Science.gov

Sample records for continuous porcine alveolar

  1. Reactomes of Porcine Alveolar Macrophages Infected with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhihua; Zhou, Xiang; Michal, Jennifer J.; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Lifan; Zhang, Ming; Ding, Bo; Liu, Bang; Manoranjan, Valipuram S.; Neill, John D.; Harhay, Gregory P.; Kehrli, Marcus E.; Miller, Laura C.

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has devastated pig industries worldwide for many years. It is caused by a small RNA virus (PRRSV), which targets almost exclusively pig monocytes or macrophages. In the present study, five SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) libraries derived from 0 hour mock-infected and 6, 12, 16 and 24 hours PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) produced a total 643,255 sequenced tags with 91,807 unique tags. Differentially expressed (DE) tags were then detected using the Bayesian framework followed by gene/mRNA assignment, arbitrary selection and manual annotation, which determined 699 DE genes for reactome analysis. The DAVID, KEGG and REACTOME databases assigned 573 of the DE genes into six biological systems, 60 functional categories and 504 pathways. The six systems are: cellular processes, genetic information processing, environmental information processing, metabolism, organismal systems and human diseases as defined by KEGG with modification. Self-organizing map (SOM) analysis further grouped these 699 DE genes into ten clusters, reflecting their expression trends along these five time points. Based on the number one functional category in each system, cell growth and death, transcription processes, signal transductions, energy metabolism, immune system and infectious diseases formed the major reactomes of PAMs responding to PRRSV infection. Our investigation also focused on dominant pathways that had at least 20 DE genes identified, multi-pathway genes that were involved in 10 or more pathways and exclusively-expressed genes that were included in one system. Overall, our present study reported a large set of DE genes, compiled a comprehensive coverage of pathways, and revealed system-based reactomes of PAMs infected with PRRSV. We believe that our reactome data provides new insight into molecular mechanisms involved in host genetic complexity of antiviral activities against PRRSV and lays a strong

  2. In depth global analysis of transcript abundance levels in porcine alveolar macrophages following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. Infection of the primary target cells, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not under...

  3. In depth global analysis of gene expression levels in porcine alveolar macrophages following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide. Infection of the preferential target cells, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not understood. Serial Analysis of Gene Ex...

  4. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus on porcine alveolar macrophage function as determined using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. The main target of infection is the porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM). Infection of PAM by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that a...

  5. Transcription Analysis of the Porcine Alveolar Macrophage Response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Li; Luping, Du; Bing, Sun; Zhengyu, Yu; Maojun, Liu; Zhixin, Feng; Yanna, Wei; Haiyan, Wang; Guoqing, Shao; Kongwang, He

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is considered the major causative agent of porcine respiratory disease complex, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. To gain more insights into the pathogenesis of this organism, the high throughput cDNA microarray assays were employed to evaluate host responses of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. A total of 1033 and 1235 differentially expressed genes were identified in porcine alveolar macrophages in responses to exposure to M. hyopneumoniae at 6 and 15 hours post infection, respectively. The differentially expressed genes were involved in many vital functional classes, including inflammatory response, immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, defense response, signal transduction, protein folding, protein ubiquitination and so on. The pathway analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were the chemokine signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domains (Nod)-like receptor signaling pathway and apoptosis signaling pathway. The reliability of the data obtained from the microarray was verified by performing quantitative real-time PCR. The expression kinetics of chemokines was further analyzed. The present study is the first to document the response of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. The data further developed our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:25098731

  6. Reactomes of porcine alveolar macrophages infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has devastated pig industries worldwide for many years. It is caused by a small RNA virus (PRRSV), which targets almost exclusively pig monocytes or macrophages. In the present study, five SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) libraries derive...

  7. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection of porcine alveolar macrophages on Toll-like receptors elicitation of type I interferon responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of virus replication initially depends on rapid activation of the innate immune responses. Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands are potent inducers of innate immunity against viral infections. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) initiates infection in pulmonary alveolar m...

  8. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus on porcine alveolar macrophage function as determined using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. The major target of infection is the alveolar macrophage (AM). Infection of AMs by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not...

  9. Synthetic Toll-like receptor 7 ligand inhibits porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection in primary porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Du, Yongkun; Du, Taofeng; Shi, Yunpeng; Zhang, Angke; Zhang, Chong; Diao, Yuwen; Jin, Guangyi; Zhou, En-Min

    2016-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a common viral pathogen, causes huge annual economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. After triggering by specific ligands, the Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), a type of pattern-recognition receptor (PRR), induces antiviral cytokines production. Previously, we synthesized an adenine analog, designated SZU101, a TLR7-specific ligand. In this study, we assessed the inhibitory effect of SZU101 on PRRSV infection in vitro. SZU101 significantly suppressed PRRSV infection in primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, SZU101-induced inhibition involved NF-κB pathway activation in PAMs to initiate expression of TLR7-mediated cytokines and induce expression of downstream signaling IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). Chloroquine, a TLR7 inhibitor, and BAY 11-7082, an NF-κB inhibitor, reversed both the SZU101-induced antiviral effect and induction of cytokine genes and ISGs expression. Therefore, SZU101 antiviral effects depend at least in part on TLR7-NF-κB signaling pathway. Additionally, administration of SZU101 enhanced the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses against PRRSV antigens in mice. Given these results, SZU101 holds promise as an antiviral agent and a vaccine adjuvant to prevent PRRSV infection in pigs. PMID:27079946

  10. Lipopolysaccharide modulation of a CD14-like molecule on porcine alveolar macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielian, T. L.; Ross, C. R.; McVey, D. S.; Chapes, S. K.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation antigen 14 (CD14) functions as a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) LPS-binding protein (LBP) complexes. Because LPS has varying effects on CD14 expression in vitro, we evaluated CD14 expression in response to LPS with a fully differentiated macrophage phenotype, the alveolar macrophage. By using flow microfluorometric analysis and a radioimmunoassay with an anti-human CD14 monoclonal antibody (My4) that cross-reacts with porcine CD14, we found that macrophages stimulated with LPS for 24 h exhibited a two- to fivefold increase in CD14-like antigen compared with unstimulated cells. At low concentrations of LPS, up-regulation of the CD14-like antigen was dependent on serum; at higher concentrations of LPS, serum was not required. In the absence of serum a 10-fold higher dose of LPS (10 ng/ml) was required to increase CD14-like expression. In addition, LPS-induced CD14-like up-regulation correlated with secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, regardless of serum concentration. Blockade with My4 antibody significantly inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion at 1 ng/ml of LPS. However, inhibition decreased as we increased the LPS concentration, suggesting the existence of CD14-independent pathways of macrophage activation in response to LPS. Alternatively, My4 may have a lower affinity for the porcine CD14 antigen than LPS, which may have only partially blocked the LPS-LBP binding site at high concentrations of LPS. Therefore, these data suggest that LPS activation of porcine alveolar macrophages for 24 h increased CD14-like receptor expression. The degree of CD14-like up-regulation was related to LPS concentration, however, activation did not require the presence of serum at high concentrations of LPS.

  11. Matrine displayed antiviral activity in porcine alveolar macrophages co-infected by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Sun, Panpan; Lv, Haipeng; Sun, Yaogui; Guo, Jianhua; Wang, Zhirui; Luo, Tiantian; Wang, Shaoyu; Li, Hongquan

    2016-01-01

    The co-infection of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is quite common in clinical settings and no effective treatment to the co-infection is available. In this study, we established the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) cells model co-infected with PRRSV/PCV2 with modification in vitro, and investigated the antiviral activity of Matrine on this cell model and further evaluated the effect of Matrine on virus-induced TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway. The results demonstrated PAM cells inoculated with PRRSV followed by PCV2 2 h later enhanced PRRSV and PCV2 replications. Matrine treatment suppressed both PRRSV and PCV2 infection at 12 h post infection. Furthermore, PRRSV/PCV2 co- infection induced IκBα degradation and phosphorylation as well as the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus indicating that PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection induced NF-κB activation. Matrine treatment significantly down-regulated the expression of TLR3, TLR4 and TNF-α although it, to some extent, suppressed p-IκBα expression, suggesting that TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway play an important role of Matrine in combating PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection. It is concluded that Matrine possesses activity against PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection in vitro and suppression of the TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway as an important underlying molecular mechanism. These findings warrant Matrine to be further explored for its antiviral activity in clinical settings. PMID:27080155

  12. Matrine displayed antiviral activity in porcine alveolar macrophages co-infected by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Na; Sun, Panpan; Lv, Haipeng; Sun, Yaogui; Guo, Jianhua; Wang, Zhirui; Luo, Tiantian; Wang, Shaoyu; Li, Hongquan

    2016-01-01

    The co-infection of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is quite common in clinical settings and no effective treatment to the co-infection is available. In this study, we established the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) cells model co-infected with PRRSV/PCV2 with modification in vitro, and investigated the antiviral activity of Matrine on this cell model and further evaluated the effect of Matrine on virus-induced TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway. The results demonstrated PAM cells inoculated with PRRSV followed by PCV2 2 h later enhanced PRRSV and PCV2 replications. Matrine treatment suppressed both PRRSV and PCV2 infection at 12 h post infection. Furthermore, PRRSV/PCV2 co- infection induced IκBα degradation and phosphorylation as well as the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus indicating that PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection induced NF-κB activation. Matrine treatment significantly down-regulated the expression of TLR3, TLR4 and TNF-α although it, to some extent, suppressed p-IκBα expression, suggesting that TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway play an important role of Matrine in combating PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection. It is concluded that Matrine possesses activity against PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection in vitro and suppression of the TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway as an important underlying molecular mechanism. These findings warrant Matrine to be further explored for its antiviral activity in clinical settings. PMID:27080155

  13. Suppression of NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Grauwet, Korneel; Vermeulen, Ben; Devriendt, Bert; Jiang, Ping; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans

    2013-06-28

    The adaptive immunity against PRRSV has already been studied in depth, but only limited data are available on the innate immune responses against this pathogen. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between porcine natural killer (NK) cells and PRRSV-infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), since NK cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity and PAMs are primary target cells of PRRSV infection. NK cytotoxicity assays were performed using enriched NK cells as effector cells and virus-infected or mock-inoculated PAMs as target cells. The NK cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected PAMs was decreased starting from 6h post inoculation (hpi) till the end of the experiment (12 hpi) and was significantly lower than that against pseudorabies virus (PrV)-infected PAMs. UV-inactivated PRRSV also suppressed NK activity, but much less than infectious PRRSV. Furthermore, co-incubation with PRRSV-infected PAMs inhibited degranulation of NK cells. Finally, using the supernatant of PRRSV-infected PAMs collected at 12 hpi showed that the suppressive effect of PRRSV on NK cytotoxicity was not mediated by soluble factors. In conclusion, PRRSV-infected PAMs showed a reduced susceptibility toward NK cytotoxicity, which may represent one of the multiple evasion strategies of PRRSV. PMID:23522639

  14. Protection Of Alveolar Macrophages And MARC 145 Cells From Porcine Reproductive And Respiratory Syndrome Virus Challenge By Swine Interferon-Beta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interferon beta, a type I IFN, is crucial in initiating the innate immune response and in the generation of the adaptive response. This study demonstrated the capacity of swine interferon beta (swIFN beta) to protect porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) and MARC145 cells from infection with porcine re...

  15. Early apoptosis of porcine alveolar macrophages limits avian influenza virus replication and pro-inflammatory dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pengxiang; Kuchipudi, Suresh V.; Mellits, Kenneth H.; Sebastian, Sujith; James, Joe; Liu, Jinhua; Shelton, Holly; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2015-01-01

    Pigs are evidently more resistant to avian than swine influenza A viruses, mediated in part through frontline epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages (AM). Although porcine AM (PAM) are crucial in influenza virus control, their mode of control is unclear. To gain insight into the possible role of PAM in the mediation of avian influenza virus resistance, we compared the host effects and replication of two avian (H2N3 and H6N1) and three mammalian (swine H1N1, human H1N1 and pandemic H1N1) influenza viruses in PAM. We found that PAM were readily susceptible to initial infection with all five avian and mammalian influenza viruses but only avian viruses caused early and extensive apoptosis (by 6 h of infection) resulting in reduced virus progeny and moderated pro-inflammation. Full length viral PB1-F2 present only in avian influenza viruses is a virulence factor that targets AM for mitochondrial-associated apoptotic cell death. With the use of reverse genetics on an avian H5N1 virus, we found that full length PB1-F2 contributed to increased apoptosis and pro-inflammation but not to reduced virus replication. Taken together, we propose that early apoptosis of PAM limits the spread of avian influenza viruses and that PB1-F2 could play a contributory role in the process. PMID:26642934

  16. Early apoptosis of porcine alveolar macrophages limits avian influenza virus replication and pro-inflammatory dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pengxiang; Kuchipudi, Suresh V; Mellits, Kenneth H; Sebastian, Sujith; James, Joe; Liu, Jinhua; Shelton, Holly; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2015-01-01

    Pigs are evidently more resistant to avian than swine influenza A viruses, mediated in part through frontline epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages (AM). Although porcine AM (PAM) are crucial in influenza virus control, their mode of control is unclear. To gain insight into the possible role of PAM in the mediation of avian influenza virus resistance, we compared the host effects and replication of two avian (H2N3 and H6N1) and three mammalian (swine H1N1, human H1N1 and pandemic H1N1) influenza viruses in PAM. We found that PAM were readily susceptible to initial infection with all five avian and mammalian influenza viruses but only avian viruses caused early and extensive apoptosis (by 6 h of infection) resulting in reduced virus progeny and moderated pro-inflammation. Full length viral PB1-F2 present only in avian influenza viruses is a virulence factor that targets AM for mitochondrial-associated apoptotic cell death. With the use of reverse genetics on an avian H5N1 virus, we found that full length PB1-F2 contributed to increased apoptosis and pro-inflammation but not to reduced virus replication. Taken together, we propose that early apoptosis of PAM limits the spread of avian influenza viruses and that PB1-F2 could play a contributory role in the process. PMID:26642934

  17. Molecular Characterization of Transcriptome-wide Interactions between Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus and Porcine Alveolar Macrophages in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Zhai, Shanli; Zhou, Xiang; Lin, Ping; Jiang, Tengfei; Hu, Xueying; Jiang, Yunbo; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Qingde; Xu, Xuewen; Li, Jin-ping; Liu, Bang

    2011-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infects mainly the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and causes porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). Previous studies have analyzed the global gene expression profiles of lung tissue in vivo and PAMs in vitro following infection with PRRSV, however, transcriptome-wide understanding of the interaction between highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) and PAMs in vivo has not yet been established. In this study, we employed Affymetrix microarrays to investigate the gene expression patterns of PAMs isolated from Tongcheng piglets (a Chinese indigenous breed) after infection with HP-PRRSV. During the infection, Tongcheng piglets exhibited typical clinical signs, e.g. fever, asthma, coughing, anorexia, lethargy and convulsion, but displayed mild regional lung damage at 5 and 7 dpi. Microarray analysis revealed that HP-PRRSV infection has affected PAMs in expression of the important genes involved in cytoskeleton and exocytosis organization, protein degradation and folding, intracellular calcium and zinc homeostasis. Several potential antiviral strategies might be employed in PAMs, including upregulating IFN-induced genes and increasing intracellular zinc ion concentration. And inhibition of the complement system likely attenuated the lung damage during HP-PRRSV infection. Transcriptomic analysis of PAMs in vivo could lead to a better understanding of the HP-PRRSV-host interaction, and to the identification of novel antiviral therapies and genetic components of swine tolerance/susceptibility to HP-PRRS. PMID:21850204

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of several plant extracts on porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Song, M; Che, T M; Bravo, D; Pettigrew, J E

    2012-08-01

    Certain plant extracts are bioactive substances of some foods or traditional herbs, known to possess antioxidant, antibacterial, and perhaps immunoregulatory effects. This study investigated the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of 7 plant extracts (anethol, capsicum oleoresin, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, garlicon, and turmeric oleoresin) on porcine alveolar macrophages collected from weaned pigs (n = 6 donor pigs) by bronchoalveolar lavage. The experimental design for this assay was a 2 [with or without 1 μg lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/mL] × 5 (5 different amounts of each plant extract) factorial arrangements in a randomized complete block design. The application of plant extracts were 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL, except for cinnamaldehyde and turmeric oleoresin, which were 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the number of live cells, Griess assay was applied to detect nitric oxide (NO) production, and ELISA was used to measure tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-1β, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and IL-10 in the cell culture supernatants of macrophages. The LPS increased (P < 0.001) the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, and TGF-β. Without LPS, anethol and capsicum oleoresin increased (linear, P < 0.001) cell viability of macrophages, whereas other plant extracts reduced (linear, P < 0.001) it. Anethol, capsicum oleoresin, and carvacrol enhanced (linear, P < 0.001) the cell proliferation of LPS-treated macrophages. Without LPS, anethol, capsicum oleoresin, cinnamaldehyde, or turmeric oleoresin stimulated TNF-α secretion, whereas all plant extracts except eugenol enhanced IL-1β concentration in the supernatants of macrophages. However, all plant extracts suppressed (linear, P < 0.001) TNF-α, and all plant extracts except turmeric oleoresin decreased (linear, P < 0.05) IL-1β secretion from LPS-treated macrophages. Anethol and capsicum oleoresin

  19. Identification of differentially expressed proteins in porcine alveolar macrophages infected with virulent/attenuated strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-Jun; Zhu, Jian-Ping; Zhou, Tao; Cheng, Qun; Yu, Ling-Xue; Wang, Ya-Xin; Yang, Shen; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Tong, Wu; Gao, Fei; Yu, Hai; Li, Guo-Xin; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    The highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) is still a serious threat to the swine industry. However, the pathogenic mechanism of HP-PRRSV remains unclear. We infected host porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) with the virulent HuN4 strain and the attenuated HuN4-F112 strain and then utilized fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) to screen for intracellular proteins that were differentially expressed in host cells infected with the two strains. There were 153 proteins with significant different expression (P<0.01) observed, 42 of which were subjected to mass spectrometry, and 24 proteins were identified. PAM cells infected with the virulent strain showed upregulated expression of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1), and proteasome subunit alpha type 6 (PSMA6), which were downregulated in cells infected with the attenuated strain. The upregulation of PKM2 provides sufficient energy for viral replication, and the upregulation of HSPB1 inhibits host cell apoptosis and therefore facilitates mass replication of the virulent strain, while the upregulation of PSMA6 facilitates the evasion of immune surveillance by the virus. Studying on those molecules mentioned above may be able to help us to understand some unrevealed details of HP-PRRSV infection, and then help us to decrease its threat to the swine industry in the future. PMID:24465692

  20. Identification of Differentially Expressed Proteins in Porcine Alveolar Macrophages Infected with Virulent/Attenuated Strains of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Cheng, Qun; Yu, Ling-Xue; Wang, Ya-Xin; Yang, Shen; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Tong, Wu; Gao, Fei; Yu, Hai; Li, Guo-Xin; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    The highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) is still a serious threat to the swine industry. However, the pathogenic mechanism of HP-PRRSV remains unclear. We infected host porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) with the virulent HuN4 strain and the attenuated HuN4-F112 strain and then utilized fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) to screen for intracellular proteins that were differentially expressed in host cells infected with the two strains. There were 153 proteins with significant different expression (P<0.01) observed, 42 of which were subjected to mass spectrometry, and 24 proteins were identified. PAM cells infected with the virulent strain showed upregulated expression of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1), and proteasome subunit alpha type 6 (PSMA6), which were downregulated in cells infected with the attenuated strain. The upregulation of PKM2 provides sufficient energy for viral replication, and the upregulation of HSPB1 inhibits host cell apoptosis and therefore facilitates mass replication of the virulent strain, while the upregulation of PSMA6 facilitates the evasion of immune surveillance by the virus. Studying on those molecules mentioned above may be able to help us to understand some unrevealed details of HP-PRRSV infection, and then help us to decrease its threat to the swine industry in the future. PMID:24465692

  1. Transcription analysis on response of porcine alveolar macrophages to co-infection of the highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Du, Luping; Xu, Xiangwei; Sun, Bing; Yu, Zhengyu; Feng, Zhixin; Liu, Maojun; Wei, Yanna; Wang, Haiyan; Shao, Guoqing; He, Kongwang

    2015-01-22

    Porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is of great concern economically, for swine producers worldwide. Co-infections with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) are considered the major causative agents of PRDC, and responsible for mass mortality in pigs. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying the host factors involved in pathogenesis and persistent infection have not been clearly established because of a lack of information regarding host responses following co-infection. In the current study, high throughput cDNA microarray assays were employed to evaluate host responses of porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) to co-infection with highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) and Mhp. A total of 2152 and 1760 genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the control group and PRRSV+Mhp co-infected group at 6 and 15 h post infection, respectively. The DE genes were involved in many vital functional classes, including inflammatory response, immune response, apoptosis, defense response, signal transduction. The pathway analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were associated with chemokine signaling pathway, cytokine, TLR, RLR and NLR signaling pathways and Jak-STAT signaling pathway. STRING analysis demonstrated that IL-1β is an integral gene in co-infections with PRRSV and Mhp. The present study is the first to document the response of PAMs to co-infection with HP-PRRSV and Mhp. The observed gene expression profile could help with the screening of potential host agents for reducing the prevalence of co-infections, and to further develop our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis associated with PRRSV and Mhp co-infection in pigs. PMID:25445346

  2. Regulation of toll-like receptors 3, 7 and 9 in porcine alveolar macrophages by different genotype 1 strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Kuzemtseva, Liudmila; de la Torre, Eugenia; Martín, Gerard; Soldevila, Ferran; Ait-Ali, Tahar; Mateu, Enric; Darwich, Laila

    2014-04-15

    The toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in the innate host defense against pathogens. Endosomal TLRs, TLR3, TLR7/8, and TLR9 are involved in antiviral responses by promoting the production of antiviral cytokines such as type I interferons. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an important disease causing economically high losses to the swine industry worldwide and caused by a single stranded positive sense RNA virus, known as PRRS virus (PRRSV). Studies focused on the interaction between PRRSV and TLRs are scarce. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of TLR3, TLR7 and TLR9 in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) infected with different genotype 1 PRRSV strains previously sequenced and characterized by their ability to induce TNF-α: 3262 (TNF-α inducer), 3267 (TNF-α not inducer) and an attenuated vaccine strain (strain Deventer, PorcilisPRRS, Merck) that replicates scarcely in PAM. PAM were infected with the different PRRSV strains (at 0.1 multiplicity of infection) for 48 h or mock-stimulated with PAM supernatants. Cells were collected at different time-points (0 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 36 h, 48 h) to determine the kinetics of viral replication by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and the expression of TLR3, 7 and 9 by qRT-PCR, flow cytometry and indirect immunofluorescence assay. Although infection with PRRSV did not affect significantly relative levels of any TLR mRNA transcript (normalized to β-actin expression), this infection resulted in significant differences in the proportion of cells expressing TLR3. Thus, in PAM infected with PRRSV strain 3262 the proportion of TLR3+ cells significantly increased from 24h compared with the controls; in contrast strain 3267 resulted in a lower proportion of TLR3+ PAM. Interestingly, strain 3262 replicate to lower levels than 3267 at comparable post-inoculation times. For strain DV, the results indicated that this strain did not replicate substantially in PAM and did not

  3. RNA-sequence analysis of primary alveolar macrophages after in vitro infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strains of differing virulence.

    PubMed

    Badaoui, Bouabid; Rutigliano, Teresa; Anselmo, Anna; Vanhee, Merijn; Nauwynck, Hans; Giuffra, Elisabetta; Botti, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) mainly infects porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), resulting in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in pigs. Most of the transcriptomic studies on PAMs infected with PRRSV conducted thus far have made use of microarray technology. Here, we investigated the transcriptome of PAMs in vitro at 12 h post-infection with two European PRRSV strains characterized by low (Lelystad, LV) and high (Lena) virulence through RNA-Seq. The expression levels of genes, isoforms, alternative transcription start sites (TSS) and differential promoter usage revealed a complex pattern of transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation upon infection with the two strains. Gene ontology analysis confirmed that infection of PAMs with both the Lena and LV strains affected signaling pathways directly linked to the innate immune response, including interferon regulatory factors (IRF), RIG1-like receptors, TLRs and PKR pathways. The results confirmed that interferon signaling is crucial for transcriptional regulation during PAM infection. IFN-β1 and IFN-αω, but not IFN-α, were up-regulated following infection with either the LV or Lena strain. The down-regulation of canonical pathways, such as the interplay between the innate and adaptive immune responses, cell death and TLR3/TLR7 signaling, was observed for both strains, but Lena triggered a stronger down-regulation than LV. This analysis contributes to a better understanding of the interactions between PRRSV and PAMs and outlines the differences in the responses of PAMs to strains with different levels of virulence, which may lead to the development of new PRRSV control strategies. PMID:24643046

  4. Salmonella Typhimurium induces SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulated and strain dependent downregulation of MHC II expression on porcine alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Foodborne salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide. Salmonella Typhimurium is the serovar most frequently isolated from persistently infected slaughter pigs in Europe. Circumvention of the host’s immune system by Salmonella might contribute to persistent infection of pigs. In the present study, we found that Salmonella Typhimurium strain 112910a specifically downregulated MHC II, but not MHC I, expression on porcine alveolar macrophages in a Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-1 and SPI-2 dependent way. Salmonella induced downregulation of MHC II expression and intracellular proliferation of Salmonella in macrophages were significantly impaired after opsonization with Salmonella specific antibodies prior to inoculation. Furthermore, the capacity to downregulate MHC II expression on macrophages differed significantly among Salmonella strains, independently of strain specific differences in invasion capacity, Salmonella induced cytotoxicity and altered macrophage activation status. The fact that strain specific differences in MHC II downregulation did not correlate with the extent of in vitro SPI-1 or SPI-2 gene expression indicates that other factors are involved in MHC II downregulation as well. Since Salmonella strain dependent interference with the pig’s immune response through downregulation of MHC II expression might indicate that certain Salmonella strains are more likely to escape serological detection, our findings are of major interest for Salmonella monitoring programs primarily based on serology. PMID:22694285

  5. Nephrocalcinosis associated with continuous enamel hypoplasia and severe alveolar bone loss: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Malka; Rafe, Zvi; Sarnat, Haim; Levin, Liran

    2014-01-01

    Enamel-renal syndrome (ERS) is a rare manifestation of nephrocalcinosis that has been associated with generalized enamel hypoplasia. The purpose of this paper was to describe, for the first time, the association of enamel-renal syndrome with severe localized periodontal bone loss. A 13-year-old boy presented with: generalized hypoplastic enamel; intrapulpal calcifications; retention of primary teeth; delayed eruption of permanent teeth; enlarged dental-follicles; misshaped roots of permanent teeth; gingival overgrowth; severe localized alveolar bone loss; and severe malocclusion. His parents were first cousins, suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. Further studies are necessary to clarify whether the etiology of the oral disturbances relates to the genetic defect in the dental tissue or to the continuous metabolic distress associated with renal dysfunction. Nevertheless, since nephrocalcinosis is often asymptomatic, dentists should refer children with generalized enamel hypoplasia or/and multiple intrapulpal calcifications to nephrologists. PMID:24960394

  6. RECOMBINANT SWINE INTERFERON BETA PROTECTS SWINE ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES AND MARC 145 CELLS FROM INFECTION WITH PORCINE REPRODUCTIVE AND RESPIRATORY SYNDROME VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine interferon beta (swIFN beta) produced in 293 cells infected with a recombinant, replication-defective human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) encoding the swIFN beta gene was tested for antiviral activity against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Marc145 cells were incubated overni...

  7. The use of porcine digestible peptides and their continuity effect in nursery pigs.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, J; Solà-Oriol, D; Guzmán-Pino, S A; Chetrit, C; Borda, E; Pérez, J F

    2016-04-01

    A total of 552 entire male and female nursery pigs were selected to be used in 2 different experiments that aimed to study if milk ingredients can be replaced by highly preferred protein sources (Exp. 1) and if pre- and postnatal exposure of those protein ingredients through the maternal diet may increase pig performance (Exp. 2). In Exp. 1, 240 pigs were separated after weaning (28 d) into 2 groups depending on the presence of lactose in their diets. Pigs ( =120) fed diets with the precence of lactose (lactose +) were given prestarter (0-14 d) and starter (15-33 d) diets with 142 and 50 g/kg of sweet milk whey, respectively; the lactose-free group ( = 120) was offered an isoenergetic diet with 20 g/kg of porcine-digestible peptides (PDP; Palbio 62SP; Bioibérica S.A., Palafolls, Spain) and wheat replacing sweet milk whey. Choice and 1-feeder tests were performed in another group of animals ( = 72) to evaluate the preference and acceptance for both diets. Pigs preferred ( = 0.039) the lactose+ over the lactose-free diet after a 30-min choice test and consumed more ( = 0.001) lactose+ than lactose-free diet in a 1-feeder test. However, no difference ( > 0.467) in performance was observed between groups for the entire nursery period. In Exp. 2, 120 animals were obtained from sows that, during late gestation (14 d) and lactation (28 d), were fed diets containing 20 g/kg of PDP and another 120 animals were obtained from sows fed an isoenergetic diet without PDP inclusion. Placenta samples were collected at farrowing to assess the volatile compounds present in the placental fluid of sows. After weaning, all pigs received a feed containing 20 g/kg of PDP in the prestarter and starter diets. A principal components analysis of the total volatile compounds showed the exclusive presence of sulfur-containing compounds and a higher presence of terpene compounds in the placental fluid of PDP-supplemented sows. In addition, pigs coming from sows fed diets supplemented with PDP

  8. Innate immune response to a H3N2 subtype swine influenza virus in newborn porcine trachea cells, alveolar macrophages, and precision-cut lung slices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Viral respiratory diseases remain of major importance in swine breeding units. Swine influenza virus (SIV) is one of the main known contributors to infectious respiratory diseases. The innate immune response to swine influenza viruses has been assessed in many previous studies. However most of these studies were carried out in a single-cell population or directly in the live animal, in all its complexity. In the current study we report the use of a trachea epithelial cell line (newborn pig trachea cells – NPTr) in comparison with alveolar macrophages and lung slices for the characterization of innate immune response to an infection by a European SIV of the H3N2 subtype. The expression pattern of transcripts involved in the recognition of the virus, interferon type I and III responses, and the host-response regulation were assessed by quantitative PCR in response to infection. Some significant differences were observed between the three systems, notably in the expression of type III interferon mRNA. Then, results show a clear induction of JAK/STAT and MAPK signaling pathways in infected NPTr cells. Conversely, PI3K/Akt signaling pathways was not activated. The inhibition of the JAK/STAT pathway clearly reduced interferon type I and III responses and the induction of SOCS1 at the transcript level in infected NPTr cells. Similarly, the inhibition of MAPK pathway reduced viral replication and interferon response. All together, these results contribute to an increased understanding of the innate immune response to H3N2 SIV and may help identify strategies to effectively control SIV infection. PMID:24712747

  9. Porcine circovirus type 2 induces type I interferon production via MyD88-IKKα-IRFs signaling rather than NF-κB in porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengmeng; Han, Junyuan; Zhang, Yaqun; Duan, Dianning; Zhang, Shuxia

    2016-02-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-I) plays important roles in host antiviral responses. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) and NF-κB transcription factors are thought to be important in the processes of viral secretion and triggering of interferon production. Recently, studies have shown that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) can induce IFN-I production in vivo and in vitro, but the mechanisms underlying the production of PAMs infected with PCV2 remains unknown. Treatment of these cells with BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation, allowed us to study the secretion of IFN-α and IFN-β in PAMs infected with PCV2. We found that IFN-α expression was induced following virus infection of PAMs. Notably, even after inhibitor treatment of PAMs infected with PCV2, secretion of IFN-α was significantly higher (P<0.05) compared with the PCV2 infection alone group. Our findings suggest that NF-κB plays a minor role in PCV2-induced type I interferon responses. To further characterize the signaling pathway that drives IFN-I expression in PAMs in response to PCV2, we used siRNA to silence the expression of Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and study the role of MyD88-IKKα-IRF signaling in IFN-I production in PAMs induced by PCV2. Our findings show that PCV2 induced IFN-α mRNA transcription, which is associated with the activities of MyD88, IRF7, and IRF3. Thus, PCV2 can induce IFN-I transcription via the MyD88-IKKα-IRF signaling axis. PMID:26850559

  10. Induction of continuous expanding infrarenal aortic aneurysms in a large porcine animal model

    PubMed Central

    Kloster, Brian O.; Lund, Lars; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2015-01-01

    Background A large animal model with a continuous expanding infrarenal aortic aneurysm gives access to a more realistic AAA model with anatomy and physiology similar to humans, and thus allows for new experimental research in the natural history and treatment options of the disease. Methods 10 pigs (group A) underwent infrarenal aortic dissection, balloon dilatation, infusion of elastase into the lumen and placement of a stenosing cuff around the aorta. 10 control pigs (group B) underwent a sham procedure. The subsequent 28 days the AP-diameters of the aneurysms were measured using ultrasound, hereafter the pigs were euthanized for inspection and AAA wall sampling for histological analysis. Results In group A, all pigs developed continuous expanding AAA's with a mean increase in AP-diameter to 16.26 ± 0.93 mm equivalent to a 57% increase. In group B the AP-diameters increased to 11.33 ± 0.13 mm equivalent to 9.3% which was significantly less than in group A (p < 0.001). In group A, a significant negative association between the preoperative weight and the resulting AP-diameters was found. Histology shoved more or less complete resolution of the elastic tissue in the tunica media in group A. The most frequent complication was a neurological deficit in the lower limbs. Conclusion In pigs it's possible to induce continuous expanding AAA's based upon proteolytic degradation and pathological flow, resembling the real life dynamics of human aneurysms. Because the lumbars are preserved, it's also a potential model for further studies of novel endovascular devices and their complications. PMID:25685342

  11. Porcine gonadogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five images submitted for teaching purposes related to porcine gonadogenesis (2), porcine fetal testicular development (2), and porcine fetal ovarian development. Key words include: Egg cell nests, Embryo, GATA4, Genital ridge, Gonad, Leydig cell, Mesonephros, MIS, Ovary, P450c17, Porcine, Sertoli ...

