

  1. 31 CFR 10.9 - Continuing education providers and continuing education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. 10.9 Section 10.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. (a) Continuing education providers—(1)...

  2. Microethics in medical education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Jharna; Dinoop, KP; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    “Microethics” is an avant-garde in the field of ethics. When the term “ethics” is brought into discussion in medical education or clinical practice, it customarily points to the traditional ethics, that is, biomedical ethics that deals with the ethical issues faced during unaccustomed or rare clinical circumstances. In contrast, microethics is a continuous ethical science existing in the physician-patient interaction that happens each day in every physician's clinical liaison. These ethical issues of everyday importance need to be introduced in the ethics training programs of medical institutions to provide insight and thereby promoting improvement in medical care and outcome. PMID:26629449

  3. A meaningful MESS (Medical Education Scholarship Support)

    PubMed Central

    Whicker, Shari A.; Engle, Deborah L.; Chudgar, Saumil; DeMeo, Stephen; Bean, Sarah M.; Narayan, Aditee P.; Grochowski, Colleen O'Connor; Nagler, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Graduate medical education faculty bear the responsibility of demonstrating active research and scholarship; however, faculty who choose education-focused careers may face unique obstacles related to the lack of promotion tracks, funding, career options, and research opportunities. Our objective was to address education research and scholarship barriers by providing a collaborative peer-mentoring environment and improve the production of research and scholarly outputs. Methods We describe a Medical Education Scholarship Support (MESS) group created in 2013. MESS is an interprofessional, multidisciplinary peer-mentoring education research community that now spans multiple institutions. This group meets monthly to address education research and scholarship challenges. Through this process, we develop new knowledge, research, and scholarly products, in addition to meaningful collaborations. Results MESS originated with eight founding members, all of whom still actively participate. MESS has proven to be a sustainable unfunded local community of practice, encouraging faculty to pursue health professions education (HPE) careers and fostering scholarship. We have met our original objectives that involved maintaining 100% participant retention; developing increased knowledge in at least seven content areas; and contributing to the development of 13 peer-reviewed publications, eight professional presentations, one Masters of Education project, and one educational curriculum. Discussion The number of individuals engaged in HPE research continues to rise. The MESS model could be adapted for use at other institutions, thereby reducing barriers HPE researchers face, providing an effective framework for trainees interested in education-focused careers, and having a broader impact on the education research landscape. PMID:27476538

  4. Professionalism in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Sean; Southgate, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Medical professionalism in today's society requires the exhibition of a range of qualities deployed in the service of patients, rather than more traditionally defined aspects such as mastery, autonomy and self-regulation. These qualities incorporate demonstrated clinical competence; aspiring to excellence in practice while demonstrating humility…

  5. Undergraduate medical education in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Chenot, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to give international readers an overview of the organisation, structure and curriculum, together with important advances and problems, of undergraduate medical education in Germany. Interest in medical education in Germany has been relatively low but has gained momentum with the new "Regulation of the Licensing of Doctors" which came into effect in 2003. Medical education had required substantial reform, particularly with respect to improving the links between theoretical and clinical teaching and the extension of interdisciplinary and topic-related instruction. It takes six years and three months to complete the curriculum and training is divided into three sections: basic science (2 years), clinical science (3 years) and final clinical year. While the reorganisation of graduate medical education required by the new "Regulation of the Licensing of Doctors" has stimulated multiple excellent teaching projects, there is evidence that some of the stipulated changes have not been implemented. Indeed, whether the medical schools have complied with this regulation and its overall success remains to be assessed systematically. Mandatory external accreditation and periodic reaccreditation of medical faculties need to be established in Germany. PMID:19675742

  6. Using a Coalition Arrangement for Providing Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karni, Karen R.; Hodapp, William J.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1981, the Minnesota Society for Medical Technology and the Division of Medical Technology, University of Minnesota, have collaborated to provide high-quality, organized, and ongoing continuing education programs for clinical laboratory personnel in the state. Workshops are intended to be practical, relevant, and timely in the practice of…

  7. Continuing Education and Mental Health Service Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses problems and issues related to the achievement of objectives in four output categories: organizational effectiveness, professional staff effectiveness, continuing education specialist development, and institutional linkage of continuing education. (Editor)

  8. The Role of a Continuing Education Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colafella, Nicholas

    1973-01-01

    The dean of continuing education at the Communiity College of Beaver County (Pennsylvania) defines community services as one portion of continuing education - and the program in Beaver County. (Editor)

  9. Faculty attitudes toward the use of audiovisuals in continuing education.

    PubMed

    Schindler, M K; Port, J

    1980-11-01

    A study was undertaken in planning for a project involving library support for formal continuing education programs. A questionnaire survey assessed faculty attitudes toward continuing education activities, self-instructional AV programs for continuing education, and self-instructional AV programs for undergraduate medical education. Actual use of AV programs in both undergraduate and postgraduate classroom teaching was also investigated. The results indicated generally positive attitudes regarding a high level of classroom use of AV programs, but little assignment of audiovisuals for self-instruction. PMID:6162840

  10. Medical Education: The Hot Seat

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Ranabir; Kumar, Raman; Pal, Shrayan; Vidyasagar; Mukherji, Bijay; Debabrata, Sarbapalli

    2016-01-01

    Medical science has eventually metamorphosed from ‘Knowledge based’ to ‘Skill based’ applied social science. So, the age-old traditional courses and curriculums in Indian medical education need a overhauling with radical modifications. With a paradigm shift, we have to take into account not only the help of scientific feedback from the teachers and students but also from all the stakeholders of health care delivery system. PMID:27453838

  11. Continuing Education: The University's "Buyer Protection Plan"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sork, Thomas J.; Pankowski, Mary L.

    1975-01-01

    Students in institutions of higher education are, in effect, consumer of a high priced product. University continuing education is in a unique position to operationalize a warranty system with the Continuing Education Unit, which gives the student some assurance that his alma mater will continue to be concerned about him. (Author)

  12. Continuing Education - A Management Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Peter F.

    The approach to continuing education at the Shell Oil Company is discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of different methods of instruction and different formats for continuing education are described. The impact of continuing education is assessed in relation to the following: hiring policies, career development, staff upgrading, promotional…

  13. Maryland Community Colleges Continuing Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board for Community Colleges, Annapolis.

    This manual outlines Maryland's community college course evaluation system for continuing education courses. Part I provides a historical overview of continuing education in Maryland, including the legal provisions establishing the development of continuing education courses as a function of community college instructional development. Part II…

  14. The School and Continuing Education: Four Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    The substance of four studies is presented to aid in identifying and analyzing the concept of continuing education and showing its practical implications. The first paper, "Continuing Education and the Educational System in France," by Joffre Dumazedier, shows the various sectors of education and its functions in France and also its inadequacies.…

  15. Continuing Education of Health Sciences Librarians: A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qureshi, Azra

    This study examines continuing education and professional development of 210 health sciences librarians affiliated with 70 academic medical libraries in the United States, which has the most advanced system of education in librarianship in the world. Of the 102 respondents, the largest categories were library directors/administrators and public…

  16. Medical Education and the Physician Workforce of Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Mosawi, Aamir Jalal

    2008-01-01

    The lack of resources in a country experiencing decades of successive wars, blockade, administrative corruption, and poor governance led to deteriorated standards throughout medical education. Although professional certification programs exist, continuing medical education accreditation and credit systems are required to monitor and certify the…

  17. Improving Medical Education: Improving Patient Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugsley, Lesley; McCrorie, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Is medical education unique among all other educational disciplines? Why does it not seem to conform to the rules laid down by universities for every other faculty? We explore the ways in which particular elements pertaining to medical education have been perceived historically and consider the ways in which medical educators and students have…

  18. [Learning theories and medical education].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, E L

    1996-01-01

    The author analyses the most important aspects of learning theories: the behaviorist, the gestaltic and the construtivist ones and concludes that the most effective attitude assimilates all positive constributions of each theory. Examining three basic learning principles, the author also presents their relation to medical educative components: knowledge retainment, psycho-motor habilities breeding and interpersonal attitudes development. PMID:9035502

  19. Why decision support systems are important for medical education.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Stathis Th; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2016-03-01

    During the last decades, the inclusion of digital tools in health education has rapidly lead to a continuously enlarging digital era. All the online interactions between learners and tutors, the description, creation, reuse and sharing of educational digital resources and the interlinkage between them in conjunction with cheap storage technology has led to an enormous amount of educational data. Medical education is a unique type of education due to accuracy of information needed, continuous changing competences required and alternative methods of education used. Nowadays medical education standards provide the ground for organising the educational data and the paradata. Analysis of such education data through education data mining techniques is in its infancy, but decision support systems (DSSs) for medical education need further research. To the best of our knowledge, there is a gap and a clear need for identifying the challenges for DSSs in medical education in the era of medical education standards. Thus, in this Letter the role and the attributes of such a DSS for medical education are delineated and the challenges and vision for future actions are identified. PMID:27222734

  20. Implementation of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative: medical students' perspective.

    PubMed

    Bagala, John Paul; Macheka, Nyasha D; Abebaw, Hiwot; Wen, Leana S

    2014-08-01

    The Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) is contributing to the transformation of medical training in Africa. In this paper, medical students present their perspective on how MEPI initiatives have influenced five key areas related to African medical trainees: educational infrastructure, information technology, community-based training, scientific research, and professional outlook and goals. They propose three new areas of focus that could further assist MEPI in bettering medical training in Africa. PMID:25072574

  1. Applying andragogy in nursing continuing education.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, B B

    1989-01-01

    Andragogy, a philosophical orientation for adult education, receives little attention in the nursing continuing education literature. Yet, the tenets of andragogy form the organizing framework for programming. This article defines andragogy and provides selected results of a research study designed to test andragogical concepts in long-term oncology nursing continuing education programs. The results of the study suggest a new way of viewing the goals of nursing continuing education activities. PMID:2495310

  2. Learning objects in medical education.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jorge G; Mintzer, Michael J; Issenberg, S Barry

    2006-11-01

    A learning object (LO) is a grouping of instructional materials structured to meet a specified educational objective. Digital LOs, which can be stored electronically, allow a new approach to instructional activity, making medical education more efficient, and potentially more cost-effective. They are reusable and can incorporate text, graphics, animations, audio, and video to support and enhance learning. A learning object can stand alone or be aggregated with additional objects to create larger forms of educational content meeting multiple educational objectives. Digital learning objects located in online repositories can be accessed by many computers and are easily handled by an array of learning management systems for delivery to learners at any time. Integrating digital learning objects with traditional educational methods in a blended learning approach assists medical educators in meeting the challenges of competing priorities. Multimedia LOs enable learners to tailor their experience to their preferred learning style. Through the use of learning objects, learners' reactions, their acquisition of knowledge, skills and attitudes, and their behavioral changes become readily measurable. Learning objects provide multiple research opportunities, such as their use in adaptive learning, their added value in preclinical versus clinical education, and their impact as part of a blended learning strategy. PMID:17594550

  3. Pediatric hospitalists in medical education: current roles and future directions.

    PubMed

    Heydarian, Cyrus; Maniscalco, Jennifer

    2012-05-01

    As the field of pediatric hospital medicine has evolved, pediatric hospitalists have become increasingly involved in medical student and resident education--providing direct education during clinical rotations, developing novel curricula to meet the demands of the new educational environment, occupying leadership roles in medical education, and more. The literature suggests that hospitalists possess the essential skills for teaching effectively, yet most hospitalists feel that additional training beyond residency is necessary to refine their knowledge and skills in education and in other essential domains. Several pediatric hospital medicine fellowships and continuing medical education activities have been developed in the last decade to meet this growing need. The recent publication of the Pediatric Hospital Medicine Core Competencies will help define the roles and expectations of practicing pediatric hospitalists, and will serve as a framework for future curriculum development in both graduate and continuing medical education. PMID:22483082

  4. Medical Informatics Education & Research in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Chouvarda, I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives This paper aims to present an overview of the medical informatics landscape in Greece, to describe the Greek ehealth background and to highlight the main education and research axes in medical informatics, along with activities, achievements and pitfalls. Methods With respect to research and education, formal and informal sources were investigated and information was collected and presented in a qualitative manner, including also quantitative indicators when possible. Results Greece has adopted and applied medical informatics education in various ways, including undergraduate courses in health sciences schools as well as multidisciplinary postgraduate courses. There is a continuous research effort, and large participation in EU-wide initiatives, in all the spectrum of medical informatics research, with notable scientific contributions, although technology maturation is not without barriers. Wide-scale deployment of eHealth is anticipated in the healthcare system in the near future. While ePrescription deployment has been an important step, ICT for integrated care and telehealth have a lot of room for further deployment. Conclusions Greece is a valuable contributor in the European medical informatics arena, and has the potential to offer more as long as the barriers of research and innovation fragmentation are addressed and alleviated. PMID:26123910

  5. Education for Medical Librarianship: A Comparative Review of Education for a Profession in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groen, Frances; Xiong, Dizhi

    1994-01-01

    Compares two distinct approaches to education for medical librarianship--those of the People's Republic of China and of North America. Topics discussed include formal degree programs; certification; the relationship between educators and practitioners; the changing needs of medical librarians regarding continuing education; lifelong learning; and…

  6. A Marketing Management Approach for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Thomas E.

    1986-01-01

    Applies a marketing management model to the revitalization, or remarketing, of continuing education. Assesses the potential of continuing education as a higher education market. Suggests surveying present students, developing and quantifying hypotheses, applying new technology, promoting selected benefits, approaching areas of opportunity, and…

  7. Standards for Continuing Education in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Nurses' Association, New York, NY.

    The quality of health care depends to a large degree on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of practicing nurses. Continuing education is one way nurses can maintain competence and meet the standards of their profession. Continuing education in nursing consists of planned learning experiences beyond a basic nursing educational program. Providers…

  8. A Strategy for Sourcing Continuing Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baukal, Charles E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Many are calling for increased continuing education for engineers, but few details are provided as to how to source that education. This paper recommends a strategy for sourcing continuing engineering education (CEE). Providers of CEE are categorized here as internal (the organization itself), external (universities, professional/trade…

  9. WOMEN'S NEEDS IN CONTINUING EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PACE, LOIS W.

    THIS STUDY SOUGHT TO DETERMINE HOW WOMEN'S FELT NEEDS FOR EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES RELATE TO EMPLOYMENT OUTSIDE THE HOME, STAGE IN THE FAMILY LIFE CYCLE, AND LEVEL OF EDUCATION. WOMEN RANDOMLY SELECTED IN LIVINGSTON COUNTY, MISSOURI, WERE SENT A QUESTIONNAIRE ON PERCEIVED EDUCATIONAL NEEDS, PREFERRED MEANS OF RECEIVING INFORMATION, AND PERSONAL…

  10. Medical Education and Communication Companies Involved in CME: An Updated Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Eric D.; Overstreet, Karen M.; Parochka, Jacqueline N.; Lemon, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Medical Education and Communication Companies (MECCs) represent approximately 21% of the providers accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), yet relatively little is known about these organizations in the greater continuing medical education (CME) community. Two prior studies described them,…

  11. L'education Permanente. (Continuous Learning)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumazedier, Joffre

    1970-01-01

    Society and culture change more rapidly than school systems. The expansion of leisure time has not been accompanied by a parallel growth in opportunities for continuing self-education. The best educated adults are most likely to take advantage of adult education. A restructuring of society and of the educational system, to make acquisition of…

  12. Continuing Education -- A Management Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, J. D.

    The needs for continuing engineering education to avoid technical obsolescence and the programs offered by one company to fill this need are discussed. Ten educational alternative programs of the Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque (New Mexico) are described. (CP)

  13. Clinical evidence continuous medical education: a randomised educational trial of an open access e-learning program for transferring evidence-based information – ICEKUBE (Italian Clinical Evidence Knowledge Utilization Behaviour Evaluation) – study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Moja, Lorenzo; Moschetti, Ivan; Cinquini, Michela; Sala, Valeria; Compagnoni, Anna; Duca, Piergiorgio; Deligant, Christian; Manfrini, Roberto; Clivio, Luca; Satolli, Roberto; Addis, Antonio; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Dri, Pietro; Liberati, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Background In an effort to ensure that all physicians have access to valid and reliable evidence on drug effectiveness, the Italian Drug Agency sponsored a free-access e-learning system, based on Clinical Evidence, called ECCE. Doctors have access to an electronic version and related clinical vignettes. Correct answers to the interactive vignettes provide Continuing Medical Education credits. The aims of this trial are to establish whether the e-learning program (ECCE) increases physicians' basic knowledge about common clinical scenarios, and whether ECCE is superior to the passive diffusion of information through the printed version of Clinical Evidence. Design All Italian doctors naïve to ECCE will be randomised to three groups. Group one will have access to ECCE for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot A and will provide control data for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot B; group two vice versa; group three will receive the concise printed version of Clinical Evidence. There are in fact two designs: a before and after pragmatic trial utilising a two by two incomplete block design (group one versus group two) and a classical design (group one and two versus group three). The primary outcome will be the retention of Clinical Evidence contents assessed from the scores for clinical vignettes selected from ECCE at least six months after the intervention. To avoid test-retest effects, we will randomly select vignettes out of lot A and lot B, avoiding repetitions. In order to preserve the comparability of lots, we will select vignettes with similar, optimal psychometric characteristics. Trial registration ISRCTN27453314 PMID:18637189

  14. Leveraging e-learning in medical education.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kadriye O; Cidon, Michal J; Seto, Teresa L; Chen, Haiqin; Mahan, John D

    2014-07-01

    e-Learning has become a popular medium for delivering instruction in medical education. This innovative method of teaching offers unique learning opportunities for medical trainees. The purpose of this article is to define the present state of e-learning in pediatrics and how to best leverage e-learning for educational effectiveness and change in medical education. Through addressing under-examined and neglected areas in implementation strategies for e-learning, its usefulness in medical education can be expanded. This study used a systematic database review of published studies in the field of e-learning in pediatric training between 2003 and 2013. The search was conducted using educational and health databases: Scopus, ERIC, PubMed, and search engines Google and Hakia. A total of 72 reference articles were suitable for analysis. This review is supplemented by the use of "e-Learning Design Screening Questions" to define e-learning design and development in 10 randomly selected articles. Data analysis used template-based coding themes and counting of the categories using descriptive statistics.Our search for pediatric e-learning (using Google and Hakia) resulted in six well-defined resources designed to support the professional development of doctors, residents, and medical students. The majority of studies focused on instructional effectiveness and satisfaction. There were few studies about e-learning development, implementation, and needs assessments used to identify the institutional and learners' needs. Reviewed studies used various study designs, measurement tools, instructional time, and materials for e-learning interventions. e-Learning is a viable solution for medical educators faced with many challenges, including (1) promoting self-directed learning, (2) providing flexible learning opportunities that would offer continuous (24h/day/7 days a week) availability for learners, and (3) engaging learners through collaborative learning communities to gain

  15. Graduate Medical Education: Its Role in Achieving a True Medical Education Continuum.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrener, Carol A; Ast, Cori; Kirch, Darrell G

    2015-09-01

    Nearly half a century ago, Lowell T. Coggeshall recommended, through what has come to be known as the Coggeshall Report, that physician education-medical school (or undergraduate medical education [UME]), residency training (or graduate medical education [GME]), and continuing medical education (CME)-be "planned and provided as a continuum." While the dream of a true continuum remains unfulfilled, recent innovations focused on defining and assessing meaningful outcomes at last offer the anchor for the creation of a seamless, flexible, and ongoing pathway for the preparation of physicians. Recent innovations, including a widely accepted competency framework and entrustable professional activities (EPAs), provide key tools for creating a continuum. The competency framework is being leveraged in UME, GME, and CME and is serving as the foundation for the continuum. Learners and those who assess them are increasingly relying on observable behaviors (e.g., EPAs) to determine progress. The GME community in the United States and Canada has played-and continues to play-a leading role in the creation of these tools and a true medical education continuum. Despite some systemic challenges to implementation (e.g., premedical learner formation, time-in-step requirements), the GME community is already operationalizing these tools as a basis for other innovations that are improving transitions across the continuum (e.g., competency-based progression of residents). The medical education community's greatest responsibility in the years ahead will be to build on these efforts in GME-joining together to learn from one another and develop a continuum that serves the public and the profession. PMID:26177531

  16. Microdialysis microneedles for continuous medical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Jeffrey D; Trebotich, David; Liepmann, Dorian

    2005-03-01

    Enzyme based biosensors suffer from loss of activity and sensitivity through a variety of processes. One major reason for the loss is through large molecular weight proteins settling onto the sensor and affecting sensor signal stability and disrupting enzyme function. One way to minimize loss of sensor activity is to filter out large molecular weight compounds before sensing small biochemicals such as glucose. A novel microdialysis microneedle is introduced that is capable of excluding large MW compounds based on size. Preliminary experimental evidence of membrane permeability is shown, as well as diffusion and permeability modeling. Microdialysis microneedles present an attractive first step towards decreasing size, patient discomfort and energy consumption of portable medical monitors over existing technologies. PMID:15834522

  17. Continuing Education on Dying and Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chodil, Judith J.; Dulaney, Peggy E.

