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Sample records for continuous flow-type hyperpolarizing

  1. NMR signal enhancement for hyperpolarized fluids continuously generated in hydrogenation reactions with parahydrogen.

    PubMed

    Barskiy, Danila A; Salnikov, Oleg G; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Koptyug, Igor V

    2015-02-12

    In the present study we analyze the factors which can lower hyperpolarization of fluids produced in a continuous flow regime by the parahydrogen-induced polarization technique. We use the findings of this analysis to examine the flow rate dependence of propane hyperpolarization produced in the heterogeneous propylene hydrogenation by parahydrogen over Rh/TiO2 catalyst. We have estimated the maximum attainable propane (1)H hyperpolarization yield and the corrected percentage of pairwise hydrogen addition in heterogeneous hydrogenation, which was found to be ∼7%. The approach developed for polarization analysis is useful for the optimization of experimental setup and reaction conditions to obtain maximum hyperpolarization for parahydrogen-based catalyst-free continuously generated fluids applicable in biomedical magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25587942

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of dissolved hyperpolarized 129Xe using a membrane-based continuous flow system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, N.; Zänker, P. P.; Blümler, P.; Meise, F. M.; Schreiber, L. M.; Scholz, A.; Schmiedeskamp, J.; Spiess, H. W.; Münnemann, K.

    2009-11-01

    A technique for continuous production of solutions containing hyperpolarized 129Xe is explored for MRI applications. The method is based on hollow fiber membranes which inhibit the formation of foams and bubbles. A systematic analysis of various carrier agents for hyperpolarized 129Xe has been carried out, which are applicable as contrast agents for in vivo MRI. The image quality of different hyperpolarized Xe solutions is compared and MRI results obtained in a clinical as well as in a nonclinical MRI setting are provided. Moreover, we demonstrate the application of 129Xe contrast agents produced with our dissolution method for lung MRI by imaging hyperpolarized 129Xe that has been both dissolved in and outgassed from a carrier liquid in a lung phantom, illustrating its potential for the measurement of lung perfusion and ventilation.

  3. Molecular MRI in the Earth's Magnetic Field Using Continuous Hyperpolarization of a Biomolecule in Water.

    PubMed

    Rovedo, Philipp; Knecht, Stephan; Bäumlisberger, Tim; Cremer, Anna Lena; Duckett, Simon B; Mewis, Ryan E; Green, Gary G R; Burns, Michael; Rayner, Peter J; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; Pütz, Gerhard; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-06-30

    In this work, we illustrate a method to continuously hyperpolarize a biomolecule, nicotinamide, in water using parahydrogen and signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE). Building on the preparation procedure described recently by Truong et al. [ J. Phys. Chem. B , 2014 , 118 , 13882 - 13889 ], aqueous solutions of nicotinamide and an Ir-IMes catalyst were prepared for low-field NMR and MRI. The (1)H-polarization was continuously renewed and monitored by NMR experiments at 5.9 mT for more than 1000 s. The polarization achieved corresponds to that induced by a 46 T magnet (P = 1.6 × 10(-4)) or an enhancement of 10(4). The polarization persisted, although reduced, if cell culture medium (DPBS with Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) or human cells (HL-60) were added, but was no longer observable after the addition of human blood. Using a portable MRI unit, fast (1)H-MRI was enabled by cycling the magnetic field between 5 mT and the Earth's field for hyperpolarization and imaging, respectively. A model describing the underlying spin physics was developed that revealed a polarization pattern depending on both contact time and magnetic field. Furthermore, the model predicts an opposite phase of the dihydrogen and substrate signal after one exchange, which is likely to result in the cancelation of some signal at low field. PMID:27228166

  4. RF-SABRE: A Way to Continuous Spin Hyperpolarization at High Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L

    2015-10-29

    A new technique is developed that allows one to carry out the signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) experiments at high magnetic field. SABRE is a hyperpolarization method, which utilizes transfer of spin order from para-hydrogen to the spins of a substrate in transient iridium complexes. Previously, it has been thought that such a transfer of spin order is only efficient at low magnetic fields, notably, at level anti-crossing (LAC) regions. Here it is demonstrated that LAC conditions can also be fulfilled at high fields under the action of a RF field. The high-field RF-SABRE experiment can be implemented using commercially available nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines and does not require technically demanding field-cycling. The achievable NMR enhancements are around 100 for several substrates as compared to their NMR signals at thermal equilibrium conditions at 4.7 T. The frequency dependence of RF-SABRE is comprised of well pronounced peaks and dips, whose position and amplitude are conditioned solely by the magnetic resonance parameters such as chemical shifts and scalar coupling of the spin system involved in the polarization transfer and by the amplitude of the RF field. Thus, the proposed method can serve as a new sensitive tool for probing transient complexes. Simulations of the dependence of magnetization transfer (i.e., NMR signal amplifications) on the frequency and amplitude of the RF field are in good agreement with the developed theoretical approach. Furthermore, the method enables continuous re-hyperpolarization of the SABRE substrate over a long period of time, giving a straightforward way to repetitive NMR experiments. PMID:25970807

  5. Continuously Infusing Hyperpolarized 129Xe into Flowing Aqueous Solutions Using Hydrophobic Gas Exchange Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Zackary I.; Möller, Harald E.; Hedlund, Laurence W.; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2009-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe yields high signal intensities in magnetic resonance (MR) and, through its large chemical shift range of ∼300 ppm, provides detailed information about the local chemical environment. To exploit these properties in aqueous solutions and living tissues requires the development of methods for efficiently dissolving HP 129Xe over an extended time period. To this end, we have used commercially available gas exchange modules to continuously infuse concentrated HP 129Xe into flowing liquids, including rat whole blood, for periods as long as one hour, and have demonstrated the feasibility of dissolved-phase MR imaging with sub-millimeter resolution within minutes. These modules, which exchange gases using hydrophobic microporous polymer membranes, are compatible with a variety of liquids and are suitable for infusing HP 129Xe into the bloodstream in vivo. Additionally, we have developed a detailed mathematical model of the infused HP 129Xe signal dynamics that should be useful in designing improved infusion systems that yield even higher dissolved HP 129Xe signal intensities. PMID:19702286

  6. A continuous-flow, high-throughput, high-pressure parahydrogen converter for hyperpolarization in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Bär, Sébastien; Leupold, Jochen; Jenne, Klaus; Leibfritz, Dieter; Hennig, Jürgen; Duckett, Simon B; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-02-01

    Pure parahydrogen (pH(2) ) is the prerequisite for optimal pH(2) -based hyperpolarization experiments, promising approaches to access the hidden orders of magnitude of MR signals. pH(2) production on-site in medical research centers is vital for the proliferation of these technologies in the life sciences. However, previously suggested designs do not meet our requirements for safety or production performance (flow rate, pressure or enrichment). In this article, we present the safety concept, design and installation of a pH(2) converter, operated in a clinical setting. The apparatus produces a continuous flow of four standard liters per minute of ≈98% enriched pH(2) at a pressure maximum of 50 bar. The entire production cycle, including cleaning and cooling to 25 K, takes less than 5 h, only ≈45 min of which are required for actual pH(2) conversion. A fast and simple quantification procedure is described. The lifetimes of pH(2) in a glass vial and aluminum storage cylinder are measured to be T(1C) (glass vial) =822 ± 29 min and T(1C) (Al cylinder) =129 ± 36 days, thus providing sufficiently long storage intervals and allowing the application of pH(2) on demand. A dependence of line width on pH(2) enrichment is observed. As examples, (1) H hyperpolarization of pyridine and (13) C hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate are presented. PMID:22833391

  7. Production of carbonaceous adsorbents from agricultural by-products and novolac resin under a continuous countercurrent flow type pyrolysis operation.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Z; Simitzis, J

    2013-02-01

    Carbonaceous adsorbents based on novolac resin (N) and olive stone biomass (B) in a proportion of 20/80 and 40/60 w./w. N/O were produced. The specimens were cured (c) and pyrolyzed/carbonized (C) up to 1000 °C under a continuous countercurrent flow type pyrolysis operation (N20B-cC, N40B-cC). Commercial activated carbon (AC) was used for comparison reasons. Methylene blue adsorption from its aqueous solutions onto the adsorbents and kinetic analysis were investigated. The specific surface area of adsorbents and the gross calorific values (GCV) of cured materials were determined. The results show that N40B-cC presents lower weight loss and shrinkage but higher methylene blue adsorption than N20B-cC. Pseudo-second order mechanism describes better methylene blue adsorption onto all adsorbents. The specific surface area of carbonaceous and the gross calorific values of cured materials follow the order: AC>N20B-cC>N40B-cC and N100-c>N40B-c>N20B-c>B respectively. Olive stone biomass may constitute a suitable precursor for the production of carbonaceous materials. PMID:23246760

  8. In Vivo MR Imaging of Pulmonary Perfusion and Gas Exchange in Rats via Continuous Extracorporeal Infusion of Hyperpolarized 129Xe

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Zackary I.; Möller, Harald E.; Hedlund, Laurence W.; Nouls, John C.; Freeman, Matthew S.; Qi, Yi; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits high resolution, regional visualization of pulmonary ventilation. Additionally, its reasonably high solubility (>10%) and large chemical shift range (>200 ppm) in tissues allow HP 129Xe to serve as a regional probe of pulmonary perfusion and gas transport, when introduced directly into the vasculature. In earlier work, vascular delivery was accomplished in rats by first dissolving HP 129Xe in a biologically compatible carrier solution, injecting the solution into the vasculature, and then detecting HP 129Xe as it emerged into the alveolar airspaces. Although easily implemented, this approach was constrained by the tolerable injection volume and the duration of the HP 129Xe signal. Methods and Principal Findings Here, we overcome the volume and temporal constraints imposed by injection, by using hydrophobic, microporous, gas-exchange membranes to directly and continuously infuse 129Xe into the arterial blood of live rats with an extracorporeal (EC) circuit. The resulting gas-phase 129Xe signal is sufficient to generate diffusive gas exchange- and pulmonary perfusion-dependent, 3D MR images with a nominal resolution of 2×2×2 mm3. We also show that the 129Xe signal dynamics during EC infusion are well described by an analytical model that incorporates both mass transport into the blood and longitudinal relaxation. Conclusions Extracorporeal infusion of HP 129Xe enables rapid, 3D MR imaging of rat lungs and, when combined with ventilation imaging, will permit spatially resolved studies of the ventilation-perfusion ratio in small animals. Moreover, EC infusion should allow 129Xe to be delivered elsewhere in the body and make possible functional and molecular imaging approaches that are currently not feasible using inhaled HP 129Xe. PMID:22363613

  9. Regenerative hyperpolarization in rods.

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, F S

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical properties of the rods in Necturus maculosus were studied at the cell body and the outer segments in dark and light under current and voltage clamp with a pair of intracellular electrodes separated by about 1 mum. 2. The membrane resistance in the dark was voltage- and time-dependent both for the cell body and the outer segment. Slight depolarizations in the cell body reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 10 M omega with a time constant of about 1 sec. Polarization in either direction, at the outer segment, when greater than about 20 mV, reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 30 M omega. The dark potential in the cell body was typically -30 to -35 m V; at the outer segment it was typically only -10 to -15 mV. 3. The light-elicited voltage response in both the cell body and the outer segment was largest with the membrane near the dark potential level. In both regions, the response was reduced when the membrane was polarized in either direction. 4. Under voltage-clamp conditions, a reversal potential for the light response near + 10 mV was measured at the outer segment. At the cell body no reversal potential for the light response was measured; there the clamping current required during the light response was almost of the same magnitude at all potential levels. 5. When the membrane at the cell body was hyperpolarized in the dark under voltage clamp, a transient outward current, typically about one-half the magnitude of the initial inward clamping current was required to maintain the membrane at the clamped potential level. This outward current transient was associated with a decrease in membrane resistance with similar time course. The transient outward current reversed and became inward when the membrane was clamped to potentials more negative than -80 mV. Thus, the transient outward current appears to involve a transient activation initiated by hyperpolarization. I is regenerative in that it is initiated by hyperpolarization and tends to

  10. Physics of Hyperpolarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happer, William

    1999-11-01

    The production of highly spin-polarized (hyperpolarized) gases by optical pumping with lasers involves spin-dependent interactions of atoms in gases, liquids, solids and on surfaces. Although enough is understood about these interactions to allow large quantities of hyperpolarized gas to be prepared, some of the basic physics is still mysterious. A better understanding of the physics would lead to worthwhile improvements in the performance of polarization systems. The most important physics involved in the production of hyperpolarized gases will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on areas where the physics is still not understood.

  11. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques for Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in NMR hyperpolarization have enabled a wide array of new in vivo molecular imaging modalities—ranging from functional imaging of the lungs to metabolic imaging of cancer. This Concept article explores selected advances in methods for the preparation and use of hyperpolarized contrast agents, many of which are already at or near the phase of their clinical validation in patients. PMID:25470566

  12. Nuclear hyperpolarization comes of age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Gunnar; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    The last decade has seen transformative developments and previously unthinkable opportunities opening in the fields of solid-state, solution and imaging NMR, thanks to the advent of methods for hyperpolarizing the nuclear spins. Probably since the introduction of the Fourier Transform, and to some extent for similar reasons, few single concepts have had the potential to affect so many areas of magnetic resonance, as the dissemination of these sensitivity-enhancing methods. The generality of these methods, particularly those based on dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), has triggered exciting new research over a wide range of applications ranging from material sciences and structural biology to metabolic analysis, biochemistry, biology and clinical diagnosis. This excitement has been accompanied by concurrent efforts to better understand the physical basis of nuclear hyperpolarization to optimize the instrumentation that will achieve higher levels of nuclear polarization over a wide range of conditions, and with new NMR and MRI sequences and experiments that will better fit the particular demands of these experiments. This concentrated attention has also brought in close synergy the electron and nuclear magnetic resonance communities, particularly as the former showed the latter that electrons could be exploited via DNP to originate nuclear hyperpolarization over a wide range of solution and solid state systems. Such "DNP revolution" also rekindled similar searches based on alternatives such as para-Hydrogen induced polarization and optical pumping. The kind of NMR enhancement that all these techniques could provide would have been unreachable by traditional approaches, for instance further optimizations of the NMR receiving hardware or increasing the NMR/MRI observation fields.

  13. Medical Imaging of Hyperpolarized Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. Wilson

    2009-08-01

    Since the introduction of hyperpolarized 3He and 129Xe as gaseous MRI contrast agents more than a decade ago, a rich variety of imaging techniques and medical applications have been developed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the inhaled gas depicts ventilated lung airspaces with unprecedented detail, and allows one to track airflow and pulmonary mechanics during respiration. Information about lung structure and function can also be obtained using the physical properties of the gas, including spin relaxation in the presence of oxygen, restricted diffusion inside the alveolar airspaces, and the NMR frequency shift of xenon dissolved in blood and tissue.

  14. A magnetic tunnel to shelter hyperpolarized fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Milani, Jonas Vuichoud, Basile; Bornet, Aurélien; Miéville, Pascal; Mottier, Roger; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2015-02-15

    To shield solutions carrying hyperpolarized nuclear magnetization from rapid relaxation during transfer through low fields, the transfer duct can be threaded through an array of permanent magnets. The advantages are illustrated for solutions containing hyperpolarized {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclei in a variety of molecules.

  15. Development of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.

    1998-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging using the MR signal from hyperpolarized noble gases 129Xe and 3He may become an important new diagnostic technique. Alex Pines (adapting the hyperpolarization technique pioneered by William Happer) presented MR spectroscopy studies using hyperpolarized 129Xe. The current authors recognized that the enormous enhancement in the detectability of 129Xe, promised by hyperpolarization, would solve the daunting SNR problems impeding their attempts to use 129Xe as an in vivo MR probe, especially in order to study the action of general anesthetics. It was hoped that hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI would yield resolutions equivalent to that achievable with conventional 1H 2O MRI, and that xenon's solubility in lipids would facilitate investigations of lipid-rich tissues that had as yet been hard to image. The publication of hyperpolarized 129Xe images of excised mouse lungs heralded the emergence of hyperpolarized noble-gas MRI. Using hyperpolarized 3He, researchers have obtained images of the lung gas space of guinea pigs and of humans. Lung gas images from patients with pulmonary disease have recently been reported. 3He is easier to hyperpolarize than 129Xe, and it yields a stronger MR signal, but its extremely low solubility in blood precludes its use for the imaging of tissue. Xenon, however, readily dissolves in blood, and the T1 of dissolved 129Xe is long enough for sufficient polarization to be carried by the circulation to distal tissues. Hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved-phase tissue spectra from the thorax and head of rodents and humans have been obtained, as have chemical shift 129Xe images from the head of rats. Lung gas 129Xe images of rodents, and more recently of humans, have been reported. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) may elucidate the link between the structure of the lung and its function. The technique may also be useful in identifying ventilation-perfusion mismatch in patients with pulmonary embolism, in staging and tracking the

  16. Hyperpolarized (129)Xe T (1) in oxygenated and deoxygenated blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.; Kacher, D. F.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Jolesz, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    The viability of the new technique of hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) for imaging organs other than the lungs depends on whether the spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), of (129)Xe is sufficiently long in the blood. In previous experiments by the authors, the T(1) was found to be strongly dependent upon the oxygenation of the blood, with T(1) increasing from about 3 s in deoxygenated samples to about 10 s in oxygenated samples. Contrarily, Tseng et al. (J. Magn. Reson. 1997; 126: 79-86) reported extremely long T(1) values deduced from an indirect experiment in which hyperpolarized (129)Xe was used to create a 'blood-foam'. They found that oxygenation decreased T(1). Pivotal to their experiment is the continual and rapid exchange of hyperpolarized (129)Xe between the gas phase (within blood-foam bubbles) and the dissolved phase (in the skin of the bubbles); this necessitated a complicated analysis to extract the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood. In the present study, the experimental design minimizes gas exchange after the initial bolus of hyperpolarized (129)Xe has been bubbled through the sample. This study confirms that oxygenation increases the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood, from about 4 s in freshly drawn venous blood, to about 13 s in blood oxygenated to arterial levels, and also shifts the red blood cell resonance to higher frequency. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Abbreviations used BOLD blood oxygen level dependent NOE nuclear overhouses effect PO(2) oxygen partial pressure RBC red blood cells RF radio frequency SNR signal-to-noise ratio.

  17. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  18. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  19. Do twisted laser beams evoke nuclear hyperpolarization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. B.; Andrews, D. L.; Rohrbach, A.; Gohn-Kreuz, C.; Shatokhin, V. N.; Kiselev, V. G.; Hennig, J.; von Elverfeldt, D.; Hövener, J.-B.

    2016-07-01

    The hyperpolarization of nuclear spins promises great advances in chemical analysis and medical diagnosis by substantially increasing the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Current methods to produce a hyperpolarized sample, however, are arduous, time-consuming or costly and require elaborate equipment. Recently, a much simpler approach was introduced that holds the potential, if harnessed appropriately, to revolutionize the production of hyperpolarized spins. It was reported that high levels of hyperpolarization in nuclear spins can be created by irradiation with a laser beam carrying orbital angular momentum (twisted light). Aside from these initial reports however, no further experimental verification has been presented. In addition, this effect has so far evaded a critical theoretical examination. In this contribution, we present the first independent attempt to reproduce the effect. We exposed a sample of immersion oil or a fluorocarbon liquid that was placed within a low-field NMR spectrometer to Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel laser beams at a wavelength of 514.5 nm and various topological charges. We acquired 1H and 19F NMR free induction decay data, either during or alternating with the irradiation that was parallel to B0. We observed an irregular increase in NMR signal in experiments where the sample was exposed to beams with higher values of the topological charge. However, at no time did the effect reach statistical significance of 95%. Given the measured sensitivity of our setup, we estimate that a possible effect did not exceed a hyperpolarization (at 5 mT) of 0.14-6%, depending on the assumed hyperpolarized volume. It should be noted though, that there were some differences between our setup and the previous implementation of the experiment, which may have inhibited the full incidence of this effect. To approach a theoretical description of this effect, we considered the interaction of an electron with a plane wave, which is known to be

  20. Do twisted laser beams evoke nuclear hyperpolarization?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A B; Andrews, D L; Rohrbach, A; Gohn-Kreuz, C; Shatokhin, V N; Kiselev, V G; Hennig, J; von Elverfeldt, D; Hövener, J-B

    2016-07-01

    The hyperpolarization of nuclear spins promises great advances in chemical analysis and medical diagnosis by substantially increasing the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Current methods to produce a hyperpolarized sample, however, are arduous, time-consuming or costly and require elaborate equipment. Recently, a much simpler approach was introduced that holds the potential, if harnessed appropriately, to revolutionize the production of hyperpolarized spins. It was reported that high levels of hyperpolarization in nuclear spins can be created by irradiation with a laser beam carrying orbital angular momentum (twisted light). Aside from these initial reports however, no further experimental verification has been presented. In addition, this effect has so far evaded a critical theoretical examination. In this contribution, we present the first independent attempt to reproduce the effect. We exposed a sample of immersion oil or a fluorocarbon liquid that was placed within a low-field NMR spectrometer to Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel laser beams at a wavelength of 514.5nm and various topological charges. We acquired (1)H and (19)F NMR free induction decay data, either during or alternating with the irradiation that was parallel to B0. We observed an irregular increase in NMR signal in experiments where the sample was exposed to beams with higher values of the topological charge. However, at no time did the effect reach statistical significance of 95%. Given the measured sensitivity of our setup, we estimate that a possible effect did not exceed a hyperpolarization (at 5mT) of 0.14-6%, depending on the assumed hyperpolarized volume. It should be noted though, that there were some differences between our setup and the previous implementation of the experiment, which may have inhibited the full incidence of this effect. To approach a theoretical description of this effect, we considered the interaction of an electron with a plane wave, which is known to be

  1. Endothelium-Dependent Hyperpolarization and Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Félétou, Michel

    2016-05-01

    The endothelium controls vascular tone not only by releasing various vasoactive substances but also by another pathway associated with the hyperpolarization of both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells and is termed endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH). These responses involve an increase in the endothelial intracellular Ca concentration by the activation of transient receptor potential channels (predominantly TRPV4) followed by the opening of Ca-activated K channels of small and intermediate conductance (SKCa and IKCa). These channels show a distinct subcellular distribution. SKCa are widely distributed over the plasma membrane but segregates at sites of homocellular endothelial junctions, whereas IKCa are preferentially expressed in the myoendothelial projections. Following KCa activation, smooth muscle hyperpolarization is evoked by electrical coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions and/or by the potassium efflux that subsequently activates smooth muscle Kir2.1 and/or Na/K-ATPase. Alteration of the EDH contributes to the endothelial dysfunctions observed in various pathologies or conversely compensates for the loss in NO bioavailability. A better characterization of EDH should allow determining whether new druggable targets can be identified for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26657714

  2. Hyperpolarized Gas MRI: Technique and Applications

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Holman P.; Kaushik, S. Sivaram; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Functional imaging today offers a rich world of information that is more sensitive to changes in lung structure and function than traditionally obtained pulmonary function tests. Hyperpolarized helium (3He) and xenon (129Xe) MR imaging of the lungs provided new sensitive contrast mechanisms to probe changes in pulmonary ventilation, microstructure and gas exchange. With the recent scarcity in the supply of 3He the field of hyperpolarized gas imaging shifted to the use of cheaper and naturally available 129Xe. Xenon is well tolerated and recent technical advances have ensured that the 129Xe image quality is on par with that of 3He. The added advantage of 129Xe is its solubility in pulmonary tissue, which allows exploring specific lung function characteristics involved in gas exchange and alveolar oxygenation. With a plethora of contrast mechanisms, hyperpolarized gases and 129Xe in particular, stands to be an excellent probe of pulmonary structure and function, and provide sensitive and non-invasive biomarkers for a wide variety of pulmonary diseases. PMID:25952516

  3. Para-hydrogen perspectives in hyperpolarized NMR.

    PubMed

    Glöggler, Stefan; Colell, Johannes; Appelt, Stephan

    2013-10-01

    The first instance of para-hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) in an NMR experiment was serendipitously observed in the 1980s while investigating a hydrogenation reaction (Seldler et al., 1983; Bowers and Weitekamp, 1986, 1987; Eisenschmid et al., 1987) [1-4]. Remarkably a theoretical investigation of the applicability of para-hydrogen as a hyperpolarization agent was being performed in the 1980's thereby quickly providing a theoretical basis for the PHIP-effect (Bowers and Weitekamp, 1986) [2]. The discovery of signal amplification by a non-hydrogenating interaction with para-hydrogen has recently extended the interest to exploit the PHIP effect, as it enables investigation of compounds without structural alteration while retaining the advantages of spectroscopy with hyperpolarized compounds [5]. In this article we will place more emphasis of the future applications of the method while only briefly discussing the efforts that have been made in the understanding of the phenomenon and the development of the method so far. PMID:23932399

  4. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  5. Solution NMR of polypeptides hyperpolarized by dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Ragavan, Mukundan; Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Sekar, Giridhar; Hilty, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Hyperpolarization of nuclear spins through techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can greatly increase the signal-to-noise ratio in NMR measurements, thus eliminating the need for signal averaging. This enables the study of many dynamic processes which would otherwise not be amenable to study by NMR spectroscopy. A report of solid- to liquid-state DNP of a short peptide, bacitracin A, as well as of a full-length protein, L23, is presented here. The polypeptides are hyperpolarized at low temperature and dissolved for NMR signal acquisition in the liquid state in mixtures of organic solvent and water. Signal enhancements of 300-2000 are obtained in partially deuterated polypeptide when hyperpolarized on (13)C and of 30-180 when hyperpolarized on (1)H. A simulated spectrum is used to identify different resonances in the hyperpolarized (13)C spectra, and the relation between observed signal enhancement for various groups in the protein and relaxation parameters measured from the hyperpolarized samples is discussed. Thus far, solid- to liquid-state DNP has been used in conjunction with small molecules. The results presented here, however, demonstrate the feasibility of hyperpolarizing larger proteins, with potential applications toward the study of protein folding or macromolecular interactions. PMID:21651293

  6. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI of the Human Lung

    PubMed Central

    Mugler, John P.; Altes, Talissa A.

    2012-01-01

    By permitting direct visualization of the airspaces of the lung, MR imaging using hyperpolarized gases provides unique strategies for evaluating pulmonary structure and function. Although the vast majority of research in humans has been performed using hyperpolarized 3He, recent contraction in the supply of 3He and consequent increases in price have turned attention to the alternative agent, hyperpolarized 129Xe. Compared to 3He, 129Xe yields reduced signal due to its smaller magnetic moment. Nonetheless, taking advantage of advances in gas-polarization technology, recent studies in humans using techniques for measuring ventilation, diffusion, and partial pressure of oxygen have demonstrated results for hyperpolarized 129Xe comparable to those previously demonstrated using hyperpolarized 3He. In addition, xenon has the advantage of readily dissolving in lung tissue and blood following inhalation, which makes hyperpolarized 129Xe particularly attractive for exploring certain characteristics of lung function, such as gas exchange and uptake, which cannot be accessed using 3He. Preliminary results from methods for imaging 129Xe dissolved in the human lung suggest that these approaches will provide new opportunities for quantifying relationships among gas delivery, exchange, and transport, and thus show substantial potential to broaden our understanding of lung disease. Finally, recent changes in the commercial landscape of the hyperpolarized-gas field now make it possible for this innovative technology to move beyond the research lab. PMID:23355432

  7. Light Adaptation in Pecten Hyperpolarizing Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Maria del Pilar; Nasi, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    The ability of scallop hyperpolarizing photoreceptors to respond without attenuation to repetitive flashes, together with their low light sensitivity, lack of resolvable quantum bumps and fast photoresponse kinetics, had prompted the suggestion that these cells may be constitutively in a state akin to light adaptation. We here demonstrate that their photocurrent displays all manifestations of sensory adaptation: (a) The response amplitude to a test flash is decreased in a graded way by background or conditioning lights. This attenuation of the response develops with a time constant of 200–800 ms, inversely related to background intensity. (b) Adapting stimuli shift the stimulus-response curve and reduce the size of the saturating photocurrent. (c) The fall kinetics of the photoresponse are accelerated by light adaptation, and the roll-off of the modulation transfer function is displaced to higher frequencies. This light-induced desensitization exhibits a rapid recovery, on the order of a few seconds. Based on the notion that Ca mediates light adaptation in other cells, we examined the consequences of manipulating this ion. Removal of external Ca reversibly increased the photocurrent amplitude, without affecting light sensitivity, photoresponse kinetics, or susceptibility to background adaptation; the effect, therefore, concerns ion permeation, rather than the regulation of the visual response. Intracellular dialysis with 10 mM BAPTA did not reduce the peak-to-plateau decay of the photocurrent elicited by prolonged light steps, not the background-induced compression of the response amplitude range and the acceleration of its kinetics. Conversely, high levels of buffered free [Ca]i (10 μM) only marginally shifted the sensitivity curve (Δσ = 0.3 log) and spared all manifestations of light adaptation. These results indicate that hyperpolarizing invertebrate photoreceptors adapt to light, but the underlying mechanisms must utilize pathways that are largely

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Hyperpolarized 13C Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jeremy W.

    Hyperpolarized 13C substrates offer the potential to non-invasively image metabolism and enzymatic activity. However, hyperpolarization introduces a number of difficulties, and imaging is hampered by non-equilibrium magnetization and the need for spectral encoding. There is therefore a need for fast and RF efficient spectral imaging techniques. This work presents a number of new methods that can be used to improve polarization, increase RF efficiency and improve modeling accuracy in hyperpolarized 13C experiments. In particular, a novel encoding and reconstruction algorithm is presented that can generate spatially and spectrally resolved images with a single RF excitation and echo time. This reconstruction framework increases data acquisition efficiency, enabling accelerated acquisition speed, preserved polarization, and/or improved temporal or spatial resolution. Overall, the methods enumerated in this dissertation have the potential to improve modeling accuracy and to mitigate the conventional tradeoffs between SNR, spatial resolution, and temporal resolution that govern image quality in hyperpolarized 13C experiments.

  9. LIGHT-SABRE enables efficient in-magnet catalytic hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, Thomas; Truong, Milton; Coffey, Aaron M.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Warren, Warren S.

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization overcomes the sensitivity limitations of traditional NMR and MRI, but the most general method demonstrated to date (dynamic nuclear polarization) has significant limitations in scalability, cost, and complex apparatus design. As an alternative, signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) of parahydrogen on transition metal catalysts can hyperpolarize a variety of substrates, but to date this scheme has required transfer of the sample to low magnetic field or very strong RF irradiation. Here we demonstrate "Low-Irradiation Generation of High Tesla-SABRE" (LIGHT-SABRE) which works with simple pulse sequences and low power deposition; it should be usable at any magnetic field and for hyperpolarization of many different nuclei. This approach could drastically reduce the cost and complexity of producing hyperpolarized molecules.

  10. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    PubMed Central

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E.J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60 s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance. PMID:26450570

  11. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E. J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-10-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60 s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance.

  12. Hyperpolarized xenon magnetic resonance of the lung and the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind Krishnamachari

    2001-04-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a new diagnostic modality that has been used successfully for lung imaging. Xenon is soluble in blood and inhaled xenon is transported to the brain via circulating blood. Xenon also accumulates in the lipid rich white matter of the brain. Hyperpolarized xenon can hence be used as a tissue- sensitive probe of brain function. The goals of this study were to identify the NMR resonances of xenon in the rat brain and evaluate the role of hyperpolarized xenon for brain MRI. We have developed systems to produce sufficient volumes of hyperpolarized xenon for in vivo brain experiments. The specialized instrumentation developed include an apparatus for optical pump-cell manufacture and high purity gas manifolds for filling cells. A hyperpolarized gas delivery system was designed to ventilate small animals with hyperpolarized xenon for transport to the brain. The T1 of xenon dissolved in blood indicates that the lifetime of xenon in the blood is sufficient for significant magnetization to be transferred to distal tissues. A variety of carrier agents for intravenous delivery of hyperpolarized xenon were tested for transport to distal tissues. Using our new gas delivery system, high SNR 129Xe images of rat lungs were obtained. Spectroscopy with hyperpolarized xenon indicated that xenon was transported from the lungs to the blood and tissues with intact magnetization. After preliminary studies that indicated the feasibility for in vivo rat brain studies, experiments were performed with adult rats and young rats with different stages of white matter development. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments showed the prominence of one peak from xenon in the rat brain, which was assigned to brain lipids. Cerebral brain perfusion was calculated from the wash-out of the hyperpolarized xenon signal in the brain. An increase in brain perfusion during maturation was observed. These experiments showed that hyperpolarized xenon MRI

  13. Hyperpolarized 83Kr MRI of lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Elkins, Nancy D.; Stupic, Karl F.; Repine, John E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr (spin I = 9/2) is a promising gas-phase contrast agent that displays sensitivity to the surface chemistry, surface-to-volume ratio, and surface temperature of the surrounding environment. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates the feasibility of ex vivo hp 83Kr magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lungs using natural abundance krypton gas (11.5% 83Kr) and excised, but otherwise intact, rat lungs located within a custom designed ventilation chamber. Experiments comparing the 83Kr MR signal intensity from lungs to that arising from a balloon with no internal structure inflated to the same volume with krypton gas mixture suggest that most of the observed signal originated from the alveoli and not merely the conducting airways. The 83Kr longitudinal relaxation times in the rat lungs ranged from 0.7 to 3.7 s but were reproducible for a given lung. Although the source of these variations was not explored in this work, hp 83Kr T1 differences may ultimately lead to a novel form of MRI contrast in lungs. The currently obtained 1200-fold signal enhancement for hp 83Kr at 9.4 T field strength is found to be 180 times below the theoretical upper limit.

  14. Quality assurance of PASADENA hyperpolarization for 13C biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Harris, Kent C.; Perman, William H.; Tran, Thao T.; Bhattacharya, Pratip

    2009-01-01

    Object Define MR quality assurance procedures for maximal PASADENA hyperpolarization of a biological 13C molecular imaging reagent. Materials and methods An automated PASADENA polarizer and a parahydrogen generator were installed. 13C enriched hydroxyethyl acrylate, 1-13C, 2,3,3-d3 (HEA), was converted to hyperpolarized hydroxyethyl propionate, 1-13C, 2,3,3-d3 (HEP) and fumaric acid, 1-13C, 2,3-d2 (FUM) to hyperpolarized succinic acid, 1-13C, 2,3-d2 (SUC), by reaction with parahydrogen and norbornadiene rhodium catalyst. Incremental optimization of successive steps in PASADENA was implemented. MR spectra and in vivo images of hyperpolarized 13C imaging agents were acquired at 1.5 and 4.7 T. Results Application of quality assurance (QA) criteria resulted in incremental optimization of the individual steps in PASADENA implementation. Optimal hyperpolarization of HEP of P = 20% was achieved by calibration of the NMR unit of the polarizer (B0 field strength ± 0.002 mT). Mean hyperpolarization of SUC, P = [15.3 ± 1.9]% (N = 16) in D2O, and P = [12.8 ± 3.1]% (N = 12) in H2O, was achieved every 5–8 min (range 13–20%). An in vivo 13C succinate image of a rat was produced. Conclusion PASADENA spin hyperpolarization of SUC to 15.3% in average was demonstrated (37,400 fold signal enhancement at 4.7 T). The biological fate of 13C succinate, a normally occurring cellular intermediate, might be monitored with enhanced sensitivity. PMID:19067009

  15. Hyperpolarized Xenon for NMR and MRI Applications

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Christopher; Kunth, Martin; Döpfert, Jörg; Rossella, Federica; Schröder, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) suffer from intrinsic low sensitivity because even strong external magnetic fields of ~10 T generate only a small detectable net-magnetization of the sample at room temperature 1. Hence, most NMR and MRI applications rely on the detection of molecules at relative high concentration (e.g., water for imaging of biological tissue) or require excessive acquisition times. This limits our ability to exploit the very useful molecular specificity of NMR signals for many biochemical and medical applications. However, novel approaches have emerged in the past few years: Manipulation of the detected spin species prior to detection inside the NMR/MRI magnet can dramatically increase the magnetization and therefore allows detection of molecules at much lower concentration 2. Here, we present a method for polarization of a xenon gas mixture (2-5% Xe, 10% N2, He balance) in a compact setup with a ca. 16000-fold signal enhancement. Modern line-narrowed diode lasers allow efficient polarization 7 and immediate use of gas mixture even if the noble gas is not separated from the other components. The SEOP apparatus is explained and determination of the achieved spin polarization is demonstrated for performance control of the method. The hyperpolarized gas can be used for void space imaging, including gas flow imaging or diffusion studies at the interfaces with other materials 8,9. Moreover, the Xe NMR signal is extremely sensitive to its molecular environment 6. This enables the option to use it as an NMR/MRI contrast agent when dissolved in aqueous solution with functionalized molecular hosts that temporarily trap the gas 10,11. Direct detection and high-sensitivity indirect detection of such constructs is demonstrated in both spectroscopic and imaging mode. PMID:22986346

  16. Towards hyperpolarized 13C-succinate imaging of brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Pratip; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Perman, William H.; Harris, Kent C.; Lin, Alexander P.; Norton, Valerie A.; Tan, Chou T.; Ross, Brian D.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2007-05-01

    We describe a novel 13C enriched precursor molecule, sodium 1- 13C acetylenedicarboxylate, which after hydrogenation by PASADENA (Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allows Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment) under controlled experimental conditions, becomes hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate. Fast in vivo 3D FIESTA MR imaging demonstrated that, following carotid arterial injection, the hyperpolarized 13C-succinate appeared in the head and cerebral circulation of normal and tumor-bearing rats. At this time, no in vivo hyperpolarized signal has been localized to normal brain or brain tumor. On the other hand, ex vivo samples of brain harvested from rats bearing a 9L brain tumor, 1 h or more following in vivo carotid injection of hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate, contained significant concentrations of the injected substrate, 13C sodium succinate, together with 13C maleate and succinate metabolites 1- 13C-glutamate, 5- 13C-glutamate, 1- 13C-glutamine and 5- 13C-glutamine. The 13C substrates and products were below the limits of NMR detection in ex vivo samples of normal brain consistent with an intact blood-brain barrier. These ex vivo results indicate that hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate may become a useful tool for rapid in vivo identification of brain tumors, providing novel biomarkers in 13C MR spectral-spatial images.