  12. Automated continuous quantitative measurement of proximal airways on dynamic ventilation CT: initial experience using an ex vivo porcine lung phantom

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Nagatani, Yukihiro; Moriya, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Kotaro; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Inokawa, Hiroyasu; Kimoto, Tatsuya; Teramoto, Ryuichi; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of continuous quantitative measurement of the proximal airways, using dynamic ventilation computed tomography (CT) and our research software. Methods A porcine lung that was removed during meat processing was ventilated inside a chest phantom by a negative pressure cylinder (eight times per minute). This chest phantom with imitated respiratory movement was scanned by a 320-row area-detector CT scanner for approximately 9 seconds as dynamic ventilatory scanning. Obtained volume data were reconstructed every 0.35 seconds (total 8.4 seconds with 24 frames) as three-dimensional images and stored in our research software. The software automatically traced a designated airway point in all frames and measured the cross-sectional luminal area and wall area percent (WA%). The cross-sectional luminal area and WA% of the trachea and right main bronchus (RMB) were measured for this study. Two radiologists evaluated the traceability of all measurable airway points of the trachea and RMB using a three-point scale. Results It was judged that the software satisfactorily traced airway points throughout the dynamic ventilation CT (mean score, 2.64 at the trachea and 2.84 at the RMB). From the maximum inspiratory frame to the maximum expiratory frame, the cross-sectional luminal area of the trachea decreased 17.7% and that of the RMB 29.0%, whereas the WA% of the trachea increased 6.6% and that of the RMB 11.1%. Conclusion It is feasible to measure airway dimensions automatically at designated points on dynamic ventilation CT using research software. This technique can be applied to various airway and obstructive diseases. PMID:26445535

  13. Transfer of tylosin resistance between Enterococcus spp. during continuous-flow culture of feral or domestic porcine gut microbes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixed populations of domesticated and feral pig gut microbes (RPCF and FC, respectively) were grown in continuous culture to investigate the effects of tylosin on antimicrobial resistance. Cultures established in steady state were inoculated with 9.7 log10 colony forming units (CFU) of a tylosin-re...

  14. Production of porcine TNFα by ADAM17-mediated cleavage negatively regulates porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ren; Guo, Longjun; Gu, Weihong; Luo, Xiaolei; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Yunfei; Tian, Zhijun; Feng, Li; Wang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes a series of inflammatory reactions in sites of infection, companied by the upregulation of key inflammatory factor TNFα. TNFα, which serves as a "master regulator" of inflammatory cytokine production, is mainly produced by macrophages at the early infection stage. Here, we showed that porcine alveolar macrophages produced a great amount of soluble TNFα upon PRRSV infection. Furthermore, we found that TNFα had great anti-PRRSV effect. Next, by using inhibitor and genetic modification methods, we addressed that porcine TNFα production was mediated by ADAM17. Lastly, we proved that the (78)Arg-Ser-Ser motif of porcine TNFα contained the essential information for efficient cleavage. Taken together, our findings provide the direct evidence that ADAM17 cleaves porcine TNFα, which represents a new view for identifying potential therapeutic targets in anti-PRRSV therapy. PMID:26724939

  15. Porcine Sialoadhesin: A Newly Identified Xenogeneic Innate Immune Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Linda G.; Delputte, Peter L.; Waldman, Joshua P.; Nauwynck, Hans J.; Rees, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Extracorporeal porcine liver perfusion is being developed as a bridge to liver allotransplantation for patients with fulminant hepatic failure. This strategy is limited by porcine Kupffer cell destruction of human erythrocytes, mediated by lectin binding of a sialic acid motif in the absence of antibody and complement. Sialoadhesin, a macrophage restricted lectin that binds sialic acid, was originally described as a sheep erythrocyte binding receptor. Given similarities between sialoadhesin and the unidentified macrophage lectin in our model, we hypothesized porcine sialoadhesin contributed to recognition of human erythrocytes. Two additional types of macrophages were identified to bind human erythrocytes - spleen and alveolar. Expression of sialoadhesin was confirmed by immunofluorescence in porcine tissues and by flow cytometry on primary macrophages. A stable transgenic cell line expressing porcine sialoadhesin (pSn CHO) bound human erythrocytes, while a sialoadhesin mutant cell line did not. Porcine macrophage and pSn CHO recognition of human erythrocytes was inhibited approximately 90% by an anti-porcine sialoadhesin monoclonal antibody and by human erythrocyte glycoproteins. Furthermore, this binding was substantially reduced by sialidase treatment of erythrocytes. These data support the hypothesis that porcine sialoadhesin is a xenogeneic receptor that mediates porcine macrophage binding of human erythrocytes in a sialic acid-dependent manner. PMID:22958948

  16. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  17. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  18. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  19. In Depth Global Analysis of Transcript Abundance Levels Following Infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. Infection of the primary target cells, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not under...

  20. Marked differences between MARC-145 cells and swine alveolar macrophages in IFN beta-induced activation of antiviral state against PRRSV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The replication kinetics of field isolates and a vaccine virus of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were evaluated in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM). In MARC-145 cells, the eclipse period of the vaccine virus was about 10 hours and was shorter than t...

  1. Integrated miRNA and mRNA transcriptomes of porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM cells) identifies strain-specific miRNA molecular signatures associated with H-PRRSV and N-PRRSV infection.

    PubMed

    Cong, Peiqing; Xiao, Shuqi; Chen, Yaosheng; Wang, Liangliang; Gao, Jintao; Li, Ming; He, Zuyong; Guo, Yunxue; Zhao, Guangyin; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Luxi; Mo, Delin; Liu, Xiaohong

    2014-09-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most significant viral diseases in swine, which causes large economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. There is considerable strain variation in PRRSV and two examples of this are the highly virulent Chinese-type PRRSV (H-PRRSV) and the classical North American type PRRSV (N-PRRSV), both with different pathogenesis. These differences may be due in part to genetic and phenotypic differences in virus replication, but also interaction with the host cell. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial regulators of gene expression and play vital roles in virus and host interactions. However, the regulation role of miRNAs during PRRSV infection has not been systematically investigated. In order to better understand the differential regulation roles of cellular miRNAs in the host response to PRRSV, miRNA expression and a global mRNA transcriptome profile was determined in primary cells infected with either H-PRRSV or N-PRRSV as multiple time points during the viral lifecycle. miRNA-mRNA interactome networks were constructed by integrating the differentially expressed miRNAs and inversely correlated target mRNAs. Using gene ontology and pathway enrichment analyses, cellular pathways associated with deregulated miRNAs were identified, including immune response, phagosome, autophagy, lysosome, autolysis, apoptosis and cell cycle regulation. To our knowledge, this is the first global analysis of strain-specific host miRNA molecular signatures associated with H- and N-PRRSV infection by integrating miRNA and mRNA transcriptomes and provides a new perspective on the contribution of miRNAs to the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. PMID:24962047

  2. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Borie, R; Danel, C; Debray, M-P; Taille, C; Dombret, M-C; Aubier, M; Epaud, R; Crestani, B

    2011-06-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare pulmonary disease characterised by alveolar accumulation of surfactant. It may result from mutations in surfactant proteins or granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor genes, it may be secondary to toxic inhalation or haematological disorders, or it may be auto-immune, with anti-GM-CSF antibodies blocking activation of alveolar macrophages. Auto-immune alveolar proteinosis is the most frequent form of PAP, representing 90% of cases. Although not specific, high-resolution computed tomography shows a characteristic "crazy paving" pattern. In most cases, bronchoalveolar lavage findings establish the diagnosis. Whole lung lavage is the most effective therapy, especially for auto-immune disease. Novel therapies targeting alveolar macrophages (recombinant GM-CSF therapy) or anti-GM-CSF antibodies (rituximab and plasmapheresis) are being investigated. Our knowledge of the pathophysiology of PAP has improved in the past 20 yrs, but therapy for PAP still needs improvement. PMID:21632797

  3. Molecular characterization of porcine SARM1 and its role in regulating TLRs signaling during highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Jiang, Tengfei; Du, Xiaochuan; Zhou, Ping; Jiang, Zhihua; Michal, Jennifer J; Liu, Bang

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) that trigger innate immune response and mediate acquired immunity. Evidence has shown that SARM1 (sterile-α and TIR motif containing protein 1) is one of five TIR domain-containing adaptor proteins involved in TLRs signaling transduction. In the present study, a full-length cDNA sequence was cloned for the porcine SARM1 gene, which contains nine exons. Using the radiation hybrid mapping approach, we assigned the porcine gene to SSC12 q13. Under the normal condition, porcine SARM1 was highly expressed in brain and spleen. Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly (I:C)) weakly induced the porcine SARM1 expression in the early stimulation. We found that porcine SARM1 protein is localized in mitochondria and attenuates NF-κB activation induced by stimulation and infection. The quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) analysis showed that the expression of porcine SARM1 significantly decreased in several tissues of Tongcheng pigs infected with highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV). Gene-interaction network analysis for porcine SARM1 in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) showed that down-regulation of SARM1 gene in infected Tongcheng pig may modulate TRIF-depend TLRs signaling and regulate the expression of disease-resistant genes and inflammatory genes. Our findings provide evidence that porcine SARM1 may play an important role in immune regulation with PRRSV infection. PMID:22366489

  4. [Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis].

    PubMed

    Floarea-Strat, Alina; Stanciu, Adriana; Creţeanu, Mihai

    2003-01-01

    It is a disease of obscure cause that is characterized by the accumulation of a granular material that contains abundant lipid within the alveoli of lung. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) has been divided into a congenital and an adult form. The acquired form has been subdivided into a idiopathic form and a secondary form associated with a know disorder or exposure as silica, aluminium, titanium. Dyspnea and cough are the most common presenting symptoms. Chest pain, hemoptysis, fever and weight loss are variably reported. Pathogenesis remains unknown, but evidence points to a dysfunction of alveolar macrophages. Mice genetically deficient in granulocyte macrophagecolony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) show an alveolar proteinosis. A neutralizing antibody against GM-CSF was found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum of patients with idiopathic PAP. Currently, no specific therapy exists for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and sequential whole lung lavage is standard treatment. PMID:14756054

  5. [Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis].

    PubMed

    Hutyrová, B

    2007-10-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare disease characterised by excessive accumulation of surfactant components in the alveoli and the distal airways with minimum inflammatory reaction and fibrosis of pulmonary interstitium. Three clinical forms of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis are distinguished - congenital, primary and secondary. Results of ultrastructural, biochemical and functional analyses and studies performed on genetically modified mice support the presumption that accumulation of surfactant in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a result of a degradation disorder and of diminished clearance of the surfactant from the alveolar space rather than of excessive synthesis of surfactant components. Over the last 15 years, significant discoveries have been made which have helped to clarify the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease. A number of gene mutations have been discovered which lead to the development of congenital pulmonary proteinosis. Apart from impaired surfactant protein function, a key role in the development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is played by the signal pathway of granulocyte and macrophage colonies stimulating growth factor (GM-CSF) which is necessary for the functioning of alveolar macrophages and for surfactant homeostasis. The role of GM-CSF has been proven especially in primary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis which is currently considered an auto-immune disease involving the development of GM-CSF neutralising autoantibodies. In most cases, the prognosis for the disease in adult patients is good, even though there is a 10 to 15% rate of patients who develop respiratory failure. Total pulmonary lavage is considered to be the standard method of treatment. In recent years, recombinant human GM-CSF has been studied as a prospective therapy for the treatment of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. PMID:18072433

  6. Review of secondary alveolar cleft repair

    PubMed Central

    Cho-Lee, Gui-Youn; García-Díez, Eloy-Miguel; Nunes, Richard-Agostinho; Martí-Pagès, Carles; Sieira-Gil, Ramón; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    achieves all these several objectives: (1) to obtain maxillary arch continuity, (2) to maximize bone support for the dentition, (3) to stabilize the maxillary segments after orthodontic treatment, (4) to eliminate oronasal fistulae, (5) to provide nasal alar cartilage support, (6) to establish ideal alveolar morphology, and (7) to provide available bone with attached soft tissue for future endosteal implant placement in cases where there is a residual dental space. We advocate for the use of a minimal incision to obtain the iliac crest bone graft and for the use of a corticocancellous block of bone in combination with bone chips. PMID:23662259

  7. Simple bone augmentation for alveolar ridge defects.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Christopher J; Vogel, Christopher T; Fisher, G Rawleigh

    2015-05-01

    Dental implant procedures, both surgical placement and preimplant bone augmentation, have become an integral aspect of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon's practice. The number of dental implants placed each year continues to increase as a result of increasing patient exposure and awareness of dental implants, the increased functional and esthetic dental demands of general practitioners and patients, the overall increase in age of the US patient population, and expanded insurance coverage of dental implant-related procedures. This article outlines relevant surgical procedures aimed toward reconstructing alveolar ridge defects to restore intra-arch alveolar discrepancies before restoration-driven dental implant placement. PMID:25951957

  8. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ajmal; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2011-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare but potentially treatable disease, characterized by impaired surfactant metabolism that leads to accumulation in the alveoli of proteinaceous material rich in surfactant protein and its component. Novel insights from an animal model aided the discovery of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibodies as a pathogenetic mechanism in human pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The vast majority of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis occurs as an autoimmune disease; less commonly, it is congenital or secondary to an underlying disorder such as infection, hematological malignancy, or immunodeficiency. The subacute indolent course of this disease often delays the diagnosis by months to years. Crazy-paving appearance in a geographic distribution is a characteristic feature of this disease visible on high-resolution computed tomography (CT). A definitive diagnosis, however, requires lung biopsy, which typically shows partial or complete filling of alveoli with periodic-acid-Schiff-positive granular and eosinophilic material in preserved alveolar architecture. Patients with minimal symptoms are managed conservatively, whereas patients with hypoxemia require a more aggressive approach. Whole-lung lavage is the most widely accepted therapy for symptomatic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Correction of GM-CSF deficiency with exogenous GM-CSF is an alternative therapy. The combination of a systemic treatment (GM-CSF) and a local treatment (whole-lung lavage) augmenting the action of one another is a promising new approach. As the knowledge about this rare disease increases, the role of novel therapies is likely to be better defined and optimized. PMID:21496372

  9. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandeep M; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Reynolds, Jordan P; Krowka, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a disease of alveolar accumulation of phospholipoproteinaceous material that results in gas exchange impairment leading to dyspnea and alveolar infiltrates. There are three forms of PAP: congenital, acquired and idiopathic; of which the latter two are predominant in the adult population. Previous case studies have found that the acquired form can be secondary to various autoimmune, infectious, malignant and environmental etiologies. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PAP demonstrate that the idiopathic form is due to antigranulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor antibodies. Therapeutic targets that replace granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor or remove these antibodies are being actively developed. The current standard of care is to perform whole lung lavage on these patients to clear the alveolar space to help improve respiratory physiology. A case of PAP is reported, followed by a literature review on the diagnosis and management of this rare condition with the aim of increasing awareness among physicians when treating patients who present with alveolar infiltrates. PMID:22891182

  10. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Surender; Mohapatra, Prasanta R.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare, chronic lung disease with bilateral intra-alveolar calcium and phosphate deposition throughout the lung parenchyma with predominance to lower and midzone. Although, etiology and pathogenesis of PAM is not fully understood, the mutation in SLC34A2 gene that encodes a sodium-phosphate co-transporter in alveolar type II cells resulting in the accumulation and forming of microliths rich in calcium phosphate (due to impaired clearance) are considered to be the cause of the disease. Chest radiograph and high-resolution CT of thorax are nearly pathognomonic for diagnosing PAM. HRCT demonstrates diffuse micronodules showing slight perilobular predominance resulting in calcification of interlobular septa. Patients with PAM are asymptomatic till development of hypoxemia and cor-pulmonale. No therapy has been proven to be beneficial except lung transplantation. PMID:23741096

  11. Alveolar wall relations.

    PubMed

    Gil, J

    1982-01-01

    We have presented a highly dynamic view of the alveolar septum and its main enclosed structure, the dense capillary network. The septal or perimicrovascular interstitium is the space between alveolar epithelial sheets after exclusion of the capillary network. It contains cells, fibers, and a viscous matrix. Capillaries form a very complex network, which closely follows the geometry of the terminal airways and participates in functional adaptations of the wall, particularly septal pleating. The level of filling and configuration of different capillaries ranging from collapse to full distension are variable, depending on factors such as transmural balance of forces but also on tissular configuration. Alveolar flooding of any cause will produce an immediate change of capillary configuration and volume. PMID:6953828

  12. Secondary alveolar bone grafting: our experience with olecranon bone graft.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Emmanuela; Sabás, Mariana; Dogliotti, Pedro; Espósito, Raquel

    2010-03-01

    Management of alveolar cleft has dramatically changed during the last century: secondary alveolar bone grafting is now an integral part of cleft palate and craniofacial center's protocols. The objectives of alveolar repair and bone grafting are as follows: providing a continuous and stable maxillary dental arch, closure of oronasal fistulae, adequate bone for tooth eruption or orthodontic movement, and nasal base support, improving facial aesthetic. Although cancellous iliac bone is the donor site selected more frequently, bone grafts harvested from different sites have been advocated to decrease donor site morbidity.The aim of this study was to propose and evaluate the use of olecranon as a donor site in 24 patients with secondary alveolar cleft. The graft is taken as a single piece to fit the alveolar cleft defect, and it includes periosteum and corticocancellous bone to improve early vascularization and greater volume maintenance. PMID:20186086

  13. Inhibition of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by Cecropin D in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohong; Guo, Chunhe; Huang, Yumao; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Yaosheng

    2015-08-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) continues to cause substantial economic losses to the pig industry worldwide. Although vaccines are commercially available for the control of PRRSV infection, no vaccination regimen has been proved sustained success in terms of generating a protective immune response. Therefore, the development of novel antivirals is urgently needed. Antimicrobial peptides display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities against bacteria, fungi, and viruses and play an important role in host innate immune response. Here, we tested whether Cecropin D (CD) could inhibit PRRSV infection and replication in vitro. The inhibitory effect of CD occurred during viral attachment and the early period of viral entry into Marc-145 cells. CD also attenuated virus-induced apoptosis during the late phase of PRRSV infection and suppressed virus release in Marc-145 cells, which might contribute to the inhibition of PRRSV infection. Similar inhibitory effects on PRRSV infection were also found with CD treatment in porcine alveolar macrophages, the major target cell type of PRRSV infection in pigs in vivo. These findings suggest that CD has the potential to develop a new therapeutic agent against PRRSV infection. PMID:26102162

  14. Porcine TLR3 characterization and expression in response to influenza virus and Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have provided a detailed structural analysis of porcine alveolar macrophage TLR3 extracellular domain (ECD). The pTLR3-ECD contains 18 leucine-rich repeat (LRRs) consisting of blocks of consensus motifs and non-consensus motifs containing insertions. Excluding the N-terminal and C-terminal LRRs, ...

  15. Differential roles of Toll-like receptors in the elicitation of type I interferon responses by alveolar macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of virus replication initially depends on rapid activation of the innate immune responses. Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands are potent inducers of innate immunity against viral infections. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) initiates infection in pulmonary alveolar...

  16. Antibody repertoire development in fetal and neonatal piglets. XV. Porcine circovirus type 2 infection differentially affects serum IgG levels and antibodies to ORF2 in piglets free from other environmental factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is an important pathogen in the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) and its persistence may be due to dysregulation of systemic immunity. We examined this contention using isolator piglets. We present data on Ig levels in serum and bronchio-alveolar lavage (BA...

  17. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tisha; Lazar, Catherine A; Fishbein, Michael C; Lynch, Joseph P

    2012-10-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disorder characterized by the accumulation of surfactant lipids and protein in the alveolar spaces, with resultant impairment in gas exchange. The clinical course can be variable, ranging from spontaneous resolution to respiratory failure and death. PAP in all forms is caused by excessive accumulation of surfactant within the alveolar spaces. Autoimmune PAP accounts for the vast majority of cases in humans and is caused by autoantibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which results in impaired catabolism and clearance of surfactant lipids and proteins. Inherited or congenital forms of PAP are exceptionally rare and caused by mutations of genes encoding for surfactant proteins. Secondary forms of PAP are associated with diverse clinical disorders and are caused by reduced alveolar macrophage numbers or function with resultant reduced pulmonary clearance of surfactant. PAP is characterized by progressive exertional dyspnea and nonproductive cough with hypoxemia. Bilateral infiltrates are typically present on chest radiograph, and high-resolution computed tomography reveals diffuse ground-glass opacities and airspace consolidation with interlobular septal thickening in a characteristic "crazy paving" pattern. Although surgical lung biopsy will provide a definitive diagnosis, a combination of typical clinical and imaging features with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive material on bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial biopsies is usually sufficient. The standard of care for treatment of PAP remains whole lung lavage, but treatment is not required in all patients. Autoimmune PAP has also been successfully treated with GM-CSF, both inhaled and systemic, but the optimal dose, duration, and route of administration of GM-CSF have not been elucidated. PMID:23001804

  18. Alveolar Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25932959

  19. Alveolar development and disease.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-07-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25932959

  20. A comparative study on the effect of subtherapeutic tylosin administration on select feral or domestic porcine gut microflora grown in continuous-flow culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous flow cultures of feral (culture FC) and domesticated (culture RPCF) pig gut microflora were established in steady state. Cultures, in duplicate, were continuously infused subtherapeutic (25 ug/ml) levels of tylosin and sampled at intervals to assess effects on total culturable anaerobes,...

  1. Novel porcine repetitive elements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An analysis of 220 fully sequenced porcine BACs generated by the Comparative Vertebrate Sequencing Initiative (http://www.nisc.nih.gov/) revealed 27 distinct, novel porcine repetitive elements ranging in length from 55 to 1059 nucleotides. This set of fully sequenced BACs covers approximately 1% of...

  2. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Ioachimescu, O C; Kavuru, M S

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare syndrome characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of surfactant components and cellular debris, with minimal interstitial inflammation or fibrosis. The condition has a variable clinical course, from spontaneous resolution to respiratory failure and death due to disease progression or superimposed infections. The standard of care for alveolor proteinosis therapy is represented by whole lung lavage. Important discoveries have been made in the last decade with respect to disease pathogenesis and therapy of both congenital and acquired forms of the disease. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) pathway has been shown to be involved in the disease pathogenesis of both acquired and congenital disease. Furthermore, anti-GM-CSF blocking autoantibodies have been found in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and seem to interfere with the surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages in many acquired cases. In the congenital form, the most common defects identified to date are several mutations of the genes encoding GM-CSF receptor subunits or surfactant proteins. Using GM-CSF as a therapeutic tool has also been shown to be effective in at least half of the acquired cases treated, while the importance of quantitative determination of anti-GM-CSF antibodies before and during the course of the therapy, as well as the autoantibody titer-GM-CSF dose relationship are to be elucidated. The congenital form of the disease does not respond to therapy with GM-CSF, consistent with the known primary defects and differences in disease pathogenesis. PMID:16916009

  3. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  4. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Kuberappa, Puneeth Horatti; Srinivas, G Vijay; Kiresur, Mohammad Asif

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant neoplasm of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma seen in childhood and adolescence. The most frequent site is the head and neck accounting for 40% of all cases and other involved sites are genitourinary tract, retroperitoneum, and to a lesser extent, the extremities. RMS is relatively uncommon in the oral cavity and the involvement of the jaws is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of 50-year-old female with oral RMS involving maxillary alveolar region with clinical, radiological, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. PMID:27194887

  5. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of maxilla.

    PubMed

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Kuberappa, Puneeth Horatti; Srinivas, G Vijay; Kiresur, Mohammad Asif

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant neoplasm of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma seen in childhood and adolescence. The most frequent site is the head and neck accounting for 40% of all cases and other involved sites are genitourinary tract, retroperitoneum, and to a lesser extent, the extremities. RMS is relatively uncommon in the oral cavity and the involvement of the jaws is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of 50-year-old female with oral RMS involving maxillary alveolar region with clinical, radiological, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. PMID:27194887

  6. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuji; Trapnell, Bruce C

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare syndrome characterized by the accumulation of surfactant in alveoli and terminal airways resulting in respiratory failure. PAP comprises part of a spectrum of disorders of surfactant homeostasis (clearance and production). The surfactant production disorders are caused by mutations in genes required for normal surfactant production. The PAP syndrome is identified based on history, radiologic, and bronchoalveolar lavage and/or histopathologic findings. The diagnosis of PAP-causing diseases in secondary PAP requires further studies. Whole-lung lavage is the current standard therapy and promising new pharmacologic therapies are in development. PMID:27514590

  7. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kevan; Dell, Sharon; Birken, Catherine; Al-Saleh, Suhail

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is often asymptomatic despite significant changes in chest imaging. Diagnosis is often made when patients become symptomatic in adulthood. There are still no proven treatments, but earlier diagnosis may allow for evaluation of preventative strategies that could improve outcome. It is an important diagnosis to consider in children who have marked radiographic findings with no or very mild symptoms or physical findings. Diagnosis can be made with imaging alone but may necessitate lung biopsy for definitive diagnosis. PMID:27445543

  8. Gene Expression Profiling of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infected Porcine Alveolar Macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identifying specific pathways that associate with variation in PRRSV replication and macrophage function can lead to novel gene targets for the control of PRRSV infection. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) is a powerful technique that allows a detailed and profound quantitative and qualitati...

  9. Immunohistochemistry of porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Berger, U; Mahrle, G

    1991-01-01

    The present paper reports immunohistological findings in porcine skin, which were obtained by use of mono- and polyclonal antihuman antibodies and either alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) or peroxidase (POX) technique. Epidermal staining was observed with antibodies to keratins (K 8.12, RSKE 60), filaggrin, and calmodulin (ACAM). Staining of connective tissue and vessels was achieved using antibodies to vimentin (V9(1)), collagen type IV, and fibronectin. In general, these antibodies gave a staining pattern similar to that of normal human skin. The similarities of immunoreactivity to poly- and monoclonal antihuman antibodies in porcine and human skin render porcine skin a reliable model in biomedical research. PMID:1710864

  10. Alveolar bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Lilja, Jan

    2009-01-01

    In patients with cleft lip and palate, bone grafting in the mixed dentition in the residual alveolar cleft has become a well-established procedure. The main advantages can be summarised as follows: stabilisation of the maxillary arch; facilitation of eruption of the canine and sometimes facilitation of the lateral incisor eruption; providing bony support to the teeth adjacent to the cleft; raising the alar base of the nose; facilitation of closure of an oro-nasal fistula; making it possible to insert a titanium fixture in the grafted site and to obtain favourable periodontal conditions of the teeth within and adjacent to the cleft. The timing of the ABG surgery take into consideration not only eruption of the canine but also that of the lateral incisor, if present. The best time for bone grafting surgery is when a thin shell of bone still covers the soon erupting lateral incisor or canine tooth close to the cleft. PMID:19884665

  11. Porcine skin damage thresholds for 0.6 to 9.5 cm beam diameters from 1070-nm continuous-wave infrared laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Vincelette, Rebecca; Noojin, Gary D; Harbert, Corey A; Schuster, Kurt J; Shingledecker, Aurora D; Stolarski, Dave; Kumru, Semih S; Oliver, Jeffrey W

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing use of high-power fiber lasers in manufacturing and telecommunications industries operating in the infrared spectrum between 1000 and 2000 nm, which are advertised to provide as much as 10 kW continuous output power at 1070 nm. Safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental and modeling investigations with scant data available for these wavelengths. A series of studies using 1070-nm infrared lasers to determine the minimum visible lesion damage thresholds in skin using the Yucatan miniature pig (Sus scrofa domestica) for a range of beam diameters (0.6, 1.1, 1.9, 2.4, 4.7, and 9.5 cm) and a range of exposure durations (10 ms to 10 s) is presented. Experimental peak temperatures associated with each damage threshold were measured using thermal imaging. Peak temperatures at damage threshold for the 10-s exposures were ∼10°C lower than those at shorter exposures. The lowest and highest experimental minimum visible lesion damage thresholds were found to have peak radiant exposures of 19 and 432  J/cm2 for the beam diameter-exposure duration pairs of 2.4 cm, 25 ms and 0.6 cm, 10 s, respectively. Thresholds for beam diameters >2.5  cm had a weak to no effect on threshold radiant exposure levels for exposure times ≤0.25  s, but may have a larger effect on thresholds for exposures ≥10  s. PMID:24658776

  12. Blood gas and hematological changes in experimental peracute porcine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiorpes, A L; MacWilliams, P S; Schenkman, D I; Bäckström, L R

    1990-01-01

    The effect of experimental, peracute, porcine pleuropneumonia on arterial blood gases, acid base status, the leukogram, and gross and microscopic lung structure was studied in nine growing pigs (mean weight +/- SD 10.6 +/- 2.0 kg). Pigs were inoculated intranasally with a virulent serotype 5 isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and all showed signs typical of the disease within four hours. Death occurred in all pigs from 4.5 to 32 hours postinoculation (mean 14 hours). Gross and microscopic changes were typical of porcine pleuropneumonia in all pigs. Changes in the leukogram included a rapid decline in total white cells, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils. Pigs maintained alveolar ventilation throughout the study as arterial CO2 tension was unchanged; however, arterial O2 tension and pH decreased from (mean +/- SD) 95.2 +/- 5.7 torr and 7.463 +/- 0.018 at baseline to 62.1 +/- 12.3 torr and 7.388 +/- 0.045, respectively, within 90 minutes prior to death. The data showed that in this model of peracute porcine pleuropneumonia, progressive ventilatory failure was not a feature of the disease, and the blood gas values and acid base status were maintained within physiological ranges. The histopathological hematological and physiological findings were consistent with the hypothesis that peracute porcine pleuropneumonia resembles septic shock. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2106382

  13. PPARs in alveolar macrophage biology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Monica R; Standiford, Theodore J; Reddy, Raju C

    2007-01-01

    PPARs, most notably PPAR-gamma, play a crucial role in regulating the activation of alveolar macrophages, which in turn occupy a pivotal place in the immune response to pathogens and particulates drawn in with inspired air. In this review, we describe the dual role of the alveolar macrophage as both a first-line defender through its phagocytotic activity and a regulator of the immune response. Depending on its state of activation, the alveolar macrophage may either enhance or suppress different aspects of immune function in the lung. We then review the role of PPAR-gamma and its ligands in deactivating alveolar macrophages-thus limiting the inflammatory response that, if unchecked, could threaten the essential respiratory function of the alveolus-while upregulating the cell's phagocytotic activity. Finally, we examine the role that inadequate or inappropriate PPAR-gamma responses play in specific lung diseases. PMID:18000531

  14. Micronuclei in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    D'Agostini, F; Bonatti, S; Oddera, S; De Flora, S

    1992-01-01

    Occurrence of micronuclei was monitored in pulmonary alveolar macrophages collected from 31 individuals undergoing diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage. The overall frequency of micronucleated cells was 3.88 +/- 1.84/1000, without any significant difference attributable to sex, age, pathology, occupation, or smoking habits. The lack of influence of cigarette smoke on this clastogenicity index presumably reflects the very low rate of mitoses of macrophages in the alveolar lumen. PMID:1579732

  15. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  16. Micromechanics of alveolar edema.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Carrie E; Lederer, David J; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2011-01-01

    The decrease of lung compliance in pulmonary edema underlies ventilator-induced lung injury. However, the cause of the decrease in compliance is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that in pulmonary edema, the mechanical effects of liquid-filled alveoli increase tissue stress in adjacent air-filled alveoli. By micropuncture of isolated, perfused rat lungs, we established a single-alveolus model of pulmonary edema that we imaged using confocal microscopy. In this model, we viewed a liquid-filled alveolus together with its air-filled neighbor at different transpulmonary pressures, both before and after liquid-filling. Instilling liquid in an alveolus caused alveolar shrinkage. As a result, the interalveolar septum was stretched, causing the neighboring air-filled alveolus to bulge. Thus, the air-filled alveolus was overexpanded by virtue of its adjacency to a liquid-filled alveolus. Confocal microscopy at different depths of the liquid-filled alveolus revealed a meniscus. Lung inflation to near-total lung capacity (TLC) demonstrated decreased compliance of the air-filled but not liquid-filled alveolus. However, at near TLC, the air-filled alveolus was larger than it was in the pre-edematous control tissue. In pulmonary edema, liquid-filled alveoli induce mechanical stress on air-filled alveoli, reducing the compliance of air-filled alveoli, and hence overall lung compliance. Because of increased mechanical stress, air-filled alveoli may be susceptible to overdistension injury during mechanical ventilation of the edematous lung. PMID:20118224

  17. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity.