    1984-01-01

    "Dying and Death in Critical Care Practice" was a one-day continuing education offering designed for registered nurses who practiced in settings such as emergency rooms, intensive care units, coronary care units, and operating rooms. The workshop was part of a continuing education curriculum in critical care nursing. (SSH)

  18. Individualizing Administrator Continuing Education. An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Edward

    This paper is one of a series of vocational papers reporting results of individualized continuing education (ICE) programs for school administrators and school climate improvement programs. It summarizes the practices of some 45 school districts throughout the nation that have actually been operating individualized continuing education programs.…

  19. Continuing Education Needs in Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capanema, Clelia de Freitas

    Continuing education needs of the Latin American population are related to the need of Latin American countries for social and economic development. The source of continuing educaton needs is the area's differentiated socioeconomic development and cultural diversity. Some common features of Latin American educational systems, well known as…

  20. Continuing Higher Education: The Coming Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Allan W., Ed.; King, B. Kay, Ed.

    This book, containing seven chapters and an epilogue, describes how continuing education--as a structure and a function--can become a unique tool for reorienting major universities toward confronting new societal challenges. "The Coming Wave" (Lerner) discusses relevant organizational theory to explain the special role of continuing education in…

  1. New Life Styles for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Continuing Education Service.

    Major addresses presented at the 13th Seminar for College and University Leaders in Continuing Education are provided in these proceedings. The addresses are as follows: "Seminar Preview" by Russell J. Kleis; "Welcome" by Armand L. Hunter; "The Continuing Education University" by Charles E. Perry; "Major Problems Facing the University: Internal…

  2. Professional Accreditation for International Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Paul Jay

    It is reasonable to argue that the members of a profession are the only ones who can directly address issues of accreditation. In the context of accreditation for international continuing education, it may be argued that professional organizations in continuing education cannot function as accrediting bodies except in the sense that they determine…

  3. Problems in Allied Health Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parochka, Jacqueline

    Problems related to the delivery of continuing education programs in the allied health professions are examined, based on the viewpoints of allied health professional organizations, allied health faculty members, and continuing education administrative units. Problems as seen by professional organizations include: allied health continuing…

  4. Board of Regents Symposium on Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    As discussed in several addresses at a New York State Board of Regents symposium, the task of continuing education in New York State includes adult basic education, job training, and other forms of involvement by educators and other segments of society in efforts to enable individuals, communities, and organizations to function effectively in a…

  5. An Overview of Continuing Interprofessional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Interprofessional education, continuing interprofessional education, interprofessional collaboration, and interprofessional care are moving to the forefront of approaches with the potential to reorganize the delivery of health professions education and health care practice. This article discusses 7 key trends in the scholarship and practice of…

  6. Continuing Education and Community Service in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haygood, Kenneth

    This report was prepared at the request of the Higher Education Facilities Commission in order to provide background, a progress report, and recommendations for further action to those interested in the Massachusetts programs of continuing education and community service funded under Title I of the Higher Education Act of 1965. Among the materials…

  7. Continuing Education: Upgrading the Skills of Laboratory Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romeo, Joan; Johnson, Dallas

    1977-01-01

    Community and junior colleges are in a prime position to spearhead much-needed continuing education courses for the retraining of medical laboratory technicians in outlying areas and small towns. Programs currently underway combine short courses, bench refreshers, and self-instructional materials; similar programs are planned by a number of…

  8. Talkback Telephone Network: Techniques of Providing Library Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ruth W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes techniques developed for providing continuing education to individuals solving medical reference requests over a telephone teleconference network linking library personnel in nonurban public libraries, systems libraries, and small hospital libraries. Background, project aims, and teleconferencing techniques, including their advantages,…

  9. Advancing Public Health through Continuing Education of Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Addleton, Robert L.; Vitale, Frank M.; Christiansen, Bruce A.; Mejicano, George C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the CS2day (Cease Smoking Today) initiative positioned continuing education (CE) in the intersection between medicine and public health. The authors suggest that most CE activities address the medical challenges that clinicians confront, often to the neglect of the public health issues that are key risk factors for the…

  10. The use of continuing adult education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the National Space Grant and Fellowship Program include the expansion of space-oriented educational programs beyond the traditional boundaries of university campuses to reach 'non-traditional' students whose personal and professional lives would be enhanced by access to such programs. These objectives coincide with those of the continuing education programs that exist on most university campuses. By utilizing continuing educations resources and facilities, members of the National Space Grant Program can greatly enhance the achievement of program objectives.

  11. Becoming a medical educator: motivation, socialisation and navigation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite an increasing concern about a future shortage of medical educators, little published research exists on career choices in medical education nor the impact of specific training posts in medical education (e.g. academic registrar/resident positions). Medical educators at all levels, from both medical and non-medical backgrounds, are crucial for the training of medical students, junior doctors and in continuing professional development. We explored the motivations and experiences of junior doctors considering an education career and undertaking a medical education registrar (MER) post. Methods Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with junior doctors and clinicians across Queensland Health. Framework analysis was used to identify themes in the data, based on our defined research questions and the medical education workforce issues prompting the study. We applied socio-cognitive career theory to guide our analysis and to explore the experience of junior doctors in medical education registrar posts as they enter, navigate and fulfil the role. Results We identified six key themes in the data: motivation for career choice and wanting to provide better education; personal goals, expectations and the need for self-direction; the influence of role models; defining one’s identity; support networks and the need for research as a potential barrier to pursuing a career in/with education. We also identified the similarities and differences between the MERs’ experiences to develop a composite of an MER’s journey through career choice, experience in role and outcomes. Conclusions There is growing interest from junior doctors in pursuing education pathways in a clinical environment. They want to enhance clinical teaching in the hospitals and become specialists with an interest in education, and have no particular interest in research or academia. This has implications for the recruitment and training of the next generation of clinical

  12. Medical Readers' Theater: Relevance to Geriatrics Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Johanna; Cho, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Medical Readers' Theater (MRT) is an innovative and simple way of helping medical students to reflect on difficult-to-discuss topics in geriatrics medical education, such as aging stereotypes, disability and loss of independence, sexuality, assisted living, relationships with adult children, and end-of-life issues. The authors describe a required…

  13. Transforming Vietnam's Medical Education through E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churton, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The costs for providing medical school education and services in Vietnam's universities continue to increase. Through a collaborative project between the Government of the Netherlands and Vietnam's Ministry of Health, a five year experimental program to develop in-country capacity and reduce the dependence upon a foreign medical service delivery…

  14. Analysis of the Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education Program Fund Allocations for Indirect Medical Education Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynn, Barbara O.; Kawata, Jennifer

    This study analyzed issues related to estimating indirect medical education costs specific to pediatric discharges. The Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education (CHGNE) program was established to support graduate medical education in children's hospitals. This provision authorizes payments for both direct and indirect medical education…

  15. Simulation-based medical education in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Lopreiato, Joseph O; Sawyer, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    The use of simulation-based medical education (SBME) in pediatrics has grown rapidly over the past 2 decades and is expected to continue to grow. Similar to other instructional formats used in medical education, SBME is an instructional methodology that facilitates learning. Successful use of SBME in pediatrics requires attention to basic educational principles, including the incorporation of clear learning objectives. To facilitate learning during simulation the psychological safety of the participants must be ensured, and when done correctly, SBME is a powerful tool to enhance patient safety in pediatrics. Here we provide an overview of SBME in pediatrics and review key topics in the field. We first review the tools of the trade and examine various types of simulators used in pediatric SBME, including human patient simulators, task trainers, standardized patients, and virtual reality simulation. Then we explore several uses of simulation that have been shown to lead to effective learning, including curriculum integration, feedback and debriefing, deliberate practice, mastery learning, and range of difficulty and clinical variation. Examples of how these practices have been successfully used in pediatrics are provided. Finally, we discuss the future of pediatric SBME. As a community, pediatric simulation educators and researchers have been a leading force in the advancement of simulation in medicine. As the use of SBME in pediatrics expands, we hope this perspective will serve as a guide for those interested in improving the state of pediatric SBME. PMID:25748973

  16. A Historical Perspective of Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcioglu, Huseyin; Bilge, Ugur; Unluoglu, Ilhami

    2015-01-01

    Even though there are significant developments in recent years in medical education, physicians are still needed reform and innovation in order to prepare the information society. The spots in the forefront of medical education in recent years; holistic approach in all processes, including health education, evidence-based medicine and…

  17. American Medical Education: Institutions, Programs, and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robert F.

    This report presents information about the academic medical centers belonging to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and profiles American medical education generally. Following a brief introduction, a section on institutions and resources offers information on medical schools' financial support, faculties, and faculty practice…

  18. Texas Medical Schools Beef Up Nutrition Education.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-11-01

    With lifestyle-related diseases on the rise, some medical schools help to arm future doctors with the nutrition knowledge they'll need. Texas medical schools and residency programs are getting ahead of the curve in addressing this public-health-meets-medical-education issue, with medical students often leading the charge. PMID:26536515

  19. Augmented reality in medical education?

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Carolien; Barsom, Esther; Schijven, Marlies; Christoph, Noor

    2014-09-01

    Learning in the medical domain is to a large extent workplace learning and involves mastery of complex skills that require performance up to professional standards in the work environment. Since training in this real-life context is not always possible for reasons of safety, costs, or didactics, alternative ways are needed to achieve clinical excellence. Educational technology and more specifically augmented reality (AR) has the potential to offer a highly realistic situated learning experience supportive of complex medical learning and transfer. AR is a technology that adds virtual content to the physical real world, thereby augmenting the perception of reality. Three examples of dedicated AR learning environments for the medical domain are described. Five types of research questions are identified that may guide empirical research into the effects of these learning environments. Up to now, empirical research mainly appears to focus on the development, usability and initial implementation of AR for learning. Limited review results reflect the motivational value of AR, its potential for training psychomotor skills and the capacity to visualize the invisible, possibly leading to enhanced conceptual understanding of complex causality. PMID:24464832

  20. The role of the Malaysian Medical Council in medical education.

    PubMed

    Mahmud Mohd, M N

    2005-08-01

    The Malaysian Medical Council (MMC) operates under the Medical Act of 1971, which defines its core functions related to (a) the registration and practice of medical practitioners (b) the period of compulsory service (c) provisions to be enacted for purposes of (a) and (b). In the early years the MMC used the list of recognised colleges or Universities that appeared in the list of degrees recognised by the General Medical Council of United Kingdom (GMC). Over the years the MMC has undertaken the role of granting recognition to other medical schools in the country and overseas, and added the name of these schools to the existing register of recognised medical degrees in the second schedule of the Act. For the purpose of recognition of medical schools the MMC endorsed a guideline on standards and procedures on accreditation developed in 1996, which was later realigned with international and regional guidelines, in 2000 and 2001. It is recommended that the MMC establishes an active functional 'Education Committee' and that the role of MMC in medical education should be clearly and explicitly stated in the Act. An amendment to the Act would require the MMC to be responsible not only for undergraduate medical education but medical education in its entire phase. PMID:16315620

  1. Continuous quality improvement and medical informatics: the convergent synergy.

    PubMed

    Werth, G R; Connelly, D P

    1992-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) and medical informatics specialists need to converge their efforts to create synergy for improving health care. Health care CQI needs medical informatics' expertise and technology to build the information systems needed to manage health care organizations according to quality improvement principles. Medical informatics needs CQI's philosophy and methods to build health care information systems that can evolve to meet the changing needs of clinicians and other stakeholders. This paper explores the philosophical basis for convergence of CQI and medical informatics efforts, and then examines a clinical computer workstation development project that is applying a combined approach. PMID:1482948

  2. Universities and medical schools: reflections on a half-century of Canadian medical education.

    PubMed

    Naimark, A

    1993-05-01

    After 50 years of accelerated development, universities and medical schools have entered a period of uncertainty and instability. The Flexnerian paradigm of medical education, rooted in biomedical science and conducted under the aegis of a university, reached its apotheosis by the late 1960s and the early 1970s. Fuelled by the introduction of comprehensive, government-sponsored health care insurance and advances in technology, the demand for health care professionals and for access to facilities increased sharply. Medical education, research and advanced clinical services expanded dramatically aided by the emergence of academic health sciences centres and accompanied by a wave of medical curriculum reform. Now medical schools must strike a dynamic balance in responding to the continued expansion of knowledge and technology, the demand for social equity and the exigencies of prolonged fiscal constraint. They must also balance the biological and sociological approaches to medicine in establishing the foundations for the future development of Canadian medical education. PMID:8477376

  3. Biostatistical and medical statistics graduate education

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The development of graduate education in biostatistics and medical statistics is discussed in the context of training within a medical center setting. The need for medical researchers to employ a wide variety of statistical designs in clinical, genetic, basic science and translational settings justifies the ongoing integration of biostatistical training into medical center educational settings and informs its content. The integration of large data issues are a challenge. PMID:24472088

  4. Attracting and Holding the Continuing Education Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Patricia; Nixon, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Suggests ways business communication teachers can reach continuing education students, including analyzing the community needs, finding a target market, tailoring a course to the market, selling the course, setting up the class, and using effective teaching techniques. (RL)

  5. Mandatory Continuing Education for Clinical Laboratory Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Fran; Pankowski, Mary L.

    1992-01-01

    Rapid changes make mandatory continuing education (MCE) for clinical laboratory professionals imperative. Recent well-designed studies refute arguments of ineffectiveness by showing how (MCE) alters professional practice. Problems other professions have had with licensure can be avoided. (SK)

  6. Overview of Continuing Education Financing and Budgeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipp, Travis

    1982-01-01

    Continuing education agencies have cycles of financial activities that are all parts of financial management, including obtaining funding and venture capital, setting fees, and controlling costs for cost recovery. (Author/SSH)

  7. Ethical Issues in Marketing and Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martel, Laurence D.; Colley, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Raises ethical considerations relevant to the marketing of continuing education and suggests two approaches to their resolution: deontology (all actions guided by universal rules are moral) and teleology (consequences of an action determine whether it is moral). (CH)

  8. Accreditation of Continuing Education: The Critical Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSilets, Lynore D.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the history of accreditation in nursing continuing education, describes the system and process, and identifies institutional characteristics needed before beginning the process. Uses the American Nurses Center Commission on Accreditation model. (Author/SK)

  9. Continuing Education--Important to Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klus, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is the importance of continuing education in business and in society as a whole. Trends and opportunities, the importance of knowledge and new technology in modern society, and visions for the future are outlined. (Author/YP)

  10. Continuing Professional Education: A Spiritually Based Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lynda W.

    2000-01-01

    Parish nursing is a health promotion ministry that links faith and health. A continuing education course to prepare nurses for it addresses spiritual, emotional, physical, mental, cultural, and social dimensions. It includes reflective and self-assessment activities. (SK)

  11. Continuing Education Instrumentation Training in Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Jacqueline; Frankel, Saundra

    1980-01-01

    Describes the continuing education program for clinical chemistry instrumentation training established at The College of Staten Island, New York. A course consisting of 14 sessions is outlined and discussed. (CS)

  12. Review of online educational resources for medical physicists.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, Joann I

    2013-01-01

    Medical physicists are often involved in the didactic training of graduate students, residents (both physics and physicians), and technologists. As part of continuing medical education, we are also involved in maintenance of certification projects to assist in the education of our peers. As such, it is imperative that we remain current concerning available educational resources. Medical physics journals offer book reviews, allowing us an opportunity to learn about newly published books in the field. A similar means of communication is not currently available for online educational resources. This information is conveyed through informal means. This review presents a summary of online resources available to the medical physics community that may be useful for educational purposes. PMID:24257289

  13. Adult and Continuing Education Research Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Wendell

    Adult and continuing education is the most evolutionary area in education today. It is growing, both in terms of student participation and in the number and types of providers. Of the approximately 120 million adults in the United States, 12 percent (or 18 million) were involved in a formal learning experience leading to a diploma last year. Adult…

  14. Continuities, Discontinuities, Interactions: Values, Education, and Neuroethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semetsky, Inna

    2009-01-01

    This article begins by revisiting the current model of values education (moral education) which has recently been set up in Australian schools. This article problematizes the pedagogical model of teaching values in the direct transmission mode from the perspective of the continuity of experience as central to the philosophies of John Dewey and…

  15. The Military's Challenge to Continuing Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Victor M.; Pankowski, Mary L.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. armed forces will be reduced by 25 percent by 1995. University continuing higher education will be the first place many military personnel will seek the advanced education, credentials, and skills necessary to join the civilian work force. (SK)

  16. An Experience with Volunteers in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillsworth, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Offers examples of the use of volunteers in recreation and adult education programs. Describes Fanshawe College's local community advisory committees for continuing education centers. Identifies conditions for using volunteers effectively. Reviews Edison College's Talent Banking system which involves volunteers as visiting lecturers, career…

  17. Operationalization of Strategic Change in Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Evia O. W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Hong Kong continuing education has encountered vigorous change in recent years. It is not limited to the mode of teaching and learning. Changing government policies, fund cutting to the higher education system and the entry of overseas university degrees increase the intensity of competition in the environment to an extraordinary extent.…

  18. An Anatomy of Continuing Interprofessional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    Continuing interprofessional education is the means by which experienced health, social care, and other practitioners learn with, from, and about each other, formally and informally, to improve their collective practice and to cultivate closer collaboration. It applies principles of interprofessional education through media commonly employed in…

  19. Commercial Marketing Techniques in Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fram, Eugene H.; Clarcq, Jack R.

    1978-01-01

    Stating that continuing education administrators and faculty must change their curricula to meet the needs of students and employers, the authors present for curriculum planners what they call a "cybernetic model," which uses a marketing approach. As an illustration they describe a management education case study. (MF)

  20. Implementation of Strategies in Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettunen, Juha

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to provide higher education institutions with strategies of continuing education and methods to communicate and implement these strategies. Design/methodology/approach--The balanced scorecard approach is used to implement the strategy. It translates the strategy into tangible objectives, measures and targets…

  1. Research Areas in Adult and Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Röbken, Heinke; Ehrenspeck-Kolasa, Yvonne; von Ossietzky, Carl

    2014-01-01

    This study builds upon a Delphi study carried out by Zawacki-Richter (2009) which posited a validated classification of research areas in the special area of distance education. We now replicate the study for the broader field of adult and continuing education (ACE). The aims of this paper are: firstly, to develop a categorisation of research…

  2. Project PEER: Continuing Education in Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hengesbaugh, Jean Houger

    A continuing education program to provide technical training or consultation for laboratory technologists practicing in rural and urban Utah has been established by the Centers for Disease Control and the Utah State Department of Health under the name Project PEER (Pursuing Excellence through Education Regionally). The core of the program is a…

  3. Continuing Legal Education--Who Pays?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Paul

    1985-01-01

    Examines one of the controversies of adult education--whether it should be supported wholly by learner fees. It is a microcosmic examination of the argument as it applies to continuing legal education. Argues that the legal profession, as a corporate body, is responsible for the cost of maintaining the competence of its corporate membership.…

  4. Ethical Issues in Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Patricia Ann

    2000-01-01

    Continuing professional education practitioners often face ethical dilemmas regarding their obligations to multiple stakeholders and issues arising in new arenas such as the workplace, distance education, and collaboration with business. Codes of ethics can guide practice, but practitioners should also identify their personal core values system…

  5. Access to continued-use medication among older adults, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Karynna Pimentel; Brito, Alexandre dos Santos; Rodrigues, Claudia Soares; Luiz, Ronir Raggio

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence and associated access factors for all continued-use prescription drugs and the ways in which they can be obtained. METHODS Data was obtained from the 2008 Household National Survey. The sample comprised 27,333 individuals above 60 years who reported that they used continued-use prescription drugs. A descriptive analysis and binary and multiple multinomial logistic regressions were performed. RESULTS 86.0% of the older adults had access to all the medication they needed, and among them, 50.7% purchased said medication. Those who obtained medication from the public health system were younger (60-64 years), did not have health insurance plans, and belonged to the lower income groups. It is remarkable that 14.0% of the subjects still had no access to any continued-use medication, and for those with more than four chronic diseases, this amount reached 22.0%. Those with a greater number of chronic diseases ran a higher risk of not having access to all the medication they needed. CONCLUSIONS There are some groups of older adults with an increased risk of not obtaining all the medication they need and of purchasing it. The results of this study are expected to contribute to guide programs and plans for access to medication in Brazil. PMID:25741646

  6. Evaluating ethics competence in medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Savulescu, J; Crisp, R; Fulford, K W; Hope, T

    1999-01-01

    We critically evaluate the ways in which competence in medical ethics has been evaluated. We report the initial stage in the development of a relevant, reliable and valid instrument to evaluate core critical thinking skills in medical ethics. This instrument can be used to evaluate the impact of medical ethics education programmes and to assess whether medical students have achieved a satisfactory level of performance of core skills and knowledge in medical ethics, within and across institutions. PMID:10536759

  7. Reform of medical education in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Kee, Changwon

    2010-01-01

    There are 41 medical schools in South Korea with over 3500 students graduating from the medical schools annually with the appropriate qualifications to practice medicine. Korean medical educators have made significant efforts to enhance the effectiveness of medical education by preparing students for the rapidly changing global environment of medicine and healthcare. This article outlines the reform efforts made by Korean medical schools to meet such demands, which includes the adoption of student-centered and competency-based education, e-learning, and authentic assessment of clinical performance. It also discusses the recent reform of the medical education system, driven by the Government's policy to prepare Korean higher education for an increasingly knowledge-based society. PMID:20163225

  8. Management studies in medical education.

    PubMed

    Noor Ghani, S; Saimy, I

    2005-08-01

    In 1977, the World Health Assembly (WHA) set the social target--the "Health For All" goal and in 1995, urged member states to "re-orientate medical education and medical practice for "Health For All" (resolution WHA 48.8). This led to World Health Organisation to enunciate the "5-star doctor" needing skills in healthcare management, quality assurance and health economics. The Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya introduced the New Integrated Curriculum (NIC) in 1995. The objective was aimed at producing a competent doctor with a holistic approach to the practice of medicine. This was to be achieved by having 3 strands of studies i.e. The Scientific Basis of Medicine (SBM), the Doctor, Patient, Health and Society (DPHS), and Personal and Professional Development (PPD) over the 5-year programme, split into 3 phases. Elements of the "5-star doctor" were introduced in strand 2--DPHS and strand 3--PPD. Management studies were introduced in the Personal and Professional Development (PPD) strand. This led to an instructional module--"Principles of Management in Health Care Services (PMGT)" comprising of the Management of Self, Resources and People and incorporating a three week field programme. Evaluation is undertaken at the end of the phase IIIA of the studies. This NIC approach will be able to produce a "5-star doctor", a team player, leader, communicator and an effective manager. PMID:16315627

  9. The Challenges for Physicians of Demonstrating Continuing Competence in the Changing World of Medical Regulation: Osteopathic Pediatrician Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langenau, Erik E.; Gimpel, John R.