  17. Single voxel localization for dynamic hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Albert P.; Cunningham, Charles H.

    2015-09-01

    The PRESS technique has been widely used to achieve voxel localization for in vivo1H MRS acquisitions. However, for dynamic hyperpolarized 13C MRS experiments, the transition bands of the refocusing pulses may saturate the pre-polarized substrate spins flowing into the voxel. This limitation may be overcome by designing refocusing pulses that do not perturb the resonance of the hyperpolarized substrate, but selectively refocuses the spins of the metabolic products. In this study, a PRESS pulse sequence incorporating spectral-spatial refocusing pulses that have a stop band ('notch') at the substrate resonance is tested in vivo using hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Higher metabolite SNR was observed in experiments using the spectral-spatial refocusing pulses as compared to conventional refocusing pulses.

  18. Single voxel localization for dynamic hyperpolarized (13)C MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Albert P; Cunningham, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    The PRESS technique has been widely used to achieve voxel localization for in vivo(1)H MRS acquisitions. However, for dynamic hyperpolarized (13)C MRS experiments, the transition bands of the refocusing pulses may saturate the pre-polarized substrate spins flowing into the voxel. This limitation may be overcome by designing refocusing pulses that do not perturb the resonance of the hyperpolarized substrate, but selectively refocuses the spins of the metabolic products. In this study, a PRESS pulse sequence incorporating spectral-spatial refocusing pulses that have a stop band ('notch') at the substrate resonance is tested in vivo using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. Higher metabolite SNR was observed in experiments using the spectral-spatial refocusing pulses as compared to conventional refocusing pulses. PMID:26232365

  19. Hyperpolarized NMR of plant and cancer cell extracts at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Milani, Jonas; Vuichoud, Basile; Bornet, Aurélien; Lalande-Martin, Julie; Tea, Illa; Yon, Maxime; Maucourt, Mickaël; Deborde, Catherine; Moing, Annick; Frydman, Lucio; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Natural abundance (13)C NMR spectra of biological extracts are recorded in a single scan provided that the samples are hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization combined with cross polarization. Heteronuclear 2D correlation spectra of hyperpolarized breast cancer cell extracts can also be obtained in a single scan. Hyperpolarized NMR of extracts opens many perspectives for metabolomics. PMID:26215673

  20. Transmembrane Exchange of Hyperpolarized 13C-Urea in Human Erythrocytes: Subminute Timescale Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Guilhem; Puckeridge, Max; Liangfeng, Guo; Tan, Yee Ling; Jacob, Chacko; Garland, Marc; Kuchel, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    The rate of exchange of urea across the membranes of human erythrocytes (red blood cells) was quantified on the 1-s to 2-min timescale. 13C-urea was hyperpolarized and subjected to rapid dissolution and the previously reported (partial) resolution of 13C NMR resonances from the molecules inside and outside red blood cells in suspensions was observed. This enabled a stopped-flow type of experiment to measure the (initially) zero-trans transport of urea with sequential single-pulse 13C NMR spectra, every second for up to ∼2 min. Data were analyzed using Bayesian reasoning and a Markov chain Monte Carlo method with a set of simultaneous nonlinear differential equations that described nuclear magnetic relaxation combined with transmembrane exchange. Our results contribute to quantitative understanding of urea-exchange kinetics in the whole body; and the methodological approach is likely to be applicable to other cellular systems and tissues in vivo. PMID:24209840

  1. PASADENA hyperpolarization of 13C biomolecules: equipment design and installation

    PubMed Central

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Harris, Kent C.; Perman, William H.; Robertson, Larry W.; Bhattacharya, Pratip

    2009-01-01

    Object The PASADENA method has achieved hyperpolarization of 16–20% (exceeding 40,000-fold signal enhancement at 4.7 T), in liquid samples of biological molecules relevant to in vivo MRI and MRS. However, there exists no commercial apparatus to perform this experiment conveniently and reproducibly on the routine basis necessary for translation of PASADENA to questions of biomedical importance. The present paper describes equipment designed for rapid production of six to eight liquid samples per hour with high reproducibility of hyperpolarization. Materials and methods Drawing on an earlier, but unpublished, prototype, we provide diagrams of a delivery circuit, a laminar-flow reaction chamber within a low field NMR contained in a compact, movable housing. Assembly instructions are provided from which a computer driven, semiautomated PASADENA polarizer can be constructed. Results Together with an available parahydrogen generator, the polarizer, which can be operated by a single investigator, completes one cycle of hyperpolarization each 52 s. Evidence of efficacy is presented. In contrast to competing, commercially available devices for dynamic nuclear polarization which characteristically require 90 min per cycle, PASADENA provides a low-cost alternative for high throughput. Conclusions This equipment is suited to investigators who have an established small animal NMR and wish to explore the potential of heteronuclear (13C and 15N) MRI, MRS, which harnesses the enormous sensitivity gain offered by hyperpolarization. PMID:19067008

  2. Large Production of Hyperpolarized 129-Xe for MRI Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruset, Iulian; Hersman, F. W.; Distelbrink, Jan; Ketel, Stephen; Covrig, Silviu; Muradian, Iga; Sindile, Adrian

    2007-03-01

    Although 129-Xe was the first hyperpolarized gas to be used in MRI studies, the research community has focused on 3-He, mainly because of the larger quantities of hyperpolarized gas available. Xenon has advantages over helium, such as natural abundance, lower diffusion, and high solubility in blood. It presents a large frequency chemical shift when dissolved in blood, tissue, brain, or trapped in molecular cages. A new design of a high-flow low-pressure spin-exchange optical pumping Rb-Xe polarizer was recently demonstrated by our group. The concept of counterflowing the gas mixture against laser light and dividing the polarizing cell in three operational zones has resulted in an increase with over an order of magnitude in the output magnetization compared with previously reported polarizers. We were able to produce hyperpolarized xenon at 64% polarization for 0.3 liters/hour flow rate and 22% polarization at 6 liters/hour. We also demonstrated a new design of freezing and thawing hyperpolarized xenon with minimum losses. We will present the concept of the high-flow low-pressure counterflowing xenon polarizer, its performance, as well as new optical pumping laser technologies. We will discuss optimization plans for xenon polarizing systems based on experimental observed limitations and theoretical modeling.

  3. Conduction of hyperpolarization along hamster feed arteries: augmentation by acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Geoffrey G; Neild, Timothy O; Segal, Steven S

    2002-07-01

    The conduction of vasodilation along resistance vessels has been presumed to reflect the electrotonic spread of hyperpolarization from cell to cell along the vessel wall through gap junction channels. However, the vasomotor response to acetylcholine (ACh) encompasses greater distances than can be explained by passive decay. To investigate the underlying mechanism for this behavior, we tested the hypothesis that ACh augments the conduction of hyperpolarization. Feed arteries (n = 23; diameter, 58 +/- 4 microm; segment length, 2-8 mm) were isolated from the hamster retractor muscle, cannulated at each end, and pressurized to 75 mmHg (at 37 degrees C). Vessels were impaled with one or two dye-containing microelectrodes simultaneously (separation distance, 50 microm to 3.5 mm). Membrane potential (E(m)) (rest, approximately -30 mV) and electrical responses were similar between endothelium and smooth muscle, as predicted for robust myoendothelial coupling. Current injection (-0.8 nA, 1.5 s) evoked hyperpolarization (-10 +/- 1 mV; membrane time constant, 240 ms) that conducted along the vessel with a length constant (lambda) = 1.2 +/- 0.1 mm; spontaneous E(m) oscillations (approximately 1 Hz) decayed with lambda = 1.2 + 0.1 mm. In contrast, ACh microiontophoresis (500 nA, 500 ms, 1 microm tip) evoked hyperpolarization (-14 +/- 2 mV) that conducted with lambda = 1.9 +/- 0.1 mm, 60% further (P < 0.05) than responses evoked by purely electrical stimuli. These findings indicate that ACh augments the conduction of hyperpolarization along the vessel wall. PMID:12063280

  4. Propane-d6 Heterogeneously Hyperpolarized by Parahydrogen

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived spin states of hyperpolarized propane-d6 gas were demonstrated following pairwise addition of parahydrogen gas to propene-d6 using heterogeneous parahydrogen-induced polarization (HET-PHIP). Hyperpolarized molecules were synthesized using Rh/TiO2 solid catalyst with 1.6 nm Rh nanoparticles. Hyperpolarized (PH ∼ 1%) propane-d6 was detected at high magnetic field (9.4 T) spectroscopically and by high-resolution 3D gradient-echo MRI (4.7 T) as the gas flowed through the radiofrequency coil with a spatial and temporal resolution of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm3 and 17.7 s, respectively. Stopped-flow hyperpolarized propane-d6 gas was also detected at 0.0475 T with an observed nuclear spin polarization of PH ∼ 0.1% and a relatively long lifetime with T1,eff = 6.0 ± 0.3 s. Importantly, it was shown that the hyperpolarized protons of the deuterated product obtained via pairwise parahydrogen addition could be detected directly at low magnetic field. Importantly, the relatively long low-field T1,eff of HP propane-d6 gas is not susceptible to paramagnetic impurities as tested by exposure to ∼0.2 atm oxygen. This long lifetime and nontoxic nature of propane gas could be useful for bioimaging applications including potentially pulmonary low-field MRI. The feasibility of high-resolution low-field 2D gradient-echo MRI was demonstrated with 0.88 × 0.88 mm2 spatial and ∼0.7 s temporal resolution, respectively, at 0.0475 T. PMID:25506406

  5. Chloride dependence of hyperpolarization-activated chloride channel gates.

    PubMed

    Pusch, M; Jordt, S E; Stein, V; Jentsch, T J

    1999-03-01

    1. ClC proteins are a class of voltage-dependent Cl- channels with several members mutated in human diseases. The prototype ClC-0 Torpedo channel is a dimeric protein; each subunit forms a pore that can gate independently from the other one. A common slower gating mechanism acts on both pores simultaneously; slow gating activates ClC-0 at hyperpolarized voltages. The ClC-2 Cl- channel is also activated by hyperpolarization, as are some ClC-1 mutants (e.g. D136G) and wild-type (WT) ClC-1 at certain pH values. 2. We studied the dependence on internal Cl- ([Cl-]i) of the hyperpolarization-activated gates of several ClC channels (WT ClC-0, ClC-0 mutant P522G, ClC-1 mutant D136G and an N-terminal deletion mutant of ClC-2), by patch clamping channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 3. With all these channels, reducing [Cl-]i shifted activation to more negative voltages and reduced the maximal activation at most negative voltages. 4. We also investigated the external halide dependence of WT ClC-2 using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording. Reducing external Cl- ([Cl-]o) activated ClC-2 currents. Replacing [Cl-]o by the less permeant Br- reduced channel activity and accelerated deactivation. 5. Gating of the ClC-2 mutant K566Q in normal [Cl-]o resembled that of WT ClC-2 in low [Cl-]o, i.e. channels had a considerable open probability (Po) at resting membrane potential. Substituting external Cl- by Br- or I- led to a decrease in Po. 6. The [Cl-]i dependence of the hyperpolarization-activated gates of various ClC channels suggests a similar gating mechanism, and raises the possibility that the gating charge for the hyperpolarization-activated gate is provided by Cl-. 7. The external halide dependence of hyperpolarization-activated gating of ClC-2 suggests that it is mediated or modulated by anions as in other ClC channels. In contrast to the depolarization-activated fast gates of ClC-0 and ClC-1, the absence of Cl- favours channel opening. Lysine 556 may be important for the

  6. Open-Source Automated Parahydrogen Hyperpolarizer for Molecular Imaging Using (13)C Metabolic Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aaron M; Shchepin, Roman V; Truong, Milton L; Wilkens, Ken; Pham, Wellington; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-08-16

    An open-source hyperpolarizer producing (13)C hyperpolarized contrast agents using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) for biomedical and other applications is presented. This PHIP hyperpolarizer utilizes an Arduino microcontroller in conjunction with a readily modified graphical user interface written in the open-source processing software environment to completely control the PHIP hyperpolarization process including remotely triggering an NMR spectrometer for efficient production of payloads of hyperpolarized contrast agent and in situ quality assurance of the produced hyperpolarization. Key advantages of this hyperpolarizer include: (i) use of open-source software and hardware seamlessly allowing for replication and further improvement as well as readily customizable integration with other NMR spectrometers or MRI scanners (i.e., this is a multiplatform design), (ii) relatively low cost and robustness, and (iii) in situ detection capability and complete automation. The device performance is demonstrated by production of a dose (∼2-3 mL) of hyperpolarized (13)C-succinate with %P13C ∼ 28% and 30 mM concentration and (13)C-phospholactate at %P13C ∼ 15% and 25 mM concentration in aqueous medium. These contrast agents are used for ultrafast molecular imaging and spectroscopy at 4.7 and 0.0475 T. In particular, the conversion of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate to (13)C-lactate in vivo is used here to demonstrate the feasibility of ultrafast multislice (13)C MRI after tail vein injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate in mice. PMID:27478927

  7. SU-E-J-120: Comparing 4D CT Computed Ventilation to Lung Function Measured with Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, B; Chen, Q

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To correlate ventilation parameters computed from 4D CT to ventilation, profusion, and gas exchange measured with hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI for a set of lung cancer patients. Methods: Hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI lung scans were acquired for lung cancer patients, before and after radiation therapy, measuring ventilation, perfusion, and gas exchange. In the standard clinical workflow, these patients also received 4D CT scans before treatment. Ventilation was computed from 4D CT using deformable image registration (DIR). All phases of the 4D CT scan were registered using a B-spline deformable registration. Ventilation at the voxel level was then computed for each phase based on a Jacobian volume expansion metric, yielding phase sorted ventilation images. Ventilation based upon 4D CT and Xe-129 MRI were co-registered, allowing qualitative visual comparison and qualitative comparison via the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Analysis shows a weak correlation between hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI and 4D CT DIR ventilation, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.17 to 0.22. Further work will refine the DIR parameters to optimize the correlation. The weak correlation could be due to the limitations of 4D CT, registration algorithms, or the Xe-129 MRI imaging. Continued development will refine parameters to optimize correlation. Conclusion: Current analysis yields a minimal correlation between 4D CT DIR and Xe-129 MRI ventilation. Funding provided by the 2014 George Amorino Pilot Grant in Radiation Oncology at the University of Virginia.

  8. Physiological response of rats to delivery of helium and xenon: implications for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, M. P.; Sigaloff, K. C.; Kubatina, L. V.; Donahue, M. A.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; ALbert, M. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The physiological effects of various hyperpolarized helium and xenon MRI-compatible breathing protocols were investigated in 17 Sprague-Dawley rats, by continuous monitoring of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, EKG, temperature and endotracheal pressure. The protocols included alternating breaths of pure noble gas and oxygen, continuous breaths of pure noble gas, breath-holds of pure noble gas for varying durations, and helium breath-holds preceded by two helium rinses. Alternate-breath protocols up to 128 breaths caused a decrease in oxygen saturation level of less than 5% for either helium or xenon, whereas 16 continuous-breaths caused a 31.5% +/- 2.3% decrease in oxygen saturation for helium and a 30.7% +/- 1. 3% decrease for xenon. Breath-hold protocols up to 25 s did not cause the oxygen saturation to fall below 90% for either of the noble gases. Oxygen saturation values below 90% are considered pathological. At 30 s of breath-hold, the blood oxygen saturation dropped precipitously to 82% +/- 0.6% for helium, and to 76.5% +/- 7. 4% for xenon. Breath-holds longer than 10 s preceded by pre-rinses caused oxygen saturation to drop below 90%. These findings demonstrate the need for standardized noble gas inhalation procedures that have been carefully tested, and for continuous physiological monitoring to ensure the safety of the subject. We find short breath-hold and alternate-breath protocols to be safe procedures for use in hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance as a Sensitive Detector of Metabolic Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance allows for noninvasive measurements of biochemical reactions in vivo. Although this technique provides a unique tool for assaying enzymatic activities in intact organs, the scope of its application is still elusive for the wider scientific community. The purpose of this review is to provide key principles and parameters to guide the researcher interested in adopting this technology to address a biochemical, biomedical, or medical issue. It is presented in the form of a compendium containing the underlying essential physical concepts as well as suggestions to help assess the potential of the technique within the framework of specific research environments. Explicit examples are used to illustrate the power as well as the limitations of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance. PMID:25369537

  10. Sampling Hyperpolarized Molecules Utilizing a 1 Tesla Permanent Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Sui Seng; DiGialleonardo, Valentina; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Jeong, Sangmoo; Granlund, Kristin L.; Miloushev, Vesselin; Poot, Alex J.; Truong, Steven; Alvarez, Julio A.; Aldeborgh, Hannah N.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP MRS) using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique that has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting 13C nuclei. However, the HP MRS polarization decays in the liquid state according to the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the nucleus. Sampling of the signal also destroys polarization, resulting in a limited temporal ability to observe biologically interesting reactions. In this study, we demonstrate that sampling hyperpolarized signals using a permanent magnet at 1 Tesla (1T) is a simple and cost-effective method to increase T1s without sacrificing signal-to-noise. Biologically-relevant information may be obtained with a permanent magnet using enzyme solutions and in whole cells. Of significance, our findings indicate that changes in pyruvate metabolism can also be quantified in a xenograft model at this field strength. PMID:27597137

  11. Sampling Hyperpolarized Molecules Utilizing a 1 Tesla Permanent Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Tee, Sui Seng; DiGialleonardo, Valentina; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Jeong, Sangmoo; Granlund, Kristin L; Miloushev, Vesselin; Poot, Alex J; Truong, Steven; Alvarez, Julio A; Aldeborgh, Hannah N; Keshari, Kayvan R

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP MRS) using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique that has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting (13)C nuclei. However, the HP MRS polarization decays in the liquid state according to the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the nucleus. Sampling of the signal also destroys polarization, resulting in a limited temporal ability to observe biologically interesting reactions. In this study, we demonstrate that sampling hyperpolarized signals using a permanent magnet at 1 Tesla (1T) is a simple and cost-effective method to increase T1s without sacrificing signal-to-noise. Biologically-relevant information may be obtained with a permanent magnet using enzyme solutions and in whole cells. Of significance, our findings indicate that changes in pyruvate metabolism can also be quantified in a xenograft model at this field strength. PMID:27597137

  12. Molecular imaging using a targeted magnetic resonance hyperpolarized biosensor.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Leif; Lowery, Thomas J; Hilty, Christian; Wemmer, David E; Pines, Alexander

    2006-10-20

    A magnetic resonance approach is presented that enables high-sensitivity, high-contrast molecular imaging by exploiting xenon biosensors. These sensors link xenon atoms to specific biomolecular targets, coupling the high sensitivity of hyperpolarized nuclei with the specificity of biochemical interactions. We demonstrated spatial resolution of a specific target protein in vitro at micromolar concentration, with a readout scheme that reduces the required acquisition time by >3300-fold relative to direct detection. This technique uses the signal of free hyperpolarized xenon to dramatically amplify the sensor signal via chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). Because it is approximately 10,000 times more sensitive than previous CEST methods and other molecular magnetic resonance imaging techniques, it marks a critical step toward the application of xenon biosensors as selective contrast agents in biomedical applications. PMID:17053143

  13. Optical hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in nanodiamond ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical nuclear polarization holds the key for orders of magnitude enhancements of nuclear magnetic resonance signals which, in turn, would enable a wide range of novel applications in biomedical sciences. However, current implementations of DNP require cryogenic temperatures and long times for achieving high polarization. Here we propose and analyze in detail protocols that can achieve rapid hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in randomly oriented ensembles of nanodiamonds at room temperature. Our protocols exploit a combination of optical polarization of electron spins in nitrogen-vacancy centers and the transfer of this polarization to 13C nuclei by means of microwave control to overcome the severe challenges that are posed by the random orientation of the nanodiamonds and their nitrogen-vacancy centers. Specifically, these random orientations result in exceedingly large energy variations of the electron spin levels that render the polarization and coherent control of the nitrogen-vacancy center electron spins as well as the control of their coherent interaction with the surrounding 13C nuclear spins highly inefficient. We address these challenges by a combination of an off-resonant microwave double resonance scheme in conjunction with a realization of the integrated solid effect which, together with adiabatic rotations of external magnetic fields or rotations of nanodiamonds, leads to a protocol that achieves high levels of hyperpolarization of the entire nuclear-spin bath in a randomly oriented ensemble of nanodiamonds even at room temperature. This hyperpolarization together with the long nuclear-spin polarization lifetimes in nanodiamonds and the relatively high density of 13C nuclei has the potential to result in a major signal enhancement in 13C nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and suggests functionalized and hyperpolarized nanodiamonds as a unique probe for molecular imaging both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. A hyperpolarization-activated ion current of amphibian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-de la Paz, L D; Salazar-Soto, D B; Reyes, J P; Miledi, R; Martinez-Torres, A

    2013-08-01

    A comparative analysis of a hyperpolarization-activated ion current present in amphibian oocytes was performed using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique in Xenopus laevis, Xenopus tropicalis, and Ambystoma mexicanum. This current appears to be driven mainly by Cl(-) ions, is independent of Ca(2+), and is made evident by applying extremely negative voltage pulses; it shows a slow activating phase and little or no desensitization. The pharmacological profile of the current is complex. The different channel blocker used for Cl(-), K(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) conductances, exhibited various degrees of inhibition depending of the species. The profiles illustrate the intricacy of the components that give rise to this current. During X. laevis oogenesis, the hyperpolarization-activated current is present at all stages of oocytes tested (II-VI), and the amplitude of the current increases from about 50 nA in stage I to more than 1 μA in stage VI; nevertheless, there was no apparent modification of the kinetics. Our results suggest that the hyperpolarization-activated current is present both in order Anura and Urodela oocytes. However, the electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics are quite perplexing and seem to suggest a mixture of ionic conductances that includes the activation of both anionic and cationic channels, most probably transiently opened due to the extreme hyperpolarizion of the plasma membrane. As a possible mechanism for the generation of the current, a kinetic model which fits the data suggests the opening of pores in the plasma membrane whose ion selectivity is dependent on the extracellular Cl(-) concentration. The extreme voltage conditions could induce the opening of otherwise latent pores in plasma membrane proteins (i.e., carriers), resembling the ´slippage´ events already described for some carriers. These observations should be valuable for other groups trying to express cloned, voltage-dependent ion channels in oocytes of

  15. Combustion resistance of the 129Xe hyperpolarized nuclear spin state.

    PubMed

    Stupic, Karl F; Six, Joseph S; Olsen, Michael D; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Using a methane-xenon mixture for spin exchange optical pumping, MRI of combustion was enabled. The (129)Xe hyperpolarized nuclear spin state was found to sufficiently survive the complete passage through the harsh environment of the reaction zone. A velocity profile (V(z)(z)) of a flame was recorded to demonstrate the feasibility of MRI velocimetry of transport processes in combustors. PMID:23165418

  16. The Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Hyperpolarized 89Y Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Ashish; Lumata, Lloyd; Xing, Yixun; Merritt, Matthew; Zhao, Piyu; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, Dean; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2011-03-01

    The low sensitivity of NMR can be overcome by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). However, a limitation to the use of hyperpolarized materials is the signal decay due to T1 relaxation. Among NMR-active nuclei, 89 Y is potentially valuable in medical imaging because in chelated form, pH-sensitive agents can be developed. 89 Y also offers many attractive features -- 100 % abundance, a 1/2 spin, and a long T1 , up to 10 min. Yet, developing new 89 Y complexes with even longer T1 values is desirable. Designing such complexes relies upon understanding the mechanism(s) responsible for T1 relaxation. We report an approach to hyperpolarized T1 measurements that enabled an analysis of relaxation mechanisms by selective deuteration of the ligand backbone, the solvent or both. Hyperpolarized 89 Y -- DTPA, DOTA, EDTA, and deuterated EDTA complexes were studied. Results suggest that substitution of low-gamma nuclei on the ligand backbone as opposed to that of the solvent most effectively increase the 89 Y T1 . These results are encouraging for in vivo applications as the presence of bound water may not dramatically affect the T1 .

  17. Constant-variable flip angles for hyperpolarized media MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, He; Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Chen, Xian; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-02-01

    The longitudinal magnetization of hyperpolarized media, such as hyperpolarized 129Xe, 3He, etc., is nonrenewable. When the MRI data acquisition begins at the k-domain center, a constant flip angle (CFA) results in an image of high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) but sacrifices the accuracy of spatial information. On the other hand, a variable flip angle (VFA) strategy results in high accuracy but suffers from a low SNR. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme to optimize both the SNR and accuracy, called constant-variable flip angles (CVFA). The proposed scheme suggests that hyperpolarized magnetic resonance signals are firstly acquired through a train of n∗ CFA excitation pulses, followed by a train of N-n∗ VFA excitation pulses. We simulate and optimize the flip angle used in the CFA section, the number of CFA excitation pulses, the number of VFA excitation pulses, and the initial and final variable flip angles adopted in the VFA section. Phantom and in vivo experiments demonstrate the good performance of the CVFA designs and their ability to maintain both high SNR and spatial resolution.

  18. Probing lung microstructure with hyperpolarized 3He gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Sukstanskii, Alexander L; Quirk, James D; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that gradient echo MRI with hyperpolarized (3)He gas can be used for simultaneously extracting in vivo information about lung ventilation properties, alveolar geometrical parameters, and blood vessel network structure. This new approach is based on multi-gradient-echo experimental measurements of hyperpolarized (3)He gas MRI signal from human lungs and a proposed theoretical model of this signal. Based on computer simulations of (3)He atoms diffusing in the acinar airway tree in the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field induced by the susceptibility differences between lung tissue (alveolar septa, blood vessels) and lung airspaces, we derive analytical expressions relating the time-dependent MR signal to the geometrical parameters of acinar airways and the blood vessel network. Data obtained on eight healthy volunteers are in good agreement with literature values. This information is complementary to the information obtained by means of the in vivo lung morphometry technique with hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI previously developed by our group, and opens new opportunities to study lung microstructure in health and disease. PMID:24920182

  19. Time resolved spectroscopic NMR imaging using hyperpolarized 129Xe.

    PubMed

    Han, S; Kühn, H; Häsing, F W; Münnemann, K; Blümich, B; Appelt, S

    2004-04-01

    We have visualized the melting and dissolution processes of xenon (Xe) ice into different solvents using the methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, imaging, and time resolved spectroscopic imaging by means of hyperpolarized 129Xe. Starting from the initial condition of a hyperpolarized solid Xe layer frozen on top of an ethanol (ethanol/water) ice block we measured the Xe phase transitions as a function of time and temperature. In the pure ethanol sample, pieces of Xe ice first fall through the viscous ethanol to the bottom of the sample tube and then form a thin layer of liquid Xe/ethanol. The xenon atoms are trapped in this liquid layer up to room temperature and keep their magnetization over a time period of 11 min. In the ethanol/water mixture (80 vol%/20%), most of the polarized Xe liquid first stays on top of the ethanol/water ice block and then starts to penetrate into the pores and cracks of the ethanol/water ice block. In the final stage, nearly all the Xe polarization is in the gas phase above the liquid and trapped inside the pores. NMR spectra of homogeneous samples of pure ethanol containing thermally polarized Xe and the spectroscopic images of the melting process show that very high concentrations of hyperpolarized Xe (about half of the density of liquid Xe) can be stored or delivered in pure ethanol. PMID:15040986

  20. Quantitative Assessment of Lung Using Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Kiarash; Stephen, Michael; Kadlecek, Stephen; Cadman, Robert V.; Ishii, Masaru; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2009-01-01

    Improvements in the quantitative assessment of structure, function, and metabolic activity in the lung, combined with improvements in the spatial resolution of those assessments, enhance the diagnosis and evaluation of pulmonary disorders. Radiologic methods are among the most attractive techniques for the comprehensive assessment of the lung, as they allow quantitative assessment of this organ through measurements of a number of structural, functional, and metabolic parameters. Hyperpolarized nuclei magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has opened up new territories for the quantitative assessment of lung function and structure with an unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity. This review article presents a survey of recent developments in the field of pulmonary imaging using hyperpolarized nuclei MRI for quantitative imaging of different aspects of the lung, as well as preclinical applications of these techniques to diagnose and evaluate specific pulmonary diseases. After presenting a brief overview of various hyperpolarization techniques, this survey divides the research activities of the field into four broad areas: lung microstructure, ventilation, oxygenation, and perfusion. Finally, it discusses the challenges currently faced by researchers in this field to translate this rich body of methodology into wider-scale clinical applications. PMID:19687215

  1. Phagocytic activity and hyperpolarizing responses in L-strain mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Y; Tsuchiya, W; Yada, T; Yano, J; Yawo, H

    1981-01-01

    1. Fibroblastic L cells not only respond with a slow hyperpolarizing potential change to a mechanical or electrical stimulus but also show spontaneous, repetitive hyperpolarizations (i.e. membrane potential oscillation). 2. Almost all the cells can actively take up latex beads whose surfaces were treated by U.V. irradiation. 3. Non-phagocytic L cells hardly showed hyperpolarizing responses, while hyperpolarizing responses were obtained in all the phagocytic L cells. The exposure of the cell surface to beads, however, did not trigger the generation of hyperpolarizing responses. 4. Metabolic inhibitors, low temperature and cytochalasin B inhibited both the uptake of beads and the hyperpolarizing responses. 5. Increasing the external concentration of Ca2+ induced a remarkable stimulation of the phagocytosis of beads. Mg2+ and Ba2+, which inhibited hyperpolarizing responses due to competition for Ca2+ sites on the outer surface of the membrane, significantly suppressed the uptake of beads. 6. Verapamil, a Ca2+ channel blocker, inhibited not only hyperpolarizing membrane responses but also ingestion of beads. 7. It is concluded that the Ca2+ inflow on the hyperpolarizing membrane responses is closely associated with the phagocytic activity in L cells, probably through activation of the microfilament assembly. Images Plate 1 PMID:7024506

  2. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B; Mewis, Ryan E; Highton, Louise A R; Kenny, Stephen M; Green, Gary G R; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all ¹H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10⁻³ Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application. PMID:24336292

  3. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10−3 Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application. PMID:24336292

  4. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10-3 Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  5. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI: A Viable Functional Lung Imaging Modality?

    PubMed Central

    Patz, Samuel; Hersman, F. William; Muradian, Iga; Hrovat, Mirko I.; Ruset, Iulian C.; Ketel, Stephen; Jacobson, Francine; Topulos, George P.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Butler, James P.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of researchers investigating hyperpolarized gas MRI as a candidate functional lung imaging modality have used 3He as their imaging agent of choice rather than 129Xe. This preference has been predominantly due to, 3He providing stronger signals due to higher levels of polarization and higher gyromagnetic ratio, as well as its being easily available to more researchers due to availability of polarizers (USA) or ease of gas transport (Europe). Most researchers agree, however, that hyperpolarized 129Xe will ultimately emerge as the imaging agent of choice due to its unlimited supply in nature and its falling cost. Our recent polarizer technology delivers vast improvements in hyperpolarized 129Xe output. Using this polarizer, we have demonstrated the unique property of xenon to measure alveolar surface area noninvasively. In this article, we describe our human protocols and their safety, and our results for the measurement of the partial pressure of pulmonary oxygen (pO2) by observation of 129Xe signal decay. We note that the measurement of pO2 by observation of 129Xe signal decay is more complex than that for 3He because of an additional signal loss mechanism due to interphase diffusion of 129Xe from alveolar gas spaces to septal tissue. This results in measurements of an equivalent pO2 that accounts for both traditional T1 decay from pO2 and that from interphase diffusion. We also provide an update on new technological advancements that form the foundation for an improved compact design polarizer as well as improvements that provide another order-of-magnitude scale-up in xenon polarizer output. PMID:17890035

  6. Chemical shift of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.

    2002-01-01

    We report NMR measurements of hyperpolarized xenon dissolved in liquid nitrogen. The dependence of the 129Xe frequency shift on liquid nitrogen temperature was measured along the nitrogen saturated vapor curve from 77 to 93 K. Plotted as a function of the liquid nitrogen density, the chemical shift of xenon is very well described by a simple proportionality relation, with a slope of 0.2135(15) ppm/amagat. The relationship between the chemical shift and the longitudinal spin relaxation is considered in terms of the spin-rotation interaction, and estimates of Xe relaxation time in liquid nitrogen are discussed.

  7. Transport and imaging of brute-force (13)C hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Smith, Bryce A; Mattingly, Mark; Goloshevsky, Artem G; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate transport of hyperpolarized frozen 1-(13)C pyruvic acid from its site of production to a nearby facility, where a time series of (13)C images was acquired from the aqueous dissolution product. Transportability is tied to the hyperpolarization (HP) method we employ, which omits radical electron species used in other approaches that would otherwise relax away the HP before reaching the imaging center. In particular, we attained (13)C HP by 'brute-force', i.e., using only low temperature and high-field (e.g., T<∼2K and B∼14T) to pre-polarize protons to a large Boltzmann value (∼0.4% (1)H polarization). After polarizing the neat, frozen sample, ejection quickly (<1s) passed it through a low field (B<100G) to establish the (1)H pre-polarization spin temperature on (13)C via the process known as low-field thermal mixing (yielding ∼0.1% (13)C polarization). By avoiding polarization agents (a.k.a. relaxation agents) that are needed to hyperpolarize by the competing method of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP), the (13)C relaxation time was sufficient to transport the sample for ∼10min before finally dissolving in warm water and obtaining a (13)C image of the hyperpolarized, dilute, aqueous product (∼0.01% (13)C polarization, a >100-fold gain over thermal signals in the 1T scanner). An annealing step, prior to polarizing the sample, was also key for increasing T1∼30-fold during transport. In that time, HP was maintained using only modest cryogenics and field (T∼60K and B=1.3T), for T1((13)C) near 5min. Much greater time and distance (with much smaller losses) may be covered using more-complete annealing and only slight improvements on transport conditions (e.g., yielding T1∼5h at 30K, 2T), whereas even intercity transfer is possible (T1>20h) at reasonable conditions of 6K and 2T. Finally, it is possible to increase the overall enhancement near d-DNP levels (i.e., 10(2)-fold more) by polarizing below 100mK, where nanoparticle

  8. Transport and imaging of brute-force 13C hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Smith, Bryce A.; Mattingly, Mark; Goloshevsky, Artem G.; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate transport of hyperpolarized frozen 1-13C pyruvic acid from its site of production to a nearby facility, where a time series of 13C images was acquired from the aqueous dissolution product. Transportability is tied to the hyperpolarization (HP) method we employ, which omits radical electron species used in other approaches that would otherwise relax away the HP before reaching the imaging center. In particular, we attained 13C HP by 'brute-force', i.e., using only low temperature and high-field (e.g., T < ∼2 K and B ∼ 14 T) to pre-polarize protons to a large Boltzmann value (∼0.4% 1H polarization). After polarizing the neat, frozen sample, ejection quickly (<1 s) passed it through a low field (B < 100 G) to establish the 1H pre-polarization spin temperature on 13C via the process known as low-field thermal mixing (yielding ∼0.1% 13C polarization). By avoiding polarization agents (a.k.a. relaxation agents) that are needed to hyperpolarize by the competing method of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP), the 13C relaxation time was sufficient to transport the sample for ∼10 min before finally dissolving in warm water and obtaining a 13C image of the hyperpolarized, dilute, aqueous product (∼0.01% 13C polarization, a >100-fold gain over thermal signals in the 1 T scanner). An annealing step, prior to polarizing the sample, was also key for increasing T1 ∼ 30-fold during transport. In that time, HP was maintained using only modest cryogenics and field (T ∼ 60 K and B = 1.3 T), for T1(13C) near 5 min. Much greater time and distance (with much smaller losses) may be covered using more-complete annealing and only slight improvements on transport conditions (e.g., yielding T1 ∼ 5 h at 30 K, 2 T), whereas even intercity transfer is possible (T1 > 20 h) at reasonable conditions of 6 K and 2 T. Finally, it is possible to increase the overall enhancement near d-DNP levels (i.e., 102-fold more) by polarizing below 100 mK, where

  9. Hyperpolarized (6)Li as a probe for hemoglobin oxygenation level.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Riccardo; Mishkovsky, Mor; Simonenko, Yana; van Heeswijk, Ruud B; Gruetter, Rolf; Eliav, Uzi; Navon, Gil; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a versatile technique to dramatically enhance the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal intensity of insensitive long-T1 nuclear spins such as (6)Li. The (6)Li longitudinal relaxation of lithium ions in aqueous solutions strongly depends on the concentration of paramagnetic species, even if they are present in minute amounts. We herein demonstrate that blood oxygenation can be readily detected by taking advantage of the (6)Li signal enhancement provided by dissolution DNP, together with the more than 10% decrease in (6)Li longitudinal relaxation as a consequence of the presence of paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin. PMID:26265292

  10. Spin Relaxation in Hyperpolarized He-3 Fermi Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Bedell, Kevin

    2004-03-01

    In the past few years, attention has been drawn towards the hyperpolarized gases of Xenon-129 and Helium-3 isotopes. Medical research has explored the possibilities of using these isotopes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs in both human and animal test subjects. Because the atoms of hyperpolarized gas are forced into a specific spin state, the MRI signal is enhanced. While the spin relaxation times of Helium-3 can be calculated in the high and low temperature limits, there exists no exact analytic solution for intermediate temperatures. The intention of this research was to numerically connect these limits with an accurate approximation. To do this, various analytic and numerical methods were used to reduce the spin relaxation time to a function of temperature, chemical potential, and particle number. Additional numerical methods were then used to calculate the chemical potential of Helium-3. The data show that a minimum occurs in the spin relaxation time at the order of the Fermi temperature, after which the classical limit is rapidly approached. These computational results seem to coincide with those expected.