    PubMed

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A; Islam, Mohammad N; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S; Prince, Alice S; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-27

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca(2+) waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca(2+)-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation. PMID:24463523

  18. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  19. Hereditary Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuji; Sakagami, Takuro; Young, Lisa R.; Carey, Brenna C.; Wood, Robert E.; Luisetti, Maurizio; Wert, Susan E.; Rubin, Bruce K.; Kevill, Katharine; Chalk, Claudia; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Stevens, Carrie; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Campo, Ilaria; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: We identified a 6-year-old girl with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), impaired granulocyte-macrophage colony–stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor function, and increased GM-CSF. Objectives: Increased serum GM-CSF may be useful to identify individuals with PAP caused by GM-CSF receptor dysfunction. Methods: We screened 187 patients referred to us for measurement of GM-CSF autoantibodies to diagnose autoimmune PAP. Five were children with PAP and increased serum GM-CSF but without GM-CSF autoantibodies or any disease causing secondary PAP; all were studied with family members, subsequently identified patients, and controls. Measurement and Main Results: Eight children (seven female, one male) were identified with PAP caused by recessive CSF2RA mutations. Six presented with progressive dyspnea of insidious onset at 4.8 ± 1.6 years and two were asymptomatic at ages 5 and 8 years. Radiologic and histopathologic manifestations were similar to those of autoimmune PAP. Molecular analysis demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling was absent in six and severely reduced in two patients. The GM-CSF receptor β chain was detected in all patients, whereas the α chain was absent in six and abnormal in two, paralleling the GM-CSF signaling defects. Genetic analysis revealed multiple distinct CSF2RA abnormalities, including missense, duplication, frameshift, and nonsense mutations; exon and gene deletion; and cryptic alternative splicing. All symptomatic patients responded well to whole-lung lavage therapy. Conclusions: CSF2RA mutations cause a genetic form of PAP presenting as insidious, progressive dyspnea in children that can be diagnosed by a combination of characteristic radiologic findings and blood tests and treated successfully by whole-lung lavage. PMID:20622029

  20. CFTR is required for maximal transepithelial liquid transport in pig alveolar epithelia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Comellas, Alejandro P; Karp, Philip H; Ernst, Sarah E; Moninger, Thomas O; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Taft, Peter J; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Rector, Michael V; Rossen, Nathan; Stoltz, David A; McCray, Paul B; Welsh, Michael J; Zabner, Joseph

    2012-07-01

    A balance between alveolar liquid absorption and secretion is critical for maintaining optimal alveolar subphase liquid height and facilitating gas exchange in the alveolar space. However, the role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR) in this homeostatic process has remained elusive. Using a newly developed porcine model of cystic fibrosis, in which CFTR is absent, we investigated ion transport properties and alveolar liquid transport in isolated type II alveolar epithelial cells (T2AECs) cultured at the air-liquid interface. CFTR was distributed exclusively to the apical surface of cultured T2AECs. Alveolar epithelia from CFTR(-/-) pigs failed to increase liquid absorption in response to agents that increase cAMP, whereas cAMP-stimulated liquid absorption in CFTR(+/-) epithelia was similar to that in CFTR(+/+) epithelia. Expression of recombinant CFTR restored stimulated liquid absorption in CFTR(-/-) T2AECs but had no effect on CFTR(+/+) epithelia. In ex vivo studies of nonperfused lungs, stimulated liquid absorption was defective in CFTR(-/-) alveolar epithelia but similar between CFTR(+/+) and CFTR(+/-) epithelia. When epithelia were studied at the air-liquid interface, elevating cAMP levels increased subphase liquid height in CFTR(+/+) but not in CFTR(-/-) T2AECs. Our findings demonstrate that CFTR is required for maximal liquid absorption under cAMP stimulation, but it is not the rate-limiting factor. Furthermore, our data define a role for CFTR in liquid secretion by T2AECs. These insights may help to develop new treatment strategies for pulmonary edema and respiratory distress syndrome, diseases in which lung liquid transport is disrupted. PMID:22637155

  1. CFTR is required for maximal transepithelial liquid transport in pig alveolar epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaopeng; Comellas, Alejandro P.; Karp, Philip H.; Ernst, Sarah E.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Rector, Michael V.; Rossen, Nathan; Stoltz, David A.; McCray, Paul B.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A balance between alveolar liquid absorption and secretion is critical for maintaining optimal alveolar subphase liquid height and facilitating gas exchange in the alveolar space. However, the role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR) in this homeostatic process has remained elusive. Using a newly developed porcine model of cystic fibrosis, in which CFTR is absent, we investigated ion transport properties and alveolar liquid transport in isolated type II alveolar epithelial cells (T2AECs) cultured at the air-liquid interface. CFTR was distributed exclusively to the apical surface of cultured T2AECs. Alveolar epithelia from CFTR−/− pigs failed to increase liquid absorption in response to agents that increase cAMP, whereas cAMP-stimulated liquid absorption in CFTR+/− epithelia was similar to that in CFTR+/+ epithelia. Expression of recombinant CFTR restored stimulated liquid absorption in CFTR−/− T2AECs but had no effect on CFTR+/+ epithelia. In ex vivo studies of nonperfused lungs, stimulated liquid absorption was defective in CFTR−/− alveolar epithelia but similar between CFTR+/+ and CFTR+/− epithelia. When epithelia were studied at the air-liquid interface, elevating cAMP levels increased subphase liquid height in CFTR+/+ but not in CFTR−/− T2AECs. Our findings demonstrate that CFTR is required for maximal liquid absorption under cAMP stimulation, but it is not the rate-limiting factor. Furthermore, our data define a role for CFTR in liquid secretion by T2AECs. These insights may help to develop new treatment strategies for pulmonary edema and respiratory distress syndrome, diseases in which lung liquid transport is disrupted. PMID:22637155

  2. Is alveolar cleft reconstruction still controversial? (Review of literature)

    PubMed Central

    Seifeldin, Sameh A.

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CL/P) is a frequent congenital malformation that manifests in several varieties including unilateral or bilateral and complete or incomplete. Alveolar cleft reconstruction remains controversial with regard to timing, graft materials, surgical techniques, and methods of evaluation. Many studies have been conducted addressing these points to develop an acceptable universal protocol for managing CL/P. The primary goal of alveolar cleft reconstruction in CL/P patients is to provide a bony bridge at the cleft site that allows maxillary arch continuity, oronasal fistula repair, eruption of the permanent dentition into the newly formed bone, enhances nasal symmetry through providing alar base support, orthodontic movement and placement of osseointegrated implants when indicated. Other goals include improving speech, improvement of periodontal conditions, establishing better oral hygiene, and limiting growth disturbances. In order to rehabilitate oral function in CL/P patients alveolar bone grafting is necessary. Secondary bone grafting is the most widely accepted method for treating alveolar clefts. Autogenous bone graft is the primary source for reconstructing alveolar cleft defects and is currently the preferred grafting material. PMID:26792963

  3. Molecular cloning, chromosomal location, and expression analysis of porcine CD14.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Gema; Pérez, Eva; Jiménez-Marín, Angeles; Mompart, Florence; Morera, Luis; Barbancho, Manuel; Llanes, Diego; Garrido, Juan J

    2007-01-01

    CD14 is a membrane-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein that binds lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria and enables LPS-dependent responses in a variety of cells. In this study a cDNA containing the porcine CD14 coding sequence has been cloned and its complete sequence determined. The amino acid sequence deduced from pig CD14 cDNA encodes a 373 amino acid polypeptide that exhibits 75%, 72%, 69%, 66%, 57% and 56% similarity to CD14 from cow, horse, human, rabbit, mouse and rat, respectively. Structural analysis showed that the porcine CD14 is a membrane glycoprotein with a GPI-anchor site and an extracellular domain containing 11 leucine-rich repeats. In addition, the LPS-binding regions identified in the human CD14 are highly conserved in the N-terminal domain of the porcine sequence. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to locate the CD14 gene on the pig chromosome 2, band q28. Expression analysis revealed that porcine CD14 transcripts were detected in all tissues and cells examined, suggesting that the expression of porcine CD14 gene is not restricted to myeloid cell lineage. Finally, we report that LPS stimulation significantly up-regulated CD14 gene expression in porcine alveolar macrophages. PMID:17169425

  4. Use of an Ex Vivo Porcine Mucosal Model to Study Superantigen Penetration.

    PubMed

    Squier, Christopher A; Mantz, Mary J

    2016-01-01

    In vitro perfusion studies are frequently used to determine the penetration of compounds through skin and mucosa. Porcine tissue has been shown to be an excellent model for human tissue in terms of structure, function, and reactivity. We describe the use of porcine tissue ex-vivo in a continuous flow perfusion system to study the behavior of superantigens in this model. PMID:26676044

  5. Human Alveolar Echinococcosis in Kyrgyzstan

    PubMed Central

    Usubalieva, Jumagul; Minbaeva, Gulnara; Ziadinov, Iskender; Deplazes, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Human echinococcosis is a reportable disease in Kyrgyzstan. Between 1995 and 2011, human alveolar echinococcosis increased from <3 cases per year to >60 cases per year. The origins of this epidemic, which started in 2004, may be linked to the socioeconomic changes that followed the dissolution of the former Soviet Union. PMID:23763935

  6. Molecular characterization of the porcine S100A6 gene and analysis of its expression in pigs infected with highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Peng; Michal, Jennifer J; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Jinhua; Jiang, Zhihua; Liu, Bang

    2015-08-01

    Our previous microarray study revealed that S100A6 was significantly upregulated in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) infected with highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV). In the present study, we cloned both cDNA and genomic DNA sequences of the gene. Transient transfection indicated that the porcine S100A6 protein was located in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that the porcine S100A6 gene was highly expressed in the kidney and subcutaneous fat. Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly (I:C)] induced porcine S100A6 gene expression in PK-15 cells. Quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) analysis further showed that the porcine S100A6 gene was upregulated in different cells and tissues of Tongcheng pigs infected with HP-PRRSV. Chromosome walking obtained the porcine S100A6 promoter region and then luciferase reporter assays confirmed its regulatory activities. We observed a putative NF-κB binding site in the core promoter region, which may explain the upregulation of porcine S100A6 in response to PRRSV. Transfection of NF-κB (p65 subunit) intensely induced the promoter activity of the porcine S100A6 gene, while an NF-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), inhibited this activity. Furthermore, compared to its wild type, the promoter activity was significantly reduced when it contained a mutant NF-κB binding site. All these results provide a solid foundation to further investigate how S100A6 is involved in PRRSV infection. PMID:25480733

  7. Molecular cloning and characterizations of porcine SAMHD1 and its roles in replication of highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shen; Shan, Tongling; Zhou, Yanjun; Jiang, Yifeng; Tong, Wu; Liu, Fei; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Qingzhan; Tong, Guangzhi

    2014-12-01

    The sterile alpha motif and HD domain 1 (SAMHD1) protein is a novel innate immunity restriction factor that inhibits HIV-1 infection in myeloid cells. Here, we cloned the full-length SAMHD1 complementary DNA (cDNA) from porcine peripheral blood lymphocytes. The porcine SAMHD1 cDNA was of 3951 bp with an open reading frame of 1884 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 627 amino acids. Porcine SAMHD1 mRNA was detected in all swine tissues examined, with the higher expression in the tonsil, lung, liver, and lymph node tissues. The SAMHD1 protein was localized to the nucleus. Overexpression of SAMHD1 blocked the proliferation of HuN4, a highly pathogenic strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV), in MARC-145 cells, by inhibiting the synthesis of the HuN4 complement RNA. The antiviral effects of the simian SAMHD1 protein were nearly equivalent to those of porcine SAMHD1 in the HuN4-infected MARC-145 cells. Phosphorylation analysis of SAMHD1 showed that overexpressed SAMHD1 protein was in primarily an unphosphorylated state. SAMHD1 overexpression increased the transcript abundance of IFN-stimulated genes ISG15 and ISG56. The mRNA levels of SAMHD1 and ISGs were significantly increased in porcine alveolar macrophages infected with HP-PRRSV. SAMHD1 protein level was also elevated, and the protein was not phosphorylated during infection. Collectively, our data indicate that SAMHDI inhibits HP-PRRSV proliferation through inhibiting the replication of HP-PRRSV. SAMHD1 might be the protein participating in the IFN signaling and is thus an important immunoregulatory protein in innate immunity. PMID:25106914

  8. [Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Fernández F, Cristina; Salinas F, Mauricio; de Grazia K, José Andrés; Díaz P, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is an extremely rare disease characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of calcified spherical particles (called microliths), due to a mutation of the gene encoding a membrane transport protein of the alveolar surface. Most patients are asymptomatic at diagnosis. The course of the disease is slowly progressive, with development of pulmonary fibrosis and respiratory failure. The "sandstorm" pattern is the characteristic finding of this disease. We report a 39-year-old female presenting with progressive dyspnea. A chest X ray showed ground-glass opacities and a high resolution CT scan showed numerous calcified lung micronodules. A surgical lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. PMID:25427025

  9. Porcine prion protein amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions. PMID:26218890

  10. Management of the alveolar cleft.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Pedro E; Schuster, Lindsay A; Levy-Bercowski, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Orthopedic and orthodontic management of patients born with clefts of the lip, alveolus and palate is based on the application of basic biomechanical principles adapted to the individualized cleft anatomy. This article focuses on orthopedic and orthodontic preparation for 2 stages of interdisciplinary orthodontic/surgical cleft care: presurgical infant orthopedics (nasoalveolar molding) for lip/alveolus/nasal surgical repair and maxillary arch preparation for secondary alveolar bone grafting. These preparatory stages of orthopedic/orthodontic therapy are undertaken with the goal of restoring normal anatomic relationships to assist the surgeon in providing the best possible surgical care. PMID:24607190

  11. Synthesis of Dipalmitoyl Lecithin by Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Robert J.; Huber, Gary; Vaughan, Martha

    1972-01-01

    A reliable, relatively simple method for isolation and quantification of disaturated lecithins is described. In rabbit lung, 34% of the lecithins were disaturated, in alveolar macrophages, 19%. More than 95% of the fatty acids of the disaturated lecithins from lung and alveolar macrophages was palmitic. Hence, the disaturated lecithins from these sources were essentially all dipalmitoyl lecithin. Both heterophils and alveolar macrophages incorporated 14C-labeled choline and palmitate into disaturated lecithins. Liver slices in which only about 1% of the lecithins were disaturated incorporated very little of these precursors into this fraction. Of the palmitate incorporated in vitro into disaturated lecithins by alveolar macrophages, heterophils, and lung slices, 37% was in the 1 position. In disaturated lecithins isolated from pulmonary lavage fluid, alveolar macrophages, and lung of rabbit 8-12 hr after a single intravenous injection of palmitic-1-14C acid, 45% of the 14C was in position 1. At earlier times, from 20-240 min after injection, the distribution of 14C was similar in the samples from lung, but in those from alveolar macrophages and lavage fluid, the percentage in position 1 was slightly lower. Glycerol-U-14C was incorporated into disaturated lecithins by alveolar macrophages and by lung slices in vitro. Both tissues incorporated very little label from ethanolamine or from methyl-labeled methionine into this fraction. All of the data are consistent with the view that alveolar macrophages synthesize dipalmitoyl lecithin via the cytidine diphosphate-choline pathway. PMID:5066597

  12. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Warfarin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Bülent; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Baha, Reshat Mehmet; Zeytun, Neslihan Ebru Eryaşar; Yetisgen, Azize

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening clinical pathologic syndrome caused by a variety of diseases. We report a case of DAH related to therapy of warfarin use. In this case report, we present the diffuse alveolar hemorrhage case as a rare and life-threatening complication of warfarin. PMID:26347781

  13. Pulse granuloma of the alveolar ridge.

    PubMed

    Mincer, H H; McCoy, J M; Turner, J E

    1979-08-01

    Six examples of pulse granulomas of the alveolar ridge are presented. The lesion consists of a foreign-body granuloma containing identifiable particles of leguminous foods. The vegetable matter is introduced through an alveolar defect, usually a postextraction socket. Simple curettage is apparently adequate treatment to effect cure. PMID:382018

  14. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage following alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Ashutosh; Matuschak, George M

    2008-06-01

    This study describes an unusual patient with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) in whom diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) developed as a complication of alemtuzumab therapy following renal transplantation. A 26-year-old man with XLAS underwent retransplantation with a cadaveric renal allograft. He received alemtuzumab therapy as a part of an immunosuppressive induction protocol, and dyspnea and hemoptysis developed. A chest CT scan showed diffuse alveolar opacities. Bronchoscopy was performed to determine the cause of hemoptysis and hypoxia. BAL showed a characteristic increasingly bloody return in the sequential aliquots. There was no growth of pathogenic bacteria or evidence of opportunistic infection. Clinical improvement occurred with the initiation of steroids, and the patient required short-term mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of DAH associated with use of alemtuzumab therapy, although other pulmonary toxicities have been described. The prevalence of this form of pulmonary toxicity is unclear and requires further systematic study. PMID:18574290

  15. Leukotriene B4 receptors on guinea pig alveolar eosinophils

    SciTech Connect

    Maghni, K.; de Brum-Fernandes, A.J.; Foeldes-Filep, E.G.; Gaudry, M.; Borgeat, P.; Sirois, P. )

    1991-09-01

    The existence of receptors for LTB4 on highly purified guinea pig alveolar eosinophils was investigated. Massive infiltration of eosinophils in alveolar spaces was induced in guinea pigs by i.v. injections of Sephadex beads G50 (16 mg/kg). Alveolar eosinophils (50 {times} 10(6) cells) were purified to approximately 98% by Percoll continuous density gradient centrifugation. The binding studies indicated that alveolar eosinophils bind LTB4 in a saturable, reversible and specific manner. Scatchard analysis indicated the existence of high-affinity binding sites (Kd1 = 1.00 {plus minus} 0.22 nM; Bmax1 = 966 {plus minus} 266 sites/cell) and low-affinity binding sites (Kd2 = 62.5 {plus minus} 8.9 nM; Bmax2 = 5557 {plus minus} 757 sites/cell). The metabolism of LTB4 by alveolar eosinophils in binding conditions was assessed by RP-HPLC and no significant degradation of (3H)LTB4 was observed. LTB4 dose-dependently stimulated eosinophil migration in both chemokinesis and chemotaxis assays with an EC50 value of 1.30 {plus minus} 0.14 and 18.14 {plus minus} 1.57 nM, respectively. LTB4 caused a dose-dependent increase in the production of superoxide anion with an apparent EC50 value of 50 {times} 10(-9) M in the authors experimental conditions. LTB4 also induced a dose-dependent increase in the generation of TxA2 with an EC50 value of 46.2 {times} 10(-9) M. Taken together, their results demonstrated that guinea pig alveolar eosinophils express two classes of specific receptors for LTB4. The high-affinity binding sites seem associated to chemokinesis and chemotaxis whereas the low-affinity binding sites seem associated to superoxide anion production and generation of TxA2. The existence of LTB4 receptors in eosinophils could explain the presence of these cells in hypersensitivity reactions.

  16. Detection and Characterization of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus in Porcine Plasma and Porcine Factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Takefman, Daniel M.; Wong, Susan; Maudru, Thomas; Peden, Keith; Wilson, Carolyn A.

    2001-01-01

    The pig genome contains porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) capable of infecting human cells. Detection of infectious retrovirus in porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells and endothelial cells suggested to us that pig plasma is likely to contain PERV. Both PERV env sequences and viral reverse transcriptase (RT) activity were detected in all plasma samples isolated from four NIH minipigs. To detect infectious virus from plasma, we performed a culture assay using three cell lines of feline, swine, and human origin that had previously been shown to be permissive for PERV. Infectious virus was successfully cultured from all four NIH minipig plasmas on the swine cell line ST-IOWA. Using RT-PCR with env-specific primers, we could detect expression of PERV class C envelope in the supernatant of ST-IOWA cells that had been exposed to each pig plasma. We next examined a pig plasma derivative, Hyate:C (porcine factor VIII), and found evidence of PERV particles, since all six lots examined were positive for PERV RNA and RT activity. However, infectious virus could not be detected in clinical lots of Hyate:C, suggesting that the manufacturing process might reduce the load of infectious virus to levels below detectable limits of the assay. Detection of infectious virus in porcine plasma confirms and extends the previous findings that certain porcine cells express PERV when manipulated in vitro and clearly demonstrates that there are porcine cells that express infectious PERV constitutively in vivo. PMID:11312325

  17. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  18. Infection of porcine bone marrow-derived macrophages by porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus impairs phagosomal maturation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Sibapriya; McKenna, Neil; Balce, Dale R; Yates, Robin M

    2016-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a positive-sense, ssRNA virus of the genus Arterivirus, is a devastating disease of swine worldwide. Key early targets of PRRSV infection in pigs include professional phagocytes in the lung, such as alveolar and interstitial macrophages and dendritic cells, the dysfunction of which is believed to be responsible for much of the associated mortality. In order to study the effect of virus infection on phagocyte function, the development of a robust, reproducible model would be advantageous. Given the limitations of current models, we set out to develop a porcine bone marrow-derived macrophage (PBMMΦ) cell model to study phagosomal maturation and function during PRRSV infection. Derivation of PBMMΦs from marrow using cultured L929 fibroblast supernatant produced a homogeneous population of cells that exhibited macrophage-like morphology and proficiency in Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and phagosomal maturation. PBMMΦs were permissive to PRRSV infection, resulting in a productive infection that peaked at 24 h. Assessment of the effect of PRRSV infection on the properties of phagosomal maturation in PBMMΦs revealed a significant decrease in phagosomal proteolysis and lowered production of reactive oxygen species, but no change in PBMMΦ viability, phagocytosis or the ability of phagosomes to acidify. In this study, we present a new model to investigate PRRSV infection of phagocytes, which demonstrates a significant effect on phagosomal maturation with the associated implications on proper macrophage function. This model can also be used to study the effect on the phagosomal microenvironment of infection by other viruses targeting porcine macrophages. PMID:26702996

  19. Enhancing neutralizing antibody production by an interferon-inducing porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Xiao, Yueqiang; Opriessnig, Tanja; Ding, Yi; Yu, Ying; Nan, Yuchen; Ma, Zexu; Halbur, Patrick G; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2013-11-12

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV) continues to cause substantial economic losses to the global swine industry. PRRSV appears to inhibit synthesis of type I interferons (IFNs), such as IFN-α and -β, which are critical for the innate immunity and play an important role in the modulation of adaptive immunity. An atypical PRRSV strain, A2MC2, is able to induce type I IFNs in vitro. In this study, A2MC2 induction of neutralizing antibodies in vivo was compared with the Ingelvac PRRS modified live virus (MLV) vaccine strain and VR-2385 (a moderate virulent strain). Three-week-old pigs were exposed to these PRRSV strains via intranasal or intramuscular routes to also account for a possible effect of inoculation routes. The interferon-inducing A2MC2 resulted in earlier onset and significantly higher levels of PRRSV neutralizing antibodies than the MLV. In addition, the A2MC2-induced neutralizing antibodies were capable of neutralizing VR-2385, a heterologous strain. The pigs exposed via intranasal route had higher titers of neutralizing antibodies than those injected via intramuscular route. Macroscopic and microscopic lung lesions 14 days post-exposure indicated that A2MC2 had similar virulence in vivo as VR-2385. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) collected during the necropsy 14 days post-exposure in the A2MC2 group had higher level expression of IFN-γ than the MLV group. These results indicate that A2MC2 can be further explored for development of an improved vaccine against PRRS. PMID:24063978

  20. Secondary Alveolar Bone Grafting (CLEFTSiS) 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Michael; Rae, Jennifer; Paterson, Paul; Gilgrass, Toby; Devlin, Mark; McIntyre, Grant

    2016-03-01

    Objective To determine whether alveolar bone graft outcomes for unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients have continued to improve since the reorganization of cleft services in Scotland in 2000. Design Retrospective analysis of postoperative anterior occlusal radiographs. Patients and Participants Eighty-one of 106 patients who were eligible for alveolar bone grafting between 2007 and 2010 had suitable postoperative radiographs available. Interventions Twenty-seven percent of the patients (n = 22) had presurgical orthodontic intervention. All patients underwent alveolar bone grafting with bone harvested from the iliac crest. Main Outcome Measures The Kindelan bone-fill index was used to evaluate success. Weighted kappa statistics were used to assess intra- and interobserver reproducibility. A comparison was made with results from 2000 to 2004 to assess any improvement. Chi-square tests (or Fisher exact test) were used to determine whether outcomes differed depending on the laterality of the cleft, use of presurgical expansion, or age at bone grafting. Results Interobserver scoring agreement was good (weighted kappa = .383). Intraobserver reproducibility was greater (weighted kappas of .835 and .620). Success was achieved in 99% of bone grafts, compared with 76% in the period from 2000 to 2004 (P < .001). There was no statistically significant relationship between the laterality of the cleft (P = 1.000), use of presurgical expansion (P = 1.000), or age at time of bone grafting and outcome (P = .259). Conclusion Scottish secondary alveolar bone graft outcomes improved during 2007 to 2010 in comparison to the 2000 to 2004 results. PMID:26914161

  1. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  2. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  3. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  4. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  5. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  6. Porcine Dentin Sialophosphoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Lu, Yuhe; Hu, Jan C.-C.; Kim, Jung-Wook; Iwata, Takanori; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Nagano, Takatoshi; Yamakoshi, Fumiko; Hu, Yuanyuan; Fukae, Makoto; Simmer, James P.

    2008-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is critical for proper mineralization of tooth dentin, and mutations in DSPP cause inherited dentin defects. Dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) is the C-terminal cleavage product of DSPP that binds collagen and induces intrafibrillar mineralization. We isolated DPP from individual pigs and determined that its N-terminal and C-terminal domains are glycosylated and that DPP averages 155 phosphates per molecule. Porcine DPP is unstable at low pH and high temperatures, and complexing with collagen improves its stability. Surprisingly, we observed DPP size variations on SDS-PAGE for DPP isolated from individual pigs. These variations are not caused by differences in proteolytic processing or degrees of phosphorylation or glycosylation, but rather to allelic variations in Dspp. Characterization of the DPP coding region identified 4 allelic variants. Among the 4 alleles, 27 sequence variations were identified, including 16 length polymorphisms ranging from 3 to 63 nucleotides. None of the length variations shifted the reading frame, and all localized to the highly redundant region of the DPP code. The 4 alleles encode DPP domains having 551, 575, 589, or 594 amino acids and completely explain the DPP size variations. DPP length variations are polymorphic and are not associated with dentin defects. PMID:18359767

  7. Fatal Alveolar Echinococcosis of the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Keutgens, Aurore; Simoni, Paolo; Detrembleur, Nancy; Frippiat, Frédéric; Giot, Jean-Baptiste; Spirlet, François; Aghazarian, Saro; Descy, Julie; Meex, Cécile; Huynen, Pascale; Melin, Pierrette; Müller, Norbert; Gottstein, Bruno; Carlier, Yves

    2013-01-01

    For the last 10 years, the southern part of Belgium has been recognized as a low-risk area of endemicity for alveolar echinococcosis. This infection, caused by Echinococcus multilocularis, usually induces a severe liver condition and can sometimes spread to other organs. However, alveolar echinococcosis involving bones has been described only very rarely. Here, a fatal case of spondylodiscitis due to E. multilocularis contracted in southern Belgium is reported. PMID:23175265

  8. Telomere dysfunction causes alveolar stem cell failure.

    PubMed

    Alder, Jonathan K; Barkauskas, Christina E; Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Stanley, Susan E; Kembou, Frant; Tuder, Rubin M; Hogan, Brigid L M; Mitzner, Wayne; Armanios, Mary

    2015-04-21

    Telomere syndromes have their most common manifestation in lung disease that is recognized as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. In both conditions, there is loss of alveolar integrity, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. We tested the capacity of alveolar epithelial and stromal cells from mice with short telomeres to support alveolar organoid colony formation and found that type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s), the stem cell-containing population, were limiting. When telomere dysfunction was induced in adult AEC2s by conditional deletion of the shelterin component telomeric repeat-binding factor 2, cells survived but remained dormant and showed all the hallmarks of cellular senescence. Telomere dysfunction in AEC2s triggered an immune response, and this was associated with AEC2-derived up-regulation of cytokine signaling pathways that are known to provoke inflammation in the lung. Mice uniformly died after challenge with bleomycin, underscoring an essential role for telomere function in AEC2s for alveolar repair. Our data show that alveoloar progenitor senescence is sufficient to recapitulate the regenerative defects, inflammatory responses, and susceptibility to injury that are characteristic of telomere-mediated lung disease. They suggest alveolar stem cell failure is a driver of telomere-mediated lung disease and that efforts to reverse it may be clinically beneficial. PMID:25840590

  9. Evaluation of the Human Host Range of Bovine and Porcine Viruses that may Contaminate Bovine Serum and Porcine Trypsin Used in the Manufacture of Biological Products

    PubMed Central

    Marcus-Sekura, Carol; Richardson, James C.; Harston, Rebecca K.; Sane, Nandini; Sheets, Rebecca L.

    2011-01-01

    Current U.S. requirements for testing cell substrates used in production of human biological products for contamination with bovine and porcine viruses are U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 9CFR tests for bovine serum or porcine trypsin. 9CFR requires testing of bovine serum for seven specific viruses in six families (immunofluorescence) and at least 2 additional families non-specifically (cytopathicity and hemadsorption). 9CFR testing of porcine trypsin is for porcine parvovirus. Recent contaminations suggest these tests may not be sufficient. Assay sensitivity was not the issue for these contaminations that were caused by viruses/virus families not represented in the 9CFR screen. A detailed literature search was undertaken to determine which viruses that infect cattle or swine or bovine or porcine cells in culture also have human host range [ability to infect humans or human cells in culture] and to predict their detection by the currently used 9CFR procedures. There are more viruses of potential risk to biological products manufactured using bovine or porcine raw materials than are likely to be detected by 9CFR testing procedures; even within families, not all members would necessarily be detected. Testing gaps and alternative methodologies should be evaluated to continue to ensure safe, high quality human biologicals. PMID:22000165

  10. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) first appeared in the late 1980s, though serologic evidence indicates that it had been circulating in swine for some time prior to being recognized. PRRS has since become a highly significant infectious disease affecting swine production worldwid...

  11. Chloride-dependent secretion of alveolar wall liquid determined by optical-sectioning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Jens; Perlman, Carrie E; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2007-06-01

    The liquid layer lining the pulmonary alveolar wall critically determines the lung's immune defense against inhaled pathogens, because it provides a liquid milieu in the air-filled alveolus for dispersal of immune cells and defensive surfactant proteins. However, mechanisms underlying formation of the liquid are unknown. We achieved visualization of the alveolar wall liquid (AWL) in situ in mouse lungs by means of optical-sectioning microscopy. Continuous liquid secretion was present in alveoli of wild-type (WT) mice under baseline conditions. This secretion was blocked by inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR). The secretion was absent in Cftr(-/-) mice, and it was blocked when chloride was depleted from the perfusate of WT mice, providing the first evidence that CFTR-dependent chloride secretion causes AWL formation. Injected microparticles demonstrated flow of the AWL. The flow was blocked by CFTR inhibition and was absent in Cftr(-/-) mice. We conclude that CFTR-dependent liquid secretion is present in alveoli of the adult mouse. Defective alveolar secretion might impair alveolar immune defense and promote alveolar disease. PMID:17290033

  12. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Marco Antonio; Ramalho, Gabriel Cardoso; Manzi, Marcello Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics. PMID:27433360

  13. [Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning in implant surgery].

    PubMed

    Ardekian, L; Salnea, J; Abu el-Naaj, I; Gutmacher, T; Peled, M

    2001-04-01

    Severe resorption of the posterior mandible possesses one of the most difficult restorative challenges to the implant surgery today. This resorption may prevent the placement of dental implants without the potentially damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. To create the opportunity of insertion dental implants of adequately length in those cases, the technique of nerve repositioning has been advocated. The purpose of this article is to describe two cases of nerve repositioning combined with placement of dental implants. Both cases showed appropriate postoperative healing without damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. The inferior alveolar nerve repositioning technique seems to be an acceptable alternative to augmentation procedure prior to dental implants placement in cases exhibiting atrophic posterior mandibular ridges. PMID:11494807

  14. Characterization of the microRNAome in Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    A. Hicks, Julie; Yoo, Dongwan; Liu, Hsiao-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV), a member of the arterivirus family, is the causative agent of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS). PRRS is characterized by late term abortions and respiratory disease, particularly in young pigs. Small regulatory RNAs termed microRNA (miRNA) are associated with gene regulation at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs are known to play many diverse and complex roles in viral infections. To discover the impact of PRRSV infections on the cellular miRNAome, Illumina deep sequencing was used to construct small RNA expression profiles from in vitro cultured PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). A total of forty cellular miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed within the first 48 hours post infection (hpi). The expression of six miRNAs, miR-30a-3p, miR-132, miR-27b*, miR-29b, miR-146a and miR-9-2, were altered at more than one time point. Target gene identification suggests that these miRNAs are involved in regulating immune signaling pathways, cytokine, and transcription factor production. The most highly repressed miRNA at 24 hpi was miR-147. A miR-147 mimic was utilized to maintain miR-147 levels in PRRSV-infected PAMs. PRRSV replication was negatively impacted by high levels of miR-147. Whether down-regulation of miR-147 is directly induced by PRRSV or if it is part of the cellular response and PRRSV indirectly benefits remains to be determined. No evidence could be found of PRRSV-encoded miRNAs. Overall, the present study has revealed that a large and diverse group of miRNAs are expressed in swine alveolar macrophages and that the expression of a subset of these miRNAs is altered in PRRSV infected macrophages. PMID:24339989

  15. ALVEOLAR BREATH SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined an alveolar breath collection ...

  16. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Ysasi, Alexandra B; Wagner, Willi L; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-06-15

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends ("E"). Septal retraction, observed in 20-30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  17. Increased alveolar plasminogen activator in early asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cantin, A.; Allard, C.; Begin, R.

    1989-03-01

    Alveolar macrophage-derived plasminogen activator (PA) activity is decreased in some chronic interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis but increased in experimental models of acute alveolitis. Although asbestos fibers can stimulate alveolar macrophages (AM) to release PA in vitro, the effect of chronic asbestos exposure of the lower respiratory tract on lung PA activity remains unknown. The present study was designed to evaluate PA activity of alveolar macrophages and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in asbestos-exposed sheep and asbestos workers. Forty-three sheep were exposed to either 100 mg UICC chrysotile B asbestos in 100 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or to 100 ml PBS by tracheal infusion every 2 wk for 18 months. At Month 18, chest roentgenograms were analyzed and alveolar macrophage and extracellular fluid PA activity were measured in samples obtained by BAL. Alveolar macrophage PA activity was increased in the asbestos-exposed sheep compared to control sheep (87.2 +/- 17.3 versus 41.1 +/- 7.2 U/10(5) AM-24 h, p less than 0.05) as was the BAL fluid PA activity (674.9 +/- 168.4 versus 81.3 +/- 19.7 U/mg alb-24 h, p less than 0.01). Among the asbestos-exposed sheep, 10 had normal chest roentgenograms (Group SA) and 15 had irregular interstitial opacities (Group SB). Strikingly, whereas Group SA did not differ from the control group in BAL cellularity or PA activity, Group SB had marked increases in alveolar macrophages (p less than 0.005), AM PA activity (p less than 0.02), and BAL PA activity (p less than 0.001) compared to the control group.

  18. Interleukin-5 is the predominant cytokine produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, D; Menzel, J; Gottstein, B; Kern, P

    1995-01-01

    An involvement of cellular immunity in alveolar echinococcosis is strongly suggested by the intense granulomatous infiltrations observed around the hepatic parasite lesions. However, the basis of cellular immunoregulation in patient with alveolar echinococcosis is poorly understood. The present report shows a comparative analysis of lymphoid cell function in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 16 patients with alveolar echinococcosis and of healthy individuals. Our in vitro restimulation studies with crude Echinococcus multilocularis antigen demonstrated that PBMC from patients with alveolar echinococcosis were responsive to challenge with parasitic antigen as measured by lymphoid cell proliferation. In this system, we also evaluated cytokine expression at the gene and protein levels after stimulation with E. multilocularis antigen. Analysis of cytokine mRNA expression revealed distinct patterns of cytokine expression in patients and normal donors. By using reverse transcriptase PCR, we could demonstrate that the TH1 cytokine transcripts interleukin-2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) are present in PBMC from patients with alveolar echinococcosis. Moreover, it was found that stimulation with E. multilocularis antigen induced or enhanced the expression of the TH2 cytokine IL-3, IL-4, IL-10, and especially IL-5 mRNAs in PBMC from 13 of 16 patients with alveolar echinococcosis. Two patients who were examined after radical surgery, as well as another patient with a stable course of the disease under continuous chemotherapy, were not able to generate the same pattern of cytokine response and had no evidence of IL-5 mRNA synthesis. In contrast to the frequent expression of TH2 cytokine mRNAs observed in patients with alveolar echinococcosis, PBMC cultures from normal donors showed prominent IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNA expression but weak IL-3, IL-4, and IL-10 mRNA expression. Most interestingly, IL-5 mRNA was substantially absent in PBMC from healthy

  19. Rehabilitation of masticatory function improves the alveolar bone architecture of the mandible in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Mavropoulos, Anestis; Odman, Anna; Ammann, Patrick; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2010-09-01

    Masticatory functional changes have been shown to influence the quantity and quality of the alveolar bone during growth. This study was designed to investigate the effect of masticatory function rehabilitation on the morphology and the trabecular architecture of the mandibular alveolar bone after cessation of growth. Forty-four Sprague-Dawley male rats received soft diet in order to develop masticatory muscle hypofunction. After 21 weeks, after cessation of growth, the animals were divided into two groups: the first group continued receiving soft diet for six more weeks (hypofunction group), while the second group changed to ordinary (hard) diet with the aim to restore a normal masticatory function (rehabilitation group). A third group of 16 male rats (normal group) received ordinary (hard) diet during the whole experimental period and served as control. Micro-tomographic histomorphometry was used to evaluate the architecture of the mandibular alveolar bone (e.g. bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, etc.) at the end of the experiment (27 weeks). The height and width of the alveolar process were measured as well. The alveolar process trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) was lower for the animals of the hypofunctional group as compared to those of the normal (p<0.01) and the rehabilitation (p<0.05) groups. Despite the significant improvement observed in the rehabilitation group, their BV/TV was lower in comparison to the normal group (p<0.05) at the end of this experiment. All the other micro-tomographic parameters followed the same pattern of change between groups; values of the rehabilitation group were between the values of the two other groups, differing significantly from both of them. The alveolar process was significantly shorter in the normal group in comparison to both the hypofunctional and rehabilitation groups (p<0.05). On the other hand, both the normal and rehabilitation groups were had a wider alveolar process than the

  20. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong Xiao, Shaobo

    2014-11-15

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. - Highlights: • PRRSV infection triggers HMGB1 release from MARC-145 cells and PAMs. • HMGB1 does not significantly affect PRRSV proliferation. • HMGB1 is involved in PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory responses. • HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced inflammatory responses through TLR2/4 and RAGE.