    2012-01-01

    The current system of continuing medical education, maintenance of certification, and renewal of medical licenses can be quite burdensome and inefficient for all practicing physicians: medical doctors (M.D.s) and doctors of osteopathic medicine (D.O.s). D.O.s have opportunities for residency training and specialty certification which are not…

  10. Continuing education in nursing: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Lorraine

    2007-07-01

    The importance of continuing education for nurses has been increasingly emphasized in the nursing literature since the beginning of the profession. The concept of continuing education is often used as a substitute for associated terms such as continuing professional development and lifelong learning, thus highlighting a need for its clarification. The purpose of this article is to explain and describe continuing education, in order to encourage a broader understanding of the concept among nurses. The concept analysis is directed by Rodgers' [Rodgers, B.L., 1989. Concept analysis and the development of nursing knowledge: the evolutionary cycle. Journal of Advanced Nursing 14, 330-335] 'evolutionary approach' which is viewed as an ongoing dynamic process, and one that identifies the shared meaning of concepts. Examining everyday discourse used in the nursing literature identified the critical attributes, antecedents and consequence of continuing education in nursing. As a result, the emerging attributes of the concept are synthesised into a conceptual model. The article concludes with an exploration of the application of the concept of continuing education within nursing and its implications for professional development. PMID:17109998

  11. Undergraduate Rural Medical Education Program Development: Focus Group Consultation with the NRHA Rural Medical Educators Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Laura H.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; Florence, Joseph A.; Boulger, James G.; Hunsaker, Matt L.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Over a decade ago, leaders in rural medical education established the Rural Medical Educators (RME) Group, an interest group within the National Rural Health Association, to support faculty in rural medical education programs. This group has convened an annual RME conclave since 2006. In 2008, this conclave convened 15 national leaders in…

  12. The Role of Medical Museums in Contemporary Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marreez, Yehia M. A-H.; Willems, Luuk N. A.; Wells, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    From the early 19th century until the most recent two decades, open-space and satellite museums featuring anatomy and pathology collections (collectively referred to as "medical museums") had leading roles in medical education. However, many factors have caused these roles to diminish dramatically in recent years. Chief among these are the great…

  13. An Electronic Pillbox for Continuous Monitoring of Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Tamara. L.; Hunt, John M.; Adami, Andre; Kaye, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an instrumented pillbox, called a MedTracker, which allows monitoring of medication adherence on a continuous basis. This device improves on existing systems by providing mobility, frequent and automatic data collection, more detailed information about nonadherence and medication errors, and the familiar interface of a 7-day drug store pillbox. We report on the design of the MedTracker, and on the results of a field trial in 39 homes to evaluate the device. PMID:17946369

  14. Sexual harassment in medical education: liability and protection.

    PubMed

    Recupero, Patricia Ryan; Heru, Alison M; Price, Marilyn; Alves, Jody

    2004-09-01

    The prevalence and frequency of sexual harassment in medical education is well documented. On the graduation questionnaire administered by the Association of American Medical Colleges in 2003, 15% of medical students reported experiences of mistreatment during medical school. On items that specifically address sexual mistreatment, over 2% of students reported experiencing gender-based exclusion from training opportunities, and unwanted sexual advances and offensive sexist comments from school personnel. Sexual harassment of medical trainees by faculty supervisors is obviously unethical and may also be illegal under education discrimination laws. In two cases in 1998 and 1999, the U.S. Supreme Court clarified that schools may be held liable under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 for the sexual harassment of their students. In 2001, the Office of Civil Rights of the Department of Education released revised policy guidelines on sexual harassment that reflect the Supreme Court rulings. Medical school administrators should undertake formal assessments of the educational environment in their training programs as a first step toward addressing the problem of sexual harassment. The authors recommend that medical schools implement measures to both prevent and remedy sexual harassment in their training programs. These constructive approaches include applying faculty and student education, establishing a system for notification and response, and creating an institutional structure to provide continuous evaluation of the educational environment. PMID:15326003

  15. Continuity of Care: Sharing the Medication Treatment Plan.

    PubMed

    Spahni, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The shared medication treatment plan is a key element for supporting the continuity of care. Indeed a substantial amount of emergency hospitalization is linked to medication - 5% to 10% according to some studies. Methods and tools helping all healthcare providers to have a better knowledge of the complete medication plan are therefore required in order to limit side effects linked to an insufficient knowledge of what the patient is taking. The workshop intends to present various initiatives and open the discussion about the limits, pros and cons of various initiatives. PMID:27332315

  16. [First online continuing tele-education in gastroenterology in Croatia].

    PubMed

    Pulanić, Roland; Iveković, Hrvoje; Pulanić, Drazen; Vrazić, Hrvoje; Ostojić, Rajko; Premuzić, Marina; Lepoglavec, Zeljko

    2003-01-01

    The expansion and popularity of the Internet created the expansion of tele-medicine, with tele-education as its important part. Such on-line distance learning is especially important for diseases being in the focus of public health interest, as diseases of the gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary and pancreatic system due to their frequency. Therefore, in this study is shown the "TIGEL project of tele-interventional gastroenterology" that was launched in May 2001 at the Center for Interventional Gastroenterology, Department of Gastroenterology, University Department of Medicine, Zagreb University Hospital Center. The project includes creation of a web site at the server of the Zagreb University School of Medicine (www.mef.hr/edumed/gastro/index.html), and among the most important goals of the project is continuous medical tele-education in gastroenterology. Beside description of the project, one of the founders of continuous on-line medical education in Croatia, this work describes many advantages but also some still unsolved questions considering medical tele-education, a very promising but still developing way of education. PMID:15038219

  17. The Medicalization of Education: A Historiographic Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrina, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author described eight, distinct practices through which schools were medicalized during the last decade of the 19th century and the first three decades of the 20th century. The medicalization of education was summarized in expanding definitions of educational hygiene, encompassing mental, neoscholastic, physical, and school…

  18. Medical education today: globalising with quality.

    PubMed

    Shahabudin, S H

    2005-08-01

    With globalization education has become a tradable service governed by the rules and regulations of GATS and worth trillions of dollars. International standards are rapidly being developed to facilitate cross border supply of services. In medical education, the WFME has produced International Guidelines on Quality in Medical Education which has a regional equivalent in the WHO Western Pacific Region, and the IIME has defined the minimum essential requirements of standards in medical education in seven core competences. Malaysia, having an explicit policy of making education a sector for revenue generation, has put in place regulatory frameworks and incentives to make the country a centre of educational excellence. Within the ambit of this national aspiration, medical education has grown phenomenally in the last decade. Standards and procedures for accreditation of medical schools in line with the world standards have been developed and implemented and policies are enforced to facilitate compliance to the standards. The ultimate goal is for medical schools to be self-accredited. In striving towards self-accreditation medical schools should be innovative in making changes in the three requirements of medical education. These are the intellectual and social imperatives and strategies for effective implementation. PMID:16315616

  19. Financing Medical Education by the States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tim

    This document reviews programs and policy options for states concerned with methods of financing medical education. An introductory section considers the current climate for medical education and the health care workforce, noting the rapid movement to managed care and the need to increase the number of primary care physicians. The next section…

  20. Child Psychiatry Curricula in Undergraduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Michael Gifford; Giesen, Femke; Walter, Garry

    2008-01-01

    A study to review the amount of time devoted to child psychiatry in undergraduate medical education is conducted. Results conclude that relatively low priority is given to child psychiatry in medical education with suggestions for international teaching standards on the subject.

  1. Accreditation of Allied Medical Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL. Council on Medical Education.

    Prepared by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association with the cooperation of collaborating organizations, this document is a collection of guidelines for accredited programs for medical assistants, nuclear medicine technology, orthopedic assistants, radiation therapy technology, and radiologic technologists. The…

  2. Medical Students' Affirmation of Ethics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrmann, Jon A.; Hoop, Jinger; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite the acknowledged importance of ethics education in medical school, little empirical work has been done to assess the needs and preferences of medical students regarding ethics curricula. Methods: Eighty-three medical students at the University of New Mexico participated in a self-administered written survey including 41 scaled…

  3. Alcohol and Drug Abuse in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galanter, Marc, Ed.

    This book presents the state of the art of American medical education in alcohol and drug abuse, and is the culmination of a four-year collaborative effort among the medical school faculty of the Career Teacher Program in Alcohol and Drug Abuse. The first part contains reports, curricula, and survey data prepared for the medical education…

  4. Standardizing and personalizing science in medical education.

    PubMed

    Lambert, David R; Lurie, Stephen J; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Ward, Denham S

    2010-02-01

    In the century since the initial publication of the Flexner Report, medical education has emphasized a broad knowledge of science and a fundamental understanding of the scientific method, which medical educators believe are essential to the practice of medicine. The enormous growth of scientific knowledge that underlies clinical practice has challenged medical schools to accommodate this new information within the curricula. Although innovative educational modalities and new curricula have partly addressed this growth, the authors argue for a systematic restructuring of the content and structure of science education from the premedical setting through clinical practice. The overarching goal of science education is to provide students with a broad, solid foundation applicable to medicine, a deep understanding of the scientific method, and the attitudes and skills needed to apply new knowledge to patient care throughout their careers. The authors believe that to accomplish this successfully, the following changes must occur across the three major stages of medical education: (1) a reshaping of the scientific preparation that all students complete before medical school, (2) an increase in individualized science education during medical school, and (3) an emphasis on knowledge acquisition skills throughout graduate medical education and beyond to assure lifelong scientific learning. As students progress through the educational continuum, the balance of standardized and personalized scientific knowledge will shift toward personalization. Greater personalization demands that physicians possess well-refined skills in information acquisition, interpretation, and application for optimal lifelong learning and effective clinical practice. PMID:20107368

  5. Changes to postgraduate medical education in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mehool

    2016-08-01

    Medicine is a constantly evolving profession, especially with the advent of rapid advances in the scientific base that underpins this vocation. In order to ensure that training in medicine is contemporary with the continuous evolution of the profession, there has been a multitude of changes to postgraduate medical education, particularly in the UK. This article aims to provide an overview of relevant key changes to postgraduate medical education in the UK during the 21st century, including changes to the structure, governance and commissioning of medical education, effects of European Working Time Directive on training, recent recommendations in the Future Hospital Commission report and Shape of training report, and recent requirements for accreditation of medical education trainers. Many of these recommendations will require complex discussions often at organisational levels, hopefully with some realistic and pragmatic solutions for implementation. PMID:27481371

  6. Organization Development Strategies for Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Alan B.; Underbaake, Gail; McBride, Patrick E.; Mejicano, George C.

    2001-01-01

    Primary care facilities (n=15) were randomly assigned to one of four experimental treatments. Two care practices from each were analyzed. Cardiovascular disease prevention was improved by effective leadership, priority setting, joint planning, resources, and ownership. Hindering improvement were patient load, chaos surrounding reorganization, lack…

  7. Challenges in nursing continuing education: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Eslamian, Jalil; Moeini, Mahin; Soleimani, Marzie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nursing continuing education with development of knowledge, skill, and attitude results in improvement of nursing activity, and thus improves the health care in the society. If the education is not planned and implement properly, it affects the patient care. This study was designed to explore the challenges of nursing continuing education in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals. Materials and Methods: The research was conducted from April 2012 to February 2013 in Isfahan, Iran. The sampling was begun with purposeful method and continued with snowball method. Thirty-nine participants were selected among the nurses of Alzahra, Kashani, and Noor hospitals, nursing and midwifery faculty, continuing education center, and the vice-chancellery for treatment. The participants were both learners and planners of continuing education program. In this descriptive explorative qualitative research, we interviewed 39 participants in five focus group and five individual interviews, until data saturation was achieved. We used semi-structured interviews and field notes for data gathering, and members checking, triangulation (data and method), peer debriefing, and peer review to increase the strength of data. Data were analyzed with thematic analysis method that was proposed by Broun and Clarke in 2006. Results: Data analysis produced 175 initial codes, 8 subthemes, and 5 main themes. The main themes included: Learners related factors, teachers related factors, educational process related factors, inadequate facilities, and defective evaluation. Conclusions: According to the results, we need to revise the educational process in nursing continuing education. To achieve this goal, we need a team for needs assessment, planning, and evaluation. In addition, we must pay attention to educators’ and learners’ issues. PMID:26120340

  8. Mobile Learning in Medical Education: Review.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-10-01

    In the past several years, mobile learning made rapid inroads into the provision of medical education. There are significant advantages associated with mobile learning. These include high access, low cost, more situated and contextual learning, convenience for the learner, continuous communication and interaction between learner and tutor and between learner and other learners, and the ability to self-assess themselves while learning. Like any other form of medical pedagogy, mobile learning has its downsides. Disadvantages of mobile learning include: inadequate technology, a risk of distraction from learning by using a device that can be used for multiple purposes, and the potential for breakdown in barriers between personal usage of the mobile device and professional or educational use. Despite these caveats, there is no question but that mobile learning offers much potential. In the future, it is likely that the strategy of mobile first, whereby providers of e-learning think of the user experience on a mobile first, will result in learners who increasingly expect that all e-learning provision will work seamlessly on a mobile device. PMID:26949301

  9. Changes in medical education: the community perspective.

    PubMed

    Hensel, W A; Smith, D D; Barry, D R; Foreman, R

    1996-05-01

    The societal and economic forces driving change in medical education are affecting communities as well as universities. Each of the four authors of this paper is deeply involved in one of the components of their locale's well-developed community-based medical educational system, and each describes how change is influencing his role in that system, whether the role be managing a community hospital, directing a local Area Health Education Center, participating as a family medicine faculty member, or being a community preceptor. They agree on some common themes: (1) that it is good that medical students' education is moving into the community (e.g., this validates the importance of the community hospital to medical education, is an acknowledgment of the importance of generalism, and provides students invaluable learning experiences); (2) that educating medical students in the community is expensive, and more funding and resources are needed so that the area's hospitals, community faculty, preceptors, and support services can be fairly compensated for their commitment; and (3) that their community-based education system can no longer absorb the costs of training more medical students. This is not a criticism of academic medical centers, which are under tremendous financial pressures themselves, but is simply to state the community perspective and to urge fairness in the distribution of resources for medical education. Community institutions and academic medical centers will work individually to create their own integrated health care systems but must work together to create a better, more cost-effective system for educating medical students. PMID:9114859

  10. Applications and Benefits of Computer Based Education for Medical and Allied Health Education

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Robert M.

    1981-01-01

    Advances in computer technology have provided unique opportunities to apply computer systems to a wide variety of medical and health care functions. One area which holds great potential for using computer systems is medical and health science education. The following paper focuses on 1. The benefits which can be derived from using computers to deliver many forms of medical education but particularly continuing medical education. 2. The applications of computer technology to medical and health science training. 3. The future applications of computers to medical and health science education. The paper cites numerous examples of how computers are currently being used in health care training and what new developments might be used in the very near future.

  11. Incorporating Environmental Health into Pediatric Medical and Nursing Education

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, Leyla Erk; Roberts, James; Rogers, Bonnie; Love, Rebecca; Etzel, Ruth; Paulson, Jerome; Witherspoon, Nsedu Obot; Dearry, Allen

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric medical and nursing education currently lacks the environmental health content necessary to appropriately prepare pediatric health care professionals to prevent, recognize, manage, and treat environmental-exposure–related disease. Leading health institutions have recognized the need for improvements in health professionals’ environmental health education. Parents are seeking answers about the impact of environmental toxicants on their children. Given the biologic, psychological, and social differences between children and adults, there is a need for environmental health education specific to children. The National Environmental Education and Training Foundation, in partnership with the Children’s Environmental Health Network, created two working groups, one with expertise in medical education and one with expertise in nursing education. The working groups reviewed the transition from undergraduate student to professional to assess where in those processes pediatric environmental health could be emphasized. The medical education working group recommended increasing education about children’s environmental health in the medical school curricula, in residency training, and in continuing medical education. The group also recommended the expansion of fellowship training in children’s environmental health. Similarly, the nursing working group recommended increasing children’s environmental health content at the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing nursing education levels. Working groups also identified the key medical and nursing organizations that would be important in leveraging these changes. A concerted effort to prioritize pediatric environmental health by governmental organizations and foundations is essential in providing the resources and expertise to set policy and provide the tools for teaching pediatric environmental health to health care providers. PMID:15579423

  12. In defence of utility: the medical humanities and medical education.

    PubMed

    Blease, Charlotte

    2016-06-01

    The idea that a study of the humanities helps to humanise doctors has become a leitmotif within the field. It is argued that the humanities (especially, literature) help to foster insights beyond those provided by biomedical training. Healthy young medics, it is claimed, can thereby gain significant insights into patienthood, and obtain important skills that may be valuable for their professional life. But the instrumentality of the humanities is not the only justification proffered for its inclusion in medical curricula. In this paper I critically examine the two overarching justifications recurrently cited in the mainstream literature-namely, (1) the instrumental worth and (2) the intrinsic value of the medical humanities in educating doctors. Examining these theses (and focusing on the views of a leading medical humanities scholar) I show that the bifurcation into instrumental versus non-instrumental justifications is not supported by the argumentation. Instead, I find that the particulars of the supposedly intrinsic justifications amount to an unambiguously instrumental defence of the humanities. Contextualizing the present investigation to probe further, I describe a long history of debate about the role of the humanities in British education and find that it rests on unsupported dichotomies (utility vs non-utility, theoretical vs applied, educated vs trained). I conclude that the medical humanities' manifesto would be more intellectually honest and coherent, and provide a more robust defence of its value in medical education, if it chose to embrace a wholly instrumental rationale for its role. PMID:26842744

  13. Continuing Engineering Education: Who Really Needs it? (What is the Market for Continuing Education?).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, Fred

    A study was made to find out 1) if institutions have developed the right continuing engineering education programs and whether they have been able to reach those who could benefit most; 2) who was really interested in continuing education; 3) what kind of courses--company inhouse courses, college courses, short workshops, or professional society…

  14. Evaluation Models for Continuing Education Program Efficacy: How Does Athletic Training Continuing Education Measure up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty-Restrepo, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Brian J.; Del Rossi, Gianluca; Pitney, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Although continuing education is required for athletic trainers (AT) to maintain their Board of Certification credential, little is known regarding its efficacy for advancing knowledge and improving patient care. Continuing professional education (CPE) is designed to provide professionals with important practical learning opportunities.…

  15. Marketing Continuing Education: A Study of Price Strategies. Occasional Papers in Continuing Education, No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamoureux, Marvin E.

    The objective of the study conducted at the Centre for Continuing Education (CCE) at the University of British Columbia was to determine that threshold pricing not only existed for continuing education courses, but also was applicable to an administrative decision-making structure. The first part of the three-part investigation analyzed consumer…

  16. Continuing engineering education through distance learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baukal, C. E.

    2010-05-01

    The demand for distance continuing engineering education (CEE) is growing. This article describes the following with regard to CEE: the purpose; its importance, trends and unique challenges. Distance education can meet some of these challenges. Benefits and challenges of distance CEE are discussed along with the different types of distance CEE providers including universities, professional and trade organisations, corporate universities, for-profit education providers and government. Some recommendations are given for distance CEE. The specific focus here is on non-degree courses that are generally highly practical and focused.