  11. Observing and preventing rubidium runaway in a direct-infusion xenon-spin hyperpolarizer optimized for high-resolution hyper-CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer using hyperpolarized nuclei) NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, C.; Kunth, M.; Rossella, F.; Schröder, L.

    2014-02-01

    Xenon is well known to undergo host-guest interactions with proteins and synthetic molecules. As xenon can also be hyperpolarized by spin exchange optical pumping, allowing the investigation of highly dilute systems, it makes an ideal nuclear magnetic resonance probe for such host molecules. The utility of xenon as a probe can be further improved using Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer using hyperpolarized nuclei (Hyper-CEST), but for highly accurate experiments requires a polarizer and xenon infusion system optimized for such measurements. We present the design of a hyperpolarizer and xenon infusion system specifically designed to meet the requirements of Hyper-CEST measurements. One key element of this design is preventing rubidium runaway, a chain reaction induced by laser heating that prevents efficient utilization of high photon densities. Using thermocouples positioned along the pumping cell we identify the sources of heating and conditions for rubidium runaway to occur. We then demonstrate the effectiveness of actively cooling the optical cell to prevent rubidium runaway in a compact setup. This results in a 2-3-fold higher polarization than without cooling, allowing us to achieve a polarization of 25% at continuous flow rates of 9 ml/min of 129Xe. The simplicity of this design also allows it to be retrofitted to many existing polarizers. Combined with a direction infusion system that reduces shot-to-shot noise down to 0.56% we have captured Hyper-CEST spectra in unprecedented detail, allowing us to completely resolve peaks separated by just 1.62 ppm. Due to its high polarization and excellent stability, our design allows the comparison of underlying theories of host-guest systems with experiment at low concentrations, something extremely difficult with previous polarizers.

  12. Observing and preventing rubidium runaway in a direct-infusion xenon-spin hyperpolarizer optimized for high-resolution hyper-CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer using hyperpolarized nuclei) NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, C.; Kunth, M.; Rossella, F.; Schröder, L.

    2014-02-28

    Xenon is well known to undergo host-guest interactions with proteins and synthetic molecules. As xenon can also be hyperpolarized by spin exchange optical pumping, allowing the investigation of highly dilute systems, it makes an ideal nuclear magnetic resonance probe for such host molecules. The utility of xenon as a probe can be further improved using Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer using hyperpolarized nuclei (Hyper-CEST), but for highly accurate experiments requires a polarizer and xenon infusion system optimized for such measurements. We present the design of a hyperpolarizer and xenon infusion system specifically designed to meet the requirements of Hyper-CEST measurements. One key element of this design is preventing rubidium runaway, a chain reaction induced by laser heating that prevents efficient utilization of high photon densities. Using thermocouples positioned along the pumping cell we identify the sources of heating and conditions for rubidium runaway to occur. We then demonstrate the effectiveness of actively cooling the optical cell to prevent rubidium runaway in a compact setup. This results in a 2–3-fold higher polarization than without cooling, allowing us to achieve a polarization of 25% at continuous flow rates of 9 ml/min of {sup 129}Xe. The simplicity of this design also allows it to be retrofitted to many existing polarizers. Combined with a direction infusion system that reduces shot-to-shot noise down to 0.56% we have captured Hyper-CEST spectra in unprecedented detail, allowing us to completely resolve peaks separated by just 1.62 ppm. Due to its high polarization and excellent stability, our design allows the comparison of underlying theories of host-guest systems with experiment at low concentrations, something extremely difficult with previous polarizers.

  13. Molecular hydrogen and catalytic combustion in the production of hyperpolarized 83Kr and 129Xe MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicola J; Hill-Casey, Fraser; Stupic, Karl F; Six, Joseph S; Lesbats, Clémentine; Rigby, Sean P; Fraissard, Jacques; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2016-03-22

    Hyperpolarized (hp) (83)Kr is a promising MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases affecting the surface of the respiratory zone. However, the distinct physical properties of (83)Kr that enable unique MRI contrast also complicate the production of hp (83)Kr. This work presents a previously unexplored approach in the generation of hp (83)Kr that can likewise be used for the production of hp (129)Xe. Molecular nitrogen, typically used as buffer gas in spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP), was replaced by molecular hydrogen without penalty for the achievable hyperpolarization. In this particular study, the highest obtained nuclear spin polarizations were P =29% for(83)Kr and P= 63% for (129)Xe. The results were reproduced over many SEOP cycles despite the laser-induced on-resonance formation of rubidium hydride (RbH). Following SEOP, the H2 was reactively removed via catalytic combustion without measurable losses in hyperpolarized spin state of either (83)Kr or (129)Xe. Highly spin-polarized (83)Kr can now be purified for the first time, to our knowledge, to provide high signal intensity for the advancement of in vivo hp (83)Kr MRI. More generally, a chemical reaction appears as a viable alternative to the cryogenic separation process, the primary purification method of hp(129)Xe for the past 2 1/2 decades. The inherent simplicity of the combustion process will facilitate hp (129)Xe production and should allow for on-demand continuous flow of purified and highly spin-polarized (129)Xe. PMID:26961001

  14. Molecular hydrogen and catalytic combustion in the production of hyperpolarized 83Kr and 129Xe MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Nicola J.; Hill-Casey, Fraser; Stupic, Karl F.; Six, Joseph S.; Lesbats, Clémentine; Rigby, Sean P.; Fraissard, Jacques; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr is a promising MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases affecting the surface of the respiratory zone. However, the distinct physical properties of 83Kr that enable unique MRI contrast also complicate the production of hp 83Kr. This work presents a previously unexplored approach in the generation of hp 83Kr that can likewise be used for the production of hp 129Xe. Molecular nitrogen, typically used as buffer gas in spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP), was replaced by molecular hydrogen without penalty for the achievable hyperpolarization. In this particular study, the highest obtained nuclear spin polarizations were P = 29% for 83Kr and P = 63% for 129Xe. The results were reproduced over many SEOP cycles despite the laser-induced on-resonance formation of rubidium hydride (RbH). Following SEOP, the H2 was reactively removed via catalytic combustion without measurable losses in hyperpolarized spin state of either 83Kr or 129Xe. Highly spin-polarized 83Kr can now be purified for the first time, to our knowledge, to provide high signal intensity for the advancement of in vivo hp 83Kr MRI. More generally, a chemical reaction appears as a viable alternative to the cryogenic separation process, the primary purification method of hp 129Xe for the past 2 1/2 decades. The inherent simplicity of the combustion process will facilitate hp 129Xe production and should allow for on-demand continuous flow of purified and highly spin-polarized 129Xe.

  15. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, David M.L.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp 3He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with 129Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp 83Kr MRI is discussed. PMID:23290627

  16. Fast Nuclear Spin Relaxation in Hyperpolarized Solid 129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, N. N.; Patton, B.; Raman, K.; Happer, W.

    2002-04-01

    We report extensive new measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of 129Xe nuclear spins in solid xenon. For temperatures T<120 K and magnetic fields B>0.05 T, we found T1 on the order of hours, in good agreement with previous measurements and with the predicted phonon-scattering limit for the spin-rotation interaction. For T>120 K, our new data show that T1 can be much shorter than the phonon scattering limit. For B = 0.06 T, a field often used to accumulate hyperpolarized xenon, T1 is ~6 s near the Xe melting point Tm = 161.4 K. From T = 50 K to Tm, the new data are in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction that the relaxation is due to (i) modulation of the spin-rotation interaction by phonons, and (ii) modulation of the dipole-dipole interaction by vacancy diffusion.

  17. Room temperature hyperpolarization of nuclear spins in bulk

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi, Kenichiro; Negoro, Makoto; Nishida, Shinsuke; Kagawa, Akinori; Morita, Yasushi; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a means of transferring spin polarization from electrons to nuclei, can enhance the nuclear spin polarization (hence the NMR sensitivity) in bulk materials at most 660 times for 1H spins, using electron spins in thermal equilibrium as polarizing agents. By using electron spins in photo-excited triplet states instead, DNP can overcome the above limit. We demonstrate a 1H spin polarization of 34%, which gives an enhancement factor of 250,000 in 0.40 T, while maintaining a bulk sample (∼0.6 mg, ∼0.7 × 0.7 × 1 mm3) containing >1019 1H spins at room temperature. Room temperature hyperpolarization achieved with DNP using photo-excited triplet electrons has potentials to be applied to a wide range of fields, including NMR spectroscopy and MRI as well as fundamental physics. PMID:24821773

  18. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus; de Souza, Ricardo E.; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with hyper-polarized noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Penttila, S.I.; Caprihan, A.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a six-month, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclei of noble gases can be hyper polarized through a laser-driven spin exchange to a degree many orders of magnitude larger than that attainable by thermal polarization without requiring a strong magnetic field. The increased polarization from the laser pumping enables a good nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal from a gas. The main goal of this project was to demonstrate diffusion-weighted imaging of such hyper-polarized noble gas with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Possible applications include characterizing porosity of materials and dynamically imaging pressure distributions in biological or acoustical systems.

  20. Hyperpolarized cesium ions doped in a glass material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) 133 Cs nuclear magnetic resonance signals were measured from borosilicate glass cell walls during optical pumping of cesium vapor at high magnetic field (9.4 T). Significant signal enhancements were observed when additional heating of the cell wall was provided by intense but non-resonant laser irradiation, with integrated HP 133 Cs NMR signals and line widths varying as a function of heating laser power (and hence glass temperature). Given that virtually no Cs ions would originally be present in the glass, absorbed HP Cs atoms rarely met thermally-polarized Cs ions already at the surface; thus, spin-exchange via nuclear dipole interaction cannot be the primary mechanism for injecting spin polarization into the glass. Instead, it is concluded that the absorption and transport of HP atoms into the glass material itself is the dominant mechanism of nuclear spin injection at high temperatures-the first reported experimental demonstration of such a mechanism.

  1. Apparatus for preparing a solution of a hyperpolarized noble gas for NMR and MRI analysis

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2008-06-10

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  2. Enhancement of NMR and MRI in the presence of hyperpolarized noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2004-11-16

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  3. Separation of extra- and intracellular metabolites using hyperpolarized (13)C diffusion weighted MR.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Bertram L; Sriram, Renuka; Keshari, Kayvan R; Leon Swisher, Christine; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Vigneron, Daniel B; Wang, Zhen J; Larson, Peder E Z; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-09-01

    This work demonstrates the separation of extra- and intracellular components of glycolytic metabolites with diffusion weighted hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using b-values of up to 15,000smm(-2), a multi-exponential signal response was measured for hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate and lactate. By fitting the fast and slow asymptotes of these curves, their extra- and intracellular weighted diffusion coefficients were determined in cells perfused in a MR compatible bioreactor. In addition to measuring intracellular weighted diffusion, extra- and intracellular weighted hyperpolarized (13)C metabolites pools are assessed in real-time, including their modulation with inhibition of monocarboxylate transporters. These studies demonstrate the ability to simultaneously assess membrane transport in addition to enzymatic activity with the use of diffusion weighted hyperpolarized (13)C MR. This technique could be an indispensible tool to evaluate the impact of microenvironment on the presence, aggressiveness and metastatic potential of a variety of cancers. PMID:27434780

  4. Separation of extra- and intracellular metabolites using hyperpolarized 13C diffusion weighted MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelsch, Bertram L.; Sriram, Renuka; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Leon Swisher, Christine; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-09-01

    This work demonstrates the separation of extra- and intracellular components of glycolytic metabolites with diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using b-values of up to 15,000 s mm-2, a multi-exponential signal response was measured for hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate and lactate. By fitting the fast and slow asymptotes of these curves, their extra- and intracellular weighted diffusion coefficients were determined in cells perfused in a MR compatible bioreactor. In addition to measuring intracellular weighted diffusion, extra- and intracellular weighted hyperpolarized 13C metabolites pools are assessed in real-time, including their modulation with inhibition of monocarboxylate transporters. These studies demonstrate the ability to simultaneously assess membrane transport in addition to enzymatic activity with the use of diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C MR. This technique could be an indispensible tool to evaluate the impact of microenvironment on the presence, aggressiveness and metastatic potential of a variety of cancers.

  5. Distal airways in humans: dynamic hyperpolarized 3He MR imaging--feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooker, Angela C.; Hong, Kwan Soo; McKinstry, Erin L.; Costello, Philip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic hyperpolarized helium 3 (3He) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the human airways is achieved by using a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence during inhalation. The resulting dynamic images show differential contrast enhancement of both distal airways and the lung periphery, unlike static hyperpolarized 3He MR images on which only the lung periphery is seen. With this technique, up to seventh-generation airway branching can be visualized. Copyright RSNA, 2003.

  6. Apamin-sensitive K+ channels mediate an endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization in rabbit mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, M E; Brayden, J E

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular endothelial cells release a variety of substances which affect the membrane potential and tone of underlying vascular smooth muscle. In the presence of N omega-nitro-L-arginine to inhibit nitric oxide synthase and indomethacin to inhibit cyclo-oxygenase, acetylcholine (ACh; EC50 approximately 1 microM) elicited the release of an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in rabbit mesenteric arteries. 2. The hyperpolarization due to EDHF was blocked by apamin (IC50 approximately 0.3 nM), and by other inhibitors of the apamin-sensitive K+ channel (10 nM scyllatoxin, 100 microM d-tubocurarine, 300 microM gallamine) in the presence of indomethacin and N omega-nitro-L-arginine. The hyperpolarization was not blocked by glibenclamide (5 microM), iberiotoxin (10 nM), tetraethylammonium (1 mM), barium (500 microM), 4-aminopyridine (500 microM), ouabain (10 microM), bumetanide (10 microM), or nimodipine (100 nM). 3. In the presence of apamin and N omega-nitro-L-arginine, but the absence of indomethacin, ACh triggered a hyperpolarization that was blocked by glibenclamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels. A similar glibenclamide-sensitive hyperpolarization was caused by Iloprost, a stable analogue of prostacyclin. 4. In experiments which distinguished the effects of EDHF, prostanoids and nitric oxide, hyperpolarizations and/or relaxations triggered by ACh were antagonized by muscarinic antagonists, the relative potencies (atropine approximately 4-DAMP > pirenzepine) of which indicated that the release of all three endothelium-derived factors was mediated by M3 receptors. 5. Our results suggest that ACh stimulates M3 receptors on endothelial cells, triggering the release of nitric oxide and prostanoids, which hyperpolarize underlying smooth muscle by activation of KATP channels, and the release of an EDHF, which hyperpolarizes smooth muscle through the activation of apamin-sensitive K+ (KAS) channels. Images Figure 4 PMID:8788937

  7. Signal-to-noise ratio comparison of encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; Panych, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Some non-Fourier encoding methods such as wavelet and direct encoding use spatially localized bases. The spatial localization feature of these methods enables optimized encoding for improved spatial and temporal resolution during dynamically adaptive MR imaging. These spatially localized bases, however, have inherently reduced image signal-to-noise ratio compared with Fourier or Hadamad encoding for proton imaging. Hyperpolarized noble gases, on the other hand, have quite different MR properties compared to proton, primarily the nonrenewability of the signal. It could be expected, therefore, that the characteristics of image SNR with respect to encoding method will also be very different from hyperpolarized noble gas MRI compared to proton MRI. In this article, hyperpolarized noble gas image SNRs of different encoding methods are compared theoretically using a matrix description of the encoding process. It is shown that image SNR for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging is maximized for any orthonormal encoding method. Methods are then proposed for designing RF pulses to achieve normalized encoding profiles using Fourier, Hadamard, wavelet, and direct encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gases. Theoretical results are confirmed with hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  8. Flow Cytometry Analysis Reveals That Only a Subpopulation of Mouse Sperm Undergoes Hyperpolarization During Capacitation1

    PubMed Central

    Escoffier, Jessica; Navarrete, Felipe; Haddad, Doug; Santi, Celia M.; Darszon, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2015-01-01

    To gain fertilizing capacity, mammalian sperm should reside in the female tract for a period of time. The physiological changes that render the sperm able to fertilize are known as capacitation. Capacitation is associated with an increase in intracellular pH, an increase in intracellular calcium, and phosphorylation of different proteins. This process is also accompanied by the hyperpolarization of the sperm plasma membrane potential (Em). In the present work, we used flow cytometry to analyze changes in sperm Em during capacitation in individual cells. Our results indicate that a subpopulation of hyperpolarized mouse sperm can be clearly distinguished by sperm flow cytometry analysis. Using sperm bearing green fluorescent protein in their acrosomes, we found that this hyperpolarized subpopulation is composed of sperm with intact acrosomes. In addition, we show that the capacitation-associated hyperpolarization is blocked by high extracellular K+, by PKA inhibitors, and by SLO3 inhibitors in CD1 mouse sperm, and undetectable in Slo3 knockout mouse sperm. On the other hand, in sperm incubated in conditions that do not support capacitation, sperm membrane hyperpolarization can be induced by amiloride, high extracellular NaHCO3, and cAMP agonists. Altogether, our observations are consistent with a model in which sperm Em hyperpolarization is downstream of a cAMP-dependent pathway and is mediated by the activation of SLO3 K+ channels. PMID:25855261

  9. In Situ and Ex Situ Low-Field NMR Spectroscopy and MRI Endowed by SABRE Hyperpolarization**

    PubMed Central

    Barskiy, Danila A.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Koptyug, Igor V.; He, Ping; Groome, Kirsten A.; Best, Quinn A.; Shi, Fan; Goodson, Boyd M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Truong, Milton L.; Coffey, Aaron M.; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2015-01-01

    By using 5.75 and 47.5 mT nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, up to 105-fold sensitivity enhancement through signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) was enabled, and subsecond temporal resolution was used to monitor an exchange reaction that resulted in the buildup and decay of hyperpolarized species after parahydrogen bubbling. We demonstrated the high-resolution low-field proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pyridine in a 47.5 mT magnetic field endowed by SABRE. Molecular imaging (i.e. imaging of dilute hyperpolarized substances rather than the bulk medium) was conducted in two regimes: in situ real-time MRI of the reaction mixture (in which pyridine was hyperpolarized), and ex situ MRI (in which hyperpolarization decays) of the liquid hyperpolarized product. Low-field (milli-Tesla range, e.g. 5.75 and 47.5 mT used in this study) parahydrogen-enhanced NMR and MRI, which are free from the limitations of high-field magnetic resonance (including susceptibility-induced gradients of the static magnetic field at phase interfaces), potentially enables new imaging applications as well as differentiation of hyperpolarized chemical species on demand by exploiting spin manipulations with static and alternating magnetic fields. PMID:25367202

  10. Site specific polarization transfer from a hyperpolarized ligand of dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunyi; Ragavan, Mukundan; Hilty, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Protein-ligand interaction is often characterized using polarization transfer by the intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE). For such NOE experiments, hyperpolarization of nuclear spins presents the opportunity to increase the spin magnetization, which is transferred, by several orders of magnitude. Here, folic acid, a ligand of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), was hyperpolarized on (1)H spins using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP). Mixing hyperpolarized ligand with protein resulted in observable increases in protein (1)H signal predominantly in the methyl group region of the spectra. Using (13)C single quantum selection in a series of one-dimensional spectra, the carbon chemical shift ranges of the corresponding methyl groups can be elucidated. Signals observed in these hyperpolarized spectra could be confirmed using 3D isotope filtered NOESY spectra, although the hyperpolarized spectra were obtained in single scans. By further correlating the signal intensities observed in the D-DNP experiments with the occurrence of short distances in the crystal structure of the protein-ligand complex, the observed methyl proton signals could be matched to the chemical shifts of six amino acids in the active site of DHFR-folic acid binary complex. These data demonstrate that (13)C chemical shift selection of protein resonances, combined with the intrinsic selectivity towards magnetization originating from the initially hyperpolarized spins, can be used for site specific characterization of protein-ligand interactions. PMID:27189223

  11. Real-Time MRI-Guided Catheter Tracking Using Hyperpolarized Silicon Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Shah, Jay V.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Cressman, Erik; Zacharias Millward, Niki; Menter, David G.; Marcus, Charles M.; Bhattacharya, Pratip K.

    2015-08-01

    Visualizing the movement of angiocatheters during endovascular interventions is typically accomplished using x-ray fluoroscopy. There are many potential advantages to developing magnetic resonance imaging-based approaches that will allow three-dimensional imaging of the tissue/vasculature interface while monitoring other physiologically-relevant criteria, without exposing the patient or clinician team to ionizing radiation. Here we introduce a proof-of-concept development of a magnetic resonance imaging-guided catheter tracking method that utilizes hyperpolarized silicon particles. The increased signal of the silicon particles is generated via low-temperature, solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization, and the particles retain their enhanced signal for ≥40 minutes—allowing imaging experiments over extended time durations. The particles are affixed to the tip of standard medical-grade catheters and are used to track passage under set distal and temporal points in phantoms and live mouse models. With continued development, this method has the potential to supplement x-ray fluoroscopy and other MRI-guided catheter tracking methods as a zero-background, positive contrast agent that does not require ionizing radiation.

  12. Real-Time MRI-Guided Catheter Tracking Using Hyperpolarized Silicon Particles.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Shah, Jay V; Cassidy, Maja C; Cressman, Erik; Millward, Niki Zacharias; Menter, David G; Marcus, Charles M; Bhattacharya, Pratip K

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing the movement of angiocatheters during endovascular interventions is typically accomplished using x-ray fluoroscopy. There are many potential advantages to developing magnetic resonance imaging-based approaches that will allow three-dimensional imaging of the tissue/vasculature interface while monitoring other physiologically-relevant criteria, without exposing the patient or clinician team to ionizing radiation. Here we introduce a proof-of-concept development of a magnetic resonance imaging-guided catheter tracking method that utilizes hyperpolarized silicon particles. The increased signal of the silicon particles is generated via low-temperature, solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization, and the particles retain their enhanced signal for ≥ 40 minutes--allowing imaging experiments over extended time durations. The particles are affixed to the tip of standard medical-grade catheters and are used to track passage under set distal and temporal points in phantoms and live mouse models. With continued development, this method has the potential to supplement x-ray fluoroscopy and other MRI-guided catheter tracking methods as a zero-background, positive contrast agent that does not require ionizing radiation. PMID:26239953

  13. Real-Time MRI-Guided Catheter Tracking Using Hyperpolarized Silicon Particles

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Shah, Jay V.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Cressman, Erik; Zacharias Millward, Niki; Menter, David G.; Marcus, Charles M.; Bhattacharya, Pratip K.

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing the movement of angiocatheters during endovascular interventions is typically accomplished using x-ray fluoroscopy. There are many potential advantages to developing magnetic resonance imaging-based approaches that will allow three-dimensional imaging of the tissue/vasculature interface while monitoring other physiologically-relevant criteria, without exposing the patient or clinician team to ionizing radiation. Here we introduce a proof-of-concept development of a magnetic resonance imaging-guided catheter tracking method that utilizes hyperpolarized silicon particles. The increased signal of the silicon particles is generated via low-temperature, solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization, and the particles retain their enhanced signal for ≥40 minutes—allowing imaging experiments over extended time durations. The particles are affixed to the tip of standard medical-grade catheters and are used to track passage under set distal and temporal points in phantoms and live mouse models. With continued development, this method has the potential to supplement x-ray fluoroscopy and other MRI-guided catheter tracking methods as a zero-background, positive contrast agent that does not require ionizing radiation. PMID:26239953

  14. EDHF, NO and a prostanoid: hyperpolarization-dependent and -independent relaxation in guinea-pig arteries

    PubMed Central

    Tare, Marianne; Parkington, Helena C; Coleman, H A

    2000-01-01

    The contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), nitric oxide (NO) and a prostanoid (PG) to endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization and relaxation were assessed in coronary and mammary arteries of guinea-pigs by integration of the responses evoked during discrete applications of acetylcholine (ACh). The results of this integration approach were compared with those using traditional peak analysis methods.Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 μM) and indomethacin (1 μM), alone or in combination, were without effect on peak hyperpolarizations or relaxations while they markedly reduced the integrated responses in both arteries.Integrated responses attributed to NO and PG were larger than those attributed to EDHF in the coronary artery (at 2 μM ACh, hyperpolarization (mV s): NO, 4200±91; PG, 5046±157; EDHF, 1532±94; relaxation (mN s mm−1): NO, 2488±122; PG, 2234±96; EDHF, 802±54). Integrated responses attributed to NO, PG and EDHF were similar in the mammary artery (at 2 μM ACh, hyperpolarization: NO, 347±69; PG, 217±49; EDHF, 310±63; relaxation: NO, 462±94; PG, 456±144; EDHF, 458±40).Gilbenclamide (1 μM) all but abolished the hyperpolarization attributable to NO and PG but not EDHF in both arteries allowing assessment of the role of the hyperpolarization in relaxation. Gilbenclamide was without effect on the integrated relaxation due to NO but significantly reduced the relaxation associated with PG in the two arteries.In conclusion, integration of the responses enabled a more complete assessment of the contribution of EDHF, NO and PG to endothelium-dependent responses, which were strikingly different in the two arteries. There is commonality in the role of hyperpolarization in relaxation in both arteries: EDHF-dependent relaxation is strongly dependent on hyperpolarization; hyperpolarization plays an important role in PG relaxation, whereas it has a small facilitatory role in NO-dependent relaxation. PMID

  15. Reducing Relaxation of Hyperpolarized ^129 Xe during Cryogenic Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.

    2004-05-01

    Recent experimental results^1 indicate that the T1 relaxation time of solid ^129Xe is much shorter than previous models had predicted^2 near the xenon melting point of 161 K and at low magnetic fields. This enhanced relaxation is detrimental to commercial xenon polarizers, which cryogenically distill hyperpolarized ^129Xe from a buffer gas mixture. We have measured the fraction of xenon polarization lost during a typical cryogenic collection, using different permanent magnets to vary the holding field from 700 gauss to over a tesla. The results indicate that using a stronger permanent magnet around the cryo-trap is a simple way to increase the final polarization of the pure xenon gas. An additional experiment was conducted in order to determine whether the majority of the xenon relaxation occurs throughout accumulation (possibly as a result of temperature inhomogeneities within the frozen sample) or during the brief thawing time. In pinpointing the polarization loss, this research may suggest new designs for xenon polarizers. 1. Kuzma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 147602 (2002). 2. Fitzgerald et al., Phys. Rev. B 59, 8795 (1999).

  16. Validating Excised Rodent Lungs for Functional Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Six, Joseph S.; Stupic, Karl F.; Shaw, Dominick E.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ex vivo rodent lung models are explored for physiological measurements of respiratory function with hyperpolarized (hp) 129Xe MRI. It is shown that excised lung models allow for simplification of the technical challenges involved and provide valuable physiological insights that are not feasible using in vivo MRI protocols. A custom designed breathing apparatus enables MR images of gas distribution on increasing ventilation volumes of actively inhaled hp 129Xe. Straightforward hp 129Xe MRI protocols provide residual lung volume (RV) data and permit for spatially resolved tracking of small hp 129Xe probe volumes during the inhalation cycle. Hp 129Xe MRI of lung function in the excised organ demonstrates the persistence of post mortem airway responsiveness to intravenous methacholine challenges. The presented methodology enables physiology of lung function in health and disease without additional regulatory approval requirements and reduces the technical and logistical challenges with hp gas MRI experiments. The post mortem lung functional data can augment histological measurements and should be of interest for drug development studies. PMID:24023683

  17. Fluconazole treatment hyperpolarizes the plasma membrane of Candida cells.

    PubMed

    Elicharova, Hana; Sychrova, Hana

    2013-11-01

    Five pathogenic Candida species were compared in terms of their osmotolerance, tolerance to toxic sodium and lithium cations, and resistance to fluconazole. The species not only differed, in general, in their tolerance to high osmotic pressure (C. albicans and C. parapsilosis being the most osmotolerant) but exhibited distinct sensitivities to toxic sodium and lithium cations, with C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis being very tolerant but C. krusei and C. dubliniensis sensitive to LiCl. The treatment of both fluconazole-susceptible (C. albicans and C. parapsilosis) and fluconazole-resistant (C. dubliniensis, C. krusei and C. tropicalis) growing cells with subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole resulted in substantially elevated intracellular Na(+) levels. Using a diS-C3(3) assay, for the first time, to monitor the relative membrane potential (ΔΨ) of Candida cells, we show that the fluconazole treatment of growing cells of all five species results in a substantial hyperpolarization of their plasma membranes, which is responsible for an increased non-specific transport of toxic alkali metal cations and other cationic drugs (e.g., hygromycin B). Thus, the combination of relatively low doses of fluconazole and drugs, whose import into the tested Candida strains is driven by the cell membrane potential, might be especially potent in terms of its ability to inhibit the growth of or even kill various Candida species. PMID:23547882

  18. High-resolution low-field molecular magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized liquids.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aaron M; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Barskiy, Danila A; Koptyug, Igor V; Shchepin, Roman V; Waddell, Kevin W; He, Ping; Groome, Kirsten A; Best, Quinn A; Shi, Fan; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-09-16

    We demonstrate the feasibility of microscale molecular imaging using hyperpolarized proton and carbon-13 MRI contrast media and low-field (47.5 mT) preclinical scale (38 mm i.d.) 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hyperpolarized proton images with 94 × 94 μm(2) spatial resolution and hyperpolarized carbon-13 images with 250 × 250 μm(2) in-plane spatial resolution were recorded in 4-8 s (largely limited by the electronics response), surpassing the in-plane spatial resolution (i.e., pixel size) achievable with micro-positron emission tomography (PET). These hyperpolarized proton and (13)C images were recorded using large imaging matrices of up to 256 × 256 pixels and relatively large fields of view of up to 6.4 × 6.4 cm(2). (13)C images were recorded using hyperpolarized 1-(13)C-succinate-d2 (30 mM in water, %P(13C) = 25.8 ± 5.1% (when produced) and %P(13C) = 14.2 ± 0.7% (when imaged), T1 = 74 ± 3 s), and proton images were recorded using (1)H hyperpolarized pyridine (100 mM in methanol-d4, %P(H) = 0.1 ± 0.02% (when imaged), T1 = 11 ± 0.1 s). Both contrast agents were hyperpolarized using parahydrogen (>90% para-fraction) in an automated 5.75 mT parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) hyperpolarizer. A magnetized path was demonstrated for successful transportation of a (13)C hyperpolarized contrast agent (1-(13)C-succinate-d2, sensitive to fast depolarization when at the Earth's magnetic field) from the PHIP polarizer to the 47.5 mT low-field MRI. While future polarizing and low-field MRI hardware and imaging sequence developments can further improve the low-field detection sensitivity, the current results demonstrate that microscale molecular imaging in vivo is already feasible at low (<50 mT) fields and potentially at low (~1 mM) metabolite concentrations. PMID:25162371

  19. High-Resolution Low-Field Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Hyperpolarized Liquids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of microscale molecular imaging using hyperpolarized proton and carbon-13 MRI contrast media and low-field (47.5 mT) preclinical scale (38 mm i.d.) 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hyperpolarized proton images with 94 × 94 μm2 spatial resolution and hyperpolarized carbon-13 images with 250 × 250 μm2 in-plane spatial resolution were recorded in 4–8 s (largely limited by the electronics response), surpassing the in-plane spatial resolution (i.e., pixel size) achievable with micro-positron emission tomography (PET). These hyperpolarized proton and 13C images were recorded using large imaging matrices of up to 256 × 256 pixels and relatively large fields of view of up to 6.4 × 6.4 cm2. 13C images were recorded using hyperpolarized 1-13C-succinate-d2 (30 mM in water, %P13C = 25.8 ± 5.1% (when produced) and %P13C = 14.2 ± 0.7% (when imaged), T1 = 74 ± 3 s), and proton images were recorded using 1H hyperpolarized pyridine (100 mM in methanol-d4, %PH = 0.1 ± 0.02% (when imaged), T1 = 11 ± 0.1 s). Both contrast agents were hyperpolarized using parahydrogen (>90% para-fraction) in an automated 5.75 mT parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) hyperpolarizer. A magnetized path was demonstrated for successful transportation of a 13C hyperpolarized contrast agent (1-13C-succinate-d2, sensitive to fast depolarization when at the Earth’s magnetic field) from the PHIP polarizer to the 47.5 mT low-field MRI. While future polarizing and low-field MRI hardware and imaging sequence developments can further improve the low-field detection sensitivity, the current results demonstrate that microscale molecular imaging in vivo is already feasible at low (<50 mT) fields and potentially at low (∼1 mM) metabolite concentrations. PMID:25162371

  20. Oxygen-dependent hyperpolarized (129) Xe brain MR.

    PubMed

    Li, Haidong; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) (129) Xe MR offers unique advantages for brain functional imaging (fMRI) because of its extremely high sensitivity to different chemical environments and the total absence of background noise in biological tissues. However, its advancement and applications are currently plagued by issues of signal strength. Generally, xenon atoms found in the brain after inhalation are transferred from the lung via the bloodstream. The longitudinal relaxation time (T1 ) of HP (129) Xe is inversely proportional to the pulmonary oxygen concentration in the lung because oxygen molecules are paramagnetic. However, the T1 of (129) Xe is proportional to the pulmonary oxygen concentration in the blood, because the higher pulmonary oxygen concentration will result in a higher concentration of diamagnetic oxyhemoglobin. Accordingly, there should be an optimal pulmonary oxygen concentration for a given quantity of HP (129) Xe in the brain. In this study, the relationship between pulmonary oxygen concentration and HP (129) Xe signal in the brain was analyzed using a theoretical model and measured through in vivo experiments. The results from the theoretical model and experiments in rats are found to be in good agreement with each other. The optimal pulmonary oxygen concentration predicted by the theoretical model was 21%, and the in vivo experiments confirmed the presence of such an optimal ratio by reporting measurements between 25% and 35%. These findings are helpful for improving the (129) Xe signal in the brain and make the most of the limited spin polarization available for brain experiments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26915791

  1. Long-lived states to sustain hyperpolarized magnetization

    PubMed Central

    Vasos, P. R.; Comment, A.; Sarkar, R.; Ahuja, P.; Jannin, S.; Ansermet, J.-P.; Konter, J. A.; Hautle, P.; van den Brandt, B.; Bodenhausen, G.