  1. Blood gas stability and hematological changes in experimentally-induced acute porcine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiorpes, A L; Mirsky, M L; MacWilliams, P S; Bäckström, L R; Collins, M T

    1989-01-01

    Blood gas and hematological responses to acute, mild Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection of growing pigs was studied. Six pigs (average weight 10.1 kg) were experimentally infected intranasally with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5. Four pigs served as controls. Rectal temperatures and arterial blood for gas analysis and hematology were taken at 0, 8, 16, 24, 48 and 72 h postinfection. All infected pigs became febrile showing clinical signs typical of mild to moderate porcine pleuropneumonia; controls remained asymptomatic. Neutrophilia with bands and lymphopenia were observed only in infected pigs. Arterial partial pressures of O2 and CO2, and pH did not change in infected pigs. All pigs were killed after 72 h, and lungs were examined and cultured. Gross and microscopic lesions consistent with porcine pleuropneumonia were seen in 3/6 and 5/6 infected lungs, respectively. Control lungs were grossly normal with no histological evidence of pleuropneumonia. We conclude that in mild, acute porcine pleuropneumonia as established experimentally, a leukogram typical of acute inflammation and stress is seen; however, hypoxemia and alveolar hypoventilation are not features of this form of the disease. PMID:2914231

  2. Tobacco smoke and the pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Davies, P; Karnovsky, M L; Huber, G L

    1979-01-01

    Our results indicate that tobacco smoke exposure to varying duration causes morphological, biochemical and functional alterations in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The results of these changes is a population of alveolar macrophages made up of larger cells, with a reduced nucleus-cytoplasmic ratio, which are heavily loaded with heterolysosomes containing lipid. Though their fractional complement of mitochondria remains the same, an increase in the inner mitochondrial membrane surface area may be related to an enhanced oxidative metabolism. The cell is biochemically activated particularly following chronic exposure and is functionally impaired with respect to phagocytosis. PMID:232822

  3. Lung Transplant Recipient with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, M. Frances; Abdelrazek, Hesham; Patel, Vipul J.; Walia, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a progressive lung disease characterized by accumulated surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli and distal bronchioles. This accumulation is the result of impaired clearance by alveolar macrophages. PAP has been described in 11 solid organ transplant recipients, 9 of whom were treated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We report a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and tacrolimus who ultimately developed PAP, which worsened when MMF was replaced with everolimus. PMID:27213073

  4. Lung Transplant Recipient with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Tokman, Sofya; Hahn, M Frances; Abdelrazek, Hesham; Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Patel, Vipul J; Walia, Rajat; Omar, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a progressive lung disease characterized by accumulated surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli and distal bronchioles. This accumulation is the result of impaired clearance by alveolar macrophages. PAP has been described in 11 solid organ transplant recipients, 9 of whom were treated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We report a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and tacrolimus who ultimately developed PAP, which worsened when MMF was replaced with everolimus. PMID:27213073

  5. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Kaleem; Kumar Gupta, Mukesh; Dhungel, Kanchan; Lal Sah, Panna; Ansari, Sajid; Kumar Rauniyar, Raj

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is an uncommon infiltrative pulmonary disease characterized by deposition of microliths in the alveoli. We present the case of a young adult with complaints of shortness of breath on exertion. Chest radiograph showed innumerable small, dense nodules, diffusely involving both the lungs - predominantly in the lower zones. High-resolution CT scan illustrated widespread intra-alveolar microliths, diffuse ground-glass attenuation areas, septal thickening, and black pleural lines - predominantly in the basal regions. Transbronchial biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:24174699

  6. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Kaleem; Kumar Gupta, Mukesh; Dhungel, Kanchan; Lal Sah, Panna; Ansari, Sajid; Kumar Rauniyar, Raj

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is an uncommon infiltrative pulmonary disease characterized by deposition of microliths in the alveoli. We present the case of a young adult with complaints of shortness of breath on exertion. Chest radiograph showed innumerable small, dense nodules, diffusely involving both the lungs - predominantly in the lower zones. High-resolution CT scan illustrated widespread intra-alveolar microliths, diffuse ground-glass attenuation areas, septal thickening, and black pleural lines - predominantly in the basal regions. Transbronchial biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:24174699

  7. Characterization of the porcine p65 subunit of NF-κB and its association with virus antibody levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Hegang; Ma, Guojian; Gui, Duan; Zhao, Shuanping; Wang, Pan; He, Kongwang; Wang, Xuemin; Ruan, Jinxue; Cao, Jiyue; Yang, Shulin; Li, Kui

    2011-03-01

    NF-κB p65 subunit plays important roles in controlling both innate and adaptive immunity. Here we report the characterization of porcine NF-κB p65 subunit (pp65). pp65 shows high similarity to other mammalian counterparts. pp65 mRNA expression was mainly observed in lung, spleen, liver and small intestine. Furthermore, overexpression of pp65 activates NF-κB in porcine endothelial cell line PIEC, porcine alveolar macrophages cell line 3D4/21 and porcine primary fetal fibroblasts. A COOH-terminal truncation derivative of pp65 (pp65RHD) has been identified as a specific transdominant inhibitor of NFκB. Association study was performed on the selected SNP and indel. The results revealed that the SNP BglI was significantly associated (P<0.05) with pig reproduction and respiratory syndrome virus antibody level (PRRSV-AB) (0 day and 17 days), the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) antibody blocking rates (CSFV-AB) (0 day and 17 days) and pseudorabies virus antibody level (PRV-AB) (0 day and 32 days). PMID:21269694

  8. Secondary Alveolar Bone Grafting and Iliac Cancellous Bone Harvesting for Patients With Alveolar Cleft.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiyi; Wu, Chenzhou; Yang, Zheng; Duan, Zexi; Su, Zhifei; Wang, Peiqi; Zheng, Qian; Li, Chunjie

    2016-06-01

    To assess the efficacy of present interventions optimizing the result of secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) and the interventions alleviating the donor site morbidity after iliac cancellous bone harvesting. Researches were identified by searching the electronic database of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure. In addition, relevant journals and references of the included studies were searched manually. The Oxford 2011 Levels of Evidence were applied to assess the methodological quality of selected studies, and the best evidence synthesis system was applied afterward to measure the strength of evidence. As a result, 42 studies were considered eligible and included, among which 4 were of high quality while 38 were of low quality. Thirty lines of evidences were acquired after the synthesis, among which 13 were rated as moderate while 17 were rated as insufficient. As for the interventions optimizing the result of SABG, moderate evidence confirmed the efficacy of preoperative orthodontic treatment, the superiority of performing SABG before the eruption of canine, and the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography in preoperative estimation of the cleft volume. As for the interventions alleviating the morbidity of iliac cancellous bone harvesting, moderate evidence confirmed the treatment benefit of the interventions below: minimally invasive technique, including trephine and Shepard osteotomy; preemptive analgesia, including continuous bupivacaine infusion or transversus abdominis plane block. As for the rest interventions, only insufficient evidence was found. PMID:27244214

  9. Mechanical characterization of porcine corneas.

    PubMed

    Boschetti, F; Triacca, V; Spinelli, L; Pandolfi, A

    2012-03-01

    An experimental program has been carried out in order to investigate the mechanical behavior of porcine corneas. We report the results of inflation tests on the whole cornea and uniaxial tests on excised corneal strips, performed on 51 fresh porcine eyes. Uniaxial tests have been performed on specimens cut from previously inflated corneas. The cornea behavior is characterized by means of elastic stiffness, measured on both average pressure-apex displacement and average uniaxial stress-strain curves; and by means of transversal contraction coefficient, peak stress, and failure stress measured on uniaxial stress-strain curves. Uniaxial tests performed on excised strips allowed to measure the anisotropy in the corneal stiffness and to compare the stiffness of the cornea with the one of the sclera. Viscous properties of the cornea have been obtained through uniaxial relaxation curves on excised corneal strips. The relevant geometrical parameters have been measured and, with the aid of the elastic thin shell theory, a stress-strain curve has been derived from the average inflation test data and compared with similar data available in the literature. The experimental system has been developed in view of future applications to the mechanical testing of both porcine and human corneas. PMID:22482683

  10. Alveolar mechanics using realistic acinar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Haribalan; Lin, Ching-Long; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate modeling of the mechanics in terminal airspaces of the lung is desirable for study of particle transport and pathology. The flow in the acinar region is traditionally studied by employing prescribed boundary conditions to represent rhythmic breathing and volumetric expansion. Conventional models utilize simplified spherical or polygonal units to represent the alveolar duct and sac. Accurate prediction of flow and transport characteristics may require geometries reconstructed from CT-based images and serve to understand the importance of physiologically realistic representation of the acinus. In this effort, we present a stabilized finite element framework, supplemented with appropriate boundary conditions at the alveolar mouth and septal borders for simulation of the alveolar mechanics and the resulting airflow. Results of material advection based on Lagrangian tracking are presented to complete the study of transport and compare the results with simplified acinar models. The current formulation provides improved understanding and realization of a dynamic framework for parenchymal mechanics with incorporation of alveolar pressure and traction stresses.

  11. Teaching Alveolar Ventilation with Simple, Inexpensive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    When teaching and learning about alveolar ventilation with our class of 300 first-year medical students, we use four simple, inexpensive "models." The models, which encourage research-oriented learning and help our students to understand complex ideas, are distributed to the students before class. The students anticipate something new every day,…

  12. Selective alveolar corticotomy to intrude overerupted molars.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Dauro Douglas; de Oliveira, Bruno Franco; de Araújo Brito, Helio Henrique; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Medeiros, Paulo José

    2008-06-01

    Orthodontic intrusion of overerupted molars in adults is challenging for most clinicians. Efficient intrusion can be achieved by combining selective alveolar corticotomies with a modified full-coverage maxillary splint to reduce surgical risks, treatment time, and costs for both orthodontists and patients. PMID:18538256

  13. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. PMID:27099254

  14. Mechanical ventilation causes pulmonary mitochondrial dysfunction and delayed alveolarization in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Veniamin; Sosunov, Sergey A; Niatsetskaya, Zoya V; Utkina-Sosunova, Irina V; Ten, Vadim S

    2013-12-01

    Hyperoxia inhibits pulmonary bioenergetics, causing delayed alveolarization in mice. We hypothesized that mechanical ventilation (MV) also causes a failure of bioenergetics to support alveolarization. To test this hypothesis, neonatal mice were ventilated with room air for 8 hours (prolonged) or for 2 hours (brief) with 15 μl/g (aggressive) tidal volume (Tv), or for 8 hours with 8 μl/g (gentle) Tv. After 24 hours or 10 days of recovery, lung mitochondria were examined for adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-phosphorylating respiration, using complex I (C-I)-dependent, complex II (C-II)-dependent, or cytochrome C oxidase (C-IV)-dependent substrates, ATP production rate, and the activity of C-I and C-II. A separate cohort of mice was exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a known uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation. At 10 days of recovery, pulmonary alveolarization and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were assessed. Sham-operated littermates were used as control mice. At 24 hours after aggressive MV, mitochondrial ATP production rates and the activity of C-I and C-II were significantly decreased compared with control mice. However, at 10 days of recovery, only mice exposed to prolonged-aggressive MV continued to exhibit significantly depressed mitochondrial respiration. This was associated with significantly poorer alveolarization and VEGF expression. In contrast, mice exposed to brief-aggressive or prolonged-gentle MV exhibited restored mitochondrial ADP-phosphorylation, normal alveolarization and pulmonary VEGF content. Exposure to DNP fully replicated the phenotype consistent with alveolar developmental arrest. Our data suggest that the failure of bioenergetics to support normal lung development caused by aggressive and prolonged ventilation should be considered a fundamental mechanism for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature neonates. PMID:23980609

  15. Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chaulagain, Chakra P; Pilichowska, Monika; Brinckerhoff, Laurence; Tabba, Maher; Erban, John K

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), characterized by deposition of intra-alveolar PAS positive protein and lipid rich material, is a rare cause of progressive respiratory failure first described by Rosen et al. in 1958. The intra-alveolar lipoproteinaceous material was subsequently proven to have been derived from pulmonary surfactant in 1980 by Singh et al. Levinson et al. also reported in 1958 the case of 19-year-old female with panmyelosis afflicted with a diffuse pulmonary disease characterized by filling of the alveoli with amorphous material described as "intra-alveolar coagulum". This is probably the first reported case of PAP in relation to hematologic malignancy. Much progress has been made on PAP first described by Rosen which is currently classified as idiopathic or primary or autoimmune PAP. Idiopathic PAP occurs as a result of auto-antibodies directed against granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) impeding the surfactant clearing function of alveolar macrophages leading to progressive respiratory failure. Whole lung lavage and GM-CSF therapy has improved outcomes in patients with idiopathic PAP. Despite major advancement in the management of hematologic malignancy and its complications, little is known about the type of PAP first described by Levinson and now known as secondary PAP; a term also used when PAP occurs due to other causes such as occupational dusts. In this article we review and analyze the limited literature available in secondary PAP due to hematologic malignancies and present a case of PAP associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia successfully treated with bendamustine and rituximab. PMID:25300566

  16. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold to another person to be finished for slaughtering over a period of more than 1 month; (b) for...

  17. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold to another person to be finished for slaughtering over a period of more than 1 month; (b) for...

  18. Technical note: Isolation and characterization of porcine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dahanayaka, S; Rezaei, R; Porter, W W; Johnson, G A; Burghardt, R C; Bazer, F W; Hou, Y Q; Wu, Z L; Wu, G

    2015-11-01

    Within the mammary gland, functional synthesis of milk is performed by its epithelial (alveolar) cells. The availability of a stable mammary epithelial cell line is essential for biochemical studies to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for nutritional regulation of lactation. Therefore, porcine mammary epithelial cells (PMEC) were isolated from mammary glands of a 9-mo-old nonpregnant and nonlactating gilt and cultured to establish a nonimmortalized cell line. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin-18 (an intermediate filament specific for epithelial cells), β-casein (a specific marker for mammary epithelial cells), and α-lactalbumin. In culture, the PMEC doubled in number every 24 h and maintained a cobblestone morphology, typical for cultured epithelial cells, for at least 15 passages. Addition of 0.2 to 2 μg/mL prolactin to culture medium for 3 d induced the production of β-casein and α-lactalbumin by PMEC in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we have successfully developed a useful PMEC line for future studies of cellular and molecular regulation of milk synthesis by mammary epithelial cells of the sow. PMID:26641038

  19. Differences in immune response of pigs challenged with a high versus low dose inoculum of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) continues to be an economically important infectious disease of swine. Mechanisms governing activation of the innate immune response to PRRSV remain to be elucidated. Virulence differences observed between PRRSV isolates have been attribu...

  20. Genome sequences and phylogenetic analysis of K88- and F18-positive porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Sara M; Danzeisen, Jessica L; Isaacson, Richard E; Seemann, Torsten; Achtman, Mark; Johnson, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    Porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) continues to result in major morbidity and mortality in the swine industry via postweaning diarrhea. The key virulence factors of ETEC strains, their serotypes, and their fimbrial components have been well studied. However, most studies to date have focused on plasmid-encoded traits related to colonization and toxin production, and the chromosomal backgrounds of these strains have been largely understudied. Here, we generated the genomic sequences of K88-positive and F18-positive porcine ETEC strains and examined the phylogenetic distribution of clinical porcine ETEC strains and their plasmid-associated genetic content. The genomes of porcine ETEC strains UMNK88 and UMNF18 were both found to contain remarkable plasmid complements containing known virulence factors, potential novel virulence factors, and antimicrobial resistance-associated elements. The chromosomes of these strains also possessed several unique genomic islands containing hypothetical genes with similarity to classical virulence factors, although phage-associated genomic islands dominated the accessory genomes of these strains. Phylogenetic analysis of 78 clinical isolates associated with neonatal and porcine diarrhea revealed that a limited subset of porcine ETEC lineages exist that generally contain common toxin and fimbrial profiles, with many of the isolates belonging to the ST10, ST23, and ST169 multilocus sequencing types. These lineages were generally distinct from existing human ETEC database isolates. Overall, most porcine ETEC strains appear to have emerged from a limited subset of E. coli lineages that either have an increased propensity to carry plasmid-encoded virulence factors or have the appropriate ETEC core genome required for virulence. PMID:22081385

  1. Treatment of Adult Primary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Portal, José Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the distal air spaces and terminal bronchi, which may lead to impaired gas exchange. This accumulation of surfactant is due to decreased clearance by the alveolar macrophages. Its primary, most common form, is currently considered an autoimmune disease. Better knowledge of the causes of PAP have led to the emergence of alternatives to whole lung lavage, although this is still considered the treatment of choice. Most studies are case series, often with limited patient numbers, so the level of evidence is low. Since the severity of presentation and clinical course are variable, not all patients will require treatment. Due to the low level of evidence, some objective criteria based on expert opinion have been arbitrarily proposed in an attempt to define in which patients it is best to initiate treatment. PMID:25896950

  2. [Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis - a case report].

    PubMed

    Johannesdottir, Ragnheidur M; Jonsson, Steinn; Valsson, Felix; Hardardottir, Hronn; Amundadottir, Olof R; Bjornsson, Eythor; Nikulasson, Sigfus; Gudbjartsson, Tomas

    2014-11-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disease of unknown origin, where an amorphous lipoprotein material accumulates in the alveoli of the lungs. We describe a young male with a four month history of progressive dyspnea, low grade fever, hypoxemia and weight loss. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial and alveolar infiltrates in both lungs. The diagnosis of PAP was confirmed with trans-bronchial lung biopsy. Because of a deteriorating clinical course a whole lung lavage was performed. Under general anesthesia, both lungs were lavaged with warm saline in two different sessions with good results. Two years later the patient is almost free of symptoms and lung function has markedly improved. PMID:25413889

  3. Bilateral stony lung: pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Subhash; Mohan, Anant; Guleria, Randeep; Das, Prasenjit; Sarkar, Chitra

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year-old male paddy field worker was referred for exertional shortness of breath and non-productive cough for 4 years. He had been treated for pulmonary tuberculosis twice. Chest radiograph showed extensive bilateral nodular opacities ("sandstorm-like") in the middle and lower lobe. Pulmonary function tests revealed a restrictive ventilatory defect. High resolution CT showed widespread nodular infiltration with "crazy paving" appearance and interrupted black pleura sign. This was confirmed as pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) by trans-bronchial lung biopsy, which showed normal respiratory lining epithelium with dilated alveolar spaces containing many calcific bodies, some of which showed concentric calcification. The possibilities of silicosis (due to exposure to husk) and tuberculosis, both of which can mimic PAM clinically and radiologically, made this case a diagnostic challenge. PMID:21686505

  4. Bilateral stony lung: pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Subhash; Mohan, Anant; Guleria, Randeep; Das, Prasenjit; Sarkar, Chitra

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year-old male paddy field worker was referred for exertional shortness of breath and non-productive cough for 4 years. He had been treated for pulmonary tuberculosis twice. Chest radiograph showed extensive bilateral nodular opacities (“sandstorm-like”) in the middle and lower lobe. Pulmonary function tests revealed a restrictive ventilatory defect. High resolution CT showed widespread nodular infiltration with “crazy paving” appearance and interrupted black pleura sign. This was confirmed as pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) by trans-bronchial lung biopsy, which showed normal respiratory lining epithelium with dilated alveolar spaces containing many calcific bodies, some of which showed concentric calcification. The possibilities of silicosis (due to exposure to husk) and tuberculosis, both of which can mimic PAM clinically and radiologically, made this case a diagnostic challenge. PMID:21686505

  5. Rare lung diseases II: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen C; Hwang, David; Waddell, Thomas K; Downey, Gregory P

    2008-01-01

    The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed. PMID:18551202

  6. Pelvic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in a young adult

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, David; Amadi, Chiemezie; Beckman, Irwin; Patel, Shweta; Surampudi, Ramana

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas are soft-tissue tumors, rare in adults. Accounting for nearly 5% of childhood cancers, they represent less than 0.03% of adult malignancies (1, 2). Three different subtypes of rhabdomyosarcoma have been described (embryonal, alveolar and pleomorphic), making up approximately 50%, 30%, and 20% of the cases, respectively (3). Although the definitive diagnosis is made pathologically, some distinguishing features among these subtypes, and between rhabdomyosarcomas and other soft-tissue tumors, can be suggested on MRI and CT. We present an interesting case of a 20-year-old female with a locally aggressive pelvic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. While the prognosis has improved with newer treatment techniques, overall survival rates remain poor. Our case study presents typical features of a rare disease, which can often present a diagnostic dilemma for clinicians.

  7. Depletion of Alveolar Macrophages Does Not Prevent Hantavirus Disease Pathogenesis in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Brocato, Rebecca L.; Bell, Todd M.; Schellhase, Christopher W.; Mraz, Steven R.; Queen, Laurie A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) is associated with a lethal vascular leak syndrome in humans termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). The mechanism for the massive vascular leakage associated with HPS is poorly understood; however, dysregulation of components of the immune response is often suggested as a possible cause. Alveolar macrophages are found in the alveoli of the lung and represent the first line of defense to many airborne pathogens. To determine whether alveolar macrophages play a role in HPS pathogenesis, alveolar macrophages were depleted in an adult rodent model of HPS that closely resembles human HPS. Syrian hamsters were treated, intratracheally, with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes or control liposomes and were then challenged with ANDV. Treatment with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes resulted in significant reduction in alveolar macrophages, but depletion did not prevent pathogenesis or prolong disease. Depletion also did not significantly reduce the amount of virus in the lung of ANDV-infected hamsters but altered neutrophil recruitment, MIP-1α and MIP-2 chemokine expression, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in hamster bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid early after intranasal challenge. These data demonstrate that alveolar macrophages may play a limited protective role early after exposure to aerosolized ANDV but do not directly contribute to hantavirus disease pathogenesis in the hamster model of HPS. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses continue to cause disease worldwide for which there are no FDA-licensed vaccines, effective postexposure prophylactics, or therapeutics. Much of this can be attributed to a poor understanding of the mechanism of hantavirus disease pathogenesis. Hantavirus disease has long been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, by directly manipulating the Syrian hamster model, we continue to eliminate individual immune cell types. As the most numerous immune cells present in the respiratory tract

  8. Alveolar flows of the developing lungs:from embryonic to early childhood airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Hofemeier, Philipp; Fishler, Rami; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sznitman, Josue

    2014-11-01

    At the onset of life in utero the respiratory system is simply a liquid-filled duct. With our first breath, alveoli are filled with air and become a significant port of entry for airborne particles. As such, alveolar lining is nearly fully functional at birth, though lung development continues during childhood as structural changes increase alveolar surface area to optimize ventilation. We hypothesize that such fluid dynamical changes potentially affect two phenomena occurring within alveoli: (i) flow patterns in airspaces at distinct stages of both in- and ex-utero life and (ii) fate of inhaled particles ex-utero. To investigate these phenomena, we combine experimental and numerical approaches where (i) microfluidic in vitro devices mimic liquid flows across the epithelium of fetal airspaces, and (ii) computational simulations are employed to examine particle transport and deposition in the deep alveolated regions of infants' lungs. Our approaches capture anatomically-inspired geometries based on morphometrical data, as well as physiological flows, including the convective-diffusive nature of submicron particle transport in alveolar regions.Overall, we investigate respiratory flows in alveolar regions of developing lungs, from early embryonic stages to late childhood

  9. Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis: historical and biologic review and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Emtiaz, Shahram; Noroozi, Sohrab; Caramês, João; Fonseca, Luís

    2006-12-01

    Dental rehabilitation of partially or totally edentulous patients with dental implants has become common practice in the last few decades, with reliable long-term results. However, local conditions of edentulous alveolar ridges may be unfavorable for implant placement. Vertically deficient alveolar ridges, in particular, may have insufficient bone volume to hold implants of adequate dimensions, making implant placement difficult or impossible. To correct this situation, a variety of surgical procedures have been proposed, including onlay bone grafts, vertical guided bone regeneration, and alveolar distraction osteogenesis. Distraction osteogenesis is a biologic process of new bone formation between the surfaces of bone segments that are gradually separated by incremental traction. This process is initiated when a traction force is applied to the bone segments and continues as long as the callus tissues are stretched. This traction force, in turn, generates tension within the tissues that connect the bone segments, which stimulates new bone formation parallel to the vector of distraction. The aim of this article is to provide clinicians with the historical background of and biologic basis for the concept of distraction osteogenesis, which can be traced back to the 1800s. Finally, a clinical case is presented to demonstrate a step-by-step application of alveolar distraction osteogenesis as a treatment protocol in a partially edentulous ridge for improvement of esthetics. PMID:17243326

  10. 7 CFR 1230.111 - Remittance of assessments on domestic porcine animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Remittance of assessments on domestic porcine animals. 1230.111 Section 1230.111 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  11. 7 CFR 1230.608 - Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products. 1230.608 Section 1230.608 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND...

  12. 7 CFR 1230.111 - Remittance of assessments on domestic porcine animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Remittance of assessments on domestic porcine animals. 1230.111 Section 1230.111 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  13. 7 CFR 1230.608 - Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products. 1230.608 Section 1230.608 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND...

  14. 7 CFR 1230.608 - Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products. 1230.608 Section 1230.608 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND...

  15. 7 CFR 1230.608 - Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products. 1230.608 Section 1230.608 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND...

  16. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: time to shift?

    PubMed

    Papiris, Spyros A; Tsirigotis, Panagiotis; Kolilekas, Likurgos; Papadaki, Georgia; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Triantafillidou, Christina; Papaporfyriou, Anastasia; Karakatsani, Anna; Kagouridis, Konstantinos; Griese, Matthias; Manali, Effrosyni D

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is categorized into hereditary, secondary and autoimmune PAP (aPAP) types. The common pathogenesis is the ability of the alveolar macrophages to catabolize phagocytized surfactant is affected. Hereditary PAP is caused by mutations involving the GM-CSF signaling, particularly in genes for the GM-CSF receptor and sometimes by GATA2 mutations. Secondary PAP occurs in hematologic malignancies, other hematologic disorders, miscellaneous malignancies, fume and dust inhalation, drugs, autoimmune disorders and immunodeficiencies. aPAP is related to the production of GM-CSF autoantibodies. PAP is characterized morphologically by the inappropriate and progressive 'occupation' of the alveolar spaces by an excessive amount of unprocessed surfactant, limiting gas exchange and gradually exhausting the respiratory reserve. Myeloid cells' immunity deteriorates, increasing the risk of infections. Treatment of PAP is based on its etiology. In aPAP, recent therapeutic advances might shift the treatment option from the whole lung lavage procedure under general anesthesia to the inhalation of GM-CSF 'as needed'. PMID:25864717

  17. In situ methods for assessing alveolar mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wu, You; Perlman, Carrie E

    2012-02-01

    Lung mechanics are an important determinant of physiological and pathophysiological lung function. Recent light microscopy studies of the intact lung have furthered the understanding of lung mechanics but used methodologies that may have introduced artifacts. To address this concern, we employed a short working distance water immersion objective to capture confocal images of a fluorescently labeled alveolar field on the costal surface of the isolated, perfused rat lung. Surface tension held a saline drop between the objective tip and the lung surface, such that the lung surface was unconstrained. For comparison, we also imaged with O-ring and coverslip; with O-ring, coverslip, and vacuum pressure; and without perfusion. Under each condition, we ventilated the lung and imaged the same region at the endpoints of ventilation. We found use of a coverslip caused a minimal enlargement of the alveolar field; additional use of vacuum pressure caused no further dimensional change; and absence of perfusion did not affect alveolar field dimension. Inflation-induced expansion was unaltered by methodology. In response to inflation, percent expansion was the same as recorded by all four alternative methods. PMID:22074721

  18. A porcine model of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Saalfrank, A; Janssen, K-P; Ravon, M; Flisikowski, K; Eser, S; Steiger, K; Flisikowska, T; Müller-Fliedner, P; Schulze, É; Brönner, C; Gnann, A; Kappe, E; Böhm, B; Schade, B; Certa, U; Saur, D; Esposito, I; Kind, A; Schnieke, A

    2016-01-01

    We previously produced pigs with a latent oncogenic TP53 mutation. Humans with TP53 germline mutations are predisposed to a wide spectrum of early-onset cancers, predominantly breast, brain, adrenal gland cancer, soft tissue sarcomas and osteosarcomas. Loss of p53 function has been observed in >50% of human cancers. Here we demonstrate that porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) convert to a transformed phenotype after activation of latent oncogenic TP53R167H and KRASG12D, and overexpression of MYC promotes tumorigenesis. The process mimics key molecular aspects of human sarcomagenesis. Transformed porcine MSCs exhibit genomic instability, with complex karyotypes, and develop into sarcomas on transplantation into immune-deficient mice. In pigs, heterozygous knockout of TP53 was sufficient for spontaneous osteosarcoma development in older animals, whereas homozygous TP53 knockout resulted in multiple large osteosarcomas in 7–8-month-old animals. This is the first report that engineered mutation of an endogenous tumour-suppressor gene leads to invasive cancer in pigs. Unlike in Trp53 mutant mice, osteosarcoma developed in the long bones and skull, closely recapitulating the human disease. These animals thus promise a model for juvenile osteosarcoma, a relatively uncommon but devastating disease. PMID:26974205

  19. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G; Zambianchi, Marta; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S P; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2015-06-21

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit. PMID:25996248

  20. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Zambianchi, Martina; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit. PMID:25996248

  1. Candidates Cell Sources to Regenerate Alveolar Bone from Oral Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Masahiro; Takase, Kazuma; Suehiro, Fumio; Murata, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Most of the cases of dental implant surgery, especially the bone defect extensively, are essential for alveolar ridge augmentation. As known as cell therapy exerts valuable effects on bone regeneration, numerous reports using various cells from body to regenerate bone have been published, including clinical reports. Mesenchymal cells that have osteogenic activity and have potential to be harvested from intra oral site might be a candidate cells to regenerate alveolar bone, even dentists have not been harvested the cells outside of mouth. This paper presents a summary of somatic cells in edentulous tissues which could subserve alveolar bone regeneration. The candidate tissues that might have differentiation potential as mesenchymal cells for bone regeneration are alveolar bone chip, bone marrow from alveolar bone, periosteal tissue, and gingival tissue. Understanding their phenotype consecutively will provide a rational approach for alveolar ridge augmentation. PMID:22505911

  2. [Alveolar hemorrhage associated with intestinal inflammatory disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rabec, C; Barcat, J; Rey, D

    2003-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is characterized by diffuse bleeding into alveolar spaces. Three histopathological patterns may be seen: 1) pulmonary capillaritis due to immunological aggression to the membrane, 2) diffuse alveolar damage within the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 3) and "bland" DAH without alveolar or capillary damage. In the first two groups, pulmonary damage usually occurs within the context of a systemic disease. In the last, injury is usually found only in the lung, an entity called pulmonary hemosiderosis. We present a case of DAH with neither capillaritis nor diffuse alveolar damage in association with inflammatory bowel disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The case is interesting both because the association has not yet been described in the literature and because the presence of alveolar bleeding without evident tissue damage within the context of known autoimmune diseases may extend the field to include a new pathophysiological mechanism of pulmonary hemorrhage. PMID:12797945

  3. Recent advances in alveolar biology: some new looks at the alveolar interface.

    PubMed

    Possmayer, Fred; Hall, Stephen B; Haller, Thomas; Petersen, Nils O; Zuo, Yi Y; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Postle, Anthony D; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Orgeig, Sandra

    2010-08-31

    This article examines the manner in which some new methodologies and novel concepts have contributed to our understanding of how pulmonary surfactant reduces alveolar surface tension. Investigations utilizing small angle X-ray diffraction, inverted interface fluorescence microscopy, time of flight-secondary ion mass spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, two-photon fluorescence microscopy and electrospray mass spectroscopy are highlighted and a new model of ventilation-induced acute lung injury described. This contribution attempts to emphasize how these new approaches have resulted in a fuller appreciation of events presumably occurring at the alveolar interface. PMID:20206718

  4. Autophagy sustains the replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus in host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qinghao; Qin, Yixian; Zhou, Lei; Kou, Qiuwen; Guo, Xin; Ge, Xinna; Yang, Hanchun; Hu, Hongbo

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we confirmed the autophagy induced by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in permissive cells and investigated the role of autophagy in the replication of PRRSV. We first demonstrated that PRRSV infection significantly results in the increased double-membrane vesicles, the accumulation of LC3 fluorescence puncta, and the raised ratio of LC3-II/{beta}-actin, in MARC-145 cells. Then we discovered that induction of autophagy by rapamycin significantly enhances the viral titers of PRRSV, while inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA and silencing of LC3 gene by siRNA reduces the yield of PRRSV. The results showed functional autolysosomes can be formed after PRRSV infection and the autophagosome-lysosome-fusion inhibitor decreases the virus titers. We also examined the induction of autophagy by PRRSV infection in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. These findings indicate that autophagy induced by PRRSV infection plays a role in sustaining the replication of PRRSV in host cells.