  17. Blueprint for prescriber continuing education program.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    On October 25, 2011, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) posted online this Blueprint for Prescriber Continuing Education, labeled "final," relating to extended-release and long-acting opioids. The pending FDA Risk Evaluation Management Strategy (REMS) requires prescriber education. This document provides guidance to sponsors of these dosage forms in developing the prescvriber education component of their REMS. This report was posted online by the federal agency on October 25, 2011 at: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/drugsafety/informationbydrugclass/ucm277916.pdf. It is in the public domain. PMID:22764849

  18. [Challenges of basical sciences in medical education].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Carranza, Rodolfo

    2014-12-01

    The relevance of basic sciences in medical education has been recognized for centuries, and the importance of exposing medical students to science was acknowledged and reinforced by the recommendations of Flexner in 1910. Since then, traditional medical education has been divided into preclinical and clinical subjects; within this scheme, the first terms of undergraduate medical education usually concentrate on basic sciences, while subsequent ones focus on clinical sciences and clinical training. Since 1956, this educational scheme has been questioned and, in some schools, the medical curriculum has undergone significant structural changes; some of these reforms, especially integrated curricula, are associated with important reductions in the time allotted to individual basic science courses or even with their removal. The removal of basic science subjects from the medical curriculum is paradoxical because nowadays the value of biomedical knowledge and the scientific reasoning to make medical decisions is more appreciated than ever. To maintain its relevance in medical education, basic sciences have to confront three challenges: a) increasing its presence in clinical education; b) developing nuclear programs; and c) renewing laboratory instruction. PMID:25643888

  19. Reflections on Experimental Research in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, David A.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    As medical education research advances, it is important that education researchers employ rigorous methods for conducting and reporting their investigations. In this article we discuss several important yet oft neglected issues in designing experimental research in education. First, randomization controls for only a subset of possible confounders.…

  20. Medical Library Education in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, David S.; Xiong, Dizhi

    1990-01-01

    The establishment of faculties of medical library and information science in four Chinese national medical universities is described. The faculties were established in the mid-1980s, and each is fully integrated into its university. Students receive three years of nonclinical medical training and two years of library and information science…

  1. Social marketing: application to medical education.

    PubMed

    David, S P; Greer, D S

    2001-01-16

    Medical education is often a frustrating endeavor, particularly when it attempts to change practice behavior. Traditional lecture-based educational methods are limited in their ability to sustain concentration and interest and to promote learner adherence to best-practice guidelines. Marketing techniques have been very effective in changing consumer behavior and physician behavior. However, the techniques of social marketing-goal identification, audience segmentation, and market research-have not been harnessed and applied to medical education. Social marketing can be applied to medical education in the effort to go beyond inoculation of learners with information and actually change behaviors. The tremendous potential of social marketing for medical education should be pilot-tested and systematically evaluated. PMID:11177316

  2. Postage stamps fading as medical education tool.

    PubMed

    Titford, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Postage stamps have often been used around the world to educate the general public and to promote programs and policies. Stamps with medical themes have also been used to educate the general public about different aspects of medicine. As a result of the newer methods of communication, however, fewer and fewer commemorative postage stamps are used and most members of the general public never see stamps with medical themes. This article reviews recently issued stamps of medical interest, and some other medical stamps that have been issued down through the years. Some stamps with connections to the South East United States are also discussed. PMID:19488002

  3. Lived Experience of University Continuing Education Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Janice

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on a study that explored the professional lives of eight leaders of continuing education in Canadian universities, with a focus on their administrative role, to provide a deeper understanding of how they live within their practice (lived experience). A practical listing of 56 horizons of experience was identified, useful as…

  4. Alexander Graham Bell in Professional Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasworm, Carol; Hampton, Leonard A.

    1976-01-01

    The University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education and the School of Pharmacy developed and presented, as a pilot project, a series of four telelectures at 10 locations throughout the State. Participating pharmacists were receptive to the approach and reported favorable reactions in the evaluation. (LH)

  5. Marketing Realities in Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craven, Ruth F.; DuHamel, Martha B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes tenets of continuing professional education marketing: identify target audience, define mission, assess community needs, identify competition, establish credibility, develop marketing plans, provide options, evaluate, and develop high-quality programs. Offers advice for pricing, cancellations, new courses, promotion expenses, direct…

  6. Google Scholar and the Continuing Education Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howland, Jared L.; Howell, Scott; Wright, Thomas C.; Dickson, Cody

    2009-01-01

    The recent introduction of Google Scholar has renewed hope that someday a powerful research tool will bring continuing education literature more quickly, freely, and completely to one's computer. The authors suggest that using Google Scholar with other traditional search methods will narrow the research gap between what is discoverable and…

  7. Continuous Improvement through Baldridge in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siri, Diane K.; Miller, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Describes efforts of the Baldrige in Education Center and Quality Leadership Academy in Santa Cruz County, California, to support teacher and administrator efforts to improve student performance in selected schools through the use of continuous-improvement techniques adopted by many American corporations to improve product quality and increase…

  8. Tailoring Continuing Education to Construction Industry Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Harry P.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a regionally oriented continuing education program for people in the construction industry which has been cooperatively developed by representatives from university programs in technology and by industry leaders concerned with regional needs for housing, industrial building, transportation, pollution abatement, and other…

  9. Continuing Engineering Education- An Industrial Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgwardt, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    The author discusses the characteristics and role of a continuing engineering education director. It is necessary that the director of such a program must be able to communicate with the industrial complex and effectively screen and relate academic resources to industrial needs. (MS)

  10. Handbook of Marketing for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simerly, Robert G.; And Others

    This comprehensive guide to effectively marketing continuing education programs and courses consists of the following chapters: (1) "The Strategic Role of Marketing for Organizational Success" (Robert G. Simerly); (2) "Integrating Marketing into Strategic Planning" (Simerly); (3) "Learning More about Your Market: Sources and Uses of Data" (Dennis…

  11. Designing CBE for Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Keith

    Deakin Australia (DA) CBE (Continuing Business Education) programs are designed for use in conjunction with print and audio materials which are distributed as distance learning packages to business studies graduates working or planning to work as accountants, who are enrolled in the professional licensing program run by the Australian Society of…

  12. Continuing Trust Education in the 1980's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blech, Scott A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for continuing professional education in the trust industry is noted and emphasis is placed on need for new or additional training in management, taxation, employee benefits, marketing, and investments. The pros and cons of residential schools are outlined, and the use of regional and state seminars is discussed. Available from 6285…

  13. Redesigning Continuing Education in the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Today in the United States, the professional health workforce is not consistently prepared to provide high quality health care and assure patient safety, even as the nation spends more per capita on health care than any other country. The absence of a comprehensive and well-integrated system of continuing education (CE) in the health professions…

  14. Continuing Education in New Materials. FEU PICKUP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunning, Angela; Clift, Roland

    A British project: (1) identified national needs for continuing education and training (CET) in new materials; (2) assessed the priorities among the needs and developed course outlines; and (3) established a CET needs review system for training in new materials. The new materials fall into four categories: (1) polymers; (2) composites; (3)…

  15. Instant Information on Continuing Education in Metro.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, David E.

    Surveys were conducted in 1969 to evaluate the usefulness of the metropolitan Toronto Continuing Education Directory, a 424 page work giving course titles, organizations, locations, days and hours, duration, starting dates, prerequisites, qualifications awarded, and other pertinent data. Over 200 copies went free to public libraries, university…

  16. The UCSF Academy of Medical Educators.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Molly; Irby, David M; Debas, Haile T

    2003-07-01

    The Academy of Medical Educators at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), was established in 2000 to (1) foster excellence in teaching, (2) support teachers of medicine, and (3) promote curricular innovation. A membership organization, it recognizes five categories of educational activity: direct teaching, curriculum development and assessment of learner performance, advising and mentoring, educational administration and leadership, and educational research. Excellent medical student teaching and outstanding accomplishment in one or more areas of educational activity qualify a teacher for membership. Candidates prepare a portfolio that is reviewed internally and by national experts in medical education. Currently 37 faculty members, 3% of the entire school of medicine faculty, belong to the academy. The academy's innovations funding program disburses one-year grants to support curricular development and comparisons of pedagogical approaches; through this mechanism, the academy has funded 20 projects at a total cost of $442,300. Three fourths of expended funds support faculty release time. Faculty development efforts include promotion of the use of an educator's portfolio and the establishment of a mentoring program for junior faculty members built around observation of teaching. The Academy of Medical Educators vigorously supports expanded scholarship in education; the academy-sponsored Education Day is an opportunity for educators to present their work locally. Recipients of innovations-funding program grants are expected to present their work in an appropriate national forum and are assisted in doing this through quarterly scholarship clinics. The Academy of Medical Educators has been well received at UCSF and is enhancing the status of medical education and teachers. PMID:12857682

  17. Cost in medical education: one hundred and twenty years ago.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-10-01

    The first full paper that is dedicated to cost in medical education appears in the BMJ in 1893. This paper "The cost of a medical education" outlines the likely costs associated with undergraduate education at the end of the nineteenth century, and offers guidance to the student on how to make financial planning. Many lessons can be gleaned from the paper about the cost and other aspects of nineteenth century medical education. Cost is viewed almost exclusively from the domain of the male gender. Cost is viewed not just from the perspective of a young man but of a young gentleman. There is a strong implication that medicine is a club and that you have to have money to join the club and then to take part in the club's activities. Cost affects choice of medical school and selection into schools. The paper places great emphasis on the importance of passing exams at their first sitting and progressing through each year in a timely manner-mainly to save costs. The subject of cost is viewed from the perspective of the payer-at this time students and their families. The paper encourages the reader to reflect on what has and has not changed in this field since 1893. Modern medical education is still expensive; its expense deters students; and we have only started to think about how to control costs or how to ensure value. Too much of the cost of medical education continues to burden students and their families. PMID:25134666

  18. Resident Medical Care Utilization Patterns in Continuing Care Retirement Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.; Morris, Shirley; Morris, John N.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an evaluation of medical care service utilization by two elderly cohorts one living in continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) and the other living in traditional community settings. CCRC residents' overall use of Medicare-covered medical services did not differ significantly from that of the traditional community-residing elders. Both groups incurred annual per capita expenditures of approximately $2,000. In their last year of life, however, CCRC residents displayed significantly lower expenditures for hospital care ($3,854 versus $7,268) but higher expenditures for Medicare or non-Medicare-covered nursing home care ($5,565 versus $3,533). PMID:10133107

  19. Training the Trainer: Developing Educators for Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canellos, Harriete; Medio, Franklin J.; Mozlin, Rochelle; Perry, Claudia A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a program at the State University of New York College of Optometry targeted at training younger clinical faculty who wish to become involved in continuing professional education. Covers the program's purpose and the institution's experiences with implementation. (DB)

  20. Factors That Influence the Financing and Cost of Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPheeters, Harold L.

    Financing and cost factors in medical education and the effect of the many missions of a medical school on funding issues are discussed. The teaching mission of medical schools includes undergraduate medical education (preparation for the MD degree), graduate medical education (training of resident physicians), biomedical specialist education,…

  1. Continued Dispensing: what medications do patients believe should be available?

    PubMed

    Abukres, Salem Hasn; Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery David

    2015-01-01

    Background. Continued Dispensing (CD) is a new medication supply method for certain medications in Australia. It aims to prevent treatment interruption as a result of patients' inability to obtain a new valid prescription. The only currently eligible patients for this service are statin and/or oral contraceptives users who have been using these medications for 6 months or more, have not utilized the CD method during the last 12 months, and cannot obtain an immediate appointment with the prescriber in order to get a new prescription. This study aimed to investigate patients' attitudes towards potential extension and expansion of this medication supply method. Methods. A randomly selected 301 users of these medications from all Australian States were recruited using Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI). Result. The response rate was 79%. The majority of the participants (73.3%) did not agree with current restriction on CD utilization frequency. They also supported, to varying degrees, inclusion of all the proposed medications (support ranged from 44.2-78.4%). In this regard, participants who suffered from a specific disease did not differ significantly from those without the disease except in case of patients with depression (p = 0.001). Conclusions. Participants of this study strongly supported both CD extension and expansion. A future critical review of the current version of CD is highly recommended in order to enhance CD capability to achieve its goals. PMID:26019994

  2. Continued Dispensing: what medications do patients believe should be available?

    PubMed Central

    Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery David

    2015-01-01

    Background. Continued Dispensing (CD) is a new medication supply method for certain medications in Australia. It aims to prevent treatment interruption as a result of patients’ inability to obtain a new valid prescription. The only currently eligible patients for this service are statin and/or oral contraceptives users who have been using these medications for 6 months or more, have not utilized the CD method during the last 12 months, and cannot obtain an immediate appointment with the prescriber in order to get a new prescription. This study aimed to investigate patients’ attitudes towards potential extension and expansion of this medication supply method. Methods. A randomly selected 301 users of these medications from all Australian States were recruited using Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI). Result. The response rate was 79%. The majority of the participants (73.3%) did not agree with current restriction on CD utilization frequency. They also supported, to varying degrees, inclusion of all the proposed medications (support ranged from 44.2–78.4%). In this regard, participants who suffered from a specific disease did not differ significantly from those without the disease except in case of patients with depression (p = 0.001). Conclusions. Participants of this study strongly supported both CD extension and expansion. A future critical review of the current version of CD is highly recommended in order to enhance CD capability to achieve its goals. PMID:26019994

  3. Needles and Haystacks: Finding Funding for Medical Education Research.

    PubMed

    Gruppen, Larry D; Durning, Steven J

    2016-04-01

    Medical education research suffers from a significant and persistent lack of funding. Although adequate funding has been shown to improve the quality of research, there are a number of factors that continue to limit it. The competitive environment for medical education research funding makes it essential to understand strategies for improving the search for funding sources and the preparation of proposals. This article offers a number of resources, strategies, and suggestions for finding funding. Investigators must be able to frame their research in the context of significant issues and principles in education. They must set their proposed work in the context of prior work and demonstrate its potential for significant new contributions. Because there are few funding sources earmarked for medical education research, researchers much also be creative, flexible, and adaptive as they seek to present their ideas in ways that are appealing and relevant to the goals of funders. Above all, the search for funding requires persistence and perseverance. PMID:26556292

  4. Indian Education - Post School Highlights: Regional Continuing Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Toronto (Ontario). Education Div.

    Summarizing Canada's Regional Continuing Education Programs for the 1972-74 fiscal years, this document indicates support for solid education programs for the development of Indians in their communities. Brief summations are presented for the following regions: Maritime Region (1972-73 was a peak year for on-the-job training placements with…

  5. Postgraduate Education for Medical Personnel in the USSR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    In recent years it has become apparent that the system of continuing medical education developed in the USSR has reached a high level of achievement. At the invitation of the Ministry of Health of the USSR, an international study tour was organized by the World Health Organization to study the Soviet system. This report presents the findings of…

  6. Commissioning medical education: principles for best practice.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kieran

    2016-04-01

    We need to ensure that we get value for money for our investments in medical education. Commissioning is one method of ensuring that we get value. However, like any other tool, it needs to be used properly. PMID:27071431

  7. Modeling Manipulation in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Jason I.

    2010-01-01

    As residents and medical students progress through their medical training, they are presented with multiple instances in which they feel they must manipulate the healthcare system and deceive others in order to efficiently treat their patients. This, however, creates a culture of manipulation resulting in untoward effects on trainees' ethical and…

  8. Evaluation of an Audience Response System for the Continuing Education of Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Redonda G.; Ashar, Bimal H.; Getz, Kelly J.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing medical education (CME) for physicians and other health personnel is becoming increasingly important in light of recertification requirements. Interactive learning is more effective and may be useful in a continuing education setting. This study examines the use of an audience response system (ARS) as an interactive…

  9. Rural Medical Education: Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon R.; Bornstein, Stephen; Jong, Michael; Fleet, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    (Purpose) This report summarizes a synthesis of the literature related to the evidence, initiatives and approaches to rural/northern medical education, particularly its role in strengthening the medical workforce in rural areas. (Methodology) A literature review was conducted involving the literature databases MEDLINE (January 1990-March 2003),…

  10. Medical Treatment and Educational Problems in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartel, Nettie R.; Thurman, S. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    The miracles of modern medical technology are sometimes accompanied by unanticipated costs affecting survivors' quality of life. This article considers the educational implications for three groups of children who could not survive without medical intervention: children treated for cancer, low birth-weight and premature infants, and the medically…

  11. Just imagine: new paradigms for medical education.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neil B; Hull, Alan L; Young, James B; Stoller, James K

    2013-10-01

    For all its traditional successes, the current model of medical education in the United States and Canada is being challenged on issues of quality, throughput, and cost, a process that has exposed numerous shortcomings in its efforts to meet the needs of the nations' health care systems. A radical change in direction is required because the current path will not lead to a solution.The 2010 publication Educating Physicians: A Call for Reform of Medical School and Residency identifies several goals for improving the medical education system, and proposals have been made to reform medical education to meet these goals. Enacting these recommendations practically and efficiently, while training more health care providers at a lower cost, is challenging.To advance solutions, the authors review innovations that are disrupting higher education and describe a vision for using these to create a new model for competency-based, learner-centered medical education that can better meet the needs of the health care system while adhering to the spirit of the above proposals. These innovations include collaboration amongst medical schools to develop massive open online courses for didactic content; faculty working in small groups to leverage this online content in a "flipped-classroom" model; and digital badges for credentialing entrustable professional activities over the continuum of learning. PMID:23969368

  12. Software engineering education in medical informatics.

    PubMed

    Leven, F J

    1989-11-01

    Requirements and approaches of Software Engineering education in the field of Medical Informatics are described with respect to the impact of (1) experiences characterizing the "software misery", (2) status and tendencies in software methodology, and (3) educational status and needs in computer science education influenced by the controversy "theoretical versus practical education". Special attention is directed toward the growing importance of analysis, design methods, and techniques in the professional spectrum of Medical Informatics, the relevance of general principles of systems engineering in health care, the potential of non-procedural programming paradigms, and the intersection of Artificial Intelligence and education. Realizations of and experiences with programs in the field of Software Engineering are reported with respect to special requirements in Medical Informatics. PMID:2695780

  13. Teleconferencing as a medium for continuing education of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T C

    1983-04-01

    This paper describes 15 years' experience with narrow band telephony applied to continuing education of physicians and nursing staff in the state of Wisconsin. The telephonic approach is shown to be viable, effective and economical; especially so when compared to wideband video alternatives or peripatetic teachers. The department of Continuing Medical Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison, initiated the use of telephony for instructional purpose in non-credit continuing education in November, 1965. Facilities were installed for 18 hospitals, up to 350 miles from Madison, for use by 286 physicians two hours weekly. The program included lecture outlines, visuals and a full array of telephone equipment with lectures strictly timed yet allowing for questions and answers. The technical system was validated by a series of pretests and immediate and late-posttests of 52 physicians taking a telephone course. Technology was found not to interfere with the education process. The University has since enlarged the network by more than a factor of 10. By 1979-80 there were 1,320 program sessions with participation exceeding 34,000--or 270,596 student contact hours, at approximately $5.33 per student contact hours. Drawbacks include lack of eye contact, difficulty in understanding foreign accents, and necessity for videocassettes when demonstrations require movement. Strong points of telephony include its flexibility; variation in numbers attending and in visual aids; location of instructors and use in single subject/single day teaching. Telephony was found to be a uniquely useful means of providing continuing education to hospital and medical staffs. PMID:10265924

  14. E-Learning as New Method of Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2008-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED Distance learning refers to use of technologies based on health care delivered on distance and covers areas such as electronic health, tele-health (e-health), telematics, telemedicine, tele-education, etc. For the need of e-health, telemedicine, tele-education and distance learning there are various technologies and communication systems from standard telephone lines to the system of transmission digitalized signals with modem, optical fiber, satellite links, wireless technologies, etc. Tele-education represents health education on distance, using Information Communication Technologies (ICT), as well as continuous education of a health system beneficiaries and use of electronic libraries, data bases or electronic data with data bases of knowledge. Distance learning (E-learning) as a part of tele-education has gained popularity in the past decade; however, its use is highly variable among medical schools and appears to be more common in basic medical science courses than in clinical education. Distance learning does not preclude traditional learning processes; frequently it is used in conjunction with in-person classroom or professional training procedures and practices. Tele-education has mostly been used in biomedical education as a blended learning method, which combines tele-education technology with traditional instructor-led training, where, for example, a lecture or demonstration is supplemented by an online tutorial. Distance learning is used for self-education, tests, services and for examinations in medicine i.e. in terms of self-education and individual examination services. The possibility of working in the exercise mode with image files and questions is an attractive way of self education. Automated tracking and reporting of learners’ activities lessen faculty administrative burden. Moreover, e-learning can be designed to include outcomes assessment to determine whether learning has occurred. This review article

  15. Ethics and Continuing Professional Education: Today's Challenges, Tomorrow's Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Patricia A.