    2009-01-01

    Major breakthroughs have recently been reported that can help overcome two inherent drawbacks of NMR: the lack of sensitivity and the limited memory of longitudinal magnetization. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) couples nuclear spins to the large reservoir of electrons, thus making it possible to detect dilute endogenous substances in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We have designed a method to preserve enhanced (“hyperpolarized”) magnetization by conversion into long-lived states (LLS). It is shown that these enhanced long-lived states can be generated for proton spins, which afford sensitive detection. Even in complex molecules such as peptides, long-lived proton states can be sustained effectively over time intervals on the order of tens of seconds, thus allowing hyperpolarized substrates to reach target areas and affording access to slow metabolic pathways. The natural abundance carbon-13 polarization has been enhanced ex situ by almost four orders of magnitude in the dipeptide Ala-Gly. The sample was transferred by the dissolution process to a high-resolution magnet where the carbon-13 polarization was converted into a long-lived state associated with a pair of protons. In Ala-Gly, the lifetime TLLS associated with the two nonequivalent Hα glycine protons, sustained by suitable radio-frequency irradiation, was found to be seven times longer than their spin-lattice relaxation time constant (TLLS/T1 = 7). At desired intervals, small fractions of the populations of long-lived states were converted into observable magnetization. This opens the way to observing slow chemical reactions and slow transport phenomena such as diffusion by enhanced magnetic resonance. PMID:19841270

  2. PbCl2-induced hyperpolarization of rat thymocytes: involvement of charybdotoxin-sensitive K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Yasutaka; Oyama, Yasuo; Sakai, Yoshiro; Hirama, Seigo; Tomita, Kazuyoshi; Nakao, Hiromi; Umebayashi, Chisato; Ishida, Shiro; Okano, Yoshiro; Carpenter, David O

    2003-10-01

    The effect of PbCl2 on membrane potential and intracellular divalent metal cation concentrations of rat thymocytes was examined by flow cytometry. PbCl2 at concentrations of 0.3 microM or higher (up to 10 microM) produced persistent, dose-dependent hyperpolarization (decrease in the intensity of di-BA-C4 fluorescence). Removal of external Ca2+ did not significantly affect the PbCl2-induced hyperpolarization. Charybdotoxin, a specific antagonist of Ca(2+)-dependent K+ conductance, greatly attenuated the PbCl2-induced hyperpolarization. PbCl2 increased the intensity of fluo-3 fluorescence under both normal Ca2+ and nominally Ca(2+)-free conditions. These results suggest that Pb2+ enters thymocytes, causing an increase in fluo-3 fluorescence, and activates Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels, resulting in hyperpolarization. The persistent activation of K+ channels by Pb2+, leading to persistent hyperpolarization, may be one mechanism whereby Pb2+ alters immune function, as membrane potential changes influence physiological functions of lymphocytes. PMID:14502585

  3. Developing hyperpolarized silicon particles for in vivo MRI targeting of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Zacharias, Niki M; Lokesh, Ganesh L R; Volk, David E; Menter, David G; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Previs, Rebecca; Sood, Anil K; Bhattacharya, Pratip

    2016-07-01

    Silicon-based nanoparticles are ideally suited for use as biomedical imaging agents due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and simple surface chemistry that facilitates drug loading and targeting. A method of hyperpolarizing silicon particles using dynamic nuclear polarization, which increases magnetic resonance imaging signals by several orders-of-magnitude through enhanced nuclear spin alignment, has recently been developed to allow silicon particles to function as contrast agents for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging. The enhanced spin polarization of silicon lasts significantly longer than other hyperpolarized agents (tens of minutes, whereas [Formula: see text] for other species at room temperature), allowing a wide range of potential applications. We report our recent characterizations of hyperpolarized silicon particles, with the ultimate goal of targeted, noninvasive, and nonradioactive molecular imaging of various cancer systems. A variety of particle sizes (20 nm to [Formula: see text]) were found to have hyperpolarized relaxation times ranging from [Formula: see text] to 50 min. The addition of various functional groups to the particle surface had no effect on the hyperpolarization buildup or decay rates and allowed in vivo imaging over long time scales. Additional in vivo studies examined a variety of particle administration routes in mice, including intraperitoneal injection, rectal enema, and oral gavage. PMID:27547777

  4. Nitric oxide: Mediator of nonadrenergic noncholinergic hyperpolarization of opossum esophageal circular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.; Murray, J.; Conklin, J.L.; Bates, J.N. )

    1991-03-15

    The electromyogram recorded from circular smooth muscle (SM) of opossum esophagus, either during peristalsis or when the intrinsic esophageal nerves are stimulated by an electrical field (EFS), consists of a hyperpolarization followed by a depolarization. This membrane response results from the interaction of a nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) neurotransmitter with its receptors on SM membrane. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, and nitric oxide (NO) were used to test the hypothesis that NO is a mediator of this NANC nerve-induced response. The transmembrane potential difference of circular SM cells of opossum esophagus was recorded with glass microelectrode. The nerve-mediated membrane response was evoked by EFS. L-NNA (50uM) abolished the initial hyperpolarization and reduced the amplitude of and the time to maximal depolarization. L-arginine (1mM), the substrate for NO synthase, antagonized the effect of L-NNA. Neither L-NNA nor L-arginine altered the resting membrane potential. Exogenous NO produced hyperpolarization of SM membrane potential and attenuated the amplitude of EFS-induced hyperpolarization and depolarization. Nitrosocysteine, a NO-containing compound, also hyperpolarized the membrane potential. Effect of NO was neither blocked by L-NNA nor by TTX. The data support the hypothesis that NO or an NO-containing compound mediates NANC nerve-induced responses of the esophageal SM membrane.

  5. Nuclear spin hyperpolarization of the solvent using signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE).

    PubMed

    Moreno, Karlos X; Nasr, Khaled; Milne, Mark; Sherry, A Dean; Goux, Warren J

    2015-08-01

    Here we report the polarization of the solvent OH protons by SABRE using standard iridium-based catalysts under slightly acidic conditions. Solvent polarization was observed in the presence of a variety of structurally similar N-donor substrates while no solvent enhancement was observed in the absence of substrate or para-hydrogen (p-H2). Solvent polarization was sensitive to the polarizing field and catalyst:substrate ratio in a manner similar to that of substrate protons. SABRE experiments with pyridine-d5 suggest a mechanism where hyperpolarization is transferred from the free substrate to the solvent by chemical exchange while measured hyperpolarization decay times suggest a complimentary mechanism which occurs by direct coordination of the solvent to the catalytic complex. We found the solvent hyperpolarization to decay nearly 3 times more slowly than its characteristic spin-lattice relaxation time suggesting that the hyperpolarized state of the solvent may be sufficiently long lived (∼20s) to hyperpolarize biomolecules having exchangeable protons. This route may offer future opportunities for SABRE to impact metabolic imaging. PMID:26037136

  6. Irreversible Catalyst Activation Enables Hyperpolarization and Water Solubility for NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activation of a catalyst [IrCl(COD)(IMes)] (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene; COD = cyclooctadiene)] for signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) was monitored by in situ hyperpolarized proton NMR at 9.4 T. During the catalyst-activation process, the COD moiety undergoes hydrogenation that leads to its complete removal from the Ir complex. A transient hydride intermediate of the catalyst is observed via its hyperpolarized signatures, which could not be detected using conventional nonhyperpolarized solution NMR. SABRE enhancement of the pyridine substrate can be fully rendered only after removal of the COD moiety; failure to properly activate the catalyst in the presence of sufficient substrate can lead to irreversible deactivation consistent with oligomerization of the catalyst molecules. Following catalyst activation, results from selective RF-saturation studies support the hypothesis that substrate polarization at high field arises from nuclear cross-relaxation with hyperpolarized 1H spins of the hydride/orthohydrogen spin bath. Importantly, the chemical changes that accompanied the catalyst’s full activation were also found to endow the catalyst with water solubility, here used to demonstrate SABRE hyperpolarization of nicotinamide in water without the need for any organic cosolvent—paving the way to various biomedical applications of SABRE hyperpolarization methods. PMID:25372972

  7. Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance: A Novel Technique for the In Vivo Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Marie A.; Clarke, Kieran; Neubauer, Stefan; Tyler, Damian J.

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging plays a central role in cardiovascular disease for determining diagnosis, prognosis, and optimizing patient management. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that monitoring hyperpolarized 13C-labelled tracers with magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI and MRS) offers a new way to investigate the normal and diseased heart, and that the technology may be useful in patients with heart disease. In this review, we show how hyperpolarized 13C-labelled tracers are generated and have been applied experimentally, and outline the methodological advances currently underway to enable translation of hyperpolarized 13C MRI and MRS into the clinic. Using hyperpolarized 13C-labelled metabolites and metabolic MRI and MRS could help assessment of many human cardiovascular diseases, including coronary artery disease, heart failure and metabolic cardiomyopathies. We discuss the clinical areas in which the technology may, in the future, aid in the diagnosis and management of patients with cardiovascular diseases, including dynamic investigations of in vivo metabolism, coronary angiography and quantitative perfusion imaging. It is possible that, in the future, hyperpolarized magnetic resonance will play a major role in clinical cardiology. PMID:21969318

  8. Polarization Transfer from Ligands Hyperpolarized by Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for Screening in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Min, Hlaing; Sekar, Giridhar; Hilty, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a valuable technique for ligand screening, because it exhibits high specificity toward chemical structure and interactions. Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a recent advance in NMR methodology that enables the creation of non-equilibrium spin states, which can dramatically increase NMR sensitivity. Here, the transfer of such spin polarization from hyperpolarized ligand to protein is observed. Mixing hyperpolarized benzamidine with the serine protease trypsin, a "fingerprint" of enhanced protein signals is observed, which shows a different intensity profile than the equilibrium NMR spectrum of the protein, but coincides closely to the frequency profile of a saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiment. The DNP experiment benefits from hyperpolarization and enables observation of all frequencies in a single, rapid experiment. Based on these merits, it is an interesting alternative to the widely used STD experiment for identification of protein-ligand interactions. PMID:26315550

  9. Long-lasting hyperpolarization underlies seizure reduction by low frequency deep brain electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Toprani, Sheela; Durand, Dominique M

    2013-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is a common medically refractory neurological disease. Deep brain electrical stimulation (DBS) of grey matter has been used for MTLE with limited success. However, stimulation of a white matter tract connecting the hippocampi, the ventral hippocampal commissure (VHC), with low frequencies that simulate interictal discharges has shown promising results, with seizure reduction greater than 98% in bilateral hippocampi during stimulation and greater than 50% seizure reduction in bilateral hippocampi after treatment. A major hurdle to the implementation and optimization of this treatment is that the mechanisms of seizure reduction by low frequency electrical stimulation (LFS) are not known. The goal of this study is to understand how commissural fibre tract stimulation reduces bilateral hippocampal epileptic activity in an in vitro slice preparation containing bilateral hippocampi connected by the VHC. It is our hypothesis that electrical stimuli induce hyperpolarization lasting hundreds of milliseconds following each pulse which reduces spontaneous epileptic activity during each inter-stimulus interval (ISI). Stimulus-induced long-lasting-hyperpolarization (LLH) can be mediated by GABAB inhibitory post-synaptic potentials (IPSPs) or slow after-hyperpolarization (sAHP). To test the role of LLH in effective bilateral seizure reduction by fibre tract stimulation, we measured stimulus-induced hyperpolarization during LFS of the VHC using electrophysiology techniques. Antagonism of the GABAB IPSP and/or sAHP diminished stimulus-induced hyperpolarization concurrently with LFS efficacy (greater than 50% reduction). Blocking both the GABAB IPSP and sAHP simultaneously eliminated the effect of electrical stimulation on seizure reduction entirely. These data show that LFS of the VHC is an effective protocol for bilateral hippocampal seizure reduction and that its efficacy relies on the induction of long-lasting hyperpolarization mediated

  10. Mouse Sperm Membrane Potential Hyperpolarization Is Necessary and Sufficient to Prepare Sperm for the Acrosome Reaction*

    PubMed Central

    De La Vega-Beltran, Jose Luis; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; Krapf, Darío; Hernandez-González, Enrique O.; Wertheimer, Eva; Treviño, Claudia L.; Visconti, Pablo E.; Darszon, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian sperm are unable to fertilize the egg immediately after ejaculation; they acquire this capacity during migration in the female reproductive tract. This maturational process is called capacitation and in mouse sperm it involves a plasma membrane reorganization, extensive changes in the state of protein phosphorylation, increases in intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), and the appearance of hyperactivated motility. In addition, mouse sperm capacitation is associated with the hyperpolarization of the cell membrane potential. However, the functional role of this process is not known. In this work, to dissect the role of this membrane potential change, hyperpolarization was induced in noncapacitated sperm using either the ENaC inhibitor amiloride, the CFTR agonist genistein or the K+ ionophore valinomycin. In this experimental setting, other capacitation-associated processes such as activation of a cAMP-dependent pathway and the consequent increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation were not observed. However, hyperpolarization was sufficient to prepare sperm for the acrosome reaction induced either by depolarization with high K+ or by addition of solubilized zona pellucida (sZP). Moreover, K+ and sZP were also able to increase [Ca2+]i in non-capacitated sperm treated with these hyperpolarizing agents but not in untreated cells. On the other hand, in conditions that support capacitation-associated processes blocking hyperpolarization by adding valinomycin and increasing K+ concentrations inhibited the agonist-induced acrosome reaction as well as the increase in [Ca2+]i. Altogether, these results suggest that sperm hyperpolarization by itself is key to enabling mice sperm to undergo the acrosome reaction. PMID:23095755

  11. Ion Permeabilities in Mouse Sperm Reveal an External Trigger for SLO3-Dependent Hyperpolarization

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, Julio C.; de la Vega-Beltrán, José L.; Escoffier, Jessica; Visconti, Pablo E.; Treviño, Claudia L.; Darszon, Alberto; Salkoff, Lawrence; Santi, Celia M.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most cells of the body which function in an ionic environment controlled within narrow limits, spermatozoa must function in a less controlled external environment. In order to better understand how sperm control their membrane potential in different ionic conditions, we measured mouse sperm membrane potentials under a variety of conditions and at different external K+ concentrations, both before and after capacitation. Experiments were undertaken using both wild-type, and mutant mouse sperm from the knock-out strain of the sperm-specific, pH-sensitive, SLO3 K+ channel. Membrane voltage data were fit to the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation. Our study revealed a significant membrane permeability to both K+ and Cl− before capacitation, as well as Na+. The permeability to both K+ and Cl− has the effect of preventing large changes in membrane potential when the extracellular concentration of either ion is changed. Such a mechanism may protect against undesired shifts in membrane potential in changing ionic environments. We found that a significant portion of resting membrane potassium permeability in wild-type sperm was contributed by SLO3 K+ channels. We also found that further activation of SLO3 channels was the essential mechanism producing membrane hyperpolarization under two separate conditions, 1) elevation of external pH prior to capacitation and 2) capacitating conditions. Both conditions produced a significant membrane hyperpolarization in wild-type which was absent in SLO3 mutant sperm. Hyperpolarization in both conditions may result from activation of SLO3 channels by raising intracellular pH; however, demonstrating that SLO3-dependent hyperpolarization is achieved by an alkaline environment alone shows that SLO3 channel activation might occur independently of other events associated with capacitation. For example sperm may undergo stages of membrane hyperpolarization when reaching alkaline regions of the female genital tract. Significantly, other

  12. Flow Type Bio-Chemical Calorimeter with Micro Differential Thermopile Sensor.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masataka; Nakabeppu, Osamu

    2015-04-01

    Bio-chemical calorimeters with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) thermopile sensor have been studied for monitoring detailed processes of the biochemical reactions of a minute sample with a high temporal resolution. The bio-calorimeters are generally divided into a batch-type and a flow-type. We developed a highly sensitive batch-type calorimeter which can detect a 100 nW level thermal reaction. However it shows a long settling time of 2 hours because of the heat capacity of a whole calorimeter. Thus, the flow-type calorimeters in passive and active mode have been studied for measuring the thermal reactions in an early stage after starting an analysis. The flow-type calorimeter consists of the MEMS differential thermopile sensor, a pair of micro channel reactor in a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) sheet in a three-fold thermostat chamber. The calorimeter in the passive mode was tested with dilution reactions of ethanol to water and NaCl aqueous solution to water. It was shown that the calorimeter detects exo- and endothermic reaction over 250 nW at solution flow rate of 0.05 ~ 1 µl/min with a settling time of about 4 minutes. In the active mode, a response test was conducted by using heat removal by water flow from the reactor channel. The active calorimetry enhances the response time about three to four times faster. PMID:26353514

  13. Chemistry and biochemistry of 13C hyperpolarized magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Keshari, Kayvan R.; Wilson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of transient chemical phenomena by conventional NMR has proved elusive, particularly for non-1H nuclei. For 13C, hyperpolarization using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique has emerged as a powerful means to improve SNR. The recent development of rapid dissolution DNP methods has facilitated previously impossible in vitro and in vivo study of small molecules. This review presents the basics of the DNP technique, identification of appropriate DNP substrates, and approaches to increase hyperpolarized signal lifetimes. Also addressed are the biochemical events to which DNP-NMR has been applied, with descriptions of several probes that have met with in vivo success. PMID:24363044

  14. Chemistry and biochemistry of 13C hyperpolarized magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Keshari, Kayvan R; Wilson, David M

    2014-03-01

    The study of transient chemical phenomena by conventional NMR has proved elusive, particularly for non-(1)H nuclei. For (13)C, hyperpolarization using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique has emerged as a powerful means to improve SNR. The recent development of rapid dissolution DNP methods has facilitated previously impossible in vitro and in vivo study of small molecules. This review presents the basics of the DNP technique, identification of appropriate DNP substrates, and approaches to increase hyperpolarized signal lifetimes. Also addressed are the biochemical events to which DNP-NMR has been applied, with descriptions of several probes that have met with in vivo success. PMID:24363044

  15. Synthesis of Long-T1 Silicon Nanoparticles for Hyperpolarized 29Si Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Tonya M.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Lee, Menyoung; Ganguly, Shreyashi; Marcus, Charles M.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the synthesis, materials characterization and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of amorphous and crystalline silicon nanoparticles for use as hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents. The particles were synthesized by means of a metathesis reaction between sodium silicide (Na4Si4) and silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) and were surface functionalized with a variety of passivating ligands. The synthesis scheme results in particles of diameter ~10 nm with long size-adjusted 29Si spin lattice relaxation (T1) times (> 600 s), which are retained after hyperpolarization by low temperature DNP. PMID:23350651

  16. Experimentally induced postinhibitory rebound in rat nucleus ambiguus is dependent on hyperpolarization parameters and membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Dean, J B; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M; Millhorn, D E

    1989-06-01

    Postinhibitory rebound (PIR), a transient depolarization subsequent to release from experimental hyperpolarization, was identified and characterized in 81% of the cells studied in the nucleus ambiguus in slices from medulla of rat. Hyperpolarizing current pulses were administered via the recording microelectrode in the bridge-balanced mode to test for PIR. The voltage trajectory was characterized by a depolarizing sag during the pulse, rebound depolarization (PIR) after the pulse and increased input resistance during rebound. The amplitude and time course of PIR were dependent on prepulse membrane potential, pulse amplitude and pulse duration. These results suggest a potential role of PIR in respiratory rhythmogenesis. PMID:2771207

  17. Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Functional Lung Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dregely, Isabel

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe (HXe) is a non-invasive contrast agent for lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which upon inhalation follows the functional pathway of oxygen in the lung by dissolving into lung tissue structures and entering the blood stream. HXe MRI therefore provides unique opportunities for functional lung imaging of gas exchange which occurs from alveolar air spaces across the air-blood boundary into parenchymal tissue. However challenges in acquisition speed and signal-to-noise ratio have limited the development of a HXe imaging biomarker to diagnose lung disease. This thesis addresses these challenges by introducing parallel imaging to HXe MRI. Parallel imaging requires dedicated hardware. This work describes design, implementation, and characterization of a 32-channel phased-array chest receive coil with an integrated asymmetric birdcage transmit coil tuned to the HXe resonance on a 3 Tesla MRI system. Using the newly developed human chest coil, a functional HXe imaging method, multiple exchange time xenon magnetization transfer contrast (MXTC) is implemented. MXTC dynamically encodes HXe gas exchange into the image contrast. This permits two parameters to be derived regionally which are related to gas-exchange functionality by characterizing tissue-to-alveolar-volume ratio and alveolar wall thickness in the lung parenchyma. Initial results in healthy subjects demonstrate the sensitivity of MXTC by quantifying the subtle changes in lung microstructure in response to orientation and lung inflation. Our results in subjects with lung disease show that the MXTC-derived functional tissue density parameter exhibits excellent agreement with established imaging techniques. The newly developed dynamic parameter, which characterizes the alveolar wall, was elevated in subjects with lung disease, most likely indicating parenchymal inflammation. In light of these observations we believe that MXTC has potential as a biomarker for the regional quantification of 1

  18. Physical interactions of hyperpolarized gas in the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiu-Hao Josette

    1999-09-01

    This thesis addresses key interactions of hyperpolarized (HP) gas within the biological environment of the lung using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The first excised lung image was obtained in 1994 by Albert et al ., indicating the relative youth of the HP gas MRI field. Thus, there are a multitude of parameters which need to be explored to optimize contrast mechanisms and pulse sequences for in vivo applications. To perform HP gas MRI, both the production of HP gas and development of appropriate MRI pulse sequences were necessary. The apparatus for gas polarization was transferred from Princeton University, then modified and optimized to provide larger quantities and higher polarizations. It was ultimately replaced by a prototype commercial apparatus. Existing MRI pulse sequences were changed to accommodate and exploit the unique situation of non-equilibrium polarized gas. Several physical parameters of the gas relating to structure and function in the lung were investigated. It was found that using a range of excitation powers, acquisition windows, and ventilatory cycle segments yielded dramatically different types of images in the guinea pig. Spatially localized lineshapes of HP 3He showed differentiated peaks (corresponding to frequency shifts) which represent gas in major airways (2 ppm) and alveoli (1-2 ppm). Quantitative maps of the diffusion coefficient (D) showed evidence of free diffusion in the trachea (average of 2.4 cm2/s for 3He and 0.68 cm2/s for 129Xe) and restricted diffusion combined with effects of gas mixtures in the distal pulmonary airspaces (average of 0.16 cm2/s for 3He and 0.021 cm2/s for 129Xe). Experimental measurements were verified with gas mixture and porous media theory for both 3He and 129Xe. The dephasing parameter, T*2 , was mapped showing sensitivity to changes in tidal volume and oxygen level. The T*2 values ranged from 9.2 to 15.9 ms in the intrapulmonary airspaces depending on the breathing paradigm. Experimental results

  19. Effect of ionic interaction between a hyperpolarized magnetic resonance chemical probe and a gadolinium contrast agent for the hyperpolarized lifetime after dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Inoue, Kaori; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In hyperpolarization of 13C-enriched magnetic resonance chemical probes in the solid-state, a trace amount of gadolinium (Gd) contrast agent can be used to maximize polarization of the 13C nuclear spins. Here, we report systematic measurement of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and enhancement level of 13C-enriched chemical probes in the presence of various Gd contrast agents in the liquid-state after dissolution. Using two different 13C probes having opposite electric charges at neutral pH, we clearly show the T1 of hyperpolarized 13C was barely affected by the use of a Gd complex that displays repulsive interaction with the 13C probe in solution, whilst T1 was drastically shortened when there was ionic attraction between probe and complex.

  20. Effect of ionic interaction between a hyperpolarized magnetic resonance chemical probe and a gadolinium contrast agent for the hyperpolarized lifetime after dissolution.

    PubMed

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Inoue, Kaori; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In hyperpolarization of (13)C-enriched magnetic resonance chemical probes in the solid-state, a trace amount of gadolinium (Gd) contrast agent can be used to maximize polarization of the (13)C nuclear spins. Here, we report systematic measurement of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and enhancement level of (13)C-enriched chemical probes in the presence of various Gd contrast agents in the liquid-state after dissolution. Using two different (13)C probes having opposite electric charges at neutral pH, we clearly show the T1 of hyperpolarized (13)C was barely affected by the use of a Gd complex that displays repulsive interaction with the (13)C probe in solution, whilst T1 was drastically shortened when there was ionic attraction between probe and complex. PMID:27490303

  1. Stimulated release of a hyperpolarizing factor (ADHF) from mesenteric artery perivascular adipose tissue: involvement of myocyte BKCa channels and adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Weston, A H; Egner, I; Dong, Y; Porter, E L; Heagerty, A M; Edwards, G

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) releases adipocyte-derived hyperpolarizing factors (ADHFs) that may partly act by opening myocyte K+ channels. The present study in rat and mouse mesenteric arteries aimed to identify the myocyte K+ channel activated by PVAT and to determine whether adiponectin contributed to the hyperpolarizing effects of PVAT. Experimental Approach Myocyte membrane potential was recorded from de-endothelialized, non-contracted rat and mouse mesenteric arteries in the presence and absence of PVAT. Key Results The β3-adrenoceptor agonist, CL-316,243 (10 μM), generated PVAT-dependent, iberiotoxin-sensitive myocyte hyperpolarizations resulting from BKCa channel opening and which were partially blocked by L-NMMA (100 μM). Adiponectin (5 μg·mL−1) also produced iberiotoxin-sensitive hyperpolarizations in PVAT-denuded arterioles. Activation of myocyte AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) using 5 μM A-769662 also induced BKCa-mediated hyperpolarizations. Dorsomorphin abolished hyperpolarizations to CL-316,243, adiponectin and A-769662. In vessels from Adipo−/− mice, hyperpolarizations to CL-316,243 were absent whereas those to A-769662 and adiponectin were normal. In rat vessels, adipocyte-dependent hyperpolarizations were blocked by glibenclamide and clotrimazole but those to NS1619 (33 μM) were unaltered. Conclusions and Implications Under basal, non-contracted conditions, β3-adrenoceptor stimulation of PVAT releases an ADHF, which is probably adiponectin. This activates AMPK to open myocyte BKCa channels indirectly and additionally liberates NO, which also contributes to the observed PVAT-dependent myocyte hyperpolarizations. Clotrimazole and glibenclamide each reversed hyperpolarizations to adiponectin and A-769662, suggesting the involvement of myocyte TRPM4 channels in the ADHF-induced myocyte electrical changes mediated via the opening of BKCa channels. PMID:23488724

  2. Developmental conditioning of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated vasorelaxation

    PubMed Central

    Stead, Rebecca; Musa, Moji G.; Bryant, Claire L.; Lanham, Stuart A.; Johnston, David A.; Reynolds, Richard; Torrens, Christopher; Fraser, Paul A.; Clough, Geraldine F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The endothelium maintains vascular homeostasis through the release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors (EDRF) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH). The balance in EDH : EDRF is disturbed in cardiovascular disease and may also be susceptible to developmental conditioning through exposure to an adverse uterine environment to predispose to later risk of hypertension and vascular disease. Methods: Developmentally conditioned changes in EDH : EDRF signalling pathways were investigated in cremaster arterioles (18–32 μm diameter) and third-order mesenteric arteries of adult male mice offspring of dams fed either a fat-rich (high fat, HF, 45% energy from fat) or control (C, 10% energy from fat) diet. After weaning, offspring either continued on high fat or were placed on control diets to give four dietary groups (C/C, HF/C, C/HF, and HF/HF) and studied at 15 weeks of age. Results: EDH via intermediate (IKCa) and small (SKca) conductance calcium-activated potassium channels contributed less than 10% to arteriolar acetylcholine-induced relaxation in in-situ conditioned HF/C offspring compared with ∼60% in C/C (P < 0.01). The conditioned reduction in EDH signalling in HF/C offspring was reversed in offspring exposed to a high-fat diet both before and after weaning (HF/HF, 55%, P < 0.01 vs. HF/C). EDH signalling was unaffected in arterioles from C/HF offspring. The changes in EDH : EDRF were associated with altered endothelial cell expression and localization of IKCa channels. Conclusion: This is the first evidence that EDH-mediated microvascular relaxation is susceptible to an adverse developmental environment through down-regulation of the IKCa signalling pathway. Conditioned offspring exposed to a ‘second hit’ (HF/HF) exhibit adaptive vascular mechanisms to preserve dilator function. PMID:26682783

  3. A hyperpolarization-activated inward current alters swim frequency of the pteropod mollusk Clione limacina.

    PubMed

    Pirtle, Thomas J; Willingham, Kyle; Satterlie, Richard A

    2010-12-01

    The pteropod mollusk, Clione limacina, exhibits behaviorally relevant swim speed changes that occur within the context of the animal's ecology. Modulation of C. limacina swimming speed involves changes that occur at the network and cellular levels. Intracellular recordings from interneurons of the swim central pattern generator show the presence of a sag potential that is indicative of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(h)). Here we provide evidence that I(h) in primary swim interneurons plays a role in C. limacina swimming speed control and may be a modulatory target. Recordings from central pattern generator swim interneurons show that hyperpolarizing current injection produces a sag potential that lasts for the duration of the hyperpolarization, a characteristic of cells possessing I(h). Following the hyperpolarizing current injection, swim interneurons also exhibit postinhibitory rebound (PIR). Serotonin enhances the sag potential of C. limacina swim interneurons while the I(h) blocker, ZD7288, reduces the sag potential. Furthermore, a negative correlation was found between the amplitude of the sag potential and latency to PIR. Because latency to PIR was previously shown to influence swimming speed, we hypothesize that I(h) has an effect on swimming speed. The I(h) blocker, ZD7288, suppresses swimming in C. limacina and inhibits serotonin-induced acceleration, evidence that supports our hypothesis. PMID:20696266

  4. Over 20% (15)N Hyperpolarization in Under One Minute for Metronidazole, an Antibiotic and Hypoxia Probe.

    PubMed

    Barskiy, Danila A; Shchepin, Roman V; Coffey, Aaron M; Theis, Thomas; Warren, Warren S; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-07-01

    Direct NMR hyperpolarization of naturally abundant (15)N sites in metronidazole is demonstrated using SABRE-SHEATH (Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange in SHield Enables Alignment Transfer to Heteronuclei). In only a few tens of seconds, nuclear spin polarization P(15)N of up to ∼24% is achieved using parahydrogen with 80% para fraction corresponding to P(15)N ≈ 32% if ∼100% parahydrogen were employed (which would translate to a signal enhancement of ∼0.1-million-fold at 9.4 T). In addition to this demonstration on the directly binding (15)N site (using J(2)H-(15)N), we also hyperpolarized more distant (15)N sites in metronidazole using longer-range spin-spin couplings (J(4)H-(15)N and J(5)H-(15)N). Taken together, these results significantly expand the range of molecular structures and sites amenable to hyperpolarization via low-cost parahydrogen-based methods. In particular, hyperpolarized nitroimidazole and its derivatives have powerful potential applications such as direct in vivo imaging of mechanisms of action or hypoxia sensing. PMID:27321159

  5. Milli-tesla NMR and spectrophotometry of liquids hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Wilson, Zechariah; Savukov, Igor; Hilty, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization methods offer a unique means of improving low signal strength obtained in low-field NMR. Here, simultaneous measurements of NMR at a field of 0.7mT and laser optical absorption from samples hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) are reported. The NMR measurement field closely corresponds to a typical field encountered during sample injection in a D-DNP experiment. The optical spectroscopy allows determination of the concentration of the free radical required for DNP. Correlation of radical concentration to NMR measurement of spin polarization and spin-lattice relaxation time allows determination of relaxivity and can be used for optimization of the D-DNP process. Further, the observation of the nuclear Overhauser effect originating from hyperpolarized spins is demonstrated. Signals from (1)H and (19)F in a mixture of trifluoroethanol and water are detected in a single spectrum, while different atoms of the same type are distinguished by J-coupling patterns. The resulting signal changes of individual peaks are indicative of molecular contact, suggesting a new application area of hyperpolarized low-field NMR for the determination of intermolecular interactions. PMID:27423094

  6. Pomeranchuk cell for hyperpolarized 3He based on the brute force method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Seiji; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Ueda, Kunihiro; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Fujimura, Hisako; Yosoi, Masaru; Ohta, Takeshi; Frossati, Giorgio; de Waard, Arlette; Rouille, Gerard

    2014-09-01

    MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) has been used for the medical diagnosis as a radiation-free imaging equipment. Since the proton has been mainly used for medical MRI, usefulness has been rather restrictive. As an example for expanding the range of applicability, MRI with hyperpolarized 3He gas has been used for the lung disease. Here, ``hyperpolarized'' means ``polarized higher than the thermal equilibrium polarization.'' For producing a large amount of hyperpolarized 3He gas at a time, we have been developing a hyperpolarization technique based on the brute force method which uses an ultralow temperature of a few mK and a strong magnetic field around 17 T in combination with the principle of the Pomeranchuk cooling. The Pomeranchuk cell made with non-metallic materials of small heat capacity is attached to the 3He/4He dilution refrigerator using a sintered silver allowing large heat conduction. After the sensors to monitor the temperature and pressure of 3He are calibrated and the Pomeranchuk cell is constructed, the system is tested. Then, the solidification of 3He and the measurement of NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signals of 3He under the magnetic field of 17 T are carried out. The current status is reported in this talk.

  7. Sub-second Proton Imaging of 13C Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents in Water

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Milton L.; Coffey, Aaron M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2014-01-01

    Indirect proton detection of 13C hyperpolarized contrast agents potentially enables greater sensitivity. Presented here is a study of sub-second projection imaging of hyperpolarized 13C contrast agent addressing the obstacle posed by water suppression for indirect detection in vivo. Sodium acetate phantoms were used to develop and test water suppression and sub-second imaging with frequency selective RF pulses using spectroscopic and imaging indirect proton detection. A 9.8 mM aqueous solution of 13C PHIP hyperpolarized 2-hydroxyethyl-13C-propionate-d2,3,3 (HEP),

    ~25% was used for demonstration of indirect proton sub-second imaging detection. Balanced 2D FSSFP (Fast Steady State Free Precession) allowed recording proton images with FOV = 64×64 mm2 and spatial resolution 2×2 mm2 with total acquisition time of less than 0.2 s. In thermally polarized sodium 1-13C-acetate, 13C to 1H polarization transfer efficiency of 45.1% of the theoretically predicted values was observed in imaging detection corresponding to an 11 fold of overall sensitivity improvement compared to direct 13C FSSFP imaging. 13C to 1H polarization transfer efficiency of 27% was observed in imaging detection corresponding to a 3.25 fold sensitivity improvement compared to direct 13C FSSFP imaging with hyperpolarized HEP. The range of potential applications and limitations of this sub-second and ultra-sensitive imaging approach are discussed. PMID:24753438

  8. Analysis of Cancer Metabolism by Imaging Hyperpolarized Nuclei: Prospects for Translation to Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B; Brindle, Kevin; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Comment, Arnaud; Cunningham, Charles H; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Green, Gary G; Leach, Martin O; Rajan, Sunder S; Rizi, Rahim R; Ross, Brian D; Warren, Warren S; Malloy, Craig R

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in cancer biology is to monitor and understand cancer metabolism in vivo with the goal of improved diagnosis and perhaps therapy. Because of the complexity of biochemical pathways, tracer methods are required for detecting specific enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Stable isotopes such as 13C or 15N with detection by nuclear magnetic resonance provide the necessary information about tissue biochemistry, but the crucial metabolites are present in low concentration and therefore are beyond the detection threshold of traditional magnetic resonance methods. A solution is to improve sensitivity by a factor of 10,000 or more by temporarily redistributing the populations of nuclear spins in a magnetic field, a process termed hyperpolarization. Although this effect is short-lived, hyperpolarized molecules can be generated in an aqueous solution and infused in vivo where metabolism generates products that can be imaged. This discovery lifts the primary constraint on magnetic resonance imaging for monitoring metabolism—poor sensitivity—while preserving the advantage of biochemical information. The purpose of this report was to briefly summarize the known abnormalities in cancer metabolism, the value and limitations of current imaging methods for metabolism, and the principles of hyperpolarization. Recent preclinical applications are described. Hyperpolarization technology is still in its infancy, and current polarizer equipment and methods are suboptimal. Nevertheless, there are no fundamental barriers to rapid translation of this exciting technology to clinical research and perhaps clinical care. PMID:21403835

  9. Milli-tesla NMR and spectrophotometry of liquids hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yue; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Wilson, Zechariah; Savukov, Igor; Hilty, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization methods offer a unique means of improving low signal strength obtained in low-field NMR. Here, simultaneous measurements of NMR at a field of 0.7 mT and laser optical absorption from samples hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) are reported. The NMR measurement field closely corresponds to a typical field encountered during sample injection in a D-DNP experiment. The optical spectroscopy allows determination of the concentration of the free radical required for DNP. Correlation of radical concentration to NMR measurement of spin polarization and spin-lattice relaxation time allows determination of relaxivity and can be used for optimization of the D-DNP process. Further, the observation of the nuclear Overhauser effect originating from hyperpolarized spins is demonstrated. Signals from 1H and 19F in a mixture of trifluoroethanol and water are detected in a single spectrum, while different atoms of the same type are distinguished by J-coupling patterns. The resulting signal changes of individual peaks are indicative of molecular contact, suggesting a new application area of hyperpolarized low-field NMR for the determination of intermolecular interactions.