  5. Isolation and Culture of Human Alveolar Type II Pneumocytes.

    PubMed

    Witherden, I R; Tetley, T D

    2001-01-01

    Alveolar type II pneumocytes (alveolar type II cells; TII cells) play an important role in the homeostasis of the alveolar unit. They are the progenitor cells to the type I pneumocyte and are therefore responsible for regeneration of alveolar epithelium following alveolar epithelial cell damage. The type I cell covers over 90% of the alveolar surface, reflecting its capacity to stretch into a flattened cell with very little depth (approx. 0.1 µm), but with a large surface area, to facilitate gas exchange. Nevertheless, the type II cell outnumbers type I cells, estimated to be by 2:1 in rodents. Most of the type II cell lies buried in the interstitium of the alveolus, with only the apical tip of the cell reaching into the airspace, through which another crucial function, provision of alveolar surfactant, occurs. Surfactant synthesis and secretion is a unique feature of type II cells; surfactant consists of a high proportion of phospholipids (approx. 90%) and a small proportion of protein (approx. 10%), which contains surfactant apoprotein (SP), of which four have so far been described, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D (1,2). Surfactant is highly surface active and is essential to prevent alveolar collapse. In addition, surfactant has many other roles, including pulmonary host defense. Compromised surfactant synthesis and function are believed to be a feature of numerous disease states (1,2), including infant respiratory distress syndrome, adult respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar proteinosis, and microbial infection. PMID:21336897

  6. Porcine deltacoronavirus: histological lesions and genetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leyi; Hayes, Jeff; Sarver, Craig; Byrum, Beverly; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    First identified in 2012 in a surveillance study in Hong Kong, porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a proposed member of the genus Deltacoronavirus of the family Coronaviridae. In February of 2014, PDCoV was detected in pigs with clinical diarrheal symptoms for the first time in the USA. Since then, it has been detected in more than 20 states in the USA and in other countries, including Canada, South Korea, and mainland China. So far, histological lesions in the intestines of pigs naturally infected with PDCoV under field conditions have not been reported. In this report, we describe the characteristic histological lesions in the small intestine that were associated with PDCoV infection, as evidenced by detection of viral nucleic acid by RT-PCR. In addition, we performed genomic analysis to determine the genetic relationship of all PDCoV strains from the four countries. We found that PDCoV mainly caused histological lesions in the small intestines of naturally infected piglets. Sequence analysis demonstrated that the PDCoV strains of different countries are closely related and shared high nucleotide sequence similarity; however, deletion patterns in the spike and 3' untranslated regions are different among the strains from mainland China, Hong Kong, the USA, and South Korea. Our study highlights the fact that continual surveillance is needed to trace the evolution of this virus. PMID:26475155

  7. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Porcine Elastase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Porcine Elastase. This enzyme is associated with the degradation of lung tissue in people suffering from emphysema. It is useful in studying causes of this disease. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  8. Sirtuin Inhibition Adversely Affects Porcine Oocyte Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Ma, Rujun; Hu, Jin; Ding, Xiaolin; Xu, Yinxue

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins have been implicated in diverse biological processes, including oxidative stress, energy metabolism, cell migration, and aging. Here, we employed Sirtuin inhibitors, nicotinamide (NAM) and Sirtinol, to investigate their effects on porcine oocyte maturation respectively. The rate of polar body extrusion in porcine oocytes decreased after treatment with NAM and Sirtinol, accompanied with the failure of cumulus cell expansion. We further found that NAM and Sirtinol significantly disrupted oocyte polarity, and inhibited the formation of actin cap and cortical granule-free domain (CGFD). Moreover, the abnormal spindles and misaligned chromosomes were readily detected during porcine oocyte maturation after treatment with NAM and Sirtinol. Together, these results suggest that Sirtuins are involved in cortical polarity and spindle organization in porcine oocytes. PMID:26176547

  9. Porcine Head Response to Blast

    PubMed Central

    Shridharani, Jay K.; Wood, Garrett W.; Panzer, Matthew B.; Capehart, Bruce P.; Nyein, Michelle K.; Radovitzky, Raul A.; Bass, Cameron R. ‘Dale’

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposes porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110 to 740 kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3 to 6.9 ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. Instrumentation was placed on the porcine head to measure bulk acceleration, pressure at the surface of the head, and pressure inside the cranial cavity. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within 30 s and the remaining two recovered within 8 min following respiratory assistance and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80 to 390 kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300–2830 kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385 to 3845 G’s and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R2 = 0.90). One SD corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP), and head acceleration are

  10. Cloning and characterization of porcine resistin gene.

    PubMed

    Dai, M H; Xia, T; Chen, X D; Gan, L; Feng, S Q; Qiu, H; Peng, Y; Yang, Z Q

    2006-02-01

    Resistin is a member of resistin-like molecules (RELMs) and a hormone secreted from mature adipocytes in rodents and leukocytes in human. We now report the cloning and characterization of the full-length porcine resistin cDNA and gene. Sequence analysis indicated that the pig resistin cDNA sequence had an open reading frame of 330 bp encoding a 12 kDa protein of 109 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 75.2% identity to the human resistin. The porcine resistin gene was composed of four exons and had exactly the same exon structure as the human resistin gene. The tissue distribution of porcine resistin mRNA was assessed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Resistin gene expression was the highest in porcine leukocytes and low in adipose tissue. Resistin protein could be detected in porcine serum by western blotting and it circulated in serum as dimers and trimers. We provided the first evidence that resistin was abundantly expressed in porcine leukocytes and had an expression pattern similar to that in human resistin mRNA and protein. This suggests that the pig may be a suitable animal model for studying the function of resistin in human insulin resistance. PMID:16023825

  11. Pharmacologic reduction in tumor necrosis factor activity of pulmonary alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Leeper-Woodford, S K; Fisher, B J; Sugerman, H J; Fowler, A A

    1993-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), an inflammatory cytokine released by macrophages, may be a mediator of lung injury during septicemia. We previously reported that the cyclooxygenase inhibitor ibuprofen and histamine receptor antagonists cimetidine (H2 antagonist) and diphenhydramine (H1 antagonist) attenuate lung injury and reduce circulating TNF surges during porcine sepsis. Since pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) may participate in early sepsis by producing TNF, we hypothesized that the TNF activity of PAM is reduced by ibuprofen, cimetidine, and diphenhydramine. To test this, we examined changes in PAM-derived TNF bioactivity and cell viability of freshly isolated porcine PAM during exposure to bacterial endotoxin (LPS), ibuprofen, cimetidine, and diphenhydramine. The TNF activity (% L929 cytotoxicity of PAM conditioned medium) was elevated in LPS-stimulated PAM cultures (15 to 25% increase at 1 to 6 h and 40 to 43% increase at 6 to 48 h, compared with non-LPS-stimulated cultures), and ibuprofen (150 micrograms/ml) added with LPS decreased the TNF activity for 24 h (20 to 28% reduction at 1 to 24 h). Ibuprofen added 1 h after LPS was less effective in reducing the PAM-derived TNF activity (20 to 22% reduction at 2 to 6 h). Cimetidine (112 micrograms/ml) reduced the TNF activity of LPS-stimulated PAM cultures during the first 4 h of LPS exposure (15 to 24% decrease at 1 to 4 h). Diphenhydramine (150 micrograms/ml) attenuated the PAM-derived TNF activity but also decreased viability of PAM, indicating a toxic effect of this agent on PAM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8093999

  12. Pathogenesis of porcine Actinobacillus pleuropneumonia: Part I. Effects of surface components of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H; Potter, A A; Campos, M; Leighton, F A; Willson, P J; Yates, W D

    1998-01-01

    To understand the role of non-secreted components of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in virulence, we investigated in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo pulmonary changes in pigs due to various A. pleuropneumoniae (serotype 1) fractions. Following 1.5 h incubation, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 2 crude extracts and bacterial culture supernatant (BCS) at high concentrations were cytotoxic to porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM), peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes, neutrophils and a cultured porcine bone marrow cell line. Heat-killed bacteria were cytotoxic to PAM after 24 h incubation. The 2 crude extracts were prepared by shaking either intact bacteria after removing culture supernatants (crude surface extract, CSE), or whole bacterial culture (crude surface plus culture supernatant extract, CSSE) with glass beads in saline at 60 degrees C. Further experiments showed that proteins from the bacterial membrane were partially involved in cytotoxicities of these 2 extracts. Both BCS and CSSE caused multivocal hemorrhage and neutrophil infiltration when inoculated into porcine lungs, but CSE did not. The lung:whole body weight ratios of the pigs treated with CSSE were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of pigs treated with BCS, CSE, or control solution. It is concluded that beside the secreted proteins, bacterial surface components including LPS and non-secreted proteins were cytotoxic in vitro; and secreted and non-secreted components act synergistically to cause lung lesions. PMID:9553707

  13. An estimation of mechanical stress on alveolar walls during repetitive alveolar reopening and closure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng-Long; Song, Yuan-Lin; Hu, Zhao-Yan; Zhang, Su; Chen, Ya-Zhu

    2015-08-01

    Alveolar overdistension and mechanical stresses generated by repetitive opening and closing of small airways and alveoli have been widely recognized as two primary mechanistic factors that may contribute to the development of ventilator-induced lung injury. A long-duration exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to even small, shear stresses could lead to the changes in cytoskeleton and the production of inflammatory mediators. In this paper, we have made an attempt to estimate in situ the magnitudes of mechanical stresses exerted on the alveolar walls during repetitive alveolar reopening by using a tape-peeling model of McEwan and Taylor (35). To this end, we first speculate the possible ranges of capillary number (Ca) ≡ μU/γ (a dimensionless combination of surface tension γ, fluid viscosity μ, and alveolar opening velocity U) during in vivo alveolar opening. Subsequent calculations show that increasing respiratory rate or inflation rate serves to increase the values of mechanical stresses. For a normal lung, the predicted maximum shear stresses are <15 dyn/cm(2) at all respiratory rates, whereas for a lung with elevated surface tension or viscosity, the maximum shear stress will notably increase, even at a slow respiratory rate. Similarly, the increased pressure gradients in the case of elevated surface or viscosity may lead to a pressure drop >300 dyn/cm(2) across a cell, possibly inducing epithelial hydraulic cracks. In addition, we have conceived of a geometrical model of alveolar opening to make a prediction of the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) required to splint open a collapsed alveolus, which as shown by our results, covers a wide range of pressures, from several centimeters to dozens of centimeters of water, strongly depending on the underlying pulmonary conditions. The establishment of adequate regional ventilation-to-perfusion ratios may prevent recruited alveoli from reabsorption atelectasis and accordingly, reduce the required levels of

  14. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in a marble worker.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Berna Botan; Akgedik, Recep; Akgedik, Sukran; Nazaroglu, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rarely seen disease of the alveoli, characterized by accumulation of proteinous material, which stains positive with periodic acid Schiff, in the alveoli. Secondary PAP may develop as a result of occupational exposure to materials such as silica and indium. In the paper, together with a review of the relevant literature, we present an uncommon case of a 47-year old male, marble worker who was diagnosed with PAP associated with a 12-year history of exposure to marble dust. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(5):871-876. PMID:27518894

  15. Lipopolysaccharide-induced epithelial monoamine oxidase mediates alveolar bone loss in a rat chronic wound model.

    PubMed

    Ekuni, Daisuke; Firth, James D; Nayer, Tarun; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Sanbe, Toshihiro; Irie, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Oka, Takashi; Liu, Zhenzi; Vielkind, Juergen; Putnins, Edward E

    2009-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is an antimicrobial response to pathogenic challenge that may, in the case of persistent infection, have deleterious effects on the tissue of origin. A rat periodontal disease model was used to study ROS-induced chronic epithelial inflammation and bone loss. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was applied for 8 weeks into the gingival sulcus, and histological analysis confirmed the onset of chronic disease. Junctional epithelium was collected from healthy and diseased animals using laser-capture microdissection, and expression microarray analysis was performed. Of 19,730 genes changed in disease, 42 were up-regulated >/=4-fold. Three of the top 10 LPS-induced genes, monoamine oxidase B (MAO/B) and flavin-containing monooxygenase 1 and 2, are implicated in ROS signaling. LPS-associated induction of the ROS mediator H(2)O(2), as well as MAO/B and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels were validated in the rat histological sections and a porcine junctional epithelial cell culture model. Topical MAO inhibitors significantly counteracted LPS-associated elevation of H(2)O(2) production and TNF-alpha expression in vivo and in vitro, inhibited disease-associated apical migration and proliferation of junctional epithelium and inhibited induced systemic H(2)O(2) levels and alveolar bone loss in vivo. These results suggest that LPS induces chronic wounds via elevated MAO/B-mediated increases in H(2)O(2) and TNF-alpha activity by epithelial cells and is further associated with more distant effects on systemic oxidative stress and alveolar bone loss. PMID:19779138

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Gingival Tissue and Alveolar Bone during Alveolar Bone Healing*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Young; Kwon, Joseph; Kook, Min-Suk; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun; Sohn, Sungoh; Jung, Seunggon; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue regeneration is orchestrated by the surrounding supporting tissues and involves the build-up of osteogenic cells, which orchestrate remodeling/healing through the expression of numerous mediators and signaling molecules. Periodontal regeneration models have proven useful for studying the interaction and communication between alveolar bone and supporting soft tissue. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare proteins with altered expression in gingival soft tissue and alveolar bone following tooth extraction. For target identification and validation, hard and soft tissue were extracted from mini-pigs at the indicated times after tooth extraction. From triplicate experiments, 56 proteins in soft tissue and 27 proteins in alveolar bone were found to be differentially expressed before and after tooth extraction. The expression of 21 of those proteins was altered in both soft tissue and bone. Comparison of the activated networks in soft tissue and alveolar bone highlighted their distinct responsibilities in bone and tissue healing. Moreover, we found that there is crosstalk between identified proteins in soft tissue and alveolar bone with respect to cellular assembly, organization, and communication. Among these proteins, we examined in detail the expression patterns and associated networks of ATP5B and fibronectin 1. ATP5B is involved in nucleic acid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, and neurological disease, and fibronectin 1 is involved in cellular assembly, organization, and maintenance. Collectively, our findings indicate that bone regeneration is accompanied by a profound interaction among networks regulating cellular resources, and they provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the healing of periodontal tissue after tooth extraction. PMID:23824910

  17. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Zambianchi, Marta; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-06-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit.Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in

  18. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line. PMID:20400167

  19. Immunological responses of swine to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Murtaugh, Michael P; Xiao, Zhengguo; Zuckermann, Federico

    2002-01-01

    The immunology of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRS) begins with an initial encounter of PRRSV with the pig. Regardless of the route of entry of PRRSV--via inhalation, intramuscular vaccination, insemination, or other routes--productive infection occurs predominately in alveolar macrophages of the lung. Thus, innate responses of the lung and the alveolar macrophage comprise the initial defense against PRRSV. The virus appears not to elicit innate interferon and cytokine responses characteristic of other strongly immunogenic viral pathogens, and its effects are consistent with induction of a weak adaptive immune response. Humoral and cell-mediated immunity is induced in due course, and results in clearance of virus from the circulation but not from lymphoid tissues, where the infection becomes persistent. Subsequent reexposure to PRRSV elicits an anamnestic response that is partially to completely protective. Within this unconventional picture of anti-PRRSV immunity lie a variety of unresolved issues, including the nature of protective immunity within individual pigs and among pigs in commercial populations, the efficacy of protective immunity against genetically different PRRSV isolates, the effects of developmental age, sex, genetics, and other host factors on the immune response to PRRSV, and the possible suppression of host immunity to other pathogens. PMID:12513925

  20. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation Lung Ablation: Preliminary Results in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Deodhar, Ajita; Monette, Sebastien; Single, Gordon W.; Hamilton, William C.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Maybody, Majid; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2011-12-15

    Objective: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses direct electrical pulses to create permanent 'pores' in cell membranes to cause cell death. In contrast to conventional modalities, IRE has a nonthermal mechanism of action. Our objective was to study the histopathological and imaging features of IRE in normal swine lung. Materials and Methods: Eleven female swine were studied for hyperacute (8 h), acute (24 h), subacute (96 h), and chronic (3 week) effects of IRE ablation in lung. Paired unipolar IRE applicators were placed under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Some applicators were deliberately positioned near bronchovascular structures. IRE pulse delivery was synchronized with the cardiac rhythm only when ablation was performed within 2 cm of the heart. Contrast-enhanced CT scan was performed immediately before and after IRE and at 1 and 3 weeks after IRE ablation. Representative tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Results: Twenty-five ablations were created: ten hyperacute, four acute, and three subacute ablations showed alveolar edema and necrosis with necrosis of bronchial, bronchiolar, and vascular epithelium. Bronchovascular architecture was maintained. Chronic ablations showed bronchiolitis obliterans and alveolar interstitial fibrosis. Immediate post-procedure CT images showed linear or patchy density along the applicator tract. At 1 week, there was consolidation that resolved partially or completely by 3 weeks. Pneumothorax requiring chest tube developed in two animals; no significant cardiac arrhythmias were noted. Conclusion: Our preliminary porcine study demonstrates the nonthermal and extracellular matrix sparing mechanism of action of IRE. IRE is a potential alternative to thermal ablative modalities.

  1. Alveolar Epithelial Dynamics in Post-pneumonectomy Lung Growth

    PubMed Central

    Chamoto, Kenji; Gibney, Barry C.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Lee, Grace S.; Konerding, Moritz A.; Tsuda, Akira; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    The intimate anatomic and functional relationship between epithelial cells and endothelial cells within the alveolus suggests the likelihood of a coordinated response during post-pneumonectomy lung growth. To define the population dynamics and potential contribution of alveolar epithelial cells to alveolar angiogenesis, we studied alveolar Type II and Type I cells during the 21 days after pneumonectomy. Alveolar Type II cells were defined and isolated by flow cytometry using a CD45−, MHC class II+, phosphine+ phenotype. These phenotypically defined alveolar Type II cells demonstrated an increase in cell number after pneumonectomy; the increase in cell number preceded the increase in Type I (T1α+) cells. Using a parabiotic wild type/GFP pneumonectomy model, less than 3% of the Type II cells and 1% of the Type I cells were positive for GFP—a finding consistent with the absence of a blood-borne contribution to alveolar epithelial cells. The CD45−, MHC class II+, phosphine+ Type II cells demonstrated the active transcription of angiogenesis-related genes both before and after pneumonectomy. When the Type II cells on day 7 after pneumonectomy were compared to non-surgical controls, 10 genes demonstrated significantly increased expression (p<.05). In contrast to the normal adult Type II cells, there was notable expression of inflammation-associated genes (Ccl2, Cxcl2, Ifng) as well as genes associated with epithelial growth (Ereg, Lep). Together, the data suggest an active contribution of local alveolar Type II cells to alveolar growth. PMID:23408540

  2. Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage associated with aerosol propellant use

    PubMed Central

    Kelchen, Phillip; Jamous, Fady; Huntington, Mark K

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage (DAH) is a clinical syndrome resulting from injury to the alveolar microcirculation, most commonly associated with not only autoimmune disorders or connective tissue disease, but also a variety of infections, neoplasms and toxins. We report here a case of an otherwise healthy young man with DAH attributable to an inhalation injury resulting from use of aerosol spray paint. PMID:23955981

  3. Correction of alveolar cleft with calcium-based bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Spiros A; Contodimos, George B; Gkegkes, Ioannis D

    2011-05-01

    The criterion standard of alveolar cleft repair is iliac crest bone graft before secondary canine eruption. Tooth eruption has never been shown to occur in synthetic bone substitute, and there is no ideal autologous bone graft for primary repair. This prospective study evaluated alveolar cleft grafting with a calcium substitute before primary canine eruption. Ten consecutive patients with complete cleft lip, palate, and unilateral alveolar cleft with reasonably aligned arches were grafted beginning in January 2003 to March 2007. Mean age at surgery was 10.4 months. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 7 years. Radiologic evaluation of alveolar ridge was performed at the age of 4.All 10 patients were operated on by the same surgeon using the same technique, that is, conservative elevation of nasal, oral, and anterior alveolar mucosal flaps around the cleft, closure of nasal and oral flaps, placement of 1 to 3 mL of calcium substitute paste or crystals in the pocket, and closure of the anterior alveolar mucosa. All 10 patients healed without complication. Clinical evaluation revealed a well-healed arch with primary canine growth in the area of the previous cleft. Adequate normal bone formation and often a descending secondary canine were radiologically confirmed. Calcium substitutes offer significant advantages over other biomaterials as well as autologous bone grafts particularly in the primary alveolar cleft reconstruction. Our study has shown for the first time that teeth can erupt through this material, which turns into a normal functioning bone in the alveolar ridge. PMID:21558929

  4. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  5. Unexplained alveolar hemorrhage associated with Ginkgo and ginseng use.

    PubMed

    Carlile, Paul V

    2015-04-01

    The author presents a case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a woman consuming Ginkgo biloba extract and ginseng. The patient had no illnesses or exposures that would predispose to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, and an extensive evaluation revealed no etiology. The patient has had no further bleeding since discontinuing Ginkgo biloba extract and ginseng 1 year ago. PMID:25887018

  6. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Possesses an Antiviral Activity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A.; Gagnon, Carl A.; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools. PMID:24878741

  7. Analysis of the binding sites of porcine sialoadhesin receptor with PRRSV.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yibo; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Pandupuspitasari, Nuruliarizki Shinta; Kadariya, Ishwari; Cheng, Zhangrui; Ren, Yuwei; Chen, Xing; Zhou, Ao; Yang, Liguo; Kong, Dexin; Zhang, Shujun

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) can infect pigs and cause enormous economic losses to the pig industry worldwide. Porcine sialoadhesin (pSN) and CD163 have been identified as key viral receptors on porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM), a main target cell infected by PRRSV. In this study, the protein structures of amino acids 1-119 from the pSN and cSN (cattle sialoadhesin) N-termini (excluding the 19-amino acid signal peptide) were modeled via homology modeling based on mSN (mouse sialoadhesin) template structures using bioinformatics tools. Subsequently, pSN and cSN homology structures were superposed onto the mSN protein structure to predict the binding sites of pSN. As a validation experiment, the SN N-terminus (including the wild-type and site-directed-mutant-types of pSN and cSN) was cloned and expressed as a SN-GFP chimera protein. The binding activity between SN and PRRSV was confirmed by WB (Western blotting), FAR-WB (far Western blotting), ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and immunofluorescence assay. We found that the S107 amino acid residue in the pSN N-terminal played a crucial role in forming a special cavity, as well as a hydrogen bond for enhancing PRRSV binding during PRRSV infection. S107 may be glycosylated during PRRSV infection and may also be involved in forming the cavity for binding PRRSV along with other sites, including W2, Y44, S45, R97, R105, W106 and V109. Additionally, S107 might also be important for pSN binding with PRRSV. However, the function of these binding sites must be confirmed by further studies. PMID:24351868

  8. Analysis of the Binding Sites of Porcine Sialoadhesin Receptor with PRRSV

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yibo; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Pandupuspitasari, Nuruliarizki Shinta; Kadariya, Ishwari; Cheng, Zhangrui; Ren, Yuwei; Chen, Xing; Zhou, Ao; Yang, Liguo; Kong, Dexin; Zhang, Shujun

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) can infect pigs and cause enormous economic losses to the pig industry worldwide. Porcine sialoadhesin (pSN) and CD163 have been identified as key viral receptors on porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM), a main target cell infected by PRRSV. In this study, the protein structures of amino acids 1–119 from the pSN and cSN (cattle sialoadhesin) N-termini (excluding the 19-amino acid signal peptide) were modeled via homology modeling based on mSN (mouse sialoadhesin) template structures using bioinformatics tools. Subsequently, pSN and cSN homology structures were superposed onto the mSN protein structure to predict the binding sites of pSN. As a validation experiment, the SN N-terminus (including the wild-type and site-directed-mutant-types of pSN and cSN) was cloned and expressed as a SN-GFP chimera protein. The binding activity between SN and PRRSV was confirmed by WB (Western blotting), FAR-WB (far Western blotting), ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and immunofluorescence assay. We found that the S107 amino acid residue in the pSN N-terminal played a crucial role in forming a special cavity, as well as a hydrogen bond for enhancing PRRSV binding during PRRSV infection. S107 may be glycosylated during PRRSV infection and may also be involved in forming the cavity for binding PRRSV along with other sites, including W2, Y44, S45, R97, R105, W106 and V109. Additionally, S107 might also be important for pSN binding with PRRSV. However, the function of these binding sites must be confirmed by further studies. PMID:24351868

  9. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Sowmya; Jeong, Daniel K; Muddaraju, Manjunath; Jeong, Katherine; Hill, Ebone D; Greene, John N

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potentially fatal pulmonary disease syndrome that affects individuals with hematological and nonhematological malignancies. The range of inciting factors is wide for this syndrome and includes thrombocytopenia, underlying infection, coagulopathy, and the frequent use of anticoagulants, given the high incidence of venous thrombosis in this population. Dyspnea, fever, and cough are commonly presenting symptoms. However, clinical manifestations can be variable. Obvious bleeding (hemoptysis) is not always present and can pose a potential diagnostic challenge. Without prompt treatment, hypoxia that rapidly progresses to respiratory failure can occur. Diagnosis is primarily based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. This syndrome is especially common in patients with hematological malignancies, given an even greater propensity for thrombocytopenia as a result of bone marrow suppression as well as the often prolonged immunosuppression in this patient population. The syndrome also has an increased incidence in individuals with hematological malignancies who have received a bone marrow transplant. We present a case series of 5 patients with acute myeloid leukemia presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage at our institution. A comparison of clinical manifestations, radiographic findings, treatment course, and outcomes are described. A review of the literature and general overview of the diagnostic evaluation, differential diagnoses, pathophysiology, and treatment of this syndrome are discussed. PMID:27556667

  10. Biology of alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the many metabolic properties of alveolar type II cells, their production of surfactant, their role in innate immunity, and their importance in the repair process after lung injury. The review is based on the medical literature and results from our laboratory. Type II cells produce and secrete pulmonary surfactant and for that purpose they need to synthesize the lipids of surfactant. One of the regulators of lipogenesis is the transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). This is a key transcription factor regulating fatty acid synthesis. Type II cells also proliferate to restore the epithelium after lung injury, clear alveolar fluid by transporting sodium from the apical to the basolateral surface, and participate in the innate immune response to inhaled materials and organisms. The type II cell is, in many ways, the defender of the alveolus. However, the type II cells work in concert with the other cells in the gas exchange regions of the lung to keep the alveoli open and reduce inflammation due to irritants in the air we breathe. PMID:16423262

  11. Effects of immunopotentiating agents on alveolar macrophage properties.

    PubMed

    Charley, B

    1986-01-01

    Infectious respiratory diseases in man and in domestic animals are characterized by the presence of a large number of different microorganisms: viruses, bacterias, mycoplasmas. It is therefore necessary to stimulate non-specific defense mechanisms in the lung and especially alveolar macrophages (AM). These cells, located in the alveolar air-spaces, play a major role in the lung clearance mechanisms and exert antibacterial, antiviral and antitumoral activities. Activation of alveolar macrophages was studied in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lymphokines or mycobacterial derivatives (MDP). Rodent alveolar macrophages were rendered cytotoxic by in vitro exposure to LPS, free MDP or liposome-encapsulated MDP derivatives. In vivo, intravenously administered liposomes containing lipophilic MDP derivatives induced cytotoxic alveolar macrophages and protected mice against the development of pulmonary metastases. PMID:3539492

  12. Relative effects of asbestos and wollastonite on alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Pailes, W.H.; Judy, D.J.; Resnick, H.; Castranova, V.

    1984-01-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages were exposed in culture to chrysotile asbestos, wollastonite, or latex, and the effects on various biochemical and physiological parameters related to cellular viability and fibrogenicity were determined. Exposure of alveolar macrophages to asbestos, wollastonite, or latex for 3 d has no effect on oxygen consumption or cellular volume. However, treatment of alveolar macrophages with as little as 25 ..mu..g asbestos/ml for 1 d increases lysosomal enzyme release and decreases membrane integrity, i.e., decreases trypan blue exclusion and increases leakage of cytosolic enzymes. In contrast, exposure of alveolar macrophages to wollastonite or latex at 250 ..mu..g/ml does not induce lysosomal enzyme release or alter membrane integrity even after 3 d of exposure in culture. These data suggest that chrysotile asbestos damages rabbit alveolar macrophages, while wollastonite, a potential substitute for asbestos, is far less cyctotoxic. 35 references, 8 figures.

  13. Development of a Consistent and Reproducible Porcine Scald Burn Model.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Christine J; Kempf, Margit; Kimble, Roy; Cuttle, Leila

    2016-01-01

    There are very few porcine burn models that replicate scald injuries similar to those encountered by children. We have developed a robust porcine burn model capable of creating reproducible scald burns for a wide range of burn conditions. The study was conducted with juvenile Large White pigs, creating replicates of burn combinations; 50°C for 1, 2, 5 and 10 minutes and 60°C, 70°C, 80°C and 90°C for 5 seconds. Visual wound examination, biopsies and Laser Doppler Imaging were performed at 1, 24 hours and at 3 and 7 days post-burn. A consistent water temperature was maintained within the scald device for long durations (49.8 ± 0.1°C when set at 50°C). The macroscopic and histologic appearance was consistent between replicates of burn conditions. For 50°C water, 10 minute duration burns showed significantly deeper tissue injury than all shorter durations at 24 hours post-burn (p ≤ 0.0001), with damage seen to increase until day 3 post-burn. For 5 second duration burns, by day 7 post-burn the 80°C and 90°C scalds had damage detected significantly deeper in the tissue than the 70°C scalds (p ≤ 0.001). A reliable and safe model of porcine scald burn injury has been successfully developed. The novel apparatus with continually refreshed water improves consistency of scald creation for long exposure times. This model allows the pathophysiology of scald burn wound creation and progression to be examined. PMID:27612153

  14. Phenotypic modulation and cytokine profiles of antigen presenting cells by European subtype 1 and 3 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strains in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert; Popma-De Graaf, Ditta J; Fijten, Helmi; Rebel, Johanna M J

    2013-12-27

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes continuous problems in the pig industry, due to high costs of outbreaks and reduced welfare of diseased pigs. The severity of infection is, partly, dependent on the virus strain. Recently isolated Eastern-European subtype 3 strains are more pathogenic than the widespread subtype 1 strains. There is, however, almost no information available about the mechanisms involved in the pathogenicity of these subtype 3 strains. The objective of the present study was to characterize the in vitro and in vivo response of two European subtype 1 strains, Belgium A and Lelystad-Ter Huurne (LV), and a virulent subtype 3 strain, Lena, in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DC) (in vitro) and alveolar macrophages (in vitro and in vivo). It was shown that infection with the Lena strain resulted in a higher apoptosis of cells in vitro and a higher level of infectivity in vitro and in vivo than the other virus strains. Furthermore, infection with Lena resulted in a small downregulation of the immunologically relevant cell surface molecules SLA-I, SLA-II and CD80/86 in vitro, and SLA-II in vivo. In spite of these differences, in vitro cytokine responses did not differ significantly between strains, except for the absence of IL-10 production by Lena in BM-DC. The higher infectivity, apoptosis and downregulation of the cell surface molecules, may have contributed to the increased pathogenicity of Lena, and have dampened specific immune responses. This could explain the delayed and decreased adaptive immune responses observed after infections with this strain. PMID:24120935

  15. Lentiviral vector gene transfer to porcine airways.

    PubMed

    Sinn, Patrick L; Cooney, Ashley L; Oakland, Mayumi; Dylla, Douglas E; Wallen, Tanner J; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Chang, Eugene H; McCray, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated lentiviral vector development and transduction efficiencies in well-differentiated primary cultures of pig airway epithelia (PAE) and wild-type pigs in vivo. We noted gene transfer efficiencies similar to that observed for human airway epithelia (HAE). Interestingly, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based vectors transduced immortalized pig cells as well as pig primary cells more efficiently than HIV-1-based vectors. PAE express TRIM5α, a well-characterized species-specific lentiviral restriction factor. We contrasted the restrictive properties of porcine TRIM5α against FIV- and HIV-based vectors using gain and loss of function approaches. We observed no effect on HIV-1 or FIV conferred transgene expression in response to porcine TRIM5α overexpression or knockdown. To evaluate the ability of GP64-FIV to transduce porcine airways in vivo, we delivered vector expressing mCherry to the tracheal lobe of the lung and the ethmoid sinus of 4-week-old pigs. One week later, epithelial cells expressing mCherry were readily detected. Our findings indicate that pseudotyped FIV vectors confer similar tropisms in porcine epithelia as observed in human HAE and provide further support for the selection of GP64 as an appropriate envelope pseudotype for future preclinical gene therapy studies in the porcine model of cystic fibrosis (CF).Molecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids (2012) 1, e56; doi:10.1038/mtna.2012.47; published online 27 November 2012. PMID:23187455

  16. Restriction of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus by Porcine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dörrschuck, Eva; Fischer, Nicole; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Kuiper, Heidi; Spötter, Andreas; Möller, Ronny; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2011-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine cells, tissues, and organs shows promise to surmount the shortage of human donor materials. Among the barriers to pig-to-human xenotransplantation are porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) since functional representatives of the two polytropic classes, PERV-A and PERV-B, are able to infect human embryonic kidney cells in vitro, suggesting that a xenozoonosis in vivo could occur. To assess the capacity of human and porcine cells to counteract PERV infections, we analyzed human and porcine APOBEC3 (A3) proteins. This multigene family of cytidine deaminases contributes to the cellular intrinsic immunity and act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. Our data show that the porcine A3 gene locus on chromosome 5 consists of the two single-domain genes A3Z2 and A3Z3. The evolutionary relationships of the A3Z3 genes reflect the evolutionary history of mammals. The two A3 genes encode at least four different mRNAs: A3Z2, A3Z3, A3Z2-Z3, and A3Z2-Z3 splice variant A (SVA). Porcine and human A3s have been tested toward their antiretroviral activity against PERV and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) using novel single-round reporter viruses. The porcine A3Z2, A3Z3 and A3Z2-Z3 were packaged into PERV particles and inhibited PERV replication in a dose-dependent manner. The antiretroviral effect correlated with editing by the porcine A3s with a trinucleotide preference for 5′ TGC for A3Z2 and A3Z2-Z3 and 5′ CAC for A3Z3. These results strongly imply that human and porcine A3s could inhibit PERV replication in vivo, thereby reducing the risk of infection of human cells by PERV in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:21307203