    2001-01-01

    If continuing professional education is to make a difference and meet challenges, ethics and its place in professional life must be moved to the forefront. Educators should continually renew the ethics discourse, drawing on the resources of adult education. (JOW)

  16. Health Occupations Education: Medical Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Jamee Reid

    These medical assistant instructional materials include 28 instructional units organized into sections covering orientation; anatomy and physiology, related disorders, disease, and skills; office practices; and clinical practices. Each unit includes eight basic components: performance objectives, suggested activities for teachers, information…

  17. Conducting Multilevel Analyses in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zyphur, Michael J.; Kaplan, Seth A.; Islam, Gazi; Barsky, Adam P.; Franklin, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    A significant body of education literature has begun using multilevel statistical models to examine data that reside at multiple levels of analysis. In order to provide a primer for medical education researchers, the current work gives a brief overview of some issues associated with multilevel statistical modeling. To provide an example of this…

  18. A Linked Dataset of Medical Educational Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietze, Stefan; Taibi, Davide; Yu, Hong Qing; Dovrolis, Nikolas

    2015-01-01

    Reusable educational resources became increasingly important for enhancing learning and teaching experiences, particularly in the medical domain where resources are particularly expensive to produce. While interoperability across educational resources metadata repositories is yet limited to the heterogeneity of metadata standards and interface…

  19. Information Technologies (ITs) in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Toromanovic, Selim; Masic, Fedja; Sivic, Suad; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Zlatan

    2011-01-01

    Advances in medicine in recent decades are in significant correlation with the advances in the information technology. Modern information technologies (IT) have enabled faster, more reliable and comprehensive data collection. These technologies have started to create a large number of irrelevant information, which represents a limiting factor and a real growing gap, between the medical knowledge on one hand, and the ability of doctors to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. Education means, learning, teaching, or the process of acquiring skills or behavior modification through various exercises. Traditionally, medical education meant the oral, practical and more passive transferring of knowledge and skills from the educators to students and health professionals. For the clinical disciplines, of special importance are the principles, such as, “learning at bedside,” aided by the medical literature. In doing so, these techniques enable students to contact with their teachers, and to refer to the appropriate literature. The disadvantage of these educational methods is in the fact, that teachers often do not have enough time. Additionally they are not very convenient to the horizontal and vertical integration of teaching, create weak or almost no self education, as well as, low skill levels and poor integration of education with a real social environment. In this paper authors describe application of modern IT in medical education – their advantages and disadvantages comparing with traditional ways of education. PMID:23408471

  20. Final year medical education in Germany.

    PubMed

    Nikendei, Christoph; Krautter, Markus; Celebi, Nora; Obertacke, Udo; Jünger, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Medical education in Germany has undergone significant changes. The current article attempts to give an overview of final year medical education in Germany and implications for further developments. Challenges in final year medical education mainly arise from the lack of clearly defined learning objectives, the provision of structure, independent patient management and professional guidance and supervision. The abolition of the one-and-a-half-year period of pre-registration medical training in 2004 and the changes in the structure of state examinations in line with the amendment of medical licensing regulations in 2002, meant pressure on the efficiency of final year medical education on the one hand, and additional burden on final year students on the other. In this article, a broad variety of innovative models that have been implemented at different medical faculties, and which address final year students' needs, will be reported. Further challenges, such as the integration of general medicine rotations, the abolishment of the second state examination in its present form, and the integration of final year students' individual career plans will be discussed. PMID:22480889

  1. Basic medical science education must include medical informatics.

    PubMed

    Sarbadhikari, Suptendra Nath

    2004-10-01

    Medical Informatics is the science and art of processing medical information. In this age of "Information Explosion" choosing the useful one is rather difficult, and there lies the scope of electronic database management. However, still many outstanding personnel related to the healthcare sector take pride in being "computer illiterate". The onus of the best use lies on the end-user health care providers only. Another term tele-health encompasses all the e-health and telemedicine services. Computer aided or assisted learning (CAL) is a computer based tutorial method that uses the computer to pose questions, provide remedial information and chart a student through a course. Now the emphasis in medical education, is on problem based learning (PBL) and there CAL could be of utmost help if used judiciously. Basic Medical Education and Research lays the foundation for advancing and applying proper healthcare delivery systems. There is no doubt that deep knowledge of anatomy is mandatory for successful surgery. Also, comprehensive knowledge of physiology is essential for grasping the principles of pathology and pharmacology adequately, to avoid incorrect and inadequate practice of medicine. Similarly, medical informatics is not just a subject to be learnt and forgotten after the first professional MBBS examination. The final aim of every student should not only be to become a good user but also an expert for advancing medical knowledge base through medical informatics. In view of the fast changing world of medical informatics, it is of utmost necessity to formulate a flexible syllabus rather than a rigid one. PMID:15907048

  2. [Medical education in a bachelors and masters system].

    PubMed

    Harendza, S; Guse, A H

    2009-09-01

    Gain of basic and applied medical knowledge and the changing demands of society with regard to medical professions are the main factors for continuous reforms in medical curricula. The Bologna Declaration of 1999 initiated the development of a unified European higher education area. A key tool for unification is the introduction of the Bachelors/Masters system. Although some European countries have adapted their medical curricula to the Bachelors/Masters system there is still debate on this issue in Germany. Some societies, e.g., the Society for Medical Education, demonstrated how the Bachelors/Masters system might be transferred to Germany. Moreover, the German Association of Medical Students already published a core curriculum compatible with the Bologna criteria. Some central elements of the Bologna Declaration have already been or could easily be integrated into the current structure of medical studies, e.g., quality assurance or a credit point transfer system. Furthermore, in the framework of the German medical licensure law, it is possible to introduce a curriculum fully compatible with the Bologna Declaration. A meaningful prerequisite would be a unified national (or European) qualification frame and catalog of learning objectives, designed according to the Bologna criteria. This should guarantee good mobility for medical students within Europe. PMID:19669708

  3. Online Continuing Education for Expanding Clinicians' Roles in Breastfeeding Support.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Roger A; Colchamiro, Rachel; Tolan, Ellen; Browne, Susan; Foley, Mary; Jenkins, Lucia; Mainello, Kristen; Vallu, Rohith; Hanley, Lauren E; Boisvert, Mary Ellen; Forgit, Julie; Ghiringhelli, Kara; Nordstrom, Christina

    2015-11-01

    Lack of health professional support is an important variable affecting mothers' achievement of breastfeeding goals. Online continuing education is a recognized pathway for disseminating content for improving clinicians' knowledge and supporting efforts to change practices. At the time we developed our project, free, accredited continuing education for physicians related to breastfeeding management that could be easily accessed using portable devices (via tablets/smartphones) was not available. Such resources were in demand, especially for facilities pursuing designation through the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. We assembled a government, academic, health care provider, and professional society partnership to create such a tutorial that would address the diverse content needed for supporting breastfeeding mothers postdischarge in the United States. Our 1.5-hour-long continuing medical and nursing education was completed by 1606 clinicians (1172 nurses [73%] and 434 physicians [27%]) within 1 year. More than 90% of nurses and over 98% of physicians said the tutorial achieved its 7 learning objectives related to breastfeeding physiology, broader factors in infant feeding decisions and practices, the American Academy of Pediatrics' policy statement, and breastfeeding management/troubleshooting. Feedback received from the tutorial led to the creation of a second tutorial consisting of another 1.5 hours of continuing medical and nursing education related to breast examination and assessment prior to delivery, provision of anticipatory guidance to pregnant women interested in breastfeeding, maternity care practices that influence breastfeeding outcomes, breastfeeding preterm infants, breastfeeding's role in helping address disparities, and dispelling common myths. The tutorials contribute to achievement of 8 Healthy People 2020 Maternal, Infant and Child Health objectives. PMID:26013061

  4. Properties of Publications on Anatomy in Medical Education Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc; Bolhuis, Sanneke; van Kuppeveld, Sascha; Kooloos, Jan; Laan, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Publications on anatomy in medical education appear to be largely anecdotal. To explore this, we investigated the literature on anatomy in medical education, aiming first to evaluate the contribution of the literature on anatomy in medical education to "best evidence medical education" (BEME) and second to evaluate the development of this…

  5. A balancing act. Continuing education for staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Jacobsma, B

    1991-02-01

    Basic nursing education programs prepare nurses as generalists. Continuing education programs for psychiatric nurses are needed to provide additional knowledge and expertise in this specialty area. 2. This educational program was developed for psychiatric staff nurses who have completed their orientation but are new to their institution or to the psychiatric clinical area. 3. Content of the program includes an overview of theories, therapeutic relationships, psychiatric terminology, the nursing process as it relates to patients with psychiatric problems, psychotropic medications, electroconvulsive therapy, and DSM-III R. 4. A pretest based on the content of this program can help assess the learning needs of each new nurse. The nurse may then attend the entire program or only specific parts based on individualized needs. PMID:2005591

  6. Medical educators working abroad: a pilot study of educators' experiences in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    McLean, Michelle; McKimm, Judy; Major, Stella

    2014-09-01

    Medical education is now a global enterprise, with many medical educators working internationally, either for short or longer periods or even permanently. In parallel, many medical schools are now involved in collaborations and partnerships with schools in other countries. With this in mind, we set out to explore what motivates, supports and inhibits medical educators who wish to or might work outside their "home country". This article reports on the pilot stage (in specific organizational contexts in Middle East) of a longitudinal project aimed at canvassing medical educators on a broader global scale, using reflective accounts and a questionnaire survey. The findings from this pilot study raise interesting issues about the lived experience of medical educators who have chosen to work in a different culture from their own. Respondents identify many advantages around skills, personal and professional development. Three main issues emerged in terms of educators' experiences: the academic environment, medical practice in a different cultural context and personal matters. Adapting to the local culture, gender segregation and the impact on learning and teaching was an overarching factor. We introduce an explanatory framework to explain the development of international educator identity, a cyclical process in which, through experiences and reflection, individual world views and perspectives are continually modified and developed. This pilot study tested the methodologies and developed a new conceptual model that will be used in a wider study across different cultures. PMID:24804914

  7. Terminology in Continuing Education: A Hybrid Methodology for Improving the Use and Reporting of Interventions in Continuing Education.

    PubMed

    Grant, Rachel E; Van Hoof, Thomas J; Sajdlowska, Joanna; Miller, Nicole E; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Researchers and leaders working in quality improvement and continuing education have a variety of interventions available to change clinician behavior and to improve patient outcomes. Evidence from systematic reviews and meta-analyses of such interventions is often mixed, with methodological weaknesses contributing to challenges in summarizing and interpreting evidence. Confusion and inconsistency surrounding many of the terms contributes to this challenge. This international study was commissioned by the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education to use expert opinion to improve the consistency of important educational terminology by describing the essential components of a set of educational interventions, such as educational meetings. This article will describe how this project uses the literature and an expert consensus process to improve precision around the conceptualization and implementation of educational interventions. This article will offer an in-depth description of a hybrid methodology that blends the Chaffee framework for concept explication with a modified Delphi technique that constitutes a novel expert consensus process. This article concludes with recommendations for other scholars replicating this process. PMID:26954001

  8. Can Medical Education be Researched?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The issues involved in conducting educational research are addressed. Some suggestions for methodology that can be used are suggested. Concerns about attempting to carry out investigations that follow the positivist model are discussed. (KR)

  9. Space Management for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agro, Dino

    1978-01-01

    A reference on current methods and procedures for managing space in academic medical centers is provided. Focus is on elements of space management systems that can enhance the effectiveness of space allocation decisions. These include: space inventory, space standards, evaluation of space utilization, and space allocation. A bibliography is…

  10. Opinions of Veterinary Medical Educators Towards the Problems and Needs of Veterinary Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisk, Dudley B.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Members of the American Association of Veterinary Medical Colleges-Council of Educators were surveyed in an attempt to measure their opinions and feelings towards veterinary medical education. Their opinions on such topics as relationships between students, faculty, the curriculum, and the identity of veterinary medicine are reported. (LBH)

  11. The educational attributes and responsibilities of effective medical educators.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Charles J; Searle, Nancy S; Gunderman, Richard; Krane, N Kevin; Perkowski, Linda; Schutze, Gordon E; Steinert, Yvonne

    2011-04-01

    Of the many roles that the academic-educator may fulfill, that of teacher is particularly challenging. Building on prior recommendations from the literature, this article identifies the skill set of teachers across the medical education continuum-characteristics of attitude and attributes, knowledge, and pedagogic skills that permit effective teaching to be linked with effective learning and understanding. This examination which characterizes teachers' attitudes, knowledge, and skills serves to reemphasize the centrality of teaching within medical education, provides direction for faculty and institutions alike in the discharge of academic responsibilities, and makes educational accountability clear. This listing of teacher attitudes and responsibilities was vetted in 2009 by medical education leaders from across North America during a national conference on faculty development.A set of recommendations concerning faculty development issues for medical teachers is offered. The recommendations are intended to establish an academic culture in medical education that values and rewards-academically and fiscally-those centrally committed to the role of teacher. The challenges of defining skills, developing and funding programs, and ongoing evaluation must be faced to achieve success in teaching throughout medical education, now and in the future. Faculty members, fellow learners, and patients deserve no less. PMID:21346510

  12. Continuing Education in WMAHEC Year 07: An Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koewing, J. Robert; Long, Carol

    Two methods for evaluating continuing education of the Western Missouri Area Health Education Center (WMAHEC) are examined. The evaluation questions concern whether WMAHEC provided regionally accessible continuing education and whether WMAHEC catalyzed the development of administrative mechanisms to support continuing education program…

  13. The library's role in the continuing education of health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vuren, D D; Adelson, R; Caplan, R

    1987-01-01

    Health sciences librarians have historically viewed disseminating information to health professionals as a major role. Typically, they have provided individualized services and are among the professions that help health professionals further their education after finishing formal education. Another group directly involved in health professional continuing education is continuing education (CE) providers who offer ongoing learning through group activities. These two professions often reached the same audiences in the past, and their different approaches--individual and group--were complementary. Health professionals who needed information immediately or who wished individual learning used the library while those who wanted to hear eminent colleagues tended to use CE meetings or seminars; some did both. The librarians and CE providers rarely interacted, but this is now changing. With the introduction of personal computers, medical librarians have expanded their responsibilities to include formalized classroom instruction. At the same time, CE providers have increased their scope beyond formalized group instruction into individualized education. Librarians and CE providers can either collaborate and share their expertise or they can compete against each other. PMID:3450347

  14. Nutrition education in medical school: a time of opportunity1234

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Linda; Rock, Cheryl L; Edwards, Marilyn S; Bales, Connie W; Kohlmeier, Martin; Akabas, Sharon R

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate medical education has undergone significant changes in development of new curricula, new pedagogies, and new forms of assessment since the Nutrition Academic Award was launched more than a decade ago. With an emphasis on a competency-based curriculum, integrated learning, longitudinal clinical experiences, and implementation of new technology, nutrition educators have an opportunity to introduce nutrition and diet behavior–related learning experiences across the continuum of medical education. Innovative learning opportunities include bridging personal health and nutrition to community, public, and global health concerns; integrating nutrition into lifestyle medicine training; and using nutrition as a model for teaching the continuum of care and promoting interprofessional team-based care. Faculty development and identification of leaders to serve as champions for nutrition education continue to be a challenge. PMID:24646826

  15. Is the Marketing Concept Adequate for Continuing Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittenburg, Terri L.

    1984-01-01

    Because educators have a social responsibility to those they teach, the marketing concept may not be adequate as a philosophy for continuing education. In attempting to broaden the audience for continuing education, educators should consider a societal marketing concept to meet the needs of the educationally disadvantaged. (SK)

  16. Continuing Education Credits | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    We are pleased to be able to offer continuing education credits to Registered Dietitians. Registered Dietitians This event is pending for approval by the Commission on Dietetic Registration for 2 CPEUs.  Procedure  Immediately after the event, a link to a short questionnaire will be sent to you by email. Please complete the questionnaire online and print out your certificate of completion.  Please note: You may complete the evaluation and apply for credit after watching the live or archived event.  |

  17. Teaching Conflict: Professionalism and Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Holloway, K J

    2015-12-01

    Resistance by physicians, medical researchers, medical educators, and medical students to pharmaceutical industry influence in medicine is often based on the notion that physicians (guided by the ethics of their profession) and the industry (guided by profit) are in conflict. This criticism has taken the form of a professional movement opposing conflict of interest (COI) in medicine and medical education and has resulted in policies and guidelines that frame COI as the problem and outline measures to address this problem. In this paper, I offer a critique of this focus on COI that is grounded in a broader critique of neo-liberalism, arguing it individualizes the relationship between physicians and industry, too neatly delineates between the two entities, and reduces the network of social, economic, and political relations to this one dilemma. PMID:26133893

  18. China's Medical Education and Interventional Neuroradiology Training.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xianli; He, Hongwei; Wu, Zhongxue

    2015-11-01

    China's medical education system is complex and consists of degree programs lasting from 3 to 8 years, the inconsistency across previous educational backgrounds is a challenge when implementing residency training objectives and contents. Only in several advanced medical universities, education for interventional neuroradiology (INR) is a part of a rotation in the 2-year training for neurosurgery. Advanced INR techniques are confined to big cities such as Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, where most of the Chinese INRs have their 6 to 12 months fellowship to major medical centers. With a tremendous economic growth in the region, we expect that INR practice will evolve at an equally rapid pace, and information presented in this chapter may soon become obsolete. PMID:26079783

  19. [Flipped classroom in basic medical education].

    PubMed

    Merenmies, Jussi; Niemi-Murola, Leila; Pyörälä, Eeva

    2015-01-01

    Medical education is facing changes in order to improve young doctors' competency to respond better to current needs of the patients and the society. Both curriculum content and teaching methods are revised. In addition to vibrant research in academic medical education, teachers are supported by the improved web-based learning environments and novel technical tools. Flipped classroom, a new paradigm that benefits from technical development, provides many opportunities for medical education. This teaching method always consists of two mutually complementary parts. The first part of the learning action takes place independently off classroom with video lectures or other stimuli for learning. The second part takes place in conjunction with the teacher and other students, and requires student group interactions. PMID:26677552

  20. Big data in medical informatics: improving education through visual analytics.

    PubMed

    Vaitsis, Christos; Nilsson, Gunnar; Zary, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    A continuous effort to improve healthcare education today is currently driven from the need to create competent health professionals able to meet healthcare demands. Limited research reporting how educational data manipulation can help in healthcare education improvement. The emerging research field of visual analytics has the advantage to combine big data analysis and manipulation techniques, information and knowledge representation, and human cognitive strength to perceive and recognise visual patterns. The aim of this study was therefore to explore novel ways of representing curriculum and educational data using visual analytics. Three approaches of visualization and representation of educational data were presented. Five competencies at undergraduate medical program level addressed in courses were identified to inaccurately correspond to higher education board competencies. Different visual representations seem to have a potential in impacting on the ability to perceive entities and connections in the curriculum data. PMID:25160372

  1. Educating Rita and Her Sisters. Women and Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benn, Roseanne, Ed.; Elliott, Jane, Ed.; Whaley, Pat, Ed.

    This book contains 17 papers examining the various roles--learner, teacher, researcher, manager--that women have played in the development of lifelong learning. The following papers are included: "Introduction: Women and Continuing Education--Where Are We Now?" (Roseanne Benn, Jane Elliott, Pat Whaley); "Dancing into the Future: Developments in…

  2. Approaches to Learning of Medical Students and Practising Physicians: Some Empirical Evidence and Its Implications for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newble, David I.; Hejka, Eugene J.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews research efforts in learning styles and approaches to learning focusing on effects of the medical school environment. Addresses teaching, curriculum, assessment, and implications for undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing education. Concludes that medical students should be using the deep approach to learning although traditional…

  3. [Working Group on Continuing Education in Health].

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The deliberations are summarized of a working group on permanent education in health (EPS) that met in May 1995 in Washington, D.C. to propose theoretical, methodological, and operational instruments for improving the training practices of health services in the Latin America region. The region has had abundant and heterogeneous experiences with education in health services, frequently involving in-service training. This work traces development of Permanent Education in Health, beginning with the 1973 World Health Assembly, in which the problem of educating health personnel and the potential of continuing education were recognized. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has actively assisted in defining and expanding EPS and has published materials detailing the conceptual foundation and practical experiences in different countries of the region with the methodology. The major advantages of EPS are that it is oriented from the initial diagnosis to modification in practices and services; it integrates the individual, institutional, and social in the definition of problems; it considers intellectual and affective aspects jointly; it develops group consciousness and identity; and it permits generation of new knowledge. Controversy surrounding the definition and application of EPS helped to clarify its aims and objectives. Potential applications of EPS are numerous at this time of change in the health sector, with decentralization, institutional development with external funds, privatization, changes in service delivery, and other modifications of existing structures. Brief descriptions of experiences with EPS in Brazil, Argentina, the Dominican Republic, Central America, and in other PAHO programs illustrate the range of situations and contexts in which it may be usefully applied. PMID:8850126

  4. Implications for Veterinary Medical Education: Paraprofessional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukens, Roger

    1980-01-01

    The emergence of the veterinary technician as an extension of the veterinarian's capability into animal agriculture is discussed. Some aspects reviewed include: technician education, current restrictions imposed by practice acts, general acceptance by the consumer, and effective relationships for veterinary technicians working under the…

  5. Sexual health innovations in undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, E; Pugnaire, M P; Jonassen, J A; O'Dell, K; Clay, M; Hatem, D; Carlin, M

    2003-10-01

    Recent national and global initiatives have drawn attention to the importance of sexual health to individuals' well-being. These initiatives advocate enhancement of efforts to address this under-represented topic in health professions curricula. University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) has undertaken a comprehensive effort to develop an integrated curriculum in sexual health. The UMMS project draws upon the expertise of a multidisciplinary faculty of clinicians, basic scientists, a medical ethicist, and educators. This article describes the project's genesis and development at UMMS, and reports on three innovations in sexual health education implemented as part of this endeavor. PMID:14551577

  6. Continuous-Flow System Produces Medical-Grade Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Dahl, Roger W.; Wheeler, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-flow system utilizes microwave heating to sterilize water and to thermally inactivate endotoxins produced in the sterilization process. The system is designed for use in converting potable water to medical-grade water. Systems like this one could be used for efficient, small-scale production of medical- grade water in laboratories, clinics, and hospitals. This system could be adapted to use in selective sterilization of connections in ultra-pure-water-producing equipment and other equipment into which intrusion by microorganisms cannot be tolerated. Lightweight, port - able systems based on the design of this system could be rapidly deployed to remote locations (e.g., military field hospitals) or in response to emergencies in which the normal infrastructure for providing medical-grade water is disrupted. Larger systems based on the design of this system could be useful for industrial production of medical-grade water. The basic microwave-heating principle of this system is the same as that of a microwave oven: An item to be heated, made of a lossy dielectric material (in this case, flowing water) is irradiated with microwaves in a multimode microwave cavity. The heating is rapid and efficient because it results from absorption of microwave power throughout the volume of the lossy dielectric material. In this system, a copper tube having a length of 49.5 cm and a diameter of 2.25 cm serves as both the microwave cavity and the sterilization chamber. Microwave power is fed via a coaxial cable to an antenna mounted inside the tube at mid-length (see figure). Efficient power transfer occurs due to the shift in wavelength associated with the high permittivity of water combined with the strong coupling of 2.45-GHz microwaves with rotational-vibrational transitions of the dipolar water molecule.