  10. Toxin pharmacology of the ATP-induced hyperpolarization in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Tauc, M; Gastineau, M; Poujeol, P

    1992-03-23

    The effects of Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus (LQH) venom, mamba venom, Buthus tamulus (BT) venom, purified apamin and synthetic charybdotoxin on the membrane hyperpolarization induced by extracellular ATP were examined in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. For this we used a membrane potential probe (bisoxonol) to determine the potential variations. The relation between bisoxonal fluorescence and membrane potential was established by treating Madin-Darby canine kidney cells suspended in solutions containing various external sodium concentrations with gramicidin. Extracellular ATP induced a rapid hyperpolarization that was blocked by LQH venom and synthetic charybdotoxin. BT venom also blocked the response but at a much higher concentration than that of LQH. Mamba venom (Dendroaspis polylepis) and apamin did not modify the ATP-induced hyperpolarization. We concluded that the ATP induced hyperpolarization was due to the augmentation of the potassium conductance probably through Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels sensitive to charybdotoxin but not to mamba venom. The interaction previously described between charybdotoxin and dendrotoxin (the main toxin of mamba venom) was not observed in our case. PMID:1373656

  11. Imaging Renal Urea Handling in Rats at Millimeter Resolution using Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Galen D.; von Morze, Cornelius; Verkman, Alan S.; Koelsch, Bertram L.; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Lustig, Michael; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Bok, Robert A.; Sands, Jeff M.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larsen, Jan Henrik Ardenkjær; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo spin spin relaxation time (T2) heterogeneity of hyperpolarized [13C,15N2]urea in the rat kidney was investigated. Selective quenching of the vascular hyperpolarized 13C signal with a macromolecular relaxation agent revealed that a long-T2 component of the [13C,15N2]urea signal originated from the renal extravascular space, thus allowing the vascular and renal filtrate contrast agent pools of the [13C,15N2]urea to be distinguished via multi-exponential analysis. The T2 response to induced diuresis and antidiuresis was performed with two imaging agents: hyperpolarized [13C,15N2]urea and a control agent hyperpolarized bis-1,1-(hydroxymethyl)-1-13C-cyclopropane-2H8. Large T2 increases in the inner-medullar and papilla were observed with the former agent and not the latter during antidiuresis. Therefore, [13C,15N2]urea relaxometry is sensitive to two steps of the renal urea handling process: glomerular filtration and the inner-medullary urea transporter (UT)-A1 and UT-A3 mediated urea concentrating process. Simple motion correction and subspace denoising algorithms are presented to aid in the multi exponential data analysis. Furthermore, a T2-edited, ultra long echo time sequence was developed for sub-2 mm3 resolution 3D encoding of urea by exploiting relaxation differences in the vascular and filtrate pools. PMID:27570835

  12. A general chemical shift decomposition method for hyperpolarized (13) C metabolite magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Xiong; Merritt, Matthew E; Sherry, Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized carbon-13 allows sequential steps of metabolism to be detected in vivo. Potential applications in cancer, brain, muscular, myocardial, and hepatic metabolism suggest that clinical applications could be readily developed. A primary concern in imaging hyperpolarized nuclei is the irreversible decay of the enhanced magnetization back to thermal equilibrium. Multiple methods for rapid imaging of hyperpolarized substrates and their products have been proposed with a multi-point Dixon method distinguishing itself as a robust protocol for imaging [1-(13) C]pyruvate. We describe here a generalized chemical shift decomposition method that incorporates a single-shot spiral imaging sequence plus a spectroscopic sequence to retain as much spin polarization as possible while allowing detection of metabolites that have a wide range of chemical shift values. The new method is demonstrated for hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate, [1-(13) C]acetoacetate, and [2-(13) C]dihydroxyacetone. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27060361

  13. Photogeneration of membrane potential hyperpolarization and depolarization in non-excitable cells.

    PubMed

    Ando, Jun; Smith, Nicholas I; Fujita, Katsumasa; Kawata, Satoshi

    2009-02-01

    We monitored femtosecond laser induced membrane potential changes in non-excitable cells using patchclamp analysis. Membrane potential hyperpolarization of HeLa cells was evoked by 780 nm, 80 fs laser pulses focused in the cellular cytoplasm at average powers of 30-60 mW. Simultaneous detection of intracellular Ca2+ concentration and membrane potential revealed coincident photogeneration of Ca2+ waves and membrane potential hyperpolarization. By using non-excitable cells, the cell dynamics are slow enough that we can calculate the membrane potential using the steady-state approximation for ion gradients and permeabilities, as formulated in the GHK equations. The calculations predict hyperpolarization that matches the experimental measurements and indicates that the cellular response to laser irradiation is biological, and occurs via laser triggered Ca2+ which acts on Ca2+ activated K+ channels, causing hyperpolarization. Furthermore, by irradiating the cellular plasma membrane, we observed membrane potential depolarization in combination with a drop in membrane resistance that was consistent with a transient laser-induced membrane perforation. These results entail the first quantitative analysis of location-dependent laser-induced membrane potential modification and will help to clarify cellular biological responses under exposure to high intensity ultrashort laser pulses. PMID:19137284

  14. Hyperpolarized helium-3 mouse lung MRI: Studies of lung structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugas, Joseph Paul

    Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of human and animal lungs has displayed promising and useful applications to studies of lung structure and function in both healthy and diseased lungs. Hyperpolarized 3He MRI allows the visualization of gas in the gas-exchange spaces of the lungs (as opposed to tissue) and has proven especially effective in studying diseases that are characterized by ventilation defects, such as emphysema. In particular, in-vivo measurements of the 3He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) can quantify lung structure by measuring its restrictive effects on the motion of 3He spins. This allows for detection and longitudinal tracking of changes in micro-architecture that result from disease destruction of alveolar walls. Due, in part, to the difficulties inherent in administering and imaging hyperpolarized 3He within the small (0.5 cc volume) mouse lung, applications of hyperpolarized 3He MRI techniques to laboratory mice are scarce. We have been able to implement and improve the techniques of hyperpolarized 3He mouse lung MRI and subsequently apply them to studies of several mouse models of disease, including elastase-induced emphysema, smoking-induced emphysema, and lung cancer. Here we detail the design, development, and implementation of a versatile, electronically-controlled, small animal ventilator that is capable of delivering tiny volumes of hyperpolarized 3He, mixed with oxygen, to the mouse and is also compatible with both the easily depolarized 3He gas and the highly magnetic environment within and around an imaging magnet. Also described are NM techniques developed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of our images and effectively utilize the gas hyperpolarization. Applications of these technologies and techniques to small animal models of disease are presented wherein we have measured up to a 35% increase in 3He ADC in mice with elastase-induced emphysema as compared to healthy mice. We also demonstrate the potential

  15. Robust hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic imaging with selective non-excitation of pyruvate (SNEP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Way Cherng; Teo, Xing Qi; Lee, Man Ying; Radda, George K; Lee, Philip

    2015-08-01

    In vivo metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate provides localized biochemical information and is particularly useful in detecting early disease changes, as well as monitoring disease progression and treatment response. However, a major limitation of hyperpolarized magnetization is its unrecoverable decay, due not only to T1 relaxation but also to radio-frequency (RF) excitation. RF excitation schemes used in metabolic imaging must therefore be able to utilize available hyperpolarized magnetization efficiently and robustly for the optimal detection of substrate and metabolite activities. In this work, a novel RF excitation scheme called selective non-excitation of pyruvate (SNEP) is presented. This excitation scheme involves the use of a spectral selective RF pulse to specifically exclude the excitation of [1-(13)C]pyruvate, while uniformly exciting the key metabolites of interest (namely [1-(13)C]lactate and [1-(13)C]alanine) and [1-(13)C]pyruvate-hydrate. By eliminating the loss of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate magnetization due to RF excitation, the signal from downstream metabolite pools is increased together with enhanced dynamic range. Simulation results, together with phantom measurements and in vivo experiments, demonstrated the improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the extension of the lifetime of the [1-(13)C]lactate and [1-(13)C]alanine pools when compared with conventional non-spectral selective (NS) excitation. SNEP has also been shown to perform comparably well with multi-band (MB) excitation, yet SNEP possesses distinct advantages, including ease of implementation, less stringent demands on gradient performance, increased robustness to frequency drifts and B0 inhomogeneity as well as easier quantification involving the use of [1-(13)C]pyruvate-hydrate as a proxy for the actual [1-(13)C] pyruvate signal. SNEP is therefore a promising alternative for robust hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate metabolic imaging with high

  16. Towards Real-time Metabolic Profiling of Cancer with Hyperpolarized Succinate

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, Niki M.; McCullough, Christopher R.; Wagner, Shawn; Sailasuta, Napapon; Chan, Henry R.; Lee, Youngbok; Hu, Jingzhe; Perman, William H.; Henneberg, Cameron; Ross, Brian D.; Bhattacharya, Pratip

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The energy-yielding mitochondrial Krebs cycle has been shown in many cancers and other diseases to be inhibited or mutated. In most cells, the Krebs cycle with oxidative phosphorylation generates approximately 90% of the adenosine triphosphate in the cell. We designed and hyperpolarized carbon-13 labeled succinate (SUC) and its derivative diethyl succinate (DES) to interrogate the Krebs cycle in real-time in cancer animal models. Procedures Using Parahydrogen Induced Polarization (PHIP), we generated hyperpolarized SUC and DES by hydrogenating their respective fumarate precursors. DES and SUC metabolism was studied in five cancer allograft animal models: breast (4T1), Renal Cell Carcinoma (RENCA), colon (CT26), lymphoma NSO, and lymphoma A20. Results The extent of hyperpolarization was 8 ± 2% for SUC and 2.1 ± 0.6% for DES. The metabolism of DES and SUC in the Krebs cycle could be followed in animals 5 s after tail vein injection. The biodistribution of the compounds was observed using 13C FISP imaging. We observed significant differences in uptake and conversion of both compounds in different cell types both in vivo and in vitro. Conclusion With hyperpolarized DES and SUC, we are able to meet many of the requirements for a useable in vivo metabolic imaging compound – high polarization, relatively long T1 values, low toxicity and high water solubility. However, succinate and its derivative DES are metabolized robustly by RENCA but not by the other cancer models. Our results underscore the heterogeneity of cancer cells and the role cellular uptake plays in hyperpolarized metabolic spectroscopy.

  17. An evaluation of potassium ions as endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor in porcine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Bény, J L; Schaad, O

    2000-11-01

    In the rat hepatic artery, the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) was identified as potassium. Potassium hyperpolarizes the smooth muscles by gating inward rectified potassium channels and by activating the sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na(+)-K(+)ATPase). Our goal was to examine whether potassium could explain the EDHF in porcine coronary arteries. On coronary strips, the inhibition of calcium-dependent potassium channels with 100 nM apamin plus 100 microM charibdotoxin inhibited the endothelium-dependent relaxations, produced by 10 nM substance P and 300 nM bradykinin and resistant to nitro-L-arginine and indomethacin. The scavenging of potassium with 2 mM Kryptofix 2.2.2 abolished the endothelium-dependent relaxations produced by the kinins and resistant to nitro-L-arginine and indomethacin. Forty microM 18alpha glycyrrethinic acid or 50 microM palmitoleic acid, both uncoupling agents, did not inhibit these kinin relaxations. Therefore, EDHF does not result from an electrotonic spreading of an endothelial hyperpolarization. Barium (0.3 nM) did not inhibit the kinin relaxations resistant to nitro-L-arginine and indomethacin. Therefore, EDHF does not result from the activation of inward rectified potassium channels. Five hundred nM ouabain abolished the endothelium-dependent relaxations resistant to nitro-L-arginine and indomethacin without inhibiting the endothelium-derived NO relaxation. The perifusion of a medium supplemented with potassium depolarized and contracted a coronary strip; however, the short application of potassium hyperpolarized the smooth muscles. These results are compatible with the concept that, in porcine coronary artery, the EDHF is potassium released by the endothelial cells and that this ion hyperpolarizes and relaxes the smooth muscles by activating the Na(+)-K(+)ATPase. PMID:11053218

  18. In vivo single-shot 13C spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized metabolites by spatiotemporal encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Rita; Laustsen, Christoffer; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Serrao, Eva M.; Marco-Rius, Irene; Brindle, Kevin M.; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-03-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolic imaging is a growing field that has provided a new tool for analyzing metabolism, particularly in cancer. Given the short life times of the hyperpolarized signal, fast and effective spectroscopic imaging methods compatible with dynamic metabolic characterizations are necessary. Several approaches have been customized for hyperpolarized 13C MRI, including CSI with a center-out k-space encoding, EPSI, and spectrally selective pulses in combination with spiral EPI acquisitions. Recent studies have described the potential of single-shot alternatives based on spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) principles, to derive chemical-shift images within a sub-second period. By contrast to EPSI, SPEN does not require oscillating acquisition gradients to deliver chemical-shift information: its signal encodes both spatial as well as chemical shift information, at no extra cost in experimental complexity. SPEN MRI sequences with slice-selection and arbitrary excitation pulses can also be devised, endowing SPEN with the potential to deliver single-shot multi-slice chemical shift images, with a temporal resolution required for hyperpolarized dynamic metabolic imaging. The present work demonstrates this with initial in vivo results obtained from SPEN-based imaging of pyruvate and its metabolic products, after injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Multi-slice chemical-shift images of healthy rats were obtained at 4.7 T in the region of the kidney, and 4D (2D spatial, 1D spectral, 1D temporal) data sets were obtained at 7 T from a murine lymphoma tumor model.

  19. Multi-point optimization of recirculation flow type casing treatment in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tun, Min Thaw; Sakaguchi, Daisaku

    2016-06-01

    High-pressure ratio and wide operating range are highly required for a turbocharger in diesel engines. A recirculation flow type casing treatment is effective for flow range enhancement of centrifugal compressors. Two ring grooves on a suction pipe and a shroud casing wall are connected by means of an annular passage and stable recirculation flow is formed at small flow rates from the downstream groove toward the upstream groove through the annular bypass. The shape of baseline recirculation flow type casing is modified and optimized by using a multi-point optimization code with a metamodel assisted evolutionary algorithm embedding a commercial CFD code CFX from ANSYS. The numerical optimization results give the optimized design of casing with improving adiabatic efficiency in wide operating flow rate range. Sensitivity analysis of design parameters as a function of efficiency has been performed. It is found that the optimized casing design provides optimized recirculation flow rate, in which an increment of entropy rise is minimized at grooves and passages of the rotating impeller.

  20. Novel Imaging Contrast Methods for Hyperpolarized 13 C Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen Durant

    Magnetic resonance imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled small molecules has emerged as an extremely powerful tool for the in vivo monitoring of perfusion and metabolism. This work presents methods for improved imaging, parameter mapping, and image contrast generation for in vivo hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Angiography using hyperpolarized urea was greatly improved with a highly T2-weighted acquisition in combination with 15N labeling of the urea amide groups. This is due to the fact that the T2 of [13C]urea is strongly limited by the scalar coupling to the neighboring quadrupolar 14N. The long in vivo T2 values of [13C, 15N2]urea were utilized for sub-millimeter projection angiography using a contrast agent that could be safely injected in concentrations of 10-100 mM while still tolerated in patients with renal insufficiency. This study also presented the first method for in vivo T2 mapping of hyperpolarized 13C compounds. The in vivo T2 of urea was short in the blood and long within the kidneys. This persistent signal component was isolated to the renal filtrate, thus enabling for the first time direct detection of an imaging contrast agent undergoing glomerular filtration. While highly T2-weighted acquisitions select for molecules with short rotational correlation times, high diffusion weighting selects for those with the long translational correlation times. A specialized spin-echo EPI sequence was developed in order to generate highly diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized 13C images on a clinical MRI system operating within clinical peak- RF and gradient amplitude constraints. Low power adiabatic spin echo pulses were developed in order to generate a sufficiently large refocused bandwidth while maintaining low nominal power. This diffusion weighted acquisition gave enhanced tumor contrast-to-noise ratio when imaging [1-13C]lactate after infusion of [1-13C]pyruvate. Finally, the first in-man hyperpolarized 13C MRI clinical trial is discussed.

  1. Producing Radical-Free Hyperpolarized Perfusion Agents for In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Using Spin-Labeled Thermoresponsive Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tian; Mishkovsky, Mor; Junk, Matthias J N; Münnemann, Kerstin; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) provides a way to tremendously improve the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. Once the spins are hyperpolarized by dissolution DNP, the radicals used as polarizing agents become undesirable since their presence is an additional source of nuclear spin relaxation and their toxicity might be an issue. This study demonstrates the feasibility of preparing a hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]2-methylpropan-2-ol (tert-butanol) solution free of persistent radicals by using spin-labeled thermoresponsive hydrophilic polymer networks as polarizing agents. The hyperpolarized (13) C signal can be detected for up to 5 min before the spins fully relax to their thermal equilibrium. This approach extends the applicability of spin-labeled thermoresponsive hydrogel to the dissolution DNP field and highlights its potential as polarizing agent for preparing neat slowly relaxing contrast agents. The hydrogels are especially suited to hyperpolarize deuterated alcohols which can be used for in vivo perfusion imaging. PMID:27184565

  2. High-field, hyperpolarized Xe-129 NMR: Preparation and transfer of pure spin-polarized xenon gas to the sample.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Sachs, D. B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Lisitza, N. V.; Happer, W.

    2003-03-01

    Hyperpolarized ^129Xe has already found extensive applications in magnetic resonance imaging(M. S. Albert et al., Nature 370, 199 (1994)) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy(J. P. Mugler, et al., Magn. Reson. Med. 37, 809 (1997)). Using hyperpolarized xenon in high-field NMR spectroscopy opens up new prospects for medical diagnostics of many pathologies and disorders(R. K. Mazitov, et al., Doklady Biophysics 364-366, 28-31 (1999)). Here we present a new set-up for production(N. N. Kuzma, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 147602 (2002)), delivery, and temporary storage of pure hyperpolarized xenon gas for high-field (9.4T) NMR spectroscopy, with an emphasis on in-situ monitoring of ^129Xe polarization along the gas flow path and using a 1.1 T permanent magnet for cryogenic separation of hyperpolarized xenon from the buffer gases.

  3. Scalable control program for multiprecursor flow-type atomic layer deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the development and implementation of a scalable control program to control flow type atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor with multiple precursor delivery lines. The program logic is written and tested in LABVIEW environment to control ALD reactor with four precursor delivery lines to deposit up to four layers of different materials in cyclic manner. The programming logic is conceived such that to facilitate scale up for depositing more layers with multiple precursors and scale down for using single layer with any one precursor in the ALD reactor. The program takes precursor and oxidizer exposure and purging times as input and controls the sequential opening and closing of the valves to facilitate the complex ALD process in cyclic manner. The program could be used to deposit materials from any single line or in tandem with other lines in any combination and in any sequence.

  4. MR imaging of the lungs with hyperpolarized helium-3 gas transported by air.

    PubMed

    Wild, J M; Schmiedeskamp, J; Paley, M N J; Filbir, F; Fichele, S; Kasuboski, L; Knitz, F; Woodhouse, N; Swift, A; Heil, W; Mill, G H; Wolf, M; Griffiths, P D; Otten, E; van Beek, E J R

    2002-07-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas MRI shows promise in the functional imaging of the pulmonary air spaces. The production of hyperpolarized (HP) gas requires specialized laser optical pumping apparatus, which is not likely to be home built in the majority of clinical MRI radiology centres. There are two routes through which HP gas will be made available to hospitals for clinical use: either the apparatus will be installed locally at a considerable expense to the centre, or a central facility will produce the gas and then deliver it to remote MRI sites as and when required. In this study, the feasibility of transporting large quantities of HP gas for in vivo MR imaging from a remote production facility in Mainz, Germany, by airfreight to Sheffield, UK, was successfully demonstrated. PMID:12164592

  5. Light-evoked hyperpolarization and silencing of neurons by conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Feyen, Paul; Colombo, Elisabetta; Endeman, Duco; Nova, Mattia; Laudato, Lucia; Martino, Nicola; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio; Ghezzi, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The ability to control and modulate the action potential firing in neurons represents a powerful tool for neuroscience research and clinical applications. While neuronal excitation has been achieved with many tools, including electrical and optical stimulation, hyperpolarization and neuronal inhibition are typically obtained through patch-clamp or optogenetic manipulations. Here we report the use of conjugated polymer films interfaced with neurons for inducing a light-mediated inhibition of their electrical activity. We show that prolonged illumination of the interface triggers a sustained hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane that significantly reduces both spontaneous and evoked action potential firing. We demonstrate that the polymeric interface can be activated by either visible or infrared light and is capable of modulating neuronal activity in brain slices and explanted retinas. These findings prove the ability of conjugated polymers to tune neuronal firing and suggest their potential application for the in-vivo modulation of neuronal activity. PMID:26940513

  6. Detection of brown adipose tissue and thermogenic activity in mice by hyperpolarized xenon MRI

    PubMed Central

    Branca, Rosa Tamara; He, Ting; Zhang, Le; Floyd, Carlos S.; Freeman, Matthew; White, Christian; Burant, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The study of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in human weight regulation has been constrained by the lack of a noninvasive tool for measuring this tissue and its function in vivo. Existing imaging modalities are nonspecific and intrinsically insensitive to the less active, lipid-rich BAT of obese subjects, the target population for BAT studies. We demonstrate noninvasive imaging of BAT in mice by hyperpolarized xenon gas MRI. We detect a greater than 15-fold increase in xenon uptake by BAT during stimulation of BAT thermogenesis, which enables us to acquire background-free maps of the tissue in both lean and obese mouse phenotypes. We also demonstrate in vivo MR thermometry of BAT by hyperpolarized xenon gas. Finally, we use the linear temperature dependence of the chemical shift of xenon dissolved in adipose tissue to directly measure BAT temperature and to track thermogenic activity in vivo. PMID:25453088

  7. The hyperpolarizing impact of glycine on endothelial cells may be anti-atherogenic.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-08-01

    Studies to date indicate that endothelial cells express glycine-activated chloride channels, which promote hyperpolarization of the endothelial plasma membrane. If such channels are expressed by endothelial cells lining conduit arteries, glycine is likely to have anti-atherogenic activity. This reflects the fact that endothelial hyperpolarization promotes calcium influx, activating the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase, while also down-regulating the activity of the membrane-bound NADPH oxidase, chief endothelial source of superoxide. Since macrophages express glycine-activated chloride channels that suppress production of oxidants and cytokines, glycine may also oppose atherogenesis by influencing intimal macrophage function. In rats, supplemental glycine exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects attributed to chloride channel activation. Administration of large daily doses of glycine would appear to be practical and safe, and has already been shown to inhibit protein glycation in human diabetics. PMID:19232835

  8. Selective Protein Hyperpolarization in Cell Lysates Using Targeted Dynamic Nuclear Polarization.

    PubMed

    Viennet, Thibault; Viegas, Aldino; Kuepper, Arne; Arens, Sabine; Gelev, Vladimir; Petrov, Ognyan; Grossmann, Tom N; Heise, Henrike; Etzkorn, Manuel

    2016-08-26

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has the intrinsic capabilities to investigate proteins in native environments. In general, however, NMR relies on non-natural protein purity and concentration to increase the desired signal over the background. We here report on the efficient and specific hyperpolarization of low amounts of a target protein in a large isotope-labeled background by combining dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and the selectivity of protein interactions. Using a biradical-labeled ligand, we were able to direct the hyperpolarization to the protein of interest, maintaining comparable signal enhancement with about 400-fold less radicals than conventionally used. We could selectively filter out our target protein directly from crude cell lysate obtained from only 8 mL of fully isotope-enriched cell culture. Our approach offers effective means to study proteins with atomic resolution in increasingly native concentrations and environments. PMID:27351143

  9. Drug screening boosted by hyperpolarized long-lived states in NMR.

    PubMed

    Buratto, Roberto; Bornet, Aurélien; Milani, Jonas; Mammoli, Daniele; Vuichoud, Basile; Salvi, Nicola; Singh, Maninder; Laguerre, Aurélien; Passemard, Solène; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2014-11-01

    Transverse and longitudinal relaxation times (T1ρ and T1) have been widely exploited in NMR to probe the binding of ligands and putative drugs to target proteins. We have shown recently that long-lived states (LLS) can be more sensitive to ligand binding. LLS can be excited if the ligand comprises at least two coupled spins. Herein we broaden the scope of ligand screening by LLS to arbitrary ligands by covalent attachment of a functional group, which comprises a pair of coupled protons that are isolated from neighboring magnetic nuclei. The resulting functionalized ligands have longitudinal relaxation times T1((1)H) that are sufficiently long to allow the powerful combination of LLS with dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP). Hyperpolarized weak "spy ligands" can be displaced by high-affinity competitors. Hyperpolarized LLS allow one to decrease both protein and ligand concentrations to micromolar levels and to significantly increase sample throughput. PMID:25196781

  10. NMR spectroscopy of hyperpolarized ^129Xe at high fields: Maintaining spin polarization after optical pumping.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Brian; Kuzma, Nicholas N.; Lisitza, Natalia V.; Happer, William

    2003-05-01

    Spin-polarized ^129Xe has become an invaluable tool in nuclear magnetic resonance research, with applications ranging from medical imaging to high-resolution spectroscopy. High-field NMR studies using hyperpolarized xenon as a spectroscopic probe benefit from the high signal-to-noise ratios and large chemical shifts typical of optically-pumped noble gases. The experimental sensitivity is ultimately determined by the absolute polarization of the xenon in the sample, which can be substantially decreased during purification and transfer. NMR of xenon at high fields (9.4 Tesla) will be discussed, and potential mechanisms of spin relaxation during the distillation, storage(N. N. Kuzma, B. Patton, K. Raman, and W. Happer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88), 147602 (2002)., and delivery of hyperpolarized xenon will be analyzed.

  11. Hyperpolarization of Thin Films with Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Using Photoexcited Triplet Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateishi, Kenichiro; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    With dynamic nuclear polarization using the photoexcited triplet electron spin (triplet-DNP) of pentacene, nuclear spins can be hyperpolarized even in a low magnetic field at room temperature. Several demonstrations have been performed using bulk crystals. Hyperpolarization in a thin film with triplet-DNP enables new applications, such as general NMR spectroscopy and the polarized target of unstable nuclei. In this work, we succeeded in polarizing 1H spins in a thin film fabricated by the cell method. We obtained a 1H spin polarization of 12.9% using a 7-μm-thick film of p-terphenyl doped with pentacene in 0.4 T at room temperature. We also obtained a 1H spin polarization of 3.9% in 0.4 T at 150 K using a 60-μm-thick film of trans-stilbene doped with pentacene, whose single crystal cannot be made easily by conventional methods.

  12. Population diversity and function of hyperpolarization-activated current in olfactory bulb mitral cells

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Kamilla; Margrie, Troy W.

    2011-01-01

    Although neurons are known to exhibit a broad array of intrinsic properties that impact critically on the computations they perform, very few studies have quantified such biophysical diversity and its functional consequences. Using in vivo and in vitro whole-cell recordings here we show that mitral cells are extremely heterogeneous in their expression of a rebound depolarization (sag) at hyperpolarized potentials that is mediated by a ZD7288-sensitive current with properties typical of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels. The variability in sag expression reflects a functionally diverse population of mitral cells. For example, those cells with large amplitude sag exhibit more membrane noise, a lower rheobase and fire action potentials more regularly than cells where sag is absent. Thus, cell-to-cell variability in sag potential amplitude reflects diversity in the integrative properties of mitral cells that ensures a broad dynamic range for odor representation across these principal neurons. PMID:22355569

  13. Light-evoked hyperpolarization and silencing of neurons by conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyen, Paul; Colombo, Elisabetta; Endeman, Duco; Nova, Mattia; Laudato, Lucia; Martino, Nicola; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio; Ghezzi, Diego

    2016-03-01

    The ability to control and modulate the action potential firing in neurons represents a powerful tool for neuroscience research and clinical applications. While neuronal excitation has been achieved with many tools, including electrical and optical stimulation, hyperpolarization and neuronal inhibition are typically obtained through patch-clamp or optogenetic manipulations. Here we report the use of conjugated polymer films interfaced with neurons for inducing a light-mediated inhibition of their electrical activity. We show that prolonged illumination of the interface triggers a sustained hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane that significantly reduces both spontaneous and evoked action potential firing. We demonstrate that the polymeric interface can be activated by either visible or infrared light and is capable of modulating neuronal activity in brain slices and explanted retinas. These findings prove the ability of conjugated polymers to tune neuronal firing and suggest their potential application for the in-vivo modulation of neuronal activity.

  14. Light-evoked hyperpolarization and silencing of neurons by conjugated polymers

    PubMed Central

    Feyen, Paul; Colombo, Elisabetta; Endeman, Duco; Nova, Mattia; Laudato, Lucia; Martino, Nicola; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio; Ghezzi, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The ability to control and modulate the action potential firing in neurons represents a powerful tool for neuroscience research and clinical applications. While neuronal excitation has been achieved with many tools, including electrical and optical stimulation, hyperpolarization and neuronal inhibition are typically obtained through patch-clamp or optogenetic manipulations. Here we report the use of conjugated polymer films interfaced with neurons for inducing a light-mediated inhibition of their electrical activity. We show that prolonged illumination of the interface triggers a sustained hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane that significantly reduces both spontaneous and evoked action potential firing. We demonstrate that the polymeric interface can be activated by either visible or infrared light and is capable of modulating neuronal activity in brain slices and explanted retinas. These findings prove the ability of conjugated polymers to tune neuronal firing and suggest their potential application for the in-vivo modulation of neuronal activity. PMID:26940513

  15. Hyperpolarization of Nitrogen-15 Schiff Bases by Reversible Exchange Catalysis with para-Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Logan, Angus W J; Theis, Thomas; Colell, Johannes F P; Warren, Warren S; Malcolmson, Steven J

    2016-07-25

    NMR with thermal polarization requires relatively concentrated samples, particularly for nuclei with low abundance and low gyromagnetic ratios, such as (15) N. We expand the substrate scope of SABRE, a recently introduced hyperpolarization method, to allow access to (15) N-enriched Schiff bases. These substrates show fractional (15) N polarization levels of up to 2 % while having only minimal (1) H enhancements. PMID:27218241

  16. Multiparametric human hepatocellular carcinoma characterization and therapy response evaluation by hyperpolarized (13) C MRSI.

    PubMed

    Düwel, Stephan; Durst, Markus; Gringeri, Concetta V; Kosanke, Yvonne; Gross, Claudia; Janich, Martin A; Haase, Axel; Glaser, Steffen J; Schwaiger, Markus; Schulte, Rolf F; Braren, Rickmer; Menzel, Marion I

    2016-07-01

    Individual tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring based on current medical imaging methods remain challenging. This work investigates hyperpolarized (13) C compounds in an orthotopic rat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model system before and after transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). HCC ranks amongst the top six most common cancer types in humans and accounts for one-third of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early therapy response monitoring could aid in the development of personalized therapy approaches and novel therapeutic concepts. Measurements with selectively (13) C-labeled and hyperpolarized urea, pyruvate and fumarate were performed in tumor-bearing rats before and after TAE. Two-dimensional, slice-selective MRSI was used to obtain spatially resolved maps of tumor perfusion, cell energy metabolic conversion rates and necrosis, which were additionally correlated with immunohistochemistry. All three injected compounds, taken together with their respective metabolites, exhibited similar signal distributions. TAE induced a decrease in blood flow into the tumor and thus a decrease in tumor to muscle and tumor to liver ratios of urea, pyruvate and its metabolites, alanine and lactate, whereas conversion rates remained stable or increased on TAE in tumor, muscle and liver tissue. Conversion from fumarate to malate successfully indicated individual levels of necrosis, and global malate signals after TAE suggested the washout of fumarase or malate itself on necrosis. This study presents a combination of three (13) C compounds as novel candidate biomarkers for a comprehensive characterization of genetically and molecularly diverse HCC using hyperpolarized MRSI, enabling the simultaneous detection of differences in tumor perfusion, metabolism and necrosis. If, as in this study, bolus dynamics are not required and qualitative perfusion information is sufficient, the desired information could be extracted from hyperpolarized fumarate and

  17. Activity-dependent hyperpolarization of EGABA is absent in cutaneous DRG neurons from inflamed rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Xiu-Lin; Gold, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    A shift in GABAA signaling from inhibition to excitation in primary afferent neurons appears to contribute to the inflammation-induced increase in afferent input to the central nervous system (CNS). An activity-dependent depolarization of the GABA equilibrium potential (EGABA) has been described in CNS neurons which drives a shift in GABAA signaling from inhibition to excitation. The purpose of the present study was to determine if such an activity-dependent depolarization of EGABA occurs in primary afferents and whether the depolarization is amplified with persistent inflammation. Acutely dissociated retrogradely labeled cutaneous DRG neurons from naïve and inflamed rats were studied with gramicidin perforated patch recording. Rather than a depolarization, 200 action potentials delivered at 2 Hz resulted in a ~10 mV hyperpolarization of EGABA in cutaneous neurons from naïve rats. No such hyperpolarization was observed in neurons from inflamed rats. The shift in EGABA was not blocked by 10 µM bumetanide. Furthermore, because activity-dependent hyperpolarization of EGABA was fully manifest in the absence of HCO3− in the bath solution, this shift was not dependent on a change in HCO3−-Cl− exchanger activity, despite evidence of HCO3−-Cl− exchangers in DRG neurons that may contribute to the establishment of EGABA in the presence of HCO3−. While the mechanism underlying the activity-dependent hyperpolarization of EGABA has yet to be identified, because this mechanism appears to function as a form of feedback inhibition, facilitating GABA mediated inhibition of afferent activity, it may serve as a novel target for the treatment of inflammatory pain. PMID:24135545

  18. Hyperpolarization and lysophosphatidylcholine induce inward currents and ethidium fluorescence in rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Song, Y-M; Ochi, R

    2002-12-01

    Strong electric pulses produce reversible or irreversible membrane breakdown (electroporation). We analysed the permeation properties of minute pores caused by hyperpolarization or lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) by comparing the amount of charge carried by irregular inward currents (I(hi)) with changes in ethidium bromide (EB) fluorescence in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes. Forty-second negative pulses from a holding potential of -20 mV induced I(hi) whose conductance increased with hyperpolarization; the mean conductance (G(hi)) was 63.6 +/- 9.9 pS pF(-1) (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 9) at -160 mV. EB fluorescence increased during voltage pulses in parallel with the time integral of I(hi) (Q(hi)), with the magnitude of the increases in nuclear EB fluorescence being 5.3 times greater than in the cytoplasm at -160 mV. Similar hyperpolarization-induced parallel increases in I(hi) and EB fluorescence were also obtained in Na(+)-free, N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG) solution. LPC (10 microM) induced large (101.2 +/- 21.2 pS pF(-1), n = 16), rapid (rise times, 1-10 ms) I(hi) with slow relaxation rates at -80 mV that reflected increases in G(hi) to 94.3 +/- 24.8 pS pF(-1) (n = 8) at 6 min. Plots of EB fluorescence vs. Q(hi) were well fitted by a common Hill's equation with a Hill coefficient of 0.97. Taken together, our findings indicate that hyperpolarization and LPC produced pores having the same filter properties for the permeation of small ions, including ethidium(+), and that I(hi) (carried in part by Ca(2+)) generated by membrane breakdown are capable of supplying sufficient ions to evoke abnormal excitation and contraction in cardiac myocytes. PMID:12456826

  19. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    DOE PAGESBeta

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Shin, Chang S.; Page, Ralph H.; Avalos, Claudia E.; Wang, Hai-Jing; Pines, Alexander

    2015-12-07

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ~170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal ofmore » the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. In conclusion, hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions.« less

  20. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Shin, Chang S.; Page, Ralph H.; Avalos, Claudia E.; Wang, Hai-Jing; Pines, Alexander

    2015-12-07

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ~170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal of the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. In conclusion, hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions.

  1. A Catalyzing Phantom for Reproducible Dynamic Conversion of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher M.; Lee, Jaehyuk; Ramirez, Marc S.; Schellingerhout, Dawid; Millward, Steven; Bankson, James A.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo real time spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C labeled metabolites shows substantial promise for the assessment of physiological processes that were previously inaccessible. However, reliable and reproducible methods of measurement are necessary to maximize the effectiveness of imaging biomarkers that may one day guide personalized care for diseases such as cancer. Animal models of human disease serve as poor reference standards due to the complexity, heterogeneity, and transient nature of advancing disease. In this study, we describe the reproducible conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate to [1-13C]-lactate using a novel synthetic enzyme phantom system. The rate of reaction can be controlled and tuned to mimic normal or pathologic conditions of varying degree. Variations observed in the use of this phantom compare favorably against within-group variations observed in recent animal studies. This novel phantom system provides crucial capabilities as a reference standard for the optimization, comparison, and certification of quantitative imaging strategies for hyperpolarized tracers. PMID:23977006

  2. Ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer for studying magnetization fields produced by hyperpolarized helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Xi-yuan; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi; Hu, Zhao-hui; Shan, Guang-cun; Quan, Wei; Fang, Jian-cheng

    2016-04-01

    An ingenious approach to acquire the absolute magnetization fields produced by polarized atoms has been presented in this paper. The method was based on detection of spin precession signal of the hyperpolarized helium-3 with ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer of potassium by referring to time-domain analysis. At first, dynamic responses of the mixed spin ensembles in the presence of variant external magnetic fields have been analyzed by referring to the Bloch equation. Subsequently, the relevant equipment was established to achieve the functions of hyperpolarizing helium-3 and detecting the precession of spin-polarized noble gas. By analyzing the transient response of the magnetometer in time domain, we obtained the relevant damping ratio and natural frequency. When the value of damping ratio reached the maximum value of 0.0917, the combined atomic magnetometer was in equilibrium. We draw a conclusion from the steady response: the magnetization fields of the polarized electrons and the hyperpolarized nuclei were corresponding 16.12 nT and 90.74 nT. Under this situation, the nuclear magnetization field could offset disturbing magnetic fields perpendicular to the orientation of the electronic polarization, and it preserved the electronic spin staying in a stable axis. Therefore, the combined magnetometer was particularly attractive for inertial measurements.