  17. Alveolar Ridge Contouring with Free Connective Tissue Graft at Implant Placement: A 5-Year Consecutive Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Hanser, Thomas; Khoury, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated volume stability after alveolar ridge contouring with free connective tissue grafts at implant placement in single-tooth gaps. A total of 52 single-tooth gaps with labial volume deficiencies in the maxilla (incisors, canines, and premolars) were consecutively treated with implants and concomitant free palatal connective tissue grafts in 46 patients between 2006 and 2009. Implants had to be covered with at least 2 mm peri-implant local bone after insertion. At implant placement, a free connective tissue graft from the palate was fixed inside a labial split-thickness flap to form an existing concave buccal alveolar ridge contour due to tissue volume deficiency into a convex shape. Standardized volumetric measurements of the labial alveolar contour using a template were evaluated before connective tissue grafting and at 2 weeks, 1 year, and 5 years after implantprosthetic incorporation. Tissue volume had increased significantly (P < .05) in all six reference points representing the outer alveolar soft tissue contour of the implant before connective tissue grafting to baseline (2 weeks after implant-prosthetic incorporation). Statistically, 50% of the reference points (P > .05) kept their volume from baseline to 1 year after prosthetic incorporation and from baseline to 5 years after prosthetic incorporation, respectively, whereas reference points located within the area of the implant sulcus showed a significant (P < .05) decrease in volume. Clinically, 5 years after prosthetic incorporation the originally concave buccal alveolar contour was still convex in all implants, leading to a continuous favorable anatomical shape and improved esthetic situation. Intraoral radiographs confirmed osseointegration and stable peri-implant parameters with a survival rate of 100% after a follow-up of approximately 5 years. Implant placement with concomitant free connective tissue grafting appears to be an appropriate long-term means to contour preexisting buccal

  18. Swine alveolar macrophage cell model allows optimal replication of influenza A viruses regardless of their origin.

    PubMed

    Kasloff, Samantha B; Weingartl, Hana M

    2016-03-01

    The importance of pigs in interspecies transmission of influenza A viruses has been repeatedly demonstrated over the last century. Eleven influenza A viruses from avian, human and swine hosts were evaluated for replication phenotypes at three physiologically relevant temperatures (41°C, 37°C, 33°C) in an immortalized swine pulmonary alveolar macrophage cell line (IPAM 3D4/31) to determine whether this system would allow for their efficient replication. All isolates replicated well in IPAMs at 37°C while clear distinctions were observed at 41°C and 33°C, correlating to species of origin of the PB2, reflected in distinct amino acid residue profiles rather than in one particular PB2 residue. A strong TNF-α response was induced by some mammalian but not avian IAVs, while other selected cytokines remained below detection levels. Porcine IPAMs represent a natural host cell model for influenza virus replication where the only condition requiring modification for optimal IAV replication, regardless of virus origin. PMID:26855331

  19. EFFECTS OF PAMIDRONATE ON HUMAN ALVEOLAR OSTEOBLASTS IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Marolt, Darja; Cozin, Matthew; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Cremers, Serge; Landesberg, Regina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Administration of bisphosphonates has recently been associated with the development of osteonecrotic lesions of the jaw (ONJ). To elucidate the potential contributions of osteogenic cells to the development and regeneration of ONJ, we have isolated primary cells from human alveolar and long/iliac bones, and examined the effects of pamidronate on cell viability, proliferation, osteogenesis and wound healing. Materials and Methods Primary human osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells were isolated from alveolar and iliac/long bone and marrow tissue. Cellular proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, apoptosis (TUNEL, Caspase-3, and DAPI assays) and wound healing in an in vitro scratch assay were assessed after exposure to pamidronate at a range of clinically relevant doses. Results Primary alveolar osteoblasts proliferated at significantly higher rates than long/iliac bone osteoblasts in vitro. Upon exposure of alveolar osteoblasts and long/iliac bone marrow stromal cells to pamidronate for more than 72h, we have observed significantly decreased cell viability, proliferation, osteogenesis and in vitro wound healing at ≥6 × 10−5 M pamidronate, with the induction of apoptosis in ~20% of cell population. Conclusions The remodeling activity of alveolar bone, indicated by higher proliferation of alveolar osteoblasts, could be negatively affected by exposure to high concentrations of pamidronate over extended periods of time. The absence of anabolic effects of pamidronate on alveolar osteoblasts, and induction of apoptosis in osteogenic cells could negatively affect bone balance at this site, and contribute to osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:21856057

  20. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  1. Modern therapy for severe alveolar ridge atrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Feng; Pan, Chin-Yun; Wang, Wen-Chen; Lan, Ting-Hsun

    2013-01-01

    This clinical report illustrates a modern method for oral rehabilitation of severe edentulous atrophic ridge. Shallow vestibule and small denture-bearing area of the maxilla provide insufficient retention, and only the symphyseal region of the mandible has obvious alveolar ridge. The surgery of deepening vestibule of the maxilla ridge was done by using tentative miniscrew combined with old denture and soft liner. The osseointegrated dental implants were installed over symphyseal region of the mandible to act as retentive devices for prostheses. In addition, functional reline with rebase material to build buccal-tongue contact over the retromolar area after denture delivery obtained high satisfaction from the patient. Many clinical conditions cannot be managed solely with implants or preprosthetic surgery alone, whereas a combination of the 2 can achieve successful outcome. PMID:24036818

  2. Epidemiology of human alveolar echinococcosis in China.

    PubMed

    Craig, Philip S

    2006-01-01

    Globally human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a rare zoonotic helminthic disease confined to the Northern Hemisphere as sporadic infections in rural populations, principally in some areas of North America, west-central Europe, the Near East, Siberia, Central Asia, Japan and China. In China the first human cases were reported from western regions in the 1960s, but most hospital records remain fragmented and inadequate. From the mid-1990s mass screening surveys using portable ultrasound scanners recorded higher prevalences (up to 6% by county) than in any other areas of the world with some village rates as high as 15%. Risk factors identified for AE cases included ethnicity, sex, age and occupation. The role of the dog in transmission of Echinococcus multilocularis to humans now appears to be significant and may be one of the most important risk factor, in combination with landscape/land-use features conducive to maintaining wildlife host populations. PMID:16338167

  3. Diffuse alveolar damage associated with pulmonary thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Atsuhiko; Koga, Takaomi; Hidaka, Kouko

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to other internal organs, pulmonary arterial hypoperfusion does not always show ischemic changes in the lung parenchyma. Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE)-related lung injury is extremely rare except in the case of pulmonary infarctions, in which PTE occasionally causes necrosis of the parenchyma. We describe the case of an 86-year-old woman who presented with respiratory failure and bilateral ground-glass opacity predominantly the upper lobes. Autopsy revealed a saddle-shaped old organized thrombi in the main pulmonary artery, relatively fresh thrombi in both pulmonary arteries, and localized diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) in the bilateral upper lung fields. The hypoperfused regions resulting from the thromboembolism anatomically coincided with the pulmonary lesion where DAD was identified. Although PTE is not regarded as a causal factor of DAD, it might induce DAD as a result of hypoperfusion in limited cases. PMID:26029610

  4. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  5. Secondary alveolar bone grafting in cleft of the lip and palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Abhilashaa

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to restore the function and form of both arches with a proper occlusal relationship and eruption of tooth in the cleft area. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients were selected irrespective of sex and socio-economic status and whose age was within the mixed dentition period. Iliac crest is grafted in cleft area and subsequently evaluated for graft success using study models, and periapical and occlusal radiographs. Results: At the time of evaluation teeth were erupted in the area and good alveolar bone levels were present. Premaxilla becomes immobile with a good arch form and arch continuity. There are no major complications in terms of pain, infection, paraesthesia, hematoma formation at donor site without difficulty in walking. There is no complication in terms of pain, infection, exposure of graft, rejection of graft, and wound dehiscence at the recipient site. Discussion: It is evident that secondary alveolar grafting during the mixed dentition period is more beneficial for patients at the donor site as well as the recipient site. Conclusion: Long-term follow-up is required to achieve maximum advantage of secondary alveolar grafting; the age of the patient should be within the mixed dentition period, irrespective of sex, socio-economic status. It may be unilateral or bilateral. PMID:22090755

  6. Alveolar-cell carcinoma: a problem in sputum cytodiagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spriggs, A I; Cole, M; Dunnill, M S

    1982-01-01

    Cytology and histology are correlated in a series of 22 cases chosen to illustrate the differential diagnosis between clusters of benign bronchial or bronchiolar cells seen in sputum, and those of alveolar cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma with alveolar spread. Alveolar-cell carcinoma is characterised by clusters of small epithelial cells in spherical or irregular formations, none showing enough polarity to distinguish a smooth or palisaded surface. The appearances are most distinctive if vacuolation is absent. The diagnosis cannot, however, be confidently made in all cases from morphological features of cells in sputum. Images PMID:6294147

  7. Crazy paving radiography finding in asymptomatic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Rak; Chang, You-Jin; Kim, Si Wook; Choe, Kang Hyeon; Lee, Ki Man; An, Jin-Young

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare disorder characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant phospholipids and protein components. The symptoms and prognosis are extremely variable. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and/or transbronchial lung biopsy are useful for diagnosis; surgical lung biopsy is often unnecessary but useful in the focal involvement. We report a case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in a 50-year-old woman, confirmed by a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery biopsy from the initial focal involvement, with normal bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial lung biopsy findings. PMID:25182335

  8. Desquamative alveolar disease (desquamative interstitial pneumonia): case report 1

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Edgardo; Rodriguez, Jaime; Lisboa, Carmen; Ferretti, Ricardo

    1969-01-01

    Desquamative interstitial pneumonia is a disease characterized by massive alveolar cell proliferation and desquamation with sparse interstitial involvement. The reported case shows an unusually widespread radiographic reticulo-nodular image and abundant alveolar cells in the sputum. Functional studies reveal the expected diffusion defect with practically normal mechanical properties of the lung, in contrast with interstitial fibrosing lung diseases. On the basis of the pathological findings, especially the behaviour of alveolar cells, the individuality of this disease is discussed. We think that it is different from other diseases classed as varieties of a single disease or as different entities under the names of primary interstitial fibrosis or chronic fibrosing alveolitis. Images PMID:5822250

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF PORCINE PARVOVIRUS TYPE 3 AND PORCINE CIRCOVIRUS TYPE 2 IN WILD BOARS (SUS SCROFA) IN SLOVAKIA.

    PubMed

    Sliz, Ivan; Vlasakova, Michaela; Jackova, Anna; Vilcek, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    As the number of free-living wild boars (Sus scrofa L.) continues to rise in Slovakia, the probability of pathogen transmission between susceptible species increases. We investigated the distribution and genetic characterization of porcine parvovirus type 3 (PPV3), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), and their coinfection in wild boars. Among 194 animals tested, 19.1% were positive for PPV3 and 43.8% for PCV2. Similar rates of coinfection with both viruses reaching 11.0% and 11.8% were observed in juvenile and mature wild boars, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of PPV3 sequences from VP1 and NS1 genomic regions revealed a close genetic relationship among isolates from Slovakia and those sampled worldwide. Prevalence of PCV2 in wild boars was lower than that reported in domestic pigs in Slovakia. The PCV2 variants originating from sylvatic and domestic hosts in Slovakia were grouped in the same clusters, namely PCV2b-1A/1B and PCV2a-2D. PMID:25973618

  10. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus modifies innate immunity and alters disease outcome in pigs subsequently infected with porcine respiratory coronavirus: implications for respiratory viral co-infections.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Alekseev, Konstantin P; Fang, Ying; Tang, Yuxin; Saif, Linda J

    2009-11-01

    The innate immune response is critical for host defence against respiratory coronaviruses (CoVs). This study demonstrated that an ongoing respiratory virus infection compromises innate immune responses and affects the pathogenesis of a respiratory CoV co-infection. An innate immunosuppressive respiratory virus infection was established by infecting weaned pigs with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV); 10 days later, the pigs were exposed to porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV). The PRRSV/PRCV dual-infected pigs had reduced weight gains, a higher incidence of fever and more severe pneumonia compared with either single infection. Significant suppression of innate immune responses [reduced alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) levels in the lungs and reduced blood natural killer cell cytotoxicity] by the ongoing PRRSV infection was observed in dual-infected pigs, which coincided with exacerbated pneumonia during early PRCV infection. The subsequent PRCV infection led to enhanced PRRSV replication in the lungs and a trend towards increased serum T-helper type 1 (Th1) (IFN-gamma) but decreased Th2 [interleukin (IL)-4] responses, further exacerbating PRRSV pneumonia. Following PRCV infection, more severe PRRSV-related pulmonary alveolar macrophage (PAM) apoptosis occurred, as determined by an in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling assay, suggesting increased PRRSV replication in PAMs. Collectively, these observations suggest interactive effects between PRCV and PRRSV via early innate (IFN-alpha) and later adaptive Th1 (IFN-gamma) and Th2 (IL-4) immune responses. These findings imply that an existing immunomodulating respiratory viral co-infection may be a contributing factor to more severe pneumonia in respiratory CoV disease. This study provides new insights into host-pathogen interactions related to co-infection by CoVs and other respiratory viruses. PMID:19656969

  11. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus field isolates differ in in vitro interferon phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Myeong; Schommer, Susan K; Kleiboeker, Steven B

    2004-12-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-alpha and -beta) play an important role in the innate host defense against viral infection by inducing antiviral responses. In addition to direct antiviral activities, type I IFN serves as an important link between the innate and adaptive immune response through multiple mechanisms. Therefore, the outcome of a viral infection can be affected by IFN induction and the IFN sensitivity of a virus. North American porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) field isolates were studied with regard to IFN-alpha sensitivity and induction in order to understand the role of type I IFN in PRRSV pathogenesis. PRRSV isolates were differentially sensitive to porcine recombinant IFN-alpha (rIFN-alpha) and varied in their ability to induce IFN-alpha in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) cultures as measured by a porcine IFN-alpha specific ELISA on cell culture supernatants. Fifty-two plaques were purified from three PRRSV isolates (numbers 3, 7, and 12) and tested for IFN sensitivity and IFN induction. Plaque-derived populations were composed of heterogeneous populations in terms of IFN-inducing capacity and sensitivity to rIFN-alpha. When macrophages infected with isolates 3, 7, or 12 were treated with polycytidylic acid (polyI:C), IFN-alpha production was enhanced. Cells infected with isolate 3 and treated with polyI:C showed the most consistent and strongest enhancement of IFN-alpha production. It was demonstrated that the relatively low concentrations of IFN-alpha produced by isolate 3 contributed to the enhanced IFN-alpha synthesis in response to polyI:C. Isolates 7 and 12 significantly suppressed the enhanced IFN-alpha production by isolate 3 in polyI:C treated cells. To determine if suppression was at the level of IFN-alpha transcription, quantitative RT-PCR was performed for IFN-alpha mRNA and compared to GAPDH and cyclophilin mRNA quantification. However, the relative number of IFN-alpha transcript copies did not correlate with IFN

  12. Behavior of submicrometer particles in periodic alveolar airflows.

    PubMed

    Balik, G; Reis, A H; Aydin, M; Miguel, A F

    2008-04-01

    Here, we report a numerical experiment in which submicrometer particle entrainment in a periodic flow that matches those existing in the alveolus in the human lung was simulated for both sedentary and light activity. A spherical cavity with a prescribed velocity profile at the inlet was used to simulate the time-dependent periodical flow of air in the alveolus. Expansion and contraction of the alveolus were simulated by setting a conceptual permeable wall as the outer surface of the model and adjusting the boundary conditions in order to match the continuity of the flow. The simulations were conducted for breathing periods of 5 and 3 s, which match sedentary and light activity conditions, respectively, and the results were extrapolated to the real lung. It was found that, most of the particles mainly followed a straightforward path and reached the opposite side of the alveolar wall in both breathing conditions. The concentration patterns obtained are consistent with the fact that the flow within the alveolus is mainly diffusive and does not greatly depend on the flow velocity. It was found that the particles which are heavier than air move out of phase with the periodic airflow that crosses the alveolus entrance, and that these particles are significantly caught within the alveolus. Particle entrapment increases with breathing rate in accordance with experimental values and indicates that increase in breathing frequency in environments with high concentration of submicrometer particles has the consequence of increasing particle entrapment by several times with respect to normal breathing rate. PMID:18075755

  13. The localization of catalase in the pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Davies, P; Drath, D B; Engel, E E; Huber, G L

    1979-02-01

    A combined biochemical and cytochemical study of catalase was performed on alveolar macrophages lavaged from the lungs of adult male rats. Biochemically, catalase activity was present in both a high-speed granule fraction and in the supernatant. The granule-associated activity exhibited latency. Two methods of cell breakage, sonication and homogenization, yielded similar levels and distributions of catalase activity. Catalase activity in whole cells was identified cytochemically by the alkaline diaminobenzidine method and was localized within membrane-lined cytoplasmic granules similar in size to microperoxisomes and associated with cisternae of smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Localization of the reaction product was inhibited by 0.04 M aminotriazole, by cyanide, and by boiling prior to incubation. The cytochemical reaction continued in the absence of exogenous peroxide, but could be prevented by addition of catalase or pyruvate to the peroxide-free medium. Enzyme activity was also localized within a portion of the membrane-bound granules present in the cell fractions used for the biochemical assays. PMID:431040

  14. Hygienic aspects of porcine gullets.

    PubMed

    Bijker, P G; Mossel, D A; van Logtestijn, J G

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to elaborate good manufacturing practices, including the collection, processing and storage of porcine gullets, their bacterial condition immediately after collection (100 samples), as well as that of deep frozen gullets just before incorporation into meat products (40 samples), was assessed. Fresh gullets were found to be contaminated to a high degree: poured plate colony count at 30°C (PPCC) approximately 10(6) to 10(7) and Enterobacteriaceae approximately 10(3) to 10(4) cfu g(-1). Deep frozen gullets showed even higher counts: PPCC approximately 10(7) to 10(8) and Enterobacteriaceae approximately 10(4) to 10(5) cfu g(-1). Hygiene during collection was visually assessed in six abattoirs and found to be satisfactory in two, moderate in three and poor in one. The effects of processing, by cleaning or removal of the mucus membrane, on bacterial condition, pH, colour and odour were assessed before and during storage at 4°C and 20°C. Both cleaning and removal of the mucus membrane resulted in up to approximately a tenfold reduction of colony counts. After 7 days' storage at 4°C these were significantly lower than those of unprocessed gullets (P < 0·01). Processed gullets stored at 4°C were no longer fit for consumption after 4 days' storage. It being impossible to achieve a marked improvement in the bacteriological condition of gullets, the incorporation of these products into sausages should be discouraged and their use in petfoods only allowed under reasonable conditions of hygiene and chilling. PMID:22055164

  15. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis as a tool to determine batch similarity of probiotic cultures of porcine cecal bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A reconstituted porcine-derived continuous-flow (RPCF) culture of gastrointestinal bacteria effective against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in weanling pigs has been maintained for several years and used as a parent culture from which to derive additional RPCF cultures. The integrity and health ...

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Genetically Distinct Variants of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus in the Eastern Region of Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Cheun-Arom, Thaniwan; Temeeyasen, Gun; Srijangwad, Anchalee; Tripipat, Thitima; Sangmalee, Suphattra; Vui, Dam Thi; Chuanasa, Taksina; Tantituvanont, Angkana

    2015-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has continued to cause sporadic outbreaks in Thailand since 2007. Previously, PEDV in Thailand was a new variant containing an insertion and deletion in the spike gene. Herein, full-length genome sequences are reported for two variants of PEDV isolates from pigs displaying diarrhea in Thailand. PMID:26112783

  17. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis: A Rare Cause of Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Munir, Zeeshan; Khosa, Muhammad Zeeshan; Qazi, Muhammad Yaqoob

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) is a rare syndrome in the paediatric age group and characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of proteinaceous phospholipid-laden material called surfactant. The diagnosis is made by High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) chest which shows characteristic crazy paving appearance and diagnosis confirmed by Bronchoalveolar Lavage (BAL). We report two cases. First was a 9-month old infant who presented with respiratory distress and peripheral cyanosis since birth. He was diagnosed on High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) chest as a case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and broncho-alveolar lavage confirmed his diagnosis. Second case was a 10-year old female child who had a history of repeated chest infections for 5 years and now presented with cough and respiratory distress for 45 days. She was also diagnosed on HRCT chest but unfortunately she died before bronchoalveolar lavage. PMID:26208564

  18. Cytotoxic effect of uranium dioxide on rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Tasat, D.R.; de Rey, B.M.

    1987-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchial lavage were used to assess the response of these cells to cultivation in media containing increasing concentrations of particulate UO/sub 2/. The characteristic time course of uranium effects on alveolar macrophages was determined by analyzing cell viability and incorporation of uranium particles. This study reveals the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize uranium particles despite the high toxicity the metal exerts on cell membranes. However, lethal effects soon become evident. Ultrastructural analysis showed uranium particles confined within membrane bound vacuoles or free in the cytoplasm. Marked ultrastructural alterations consistent with cell death were frequently observed. The elimination of the first biological barrier hinders the scavenging of particulate contaminants in alveolar spaces, thus favoring the translocation to target organs.

  19. Primary Cerebral Alveolar Echinococcosis: Mycology to the Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Goehringer, François; Umhang, Gérald; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Hénard, Sandrine; Boué, Franck; May, Thierry; Machouart, Marie

    2014-01-01

    A case of primary cerebral alveolar echinococcosis with a favorable outcome is reported. A universal fungal PCR enabled this diagnosis, while the initial serological analysis remained noncontributive. PMID:24478516

  20. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER DECREASED IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGE CYTOKINE RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient airborne particulate matter (PM) is associated with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including increased hospitalizations for lung infection. Normal lung immune responses to bacterial infection include alveolar macrophage cytokine production and...

  1. Lung epithelial cells modulate the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rubovitch, Vardit; Gershnabel, Shoham; Kalina, Moshe

    2007-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effect of alveolar epithelial cells on inflammatory responses in macrophages. Lung epithelial cells (either rat RLE-6TN or human A549 cells) reduced LPS-induced NO production in alveolar macrophages (AM) in a contact-independent mechanism. The inhibitory effect of the epithelial cells was present already at the transcriptional level: LPS-induced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression was significantly smaller. Surfactant protein A (SP-A)-induced NO production by alveolar macrophages was also reduced in the presence of A549 cells, though, by a different kinetics. LPS-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) production (another inflammatory pathway) by alveolar macrophages was also reduced in the presence of RLE-6TN cells. These data suggest a role for lung epithelial cells in the complicated modulation of inflammatory processes, and provide an insight into the mechanism underlying. PMID:17851743

  2. *Ambient Particluate Matter Supresses Alveolar Macrophage Cytokine Response to Lipopolysaccharide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports link ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including the exacerbation of inflammatory disease and increased hospitalization for lung infections. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important defense role against infections v...

  3. Porcine cancer models for translational oncology

    PubMed Central

    Sieren, Jessica C.; Quelle, Dawn; Meyerholz, David K.; Rogers, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Large-animal cancer models are needed to advance the development of innovative and clinically applicable tumor diagnostic, therapeutic, and monitoring technologies. We developed a genetically modified porcine model of cancer based on a TP53 mutation, and established its utility for tracking tumorigenesis in vivo through non-invasive clinical imaging approaches. PMID:27308376

  4. The Porcine Immunology and Nutrition Resource Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse genomics-based databases have been developed to facilitate research with human and rodent models. Current porcine gene databases, however, lack the nutritional and immunological orientation and robust annotation to design effective molecular tools to study relevant pig models. To address t...

  5. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Knud; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Farajzadeh, Leila; Bendixen, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), idiopathic and familial, is characterized by degradation of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies (LB) in the substantia nigra. LBs contain aggregated proteins of which α-synuclein is the major component. The protein synphilin-1 interacts and colocalizes with α-synuclein in LBs. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize porcine synphilin-1 and isoforms hereof with the future perspective to use the pig as a model for Parkinson's disease. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR. The spatial expression of SNCAIP mRNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa) synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP) and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1) of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human (90%) and to mouse (84%) synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation. PMID:26101749

  6. Pulmonary surfactant surface tension influences alveolar capillary shape and oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Machiko; Weaver, Timothy E; Grant, Shawn N; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2009-10-01

    Alveolar capillaries are located in close proximity to the alveolar epithelium and beneath the surfactant film. We hypothesized that the shape of alveolar capillaries and accompanying oxygenation are influenced by surfactant surface tension in the alveolus. To prove our hypothesis, surfactant surface tension was regulated by conditional expression of surfactant protein (SP)-B in Sftpb(-/-) mice, thereby inhibiting surface tension-lowering properties of surfactant in vivo within 24 hours after depletion of Sftpb. Minimum surface tension of isolated surfactant was increased and oxygen saturation was significantly reduced after 2 days of SP-B deficiency in association with deformation of alveolar capillaries. Intravascularly injected 3.2-mum-diameter microbeads through jugular vein were retained within narrowed pulmonary capillaries after reduction of SP-B. Ultrastructure studies demonstrated that the capillary protrusion typical of the normal alveolar-capillary unit was reduced in size, consistent with altered pulmonary blood flow. Pulmonary hypertension and intrapulmonary shunting are commonly associated with surfactant deficiency and dysfunction in neonates and adults with respiratory distress syndromes. Increased surfactant surface tension caused by reduction in SP-B induced narrowing of alveolar capillaries and oxygen desaturation, demonstrating an important role of surface tension-lowering properties of surfactant in the regulation of pulmonary vascular perfusion. PMID:19202005

  7. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F.; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  8. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  9. Therapy options in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Luisetti, Maurizio; Kadija, Zamir; Mariani, Francesca; Rodi, Giuseppe; Campo, Ilaria; Trapnell, Bruce C

    2010-08-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare condition characterized by the accumulation of lipoproteinaceous material within the airspaces, resulting in impaired gas transfer, and clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic to severe respiratory failure. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there are only a few conditions whose natural history has been so dramatically changed by the influence of advances in basic science, clinical medicine, and translational research in therapeutic approaches. Whole-lung lavage is the current standard of care and it plays a critical role as a modifier factor of the natural history of proteinosis. That notwithstanding, the identification of autoantibodies neutralizing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in serum and lung of patients affected by the form of proteinosis previously referred to as idiopathic, has opened the way to novel therapeutic options, such as supplementation of exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, or strategies aimed at reducing the levels of the autoantibodies. The aim of this paper is to provide an updated review of the current therapeutic approach to proteinosis. PMID:20647242

  10. Cardiovascular risk in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Manali, Effrosyni D; Papadaki, Georgia; Konstantonis, Dimitrios; Tsangaris, Iraklis; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Kolilekas, Likurgos; Schams, Andrea; Kagouridis, Konstantinos; Karakatsani, Anna; Orfanos, Stylianos; Griese, Matthias; Papiris, Spyros A

    2016-02-01

    We hypothesized that cardiovascular events and/or indices of cardiac dysfunction may be increased in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). Systemic and pulmonary arterial hypertension, arrhythmias, pulmonary embolism, stroke and ischemic heart attack were reported. Patients underwent serum anti-GM-CSF antibodies, disease severity score (DSS), Doppler transthoracic echocardiograph, glucose, thyroid hormones, lipids, troponin and pro-Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) examination. Thirteen patients (8 female) were studied, median age of 47. Pro-BNP inversely related to DLCO% and TLC%; troponin directly related to DSS, age, P(A-a)O2, left atrium-, left ventricle-end-diastole diameter and BMI. On multiple regression analysis DSS was the only parameter significantly and strongly related with troponin (R(2) = 0.776, p = 0.007). No cardiovascular event was reported during follow-up. In PAP cardiovascular risk indices relate to lung disease severity. Therefore, PAP patients could be at increased risk for cardiovascular events. Quantitation of its magnitude and potential links to lungs' physiologic derangement will be addressed in future studies. PMID:26558331

  11. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma after treatment of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Yasushi; Iwabuchi, Haruko; Takachi, Takayuki; Hosokai, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Sakiko; Imamura, Masaru; Watanabe, Akihiro; Umezu, Hajime; Hotta, Tetsuo; Ogose, Akira; Imai, Chihaya

    2013-08-01

    Secondary rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) after treatment of osteosarcoma (OS) is rare. Reported here is the case of a metachronous RMS in the nasal cavity, developing 12 years after successful treatment of non-metastatic OS. The patient was diagnosed as having OS of the femur at 2 years of age. Chemotherapy for OS included doxorubicin (cumulative dose, 488 mg/m(2) ). No radiotherapy was given. There was no family history suggestive of cancer predisposition syndrome. At 14 years of age, alveolar RMS was diagnosed on histopathology. PAX3-FKHR fusion transcripts were detected on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Germline TP53 mutation was not seen on standard DNA sequencing. The occurrence of secondary sarcomas, in the Children's Cancer Survivor study conducted in North America, has been associated with high cumulative doses of anthracyclines, which may also have played a role in the development of RMS in the present case. In the future, novel molecular technologies might uncover genetic cancer predisposition in patients with metachronous cancers. PMID:23910806

  12. Populations at Risk for Alveolar Echinococcosis, France

    PubMed Central

    Piarroux, Martine; Piarroux, Renaud; Knapp, Jenny; Bardonnet, Karine; Dumortier, Jérôme; Watelet, Jérôme; Gerard, Alain; Beytout, Jean; Abergel, Armand; Bresson-Hadni, Solange

    2013-01-01

    During 1982–2007, alveolar echinococcosis (AE) was diagnosed in 407 patients in France, a country previously known to register half of all European patients. To better define high-risk groups in France, we conducted a national registry-based study to identify areas where persons were at risk and spatial clusters of cases. We interviewed 180 AE patients about their way of life and compared responses to those of 517 controls. We found that almost all AE patients lived in 22 départements in eastern and central France (relative risk 78.63, 95% CI 52.84–117.02). Classification and regression tree analysis showed that the main risk factor was living in AE-endemic areas. There, most at-risk populations lived in rural settings (odds ratio [OR] 66.67, 95% CI 6.21–464.51 for farmers and OR 6.98, 95% CI 2.88–18.25 for other persons) or gardened in nonrural settings (OR 4.30, 95% CI 1.82–10.91). These findings can help sensitization campaigns focus on specific groups. PMID:23647623

  13. Lung vasculitis and alveolar hemorrhage: pathology.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Fishbein, Michael C

    2011-06-01

    Pulmonary vasculitides are a diverse group of limited and systemic disorders associated with inflammation of pulmonary vessels and parenchyma. These diseases often have distinctive clinical, serological, and histopathological features-extrapulmonary sites of involvement, circulating autoantibodies, predispositions for small or large vessels, and others. Some have characteristic inflammatory lesions; others are characterized by the absence of such lesions. Frequently pathological findings overlap, rendering classification, and diagnosis a challenge. The anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small-vessel diseases constitute the major pulmonary vasculitides. These include Wegener granulomatosis (WG), Churg Strauss syndrome (CSS), and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). Less frequently, diseases such as polyarteritis nodosa, Takayasu arteritis, Behçet syndrome, and connective tissue diseases may involve pulmonary vessels, but these entities are better associated with extrapulmonary disease. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a severe manifestation of pulmonary vasculitis. DAH is most commonly seen in small-vessel vasculitides, specifically MPA and WG. Other syndromes associated with DAH include Goodpasture syndrome, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Less commonly, DAH may be secondary to infection or drugs/toxins. Furthermore, in the absence of discernable systemic disease, DAH may be idiopathic-referred to as isolated pulmonary capillaritis (IPC) or idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH), depending on the presence of capillaritis. PMID:21674412

  14. [Alveolar soft part sarcoma in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Paillard, Catherine; Coulomb, Aurore; Helfre, Sylvie; Orbach, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma, ASPS, is a rare malignant tumor, with preferential primary localization in limbs, usually occurring in adolescents and young adults. This sarcoma, well defined histologically and at molecular level, has an indolent course, but a high potential metastatic pulmonary and cerebral evolution, sometimes late. ASPS is characterized by an almost specific translocation t(X, 17)(p11;25) which creates a fusion protein, APSL-TFE3, acting as an aberrant transcription factor. An in-bloc resection of the primary tumor is the treatment of choice in cases of localized disease. Conventional chemotherapy is generally ineffective. The role of radiotherapy is discussed in case of micro- or macroscopical incomplete residue. It seems to reduce local recurrence, but did not influence overall survival. The 5 years survival rate in children, adolescents and young adults is close to 80% in case of localized disease but poorer in presence of metastases. Recently, systemic anti-tumoral treatments have been focused on the use of targeted therapies. Anti-angiogenic drugs and tyrosine kinase inhibitors are the most promising approaches, but require further study. Prognostic risk factors in the literature are age (>10Y), tumor size (>5cm) and presence of metastases. This article reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis modalities, radiographic characteristics and therapeutic strategy of this disease in the pediatric population. PMID:26235420

  15. Immunoproteasome dysfunction augments alternative polarization of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Kammerl, I E; Vosyka, O; Baumann, T; Yu, Y; Wu, Y; Irmler, M; Overkleeft, H S; Beckers, J; Eickelberg, O; Meiners, S; Stoeger, T

    2016-06-01

    The proteasome is a central regulatory hub for intracellular signaling by degrading numerous signaling mediators. Immunoproteasomes are specialized types of proteasomes involved in shaping adaptive immune responses, but their role in innate immune signaling is still elusive. Here, we analyzed immunoproteasome function for polarization of alveolar macrophages, highly specialized tissue macrophages of the alveolar lung surface. Classical activation (M1 polarization) of primary alveolar macrophages by LPS/IFNγ transcriptionally induced all three immunoproteasome subunits, low molecular mass protein 2 (LMP2), LMP7 and multicatalytic endopeptidase complex-like 1, which was accompanied by increased immunoproteasome activity in M1 cells. Deficiency of LMP7 had no effect on the LPS/IFNγ-triggered M1 profile indicating that immunoproteasome function is dispensable for classical alveolar macrophage activation. In contrast, IL-4 triggered alternative (M2) activation of primary alveolar macrophages was accompanied by a transcriptionally independent amplified expression of LMP2 and LMP7 and an increase in immunoproteasome activity. Alveolar macrophages from LMP7 knockout mice disclosed a distorted M2 profile upon IL-4 stimulation as characterized by increased M2 marker gene expression and CCL17 cytokine release. Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed enrichment of IL-4-responsive genes and of genes involved in cellular response to defense, wounding and inflammation in LMP7-deficient alveolar macrophages indicating a distinct M2 inflammation resolving phenotype. Moreover, augmented M2 polarization was accompanied by amplified AKT/STAT6 activation and increased RNA and protein expression of the M2 master transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 4 in LMP7(-/-) alveolar macrophages. IL-13 stimulation of LMP7-deficient macrophages induced a similar M2-skewed profile indicative for augmented signaling via the IL-4 receptor α (IL4Rα). IL4Rα expression was generally

  16. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  17. Production of monoclonal antibodies to porcine interleukin-18 and their use for immunoaffinity purification of recombinant porcine interleukin-18.