  7. Evaluating instruction in medical education.

    PubMed

    Irby, D M

    1983-11-01

    The component parts and development of a comprehensive system to evaluate and improve teaching in a school of medicine are described by the author in this paper. This system integrates quantitative measures of teaching (student/resident ratings of classroom and clinical teaching), descriptive documentation (faculty teaching load, innovations, and research on teaching), and qualitative judgments (peer review) on the full spectrum of instruction in medicine. Medical school policies have standardized evaluation criteria, instrumentation, and procedures while granting departments flexibility in conducting peer review. The results of two studies indicate that the evaluation system described here has had a positive impact both on the improvement of teaching and on academic promotions. PMID:6631922

  8. The Educational Kanban: promoting effective self-directed adult learning in medical education.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Stuart

    2009-07-01

    The author reviews the many forces that have driven contemporary medical education approaches to evaluation and places them in an adult learning theory context. After noting their strengths and limitations, the author looks to lessons learned from manufacturing on both efficacy and efficiency and explores how these can be applied to the process of trainee assessment in medical education.Building on this, the author describes the rationale for and development of the Educational Kanban (EK) at Children's Hospital Boston--specifically, how it was designed to integrate adult learning theory, Japanese manufacturing models, and educator observations into a unique form of teacher-student collaboration that allows for continuous improvement. It is a formative tool, built on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's six core competencies, that guides educational efforts to optimize teaching and learning, promotes adult learner responsibility and efficacy, and takes advantage of the labor-intensive clinical educational setting. The author discusses how this model, which will be implemented in July 2009, will lead to training that is highly individualized, optimizes faculty and student educational efforts, and ultimately conserves faculty resources. A model EK is provided for general reference.The EK represents a novel approach to adult learning that will enhance educational effectiveness and efficiency and complement existing evaluative models. Described here in a specific graduate medical setting, it can readily be adapted and integrated into a wide range of undergraduate and graduate clinical educational environments. PMID:19550191

  9. Continuing education through computer-aided instruction

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.

    1981-01-01

    Computer-aided and managed instruction has been incorporated into the continuing education program in the Electronics Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two Control Data Corporation PLATO terminals have been installed in the learning center, and have been providing individualized instruction to the employees for approximately 2 years. Reactions from users and total usage figures indicate that there are unique advantages to computer-aided instruction. User interaction with a computer assures individual response from a student. The learner must be actively involved in the course and cannot passively allow content to flow by. Complex simulations can be programed and used in the learning process; thus, expensive equipment can be spared the wear and tear attributed to learners. The breadth of course topics included in the on-line library assures that PLATO has a continuing education offering for most employees. New lessons appear on line at the rate of three or four per week; PLATO cost effectiveness is thus certified. Comparisons of courses taken on the terminal to the same or similar courses offered elsewhere indicate that PLATO is advantageous. Computer-aided instruction is available when the learner is ready for initial instruction and later for reviews. At Los Alamos, the demand for PLATO service is growing. The Laboratory will have eight terminals installed and operating by April 1981. 8 tables.

  10. University-Based Continuing Education for Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Kehrer, James P.; Yuksel, Nesé; Hughes, Christine A.

    2012-01-01

    University-based continuing education (CE) fulfills an important role to support the professional development of pharmacists, advance the practice of pharmacy, and contribute to societal needs for research and healthcare services. Opportunities for pharmacists to engage in new models of patient care are numerous worldwide, particularly as pharmacists’ scope of practice has expanded. Approaches to CE have changed to address the changing needs of pharmacists and now include a variety of approaches to support development of knowledge and skills. There is emphasis on the learning process as well as the knowledge, with the introduction of the concept of continuing professional development (CPD). As institutions of research and education, universities are uniquely positioned to bridge the gap between academic and practice environments, providing opportunities for translation of knowledge to practice. The Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Alberta is a provider of CE in Alberta, Canada, where an expanded scope of pharmacy practice includes prescribing, administering injections, accessing electronic patient records, and ordering laboratory tests. In this paper, the Faculty offers views about future directions for CE, including the integration of CE with core faculty activities, expanding the audience for CE, areas of focus for learning, and partnerships. Finally, we hope to ignite dialogue with others in the profession about the role and function of university-based CE. PMID:22438592

  11. Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Masashi; Fukutomi, Miki; Nagamune, Masami; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ishida, Kazuko; Iwata, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME). SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency. SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-environment simulation, learners can obtain not only technical skills but also non-technical skills, such as leadership, team work, communication, situation awareness, decision-making, and awareness of personal limitations. SBME is also effective for integration of clinical medicine and basic medicine. In addition, technology-enhanced simulation training is associated with beneficial effects for outcomes of knowledge, skills, behaviors, and patient-related outcomes. To perform SBME, effectively, not only simulators including high-fidelity mannequin-type simulators or virtual-reality simulators but also full-time faculties and instructors as professionals of SBME are essential in a clinical skills laboratory for SBME. Clinical skills laboratory is expected to become an integrated medical education center to achieve continuing professional development, integrated learning of basic and clinical medicine, and citizens' participation and cooperation in medical education. PMID:22449990

  12. Compassion as a basis for ethics in medical education

    PubMed Central

    Leget, Carlo; Olthuis, Gert

    2007-01-01

    The idea that ethics is a matter of personal feeling is a dogma widespread among medical students. Because emotivism is firmly rooted in contemporary culture, the authors think that focusing on personal feeling can be an important point of departure for moral education. In this contribution, they clarify how personal feelings can be a solid basis for moral education by focusing on the analysis of compassion by the French phenomenologist Emmanuel Housset. This leads to three important issues regarding ethics education: (1) the necessity of a continuous attention for and interpretation of the meaning of language, (2) the importance of examining what aspect of “the other” touches one and what it is that evokes the urge to act morally and (3) the need to relate oneself to the community, both to the medical community and to collectively formulated rules and laws. These issues can have a place in medical education by means of an ethical portfolio that supports students in their moral development. First, keeping a portfolio will improve their expression of the moral dimension of medical practice. Second, the effects of self‐knowledge and language mastery will limit the pitfalls of emotivism and ethical subjectivism and will stimulate the inclination to really encounter the other. Third, it will show medical students from the start that their moral responsibility is more than following rules and that they are involved personally. PMID:17906063

  13. Medical ethics and education for social responsibility.

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, M. I.

    1980-01-01

    The physician, said Henry Sigerist in 1940, has been acquiring an increasingly social role. For centuries, however, codes of medical ethics have concentrated on proper behavior toward individual patients and almost ignored the doctor's responsibilities to society. Major health service reforms have come principally from motivated lay leadership and citizen groups. Private physicians have been largely hostile toward movements to equalize the economic access for people to medical care and improve the supply and distribution of doctors. Medical practice in America and throughout the world has become seriously commercialized. In response, governments have applied various strategies to constrain physicians and induce more socially responsible behavior. But such external pressures should not be necessary if a broad socially oriented code of medical ethics were followed. Health care system changes would be most effective, but medical education could be thoroughly recast to clarify community health problems and policies required to meet them. Sigerist proposed such a new medical curriculum in 1941; if it had been introduced, a social code of medical ethics would not now seem utopian. An international conference might well be convened to consider how physicians should be educated to reach the inspiring goals of the World Health Organization. PMID:7405276

  14. Continuing Education That Matters: A Successful, Evidence-Based Course with Minimal Pharmaceutical Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfrey, Jeff; Brown, Steven R.; Ebell, Mark H.; Geng, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about the influence of the pharmaceutical and medical device industries on continuing medical education (CME) have been voiced frequently over the past decade. Reliance on industry funding increases the potential for bias. Industry-supported CME often emphasizes conditions that can be treated with newer drugs or devices rather than those…

  15. Continuing Education Meets the Learning Organization: The Challenge of a Systems Approach to Patient Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Increased attention to medical errors and patient safety highlights the importance of quality improvement in continuing medical education. Ways to enhance quality include informatics, clinical practice guidelines, learning from opinion leaders and patients, learning organizations, and just-in-time and point-of-care delivery of continuing…

  16. Medical ultrasound education for bioengineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-04-01

    The widespread adoption of ultrasound technologies in medicine has necessitated the development of educational programs to address the growing demand for trained expertise in both academia and industry. The demand has been especially great in the field of therapeutic ultrasound that has experienced a significant level of research and development activities in the past decade. The applications cover a wide range including cancer treatment, hemorrhage control, cardiac ablation, gene therapy, and cosmetic surgery. A comprehensive educational program in ultrasound is well suited for bioengineering departments at colleges and universities. Our educational program for students in Bioengineering at the University of Washington includes a year-long coursework covering theory and practice of ultrasound, conducting research projects, attending and presenting at weekly seminars on literature survey, presentations at scientific meetings, and attending specialized workshops offered by various institutions for specific topics. An important aspect of this training is its multi-disciplinary approach, encompassing science, engineering, and medicine. The students are required to build teams with expertise in these disciplines. Our experience shows that these students are well prepared for careers in academia, conducting cutting edge research, as well as industry, being involved in the transformation of research end-products to commercially viable technology.

  17. Elimination of 24-hour continuous medical resident duty in Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Hamadani, Fadi; Deckelbaum, Dan; Shaheen, Mohammed; Sauvé, Alexandre; Dumitra, Sinziana; Ahmed, Najma; Latulippe, Jean-François; Balaa, Fady; Walsh, Mark; Fata, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Summary In 2012 Quebec limited continuous in-hospital duty to 16 consecutive hours for all residents regardless of postgraduate (PGY) level. The new restrictions in Quebec appeared to have a profound, negative effect on the quality of life of surgical residents at McGill University and a perceived detrimental effect on the delivery of surgical education and patient care. Here we discuss the results of a nationwide survey that we created and distributed to general surgery residents across Canada to capture and compare their perceptions of the changes to duty hour restrictions. PMID:26574704

  18. An Evaluation Model for Professional Education--Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Christine H.

    There are striking similarities between medical education of today and progressive education of the thirties with respect to motivation for change, the values to be sought in change, and the zest with which change is pursued. It is in this climate conducive to change that a new approach to evaluation is beginning to make a significant contribution…

  19. Development of an Asset Map of Medical Education Research Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiaanse, Mary E.; Russell, Eleanor L.; Crandall, Sonia J.; Lambros, Ann; Manuel, Janeen C.; Kirk, Julienne K.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Medical education research is gaining recognition as scholarship within academic medical centers. This survey was conducted at a medium-sized academic medical center in the United States. The purpose of the study was to learn faculty interest in research in medical education, so assets could be used to develop educational scholarship…

  20. Telelearning standards and their application in medical education.

    PubMed

    Duplaga, Mariusz; Juszkiewicz, Krzysztof; Leszczuk, Mikolaj

    2004-01-01

    Medial education, both on the graduate and postgraduate levels, has become a real challenge nowadays. The volume of information in medical sciences grows so rapidly that many health professionals experience essential problems in keeping track of the state of the art in this domain. e-learning offers important advantages to medical education continuation due to its universal availability and opportunity for implementation of flexible patterns of training. An important trace of medical education is developing practical skills. Some examples of standardization efforts include: the CEN/ISSS Workshop on Learning Technology (WSLT), the Advanced Learning Infrastructure Consortium (ALIC), Education Network Australia (EdNA) and PROmoting Multimedia access to Education and Training in European Society (PROMETEUS). Sun Microsystems' support (Sun ONE, iPlanetTM ) for many of the above-mentioned standards is described as well. Development of a medical digital video library with recordings of invasive procedures incorporating additional information and commentary may improve the efficiency of the training process in interventional medicine. A digital video library enabling access to videos of interventional procedures performed in the area of thoracic medicine may be a valuable element for developing practical skills. The library has been filled with video resources recorded at the Department of Interventional Pulmonology; it enhances training options for pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons. The main focus was put on demonstration of bronchofiberoscopic and videothoracoscopic procedures. The opportunity to browse video recordings of procedures performed in the specific field also considerably enhances the options for training in other medical specialties. In the era of growing health consumer awareness, patients are also perceived as the target audience for medical digital libraries. As a case study of Computer-Based Training systems, the Medical Digital Video Library is

  1. Intensive English Language Programs: Continuing Education's Foreign Cousin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankowski, Mary L.; Maurice, Keith

    1986-01-01

    While intensive English programs have much in common with continuing education, problems of student balance, classroom management, and unique cultural pressures separate them from the mainstream of continuing education and require creative and individualized solutions. (Author/MSE)

  2. [Initial and continuous education. Entreaty for better education of physicians in therapeutics].

    PubMed

    Queneau, P; Bouvenot, G; Grandmottet, P

    1998-01-01

    Concrete education on therapeutical decision must constitute a major institutional objective during the higher academic period of the medical students. The current therapeutics constitutes a branch of instruction based on the up-to-date of the "medical science" and on the evidence evaluation. However, such evidence-based medicine still biased, evolutionary and thus provisory valid; whereas at the same time it must be appropriate and suitable for the patients benefit. Data issued from medical science are on the basis of the interactive and pragmatic apprenticeship of the therapeutical decision and prescription with a personalized approach of patient and at each step of its disease. The continuous postgraduate education programs following the initial Academic instruction contributes to up date the knowledges and moreover the professional experience and practice. This evolution is performed with respect of both the individual ethic-related to the patient and the collective ethics in terms of public health. PMID:9916331

  3. How to improve medical education website design

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Internet provides a means of disseminating medical education curricula, allowing institutions to share educational resources. Much of what is published online is poorly planned, does not meet learners' needs, or is out of date. Discussion Applying principles of curriculum development, adult learning theory and educational website design may result in improved online educational resources. Key steps in developing and implementing an education website include: 1) Follow established principles of curriculum development; 2) Perform a needs assessment and repeat the needs assessment regularly after curriculum implementation; 3) Include in the needs assessment targeted learners, educators, institutions, and society; 4) Use principles of adult learning and behavioral theory when developing content and website function; 5) Design the website and curriculum to demonstrate educational effectiveness at an individual and programmatic level; 6) Include a mechanism for sustaining website operations and updating content over a long period of time. Summary Interactive, online education programs are effective for medical training, but require planning, implementation, and maintenance that follow established principles of curriculum development, adult learning, and behavioral theory. PMID:20409344

  4. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School.

    PubMed

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the "old" curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations. PMID:27486351

  5. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School

    PubMed Central

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the “old” curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations. PMID:27486351

  6. Medical specialty boards can help measure graduate medical education outcomes.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lars E; Carek, Peter; Holmboe, Eric S; Puffer, James C; Warm, Eric J; Phillips, Robert L

    2014-06-01

    U.S. graduate medical education (GME) training institutions are under increasing scrutiny to measure program outcomes as a demonstration of accountability for the sizeable funding they receive from the federal government. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) is a potential agent of measuring GME accountability but has no interaction with physicians after residency training is completed. American Board of Medical Specialty (ABMS) member boards interact with physicians throughout their careers through maintenance of certification (MOC) and are a potential source of valuable data on physician competency and quality of care, both of which could be used to measure GME accountability.The authors propose that ABMS boards and the ACGME deepen their existing relationship to better assess residency training outcomes. ABMS boards have a wealth of data on physicians collected as a by-product of MOC and business operations. Further, many ABMS boards collect practice demographics and scope-of-practice information through MOC enrollment surveys or recertification examination questionnaires. These data are potentially valuable in helping residencies know what their graduates are doing in practice. Part 4 of MOC generally involves assessment of the quality of care delivered in practice, and ABMS boards could share these deidentified data with the ACGME and residency programs to provide direct feedback on the practice outcomes of graduates.ABMS member boards and the ACGME should broaden their long-standing relationship to further develop shared roles and data-sharing mechanisms to better inform residencies and the public about GME training outcomes. PMID:24871232

  7. Admission to Medical Education in Ten Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burn, Barbara B., Ed.

    As part of a study of access and admission to higher education in Germany and the United States, a group of papers on medical admissions in various countries was commissioned. The papers presented in this book reveal wide differences in admissions policies and procedures. Barbara Burn examines some of the major issues in a foreword: representation…

  8. [Computers do not improve undergraduate medical education].

    PubMed

    van der Meer, J

    2006-04-29

    There is no convincing evidence that computer-assisted learning (CAL) leads to better doctors. Apprenticeships supervised by expert teachers are a time-honoured and effective way to educate future doctors. Medical faculties should not invest in CAL at the expense of properly supervised clerkships. PMID:17225741

  9. Shifting Paradigms of Research in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, David M.; Edwards, Janine C. Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Medical educators debate which models of scientific research should be applied to problems in academic medicine. The reigning model was derived from the first scientific revolution of Newtonian physics. The emerging model is grounded in the second scientific revolution of Einstein's quantum physics. (Author/MSE)

  10. American Medical Education: The Student Viewpoint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessee, William F., Ed.

    A survey of student opinions on issues in medical education reveals several areas of consensus on needed changes. The following recommendations are suggested as a result of the survey: (1) Health care delivery should employ a multidisciplinary team of health professionals working to maintain health and prevent disease in communities. (2) Medical…

  11. Vanquishing Virtue: The Impact of Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulehan, Jack; Williams, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that North American medical education favors an explicit commitment to traditional values of doctoring--empathy, compassion, and altruism--but a tacit commitment to behaviors grounded in an ethic of detachment, self-interest, and objectivity. Explores differing ways (conflation, deflation, and maintaining of values) that students respond…

  12. Medical Terminology: Prefixes. Health Occupations Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on medical terminology (prefixes) is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module consists of an introduction to prefixes, a list of resources needed, and three learning experiences. Each learning experience contains an…

  13. Characterizing Computer Systems Used in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Church, V. E.; Tidball, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    The diversity in computer systems used in medical education is described, and the lack of consistant classifications and comparisons noted. A classification scheme based on those characteristics specific to the development and presentation of instructional software is proposed. A graphic system profile approach is used to ensure clarity, while categorization of users and desirable features provides breadth and precision of coverage.

  14. Medical education in the electronic medical record (EMR) era: benefits, challenges, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Michael J; Pageler, Natalie M; Kahana, Madelyn; Pantaleoni, Julie L; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, electronic medical record (EMR) use in academic medical centers has increased. Although many have lauded the clinical and operational benefits of EMRs, few have considered the effect these systems have on medical education. The authors review what has been documented about the effect of EMR use on medical learners through the lens of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's six core competencies for medical education. They examine acknowledged benefits and educational risks to use of EMRs, consider factors that promote their successful use when implemented in academic environments, and identify areas of future research and optimization of EMRs' role in medical education. PMID:23619078

  15. The State of Adult and Continuing Education in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indabawa, Sabo A., Ed.; Oduaran, Akpovire, Ed.; Afrik, Tai, Ed.; Walters, Shirley, Ed.

    This document contains 21 papers examining the state of adult and continuing education in Africa. The following papers are included: "Introduction: An Overview of the State of Adult and Continuing Education in Africa" (Akpovire Oduaran); "Setting the Tone of Adult and Continuing Education in Africa" (Michael A. Omolewa); "Significant Post…

  16. 42 CFR 136.340 - Provision of continuing education allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Provision of continuing education allowances. 136... Improvement Act Programs Subdivision J-5-Continuing Education Allowances § 136.340 Provision of continuing education allowances. In order to encourage physicians, dentists and other health professionals to join...

  17. 42 CFR 136.340 - Provision of continuing education allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Provision of continuing education allowances. 136... Improvement Act Programs Subdivision J-5-Continuing Education Allowances § 136.340 Provision of continuing education allowances. In order to encourage physicians, dentists and other health professionals to join...

  18. Philosophical Foundations: A Primer for Adult Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rampp, Lary C., Ed.; Guffey, J. Stephen, Ed.

    This document, which is intended as a primer for adult continuing education, contains 11 chapters examining the philosophical foundations of adult and continuing education. The chapter titles and authors are as follows: "Progressivism and Adult Continuing Education" (Michael Day); "Progressivism: An Anthology" (Andrea Reeve); "Progressivism;…

  19. 42 CFR 136.340 - Provision of continuing education allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provision of continuing education allowances. 136... Improvement Act Programs Subdivision J-5-Continuing Education Allowances § 136.340 Provision of continuing education allowances. In order to encourage physicians, dentists and other health professionals to join...

  20. [The beginning of western medical education].