  3. Hybrid polarizing solids for pure hyperpolarized liquids through dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Gajan, David; Bornet, Aurélien; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Melzi, Roberto; van Kalkeren, Henri A.; Veyre, Laurent; Thieuleux, Chloé; Conley, Matthew P.; Grüning, Wolfram R.; Schwarzwälder, Martin; Lesage, Anne; Copéret, Christophe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Emsley, Lyndon; Jannin, Sami

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarization of substrates for magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and imaging (MRI) by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) usually involves saturating the ESR transitions of polarizing agents (PAs; e.g., persistent radicals embedded in frozen glassy matrices). This approach has shown enormous potential to achieve greatly enhanced nuclear spin polarization, but the presence of PAs and/or glassing agents in the sample after dissolution can raise concerns for in vivo MRI applications, such as perturbing molecular interactions, and may induce the erosion of hyperpolarization in spectroscopy and MRI. We show that D-DNP can be performed efficiently with hybrid polarizing solids (HYPSOs) with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl radicals incorporated in a mesostructured silica material and homogeneously distributed along its pore channels. The powder is wetted with a solution containing molecules of interest (for example, metabolites for MRS or MRI) to fill the pore channels (incipient wetness impregnation), and DNP is performed at low temperatures in a very efficient manner. This approach allows high polarization without the need for glass-forming agents and is applicable to a broad range of substrates, including peptides and metabolites. During dissolution, HYPSO is physically retained by simple filtration in the cryostat of the DNP polarizer, and a pure hyperpolarized solution is collected within a few seconds. The resulting solution contains the pure substrate, is free from any paramagnetic or other pollutants, and is ready for in vivo infusion. PMID:25267650

  4. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    PubMed Central

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Shin, Chang S.; Page, Ralph H.; Avalos, Claudia E.; Wang, Hai-Jing; Pines, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ∼170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal of the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. Hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions. PMID:26639147

  5. Evaluation of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Pyruvate by Magnetic Resonance to Detect Ionizing Radiation Effects in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Sandulache, Vlad C.; Chen, Yunyun; Lee, Jaehyuk; Rubinstein, Ashley; Ramirez, Marc S.; Skinner, Heath D.; Walker, Christopher M.; Williams, Michelle D.; Tailor, Ramesh; Court, Laurence E.; Bankson, James A.; Lai, Stephen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) cytotoxicity is primarily mediated through reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since tumor cells neutralize ROS by utilizing reducing equivalents, we hypothesized that measurements of reducing potential using real-time hyperpolarized (HP) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can serve as a surrogate marker of IR induced ROS. This hypothesis was tested in a pre-clinical model of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), an aggressive head and neck malignancy. Human ATC cell lines were utilized to test IR effects on ROS and reducing potential in vitro and [1-13C] pyruvate HP-MRS/MRSI imaging of ATC orthotopic xenografts was used to study in vivo effects of IR. IR increased ATC intra-cellular ROS levels resulting in a corresponding decrease in reducing equivalent levels. Exogenous manipulation of cellular ROS and reducing equivalent levels altered ATC radiosensitivity in a predictable manner. Irradiation of ATC xenografts resulted in an acute drop in reducing potential measured using HP-MRS, reflecting the shunting of reducing equivalents towards ROS neutralization. Residual tumor tissue post irradiation demonstrated heterogeneous viability. We have adapted HP-MRS/MRSI to non-invasively measure IR mediated changes in tumor reducing potential in real time. Continued development of this technology could facilitate the development of an adaptive clinical algorithm based on real-time adjustments in IR dose and dose mapping. PMID:24475215

  6. The hyperpolarization of frog skeletal muscle fibres induced by removing potassium from the bathing medium

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, T.; Grundfest, H.

    1971-01-01

    1. The time course of changes in resting potential after removing K0 was studied in twenty-four single fibres and in 136 fibres from small bundle (two to four fibres) preparations of frog semitendinosus muscles. 2. The initial resting potentials in the control saline ranged between -88 and -98 mV. The potentials returned to nearly the initial values when control conditions were reinstated after 3-8 hr of experimentation. All the fibres twitched at the end of the experiment. 3. Only about one third of the fibres hyperpolarized for any length of time on exposure to a K-free saline at room temperature (20-28° C). The hyperpolarization was reversed to depolarization after a variable delay. The resting potential could fall to -50 or -40 mV. 4. The remainder of the fibres depolarized with little or no prior hyperpolarization. 5. Both patterns of response could be replicated in the different fibres. 6. Hyperpolarization induced by K-free solution was reduced or abolished on cooling to ca 10°C; on substitution of Tris or Li for Na; and upon inhibition of the Na pump with DNP (0·025-0·2 mM) or ouabain (0·05 mM). The latter agent was not as effective as the other conditions. 7. Only small, slowly developing depolarization occurred when Na was replaced with Tris or Li. 8. The various effects in K-free solutions were reversed on returning to the control conditions. 9. It is suggested that removal of K0 itself has little or no direct effect on the resting potential and that the initial hyperpolarization is due to the pumped efflux of Na without a compensatory influx of K. Block of the pump electrogenesis is manifested by depolarization of the fibres as K1 is depleted and Na1 increased. 10. The Na pump appears to be dependent upon the nutritional status of the frogs and variations of the latter probably cause the different responses of fibres to removal of K0. PMID:5571933

  7. Investigation of Lung Structure-Function Relationships Using Hyperpolarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomen, Robert P.

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an application of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phenomenon to non-invasively generate 3D tomographic images. MRI is an emerging modality for the lung, but it suffers from low sensitivity due to inherent low tissue density and short T(*/2) . Hyperpolarization is a process by which the nuclear contribution to NMR signal is greatly enhanced to more than 100,000 times that of samples in thermal equilibrium. The noble gases 3He and 129Xe are most often hyperpolarized by transfer of light angular momentum through the electron of a vaporized alkali metal to the noble gas nucleus (called Spin Exchange Optical Pumping). The enhancement in NMR signal is so great that the gas itself can be imaged via MRI, and because noble gases are chemically inert, they can be safely inhaled by a subject, and the gas distribution within the interior of the lung can be imaged. The mechanics of respiration is an elegant physical process by which air is is brought into the distal airspaces of the lungs for oxygen/carbon dioxide gas exchange with blood. Therefore proper description of lung function is intricately related to its physical structure , and the basic mechanical operation of healthy lungs -- from pressure driven airflow, to alveolar airspace gas kinetics, to gas exchange by blood/gas concentration gradients, to elastic contraction of parenchymal tissue -- is a process decidedly governed by the laws of physics. This dissertation will describe experiments investigating the relationship of lung structure and function using hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI. In particular HP gases will be applied to the study of several pulmonary diseases each of which demonstrates unique structure-function abnormalities: asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Successful implementation of an HP gas acquisition protocol for pulmonary studies is an involved and stratified undertaking which requires a solid theoretical foundation in NMR

  8. Contribution of calcium and potassium permeability changes to the off response of scallop hyperpolarizing photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Cornwall, M C; Gorman, A L

    1979-01-01

    1. The membrane response of the distal photoreceptors in the retina of the scallop Pectin irradians to the termination of a bright white light (off response) is shown to be composed of the decay of the hyperpolarizing receptor potential and an action potential with slow kinetics. 2. The action potential can be produced in darkness in the absence of external Na+ ions by membrane depolarization. 3. The action potential is maintained by replacement of external Ca2+ with Sr2+ or Ba2+, but not by Mg2+. In normal external Ca2+ (9mM), the action potential is abolished by the addition of the Ca2+ inhibitors, La3+, Co2+, and Mn2+ or the organic Ca2+ antagonist D-600. 4. Elevated external Ca2+ concentrations increase the rate of rise and peak amplitude of the action potential as well as the rate of repolarization and after hyperpolarization, but decrease the duration. 5. The rate of rise and peak amplitude of the action potential are increased by the K+ antagonists tetraethylammonium (TEA) 4-amino-phyridine (4-AP), Ba2+ and procaine. The antagonists have different effects on subsequent phases of the response, however. External TEA and Ba2+ increase the duration, but decrease the rate of repolarization and abolish the after hyperpolarization, whereas external 4-AP and procaine increase the rate of repolarization, decrease the duration and increase the after hyperpolarization. 6. The ratio of the Ca2+ to K+ permeability (P Ca/P K) estimated from the constant field equation at the peak of the action potential in different external Ca2+ concentrations is close to 1. 7. The maximum rate of rise and the peak amplitude of the action potential are increased by membrane hyperpolarization and decreased by membrane depolarization. They are decreased by background light intensity relative to their value in the dark. 8. In normal ASW the action potential can be identified during the off response as a small overshoot of membrane potential relative to its value in the dark. 9. The rate of

  9. Flow-type landslides magnitude evaluation: the case study of the Campania Region (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Antonio; De Falco, Melania; Di Crescenzo, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    In the last years studies concerning the triggering and the run-out susceptibility for different kind of landslides have become more and more precise. In the most of the cases the methodological approach involve the production of detailed thematic maps (at least 1:5000 scale) which represent a very useful tool for territorial planning, especially in urbanized areas. More recently these researches were accompanied by the growth of other studies dealing with landslide magnitude evaluation (especially in terms of volume and velocity estimate). In this paper the results of a flow-type landslides magnitude evaluation are presented. The study area is located in Southern Italy and is very wide (1,500 square kilometres) including all the Campania region. In this context flow type landslides represent the most frequent instabilities as shown by the large number of victims and the huge economic damage caused in the last few centuries. These shallow landslides involve thin cohesionless, unsaturated pyroclastic soils found over steep slopes around Somma-Vesuvio and Phlegrean district, affecting a wide area where over 100 towns are located. Since the potential volume of flow-type landslides is a measure of event magnitude we propose to estimate the potential volume at the scale of slope or basin for about 90 municipalities affecting 850 hierarchized drainage basins and 900 regular slopes. An empirical approach recently proposed in literature (De Falco et al., 2012), allows to estimate the volume of the pyroclastic cover that can be displaced along the slope. The method derives from the interpretation of numerous geological and geomorphological data gathered from a vast amount of case histories on landslides in volcanic and carbonatic contexts and it is based on determining the thickness of the pyroclastic cover and the width of the detachment and erosion-transport zone. Thickness can be evaluated with a good degree of approximation since, in these landslides, the failure

  10. Detection of inflammatory cell function using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy of hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine

    PubMed Central

    Najac, Chloé; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Kohanbash, Gary; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Okada, Hideho; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are highly prevalent inflammatory cells that play a key role in tumor development and are considered therapeutic targets. MDSCs promote tumor growth by blocking T-cell-mediated anti-tumoral immune response through depletion of arginine that is essential for T-cell proliferation. To deplete arginine, MDSCs express high levels of arginase, which catalyzes the breakdown of arginine into urea and ornithine. Here, we developed a new hyperpolarized 13C probe, [6-13C]-arginine, to image arginase activity. We show that [6-13C]-arginine can be hyperpolarized, and hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production from [6-13C]-arginine is linearly correlated with arginase concentration in vitro. Furthermore we show that we can detect a statistically significant increase in hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production in MDSCs when compared to control bone marrow cells. This increase was associated with an increase in intracellular arginase concentration detected using a spectrophotometric assay. Hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine could therefore serve to image tumoral MDSC function and more broadly M2-like macrophages. PMID:27507680

  11. Monitoring Chemotherapeutic Response by Hyperpolarized 13C-Fumarate MRS and Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mignion, Lionel; Dutta, Prasanta; Martinez, Gary V.; Foroutan, Parastou; Gillies, Robert J.; Jordan, Bénédicte F.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted chemotherapeutic agents often do not result in tumor shrinkage, so new biomarkers that correlate with clinical efficacy are needed. In this study, we investigated noninvasive imaging protocols to monitor responses to sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor approved for treatment of renal cell and hepatocellular carcinoma. Healthy cells are impermeable to fumarate, so conversion of this metabolite to malate as detected by 13C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been suggested as one marker for cell death and treatment response in tumors. Diffusion MRI also has been suggested as a measure of therapy-induced cytotoxic edema because viable cells act as a diffusion barrier in tissue. For these reasons, we assessed sorafenib responses using hyperpolarized 13C-fumarate, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in a xenograft model of human breast cancer in which daily administration of sorafenib was sufficient to stabilize tumor growth. We detected signals from fumarate and malate following intravenous administration of hyperpolarized fumarate with a progressive increase in the malate-to-fumarate (MA/FA) ratio at days 2 to 5 after sorafenib infusion. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured by DW-MRI increased in the treated group consistent with cytotoxic edema. However, the MA/FA ratio was a more sensitive marker of therapeutic response than ADC, with 2.8-fold versus 1.3-fold changes, respectively, by day 5 of drug treatment. Histologic analyses confirmed cell death in the sorafenib-treated cohort. Notably, 13C-pyruvate-to-lactate conversion was not affected by sorafenib in the breast cancer model examined. Our results illustrate how combining hyperpolarized substrates with DW-MRI can allow noninvasive monitoring of targeted therapeutic responses at relatively early times after drug administration. PMID:24285723

  12. Monitoring chemotherapeutic response by hyperpolarized 13C-fumarate MRS and diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Mignion, Lionel; Dutta, Prasanta; Martinez, Gary V; Foroutan, Parastou; Gillies, Robert J; Jordan, Bénédicte F

    2014-02-01

    Targeted chemotherapeutic agents often do not result in tumor shrinkage, so new biomarkers that correlate with clinical efficacy are needed. In this study, we investigated noninvasive imaging protocols to monitor responses to sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor approved for treatment of renal cell and hepatocellular carcinoma. Healthy cells are impermeable to fumarate, so conversion of this metabolite to malate as detected by (13)C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been suggested as one marker for cell death and treatment response in tumors. Diffusion MRI also has been suggested as a measure of therapy-induced cytotoxic edema because viable cells act as a diffusion barrier in tissue. For these reasons, we assessed sorafenib responses using hyperpolarized (13)C-fumarate, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in a xenograft model of human breast cancer in which daily administration of sorafenib was sufficient to stabilize tumor growth. We detected signals from fumarate and malate following intravenous administration of hyperpolarized fumarate with a progressive increase in the malate-to-fumarate (MA/FA) ratio at days 2 to 5 after sorafenib infusion. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured by DW-MRI increased in the treated group consistent with cytotoxic edema. However, the MA/FA ratio was a more sensitive marker of therapeutic response than ADC, with 2.8-fold versus 1.3-fold changes, respectively, by day 5 of drug treatment. Histologic analyses confirmed cell death in the sorafenib-treated cohort. Notably, (13)C-pyruvate-to-lactate conversion was not affected by sorafenib in the breast cancer model examined. Our results illustrate how combining hyperpolarized substrates with DW-MRI can allow noninvasive monitoring of targeted therapeutic responses at relatively early times after drug administration. PMID:24285723

  13. Metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate through alternate pathways in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Jin, Eunsook S; Moreno, Karlos X; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Fidelino, Leila; Merritt, Matthew E; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-04-01

    The source of hyperpolarized (HP) [(13) C]bicarbonate in the liver during metabolism of HP [1-(13) C]pyruvate is uncertain and likely changes with physiology. Multiple processes including decarboxylation through pyruvate dehydrogenase or pyruvate carboxylase followed by subsequent decarboxylation via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (gluconeogenesis) could play a role. Here we tested which metabolic fate of pyruvate contributed to the appearance of HP [(13) C]bicarbonate during metabolism of HP [1-(13) C]pyruvate by the liver in rats after 21 h of fasting compared to rats with free access to food. The (13) C NMR of HP [(13) C]bicarbonate was observed in the liver of fed rats, but not in fasted rats where pyruvate carboxylation and gluconeogenesis was active. To further explore the relative fluxes through pyruvate carboxylase versus pyruvate dehydrogenase in the liver under typical conditions of hyperpolarization studies, separate parallel experiments were performed with rats given non-hyperpolarized [2,3-(13) C]pyruvate. (13) C NMR analysis of glutamate isolated from the liver of rats revealed that flux from injected pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase was dominant under fed conditions whereas flux through pyruvate carboxylase dominated under fasted conditions. The NMR signal of HP [(13) C]bicarbonate does not parallel pyruvate carboxylase activity followed by subsequent decarboxylation reaction leading to glucose production. In the liver of healthy well-fed rats, the appearance of HP [(13) C]bicarbonate exclusively reflects decarboxylation of HP [1-(13) C]pyruvate via pyruvate dehydrogenase. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26836042

  14. Nuclear spin imaging with hyperpolarized nuclei created by brute force method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masayoshi; Kunimatsu, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Kohri, Hideki; Ohta, Takeshi; Utsuro, Masahiko; Yosoi, Masaru; Ono, Satoshi; Fukuda, Kohji; Takamatsu, Kunihiko; Ueda, Kunihiro; Didelez, Jean-P.; Prossati, Giorgio; de Waard, Arlette

    2011-05-01

    We have been developing a polarized HD target for particle physics at the SPring-8 under the leadership of the RCNP, Osaka University for the past 5 years. Nuclear polarizaton is created by means of the brute force method which uses a high magnetic field (~17 T) and a low temperature (~ 10 mK). As one of the promising applications of the brute force method to life sciences we started a new project, "NSI" (Nuclear Spin Imaging), where hyperpolarized nuclei are used for the MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). The candidate nuclei with spin ½hslash are 3He, 13C, 15N, 19F, 29Si, and 31P, which are important elements for the composition of the biomolecules. Since the NMR signals from these isotopes are enhanced by orders of magnitudes, the spacial resolution in the imaging would be much more improved compared to the practical MRI used so far. Another advantage of hyperpolarized MRI is that the MRI is basically free from the radiation, while the problems of radiation exposure caused by the X-ray CT or PET (Positron Emission Tomography) cannot be neglected. In fact, the risk of cancer for Japanese due to the radiation exposure through these diagnoses is exceptionally high among the advanced countries. As the first step of the NSI project, we are developing a system to produce hyperpolarized 3He gas for the diagnosis of serious lung diseases, for example, COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). The system employs the same 3He/4He dilution refrigerator and superconducting solenoidal coil as those used for the polarized HD target with some modification allowing the 3He Pomeranchuk cooling and the following rapid melting of the polarized solid 3He to avoid the depolarization. In this report, the present and future steps of our project will be outlined with some latest experimental results.

  15. A comparison of quantitative methods for clinical imaging with hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Charlie J; McLean, Mary A; Schulte, Rolf F; Robb, Fraser J; Gill, Andrew B; McGlashan, Nicholas; Graves, Martin J; Schwaiger, Markus; Lomas, David J; Brindle, Kevin M; Gallagher, Ferdia A

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enables the metabolism of hyperpolarized (13)C-labelled molecules, such as the conversion of [1-(13)C]pyruvate to [1-(13)C]lactate, to be dynamically and non-invasively imaged in tissue. Imaging of this exchange reaction in animal models has been shown to detect early treatment response and correlate with tumour grade. The first human DNP study has recently been completed, and, for widespread clinical translation, simple and reliable methods are necessary to accurately probe the reaction in patients. However, there is currently no consensus on the most appropriate method to quantify this exchange reaction. In this study, an in vitro system was used to compare several kinetic models, as well as simple model-free methods. Experiments were performed using a clinical hyperpolarizer, a human 3 T MR system, and spectroscopic imaging sequences. The quantitative methods were compared in vivo by using subcutaneous breast tumours in rats to examine the effect of pyruvate inflow. The two-way kinetic model was the most accurate method for characterizing the exchange reaction in vitro, and the incorporation of a Heaviside step inflow profile was best able to describe the in vivo data. The lactate time-to-peak and the lactate-to-pyruvate area under the curve ratio were simple model-free approaches that accurately represented the full reaction, with the time-to-peak method performing indistinguishably from the best kinetic model. Finally, extracting data from a single pixel was a robust and reliable surrogate of the whole region of interest. This work has identified appropriate quantitative methods for future work in the analysis of human hyperpolarized (13)C data. PMID:27414749

  16. A comparison of quantitative methods for clinical imaging with hyperpolarized 13C‐pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Charlie J.; McLean, Mary A.; Schulte, Rolf F.; Robb, Fraser J.; Gill, Andrew B.; McGlashan, Nicholas; Graves, Martin J.; Schwaiger, Markus; Lomas, David J.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enables the metabolism of hyperpolarized 13C‐labelled molecules, such as the conversion of [1‐13C]pyruvate to [1‐13C]lactate, to be dynamically and non‐invasively imaged in tissue. Imaging of this exchange reaction in animal models has been shown to detect early treatment response and correlate with tumour grade. The first human DNP study has recently been completed, and, for widespread clinical translation, simple and reliable methods are necessary to accurately probe the reaction in patients. However, there is currently no consensus on the most appropriate method to quantify this exchange reaction. In this study, an in vitro system was used to compare several kinetic models, as well as simple model‐free methods. Experiments were performed using a clinical hyperpolarizer, a human 3 T MR system, and spectroscopic imaging sequences. The quantitative methods were compared in vivo by using subcutaneous breast tumours in rats to examine the effect of pyruvate inflow. The two‐way kinetic model was the most accurate method for characterizing the exchange reaction in vitro, and the incorporation of a Heaviside step inflow profile was best able to describe the in vivo data. The lactate time‐to‐peak and the lactate‐to‐pyruvate area under the curve ratio were simple model‐free approaches that accurately represented the full reaction, with the time‐to‐peak method performing indistinguishably from the best kinetic model. Finally, extracting data from a single pixel was a robust and reliable surrogate of the whole region of interest. This work has identified appropriate quantitative methods for future work in the analysis of human hyperpolarized 13C data. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27414749

  17. Hyperpolarized 129Xe magnetic resonance imaging of a rat model of transient Ischemic Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walvick, Ronn P.; Bastan, Birgul; Reno, Austin; Mansour, Joey; Sun, Yanping; Zhou, Xin; Mazzani, Mary; Fisher, Marc; Sotak, Christopher H.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2009-02-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for nearly 80% of all stroke cases. Although proton diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the gold standards in ischemic stroke diagnostics, the use of hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI has a potential role to contribute to the diagnostic picture. The highly lipophilic hyperpolarized 129Xe can be non-invasively delivered via inhalation into the lungs where it is dissolved into the blood and delivered to other organs such as the brain. As such, we expect hyperpolarized 129Xe to act as a perfusion tracer which will result in a signal deficit in areas of blood deprived tissue. In this work, we present imaging results from an animal model of transient ischemic stroke characterized through 129Xe MRI. In this model, a suture is used to occlude the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in the rat brain, thus causing an ischemic event. After a period of MCA occlusion, the suture can then be removed to reperfuse the ischemic area. During the ischemic phase of the stroke, a signal void was observed in the MCA territory; which was subsequently restored by normal 129Xe MRI signal once perfusion was reinstated. Further, a higher resolution one-dimensional chemical shift image shows a sharp signal drop in the area of ischemia. Validation of ischemic damage was shown through both proton diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazoliumchloride (TTC) staining. The results show the potential of 129Xe to act as a perfusion tracer; information that may add to the diagnostic and prognostic utility of the clinical picture of stroke.

  18. Cardiac perfusion imaging using hyperpolarized 13c urea using flow sensitizing gradients

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jack J.; Robson, Matthew D.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of imaging the first passage of a bolus of hyperpolarized 13C urea through the rodent heart using flow‐sensitizing gradients to reduce signal from the blood pool. Methods A flow‐sensitizing bipolar gradient was optimized to reduce the bright signal within the cardiac chambers, enabling improved contrast of the agent within the tissue capillary bed. The gradient was incorporated into a dynamic golden angle spiral 13C imaging sequence. Healthy rats were scanned during rest (n = 3) and under adenosine stress‐induced hyperemia (n = 3). Results A two‐fold increase in myocardial perfusion relative to rest was detected during adenosine stress‐induced hyperemia, consistent with a myocardial perfusion reserve of two in rodents. Conclusion The new pulse sequence was used to obtain dynamic images of the first passage of hyperpolarized 13C urea in the rodent heart, without contamination from bright signal within the neighboring cardiac lumen. This probe of myocardial perfusion is expected to enable new hyperpolarized 13C studies in which the cardiac metabolism/perfusion mismatch can be identified. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Magn Reson Med 75:1474–1483, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance. PMID:25991580

  19. Hyperpolarization-activated ion channels as targets for nitric oxide signalling in deep cerebellar nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Gary W; Garthwaite, John

    2010-01-01

    Most biological effects of nitric oxide (NO) in the brain are mediated by guanylyl cyclase-coupled NO receptors, whose activation results in increased intracellular cGMP levels. Apart from protein kinase activation little is known about subsequent cGMP signal transduction. In optic nerve axons, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated cation (HCN) channels, which bind cGMP or cAMP directly, were recently suggested to be a target. The aim here was to test this possibility more directly. Neurones of the rat deep cerebellar nuclei were selected for this purpose, their suitability being attested by immunocytochemistry showing that the principal neurones expressed guanylyl cyclase protein and that NO synthase-containing fibres were abundant in the neuropil. Using whole-cell voltage-clamp recording, HCN channels in the neurones were activated in response to isoprenaline and exogenous cAMP but only occasionally did they respond to NO, although exogenous cGMP was routinely effective. With the less invasive sharp microelectrode recording technique, however, exogenous NO modulated the channels reproducibly, as measured by the size of the HCN channel-mediated voltage sag following hyperpolarization. Moreover, NO also blunted the subsequent rebound depolarizing potentials, consistent with it increasing the hyperpolarization-activated current. Optimizing the whole-cell solution to improve the functioning of NO-activated guanylyl cyclase failed to restore NO sensitivity. Minimizing cellular dialysis by using the perforated-patch technique, however, was successful. The results provide evidence that HCN channels are potential downstream mediators of NO signalling in deep cerebellar nuclei neurones and suggest that the more general importance of this transduction pathway may have been overlooked previously because of unsuitable recording methods. PMID:20529121

  20. Determining Flow Type and Shear Rate in Magmas From Bubble Shapes and Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, A. C.; Manga, M.; Cashman, K. V.

    2001-12-01

    To compare bubble geometries in obsidian to bubbles deformed under known conditions, we measure the deformation of air bubbles in corn syrup in simple shear. We use these experimental data and results of theoretical, numerical and experimental studies to interpret the shear environments that formed the textures preserved in obsidian samples. In particular, we use the shapes and orientations of bubbles in obsidian to estimate shear rates and assess flow type (simple vs. pure shear). This technique can be used to determine shear rates in volcanic conduits, the origin of pyroclastic obsidian, and the emplacement history and dynamics of obsidian flows. The deformation of a bubble is governed by the competing stresses from shearing that deforms, and surface tension that rerounds. The ratio of these stresses is the capillary number, Ca. An initially spherical bubble placed in a low Reynolds number, steady flow field deforms with a time-dependent shape and orientation until it reaches a steady geometry or breaks into smaller bubbles. A useful measure of the magnitude of flow-induced bubble deformation is the dimensionless parameter, D=(l-b)/(l+b) where l and b are the semi-major and semi-minor axes of the sheared bubble. For small deformations (Ca<< 1), low Reynolds number flow and bubble viscosity << suspending fluid viscosity, D ~ 2 Ca in pure shear and D ~ Ca in simple shear. In pure shear flow, bubble elongations are parallel to the shear direction regardless of the magnitude of bubble deformation. However, in simple shear flow, the angle between the bubble elongation and the flow varies with Ca, which is proportional to bubble radius and shear rate. Because the relationships between Ca and bubble orientation and shape for pure and simple shear differ, we can distinguish between these flow types using bubble geometries preserved in obsidian. Furthermore, because Ca is a function of shear rate, we can use relationships between Ca and D to calculate shear rates when

  1. Development and testing of hyperpolarized 13C MR calibrationless parallel imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yesu; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Shin, Peter J.; von Morze, Cornelius; Lustig, Michael; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Ohliger, Michael A.; Carvajal, Lucas; Tropp, James; Pauly, John M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    A calibrationless parallel imaging technique developed previously for 1H MRI was modified and tested for hyperpolarized 13C MRI for applications requiring large FOV and high spatial resolution. The technique was demonstrated with both retrospective and prospective under-sampled data acquired in phantom and in vivo rat studies. A 2-fold acceleration was achieved using a 2D symmetric EPI readout equipped with random blips on the phase encode dimension. Reconstructed images showed excellent qualitative agreement with fully sampled data. Further acceleration can be achieved using acquisition schemes that incorporate multi-dimensional under-sampling. PMID:26679288

  2. Hyperpolarized (13)C MR imaging detects no lactate production in mutant IDH1 gliomas: Implications for diagnosis and response monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chaumeil, Myriam M; Radoul, Marina; Najac, Chloé; Eriksson, Pia; Viswanath, Pavithra; Blough, Michael D; Chesnelong, Charles; Luchman, H Artee; Cairncross, J Gregory; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic imaging of brain tumors using (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate is a promising neuroimaging strategy which, after a decade of preclinical success in glioblastoma (GBM) models, is now entering clinical trials in multiple centers. Typically, the presence of GBM has been associated with elevated hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate produced from [1-(13)C] pyruvate, and response to therapy has been associated with a drop in hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate. However, to date, lower grade gliomas had not been investigated using this approach. The most prevalent mutation in lower grade gliomas is the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation, which, in addition to initiating tumor development, also induces metabolic reprogramming. In particular, mutant IDH1 gliomas are associated with low levels of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) and monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), three proteins involved in pyruvate metabolism to lactate. We therefore investigated the potential of (13)C MRS of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate for detection of mutant IDH1 gliomas and for monitoring of their therapeutic response. We studied patient-derived mutant IDH1 glioma cells that underexpress LDHA, MCT1 and MCT4, and wild-type IDH1 GBM cells that express high levels of these proteins. Mutant IDH1 cells and tumors produced significantly less hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate compared to GBM, consistent with their metabolic reprogramming. Furthermore, hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate production was not affected by chemotherapeutic treatment with temozolomide (TMZ) in mutant IDH1 tumors, in contrast to previous reports in GBM. Our results demonstrate the unusual metabolic imaging profile of mutant IDH1 gliomas, which, when combined with other clinically available imaging methods, could be used to detect the presence of the IDH1 mutation in vivo. PMID:27437179

  3. Validation of the In Vivo Assessment of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Activity Using Hyperpolarized 13C-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Michael S.; Heather, Lisa C.; Carter, Emma E.; Cochlin, Lowri E.; Nagel, Simon; Sibson, Nicola R.; Radda, George K.; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Many diseases of the heart are characterised by changes in substrate utilisation, which is in part regulated by the activity of the enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). Consequently, there is much interest in the in vivo evaluation of PDH activity in a range of physiological and pathological states to obtain information regarding the metabolic mechanisms of cardiac diseases. Hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate, detected using MRS, is a novel technique for evaluating PDH flux non-invasively. PDH flux has been assumed to directly reflect in vivo PDH activity, although to date this assumption remains unproven. Methods Control animals and animals undergoing interventions known to modulate PDH activity, namely high fat feeding and dichloroacetate infusion, were used to investigate the relationship between in vivo hyperpolarized MRS measurements of PDH flux and ex vivo measurements of PDH enzyme activity (PDHa). Further, the plasma concentrations of pyruvate and other important metabolites were evaluated following pyruvate infusion to assess the metabolic consequences of the pyruvate infusion during hyperpolarized MRS experiments. Results Hyperpolarized MRS measurements of PDH flux significantly correlated with ex vivo measurements of PDHa, confirming that PDH activity directly influences the in vivo flux of hyperpolarized pyruvate through cardiac PDH. The maximum plasma concentration of pyruvate reached during hyperpolarized MRS experiments was ~250 μM, equivalent to physiological pyruvate concentrations reached during exercise or with dietary interventions. Concentrations of other metabolites, including lactate, glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), did not vary during the 60 s following pyruvate infusion. Hence, during the 60 s data acquisition period, metabolism was minimally affected by pyruvate infusion. PMID:20799252

  4. Real Time Molecular Imaging of TCA Cycle Metabolism in vivo By Hyperpolarized 1-13C Diethyl Succinate

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, Niki M.; Chan, Henry R.; Sailasuta, Napapon; Ross, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    The Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) is central to metabolic energy production and is known to be altered in many disease states. Real time molecular imaging of TCA cycle in vivo will be important in understanding the metabolic basis of several diseases. Positron emission tomography (PET) using FDG-glucose (2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose) is already being used as a metabolic imaging agent in clinics. However, FDG-glucose does not reveal anything past glucose uptake and phosphorylation. We have developed a new metabolic imaging agent, hyperpolarized diethyl 1-13C 2,3-d2 succinate, that allows for real time in vivo imaging and spectroscopy of the TCA cycle. Diethyl succinate can be hyperpolarized using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) in an aqueous solution with signal enhancement of 5000 compared to Boltzmann polarization. 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were achieved in vivo seconds after injection of 10 to 20 μmol of hyperpolarized diethyl succinate into normal mice. The downstream metabolites of hyperpolarized diethyl succinate were identified in vivo as malate, succinate, fumarate and aspartate. The metabolism of diethyl succinate was altered after exposing the animal to 3-nitropropionate, a known irreversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase. Based on our results, hyperpolarized diethyl succinate allows for in real time in vivo MRI and MRS with a high signal to noise ratio and with visualization of multiple steps of the TCA cycle. Hyperpolarization of diethyl succinate and its in vivo applications may reveal an entirely new regime wherein the local status of TCA cycle metabolism is interrogated on the time scale of seconds to minutes with unprecedented chemical specificity and MR sensitivity. PMID:22146049

  5. Correlation of measures of regional lung ventilation from 4DCT vs. hyperpolarized helium-3 MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Miller, Wilson; Christensen, Gary; Reinhardt, Joseph; Benedict, Stanley; Libby, Bruce; Sheng, Ke

    2012-03-01

    Radiation induced pulmonary diseases can change the tissue material properties of lung parenchyma and the mechanics of the respiratory system. Recent advances in multi-detector-row CT (MDCT), 4DCT respiratory gating methods, and image processing techniques enable us to follow and measure those changes noninvasively during radiation therapy at a regional level. This study compares the 4DCT based ventilation measurement with the results from hyperpolarized helium-3 MR using the cumulative distribution function maps and the relative overlap (RO) statistic. We show that the similarity between the two measurements increases as the increase of the B-Spline grid spacing and Laplacian weighting which result a smoother ventilation map. The best similarity is found with weighting of 0.5 for linear elasticity and B-Spline grid spacing of 32 mm. Future work is to improve the lung image registration algorithm by incorporating hyperpolarized helium-3 MR information so as to improve its physiological modeling of the lung tissue deformation.

  6. Nondisruptive Dissolution of Hyperpolarized (129)Xe into Viscous Aqueous and Organic Liquid Crystalline Environments.

    PubMed

    Truxal, Ashley E; Slack, Clancy C; Gomes, Muller D; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Wemmer, David E; Pines, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Studies of hyperpolarized xenon-129 (hp-(129)Xe) in media such as liquid crystals and cell suspensions are in demand for applications ranging from biomedical imaging to materials engineering but have been hindered by the inability to bubble Xe through the desired media as a result of viscosity or perturbations caused by bubbles. Herein a device is reported that can be reliably used to dissolve hp-(129)Xe into viscous aqueous and organic samples without bubbling. This method is robust, requires small sample volumes (<60 μL), is compatible with existing NMR hardware, and is made from readily available materials. Experiments show that Xe can be introduced into viscous and aligned media without disrupting molecular order. We detected dissolved xenon in an aqueous liquid crystal that is disrupted by the shear forces of bubbling, and we observed liquid-crystal phase transitions in (MBBA). This tool allows an entirely new class of samples to be investigated by hyperpolarized-gas NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26954536

  7. High-throughput hyperpolarized 13C metabolic investigations using a multi-channel acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyuk; Ramirez, Marc S.; Walker, Christopher M.; Chen, Yunyun; Yi, Stacey; Sandulache, Vlad C.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of hyperpolarized (HP) compounds such as [1-13C]-pyruvate have shown tremendous potential for offering new insight into disease and response to therapy. New applications of this technology in clinical research and care will require extensive validation in cells and animal models, a process that may be limited by the high cost and modest throughput associated with dynamic nuclear polarization. Relatively wide spectral separation between [1-13C]-pyruvate and its chemical endpoints in vivo are conducive to simultaneous multi-sample measurements, even in the presence of a suboptimal global shim. Multi-channel acquisitions could conserve costs and accelerate experiments by allowing acquisition from multiple independent samples following a single dissolution. Unfortunately, many existing preclinical MRI systems are equipped with only a single channel for broadband acquisitions. In this work, we examine the feasibility of this concept using a broadband multi-channel digital receiver extension and detector arrays that allow concurrent measurement of dynamic spectroscopic data from ex vivo enzyme phantoms, in vitro anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells, and in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. Throughput and the cost of consumables were improved by up to a factor of four. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential for efficient multi-sample studies employing hyperpolarized agents.