    PubMed

    Muneta, Y; Shimoji, Y; Yokomizo, Y; Mori, Y

    2000-03-01

    We have recently reported the cloning and expression of porcine interleukin-18 (IL-18). In this study, we describe the production of anti-porcine IL-18 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and their use in the purification of a large amount of recombinant porcine IL-18 by immunoaffinity column chromatography. Five monoclonal antibodies (2-2-B, 2-5-B, 2-13-C, 3-1-C and 5-3-B) were established and characterized. Three (2-2-B, 3-1-C and 5-3-B) of them were of IgG1 subclass, and the other two were IgMs. Epitope analysis of the three IgG1 mAbs showed that they recognized the same epitope. All five mAbs demonstrated reactivity with baculovirus generated porcine IL-18 by immunoblot analysis. Biologically active porcine IL-18 was obtained by immunoaffinity chromatography using anti-porcine IL-18 mAb at more than 85% purity from culture supernatants of Trichoplusia ni (Tn5) derived cells infected with recombinant baculovirus containing the coding sequence of porcine mature IL-18. These results suggest that the anti-porcine IL-18 mAbs established in this study are useful for one-step purification of porcine mature IL-18 as well as the detection of porcine IL-18 by immunoblotting. PMID:10699583

  18. Stability of Reference Gene Expression After Porcine Sapelovirus Infection in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Chen, Yabing; Sun, Huan; Lan, Daoliang

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells, which serve as the first physical barrier to protect intestinal tract from external antigens, have an important role in the local innate immunity. Screening of reference genes that have stable expression levels after viral infection in porcine intestinal epithelial cells is critical for ensuring the reliability of the expression analysis on anti-infection genes in porcine intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, nine common reference genes in pigs, including ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HMBS, SDHA, HPRT1, TBP, YWHAZ, and RPL32, were chosen as the candidate reference genes. Porcine sapelovirus (PSV) was used as a model virus to infect porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2). The expression stability of the nine genes was assessed by the geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper software. Moreover, RefFinder program was used to evaluate the analytical results of above three softwares, and a relative expression experiment of selected target gene was used to verify the analysis results. The comprehensive results indicated that the gene combination of TBP and RPL32 has the most stable expression, which could be considered as an appropriate reference gene for research on gene expression after PSV infection in IPEC-J2cells. The results provided essential data for expression analysis of anti-infection genes in porcine intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:27092424

  19. Coincidental detection of genomes of porcine parvoviruses and porcine circovirus type 2 infecting pigs in Japan

    PubMed Central

    SAEKHOW, Prayuth; KISHIZUKA, Shingo; SANO, Natsuha; MITSUI, Hiroko; AKASAKI, Hajime; MAWATARI, Takahiro; IKEDA, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    The infection status of 15 viruses in 120 pigs aged about 6 months was investigated based on tonsil specimens collected from a slaughterhouse. Only 5 species of porcine parvoviruses and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) were detected at high frequencies; 67% for porcine parvovirus (PPV) (PPV-Kr or -NADL2 as the new abbreviation), 58% for PPV2 (CnP-PARV4), 39% for PPV3 (P-PARV4), 33% for PPV4 (PPV4), 55% for PBo-likeV (PBoV7) and 80% for PCV2. A phylogenetic analysis of PPV3 suggested that Japanese PPV3s showed a slight variation, and possibly, there were farms harboring homogeneous or heterogeneous PPV3s. Statistical analyses indicated that the detection of PCV2 was significantly coincidental with each detection of PPV, PPV2 and PPV3, and PPV and PPV4 were also coincidentally detected. The concurrent infection with PCV2 and porcine parvoviruses in the subclinically infected pigs may resemble the infection status of pigs with the clinical manifestations of porcine circovirus associated disease which occurs in 3–5 months old pigs and is thought to be primarily caused by the PCV2 infection. PMID:26166811

  20. Coincidental detection of genomes of porcine parvoviruses and porcine circovirus type 2 infecting pigs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Saekhow, Prayuth; Kishizuka, Shingo; Sano, Natsuha; Mitsui, Hiroko; Akasaki, Hajime; Mawatari, Takahiro; Ikeda, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    The infection status of 15 viruses in 120 pigs aged about 6 months was investigated based on tonsil specimens collected from a slaughterhouse. Only 5 species of porcine parvoviruses and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) were detected at high frequencies; 67% for porcine parvovirus (PPV) (PPV-Kr or -NADL2 as the new abbreviation), 58% for PPV2 (CnP-PARV4), 39% for PPV3 (P-PARV4), 33% for PPV4 (PPV4), 55% for PBo-likeV (PBoV7) and 80% for PCV2. A phylogenetic analysis of PPV3 suggested that Japanese PPV3s showed a slight variation, and possibly, there were farms harboring homogeneous or heterogeneous PPV3s. Statistical analyses indicated that the detection of PCV2 was significantly coincidental with each detection of PPV, PPV2 and PPV3, and PPV and PPV4 were also coincidentally detected. The concurrent infection with PCV2 and porcine parvoviruses in the subclinically infected pigs may resemble the infection status of pigs with the clinical manifestations of porcine circovirus associated disease which occurs in 3-5 months old pigs and is thought to be primarily caused by the PCV2 infection. PMID:26166811

  1. Tissue Distribution of Porcine FTO and Its Effect on Porcine Intramuscular Preadipocytes Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoling; Zhou, Bo; Luo, Yanliu; Huang, Zhiqing; Jia, Gang; Liu, Guangmang; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene plays an important role in adipogenesis. However, its function during porcine intramuscular preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation remains poorly understood. In this study, we prepared the antiserum against porcine FTO (pFTO), which was used to determine its subcellular localization and tissue distribution. Our data indicated that pFTO was localized predominantly in the nucleus. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot analysis showed that pFTO was highly expressed in the lung and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Overexpression of pFTO in porcine intramuscular preadipocytes significantly promoted cell proliferation and lipid deposition. Furthermore, overexpression of pFTO in differentiating porcine intramuscular preadipocytes also significantly increased the mRNA levels of adipocyte differentiation transcription factors peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα), lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and fatty acid synthase (FAS). Our findings provide the first functional evidence to reveal a role of pFTO in porcine intramuscular preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. PMID:26964098

  2. Porcine Parvovirus: Natural and Experimental Infections of the Porcine Fetus and Prevalence In Mature Swine 1

    PubMed Central

    Redman, D. R.; Bohl, E. H.; Ferguson, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Antibodies against porcine parvovirus were detected in 17 of 116 prenursing pig sera. Antibodies against transmissible gastroenteritis or ECPO-6 (an enterovirus) were not detected in prenursing sera of the pigs tested. Seventy-seven percent of 129 serum samples from 23 Ohio farms and 82% of 96 samples from slaughter plants in Ohio were serologically positive for porcine parvovirus. Mummies or other abnormalities were not observed in newly born pigs exposed to porcine parvovirus by the transuterine route 101 days after gestation. Indirect evidence suggested that the virus had not spread to other fet uses following exposure after 101 days at least not in a sufficient amount of time to stimulate detectable antibody. Direct intrafetal exposure to porcine parvovirus (i.m. injection, transutero) after 62 days of gestation resulted in dealth and mummification of the two fetuses, and apparently in the subsequent spread of the virus, as five of nine live pigs born were serologically positive for porcine parvovirus and these five pigs had not been injected with the virus. Immunoglobulin G was detected in all newborn pigs irregardless of known antigenic stimulation or the presence of specific antibody. In general, the presence of immunoglobulin M or immunoglobulin A in fetal serum was correlated with a history of antigenic stimulation or the presence of detectable antibody. PMID:4426705

  3. The Global Burden of Alveolar Echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Torgerson, Paul R.; Keller, Krista; Magnotta, Mellissa; Ragland, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    Background Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is known to be common in certain rural communities in China whilst it is generally rare and sporadic elsewhere. The objective of this study was to provide a first estimate of the global incidence of this disease by country. The second objective was to estimate the global disease burden using age and gender stratified incidences and estimated life expectancy with the disease from previous results of survival analysis. Disability weights were suggested from previous burden studies on echinococcosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We undertook a detailed review of published literature and data from other sources. We were unable to make a standardised systematic review as the quality of the data was highly variable from different countries and hence if we had used uniform inclusion criteria many endemic areas lacking data would not have been included. Therefore we used evidence based stochastic techniques to model uncertainty and other modelling and estimating techniques, particularly in regions where data quality was poor. We were able to make an estimate of the annual global incidence of disease and annual disease burden using standard techniques for calculation of DALYs. Our studies suggest that there are approximately 18,235 (CIs 11,900–28,200) new cases of AE per annum globally with 16,629 (91%) occurring in China and 1,606 outside China. Most of these cases are in regions where there is little treatment available and therefore will be fatal cases. Based on using disability weights for hepatic carcinoma and estimated age and gender specific incidence we were able to calculate that AE results in a median of 666,434 DALYs per annum (CIs 331,000-1.3 million). Conclusions/Significance The global burden of AE is comparable to several diseases in the neglected tropical disease cluster and is likely to be one of the most important diseases in certain communities in rural China on the Tibetan plateau. PMID:20582310

  4. Persistence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection in a swine operation.

    PubMed Central

    Bilodeau, R; Archambault, D; Vézina, S A; Sauvageau, R; Fournier, M; Dea, S

    1994-01-01

    A herd of Quebec seedstock pigs experienced in early 1992 a typical outbreak of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) associated with lesions of interstitial, proliferative and necrotizing pneumonia in weaned piglets. The nature of the infection was confirmed by serology using indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and virus isolation in primary cultures of porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM). Farm production recovered after eight weeks of losses. In order to evaluate the persistence of infection in the herd, five SPF-piglets were introduced in two different sections of the PRRS-affected barn four months after the disappearance of clinical symptoms, and two others were placed in a neighboring building with apparently healthy farrow-to-finnish pigs. Clinical signs, body temperature, humoral immune response, virological and histopathological findings were recorded over a 42-day period. Clinical signs were evident in all of the sentinels and prolonged fever (> or = 40 degrees C) was recorded one day post-exposure (PE). Antibody titers to PRRS virus could be detected by IIF on PAM seven days PE, and reached 1:1024 by day 21 PE. Three of the sentinels developed significant virus neutralizing antibody titers (> 1:8 to < or = 1:128) by day 35 PE. In all cases, the virus could be isolated from the serum between day 7 and 42 PE. Thus, the virus and specific antibodies coexisted for several weeks. Lesions of interstitial pneumonia was demonstrated in few animals. In experimental inoculation studies, the viral strain isolated from the sentinel pigs produced severe reproductive disorders in two sows inoculated at 95 days of gestation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. PMID:7889462

  5. Molecular mobility in the monolayers of foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Lalchev, Z I; Todorov, R K; Christova, Y T; Wilde, P J; Mackie, A R; Clark, D C

    1996-01-01

    Certain physical properties of a range of foam film types that are believed to exist in vivo in the lung have been investigated. The contribution of different lung surfactant components found in porcine lung surfactant to molecular surface diffusion in the plane of foam films has been investigated for the first time. The influence of the type and thickness of black foam films, temperature, electrolyte concentration, and extract composition on surface diffusion has been studied using the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Fluorescent phospholipid probe molecules in foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant samples or their hydrophobic extracts consisting of surfactant lipids and hydrophobic lung surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, exhibited more rapid diffusion than observed in films of its principal lipid component alone, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine dipalmitoyl. This effect appears to be due to contributions from minor lipid components present in the total surfactant lipid extracts. The minor lipid components influence the surface diffusion in foam films both by their negative charge and by lowering the phase transition temperature of lung surfactant samples. In contrast, the presence of high concentrations of the hydrophillic surfactant protein A (SP-A) and non-lung-surfactant proteins in the sample reduced the diffusion coefficient (D) of the lipid analog in the adsorbed layer of the films. Hysteresis behavior of D was observed during temperature cycling, with the cooling curve lying above the heating curve. However, in cases where some surface molecular aggregation and surface heterogeneity were observed during cooling, the films became more rigid and molecules at the interfaces became immobilized. The thickness, size, capillary pressure, configuration, and composition of foam films of lung surfactant prepared in vitro support their investigation as realistic structural analogs of the surface films that exist in vivo in the lung

  6. Characterization of two novel porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates with deletions in the GP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-zeng; Peng, Jin-mei; Bai, Yun; Wang, Qian; Liu, Yi-min; Zhang, Qiu-yue; Chang, Dan; Zhang, Wu-chao; Zhao, Hong-yuan; Ye, Chao; An, Tong-qing; Cai, Xue-hui; Tian, Zhi-jun; Tong, Guang-zhi

    2015-04-17

    Two newly emerged, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strains (Henan-A10 and A11) were isolated from the sera of aborting sows. Interestingly, both of the isolates could replicate in primary porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM) cells but not in MARC-145 cells. A phylogenetic tree based on the complete genome was constructed and the results showed that Henan-A10 and A11 were most closely related to other highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strains. However, genomic sequence analysis showed that Henan-A10 and A11 shared only 96.8-97.8% nucleotide identity with the representative HP-PRRSV strain JXA1. Notably, a 10 amino acids deletion in the GP2 endodomain was identified for the first time. A full-length, infectious cDNA clone of HuN4-F112 (attenuated strain from a HP-PRRSV) was used to construct a chimeric clone with the corresponding deletion in GP2. We found that the deletion did not affect viral growth in MARC-145 cells, indicating that the endodomain of PRRSV GP2 may be variable. PMID:25669596

  7. Cellular miR-130b inhibits replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Liwei; Gao, Fei; Jiang, Yifeng; Yu, Lingxue; Zhou, Yanjun; Zheng, Hao; Tong, Wu; Yang, Shen; Xia, Tianqi; Qu, Zehui; Tong, Guangzhi

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can impact viral infections by binding to sequences with partial complementarity on viral RNA transcripts, usually resulting in the repression of virus replication. In the present study, we identified a potential binding site for miR-130 in the 5' untranslated region (bps 155-162) of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) genome. We found that the delivery of multiple miR-130 family mimics, especially miR-130b, resulted in inhibition of PRRSV replication in vitro. miR-130 was effective in inhibiting the replication of multiple type 2 PRRSV strains, but not against vSHE, a classical type 1 strain. miR-130 over-expression did not induce IFN-α or TNF-α expression in either uninfected or PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages. Results from luciferase reporter assays indicated that miR-130 directly targeted the PRRSV 5' UTR. Intranasal inoculation of piglets with miR-130b exhibited antiviral activity in vivo and partially protected piglets from an otherwise lethal challenge with HP-PRRSV strain vJX143. Overall, these results demonstrate the importance of the miR-130 family in modulating PRRSV replication and also provide a scientific basis for using cellular miRNAs in anti-PRRSV therapies. PMID:26581169

  8. Cellular miR-130b inhibits replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liwei; Gao, Fei; Jiang, Yifeng; Yu, Lingxue; Zhou, Yanjun; Zheng, Hao; Tong, Wu; Yang, Shen; Xia, Tianqi; Qu, Zehui; Tong, Guangzhi

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can impact viral infections by binding to sequences with partial complementarity on viral RNA transcripts, usually resulting in the repression of virus replication. In the present study, we identified a potential binding site for miR-130 in the 5′ untranslated region (bps 155-162) of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) genome. We found that the delivery of multiple miR-130 family mimics, especially miR-130b, resulted in inhibition of PRRSV replication in vitro. miR-130 was effective in inhibiting the replication of multiple type 2 PRRSV strains, but not against vSHE, a classical type 1 strain. miR-130 over-expression did not induce IFN-α or TNF-α expression in either uninfected or PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages. Results from luciferase reporter assays indicated that miR-130 directly targeted the PRRSV 5′ UTR. Intranasal inoculation of piglets with miR-130b exhibited antiviral activity in vivo and partially protected piglets from an otherwise lethal challenge with HP-PRRSV strain vJX143. Overall, these results demonstrate the importance of the miR-130 family in modulating PRRSV replication and also provide a scientific basis for using cellular miRNAs in anti-PRRSV therapies. PMID:26581169

  9. Retinoic acid in alveolar development, maintenance and regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Maden, Malcolm; Hind, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Recent data suggest that exogenous retinoic acid (RA), the biologically active derivative of vitamin A, can induce alveolar regeneration in a rat model of experimental emphysema. Here, we describe a mouse model of disrupted alveolar development using dexamethasone administered postnatally. We show that the effects of dexamethasone are concentration dependent, dose dependent, long lasting and result in a severe loss of alveolar surface area. When RA is administered to these animals as adults, lung architecture and the surface area per unit of body weight are completely restored to normal. This remarkable effect may be because RA is required during normal alveolar development and administering RA re-awakens gene cascades used during development. We provide evidence that RA is required during alveologenesis in the mouse by showing that the levels of the retinoid binding proteins, the RA receptors and two RA synthesizing enzymes peak postnatally. Furthermore, an inhibitor of RA synthesis, disulphiram, disrupts alveologenesis. We also show that RA is required throughout life for the maintenance of lung alveoli because when rats are deprived of dietary retinol they lose alveoli and show the features of emphysema. Alveolar regeneration with RA may therefore be an important novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of respiratory diseases characterized by a reduced gas-exchanging surface area such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and emphysema for which there are currently no treatments. PMID:15293808

  10. Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. )

    1990-04-01

    Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

  11. The effect of exogenous surfactant on alveolar interdependence.

    PubMed

    Salito, Caterina; Aliverti, Andrea; Mazzuca, Enrico; Rivolta, Ilaria; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the nature of alveolar mechanical interdependence, we purposefully disturbed the equilibrium condition by administering exogenous surfactant in physiological non-surfactant deprived conditions. Changes in alveolar morphology induced by intra-tracheal delivery of CUROSURF were evaluated after opening a pleural window allowing in-vivo microscopic imaging of sub-pleural alveoli in 6 male anesthetized, tracheotomized and mechanically ventilated rabbits. Surfactant instillation increased the surface area of alveoli smaller than 20,000 μm(2) up to ∼ 50% at 15 min after instillation, reflecting a lowering of surface tension due to local surfactant enrichment. Conversely, for alveoli greater than 20,000 μm(2), surface area decreased by ∼ 5%. Opposite changes in alveolar surface are interpreted as reflecting a new inter-alveolar mechanical equilibrium modified by local surfactant distribution and by a decrease in lung distending pressure. We propose that smaller alveoli, representing the majority of alveolar population, might mostly contribute to improve the oxygenation index following surfactant replacement therapy in case of surfactant deficiency. PMID:25600053

  12. Osteogenic Effect of High-frequency Acceleration on Alveolar Bone

    PubMed Central

    Alikhani, M.; Khoo, E.; Alyami, B.; Raptis, M.; Salgueiro, J.M.; Oliveira, S.M.; Boskey, A.; Teixeira, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation contributes to the health of alveolar bone, but no therapy using the osteogenic effects of these stimuli to increase alveolar bone formation has been developed. We propose that the application of high-frequency acceleration to teeth in the absence of significant loading is osteogenic. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided among control, sham, and experimental groups. The experimental group underwent localized accelerations at different frequencies for 5 min/day on the occlusal surface of the maxillary right first molar at a very low magnitude of loading (4 µε). Sham rats received a similar load in the absence of acceleration or frequency. The alveolar bone of the maxilla was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (µCT), histology, fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR imaging), and RT-PCR for osteogenic genes. Results demonstrate that application of high-frequency acceleration significantly increased alveolar bone formation. These effects were not restricted to the area of application, and loading could be replaced by frequency and acceleration. These studies propose a simple mechanical therapy that may play a significant role in alveolar bone formation and maintenance. PMID:22337699

  13. [A case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis which initially deteriorated rapidly with exacerbation of pulmonary nocardiosis, responded promptly to treatment of the pulmonary nocardiosis].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shozaburo; Takayanagi, Noboru; Tokunaga, Daido; Sugita, Yutaka; Kawabata, Yoshinori

    2010-08-01

    A 37-year-old man was admitted with complaints of continuous cough and sputum production for 1 month. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest revealed a solitary mass with a cavity in the apex of the left lung and bilateral ground-glass opacities (GGO). Thereafter, the patient complained of fever, and an increase in the mass shadow size and expansion of the ground-glass opacities were observed on serial CT. The patient was given diagnoses of pulmonary nocardiosis and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis by bronchoscopic examination. Serum anti-GM-CSF antibody tests were positive. On the basis of these findings, we diagnosed autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. After beginning antituberculosis drugs and antibiotics, the tumor shadow and GGO reduced. The pulmonary alveolar proteinosis rapidly worsened on exacerbation of the pulmonary nocardiosis, but prompt overall improvement was obtained after treating the latter. We believe this to be a valuable case for examining the time progression of autoimmune pulmonary alveolar protein syndrome, because of the clinical course of the exacerbation, and the improvement in the pulmonary alveolar proteinosis after treatment of pulmonary nocardiosis. PMID:20803974

  14. Porcine hokovirus in wild boar in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Carla; Coelho, Catarina; Vieira-Pinto, Madalena; Thompson, Gertrude

    2016-04-01

    Porcine hokovirus (PHoV), also referred to as porcine parvovirus 4 (P-PARV4), a recently discovered parvovirus of swine that is closely related to human parvovirus 4/5 (H-PARV4/5), was first described in Hong Kong. To evaluate the occurrence of P-PARV4 in Portuguese wild boars in the hunting season of 2011/2012, liver and serum samples were tested. P-PARV4 was detected in 24 % of the wild boars analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed a close relationship between the P-PARV4 isolates and other P-PARV4 reference strains. This virus appears to be emerging, with yet unknown implications for public health. PMID:26711454

  15. Pulmonary contusion induces alveolar type 2 epithelial cell apoptosis: role of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Daniel H; Perl, Mario; Mangold, Stefanie; Neddermann, Anne; Braumüller, Sonja T; Zhou, Shaoixa; Bachem, Max G; Huber-Lang, Markus S; Knöferl, Markus W

    2008-11-01

    Alveolar type 2 (AT-2) cell apoptosis is an important mechanism during lung inflammation, lung injury, and regeneration. Blunt chest trauma has been shown to activate inflammatory cells such as alveolar macrophages (AMs) or neutrophils (polymorphonuclear granulocytes [PMNs]), resulting in an inflammatory response. The present study was performed to determine the capacity of different components/cells of the alveolar compartment (AMs, PMNs, or bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL] fluids) to induce apoptosis in AT-2 cells following blunt chest trauma. To study this, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham procedure or blunt chest trauma induced by a single blast wave. Various time points after injury (6 h to 7 d), the lungs were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, for AT-2 cells, or with antibodies directed against caspase 3, caspase 8, Fas, Fas ligand (FasL), BAX, and BCL-2. Bronchoalveolar lavage concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and soluble FasL were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Furthermore, cultures of AT-2 cells isolated from healthy rats were incubated with supernatants of AMs, PMNs, or BAL fluids obtained from either trauma or sham-operated animals in the presence or absence of oxidative stress. Annexin V staining or TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase) assay was used to detect apoptotic AT-2 cells. Histological evaluation revealed that the total number of AT-2 cells was significantly reduced at 48 h following trauma. Fas, FasL, active caspase 8, and active caspase 3 were markedly up-regulated in AT-2 cells after chest trauma. BAX and BCL-2 did not show any significant changes between sham and trauma. IL-1beta, but not TNF-alpha, levels were markedly increased at 24 h after the injury, and soluble FasL concentrations were significantly enhanced at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after the insult. Apoptosis of AT-2 cells incubated with supernatants from cultured AMs, isolated at 48 h following chest trauma was markedly increased when

  16. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Akihiro; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  17. Molecular characterization, expression profiles, and association analysis with hematologic parameters of the porcine HPSE and HPSE2 genes.

    PubMed

    Tao, Cong; Wang, Weimin; Zhou, Ping; Xia, Tian; Zhou, Xiang; Zeng, Cuiping; Zhang, Qingde; Liu, Bang

    2013-02-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS), which consists of repeating disaccharide units, plays an essential role in inflammation and viral infections. Heparanase (encoded by the HPSE gene) can cleave the HS chains of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), which are known to be important participants in immune responses. HPSE2 (heparanase 2) is a homologous gene of HPSE. To investigate the functions of HS, which is the primary receptor of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), the two genes involved in the metabolic process of HS were studied. Here, we present a study of tissue expression profiles, polymorphisms of the HPSE and HPSE2 genes, and the changes of their mRNA levels in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) induced by PRRSV. Both genes are preferentially expressed in porcine immune or immune-related organs under normal conditions, e.g., in the lung, spleen, and lymph node. Moreover, a synonymous mutation c.750A>G located in exon5 of the HPSE gene was detected, and was significantly associated with the white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin (HGB), and hematocrit (HCT) in the peripheral blood (p < 0.05). A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.2073A>G was found in the HPSE2 gene and association analysis showed that it was significantly associated with the WBC content in the blood (p < 0.05). Upon stimulation in healthy piglets with PRRSV, the HPSE mRNA was obviously up-regulated, while the HPSE2 mRNA did not induce a prominent change in PAMs. PMID:23109057

  18. Biphasic Presence of Fibrocytes in a Porcine Hypertrophic Scar Model

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Taryn E.; Mino, Matthew J.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Mauskar, Neil A.; Prindeze, Nicholas J.; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Jordan, Marion H.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The duroc pig has been described as a promising animal model for use in the study of human wound healing and scar formation. However little is known about the presence and chronology of the fibrocyte cell population in the healing process of these animals. Methods Wounds known to form scar were created on red duroc swine (3“ × 3”) with a dermatome to a total depth of either 0.06“ or 0.09”. These wounds were allowed to heal completely and were biopsied at scheduled time points during the healing process. Biopsies were formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded for immunohistochemical analysis. Porcine-reactive antibodies to CD-45 and procollagen-1 and a human-reactive antibody to LSP-1 were used to detect the presence of fibrocytes in immunohistochemistry an immunocytochemistry. Results Initial immunohistochemical studies showed evidence of a biphasic presence of fibrocytes. Pigs with 0.06“ deep wounds showed positive staining for CD-45 and LSP-1 within highly cellular areas at days 2 and 4 after wounding. Additional animals with 0.09” deep wounds showed positive staining within similar areas at days 56, 70, and 113 after wounding. There was no immunohistochemical evidence of fibrocytes in skin biopsies taken at days 14, 28, or 42. Procollagen-1 staining was diffuse in all samples. Cultured cells stained for CD-45, LSP-1, and procollagen-1 by immunocytochemistry. Conclusions These data confirm that fibrocytes are indeed present in this porcine model. We conclude that these cells are present after initial wounding and later during scar formation and remodeling. We believe that this is evidence of a biphasic presence of fibrocytes, first as an acute response to skin wounding followed by later involvement in the remodeling process, prompted by continued inflammation in a deep partial thickness wound. PMID:25051518

  19. Heart Rate Variability in Porcine Progressive Peritonitis-Induced Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jarkovska, Dagmar; Valesova, Lenka; Chvojka, Jiri; Benes, Jan; Sviglerova, Jitka; Florova, Blanka; Nalos, Lukas; Matejovic, Martin; Stengl, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that heart rate variability (HRV) alterations could serve as an indicator of sepsis progression and outcome, however, the relationships of HRV and major pathophysiological processes of sepsis remain unclear. Therefore, in this experimental study HRV was investigated in a clinically relevant long-term porcine model of severe sepsis/septic shock. HRV was analyzed by several methods and the parameters were correlated with pathophysiological processes of sepsis. In 16 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented domestic pigs of either gender, sepsis was induced by fecal peritonitis. Experimental subjects were screened up to the refractory shock development or death. ECG was continuously recorded throughout the experiment, afterwards RR intervals were detected and HRV parameters computed automatically using custom made measurement and analysis MATLAB routines. In all septic animals, progressive hyperdynamic septic shock developed. The statistical measures of HRV, geometrical measures of HRV and Poincaré plot analysis revealed a pronounced reduction of HRV that developed quickly upon the onset of sepsis and was maintained throughout the experiment. The frequency domain analysis demonstrated a decrease in the high frequency component and increase in the low frequency component together with an increase of the low/high frequency component ratio. The reduction of HRV parameters preceded sepsis-associated hemodynamic changes including heart rate increase or shock progression. In a clinically relevant porcine model of peritonitis-induced progressive septic shock, reduction of HRV parameters heralded sepsis development. HRV reduction was associated with a pronounced parasympathetic inhibition and a shift of sympathovagal balance. Early reduction of HRV may serve as a non-invasive and sensitive marker of systemic inflammatory syndrome, thereby widening the therapeutic window for early interventions. PMID:26779039

  20. Cloning of Porcine Pituitary Tumor Transforming Gene 1 and Its Expression in Porcine Oocytes and Embryos.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bingkun; Qin, Zhaoxian; Liu, Shuai; Nong, Suqun; Ma, Qingyan; Chen, Baojian; Liu, Mingjun; Pan, Tianbiao; Liao, D Joshua

    2016-01-01

    The maternal-to-embryonic transition (MET) is a complex process that occurs during early mammalian embryogenesis and is characterized by activation of the zygotic genome, initiation of embryonic transcription, and replacement of maternal mRNA with embryonic mRNA. The objective of this study was to reveal the temporal expression and localization patterns of PTTG1 during early porcine embryonic development and to establish a relationship between PTTG1 and the MET. To achieve this goal, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to clone porcine PTTG1. Subsequently, germinal vesicle (GV)- and metaphase II (MII)-stage oocytes, zygotes, 2-, 4-, and 8-cell-stage embryos, morulas, and blastocysts were produced in vitro and their gene expression was analyzed. The results revealed that the coding sequence of porcine PTTG1 is 609-bp in length and that it encodes a 202-aa polypeptide. Using qRT-PCR, PTTG1 mRNA expression was observed to be maintained at high levels in GV- and MII-stage oocytes. The transcript levels in oocytes were also significantly higher than those in embryos from the zygote to blastocyst stages. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that porcine PTTG1 was primarily localized to the cytoplasm and partially localized to the nucleus. Furthermore, the PTTG1 protein levels in MII-stage oocytes and zygotes were significantly higher than those in embryos from the 2-cell to blastocyst stage. After fertilization, the level of this protein began to decrease gradually until the blastocyst stage. The results of our study suggest that porcine PTTG1 is a new candidate maternal effect gene (MEG) that may participate in the processes of oocyte maturation and zygotic genome activation during porcine embryogenesis. PMID:27058238

  1. Cloning of Porcine Pituitary Tumor Transforming Gene 1 and Its Expression in Porcine Oocytes and Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Nong, Suqun; Ma, Qingyan; Chen, Baojian; Liu, Mingjun; Pan, Tianbiao; Liao, D. Joshua

    2016-01-01

    The maternal-to-embryonic transition (MET) is a complex process that occurs during early mammalian embryogenesis and is characterized by activation of the zygotic genome, initiation of embryonic transcription, and replacement of maternal mRNA with embryonic mRNA. The objective of this study was to reveal the temporal expression and localization patterns of PTTG1 during early porcine embryonic development and to establish a relationship between PTTG1 and the MET. To achieve this goal, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to clone porcine PTTG1. Subsequently, germinal vesicle (GV)- and metaphase II (MII)-stage oocytes, zygotes, 2-, 4-, and 8-cell-stage embryos, morulas, and blastocysts were produced in vitro and their gene expression was analyzed. The results revealed that the coding sequence of porcine PTTG1 is 609-bp in length and that it encodes a 202-aa polypeptide. Using qRT-PCR, PTTG1 mRNA expression was observed to be maintained at high levels in GV- and MII-stage oocytes. The transcript levels in oocytes were also significantly higher than those in embryos from the zygote to blastocyst stages. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that porcine PTTG1 was primarily localized to the cytoplasm and partially localized to the nucleus. Furthermore, the PTTG1 protein levels in MII-stage oocytes and zygotes were significantly higher than those in embryos from the 2-cell to blastocyst stage. After fertilization, the level of this protein began to decrease gradually until the blastocyst stage. The results of our study suggest that porcine PTTG1 is a new candidate maternal effect gene (MEG) that may participate in the processes of oocyte maturation and zygotic genome activation during porcine embryogenesis. PMID:27058238

  2. Tissue Sampling Guides for Porcine Biomedical Models.

    PubMed

    Albl, Barbara; Haesner, Serena; Braun-Reichhart, Christina; Streckel, Elisabeth; Renner, Simone; Seeliger, Frank; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    This article provides guidelines for organ and tissue sampling adapted to porcine animal models in translational medical research. Detailed protocols for the determination of sampling locations and numbers as well as recommendations on the orientation, size, and trimming direction of samples from ∼50 different porcine organs and tissues are provided in the Supplementary Material. The proposed sampling protocols include the generation of samples suitable for subsequent qualitative and quantitative analyses, including cryohistology, paraffin, and plastic histology; immunohistochemistry;in situhybridization; electron microscopy; and quantitative stereology as well as molecular analyses of DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and electrolytes. With regard to the planned extent of sampling efforts, time, and personnel expenses, and dependent upon the scheduled analyses, different protocols are provided. These protocols are adjusted for (I) routine screenings, as used in general toxicity studies or in analyses of gene expression patterns or histopathological organ alterations, (II) advanced analyses of single organs/tissues, and (III) large-scale sampling procedures to be applied in biobank projects. Providing a robust reference for studies of porcine models, the described protocols will ensure the efficiency of sampling, the systematic recovery of high-quality samples representing the entire organ or tissue as well as the intra-/interstudy comparability and reproducibility of results. PMID:26883152

  3. Traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alcalá-Galiano, Andrea; Gutiérrez, Ramón; Montalvo-Moreno, Juan José

    2008-03-01

    Traumatic neuromas are rare entities which characteristically arise subsequently to surgery and are usually accompanied by pain, typically neuralgic. We present an unusual case of an intraosseous traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve following tooth extraction. A 56-year-old man consulted for paresthesias and hyperesthesia in the left mandibular region following extraction of the left mandibular third molar (#38). The panoramic radiograph revealed a radiolucent lesion in the inferior alveolar nerve canal, and CT demonstrated the existence of a mass within the canal, producing widening of the same. Nerve-sparing excisional biopsy was performed. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with traumatic neuroma of the left inferior alveolar nerve. After 3 years of follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and there are no signs of recurrence. PMID:18305440

  4. Rare combination of congenital heart disease and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuki; Miyamoto, Takashi; Yoshitake, Shuichi; Naito, Yuji; Kobayashi, Tomio

    2015-10-01

    Here, we describe a case of total anomalous pulmonary venous return with coarctation of the aorta that was diagnosed as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis at autopsy in a male infant. Surgical repair was performed at 1 day of age, but the infant died on postoperative day 51 due to respiratory insufficiency without any evidence of pulmonary venous obstruction. He had been unexpectedly diagnosed with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and pulmonary hypoplasia on autopsy. Congenital pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a serious condition with a high mortality rate, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with a clinical picture of pulmonary venous obstruction, because most patients are unable to survive without proper treatment. In this report, we address specific issues that should be discussed in such cases based on our recent experience. PMID:26310609

  5. European echinococcosis registry: human alveolar echinococcosis, Europe, 1982-2000.

    PubMed

    Kern, Petra; Bardonnet, Karine; Renner, Elisabeth; Auer, Herbert; Pawlowski, Zbigniew; Ammann, Rudolf W; Vuitton, Dominique A; Kern, Peter

    2003-03-01

    Surveillance for alveolar echinococcosis in central Europe was initiated in 1998. On a voluntary basis, 559 patients were reported to the registry. Most cases originated from rural communities in regions from eastern France to western Austria; single cases were reported far away from the disease-"endemic" zone throughout central Europe. Of 210 patients, 61.4% were involved in vocational or part-time farming, gardening, forestry, or hunting. Patients were diagnosed at a mean age of 52.5 years; 78% had symptoms. Alveolar echinococcosis primarily manifested as a liver disease. Of the 559 patients, 190 (34%) were already affected by spread of the parasitic larval tissue. Of 408 (73%) patients alive in 2000, 4.9% were cured. The increasing prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis in foxes in rural and urban areas of central Europe and the occurrence of cases outside the alveolar echinococcosis-endemic regions suggest that this disease deserves increased attention. PMID:12643830

  6. Variant Inferior Alveolar Nerves and Implications for Local Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kevin T; Brokaw, Everett J; Bell, Andrea; Joy, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A sound knowledge of anatomical variations that could be encountered during surgical procedures is helpful in avoiding surgical complications. The current article details anomalous morphology of inferior alveolar nerves encountered during routine dissection of the craniofacial region in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. We also report variations of the lingual nerves, associated with the inferior alveolar nerves. The variations were documented and a thorough review of literature was carried out. We focus on the variations themselves, and the clinical implications that these variations present. Thorough understanding of variant anatomy of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves may determine the success of procedural anesthesia, the etiology of pathologic processes, and the avoidance of surgical misadventure. PMID:27269666

  7. A variant of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in nackt mice.

    PubMed

    Starost, M F; Benavides, F; Conti, C J

    2002-05-01

    Four adult mutant nackt mice, which demonstrate alopecia and CD4+ T-cell deficiency, and two outbred SENCAR mice (sentinels) were presented for routine health surveillance. Lesions were not observed at necropsy. Microscopically, all four nackt mice demonstrated multiple concretions that were 30-100 microm in diameter, irregularly rounded to oval, nonbirefringent, and amphophilic to basophilic. Many of the concretions appeared attached to or within the alveolar walls of all lung lobes. Approximately half of the concretions had irregular fracture lines. All concretions were periodic acid-Schiff positive, and Von Kassa staining revealed diffuse calcification. None of the concretions were associated with inflammatory cell infiltrates, and metaplastic ossification was not evident. A diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis, a rare disease in both humans and animals, was made based on the size and location of the concretions and the lack of an inflammatory response. This is the first report of a laboratory mouse demonstrating pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. PMID:12014504

  8. Alveolar-filling growth pattern of sarcomatoid malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Takamitsu; Tajima, Shogo; Takanashi, Yusuke; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Neyatani, Hiroshi; Funai, Kazuhito

    2016-09-01

    A case of sarcomatoid malignant pleural mesothelioma showing extremely rare growth pattern is described. A 63-year-old man presented to our hospital with left pleural effusion. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest showed diffusely thickened left visceral and parietal pleura associated with intermingled pulmonary infiltrative shadowing. Biopsy of the pleura under general anaesthesia confirmed the diagnosis of sarcomatoid malignant pleural mesothelioma. The patient underwent left extra-pleural pneumonectomy. Histopathologically, the sarcomatoid spindle tumour cells changed their morphology to polygonal cells in the pulmonary parenchyma and grew upwards, filling the alveolar space without the destruction of its septa, showing an alveolar-filling growth pattern. The current report indicates a case of sarcomatoid pleural mesothelioma that shows an alveolar-filling growth pattern, despite having not been thoroughly categorized in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. PMID:27516891

  9. Alveolar Osteitis: A Comprehensive Review of Concepts and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Kolokythas, Antonia; Olech, Eliza; Miloro, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar osteitis, “dry socket”, remains amongst the most commonly encountered complications following extraction of teeth by general dentists and specialists. A great body of literature is devoted to alveolar osteitis addressing the etiology and pathophysiology of this condition. In addition numerous studies are available discussing methods and techniques to prevent this condition. To this date though great controversy still exists regarding the appropriate terminology used for this condition as well as the actual etiology, pathophysiology, and best methods of prevention and treatment. This article is a comprehensive critical review of the available literature addressing the concepts and controversies surrounding alveolar osteitis. We aim to assist the dental health care professional with patient preparation and management of this commonly encountered postoperative condition should be encountered. PMID:20652078

  10. [Peri-operative atelectasis and alveolar recruitment manoeuvres].