    PubMed

    Kee, C D

    1992-01-01

    Our country had quite an advanced system of medical education during the era of the Koryo Kingdom, and during the Choson Dynasty, the Kyong Guk Dae Jon, in which a systematized medical education was clearly described, was compiled in the era of King Sejong. However, the educational system was not for Western medicine. Western medicine was first introduced to our country in the 9th year of King Injo (1631) when Chong Du Won, Yi Yong Jun, etc. returned from Yon Gyong (Beiuin) with Chik Bang Oe Gi. Knowledge of Western medicine was disseminated by Shil Hak (practical learning) scholars who read a translation in Chinese characters, of Chik Bang Oe Gi. Yi Ik (Song Ho), Yi Gyu Gyong (O ju), Choe Han Gi (Hye Gang), Chong Yak Yong (Ta San), etc., read books of Western medicine and introduced in writing the excellent theory of Western medicine. In addition, Yu Hyong Won (Pan Gye), Pak Ji Won (Yon Am), Pak Je Ga (Cho Jong), etc., showed much interest in Western medicine, but no writings by them about western medicine can be found. With the establishment of a treaty of amity with Japan in the 13th year of King Kojong (1876), followed by the succession of amity treaties with Western powers, foreigners including medical doctors were permitted to flow into this country. At that time, doctors Horace N. Allen, W. B. Scranton, John W. Heron, Rosetta Sherwood (Rosetta S. Hall), etc., came to Korea and inaugurated hospitals, where they taught Western medicine to Korean students. Dr. Horace N. Allen, with the permission of king Kojong, established Che Jung Won in April 1885, and in March 1886, he began at the hospital to provide education of Western medicine to Korean students who were recrutied by the Korean Government. However, the education was not conduted on a regular basis, only training them for work as assistants. This is considered to be the pioneer case of Western medical education in this country. Before that time, Japanese medical doctors came to Korea, but there are no

  1. Fusing Continuous-Valued Medical Labels Using a Bayesian Model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tingting; Dunkley, Nic; Behar, Joachim; Clifton, David A; Clifford, Gari D

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid increase in volume of time series medical data available through wearable devices, there is a need to employ automated algorithms to label data. Examples of labels include interventions, changes in activity (e.g. sleep) and changes in physiology (e.g. arrhythmias). However, automated algorithms tend to be unreliable resulting in lower quality care. Expert annotations are scarce, expensive, and prone to significant inter- and intra-observer variance. To address these problems, a Bayesian Continuous-valued Label Aggregator (BCLA) is proposed to provide a reliable estimation of label aggregation while accurately infer the precision and bias of each algorithm. The BCLA was applied to QT interval (pro-arrhythmic indicator) estimation from the electrocardiogram using labels from the 2006 PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge database. It was compared to the mean, median, and a previously proposed Expectation Maximization (EM) label aggregation approaches. While accurately predicting each labelling algorithm's bias and precision, the root-mean-square error of the BCLA was 11.78 ± 0.63 ms, significantly outperforming the best Challenge entry (15.37 ± 2.13 ms) as well as the EM, mean, and median voting strategies (14.76 ± 0.52, 17.61 ± 0.55, and 14.43 ± 0.57 ms respectively with p < 0.0001). The BCLA could therefore provide accurate estimation for medical continuous-valued label tasks in an unsupervised manner even when the ground truth is not available. PMID:26036335

  2. Developing a Marketing Strategy for Adult and Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    The project described in this report aimed to develop an effective and affordable educational marketing strategy in one local British continuing education provider, as a case study for adult and continuing education nationally. Methods employed were as follows: a marketing consultant visited education centers; business and community directories…

  3. Association for medical education and research in substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Samet, Jeffrey H; Galanter, Marc; Bridden, Carly; Lewis, David C

    2006-01-01

    The Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA) is a multi-disciplinary organization committed to health professional faculty development in substance abuse. In 1976, members of the Career Teachers Training Program in Alcohol and Drug Abuse, a US federally funded multi-disciplinary faculty development program, formed AMERSA. The organization grew from 59 founding members, who were primarily medical school faculty, to over 300 health professionals from a spectrum of disciplines including physicians, nurses, social workers, dentists, allied health professionals, psychologists and other clinical educators who are responsible for advancing substance abuse education. AMERSA members promote substance abuse education among health professionals by developing curricula, promulgating relevant policy and training health professional faculty to become excellent teachers in this field. AMERSA influences public policy by offering standards for improving substance abuse education. The organization publishes a peer-reviewed, quarterly journal, Substance Abuse, which emphasizes research on the education and training of health professions and also includes original clinical and prevention research. Each year, the AMERSA National Conference brings together researchers and health professional educators to learn about scientific advances and exemplary teaching approaches. In the future, AMERSA will continue to pursue this mission of advancing and supporting health professional faculty who educate students and trainees to address substance abuse in patients and clients. PMID:16393188

  4. Research in Adult and Continuing Education: Master of Adult and Continuing Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Univ., Pullman. Coll. of Education.

    The document presents an annotated bibliography of Master's degree theses in Adult and Continuing Education, Washington State University, 1974-76. Abstracts for the following 12 theses are presented: (1) Agrarian Reform in Chile: A Case Study; (2) An Analysis of the Activities and the Needs of the Senior Citizens in Garfield, Washington and the…

  5. Continuing education is the key in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of the Jamaican Women's Center Programme by the Population Council of New York found that 55% of teenage mothers in Jamaica returned to school in Kingston and 73% in the Mandeville branch following their pregnancies and exposure to the program. Only 15% who were not exposed to the program returned to school. The Sister School Workshop Program on Teenage Pregnancy provides knowledge instead of the myth and fantasy given by parents and clergy. Continuing education is particularly important for those with low self-esteem. The Center also provided knowledge about contraception. The findings were that contraceptive use was 89% among program graduates and 81% among nonprogram persons. In addition to the higher % of usage, there were differences in methods used. Center users preferred the IUD and pills, while nonprogram persons favored pills and injections. Subsequent pregnancies were much higher among nonprogram persons at 39%, while for program participants 15% at Kingston and 8% from the Mandeville Center had subsequent pregnancies within 3 years. The creation of the Jamaican Women's Center in 1978 has also promoted continuing education during pregnancy. Assistance is also provided to those reentering the school system after giving birth. The financial cost has been reasonable at J$3500 program year/woman and nursery facility costs at J$664/child/year. Other services to former students include counseling and school visits and occasionally financial aid amounts J$176/woman/year. Rural outreach averages J$336/woman/year. The identifiable weakness was in preparation of these girls for employment. It is suggested that additional efforts be made to provide wider and more marketable skills to meet local needs. There is also a need to provide linkage with other skills training programs and small business groups in order to expand labor force opportunities for these women. PMID:12285431

  6. Considering the clinical context of medical education.

    PubMed

    Famiglio, Linda M; Thompson, Michelle A; Kupas, Douglas F

    2013-09-01

    The article by Chen and colleagues in this issue suggests that the context in which clinical medical education is executed matters, especially if we intend to meet the projected future physician workforce needs in the United States. Placing learners in the highest-performing medical settings seems intuitive, but this can be disruptive to the patient care interface, especially in high-performing health care delivery systems. Simply placing learners in a well-functioning, highly reliable health care delivery system focused on systems of care and directed at improving quality and safety is not enough for learners. Educational experiences must be planned, organized, and strategically aligned with clinical operations to ensure seamless integration with highly reliable health care delivery systems. The authors draw on their experience at Geisinger Health System to explore the challenges and advantages to integrating the education and patient care missions of academic clinical sites for learners, patients, faculty, and the future of the workforce. PMID:23887008

  7. Preclinical Medical Student Hematology/Oncology Education Environment.

    PubMed

    Zumberg, Marc S; Broudy, Virginia C; Bengtson, Elizabeth M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2015-12-01

    To better prepare medical students to care for patients in today's changing health-care environment as they transition to continuing their education as residents, many US medical schools have been reviewing and modifying their curricula and are considering integration of newer adult learning techniques, including team-based learning, flipped classrooms, and other active learning approaches (Assoc Am Med Coll. 2014). Directors of hematology/oncology (H/O) courses requested an assessment of today's H/O education environment to help them respond to the ongoing changes in the education content and environment that will be necessary to meet this goal. Several recommendations for the improvement of cancer education resulted from American Association for Cancer Education's (ACCE's) "Cancer Education Survey II" including a call for medical schools to evaluate the effectiveness of current teaching methods in achieving cancer education objectives (Chamberlain et al. J Cancer Educ 7(2):105-114.2014). To understand the current environment and resources used in medical student preclinical H/O courses, an Internet-based, Survey Monkey®-formatted, questionnaire focusing on nine topic areas was distributed to 130 United States Hematology/Oncology Course Directors (HOCDs). HOCDs represent a diverse group of individuals who work in variably supportive environments and who are variably satisfied with their position. Several aspects of these courses remain relatively unchanged from previous assessments, including a predominance of traditional lectures, small group sessions, and examinations that are either written or computer-based. Newer technology, including web-based reproduction of lectures, virtual microscopes, and availability of additional web-based content has been introduced into these courses. A variety of learner evaluation and course assessment approaches are used. The ultimate effectiveness and impact of these changes needs to be determined. PMID:25637457

  8. Continuing education evaluation of behavior change.

    PubMed

    Brunt, B A

    2000-01-01

    Using the Cervero model of behavior change and questionnaires developed by Brigham, Ryan, and Elkins (1996), this study assessed the impact of a workshop on behavior change. Data on the individual professional (receptiveness), proposed change (feasibility), social system (climate), and program (quality), as well as self-report data about outcomes (expertise and actions) were included. Information on perceived expertise was obtained before the workshop, immediately after the workshop, and 3 months after the workshop. Information on actions initiated by the participants was obtained 3 months after the workshop. There were 70 participants in this study, with a variety of educational backgrounds and nursing experience. A matched test comparing expertise between time 1 and time 2, as well as time 1 and time 3 was significant at p = 0.00. There were significant correlations among the four variables influencing behavior change and actions and expertise. All except one participant in the study reported taking specific actions after the workshop. The mean number of actions taken was 4.0, with a range from 1 to 9. These findings indicate that a continuing education program can lead to behavior change. PMID:11912691

  9. Educational Technology: Transitioning from Business Continuity to Mission Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mekdeci, Kelly Broyles

    2011-01-01

    United States schools and American Overseas (A/OS) schools depend upon educational technology (ET) to support business operations and student learning experiences. Schools rely upon administrative software, on-line course modules, information databases, digital communications systems, and many other ET processes. However, ET's fragility compared…

  10. Investigation of Bias in Continuous Medical Image Label Fusion

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Image labeling is essential for analyzing morphometric features in medical imaging data. Labels can be obtained by either human interaction or automated segmentation algorithms, both of which suffer from errors. The Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) algorithm for both discrete-valued and continuous-valued labels has been proposed to find the consensus fusion while simultaneously estimating rater performance. In this paper, we first show that the previously reported continuous STAPLE in which bias and variance are used to represent rater performance yields a maximum likelihood solution in which bias is indeterminate. We then analyze the major cause of the deficiency and evaluate two classes of auxiliary bias estimation processes, one that estimates the bias as part of the algorithm initialization and the other that uses a maximum a posteriori criterion with a priori probabilities on the rater bias. We compare the efficacy of six methods, three variants from each class, in simulations and through empirical human rater experiments. We comment on their properties, identify deficient methods, and propose effective methods as solution. PMID:27258158

  11. Investigation of Bias in Continuous Medical Image Label Fusion.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fangxu; Prince, Jerry L; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-01-01

    Image labeling is essential for analyzing morphometric features in medical imaging data. Labels can be obtained by either human interaction or automated segmentation algorithms, both of which suffer from errors. The Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) algorithm for both discrete-valued and continuous-valued labels has been proposed to find the consensus fusion while simultaneously estimating rater performance. In this paper, we first show that the previously reported continuous STAPLE in which bias and variance are used to represent rater performance yields a maximum likelihood solution in which bias is indeterminate. We then analyze the major cause of the deficiency and evaluate two classes of auxiliary bias estimation processes, one that estimates the bias as part of the algorithm initialization and the other that uses a maximum a posteriori criterion with a priori probabilities on the rater bias. We compare the efficacy of six methods, three variants from each class, in simulations and through empirical human rater experiments. We comment on their properties, identify deficient methods, and propose effective methods as solution. PMID:27258158

  12. Medical education and information literacy in the era of open access.

    PubMed

    Brower, Stewart M

    2010-01-01

    The Open Access movement in scholarly communications poses new issues and concerns for medical education in general and information literacy education specifically. For medical educators, Open Access can affect the availability of new information, instructional materials, and scholarship in medical education. For students, Open Access materials continue to be available to them post-graduation, regardless of affiliation. Libraries and information literacy librarians are challenged in their responses to the Open Access publishing movement in how best to support Open Access endeavors within their own institutions, and how best to educate their user base about Open Access in general. PMID:20391168

  13. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Toggle navigation Careers Certification Publications Events Advocacy Continuing Education Practice Management Research Home / Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications ( ...

  14. Radiation Oncology Physics and Medical Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourland, Dan

    2011-10-01

    Medical physics, an applied field of physics, is the applications of physics in medicine. Medical physicists are essential professionals in contemporary healthcare, contributing primarily to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases through numerous inventions, advances, and improvements in medical imaging and cancer treatment. Clinical service, research, and teaching by medical physicists benefits thousands of patients and other individuals every day. This talk will cover three main topics. First, exciting current research and development areas in the medical physics sub-specialty of radiation oncology physics will be described, including advanced oncology imaging for treatment simulation, image-guided radiation therapy, and biologically-optimized radiation treatment. Challenges in patient safety in high-technology radiation treatments will be briefly reviewed. Second, the educational path to becoming a medical physicist will be reviewed, including undergraduate foundations, graduate training, residency, board certification, and career opportunities. Third, I will introduce the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), which is the professional society that represents, advocates, and advances the field of medical physics (www.aapm.org).

  15. Colonial Continuities and Educational Inequalities in Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Harold F., Jr.

    This paper explores the effect of 350 years of Dutch colonial rule upon Indonesian educational policies and the resulting regional inequalities in education. It was Dutch policy not to educate most of the children from the poorer social classes, but to use education to maintain and strengthen the existing social structure. Education was also used…

  16. Change and Continuity in Elementary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    1996-01-01

    Over the years, little has changed about elementary education. As the "American common school," elementary education attained a universality of purpose and attendance far earlier than did secondary education. The 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), with Head Start's inception and renewed interest in early childhood education,…

  17. Resources for Educators of Adults. Continuing Education for Educators of Adults: The Roles of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Alexander N.

    The author states that the coming of age of adult and continuing education has brought the role of research into focus. Two aspects of the research role are explored: What research has been done on the continuing education of adult educators, and what should be the roles of research? The major portion of this report is devoted to a review of the…

  18. 'Ten Golden Rules' for Designing Software in Medical Education: Results from a Formative Evaluation of DIALOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jha, Vikram; Duffy, Sean

    2002-01-01

    Reports the results of an evaluation of Distance Interactive Learning in Obstetrics and Gynecology (DIALOG) which is an electronic program for continuing education. Presents 10 golden rules for designing software for medical practitioners. (Contains 26 references.) (Author/YDS)

  19. Advances in information technology. Implications for medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Masys, D R

    1998-01-01

    Few kinds of technology have had as broad an impact on the recent affairs of humanity as have information technologies. The appearance and rapid spread in the past several years of innovations such as the Internet's World Wide Web and the emergence of computer networks connecting tens to hundreds of millions of people worldwide have occurred with startling rapidity. These global events portend substantial changes in the delivery of health care, the conduct of biomedical research, and the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education of health professionals. This report will attempt to succinctly review the following: (1) the characteristics of modern information technologies and recent trends that are most relevant to medical education and to the world in which future practitioners, researchers, and educators will live and work; (2) the implications of these technologies for the development of educational goals (in other words, the specific information technology skills that future health professionals will need); (3) the issues associated with the use of these technologies in the process of education; and (4) implications for near-term action by University of California medical schools and academic medical centers. PMID:9614791

  20. Continuing Education for Business. Monograph 134.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley, Max G.

    Designed to review the changing pattern of adult education, this monograph focuses attention on the current situation and pivotal points of change confronting business educators. A discussion of philosophical foundations in adult education for business in chapter 1 provides definitions and discusses transition in adult education and importance of…

  1. Educational Theory and Medical Education Practice: A Cautionary Note for Medical School Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colliver, Jerry A.

    2002-01-01

    Reflects on educational theory, in particular cognitive theory, and concludes that theory is little more than metaphor, not rigorous, tested, confirmed scientific theory. Asserts that this metaphor may lead to ideas for basic and applied research, but in the meantime it cannot be trusted to determine practice in medical education. (EV)

  2. Psychiatry's contribution to medical ethics education.

    PubMed

    Sider, R C; Clements, C

    1982-04-01

    Two recent trends in medical education, the growth of interest in biomedical ethics and the examination of psychiatry's status in medicine, have important implications for psychiatry. Educators are needed to bring a clinical perspective to bear on ethics instruction, yet psychiatrists risk missing this opportunity. Psychiatrists are uniquely suited to contribute because of their expertise in three areas: an understanding of the affective, nonrational components in ethical thought and behavior, a developmental perspective regarding personal morality, and an appreciation of the rootedness of ethics in the social ethos. Problems with contemporary ethical models of informed consent illustrate the value of psychiatry's contribution. PMID:7065297

  3. Harnessing the IT factor in medical education.

    PubMed

    Lim, Erle C H; Oh, Vernon M S; Koh, Dow-Rhoon; Seet, Raymond C S

    2008-12-01

    Escalating healthcare costs in Singapore have produced a significant movement of patients into ambulatory care, and the consequent dearth of clinical teaching materials. This deficiency has likewise prompted the creation of ambulatory teaching clinics and the use of standardised patients and simulators. In the last few decades, educators have utilised digital technology, for instance, digitally recorded heart and breath sounds, and digitised video vignettes, in medical education. We describe several pedagogical initiatives that we have undertaken at our university school of medicine. PMID:19159043

  4. Alternatives in Medical Education: Non-Animal Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Peggy, Ed.

    The technology explosion in medical education has led to the use of computer models, videotapes, interactive videos, and state-of-the-art simulators in medical training. This booklet describes alternatives to using animals in medical education. Although it is mainly intended to describe products applicable to medical school courses, high-quality,…

  5. Defending diversity: affirmative action and medical education.

    PubMed Central

    DeVille, K

    1999-01-01

    Affirmative action programs of all types are under attack legally and politically. Although medical schools have not been specifically targeted, their affirmative action programs, like others in higher education, are potentially in danger. This article examines the current legal status of affirmative action in medical education and concludes that a refurbished defense of such programs is essential if they are to survive impending judicial and political scrutiny. An analysis of existing case law and available evidence suggests that a carefully reinvigorated diversity argument is the tactic most likely to pass constitutional muster, as well as the justification most likely to blunt growing public and political opposition to admissions policies that take race and ethnicity into consideration. PMID:10432920

  6. Undergraduate medical education in palliative medicine: the first step in promoting palliative care in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Naccache, Nicole; Abou Zeid, Hicham; Nasser Ayoub, Eliane; Antakly, Marie-Claire

    2008-01-01

    Effective delivery of high-quality palliative care requires effective interprofessional team working by skilled healthcare professionals. Palliative care is therefore highly suitable for sowing the seeds of interprofessional team working in early professional undergraduate medical education. Integrating palliative medicine in undergraduate medical education curricula seems to be a must. In this review, we present as an example the Palliative and End-of-Life Care Curriculum (PEOLC) used in Canada for undergraduate medical education and underline the need for such a national curriculum in Lebanon. One must keep in mind that medical education does not stop at the end of the medical school, ongoing learning needs exist. Continuous medical education in palliative care should also be emphasized; the overall goal is promoting palliative medicine. Respecting and protecting human dignity is the right of every patient. PMID:19534074

  7. An Overview of Undergraduate Physiology Education in Turkish Medical Faculties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkanci, Z. Dicle; Pehlivanoglu, Bilge

    2008-01-01

    Physiology education, which occupies an important place in undergraduate medical education, exhibits diversities across the world. Since there was no specific source of information about physiology education in Turkish medical faculties, the authors aimed to evaluate the general status of undergraduate physiology teaching of medical students in…

  8. Medical education reform efforts and failures of U.S. medical schools, 1870-1930.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lynn E; Weiss, Richard M

    2008-07-01

    The dramatic decline in the number of US medical schools in the early twentieth century has been traced to a medical education reform movement that gained momentum after the Civil War. The major parties to reform-the universities themselves, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), state licensing boards, the American Medical Association (AMA), and Flexner-had different interests and strategies, however, and scholars have continued to debate the impact each had on the decline. To isolate the independent effects that the temporally intertwined forces for reform had on medical school failures, this study applies statistical survival analysis to an extensive and unique data set on medical schools operating in the United States between 1870 and 1930. Contrary to the views of some scholars, the results indicate that schools closed in response to critical evaluations published by the Illinois State Board of Health in the nineteenth century and the AMA and Flexner in the twentieth century. Additionally, the results indicate that schools were less likely to have failed if they adopted certain reforms implemented at leading schools or joined the AAMC, and were more likely to have failed if their state's licensing regulations mandated lengthier premedical and medical training. PMID:18276605

  9. [The Revista Médica the Chile and medical education].