  8. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon Swisher, Christine; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate-lactate, pyruvate-alanine, and pyruvate-hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines.

  9. Hyperpolarization-independent maturation and refinement of GABA/glycinergic connections in the auditory brain stem.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanmi; Bach, Eva; Noh, Jihyun; Delpire, Eric; Kandler, Karl

    2016-03-01

    During development GABA and glycine synapses are initially excitatory before they gradually become inhibitory. This transition is due to a developmental increase in the activity of neuronal potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2), which shifts the chloride equilibrium potential (ECl) to values more negative than the resting membrane potential. While the role of early GABA and glycine depolarizations in neuronal development has become increasingly clear, the role of the transition to hyperpolarization in synapse maturation and circuit refinement has remained an open question. Here we investigated this question by examining the maturation and developmental refinement of GABA/glycinergic and glutamatergic synapses in the lateral superior olive (LSO), a binaural auditory brain stem nucleus, in KCC2-knockdown mice, in which GABA and glycine remain depolarizing. We found that many key events in the development of synaptic inputs to the LSO, such as changes in neurotransmitter phenotype, strengthening and elimination of GABA/glycinergic connection, and maturation of glutamatergic synapses, occur undisturbed in KCC2-knockdown mice compared with wild-type mice. These results indicate that maturation of inhibitory and excitatory synapses in the LSO is independent of the GABA and glycine depolarization-to-hyperpolarization transition. PMID:26655825

  10. Hyperpolarized noble gas magnetic resonance imaging of the animal lung: Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santyr, Giles E.; Lam, Wilfred W.; Parra-Robles, Juan M.; Taves, Timothy M.; Ouriadov, Alexei V.

    2009-05-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas (HNG) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a very promising noninvasive tool for the investigation of animal models of lung disease, particularly to follow longitudinal changes in lung function and anatomy without the accumulated radiation dose associated with x rays. The two most common noble gases for this purpose are H3e (helium 3) and X129e (xenon 129), the latter providing a cost-effective approach for clinical applications. Hyperpolarization is typically achieved using spin-exchange optical pumping techniques resulting in ˜10 000-fold improvement in available magnetization compared to conventional Boltzmann polarizations. This substantial increase in polarization allows high spatial resolution (<1 mm) single-slice images of the lung to be obtained with excellent temporal resolution (<1 s). Complete three-dimensional images of the lungs with 1 mm slice thickness can be obtained within reasonable breath-hold intervals (<20 s). This article provides an overview of the current methods used in HNG MR imaging with an emphasis on ventilation studies in animals. Special MR hardware and software considerations are described in order to use the strong but nonrecoverable magnetization as efficiently as possible and avoid depolarization primarily by molecular oxygen. Several applications of HNG MR imaging are presented, including measurement of gross lung anatomy (e.g., airway diameters), microscopic anatomy (e.g., apparent diffusion coefficient), and a variety of functional parameters including dynamic ventilation, alveolar oxygen partial pressure, and xenon diffusing capacity.

  11. Optimizing water hyperpolarization and dissolution for sensitivity-enhanced 2D biomolecular NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Greg; Markhasin, Evgeny; Szekely, Or; Bretschneider, Christian; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    A recent study explored the use of hyperpolarized water, to enhance the sensitivity of nuclei in biomolecules thanks to rapid proton exchanges with labile amide backbone and sidechain groups. Further optimizations of this approach have now allowed us to achieve proton polarizations approaching 25% in the water transferred into the NMR spectrometer, effective water T1 times approaching 40 s, and a reduction in the dilution demanded for the cryogenic dissolution process. Further hardware developments have allowed us to perform these experiments, repeatedly and reliably, in 5 mm NMR tubes. All these ingredients - particularly the ⩾3000× 1H polarization enhancements over 11.7 T thermal counterparts, long T1 times and a compatibility with high-resolution biomolecular NMR setups - augur well for hyperpolarized 2D NMR studies of peptides, unfolded proteins and intrinsically disordered systems undergoing fast exchanges of their protons with the solvent. This hypothesis is here explored by detailing the provisions that lead to these significant improvements over previous reports, and demonstrating 1D coherence transfer experiments and 2D biomolecular HMQC acquisitions delivering NMR spectral enhancements of 100-500× over their optimized, thermally-polarized, counterparts.

  12. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Christine Leon; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate–lactate, pyruvate–alanine, and pyruvate–hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines. PMID:26117655

  13. Optimizing water hyperpolarization and dissolution for sensitivity-enhanced 2D biomolecular NMR.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Greg; Markhasin, Evgeny; Szekely, Or; Bretschneider, Christian; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    A recent study explored the use of hyperpolarized water, to enhance the sensitivity of nuclei in biomolecules thanks to rapid proton exchanges with labile amide backbone and sidechain groups. Further optimizations of this approach have now allowed us to achieve proton polarizations approaching 25% in the water transferred into the NMR spectrometer, effective water T1 times approaching 40s, and a reduction in the dilution demanded for the cryogenic dissolution process. Further hardware developments have allowed us to perform these experiments, repeatedly and reliably, in 5mm NMR tubes. All these ingredients--particularly the ⩾ 3000× (1)H polarization enhancements over 11.7T thermal counterparts, long T1 times and a compatibility with high-resolution biomolecular NMR setups - augur well for hyperpolarized 2D NMR studies of peptides, unfolded proteins and intrinsically disordered systems undergoing fast exchanges of their protons with the solvent. This hypothesis is here explored by detailing the provisions that lead to these significant improvements over previous reports, and demonstrating 1D coherence transfer experiments and 2D biomolecular HMQC acquisitions delivering NMR spectral enhancements of 100-500× over their optimized, thermally-polarized, counterparts. PMID:26920830

  14. Involvement of Ca(2+)-Dependent Hyperpolarization in Sleep Duration in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Tatsuki, Fumiya; Sunagawa, Genshiro A; Shi, Shoi; Susaki, Etsuo A; Yukinaga, Hiroko; Perrin, Dimitri; Sumiyama, Kenta; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Fujishima, Hiroshi; Ohno, Rei-ichiro; Tone, Daisuke; Ode, Koji L; Matsumoto, Katsuhiko; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2016-04-01

    The detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of sleep duration in mammals are still elusive. To address this challenge, we constructed a simple computational model, which recapitulates the electrophysiological characteristics of the slow-wave sleep and awake states. Comprehensive bifurcation analysis predicted that a Ca(2+)-dependent hyperpolarization pathway may play a role in slow-wave sleep and hence in the regulation of sleep duration. To experimentally validate the prediction, we generate and analyze 21 KO mice. Here we found that impaired Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels (Kcnn2 and Kcnn3), voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (Cacna1g and Cacna1h), or Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases (Camk2a and Camk2b) decrease sleep duration, while impaired plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (Atp2b3) increases sleep duration. Pharmacological intervention and whole-brain imaging validated that impaired NMDA receptors reduce sleep duration and directly increase the excitability of cells. Based on these results, we propose a hypothesis that a Ca(2+)-dependent hyperpolarization pathway underlies the regulation of sleep duration in mammals. PMID:26996081

  15. Distribution of Hyperpolarized Xenon in the Brain Following Sensory Stimulation: Preliminary MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    Mazzanti, Mary L.; Walvick, Ronn P.; Zhou, Xin; Sun, Yanping; Shah, Niral; Mansour, Joey; Gereige, Jessica; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2011-01-01

    In hyperpolarized xenon magnetic resonance imaging (HP 129Xe MRI), the inhaled spin-1/2 isotope of xenon gas is used to generate the MR signal. Because hyperpolarized xenon is an MR signal source with properties very different from those generated from water-protons, HP 129Xe MRI may yield structural and functional information not detectable by conventional proton-based MRI methods. Here we demonstrate the differential distribution of HP 129Xe in the cerebral cortex of the rat following a pain stimulus evoked in the animal's forepaw. Areas of higher HP 129Xe signal corresponded to those areas previously demonstrated by conventional functional MRI (fMRI) methods as being activated by a forepaw pain stimulus. The percent increase in HP 129Xe signal over baseline was 13–28%, and was detectable with a single set of pre and post stimulus images. Recent innovations in the production of highly polarized 129Xe should make feasible the emergence of HP 129Xe MRI as a viable adjunct method to conventional MRI for the study of brain function and disease. PMID:21789173

  16. Direct Measurement of Lung Motion Using Hyperpolarized Helium-3 MR Tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jing; Miller, G. Wilson; Altes, Talissa A.; Read, Paul W.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Lange, Eduard E. de; Cates, Gordon D.; Brookeman, James R.; Mugler, John P.; Sheng Ke . E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To measure lung motion between end-inhalation and end-exhalation using a hyperpolarized helium-3 (HP {sup 3}He) magnetic resonance (MR) tagging technique. Methods and Materials: Three healthy volunteers underwent MR tagging studies after inhalation of 1 L HP {sup 3}He gas diluted with nitrogen. Multiple-slice two-dimensional and volumetric three-dimensional MR tagged images of the lungs were obtained at end-inhalation and end-exhalation, and displacement vector maps were computed. Results: The grids of tag lines in the HP {sup 3}He MR images were well defined at end-inhalation and remained evident at end-exhalation. Displacement vector maps clearly demonstrated the regional lung motion and deformation that occurred during exhalation. Discontinuity and differences in motion pattern between two adjacent lung lobes were readily resolved. Conclusions: Hyperpolarized helium-3 MR tagging technique can be used for direct in vivo measurement of respiratory lung motion on a regional basis. This technique may lend new insights into the regional pulmonary biomechanics and thus provide valuable information for the deformable registration of lung.

  17. Substance P-induced relaxation and hyperpolarization in human cerebral arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, J.; Zygmunt, P. M.; Brandt, L.; Högestätt, E. D.

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular effects of substance P were studied in human isolated pial arteries removed from 14 patients undergoing cerebral cortical resection. 2. Substance P induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in the presence of indomethacin. No relaxation was seen in arteries where the endothelium had been removed. 3. N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 0.3 mM) abolished the relaxation in arteries from six patients. The relaxation was only partially inhibited in the remaining eight patients, the reduction of the maximum relaxation being less than 50% in each patient. 4. The L-NOARG-resistant relaxation was abolished when the external K+ concentration was raised above 30 mM. 5. Substance P caused a smooth muscle hyperpolarization (in the presence of L-NOARG and indomethacin), but only when the artery showed an L-NOARG-resistant relaxation. 6. The results indicate that nitric oxide is an important mediator of endothelium-dependent relaxation in human cerebral arteries. Furthermore, another endothelium-dependent pathway, causing hyperpolarization and vasodilatation, was identified in arteries from more than half the population of patients. PMID:7582516

  18. Spin Noise Detection of Nuclear Hyperpolarization at 1.2 K

    PubMed Central

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Bornet, Aurélien; Bechmann, Matthias; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami; Müller, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    We report proton spin noise spectra of a hyperpolarized solid sample of commonly used “DNP (dynamic nuclear polarization) juice” containing TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxide) and irradiated by a microwave field at a temperature of 1.2 K in a magnetic field of 6.7 T. The line shapes of the spin noise power spectra are sensitive to the variation of the microwave irradiation frequency and change from dip to bump, when the electron Larmor frequency is crossed, which is shown to be in good accordance with theory by simulations. Small but significant deviations from these predictions are observed, which can be related to spin noise and radiation damping phenomena that have been reported in thermally polarized systems. The non-linear dependence of the spin noise integral on nuclear polarization provides a means to monitor hyperpolarization semi-quantitatively without any perturbation of the spin system by radio frequency irradiation. PMID:26477605

  19. Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels in Aplysia: Contribution to classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qizong; Kuzyk, Pavlo; Antonov, Igor; Bostwick, Caleb J.; Kohn, Andrea B.; Moroz, Leonid L.; Hawkins, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels are critical regulators of neuronal excitability, but less is known about their possible roles in synaptic plasticity and memory circuits. Here, we characterized the HCN gene organization, channel properties, distribution, and involvement in associative and nonassociative forms of learning in Aplysia californica. Aplysia has only one HCN gene, which codes for a channel that has many similarities to the mammalian HCN channel. The cloned acHCN gene was expressed in Xenopus oocytes, which displayed a hyperpolarization-induced inward current that was enhanced by cGMP as well as cAMP. Similarly to its homologs in other animals, acHCN is permeable to K+ and Na+ ions, and is selectively blocked by Cs+ and ZD7288. We found that acHCN is predominantly expressed in inter- and motor neurons, including LFS siphon motor neurons, and therefore tested whether HCN channels are involved in simple forms of learning of the siphon-withdrawal reflex in a semiintact preparation. ZD7288 (100 μM) significantly reduced an associative form of learning (classical conditioning) but had no effect on two nonassociative forms of learning (intermediate-term sensitization and unpaired training) or baseline responses. The HCN current is enhanced by nitric oxide (NO), which may explain the postsynaptic role of NO during conditioning. HCN current in turn enhances the NMDA-like current in the motor neurons, suggesting that HCN channels contribute to conditioning through this pathway. PMID:26668355

  20. Inductive Measurement of Optically Hyperpolarized Phosphorous Donor Nuclei in an Isotopically Enriched Silicon-28 Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumann, P.; Patange, O.; Ramanathan, C.; Haas, H.; Moussa, O.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Riemann, H.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Becker, P.; Pohl, H.-J.; Itoh, K. M.; Cory, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the first inductive readout of optically hyperpolarized phosphorus-31 donor nuclear spins in an isotopically enriched silicon-28 crystal. The concentration of phosphorus donors in the crystal was 1.5 ×1 015 cm-3 , 3 orders of magnitude lower than has previously been detected via direct inductive detection. The signal-to-noise ratio measured in a single free induction decay from a 1 cm3 sample (≈1015 spins) was 113. By transferring the sample to an X -band ESR spectrometer, we were able to obtain a lower bound for the nuclear spin polarization at 1.7 K of ˜64 % . The 31P -T2 measured with a Hahn echo sequence was 420 ms at 1.7 K, which was extended to 1.2 s with a Carr Purcell cycle. The T1 of the 31P nuclear spins at 1.7 K is extremely long and could not be determined, as no decay was observed even on a time scale of 4.5 h. Optical excitation was performed with a 1047 nm laser, which provided above-band-gap excitation of the silicon. The buildup of the hyperpolarization at 4.2 K followed a single exponential with a characteristic time of 577 s, while the buildup at 1.7 K showed biexponential behavior with characteristic time constants of 578 and 5670 s.

  1. Hyperpolarization of “Neat” Liquids by NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) hyperpolarization of the rare isotopes in “neat” liquids, each composed only of an otherwise pure target compound with isotopic natural abundance (n.a.) and millimolar concentrations of dissolved catalyst. Pyridine (Py) or Py derivatives are studied at 0.4% isotopic natural abundance 15N, deuterated, 15N enriched, and in various combinations using the SABRE-SHEATH variant (microTesla magnetic fields to permit direct 15N polarization from parahydrogen via reversible binding and exchange with an Ir catalyst). We find that the dilute n.a. 15N spin bath in Py still channels spin order from parahydrogen to dilute 15N spins, without polarization losses due to the presence of 14N or 2H. We demonstrate P15N ≈ 1% (a gain of 2900 fold relative to thermal polarization at 9.4 T) at high substrate concentrations. This fundamental finding has a significant practical benefit for screening potentially hyperpolarizable contrast agents without labeling. The capability of screening at n.a. level of 15N is demonstrated on examples of mono- and dimethyl-substituted Py (picolines and lutidines previously identified as promising pH sensors), showing that the presence of a methyl group in the ortho position significantly decreases SABRE hyperpolarization. PMID:26029349

  2. Spin Noise Detection of Nuclear Hyperpolarization at 1.2 K.

    PubMed

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Bornet, Aurélien; Bechmann, Matthias; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami; Müller, Norbert

    2015-12-21

    We report proton spin noise spectra of a hyperpolarized solid sample of commonly used "DNP (dynamic nuclear polarization) juice" containing TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxide) and irradiated by a microwave field at a temperature of 1.2 K in a magnetic field of 6.7 T. The line shapes of the spin noise power spectra are sensitive to the variation of the microwave irradiation frequency and change from dip to bump, when the electron Larmor frequency is crossed, which is shown to be in good accordance with theory by simulations. Small but significant deviations from these predictions are observed, which can be related to spin noise and radiation damping phenomena that have been reported in thermally polarized systems. The non-linear dependence of the spin noise integral on nuclear polarization provides a means to monitor hyperpolarization semi-quantitatively without any perturbation of the spin system by radio frequency irradiation. PMID:26477605

  3. A Molecular Imaging Approach to Mercury Sensing Based on Hyperpolarized (129)Xe Molecular Clamp Probe.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qianni; Zeng, Qingbin; Jiang, Weiping; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Qing; Zhang, Xu; Bouchard, Louis-S; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-14

    Mercury pollution, in the form of mercury ions (Hg(2+)), is a major health and environmental hazard. Commonly used sensors are invasive and limited to point measurements. Fluorescence-based sensors do not provide depth resolution needed to image spatial distributions. Herein we report a novel sensor capable of yielding spatial distributions by MRI using hyperpolarized (129)Xe. A molecular clamp probe was developed consisting of dipyrrolylquinoxaline (DPQ) derivatives and twocryptophane-A cages. The DPQ derivatives act as cation receptors whereas cryptophane-A acts as a suitable host molecule for xenon. When the DPQ moiety interacts with mercury ions, the molecular clamp closes on the ion. Due to overlap of the electron clouds of the two cryptophane-A cages, the shielding effect on the encapsulated Xe becomes important. This leads to an upfield change of the chemical shift of the encapsulated Xe. This sensor exhibits good selectivity and sensitivity toward the mercury ion. This mercury-activated hyperpolarized (129)Xe-based chemosensor is a new concept method for monitoring Hg(2+) ion distributions by MRI. PMID:26792102

  4. Use of a Multi-compartment Dynamic Single Enzyme Phantom for Studies of Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Agents.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher M; Merritt, Matthew; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Bankson, James A

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of hyperpolarized substrates by magnetic resonance shows great clinical promise for assessment of critical biochemical processes in real time. Due to fundamental constraints imposed by the hyperpolarized state, exotic imaging and reconstruction techniques are commonly used. A practical system for characterization of dynamic, multi-spectral imaging methods is critically needed. Such a system must reproducibly recapitulate the relevant chemical dynamics of normal and pathological tissues. The most widely utilized substrate to date is hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]-pyruvate for assessment of cancer metabolism. We describe an enzyme-based phantom system that mediates the conversion of pyruvate to lactate. The reaction is initiated by injection of the hyperpolarized agent into multiple chambers within the phantom, each of which contains varying concentrations of reagents that control the reaction rate. Multiple compartments are necessary to ensure that imaging sequences faithfully capture the spatial and metabolic heterogeneity of tissue. This system will aid the development and validation of advanced imaging strategies by providing chemical dynamics that are not available from conventional phantoms, as well as control and reproducibility that is not possible in vivo. PMID:27166971

  5. Cyclic AMP enhances agonist-induced Ca2+ entry into endothelial cells by activation of potassium channels and membrane hyperpolarization.

    PubMed Central

    Graier, W F; Kukovetz, W R; Groschner, K

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism underlying cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated amplification of agonist-induced Ca2+ responses in endothelial cells was investigated in pig endothelial cells. Forskolin, adenosine and isoprenaline, as well as the membrane-permeant cAMP analogue dibutyryl cAMP, enhanced bradykinin-induced rises in intracellular free Ca2+ as well as bradykinin-induced Mn2+ entry. These agents were also found to hyperpolarize endothelial cells without increasing intracellular Ca2+ by itself, i.e. in the absence of bradykinin. Both amplification of bradykinin effects and the hyperpolarizing action was blocked by the protein kinase inhibitor H-8. The involvement of K+ channels in the hyperpolarizing effects of forskolin was consequently studied in perforated outside-out vesicles. Two different types of K+ channels were recorded, one of which had a large conductance (170 pS) and was activated by forskolin. We suggest that stimulation of endothelial adenylate cyclase results in activation of large-conductance K+ channels and consequently in membrane hyperpolarization, which in turn enhances bradykinin-induced entry of Ca2+ by increasing its electrochemical gradient. PMID:8385935

  6. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  7. In vivo and in vitro liver cancer metabolism observed with hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabella, C.; Karlsson, M.; Canapè, C.; Catanzaro, G.; Colombo Serra, S.; Miragoli, L.; Poggi, L.; Uggeri, F.; Venturi, L.; Jensen, P. R.; Lerche, M. H.; Tedoldi, F.

    2013-07-01

    Glutamine metabolism is, with its many links to oncogene expression, considered a crucial step in cancer metabolism and it is thereby a key target for alteration in cancer development. In particular, strong correlations have been reported between oncogene expression and expression and activity of the enzyme glutaminase. This mitochondrial enzyme, which is responsible for the deamidation of glutamine to form glutamate, is overexpressed in many tumour tissues. In animal models, glutaminase expression is correlated with tumour growth rate and it is readily possible to limit tumour growth by suppression of glutaminase activity. In principle, hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy can provide insight to glutamine metabolism and should hence be a valuable tool to study changes in glutaminase activity as tumours progress. However, no such successful in vivo studies have been reported, even though several good biological models have been tested. This may, at least partly, be due to problems in preparing glutamine for hyperpolarization. This paper reports a new and improved preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, which provides a highly sensitive 13C MR marker. With this preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, glutaminase activity in vivo in a rat liver tumour was investigated. Moreover, this marker was also used to measure response to drug treatment in vitro in cancer cells. These examples of [5-13C]glutamine used in tumour models warrant the new preparation to allow metabolic studies with this conditionally essential amino acid.

  8. A Bloch-McConnell simulator with pharmacokinetic modeling to explore accuracy and reproducibility in the measurement of hyperpolarized pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Christopher M.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of hyperpolarized (HP) agents has the potential to probe in-vivo metabolism with sensitivity and specificity that was not previously possible. Biological conversion of HP agents specifically for cancer has been shown to correlate to presence of disease, stage and response to therapy. For such metabolic biomarkers derived from MRI of hyperpolarized agents to be clinically impactful, they need to be validated and well characterized. However, imaging of HP substrates is distinct from conventional MRI, due to the non-renewable nature of transient HP magnetization. Moreover, due to current practical limitations in generation and evolution of hyperpolarized agents, it is not feasible to fully experimentally characterize measurement and processing strategies. In this work we use a custom Bloch-McConnell simulator with pharmacokinetic modeling to characterize the performance of specific magnetic resonance spectroscopy sequences over a range of biological conditions. We performed numerical simulations to evaluate the effect of sequence parameters over a range of chemical conversion rates. Each simulation was analyzed repeatedly with the addition of noise in order to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements. Results indicate that under both closed and perfused conditions, acquisition parameters can affect measurements in a tissue dependent manner, suggesting that great care needs to be taken when designing studies involving hyperpolarized agents. More modeling studies will be needed to determine what effect sequence parameters have on more advanced acquisitions and processing methods.

  9. Toward Biocompatible Nuclear Hyperpolarization Using Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange: Quantitative in Situ Spectroscopy and High-Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) of a substrate and parahydrogen at a catalytic center promises to overcome the inherent insensitivity of magnetic resonance. In order to apply the new approach to biomedical applications, there is a need to develop experimental equipment, in situ quantification methods, and a biocompatible solvent. We present results detailing a low-field SABRE polarizer which provides well-controlled experimental conditions, defined spins manipulations, and which allows in situ detection of thermally polarized and hyperpolarized samples. We introduce a method for absolute quantification of hyperpolarization yield in situ by means of a thermally polarized reference. A maximum signal-to-noise ratio of ∼103 for 148 μmol of substance, a signal enhancement of 106 with respect to polarization transfer field of SABRE, or an absolute 1H-polarization level of ≈10–2 is achieved. In an important step toward biomedical application, we demonstrate 1H in situ NMR as well as 1H and 13C high-field MRI using hyperpolarized pyridine (d3) and 13C nicotinamide in pure and 11% ethanol in aqueous solution. Further increase of hyperpolarization yield, implications of in situ detection, and in vivo application are discussed. PMID:24397559

  10. Hyperpolarized (13)C Magnetic Resonance and Its Use in Metabolic Assessment of Cultured Cells and Perfused Organs.

    PubMed

    Lumata, Lloyd; Yang, Chendong; Ragavan, Mukundan; Carpenter, Nicholas; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Merritt, Matthew E

    2015-01-01

    Diseased tissue is often characterized by abnormalities in intermediary metabolism. Observing these alterations in situ may lead to an improved understanding of pathological processes and novel ways to monitor these processes noninvasively in human patients. Although (13)C is a stable isotope safe for use in animal models of disease as well as human subjects, its utility as a metabolic tracer has largely been limited to ex vivo analyses employing analytical techniques like mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Neither of these techniques is suitable for noninvasive metabolic monitoring, and the low abundance and poor gyromagnetic ratio of conventional (13)C make it a poor nucleus for imaging. However, the recent advent of hyperpolarization methods, particularly dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), makes it possible to enhance the spin polarization state of (13)C by many orders of magnitude, resulting in a temporary amplification of the signal sufficient for monitoring kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in living tissue through magnetic resonance spectroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we review DNP techniques to monitor metabolism in cultured cells, perfused hearts, and perfused livers, focusing on our experiences with hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. We present detailed approaches to optimize the DNP procedure, streamline biological sample preparation, and maximize detection of specific metabolic activities. We also discuss practical aspects in the choice of metabolic substrates for hyperpolarization studies and outline some of the current technical and conceptual challenges in the field, including efforts to use hyperpolarization to quantify metabolic rates in vivo. PMID:26358902

  11. XeNA: an automated 'open-source' (129)Xe hyperpolarizer for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Coffey, Aaron M; Walkup, Laura L; Gust, Brogan M; Whiting, Nicholas; Newton, Hayley; Muradyan, Iga; Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Ranta, Kaili; Moroz, Gregory D; Rosen, Matthew S; Patz, Samuel; Barlow, Michael J; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Goodson, Boyd M

    2014-06-01

    Here we provide a full report on the construction, components, and capabilities of our consortium's "open-source" large-scale (~1L/h) (129)Xe hyperpolarizer for clinical, pre-clinical, and materials NMR/MRI (Nikolaou et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 110, 14150 (2013)). The 'hyperpolarizer' is automated and built mostly of off-the-shelf components; moreover, it is designed to be cost-effective and installed in both research laboratories and clinical settings with materials costing less than $125,000. The device runs in the xenon-rich regime (up to 1800Torr Xe in 0.5L) in either stopped-flow or single-batch mode-making cryo-collection of the hyperpolarized gas unnecessary for many applications. In-cell (129)Xe nuclear spin polarization values of ~30%-90% have been measured for Xe loadings of ~300-1600Torr. Typical (129)Xe polarization build-up and T1 relaxation time constants were ~8.5min and ~1.9h respectively under our spin-exchange optical pumping conditions; such ratios, combined with near-unity Rb electron spin polarizations enabled by the high resonant laser power (up to ~200W), permit such high PXe values to be achieved despite the high in-cell Xe densities. Importantly, most of the polarization is maintained during efficient HP gas transfer to other containers, and ultra-long (129)Xe relaxation times (up to nearly 6h) were observed in Tedlar bags following transport to a clinical 3T scanner for MR spectroscopy and imaging as a prelude to in vivo experiments. The device has received FDA IND approval for a clinical study of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease subjects. The primary focus of this paper is on the technical/engineering development of the polarizer, with the explicit goals of facilitating the adaptation of design features and operative modes into other laboratories, and of spurring the further advancement of HP-gas MR applications in biomedicine. PMID:24631715

  12. Characterization of the hyperpolarization-activated chloride current in dissociated rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Clark, S; Jordt, S E; Jentsch, T J; Mathie, A

    1998-02-01

    1. Dissociated rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons have been shown to possess a hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying chloride current. The current was not altered by changes in external potassium concentration, replacing external cations with NMDG (N-methyl-D-glucamine) or by addition of 10 mM caesium or barium ions. 2. The reversal potential of the current was altered by changing external anions. The anion selectivity of the current was Cl- > Br- > I- > cyclamate. All substituted permeant anions also blocked the current. 3. The current was blocked by DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid), 9AC (anthracene-9-carboxylic acid) and NPPB (5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid) but was unaffected by SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene- 2,2'-disulphonic acid) and niflumic acid. The effective blockers were voltage dependent; DIDS and NPPB were more effective at depolarized potentials while 9AC was more effective at hyperpolarized potentials. 4. The current was enhanced by extracellular acidification and reduced by extracellular alkalinization. Reducing external osmolarity was without effect in conventional whole-cell recording but enhanced current amplitude in those perforated-patch recordings where little current was evident in control external solution. 5. The current in SCG neurons was blocked by external cadmium and zinc. ClC-2 chloride currents expressed in Xenopus oocytes were also sensitive to block by these divalent ions and by DIDS but the sensitivity of ClC-2 to block by cadmium ions was lower than that of the current in SCG neurons. 6. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments showed the presence of mRNA for ClC-2 in SCG neurons but not in rat cerebellar granule cells which do not possess a hyperpolarization-activated Cl- current. 7. The data suggest that ClC-2 may be functionally expressed in rat SCG neurons. This current may play a role in regulating the internal chloride

  13. Remodeling of Hyperpolarization-Activated Current, Ih, in Ah-Type Visceral Ganglion Neurons Following Ovariectomy in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Xiao; Yan, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jia-Ying; Zhang, Hao-Cheng; Wang, Li-Juan; Pan, Xiao-Dong; Fu, Yili

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih) mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels modulate excitability of myelinated A− and Ah-type visceral ganglion neurons (VGN). Whether alterations in Ih underlie the previously reported reduction of excitability of myelinated Ah-type VGNs following ovariectomy (OVX) has remained unclear. Here we used the intact nodose ganglion preparation in conjunction with electrophysiological approaches to examine the role of Ih remodeling in altering Ah-type neuron excitability following ovariectomy in adult rats. Ah-type neurons were identified based on their afferent conduction velocity. Ah-type neurons in nodose ganglia from non-OVX rats exhibited a voltage ‘sag’ as well as ‘rebound’ action potentials immediately following hyperpolarizing current injections, which both were suppressed by the Ih blocker ZD7288. Repetitive spike activity induced afterhyperpolarizations lasting several hundreds of milliseconds (termed post-excitatory membrane hyperpolarizations, PEMHs), which were significantly reduced by ZD7288, suggesting that they resulted from transient deactivation of Ih during the preceding spike trains. Ovariectomy reduced whole-cell Ih density, caused a hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of Ih activation, and slowed Ih activation. OVX-induced Ih remodeling was accompanied by a flattening of the stimulus frequency/response curve and loss of PEMHs. Also, HCN1 mRNA levels were reduced by ∼30% in nodose ganglia from OVX rats compared with their non-OVX counterparts. Acute exposure of nodose ganglia to 17beta-estradiol partly restored Ih density and accelerated Ih activation in Ah-type cells. In conclusion, Ih plays a significant role in modulating the excitability of myelinated Ah-type VGNs in adult female rats. PMID:23951107

  14. An intact small animal model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion: Characterization of metabolic changes by hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Berthonneche, Corinne; Comment, Arnaud; Schwitter, Juerg

    2015-12-15

    Hyperpolarized carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((13)C MRS) enables the sensitive and noninvasive assessment of the metabolic changes occurring during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. Ischemia-reperfusion models using hyperpolarized (13)C MRS are established in heart preparations ex vivo and in large animals in vivo, but an in vivo model in small animals would be advantageous to allow the study of reperfusion metabolism with neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses intact with the option to perform a greater number of experiments. A novel intact rat model of ischemia-reperfusion is presented that incorporates hyperpolarized (13)C MRS to characterize reperfusion metabolism. Typically, in an in vivo model, a tissue input function (TIF) is required to account for apparent changes in the metabolism of injected hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate resulting from changes in perfusion. Whereas the measurement of a TIF by metabolic imaging is particularly challenging in small animals, the ratios of downstream metabolites can be used as an alternative. The ratio of [(13)C]bicarbonate:[1-(13)C]lactate (RatioBic/Lac) measured within 1-2 min after coronary release decreased vs. baseline in ischemic rats (n = 10, 15-min occlusion, controls: n = 10; P = 0.017 for interaction, 2-way ANOVA). The decrease in oxidative pyruvate metabolism [RatioBic/Lac(Ischemia)/RatioBic/Lac(Baseline)] modestly correlated with area at risk (r = 0.66; P = 0.002). Hyperpolarized (13)C MRS was also used to examine alanine production during ischemia, which is observed in ex vivo models, but no significant change was noted; metrics incorporating [1-(13)C]alanine did not substantially improve the discrimination of ischemic-reperfused myocardium from nonischemic myocardium. This intact rat model, which mimics the human situation of reperfused myocardial infarction, could be highly valuable for the testing of new drugs to treat reperfusion injury, thereby facilitating translational research. PMID

  15. Hyperpolarization of {sup 133}Cs nuclei enhanced by ion movement in a cesium salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2011-12-15

    Hyperpolarization of {sup 133}Cs nuclei in CsCl salt is achieved through spin transfer from an optically pumped Cs vapor, with maximum polarizations of 0.1% demonstrated. Motional narrowing of the enhanced NMR line indicates that ion movement facilitates this process by transporting spin-polarized ions from the interface into the salt. The resulting NMR enhancement allows measurement of the polarization and its dynamics in real time. Based upon the NMR frequency and the longitudinal spin relaxation time, we find no evidence that the salt is contaminated by Cs metal or paramagnetic impurities. The Cs nuclear polarization reported here could be improved several orders of magnitude by intense laser heating of the entire sample.

  16. Accelerating hyperpolarized metabolic imaging of the heart by exploiting spatiotemporal correlations.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Kilian; Sigfridsson, Andreas; Wissmann, Lukas; Busch, Julia; Batel, Michael; Krajewski, Marcin; Ernst, Matthias; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2013-11-01

    Hyperpolarized (13)C-labeled pyruvate is a promising tool to investigate cardiac metabolism. It has been shown that changes in substrate metabolism occur following the induction of ischemia. To investigate the metabolic changes that are confined to spatial regions, high spatiotemporal resolution is required. The present work exploits both spatial and temporal correlations using k-t principal component analysis (PCA) to undersample the spatiotemporal domain, thereby speeding up data acquisition. A numerical model was implemented to investigate optimal acquisition and reconstruction parameters for pyruvate, lactate and bicarbonate maps of the heart. Subsequently, prospectively undersampled in vivo data on rat hearts were acquired using a combination of spectral-spatial signal excitation and a variable-density single-shot echo planar readout. Using five-fold k-t PCA, a spatial resolution of 1 × 1 mm(2) at a temporal resolution of 3 s was achieved. PMID:23616307

  17. MRI of the lung gas-space at very low-field using hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind K.; Zhang, Adelaide X.; Mansour, Joey; Kubatina, Lyubov; Oh, Chang Hyun; Blasche, Gregory; Selim Unlu, M.; Balamore, Dilip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    In hyperpolarized (HP) noble-gas magnetic resonance imaging, large nuclear spin polarizations, about 100,000 times that ordinarily obtainable at thermal equilibrium, are created in 3He and 129Xe. The enhanced signal that results can be employed in high-resolution MRI studies of void spaces such as in the lungs. In HP gas MRI the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends only weakly on the static magnetic field (B(0)), making very low-field (VLF) MRI possible; indeed, it is possible to contemplate portable MRI using light-weight solenoids or permanent magnets. This article reports the first in vivo VLF MR images of the lungs in humans and in rats, obtained at a field of only 15 millitesla (150 Gauss).

  18. Hyperpolarization of Frozen Hydrocarbon Gases by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at 1.2 K.

    PubMed

    Vuichoud, Basile; Canet, Estel; Milani, Jonas; Bornet, Aurélien; Baudouin, David; Veyre, Laurent; Gajan, David; Emsley, Lyndon; Lesage, Anne; Copéret, Christophe; Thieuleux, Chloé; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Koptyug, Igor; Jannin, Sami

    2016-08-18

    We report a simple and general method for the hyperpolarization of condensed gases by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The gases are adsorbed in the pores of structured mesoporous silica matrices known as HYPSOs (HYper Polarizing SOlids) that have paramagnetic polarizing agents covalently bound to the surface of the mesopores. DNP is performed at low temperatures and moderate magnetic fields (T = 1.2 K and B0 = 6.7 T). Frequency-modulated microwave irradiation is applied close to the electron spin resonance frequency (f = 188.3 GHz), and the electron spin polarization of the polarizing agents of HYPSO is transferred to the nuclear spins of the frozen gas. A proton polarization as high as P((1)H) = 70% can be obtained, which can be subsequently transferred to (13)C in natural abundance by cross-polarization, yielding up to P((13)C) = 27% for ethylene. PMID:27483034

  19. Reducing Polarization Losses during Cryogenic Separation of Hyperpolarized Xenon from Buffer Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.