    PubMed

    Goic, Alejandro

    2002-07-01

    With this issue, Revista Médica de Chile will have been published uninterruptedly, for 130 years. Formal medical education had an early development since Chile became independent from Spain (1817). The first Medical Sciences Course was organized in 1833 by the Irish physician William C Blest. The Santiago Medical Society was founded in 1869 and its journal-Revista Médica de Chile--in 1872. Its first director was Dr. German Schneider. Revista Medica is the oldest serial publication in South America and the second oldest in the Spanish speaking world. This is a remarkable fact for a comparatively young country. With the creation of the Medical Society and Revista Medica, a process of continuous medical education was started and they became a real Graduate School. The Journal has adopted the main changes in knowledge and technology. Some important milestones of its development, during the second half of the 20th century, were the definition of its objectives and structure, the incorporation of peer review of manuscripts (even with foreign reviewers) the adoption of international guidelines for publication, its incorporation into the main biomedical journal indexes, the modernization of its printing process, the making of a computer generated index of all papers published since 1872, its incorporation into a digital library in INTERNET and the active participation of its editors in the World Association of Medical Journal Editors. The success of the journal is influenced by the independence that the Medical Society has conferred to the editors (all outstanding University Professors), as well as to the characteristics of an educational campus "invisible and without tumult" (Ingelfinger). PMID:12235894

  10. University medical education in Kenya: The challenges.

    PubMed

    Ndetei, David M; Mathai, Muthoni; Khasakhala, Lincoln I; Mutiso, Victoria; Mbwayo, Anne W

    2010-01-01

    There are two medical schools training doctors in Kenya: the Moi University established in 1984 and the University of Nairobi established in 1967. The University of Nairobi has so far produced the majority of Kenyan doctors. Both are public universities with the Government being the main financier. The increased demand for university education and the inability to meet these demands has led to the introduction of a system of training self-sponsored medical students alongside Government-subsidised students. One other public university has started a medical school. The pressure to increase the number of schools and students in the absence of increased resources poses a particular challenge to the country. PMID:20854156

  11. Metaphysics and medical education: taking holism seriously.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bruce

    2013-06-01

    Medical education is now suffused with concepts that have their source outside the traditional scientific and medical disciplines: concepts such as holism, connectedness and reflective practice. Teaching of these, and other problematic concepts such as medical uncertainty and error, has been defined more by the challenge they pose to the standard model rather than being informed by a strong positive understanding. This challenge typically involves a critical engagement with the idea of objectivity, which is rarely acknowledged as an inherently metaphysical critique. Consequently, these ideas prove to be difficult to teach well. I suggest that the lack of an integrating, positive narrative is the reason for teaching difficulty, and propose that what is needed is an explicit commitment to teach the metaphysics of medicine, with the concept of holism being the fulcrum on which the remaining concepts turn. An acknowledged metaphysical narrative will encompass the scientific realism that medical students typically bring to their tertiary education, and at the same time enable a bigger picture to be drawn that puts the newer and more problematic concepts into context. PMID:23692231

  12. Continuity and Change in Disaster Education in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitagawa, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to describe post-war continuity and change in disaster education in Japan. Preparedness for natural disasters has been a continuous agenda in Japan for geographical and meteorological reasons, and disaster education has been practised in both formal and informal settings. Post-war disaster management and education have taken a…

  13. Key Issues in Achievement of Educational Continuity for Migrant Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Jim L.

    Educational effects of migrant student mobility are reviewed and issues and recommendations for educational continuity are offered for discussion by policymakers. Considerations for discussion of mobility are presented: continuity of age-grade level progression and education/social/health services; agency responsibility; communication…

  14. Beyond Needs Assessment to Marketing Continuing Education in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Susan B.; Waltz, Carolyn F.

    The prevalence of the need for marketing in continuing education in nursing is justifiable considering the growing pressures for efficiency and economies of scale in this field of higher education. This paper critically analyzes the current utilization of needs assessment in continuing education programs in nursing. It is argued that the cost…

  15. The Continuing Education Market: Financial and Structural Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Richard E.

    1985-01-01

    Structural and economic problems facing higher education and potential new markets opened by continuing education are discussed, based on a study of 24 public and private institutions. Programming areas in continuing education are distribution requirements, contract training for employees of business, and noncredit courses for the general public.…

  16. Continuing Education in the Federal Republic of Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheibl, H. J.; Bartz, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides an analysis of continuing education in West Germany. Discusses the pluralistic nature of financing, the corporate sponsorship, and internal versus external educational activities. Presents advantages and disadvantages, reasons, and criteria for selecting either internal or external methods of continuing education. (JM)

  17. Innovations in Continuing Education. 1983 Award-Winning New Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Univ. Continuing Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Presented are four award-winning projects from the 1983 American College Testing Program (ACT)/National University Continuing Education Association (NUCEA) competition for innovations in continuing education. The projects are categorized according to educational audience. In the category of instruction "Seminars, Courses, and Workshops for…

  18. Syracuse University Publications in Continuing Education. List of Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Alexander N.; Holmwood, Donald

    This document is a complete list of Syracuse University Publications in Continuing Education (SUPCE). Publications are categorized under 16 headings: Notes and Essays and Reports Series in Continuing Education for Adults; Occasional Papers Series; Landmark and New Horizons Series; William Pearson Tolley Medal Series; Papers on Adult Education,…

  19. Twentieth Century Thinkers in Adult & Continuing Education. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Peter, Ed.

    This book contains 19 papers on 20th century thinkers in adult and continuing education. The book is arranged in four parts as follows: early 20th century English thinkers; early 20th century American thinkers; theorists of adult and continuing education; and theorists of adult education and social change. The following papers are included:…

  20. Continuity in Soviet Education--Another Gorbachev Hurdle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahn, Harvey R.

    This paper describes Secretary Gorbachev's efforts to reform education by introducing experimentation and freedom of expression through "glasnost." A brief educational history demonstrates the lingering effect of the "continuity phenomenon" that has plagued attempts at liberal educational reform. Essentially, the continuity phenomenon includes but…

  1. Twelve Tips for teaching medical professionalism at all levels of medical education.

    PubMed

    Al-Eraky, Mohamed Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Review of studies published in medical education journals over the last decade reveals that teaching medical professionalism is essential, yet challenging. According to a recent Best Evidence in Medical Education (BEME) guide, there is no consensus on a theoretical or practical model to integrate the teaching of professionalism into medical education. The aim of this article is to outline a practical manual for teaching professionalism at all levels of medical education. Drawing from research literature and author's experience, Twelve Tips are listed and organised in four clusters with relevance to (1) the context, (2) the teachers, (3) the curriculum, and (4) the networking. With a better understanding of the guiding educational principles for teaching medical professionalism, medical educators will be able to teach one of the most challenging constructs in medical education. PMID:25776227

  2. The Education Review Board: A Mechanism for Managing Potential Conflicts of Interest in Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Borus, Jonathan F; Alexander, Erik K; Bierer, Barbara E; Bringhurst, F Richard; Clark, Christopher; Klanica, Kaley E; Stewart, Erin C; Friedman, Lawrence S

    2015-12-01

    Concerns about the influence of industry support on medical education, research, and patient care have increased in both medical and political circles. Some academic medical centers, questioning whether industry support of medical education could be appropriate and not a conflict of interest, banned such support. In 2009, a Partners HealthCare System commission concluded that interactions with industry remained important to Partners' charitable academic mission and made recommendations to transparently manage such relationships. An Education Review Board (ERB) was created to oversee and manage all industry support of Partners educational activities.Using a case review method, the ERB developed guidelines to implement the commission's recommendations. A multi-funder rule was established that prohibits industry support from only one company for any Partners educational activity. Within that framework, the ERB established guidelines on industry support of educational conferences, clinical fellowships, and trainees' expenses for attending external educational programs; gifts of textbooks and other educational materials; promotional opportunities associated with Partners educational activities; Partners educational activities under contract with an industry entity; and industry-run programs using Partners resources.Although many changes have resulted from the implementation of the ERB guidelines, the number of industry grants for Partners educational activities has remained relatively stable, and funding for these activities declined only moderately during the first three full calendar years (2011-2013) of ERB oversight. The ERB continually educates both the Partners community and industry about the rationale for its guidelines and its openness to their refinement in response to changes in the external environment. PMID:26083402

  3. The Health of Texans. A Study of Medical and Dental Education 1974-1980. CB Study Paper No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    This document reviews the state of medical and dental education in Texas, 1974-80. Recommendations suggest: (1) The Advisory Committee and the Task Force for Medical and Dental Education would be continued as planning bodies to be convened at least once every two years. (2) No new medical or dental schools are recommended since the state will be…

  4. Selection of information resources for education in medical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-González, Maria Dolores; Sanchez-Vanderkast, Egbert

    2005-01-01

    Pharmacology is the foundation science of medical pharmacotherapy. Education in medical pharmacology (EP) requires the use of information resources (IR) to meet the challenge of the continuous introduction of new drugs and new educational, didactic and pedagogical theories to enhance knowledge. Hence criteria for selecting bibliographic material for EP should be clearly outlined and implemented. In this work we present a method to select IR for EP based on systems theory and focusing on the factors determining: (a) the integration of a list of recommended IR for EP; (b) the design of the acquisition list for faculty and students work; (c) the overall organization of the resources available for its optimal use and benefit in the educational process; and (d) a general strategy for assessing the impact of the bibliographic infrastructure. The proposal is based on information from: (i) lists of recommended readings in the academic program of the Pharmacology course given at the School of Medicine of UNAM in the last 30 years; (ii) the extent of discipline development measured by two indexes derived from the contents of Goodman and Gilman's "Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics" (G & G); (iii) the number of texts currently found in the collection of FM-UNAM which are classified in the section of Pharmacology using the Library of Congress Classification System (LCCS); and (iv) the comparison of academic versus standardized classification of pharmacology topics, such as Medical Subject Heading (MESH) and LCCS The importance of this proposal relates to its usefulness for EP and for other medical disciplines. PMID:16416687

  5. The impact of E-learning in medical education.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jorge G; Mintzer, Michael J; Leipzig, Rosanne M

    2006-03-01

    The authors provide an introduction to e-learning and its role in medical education by outlining key terms, the components of e-learning, the evidence for its effectiveness, faculty development needs for implementation, evaluation strategies for e-learning and its technology, and how e-learning might be considered evidence of academic scholarship. E-learning is the use of Internet technologies to enhance knowledge and performance. E-learning technologies offer learners control over content, learning sequence, pace of learning, time, and often media, allowing them to tailor their experiences to meet their personal learning objectives. In diverse medical education contexts, e-learning appears to be at least as effective as traditional instructor-led methods such as lectures. Students do not see e-learning as replacing traditional instructor-led training but as a complement to it, forming part of a blended-learning strategy. A developing infrastructure to support e-learning within medical education includes repositories, or digital libraries, to manage access to e-learning materials, consensus on technical standardization, and methods for peer review of these resources. E-learning presents numerous research opportunities for faculty, along with continuing challenges for documenting scholarship. Innovations in e-learning technologies point toward a revolution in education, allowing learning to be individualized (adaptive learning), enhancing learners' interactions with others (collaborative learning), and transforming the role of the teacher. The integration of e-learning into medical education can catalyze the shift toward applying adult learning theory, where educators will no longer serve mainly as the distributors of content, but will become more involved as facilitators of learning and assessors of competency. PMID:16501260

  6. Organising for Continuing Vocational Education in British Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Chris

    1992-01-01

    A study of continuing vocational education in British universities found a variety of organizational approaches and assumptions that continuing education should be mainstreamed and self-financing. Essential elements include leader commitment, specialized units, clear academic identity, and continuous reflective review. (SK)

  7. "With diabetes, it's always a continuous education and a continuous struggle."

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "With diabetes, it's always a continuous education and a continuous struggle." Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... for my lifestyle—especially controlling carbohydrates. I am a Filipina, and our basic food staple is rice, ...

  8. Managed care and medical education: hard cases and hard choices.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E

    1997-05-01

    As managed care becomes more and more dominant in U.S. health care, it is coming into conflict with medical education. There are historical reasons for this: medical education traditionally excluded physicians who chose to work in health plans, and for profit managed care has tended to avoid subsidizing medical education. In order to improve the climate, three changes are necessary: medical education must understand the tense history of discord between the two; distinctions must be made between responsible and irresponsible managed care plans; and medical educators should not assume they own the moral high ground. Arrogance, a gross oversupply of physicians and especially specialists, scandals and fraud, an often callous attitude toward the poor, and other sins can be laid at medical education's door. The worse threat for both sides is that the public and payers could simply abandon both, leading to underfunding for health professions education, a society that does not trust its health care system, and the loss of superb teaching organizations. To prevent this, managed care and medical education should work together to solve several difficult problems: how to shrink the medical education infrastructure; how to report honestly the uses to which medical education funds are put; and how to identify and end irresponsible behavior on the part of health plans and medical education entities alike. If the two sides can exercise leadership in these areas, they will be able to protect and enhance the singular place of honor that medical education holds in this society. PMID:9159575

  9. Virtual reality in medical education and assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, Laurie A.; Bell, Brad; Sullivan, Tim; Voss, Mark; Payer, Andrew F.; Goza, Stewart Michael

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)/LinCom Corporation, the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB), and the Galveston Independent School District (GISD) have teamed up to develop a virtual visual environment display (VIVED) that provides a unique educational experience using virtual reality (VR) technologies. The VIVED end product will be a self-contained educational experience allowing students a new method of learning as they interact with the subject matter through VR. This type of interface is intuitive and utilizes spatial and psychomotor abilities which are now constrained or reduced by the current two dimensional terminals and keyboards. The perpetual challenge to educators remains the identification and development of methodologies which conform the learners abilities and preferences. The unique aspects of VR provide an opportunity to explore a new educational experience. Endowing medical students with an understanding of the human body poses some difficulty challenges. One of the most difficult is to convey the three dimensional nature of anatomical structures. The ideal environment for addressing this problem would be one that allows students to become small enough to enter the body and travel through it - much like a person walks through a building. By using VR technology, this effect can be achieved; when VR is combined with multimedia technologies, the effect can be spectacular.

  10. Medical Education 1926-1928. Bulletin, 1929, No. 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, N. P.

    1929-01-01

    This bulletin reports on the status of medical education in the United States for the years 1926-1928. During the past two years the number of medical schools recognized by the American Medical Association has been reduced from 80 to 74. Reports to the American Medical Association show that the enrollment of medical students has increased from…

  11. 20 CFR 404.1593 - Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical evidence in continuing disability... Stopping Disability § 404.1593 Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases. (a) General. If you... disabled, we will have your case file with the supporting medical evidence previously used to establish...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1597a - Continued benefits pending appeal of a medical cessation determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... medical cessation determination. 404.1597a Section 404.1597a Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... Continuing Or Stopping Disability § 404.1597a Continued benefits pending appeal of a medical cessation...). If you appeal a medical cessation under both title II and title XVI (a concurrent case), the title...

  13. 20 CFR 404.1593 - Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... disabled, we will have your case file with the supporting medical evidence previously used to establish or... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical evidence in continuing disability... Stopping Disability § 404.1593 Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases. (a) General. If...

  14. A Model (Based upon Open Systems Organizational Theory) for Continuous Educational Needs Assessment in Continuing Professional Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazmanian, Paul E.

    This paper suggests that since continuing professional educators must address the ever present gap between new knowledge and practitioner competence, accurate identification and prioritization of practitioners' educational needs must be maintained on a continuous basis. Describing an adult education agency as an open system whose output depends on…

  15. [Continuous nursing education to improve the quality of health care].

    PubMed

    Fumić, Nera; Marinović, Marin; Brajan, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    Health care and today's medical and technical achievements and approved standards of treatment provide comprehensive quality, safety and traceability of medical procedures respecting the principles of health protection. Continuous education improves the quality of nursing health care and increases the effectiveness of patient care, consequently maintaining and enhancing patient safety. Patient health problems impose the need of appropriate, planned and timely nursing care and treatment. In providing quality nursing care, attention is focused on the patient and his/her needs in order to maintain and increase their safety, satisfaction, independence and recovery or peaceful death, so the health and nursing practices must be systematized, planned and based on knowledge and experience. Health and nursing care of patients at risk of developing acute and chronic wounds or already suffering from some form of this imply preventive measures that are provided through patient education, motivation, monitoring, early recognition of risk factors and causes, and reducing or removing them through the prescribed necessary medical treatment which is safe depending on the patient health status. Except for preventive measures, nursing care of patients who already suffer from some form of acute or chronic wounds is focused on the care and treatment of damaged tissue by providing appropriate and timely diagnosis, timely and proper evaluation of the wound and patient general status, knowledge and understanding of the wide range of local, oral and parenteral therapy and treatment, aiming to increase patient safety by preventing progression of the patient general condition and local wound status and reducing the possibility of developing infection or other complications of the underlying disease. In the overall patient management, through nursing process, medical interventions are implemented and aimed to maintain and optimize health status, prevent complications of existing diseases and

  16. Visual analytics in healthcare education: exploring novel ways to analyze and represent big data in undergraduate medical education

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Gunnar; Zary, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The big data present in the medical curriculum that informs undergraduate medical education is beyond human abilities to perceive and analyze. The medical curriculum is the main tool used by teachers and directors to plan, design, and deliver teaching and assessment activities and student evaluations in medical education in a continuous effort to improve it. Big data remains largely unexploited for medical education improvement purposes. The emerging research field of visual analytics has the advantage of combining data analysis and manipulation techniques, information and knowledge representation, and human cognitive strength to perceive and recognize visual patterns. Nevertheless, there is a lack of research on the use and benefits of visual analytics in medical education. Methods. The present study is based on analyzing the data in the medical curriculum of an undergraduate medical program as it concerns teaching activities, assessment methods and learning outcomes in order to explore visual analytics as a tool for finding ways of representing big data from undergraduate medical education for improvement purposes. Cytoscape software was employed to build networks of the identified aspects and visualize them. Results. After the analysis of the curriculum data, eleven aspects were identified. Further analysis and visualization of the identified aspects with Cytoscape resulted in building an abstract model of the examined data that presented three different approaches; (i) learning outcomes and teaching methods, (ii) examination and learning outcomes, and (iii) teaching methods, learning outcomes, examination results, and gap analysis. Discussion. This study identified aspects of medical curriculum that play an important role in how medical education is conducted. The implementation of visual analytics revealed three novel ways of representing big data in the undergraduate medical education context. It appears to be a useful tool to explore such data

  17. Visual analytics in healthcare education: exploring novel ways to analyze and represent big data in undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Vaitsis, Christos; Nilsson, Gunnar; Zary, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The big data present in the medical curriculum that informs undergraduate medical education is beyond human abilities to perceive and analyze. The medical curriculum is the main tool used by teachers and directors to plan, design, and deliver teaching and assessment activities and student evaluations in medical education in a continuous effort to improve it. Big data remains largely unexploited for medical education improvement purposes. The emerging research field of visual analytics has the advantage of combining data analysis and manipulation techniques, information and knowledge representation, and human cognitive strength to perceive and recognize visual patterns. Nevertheless, there is a lack of research on the use and benefits of visual analytics in medical education. Methods. The present study is based on analyzing the data in the medical curriculum of an undergraduate medical program as it concerns teaching activities, assessment methods and learning outcomes in order to explore visual analytics as a tool for finding ways of representing big data from undergraduate medical education for improvement purposes. Cytoscape software was employed to build networks of the identified aspects and visualize them. Results. After the analysis of the curriculum data, eleven aspects were identified. Further analysis and visualization of the identified aspects with Cytoscape resulted in building an abstract model of the examined data that presented three different approaches; (i) learning outcomes and teaching methods, (ii) examination and learning outcomes, and (iii) teaching methods, learning outcomes, examination results, and gap analysis. Discussion. This study identified aspects of medical curriculum that play an important role in how medical education is conducted. The implementation of visual analytics revealed three novel ways of representing big data in the undergraduate medical education context. It appears to be a useful tool to explore such data

  18. Medical education reimagined: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Prober, Charles G; Khan, Salman

    2013-10-01

    The authors propose a new model for medical education based on the "flipped classroom" design. In this model, students would access brief (~10 minute) online videos to learn new concepts on their own time. The content could be viewed by the students as many times as necessary to master the knowledge in preparation for classroom time facilitated by expert faculty leading dynamic, interactive sessions where students can apply their newly mastered knowledge.The authors argue that the modern digitally empowered learner, the unremitting expansion of biomedical knowledge, and the increasing specialization within the practice of medicine drive the need to reimagine medical education. The changes that they propose emphasize the need to define a core curriculum that can meet learners where they are in a digitally oriented world, enhance the relevance and retention of knowledge through rich interactive exercises, and facilitate in-depth learning fueled by individual students' aptitude and passion. The creation and adoption of this model would be meaningfully enhanced by cooperative efforts across medical schools. PMID:23969367

  19. To the point: a primer on medical education research.

    PubMed

    Nuthalapaty, Francis S; Casey, Petra M; Cullimore, Amie J; Dugoff, Lorraine; Abbott, Jodi F; Chuang, Alice W; Dalrymple, John L; Hueppchen, Nancy A; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph M; Katz, Nadine T; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail

    2012-07-01

    This article, from the To the Point series prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, provides educators with an introduction to medical educational research by describing the framework of educational scholarship, discussing the similarities and differences between clinical and educational research, reviewing the key steps in educational research, and providing examples of well-designed studies in the field of obstetrics and gynecology. PMID:22281429

  20. Forty years of litigation involving medical students and their education: II. Issues of finance.

    PubMed

    Helms, L B; Helms, C M

    1991-02-01

    An analysis of reported state and federal adjudication from 1950 through 1989 was undertaken to identify trends in litigation involving medical students and undergraduate medical education. Of the 110 cited judicial decisions during that time, 59 (54%) involved disputes over financing medical education; 43 (73%) were litigated since 1985. This dramatic increase arises primarily from challenges to National Health Service Corps obligations and from attempts to discharge or reorganize debt under the Bankruptcy Code. Medical school graduates enjoyed very little success in these cases. Analysis of court decisions points to a need for informed counseling for medical students, particularly as to the consequences of timing in default on service obligations and of incurring loans under the Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL) program as opposed to other loan sources. The growing educational debt of today's medical students foreshadows continued litigation in this area. PMID:1993104