    2001-05-01

    Present-day optical pumping and spin-exchange technology can produce bulk volumes of xenon with polarization of forty percent or more, but in the process xenon needs to be mixed with much larger quantities of buffer gases, such as helium and/or nitrogen(B. Driehuys et al., High-volume production of laser-polarized Xe-129), Appl. Phys. Lett. 69: 1668, 1996.. Currently, hyperpolarized xenon yield is limited in part by the collection efficiency --- even the best cryogenic separation techniques introduce losses of more than half of ^129Xe polarization when applied to bulk quantities of gas. Here we will report new data on the effects of field strength, flow rate, temperature, and presence of other xenon isotopes on the collection efficiency, as well as some possible means for preventing loss of ^129Xe spin polarization during the cryogenic separation process.

  20. Optical hyperpolarization and NMR detection of 129Xe on a microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Kennedy, Daniel J.; Rosenbluh, Michael; Donley, Elizabeth A.; Knappe, Svenja; Seltzer, Scott J.; Ring, Hattie L.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Kitching, John

    2014-05-01

    Optically hyperpolarized 129Xe gas has become a powerful contrast agent in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging, with applications ranging from studies of the human lung to the targeted detection of biomolecules. Equally attractive is its potential use to enhance the sensitivity of microfluidic NMR experiments, in which small sample volumes yield poor sensitivity. Unfortunately, most 129Xe polarization systems are large and non-portable. Here we present a microfabricated chip that optically polarizes 129Xe gas. We have achieved 129Xe polarizations >0.5% at flow rates of several microlitres per second, compatible with typical microfluidic applications. We employ in situ optical magnetometry to sensitively detect and characterize the 129Xe polarization at magnetic fields of 1 μT. We construct the device using standard microfabrication techniques, which will facilitate its integration with existing microfluidic platforms. This device may enable the implementation of highly sensitive 129Xe NMR in compact, low-cost, portable devices.

  1. Hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging of asthma: short-term reproducibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, Andrew; McKay, Shayna; Mathew, Lindsay; Santyr, Giles; McCormack, David G.; Parraga, Grace

    2008-03-01

    We examined subjects with exercise-induced asthma to assess the short-term reproducibility of hyperpolarized (Hp) helium-3 ( 3He) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of regional ventilation defects before asthma exacerbation. Our objective was to evaluate pre-exercise interscan Hp 3He MRI measurement reproducibility of subjects scanned on three separate occasions (5 +/- 2 days between sessions). Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 3.0 Tesla with a custom-built rigid elliptical 3He chest coil. Images for six subjects were evaluated by two observers; one who quantified ventilation defect score and ventilation defect volume and another who quantified percent ventilated volume. For all six subjects, pre-exercise ventilation defect location and number of defects were similar at all three visits suggesting persistence of many defects, but changes in defect volume and percent ventilated volume were detected.

  2. Hyperpolarized functional magnetic resonance of murine skeletal muscle enabled by multiple tracer-paradigm synchronizations.

    PubMed

    Leftin, Avigdor; Roussel, Tangi; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Measuring metabolism's time- and space-dependent responses upon stimulation lies at the core of functional magnetic resonance imaging. While focusing on water's sole resonance, further insight could arise from monitoring the temporal responses arising from the metabolites themselves, in what is known as functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Performing these measurements in real time, however, is severely challenged by the short functional timescales and low concentrations of natural metabolites. Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization is an emerging technique that can potentially alleviate this, as it provides a massive sensitivity enhancement allowing one to probe low-concentration tracers and products in a single-scan. Still, conventional implementations of this hyperpolarization approach are not immediately amenable to the repeated acquisitions needed in real-time functional settings. This work proposes a strategy for functional magnetic resonance of hyperpolarized metabolites that bypasses this limitation, and enables the observation of real-time metabolic changes through the synchronization of stimuli-triggered, multiple-bolus injections of the metabolic tracer 13C1-pyruvate. This new approach is demonstrated with paradigms tailored to reveal in vivo thresholds of murine hind-limb skeletal muscle activation, involving the conversion of 13C1-pyruvate to 13C1-lactate and 13C1-alanine. These functional hind-limb studies revealed that graded skeletal muscle stimulation causes commensurate increases in glycolytic metabolism in a frequency- and amplitude-dependent fashion, that can be monitored on the seconds/minutes timescale using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization. Spectroscopic imaging further allowed the in vivo visualization of uptake, transformation and distribution of the tracer and products, in fast-twitch glycolytic and in slow-twitch oxidative muscle fiber groups. While these studies open vistas in time and sensitivity for metabolic

  3. Hyperpolarized Functional Magnetic Resonance of Murine Skeletal Muscle Enabled by Multiple Tracer-Paradigm Synchronizations

    PubMed Central

    Leftin, Avigdor; Roussel, Tangi; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Measuring metabolism's time- and space-dependent responses upon stimulation lies at the core of functional magnetic resonance imaging. While focusing on water's sole resonance, further insight could arise from monitoring the temporal responses arising from the metabolites themselves, in what is known as functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Performing these measurements in real time, however, is severely challenged by the short functional timescales and low concentrations of natural metabolites. Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization is an emerging technique that can potentially alleviate this, as it provides a massive sensitivity enhancement allowing one to probe low-concentration tracers and products in a single-scan. Still, conventional implementations of this hyperpolarization approach are not immediately amenable to the repeated acquisitions needed in real-time functional settings. This work proposes a strategy for functional magnetic resonance of hyperpolarized metabolites that bypasses this limitation, and enables the observation of real-time metabolic changes through the synchronization of stimuli-triggered, multiple-bolus injections of the metabolic tracer 13C1-pyruvate. This new approach is demonstrated with paradigms tailored to reveal in vivo thresholds of murine hind-limb skeletal muscle activation, involving the conversion of 13C1-pyruvate to 13C1-lactate and 13C1-alanine. These functional hind-limb studies revealed that graded skeletal muscle stimulation causes commensurate increases in glycolytic metabolism in a frequency- and amplitude-dependent fashion, that can be monitored on the seconds/minutes timescale using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization. Spectroscopic imaging further allowed the in vivo visualization of uptake, transformation and distribution of the tracer and products, in fast-twitch glycolytic and in slow-twitch oxidative muscle fiber groups. While these studies open vistas in time and sensitivity for metabolic

  4. Performance of 4600-pound-thrust centrifugal-flow-type turbojet engine with water-alcohol injection at inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasser, Philip W

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of injecting a water-alcohol mixture of 2:1 at the compressor inlet of a centrifugal-flow type turbojet engine was conducted in an altitude test chamber at static sea-level conditions and at an altitude of 20,000 feet with a flight Mach number of 0.78 with an engine operating at rated speed. The net thrust was augmented by 0.16 for both flight conditions with a ratio of injected liquid to air flow of 0.05. Further increases in the liquid-air ratio did not give comparable increases in thrust.

  5. Optimization of operation of a three-electrode gyrotron with the use of a flow-type calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kharchev, Nikolay K.; Batanov, German M.; Kolik, Leonid V.; Malakhov, Dmitrii V.; Petrov, Aleksandr Ye.; Sarksyan, Karen A.; Skvortsova, Nina N.; Stepakhin, Vladimir D.; Belousov, Vladimir I.; Malygin, Sergei A.; Tai, Yevgenii M.

    2013-01-15

    Results are presented for measurements of microwave power of the Borets-75/0.8 gyrotron with recovery of residual electron energy, which were performed by a flow-type calorimeter. This gyrotron is a part of the ECR plasma heating complex put into operation in 2010 at the L-2M stellarator. The new calorimeter is capable of measuring microwave power up to 0.5 MW. Monitoring of the microwave power makes it possible to control the parameters of the gyrotron power supply unit (its voltage and current) and the magnetic field of the cryomagnet in order to optimize the gyrotron operation and arrive at maximum efficiency.

  6. Optimization of operation of a three-electrode gyrotron with the use of a flow-type calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Kharchev, Nikolay K; Batanov, German M; Kolik, Leonid V; Malakhov, Dmitrii V; Petrov, Aleksandr Ye; Sarksyan, Karen A; Skvortsova, Nina N; Stepakhin, Vladimir D; Belousov, Vladimir I; Malygin, Sergei A; Tai, Yevgenii M

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented for measurements of microwave power of the Borets-75/0.8 gyrotron with recovery of residual electron energy, which were performed by a flow-type calorimeter. This gyrotron is a part of the ECR plasma heating complex put into operation in 2010 at the L-2M stellarator. The new calorimeter is capable of measuring microwave power up to 0.5 MW. Monitoring of the microwave power makes it possible to control the parameters of the gyrotron power supply unit (its voltage and current) and the magnetic field of the cryomagnet in order to optimize the gyrotron operation and arrive at maximum efficiency. PMID:23387650

  7. In vivo13C spectroscopy in the rat brain using hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjańska, Małgorzata; Iltis, Isabelle; Shestov, Alexander A.; Deelchand, Dinesh K.; Nelson, Christopher; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2010-10-01

    The low sensitivity of 13C spectroscopy can be enhanced using dynamic nuclear polarization. Detection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products has been reported in kidney, liver, and muscle. In this work, the feasibility of measuring 13C signals of hyperpolarized 13C metabolic products in the rat brain in vivo following the injection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate is investigated. Injection of [2- 13C]pyruvate led to the detection of [2- 13C]lactate, but no other downstream metabolites such as TCA cycle intermediates were detected. Injection of [1- 13C]pyruvate enabled the detection of both [1- 13C]lactate and [ 13C]bicarbonate. A metabolic model was used to fit the hyperpolarized 13C time courses obtained during infusion of [1- 13C]pyruvate and to determine the values of VPDH and VLDH.

  8. Fast volumetric imaging of ethanol metabolism in rat liver with hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Sonal; Spielman, Daniel; Yen, Yi-Fen; Hurd, Ralph; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Mayer, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, volumetric imaging of hyperpolarized 13C compounds allows the real time measurement of metabolic activity and can be useful in distinguishing between normal and diseased tissues. This work extends a fast 2D under-sampled spiral magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequence to provide volumetric coverage, acquiring a 16×16×12 matrix with a nominal 5 mm isotropic resolution in 4.5 s. The rapid acquisition enables a high temporal resolution for dynamic imaging. This dynamic 3D MRSI method was used to investigate hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate metabolism modulated by the administration of ethanol in rat liver. A significant increase in the pyruvate to lactate conversion was observed in the liver due to the greater availability of NADH from ethanol metabolism. PMID:22331837

  9. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  10. HYPERPOLARIZED 13C MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ITS USE IN METABOLIC ASSESSMENT OF CULTURED CELLS AND PERFUSED ORGANS

    PubMed Central

    Lumata, Lloyd; Yang, Chendong; Ragavan, Mukundan; Carpenter, Nicholas; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Merritt, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Diseased tissue is often characterized by abnormalities in intermediary metabolism. Observing these alterations in situ may lead to an improved understanding of pathological processes and novel ways to monitor these processes non-invasively in human patients. Although 13C is a stable isotope safe for use in animal models of disease as well as human subjects, its utility as a metabolic tracer has largely been limited to ex vivo analyses employing analytical techniques like mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Neither of these techniques is suitable for non-invasive metabolic monitoring, and the low abundance and poor gyromagnetic ratio of conventional 13C make it a poor nucleus for imaging. However, the recent advent of hyperpolarization methods, particularly dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), make it possible to enhance the spin polarization state of 13C by many orders of magnitude, resulting in a temporary amplification of the signal sufficient for monitoring kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in living tissue through magnetic resonance spectroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging. Here we review DNP techniques to monitor metabolism in cultured cells, perfused hearts, and perfused livers, focusing on our experiences with hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. We present detailed approaches to optimize the DNP procedure, streamline biological sample preparation, and maximize detection of specific metabolic activities. We also discuss practical aspects in the choice of metabolic substrates for hyperpolarization studies, and outline some of the current technical and conceptual challenges in the field, including efforts to use hyperpolarization to quantify metabolic rates in vivo. PMID:26358902

  11. Release of C-type natriuretic peptide accounts for the biological activity of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sharmila D.; Nilsson, Holger; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2003-01-01

    Endothelial cells in most vascular beds release a factor that hyperpolarizes the underlying smooth muscle, produces vasodilatation, and plays a fundamental role in the regulation of local blood flow and systemic blood pressure. The identity of this endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), which is neither NO nor prostacyclin, remains obscure. Herein, we demonstrate that in mesenteric resistance arteries, release of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) accounts for the biological activity of EDHF. Both produce identical smooth muscle hyperpolarizations that are attenuated in the presence of high [K+], the Gi G protein (Gi) inhibitor pertussis toxin, the G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K+ channel inhibitor tertiapin, and a combination of Ba2+ (inwardly rectifying K+ channel blocker) plus ouabain (Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor). Responses to EDHF and CNP are unaffected by the natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A/B antagonist HS-142-1, but mimicked by the selective NPR-C agonist, cANF4–23. EDHF-dependent relaxation is concomitant with liberation of endothelial CNP; in the presence of the myoendothelial gap-junction inhibitor 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid or after endothelial denudation, CNP release and EDHF responses are profoundly suppressed. These data demonstrate that acetylcholine-evoked release of endothelial CNP activates NPR-C on vascular smooth muscle that via a Gi coupling promotes Ba2+/ouabain-sensitive hyperpolarization. Thus, we have revealed the identity of EDHF and established a pivotal role for endothelial-derived CNP in the regulation of vascular tone and blood flow. PMID:12552127

  12. The effect of exogenous substrate concentrations on true and apparent metabolism of hyperpolarized pyruvate in the isolated perfused lung.

    PubMed

    Kadlecek, Stephen; Shaghaghi, Hoora; Siddiqui, Sarmad; Profka, Harrilla; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Rizi, Rahim

    2014-12-01

    Although relatively metabolically inactive, the lung has an important role in maintaining systemic glycolytic intermediate and cytosolic redox balance. Failure to perform this function appropriately may lead to lung disease progression, including systemic aspects of these disorders. In this study, we experimentally probe the response of the isolated, perfused organ to varying glycolytic intermediate (pyruvate and lactate) concentrations, and the effect on the apparent metabolism of hyperpolarized 1-(13)C pyruvate. Twenty-four separate conditions were studied, from sub-physiological to super-physiological concentrations of each metabolite. A three-compartment model is developed, which accurately matches the full range of experiments and includes a full account of evolution of agent concentration and polarization. The model is then refined using a series of approximations which are shown to be applicable to cases of physiological relevance, and which facilitate an intuitive understanding of the saturation and scaling behavior. Perturbations of the model assumptions are used to determine the sensitivity to input parameter estimates, and finally the model is used to examine the relationship between measurements accessible by NMR and the underlying physiological parameters of interest. Based on the observed scaling of lactate labeling with lactate and pyruvate concentrations, we conclude that the level of hyperpolarized lactate signal in the lung is primarily determined by the rate at which NAD(+) is reduced to NADH. Further, although weak dependences on other factors are predicted, the modeled NAD(+) reduction rate is largely governed by the intracellular lactate pool size. Conditions affecting the lactate pool can therefore be expected to display the highest contrast in hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate imaging. The work is intended to serve as a basis both to interpret the signal dynamics of hyperpolarized measurements in the normal lung and to understand the cause of

  13. A pill-box design, flow type, gas scintillation proportional counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, S. P.; Sharma, R. C.; Bhati, S.; Somasundaram, S.

    1982-07-01

    A gas scintillation proportional counter of "pill-box" design, operated with argon +2.5% nitrogen gas in continuous flow, has been developed. An energy resolution of 1.6% is obtained for 239Pu α-particles emitted from a mixed nuclide source of 239Pu- 241Am - 244Cm and injected into the counter parallel to the anode. The risetime of the scintillation pulse is found to be less than 0.5 μs. Measurements have been made of charge and light gain factors as a function of anode voltage. It is found that for a given anode voltage, the scintillation pulse amplitude increases sharply with the addition of nitrogen to argon and reaches a maximum at about 2.5% and then decreases slowly, whereas the charge pulse amplitude reduces monotonically. Nitrogen improvement factors with the addition of 2.5% nitrogen to argon are found to be different for two photomultipliers with different photocathode responses. The improvement in energy resolution as a result of addition of nitrogen to argon is discussed. Comments are made on the intrinsic energy resolution capabilities of such a counter.

  14. Diet-Induced Obesity Impairs Endothelium-Derived Hyperpolarization via Altered Potassium Channel Signaling Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, Rebecca E.; Grayson, T. Hilton; Morris, Margaret J.; Howitt, Lauren; Chadha, Preet S.; Sandow, Shaun L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The vascular endothelium plays a critical role in the control of blood flow. Altered endothelium-mediated vasodilator and vasoconstrictor mechanisms underlie key aspects of cardiovascular disease, including those in obesity. Whilst the mechanism of nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation has been extensively studied in obesity, little is known about the impact of obesity on vasodilation to the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH) mechanism; which predominates in smaller resistance vessels and is characterized in this study. Methodology/Principal Findings Membrane potential, vessel diameter and luminal pressure were recorded in 4th order mesenteric arteries with pressure-induced myogenic tone, in control and diet-induced obese rats. Obesity, reflecting that of human dietary etiology, was induced with a cafeteria-style diet (∼30 kJ, fat) over 16–20 weeks. Age and sexed matched controls received standard chow (∼12 kJ, fat). Channel protein distribution, expression and vessel morphology were determined using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and ultrastructural techniques. In control and obese rat vessels, acetylcholine-mediated EDH was abolished by small and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (SKCa/IKCa) inhibition; with such activity being impaired in obesity. SKCa-IKCa activation with cyclohexyl-[2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-methyl-pyrimidin-4-yl]-amine (CyPPA) and 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone (1-EBIO), respectively, hyperpolarized and relaxed vessels from control and obese rats. IKCa-mediated EDH contribution was increased in obesity, and associated with altered IKCa distribution and elevated expression. In contrast, the SKCa-dependent-EDH component was reduced in obesity. Inward-rectifying potassium channel (Kir) and Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition by barium/ouabain, respectively, attenuated and abolished EDH in arteries from control and obese rats, respectively; reflecting differential Kir expression and

  15. XeNA: An automated ‘open-source’ 129Xe hyperpolarizer for clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Coffey, Aaron M.; Walkup, Laura L.; Gust, Brogan M.; Whiting, Nicholas; Newton, Hayley; Muradyan, Iga; Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Ranta, Kaili; Moroz, Gregory D.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Patz, Samuel; Barlow, Michael J.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2014-01-01

    Here we provide a full report on the construction, components, and capabilities of our consortium’s “open-source” large-scale (~1 L/hr) 129Xe hyperpolarizer for clinical, pre-clinical, and materials NMR/MRI (Nikolaou et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 110, 14150 (2013)). The ‘hyperpolarizer’ is automated and built mostly of off-the-shelf components; moreover, it is designed to be cost-effective and installed in both research laboratories and clinical settings with materials costing less than $125,000. The device runs in the xenon-rich regime (up to 1800 Torr Xe in 0.5 L) in either stopped-flow or single-batch mode—making cryo-collection of the hyperpolarized gas unnecessary for many applications. In-cell 129Xe nuclear spin polarization values of ~30-90% have been measured for Xe loadings of ~300-1600 Torr. Typical 129Xe polarization build-up and T1 relaxation time constants were ~8.5 min and ~1.9 hr respectively under our SEOP conditions; such ratios, combined with near-unity Rb electron spin polarizations enabled by the high resonant laser power (up to ~200 W), permits such high PXe values to be achieved despite the high in-cell Xe densities. Importantly, most of the polarization is maintained during efficient HP gas transfer to other containers, and ultra-long 129Xe relaxation times (up to nearly 6 hr) were observed in Tedlar bags following transport to a clinical 3 T scanner for MR spectroscopy and imaging as a prelude to in vivo experiments. The device has received FDA IND approval for a clinical study of COPD subjects. The primary focus of this paper is on the technical / engineering development of the polarizer, with the explicit goals of facilitating the adaptation of design features and operative modes into other laboratories, and of spurring the further advancement of HP-gas MR applications in biomedicine. PMID:24631715

  16. Properties of two calcium-activated hyperpolarizations in rat hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, B; Nicoll, R A

    1987-01-01

    1. Intracellular recording from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in the slice preparation was used to analyse the pharmacological sensitivity of action potential repolarization and the hyperpolarizations that follow the action potential. The Ca2+-activated after-hyperpolarizations (a.h.p.s) could be divided into a fast a.h.p. with a time course of milliseconds, and a slow a.h.p. which lasted for a few seconds at a temperature of 30 degrees C. 2. The repolarization of the action potential is sensitive to the Ca2+ channel blocker Cd2+. This effect is simultaneous with a block of the fast a.h.p. which follows immediately upon the repolarization of the action potential. The slow a.h.p. was also blocked by Cd2+. 3. Low concentrations of the K+ channel blocker, tetraethylammonium (TEA; 200-500 microM), block the fast a.h.p. and slow down action potential repolarization. The slow a.h.p. was not affected by low concentrations of TEA. 4. The action potential repolarization and the fast a.h.p. are also reversibly sensitive to charybdotoxin. This agent had no effect on the slow a.h.p. 5. When EGTA or BAPTA were added to the normal recording electrolyte (KMeSO4), the generation of slow a.h.p.s was prevented. In addition, cells impaled with BAPTA-containing electrodes displayed broader action potentials and much reduced fast a.h.p.s compared to recordings made with electrodes containing KMeSO4 alone or with EGTA. 6. The slow a.h.p. can be eliminated by noradrenaline, 8-bromocyclic AMP or carbachol. Under these conditions there are no effects on the fast a.h.p. or on action potential duration. 7. Block of the fast a.h.p. with TEA or CTX (charybdotoxin) is associated with an increased frequency of the first few action potentials during a depolarization. This is a quite distinct effect from the greatly increased number of action potentials which results from block of the slow a.h.p. 8. The results support a conclusion that the fast a.h.p. is generated by the TEA- and voltage

  17. Detection of Early Response to Temozolomide Treatment in Brain Tumors Using Hyperpolarized 13C MR Metabolic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ilwoo; Bok, Robert; Ozawa, Tomoko; Phillips, Joanna J.; James, C. David; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using DNP hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate to measure early response to temozolomide (TMZ) therapy using an orthotopic human glioblastoma xenograft model. Materials and Methods Twenty athymic rats with intracranial implantation of human glioblastoma cells were divided into two groups: one group received an oral administration of 100 mg/kg TMZ (n = 10) and the control group received vehicle only (n = 10). 13C 3D magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data were acquired following injection of 2.5 mL (100 mM) hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate using a 3T scanner prior to treatment (day D0), at D1 (days from treatment) or D2. Results Tumor metabolism as assessed by the ratio of lactate to pyruvate (Lac/Pyr) was significantly altered at D1 for the TMZ-treated group but tumor volume did not show a reduction until D5 to D7. The percent change in Lac/Pyr from baseline was statistically different between the two groups at D1 and D2 (P < 0.008), while percent tumor volume was not (P > 0.2). Conclusion The results from this study suggest that metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate may provide a unique tool that clinical neuro-oncologists can use in the future to monitor tumor response to therapy for patients with brain tumors. PMID:21590996

  18. Fast Determination of Flip Angle and T1 in Hyperpolarized Gas MRI During a Single Breath-Hold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-05-01

    MRI of hyperpolarized media, such as 129Xe and 3He, shows great potential for clinical applications. The optimal use of the available spin polarization requires accurate flip angle calibrations and T1 measurements. Traditional flip angle calibration methods are time-consuming and suffer from polarization losses during T1 relaxation. In this paper, we propose a method to simultaneously calibrate flip angles and measure T1 in vivo during a breath-hold time of less than 4 seconds. We demonstrate the accuracy, robustness and repeatability of this method and contrast it with traditional methods. By measuring the T1 of hyperpolarized gas, the oxygen pressure in vivo can be calibrated during the same breath hold. The results of the calibration have been applied in variable flip angle (VFA) scheme to obtain a stable steady-state transverse magnetization. Coupled with this method, the ultra-short TE (UTE) and constant VFA (CVFA) schemes are expected to give rise to new applications of hyperpolarized media.

  19. Fast Determination of Flip Angle and T1 in Hyperpolarized Gas MRI During a Single Breath-Hold

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-01-01

    MRI of hyperpolarized media, such as 129Xe and 3He, shows great potential for clinical applications. The optimal use of the available spin polarization requires accurate flip angle calibrations and T1 measurements. Traditional flip angle calibration methods are time-consuming and suffer from polarization losses during T1 relaxation. In this paper, we propose a method to simultaneously calibrate flip angles and measure T1 in vivo during a breath-hold time of less than 4 seconds. We demonstrate the accuracy, robustness and repeatability of this method and contrast it with traditional methods. By measuring the T1 of hyperpolarized gas, the oxygen pressure in vivo can be calibrated during the same breath hold. The results of the calibration have been applied in variable flip angle (VFA) scheme to obtain a stable steady-state transverse magnetization. Coupled with this method, the ultra-short TE (UTE) and constant VFA (CVFA) schemes are expected to give rise to new applications of hyperpolarized media. PMID:27169670

  20. Fast Determination of Flip Angle and T1 in Hyperpolarized Gas MRI During a Single Breath-Hold.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-01-01

    MRI of hyperpolarized media, such as (129)Xe and (3)He, shows great potential for clinical applications. The optimal use of the available spin polarization requires accurate flip angle calibrations and T1 measurements. Traditional flip angle calibration methods are time-consuming and suffer from polarization losses during T1 relaxation. In this paper, we propose a method to simultaneously calibrate flip angles and measure T1 in vivo during a breath-hold time of less than 4 seconds. We demonstrate the accuracy, robustness and repeatability of this method and contrast it with traditional methods. By measuring the T1 of hyperpolarized gas, the oxygen pressure in vivo can be calibrated during the same breath hold. The results of the calibration have been applied in variable flip angle (VFA) scheme to obtain a stable steady-state transverse magnetization. Coupled with this method, the ultra-short TE (UTE) and constant VFA (CVFA) schemes are expected to give rise to new applications of hyperpolarized media. PMID:27169670

  1. Multidimensional mapping of spin-exchange optical pumping in clinical-scale batch-mode 129Xe hyperpolarizers.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Coffey, Aaron M; Ranta, Kaili; Walkup, Laura L; Gust, Brogan M; Barlow, Michael J; Rosen, Matthew S; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-05-01

    We present a systematic, multiparameter study of Rb/(129)Xe spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) in the regimes of high xenon pressure and photon flux using a 3D-printed, clinical-scale stopped-flow hyperpolarizer. In situ NMR detection was used to study the dynamics of (129)Xe polarization as a function of SEOP-cell operating temperature, photon flux, and xenon partial pressure to maximize (129)Xe polarization (PXe). PXe values of 95 ± 9%, 73 ± 4%, 60 ± 2%, 41 ± 1%, and 31 ± 1% at 275, 515, 1000, 1500, and 2000 Torr Xe partial pressure were achieved. These PXe polarization values were separately validated by ejecting the hyperpolarized (129)Xe gas and performing low-field MRI at 47.5 mT. It is shown that PXe in this high-pressure regime can be increased beyond already record levels with higher photon flux and better SEOP thermal management, as well as optimization of the polarization dynamics, pointing the way to further improvements in hyperpolarized (129)Xe production efficiency. PMID:24731261

  2. Multidimensional Mapping of Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping in Clinical-Scale Batch-Mode 129Xe Hyperpolarizers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic, multiparameter study of Rb/129Xe spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) in the regimes of high xenon pressure and photon flux using a 3D-printed, clinical-scale stopped-flow hyperpolarizer. In situ NMR detection was used to study the dynamics of 129Xe polarization as a function of SEOP-cell operating temperature, photon flux, and xenon partial pressure to maximize 129Xe polarization (PXe). PXe values of 95 ± 9%, 73 ± 4%, 60 ± 2%, 41 ± 1%, and 31 ± 1% at 275, 515, 1000, 1500, and 2000 Torr Xe partial pressure were achieved. These PXe polarization values were separately validated by ejecting the hyperpolarized 129Xe gas and performing low-field MRI at 47.5 mT. It is shown that PXe in this high-pressure regime can be increased beyond already record levels with higher photon flux and better SEOP thermal management, as well as optimization of the polarization dynamics, pointing the way to further improvements in hyperpolarized 129Xe production efficiency. PMID:24731261

  3. Continuous flow Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization of water in the fringe field of a clinical magnetic resonance imaging system for authentic image contrast

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, Mark D.; Siaw, Ting Ann; Sailasuta, Napapon; Ross, Brian D.; Bhattacharya, Pratip; Han, Songi

    2016-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate a system to generate hyperpolarized water in the 0.35 T fringe field of a clinical 1.5 T whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet. Once generated, the hyperpolarized water is quickly and continuously transferred from the 0.35 T fringe to the 1.5 T center field of the same magnet for image acquisition using standard MRI equipment. The hyperpolarization is based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which effectively and quickly transfers the higher spin polarization of free radicals to nuclear spins at ambient temperatures. We visualize the dispersion of hyperpolarized water as it flows through water-saturated systems by utilizing an observed −15 fold DNP signal enhancement with respect to the unenhanced 1H MRI signal of water at 1.5 T. The experimental DNP apparatus presented here is readily portable and can be brought to and used with any conventional unshielded MRI system. A new method of immobilizing radicals to gel beads via polyelectrolyte linker arms is described, which led to superior flow Overhauser DNP performance compared to previously presented gels. We discuss the general applicability of Overhauser DNP hyperpolarization of water and aqueous solutions in the fringe field of commercially available magnets with central fields up to 4.7 Tesla. PMID:20541445

  4. HP-Xe to go: Storage and transportation of hyperpolarized (129)Xenon.

    PubMed

    Repetto, M; Zimmer, S; Allmendinger, F; Blümler, P; Doll, M; Grasdijk, J O; Heil, W; Jungmann, K; Karpuk, S; Krause, H-J; Offenhäusser, A; Schmidt, U; Sobolev, Y; Willmann, L

    2016-04-01

    Recently the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of hyperpolarized (HP)-(129)Xe was significantly improved by using uncoated and Rb-free storage vessels of GE180 glass. For these cells, a simple procedure was established to obtain reproducible wall relaxation times of about 18 h. Then the limiting relaxation mechanism in pure Xe is due to the coupling between the nuclear spins and the angular momentum of the Xe-Xe van-der-Waals-molecules. This mechanism can be significantly reduced by using different buffer gases of which CO2 was discovered to be the most efficient so far. From these values, it was estimated that for a 1:1 mixture of HP-Xe with CO2 a longitudinal relaxation time of about 7 h can be expected, sufficient to transport HP-Xe from a production to a remote application site. This prediction was verified for such a mixture at a total pressure of about 1 bar in a 10 cm glass cell showing a storage time of T1≈9 h (for T1(wall)=(34±9) h) which was transported inside a magnetic box over a distance of about 200 km by car. PMID:26927028

  5. Hyperpolarized 83Kr magnetic resonance imaging of alveolar degradation in a rat model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lilburn, David M L; Lesbats, Clémentine; Six, Joseph S; Dubuis, Eric; Yew-Booth, Liang; Shaw, Dominick E; Belvisi, Maria G; Birrell, Mark A; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Hyperpolarized (83)Kr surface quadrupolar relaxation (SQUARE) generates MRI contrast that was previously shown to correlate with surface-to-volume ratios in porous model surface systems. The underlying physics of SQUARE contrast is conceptually different from any other current MRI methodology as the method uses the nuclear electric properties of the spin I = 9/2 isotope (83)Kr. To explore the usage of this non-radioactive isotope for pulmonary pathophysiology, MRI SQUARE contrast was acquired in excised rat lungs obtained from an elastase-induced model of emphysema. A significant (83)Kr T1 relaxation time increase in the SQUARE contrast was found in the elastase-treated lungs compared with the baseline data from control lungs. The SQUARE contrast suggests a reduction in pulmonary surface-to-volume ratio in the emphysema model that was validated by histology. The finding supports usage of (83)Kr SQUARE as a new biomarker for surface-to-volume ratio changes in emphysema. PMID:25994296

  6. Effects of Pulmonary Inhalation on Hyperpolarized Krypton-83 Magnetic Resonance T1 Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, K.F.; Elkins, N.D.; Pavlovskaya, G.E.; Repine, J.E.; Meersmann, T.

    2011-01-01

    The 83Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T1 of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface to volume ratio, and surface temperature. The current work explored aspects of pulmonary 83Kr T1 relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr with approximately 4.4 % spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp 83Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to explore the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured 83Kr T1 relaxation times. The longitudinal 83Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T1 = 1.3 s and T1 = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data was highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the 83Kr T1 relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of 83Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function. PMID:21628780

  7. Analysis of hyperpolarized dynamic 13C lactate imaging in a transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Janine M.; Chen, Albert P.; Zierhut, Matthew L.; Bok, Robert A.; Cunningham, Charles H.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the application of an acquisition that selectively excites the [1-13C]lactate resonance and allows dynamic tracking of the conversion of 13C-lactate from hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate at a high spatial resolution. In order to characterize metabolic processes occurring in a mouse model of prostate cancer, 20 sequential 3D images of 13C-lactate were acquired 5 s apart using a pulse sequence that incorporated a spectral–spatial excitation pulse and a flyback echo-planar readout to track the time course of newly converted 13C-lactate after injection of prepolarized 13C-pyruvate. The maximum lactate signal (MLS), full-width half-maximum (FWHM), time to the peak 13C-lactate signal (TTP) and area under the dynamic curve were calculated from the dynamic images of 10 TRAMP mice and two wild-type controls. The regional variation in 13C-lactate associated with the injected pyruvate was demonstrated by the peak of the 13C-lactate signal occurring earlier in the kidney than in the tumor region. The intensity of the dynamic 13C-lactate curves also varied spatially within the tumor, illustrating the heterogeneity in metabolism that was most prominent in more advanced stages of disease development. The MLS was significantly higher in TRAMP mice that had advanced disease. PMID:19695815

  8. Is neural hyperpolarization by cathodal stimulation always detrimental at the behavioral level?

    PubMed Central

    Pirulli, Cornelia; Fertonani, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (c-tDCS) is usually considered an inhibitory stimulation. From a physiological perspective, c-tDCS induces hyperpolarization at the neural level. However, from a behavioral perspective, c-tDCS application does not always result in performance deterioration. In this work, we investigated the role of several important stimulation parameters (i.e., timing, presence of pauses, duration, and intensity) in shaping the behavioral effects of c-tDCS over the primary visual cortex. In Experiment 1, we applied c-tDCS at two different times (before or during an orientation discrimination task). We also studied the effects of pauses during the stimulation. In Experiments 2 and 3, we compared different durations (9 vs. 22 min) and intensities (0.75 vs. 1.5 mA) of stimulation. c-tDCS applied before task execution induced an improvement of performance, highlighting the importance of the activation state of the cortex. However, this result depended on the duration and intensity of stimulation. We suggest that the application of c-tDCS induces depression of cortical activity over a specific stimulated area; but to keep reactivity within given limits, the brain react in order to restore the equilibrium and this might result in increased sensitivity in visual performance. This is a further example of how the nervous system dynamically maintains a condition that permits adequate performance in different environments. PMID:25018709

  9. Directly detected 55Mn MRI: Application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized 13C MRI development

    PubMed Central

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D.; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 (55Mn) MRI using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized 13C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the 55Mn and 13C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective “13C” MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, 55Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical 13C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large 13C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d= 8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7M) was scanned rapidly by 55Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for 13C, using a balanced SSFP acquisition. The requisite penetration of RF magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for 55Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image SNR of ~60 at 0.5cm3 spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP 13C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  10. Strategies for rapid in vivo 1H and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Sarah J.; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Li, Yan; Park, Il woo; Crane, Jason

    2013-04-01

    In vivo MRSI is an important imaging modality that has been shown in numerous research studies to give biologically relevant information for assessing the underlying mechanisms of disease and for monitoring response to therapy. The increasing availability of high field scanners and multichannel radiofrequency coils has provided the opportunity to acquire in vivo data with significant improvements in sensitivity and signal to noise ratio. These capabilities may be used to shorten acquisition time and provide increased coverage. The ability to acquire rapid, volumetric MRSI data is critical for examining heterogeneity in metabolic profiles and for relating serial changes in metabolism within the same individual during the course of the disease. In this review we discuss the implementation of strategies that use alternative k-space sampling trajectories and parallel imaging methods in order to speed up data acquisition. The impact of such methods is demonstrated using three recent examples of how these methods have been applied. These are to the acquisition of robust 3D 1H MRSI data within 5-10 min at a field strength of 3 T, to obtaining higher sensitivity for 1H MRSI at 7 T and to using ultrafast volumetric and dynamic 13C MRSI for monitoring the changes in signals that occur following the injection of hyperpolarized 13C agents.