    PubMed

    Rama-Maceiras, Pablo

    2010-06-01

    Respiratory complications are a significant cause of post-operative morbidity and mortality. Peri-operative atelectasis, in particular, affects 90% of surgical patients and its effects can be prolonged, due to changes in respiratory mechanics, pulmonary circulation and hypoxaemia. Alveolar collapse is caused by certain predisposing factors, mainly by compression and absorption mechanisms. To prevent or treat these atelectasis several therapeutic strategies have been proposed, such as alveolar recruitment manoeuvres, which has become popular in the last few years. Its application in patients with alveolar collapse, but without a previous significant acute lung lesion, has some special features, therefore its use is not free of uncertainties and complications. This review describes the frequency, pathophysiology, importance and treatment of peri-operative atelectasis. Special attention is paid to treatment with recruitment manoeuvres, with the purpose of providing a basis for the their rational and appropriate use. PMID:19959274

  11. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sebring, R.J. ); Oberdorster, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment of one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Recent advances in alveolar biology: evolution and function of alveolar proteins.

    PubMed

    Orgeig, Sandra; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Casals, Cristina; Clark, Howard W; Haczku, Angela; Knudsen, Lars; Possmayer, Fred

    2010-08-31

    This review is focused on the evolution and function of alveolar proteins. The lung faces physical and environmental challenges, due to changing pressures/volumes and foreign pathogens, respectively. The pulmonary surfactant system is integral in protecting the lung from these challenges via two groups of surfactant proteins - the small molecular weight hydrophobic SPs, SP-B and -C, that regulate interfacial adsorption of the lipids, and the large hydrophilic SPs, SP-A and -D, which are surfactant collectins capable of inhibiting foreign pathogens. Further aiding pulmonary host defence are non-surfactant collectins and antimicrobial peptides that are expressed across the biological kingdoms. Linking to the first symposium session, which emphasised molecular structure and biophysical function of surfactant lipids and proteins, this review begins with a discussion of the role of temperature and hydrostatic pressure in shaping the evolution of SP-C in mammals. Transitioning to the role of the alveolus in innate host defence we discuss the structure, function and regulation of antimicrobial peptides, the defensins and cathelicidins. We describe the recent discovery of novel avian collectins and provide evidence for their role in preventing influenza infection. This is followed by discussions of the roles of SP-A and SP-D in mediating host defence at the alveolar surface and in mediating inflammation and the allergic response of the airways. Finally we discuss the use of animal models of lung disease including knockouts to develop an understanding of the role of these proteins in initiating and/or perpetuating disease with the aim of developing new therapeutic strategies. PMID:20433956

  13. Alveolar macrophage kinetics and function after interruption of canine marrow function

    SciTech Connect

    Springmeyer, S.C.; Altman, L.C.; Kopecky, K.J.; Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.

    1982-03-01

    To study the kinetics and function of alveolar macrophages after interruption of marrow function, we performed serial bronchoalveolar lavages in dogs. The studies were performed before and after 9.0 to 9.5 Grey total body irradiation and marrow infusion. Monocytes had disappeared from the bloodstream by Day 7 after the irradiation. Alveolar macrophages were significantly decreased at Day 21. At Days 14 and 21 myeloperoxidase-positive alveolar macrophages were also significantly decreased. Beyond Day 30 the number of circulating monocytes, myeloperoxidase-positive and total alveolar macrophages had returned. Sex chromatin stains of alveolar macrophages obtained from a male dog that received female marrow indicated that the repopulating macrophages were of marrow origin. In vitro studies of alveolar macrophage migration and phagocytosis demonstrated increased activities beyond Day 30. These studies suggest that in this model the alveolar macrophage is dependent on the bone marrow for support and that the alveolar macrophage depletion may impair lung defense mechanisms.

  14. Alveolar recruitment in pulmonary contusion: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Lívia Maria Vitório; Lopes, Lucianne Cristina da Silva; Cipriano, Graziella França Bernardelli; Vendrame, Letícia Sandre; Andrade Junior, Ary

    2009-03-01

    Treatment of pulmonary contusion when adequately established is very simple in most cases. Pathophysiological changes occur as a result of the effects produced by loss of chest wall integrity, accumulation of fluid in the pleural cavity, obstruction of the airways and lung dysfunction. The alveolar recruitment maneuver is the reopening of collapsed lung areas by increasing inspiratory pressure in the airway. The primary objective of this case report was to evaluate the effectiveness of the alveolar recruitment maneuver in a patient with pulmonary contusion. A 33 year old male patient, with a clinical condition of bilateral chest trauma and traumatic brain injury, evolved with reduction of the level of consciousness, acute respiratory failure, hypovolemic shock and hemoptysis. The patient underwent thoracentesis, bilateral thoracic drainage and was also submitted to invasive mechanical ventilation. After 48 hours of invasive mechanical ventilation, in accordance with protective strategy an alveolar recruitment maneuver mode, pressure-controlled ventilation, pressure controlled 10 cmH2O, respiratory rate 10 rpm, inspiratory time 3.0, positive end-expiratory pressure 30 cmH2O and FI0(2) 100%, for two minutes. After the alveolar recruitment maneuver, the patient presented clinical pulmonary improvement, but there was a variation of 185 to 322 of Pa0(2)/FiO2 (arterial partial pressure of oxygen/ fraction of inspired oxygen). He was discharged from the intensive care unit 22 days after admission. The alveolar recruitment maneuver in this patient showed significant results in the treatment of pulmonary contusion, improving blood oxygenation, preventing alveolar collapse and reversing atelectasis. PMID:25303136

  15. Metabolic enhancement and increase of alveolar macrophages induced by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Mochitate, K.; Miura, T.

    1989-06-01

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to 0.2 ppm ozone (O3) for 14 days and at intervals alveolar macrophages were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage to examine the effects of O3. The specific activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase of alveolar macrophages increased to 1.6-fold (on the 3rd day) and 1.5-fold (on the 5th day), respectively, those of the control values. Similarly, the specific activities of pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and hexokinase also increased to 1.6-fold, 1.4-fold, and 1.2-fold, respectively, those of the control values on the 3rd day. The activities of all enzymes tested were maintained at significantly higher levels until the 14th day. Furthermore, the incorporation of (14C)thymidine into alveolar macrophages increased twice the control values on the 1st and 3rd days and was almost completely inhibited by the addition of 1.23 x 10(-4) M aphidicolin, a competitive inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha. The number of alveolar macrophages collected from exposed animals also increased to 1.5-fold that of the control value on the 3rd day and was maintained at significantly higher level until the 14th day. It was noted that alveolar macrophages of small size preferentially increased between the 5th and 14th days. These results show that exposures to 0.2 ppm O3 induced a metabolic enhancement of the peroxidative metabolism, glycolysis, and DNA synthesis in alveolar macrophages and increased the macrophages of small size.

  16. Purification and properties of rabbit alveolar macrophage lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, S F; Martinez, R J

    1979-01-01

    Lysozyme was isolated from Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-elicited rabbit alveolar macrophages by acid extraction and purified to homogeneity by a single-column procedure. Yields of the purified enzyme averaged between 20 and 30 mg per rabbit, values far in excess of those obtained with previously published methods. Rabbit lysozyme has a molecular weight of 14,300 and exhibits optimal lytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus at an ionic strength of 0.04, pH 6.5. Our results indicate that lysozyme and other granule components can be fractionated from elicited alveolar macrophages by using simple techniques, suggesting methods for the bulk purification of lysosomal constituents. Images PMID:37167

  17. Case Report: Multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Jose Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    A multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma in a 68-year-old man is reported. Four different peripheral tumor nodules were identified on gross examination. A fifth central tumor corresponded to a conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma is a rare tumor that has been very recently characterized as a distinct histotype within the spectrum of papillary renal cell carcinoma. Immunostaining with cyclin D1 seems to be specific of this tumor subtype. This is the first reported case with multifocal presentation. PMID:27158455

  18. Partial pulmonary embolization disrupts alveolarization in fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia is closely associated with an arrest of alveolar development and pulmonary capillary dysplasia, it is unknown whether these two features are causally related. To investigate the relationship between pulmonary capillaries and alveolar formation, we partially embolized the pulmonary capillary bed. Methods Partial pulmonary embolization (PPE) was induced in chronically catheterized fetal sheep by injection of microspheres into the left pulmonary artery for 1 day (1d PPE; 115d gestational age; GA) or 5 days (5d PPE; 110-115d GA). Control fetuses received vehicle injections. Lung morphology, secondary septal crests, elastin, collagen, myofibroblast, PECAM1 and HIF1α abundance and localization were determined histologically. VEGF-A, Flk-1, PDGF-A and PDGF-Rα mRNA levels were measured using real-time PCR. Results At 130d GA (term ~147d), in embolized regions of the lung the percentage of lung occupied by tissue was increased from 29 ± 1% in controls to 35 ± 1% in 1d PPE and 44 ± 1% in 5d PPE fetuses (p < 0.001). Secondary septal crest density was reduced from 8 ± 0% in controls to 5 ± 0% in 1d PPE and 4 ± 0% in 5d PPE fetuses (p < 0.05), indicating impaired alveolar formation. The deposition of differentiated myofibroblasts (23 ± 1% vs 28 ± 1%; p < 0.001) and elastin fibres (3 ± 0% vs 4 ± 0%; p < 0.05) were also impaired in embolized lung regions of PPE fetuses compared to controls. PPE did not alter the deposition of collagen or PECAM1. At 116d GA in 5d PPE fetuses, markers of hypoxia indicated that a small and transient hypoxic event had occurred (hypoxia in 6.7 ± 1.4% of the tissue within embolized regions of 5d PPE fetuses at 116d compared to 0.8 ± 0.2% of tissue in control regions). There was no change in the proportion of tissue labelled with HIF1α. There was no change in mRNA levels of the angiogenic factors VEGF and Flk-1, although a small increase in PDGF-Rα expression at 116d GA, from 1.00 ± 0.12 in

  19. Mandibular osteotomies after drawing out the inferior alveolar nerve along the canal.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hoon; Kim, Byung-Gun

    2003-01-01

    In some cases, the inferior alveolar nerve runs through a lower course than usual. In such cases, osteotomy of the mandible can injure the inferior alveolar nerves. In other instances, the course of the mandibular osteotomy can meet that of the inferior alveolar nerve. In these cases, a useful method may be excavating the canal and drawing the nerve out through it. With this technique, we can make the osteotomy as initially planned with minimal damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. PMID:14629066

  20. Exploring the genetic basis for porcine circovirus pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine circoviruses are members of the Circovirus genus within the Circoviridae family. Association of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) with post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) was first reported in western Canada in 1996. Shortly thereafter the disease was recognized in Europe. Sub...

  1. Outbreak investigation of porcine epidemic diarrhea in swine in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Pasma, Tim; Furness, Mary Catherine; Alves, David; Aubry, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus was first diagnosed in Ontario in January of 2014. An outbreak investigation was conducted and it was hypothesized that feed containing spray-dried porcine plasma contaminated with the virus was a risk factor in the introduction and spread of the disease in Ontario. PMID:26740705

  2. Porcine bocaviruses: genetic analysis and prevalence in Chinese swine population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among members of the Bocavirus genus, that contain three open reading frames (ORFs), of the Parvovirinae subfamily, porcine bocaviruses (PoBoVs) exhibit the most genetic diversity. Based on the ORF2-encoded VP1 classification, the six reported porcine bocaviruses were grouped into four species: PoBo...

  3. Serial bronchoscopic lung lavage in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis under local anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Davis, K Rennis; Vadakkan, D Thomas; Krishnakumar, E V; Anas, A Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease, characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant composed of proteins and lipids due to defective surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages. Mainstay of treatment is whole lung lavage, which requires general anesthesia. Herein, we report a case of primary PAP, successfully treated with serial bronchoscopic lung lavages under local anesthesia. PMID:25814803

  4. Breast metastasis in an adult woman with alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of the ethmoid sinus

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Sean D.; Raj, Karuna M.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Brahmaroutu, Ashrita; Whitman, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    A new breast mass was identified in an adult woman undergoing treatment for a known ethmoid sinus alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Histopathological evaluation revealed alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma metastatic to the breast. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, primarily described in adolescents and especially rare in adults, can uncommonly metastasize to the breast. PMID:27186248

  5. Extrahepatic islet transplantation with microporous polymer scaffolds in syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models

    PubMed Central

    Gibly, Romie F.; Zhang, Xiaomin; Graham, Melanie L.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Lowe, William L.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2011-01-01

    Intraportal transplantation of islets has successfully treated select patients with type 1 diabetes. However, intravascular infusion and the intrahepatic site contribute to significant early and late islet loss, yet a clinical alternative has remained elusive. We investigated non-encapsulating, porous, biodegradable polymer scaffolds as a vehicle for islet transplantation into extrahepatic sites, using syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models. Scaffold architecture was modified to enhance cell infiltration leading to re-vascularization of the islets with minimal inflammatory response. In the diabetic mouse model, 125 islets seeded on scaffolds implanted into the epididymal fat pad restored normoglycemia within an average of 1.95 days and transplantation of only 75 islets required 12.1 days. Increasing the pore size to increase islet-islet interactions did not significantly impact islet function. The porcine model was used to investigate early islet engraftment. Increasing the islet seeding density led to a greater mass of engrafted islets, though the efficiency of islet survival decreased. Transplantation into the porcine omentum provided greater islet engraftment than the gastric submucosa. These results demonstrate scaffolds support murine islet transplantation with high efficiency, and feasibility studies in large animals support continued pre-clinical studies with scaffolds as a platform to control the transplant microenvironment. PMID:21959005

  6. Effects of cyclic flexural fatigue on porcine bioprosthetic heart valve heterograft biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mirnajafi, Ali; Zubiate, Brett; Sacks, Michael S

    2010-07-01

    Although bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV) remain the primary treatment modality for adult heart valve replacement, continued problems with durability remain. Several studies have implicated flexure as a major damage mode in porcine-derived heterograft biomaterials used in BHV fabrication. Although conventional accelerated wear testing can provide valuable insights into BHV damage phenomena, the constituent tissues are subjected to complex, time-varying deformation modes (i.e., tension and flexure) that do not allow for the control of the amount, direction, and location of flexure. Thus, in this study, customized fatigue testing devices were developed to subject circumferentially oriented porcine BHV tissue strips to controlled cyclic flexural loading. By using this approach, we were able to study layer-specific structural damage induced by cyclic flexural tensile and compressive stresses alone. Cycle levels of 10 x 10(6), 25 x 10(6), and 50 x 10(6) were used, with resulting changes in flexural stiffness and collagen structure assessed. Results indicated that flexural rigidity was markedly reduced after only 10 x 10(6) cycles, and progressively decayed at a lower rate with cycle number thereafter. Moreover, the against-curvature fatigue direction induced the most damage, suggesting that the ventricularis and fibrosa layers have low resistance to cyclic flexural compressive and tensile loads, respectively. The histological analyses indicated progressive collagen fiber delamination as early as 10 x 10(6) cycles but otherwise no change in gross collagen orientation. Our results underscore that porcine-derived heterograft biomaterials are very sensitive to flexural fatigue, with delamination of the tissue layers the primary underlying mechanism. This appears to be in contrast to pericardial BHV, wherein high tensile stresses are considered to be the major cause of structural failure. These findings point toward the need for the development of chemical fixation

  7. OCT-4 expression is essential for the segregation of trophectoderm lineages in porcine preimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    EMURA, Natsuko; SAKURAI, Nobuyuki; TAKAHASHI, Kazuki; HASHIZUME, Tsutomu; SAWAI, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Oct-4, a member of the POU family of transcription factors, is a key factor that regulates the segregation of the inner cell mass (ICM) and the trophectoderm (TE) during the transition from morula to blastocyst in mice. However, little is known about its role in porcine early embryogenesis. To determine the function of OCT-4 in the ICM and TE segregation of porcine embryos, we studied the developmental morphology of porcine embryos using RNA interference technology. Our experiments demonstrated that when 1-cell stage embryos were co-injected with the small interfering RNA (siRNA)for targeted knockdown of OCT-4 (OCT-4-siRNA) and tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC)-dextran conjugate (Dx), they failed to form blastocysts. Therefore, in this study, we constructed chimeric embryos comprising blastomeres that either expressed OCT-4 normally or showed downregulated OCT-4 expression by co-injection of OCT-4-siRNA and Dx into one blastomere in 2- to 4-cell stage embryos. In control embryos, which were co-injected with control siRNA and Dx, Dx-positive cells contributed to the TE lineage in almost all the blastocysts examined. In contrast, Dx-positive cells derived from a blastomere co-injected with OCT-4-siRNA and Dx were degenerated in almost half the blastocysts. This was probably due to the inability of these cells to differentiate into the TE lineage. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed no difference in the levels of SOX2, TEAD4, FGF4 and FGFR1-IIIc, all of which are known to be regulated by OCT-4, between the OCT-4-siRNA-injected morulae and the control ones. However, the level of CDX2, a molecule specifically expressed in the TE lineage, was significantly higher in the former than in the latter. Our results indicate that continuous expression of OCT-4 in blastomeres is essential for TE formation of porcine embryos. PMID:27210587

  8. Pathological Characterization of an Outbreak of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huong Giang, N T; Lan, N T; Nam, N H; Hirai, T; Yamaguchi, R

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, a highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) emerged in Vietnam and spread to nearly all regions of the country by 2010. Ten representative pigs of different age groups, infected naturally with HP-PRRSV in northern Vietnam in 2010, were used to characterize the pathological features of the infection. Infection was confirmed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and viral isolation. The clinical signs and gross findings in these pigs included high fever (>40.2°C), red skin, blue ears, anorexia, respiratory distress, diarrhoea, haemorrhagic pleurisy and lymphadenopathy. Reproductive failure was the main clinical feature in sows. PRRSV infection-associated microscopical lung and lymph node lesions were observed frequently, regardless of age of the animals. Lung lesions were characterized by interstitial pneumonia and were occasionally associated with haemorrhage and fluid exudation following alveolar collapse. Lymph nodes exhibited characteristic haemorrhage and apoptosis, lymphocytic depletion and disorganization secondary to fibrosis and capillary formation. Haematoxylin and eosin staining or caspase-3 immunohistochemistry revealed apoptosis induction in various tissues and organs, particularly the lymph nodes and lungs. Primarily haemorrhagic microscopical lesions were observed commonly in other organs including the spleen, liver, heart and kidney. Immunohistochemical examination revealed HP-PRRS antigen in the lung, lymph node, liver and kidney macrophages, and lung and kidney epithelial cells. Pigs infected naturally with HP-PRRS in the field have multisystemic disease characterized by marked apoptotic cell death. PMID:26774273

  9. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shende, Ruchira P; Sampat, Bhavin K; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Kulkarni, Satish

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of 58 year old female diagnosed with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with recurrence of PAP after 5 repeated whole lung lavage, responding to subcutaneous injections of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor therapy (GM-CSF). Thus indicating that GM-CSF therapy is a promising alternative in those requiring repeated whole lung lavage PMID:24475687

  10. Immune dysregulation in the pathogenesis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Moczygemba, Margarita; Huston, David P

    2010-09-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease of the lung characterized by the accumulation of surfactant-derived lipoproteins within pulmonary alveolar macrophages and alveoli, resulting in respiratory insufficiency and increased infections. The disease is caused by a disruption in surfactant catabolism by alveolar macrophages due to loss of functional granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling. The underlying molecular mechanisms causing deficiencies in GM-CSF signaling are as follows: 1) high levels of neutralizing GM-CSF autoantibodies observed in autoimmune PAP; 2) mutations in CSF2RA, the gene encoding the alpha chain of the GM-CSF receptor, observed in hereditary PAP; and 3) reduced numbers and function of alveolar macrophages as a result of other clinical diseases seen in secondary PAP. Recent studies investigating the biology of GM-CSF have revealed that not only does this cytokine have an indispensable role in lung physiology, but it is also a critical regulator of innate immunity and lung host defense. PMID:20623372

  11. Evaluation of color Doppler ultrasonography in diagnosing hepatic alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Song; Qin, Zhao; Haitao, Li; Lei, Yang; Lanhui, Yao; Qin, Xu; Yongquan, Lu; Hao, Wen

    2012-02-01

    To assess the accuracy of color Doppler ultrasonography in diagnosing hepatic alveolar echinococcosis, 129 patients were examined at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University between July 2004 and June 2010. Those patients suspected of having hepatic alveolar echinococcosis were examined and diagnosed by color Doppler ultrasound. All the cases were compared with the gold standard. The findings of their sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio and 95% confidence interval were recorded. Sensitivity: 95% (95% confidence interval: 90.7%-99.3%); specificity: 20.7% (95% confidence interval: 6.0%-35.4%); positive predictive value: 80.5%; negative predictive value: 54.5%; positive likelihood ratio: 1.2: negative likelihood ratio: 0.2. Our study indicates that color Doppler ultrasonography, when used in diagnosing hepatic alveolar echinococcosis, has high sensitivity although specificity is low. Color Doppler ultrasound is, thus, considered to be an efficient means for diagnosing hepatic alveolar echinococcosis. PMID:22230130

  12. EVALUATION OF TRACE-ELEMENT INTERACTIONS USING CULTURED ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is important to consider the interactions of toxic trace elements in an evaluation of the toxicity of environmental pollutants. The in vitro toxicity screening system, using the rabbit alveolar macrophage, provides a particularly useful system for evaluating trace-element inte...

  13. Abnormal gallium scintigraphy in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.D.; White, D.A.; Stover-Pepe, D.E.; Caravelli, J.F.; Van Uitert, C.; Benua, R.S.

    1987-04-01

    A patient with medulloblastoma of the cerebellum developed dyspnea and hypoxemia. Pulmonary function tests showed decreased lung volume and diffusing capacity, while the chest radiographs initially showed only mild interstitial infiltrates. Repeated gallium scans showed diffuse lung uptake and diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis was made by open lung biopsy.

  14. The development and plasticity of alveolar type 1 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Hernandez, Belinda J; Martinez Alanis, Denise; Narvaez del Pilar, Odemaris; Vila-Ellis, Lisandra; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Evans, Scott E; Ostrin, Edwin J; Chen, Jichao

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar type 1 (AT1) cells cover >95% of the gas exchange surface and are extremely thin to facilitate passive gas diffusion. The development of these highly specialized cells and its coordination with the formation of the honeycomb-like alveolar structure are poorly understood. Using new marker-based stereology and single-cell imaging methods, we show that AT1 cells in the mouse lung form expansive thin cellular extensions via a non-proliferative two-step process while retaining cellular plasticity. In the flattening step, AT1 cells undergo molecular specification and remodel cell junctions while remaining connected to their epithelial neighbors. In the folding step, AT1 cells increase in size by more than 10-fold and undergo cellular morphogenesis that matches capillary and secondary septa formation, resulting in a single AT1 cell spanning multiple alveoli. Furthermore, AT1 cells are an unexpected source of VEGFA and their normal development is required for alveolar angiogenesis. Notably, a majority of AT1 cells proliferate upon ectopic SOX2 expression and undergo stage-dependent cell fate reprogramming. These results provide evidence that AT1 cells have both structural and signaling roles in alveolar maturation and can exit their terminally differentiated non-proliferative state. Our findings suggest that AT1 cells might be a new target in the pathogenesis and treatment of lung diseases associated with premature birth. PMID:26586225

  15. Studying the Role of Alveolar Macrophages in Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vadrevu, Surya Kumari; Sharma, Sharad; Chintala, Navin; Patel, Jalpa; Karbowniczek, Magdalena; Markiewski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the syngeneic model of breast cancer (4T1) to the studies on a role of pulmonary alveolar macrophages in cancer metastasis. The 4T1 cells expressing GFP in combination with imaging and confocal microscopy are used to monitor tumor growth, track metastasizing tumor cells, and quantify the metastatic burden. These approaches are supplemented by digital histopathology that allows the automated and unbiased quantification of metastases. In this method the routinely prepared histological lung sections, which are stained with hematoxylin and eosin, are scanned and converted to the digital slides that are then analyzed by the self-trained pattern recognition software. In addition, we describe the flow cytometry approaches with the use of multiple cell surface markers to identify alveolar macrophages in the lungs. To determine impact of alveolar macrophages on metastases and antitumor immunity these cells are depleted with the clodronate-containing liposomes administrated intranasally to tumor-bearing mice. This approach leads to the specific and efficient depletion of this cell population as confirmed by flow cytometry. Tumor volumes and lung metastases are evaluated in mice depleted of alveolar macrophages, to determine the role of these cells in the metastatic progression of breast cancer. PMID:27403530

  16. Increased alveolar soluble annexin V promotes lung inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Susan; Shi, Wei; Xu, Wei; Frey, Mark R; Moats, Rex; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Warburton, David

    2015-11-01

    The causes underlying the self-perpetuating nature of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a progressive and usually lethal disease, remain unknown. We hypothesised that alveolar soluble annexin V contributes to lung fibrosis, based on the observation that human IPF bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) containing high annexin V levels promoted fibroblast involvement in alveolar epithelial wound healing that was reduced when annexin V was depleted from the BALF. Conditioned medium from annexin V-treated alveolar epithelial type 2 cells (AEC2), but not annexin V per se, induced proliferation of human fibroblasts and contained pro-fibrotic, IPF-associated proteins, as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines that were found to correlate tightly (r>0.95) with annexin V levels in human BALF. ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase in AECs was activated by annexin V, and blockade reduced the fibrotic potential of annexin V-treated AEC-conditioned medium. In vivo, aerosol delivery of annexin V to mouse lung induced inflammation, fibrosis and increased hydroxyproline, with activation of Wnt, transforming growth factor-β, mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB signalling pathways, as seen in IPF. Chronically increased alveolar annexin V levels, as reflected in increased IPF BALF levels, may contribute to the progression of IPF by inducing the release of pro-fibrotic mediators. PMID:26160872

  17. Biomimetics of fetal alveolar flow phenomena using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Fishler, Rami; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sznitman, Josué

    2015-01-01

    At the onset of life in utero, the respiratory system begins as a liquid-filled tubular organ and undergoes significant morphological changes during fetal development towards establishing a respiratory organ optimized for gas exchange. As airspace morphology evolves, respiratory alveolar flows have been hypothesized to exhibit evolving flow patterns. In the present study, we have investigated flow topologies during increasing phases of embryonic life within an anatomically inspired microfluidic device, reproducing real-scale features of fetal airways representative of three distinct phases of in utero gestation. Micro-particle image velocimetry measurements, supported by computational fluid dynamics simulations, reveal distinct respiratory alveolar flow patterns throughout different stages of fetal life. While attached, streamlined flows characterize the shallow structures of premature alveoli indicative of the onset of saccular stage, separated recirculating vortex flows become the signature of developed and extruded alveoli characteristic of the advanced stages of fetal development. To further mimic physiological aspects of the cellular environment of developing airways, our biomimetic devices integrate an alveolar epithelium using the A549 cell line, recreating a confluent monolayer that produces pulmonary surfactant. Overall, our in vitro biomimetic fetal airways model delivers a robust and reliable platform combining key features of alveolar morphology, flow patterns, and physiological aspects of fetal lungs developing in utero. PMID:25759753

  18. Noninvasive assessment of alveolar microvascular recruitment in conscious nonsedated rats

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Dane, Dan M.; Ravikumar, Priya; Unger, Roger H.; Hsia, Connie C.W.

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of alveolar microvascular reserves, assessed from the relationship between pulmonary diffusing capacity (DLCO) and perfusion (Q̇c), is critical to maintenance of arterial blood oxygenation. Leptin-resistant ZDF fatty diabetic (fa/fa) rats exhibit restricted cardiopulmonary physiology under anesthesia. To assess alveolar microvascular function in conscious, non-sedated, non-instrumented, and minimally restrained animals, we adapted a rebreathing technique to fa/fa and control non-diabetic (+/+) rats (4-5 and 7-11 mo old) at rest and mild spontaneous activity. Measurements included O2 uptake, lung volume, Q̇c, DLCO, membrane diffusing capacity (DMCO), capillary blood volume (Vc) and septal tissue-blood volume. In older fa/fa than +/+ animals, DLCO and DMCO at a given Q̇c were lower; Vc was reduced in proportion to Q̇c. Results demonstrate the consequences of alveolar microangiopathy in metabolic syndrome: lung volume restriction, reduced Q̇c, and elevated membrane resistance to diffusion. At a given Q̇c, DLCO is lower in rats and guinea pigs than dogs or humans, consistent with limited alveolar microvascular reserves in small animals. PMID:24100202

  19. Breastfeeding, lung volumes and alveolar size at school-age

    PubMed Central

    Dogaru, Cristian M; Narayanan, Manjith; Spycher, Ben D; Pescatore, Anina M; Owers-Bradley, John; Beardsmore, Caroline S; Silverman, Michael; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies found larger lung volumes at school-age in formerly breastfed children, with some studies suggesting an effect modification by maternal asthma. We wanted to explore this further in children who had undergone extensive lung function testing. The current study aimed to assess whether breastfeeding was associated with larger lung volumes and, if so, whether all compartments were affected. We also assessed association of breastfeeding with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), which measures freedom of gas diffusion in alveolar-acinar compartments and is a surrogate of alveolar dimensions. Additionally, we assessed whether these effects were modified by maternal asthma. Methods We analysed data from 111 children and young adults aged 11–21 years, who had participated in detailed lung function testing, including spirometry, plethysmography and measurement of ADC of 3Helium (3He) by MR. Information on breastfeeding came from questionnaires applied in early childhood (age 1–4 years). We determined the association between breastfeeding and these measurements using linear regression, controlling for potential confounders. Results We did not find significant evidence for an association between duration of breastfeeding and lung volumes or alveolar dimensions in the entire sample. In breastfed children of mothers with asthma, we observed larger lung volumes and larger average alveolar size than in non-breastfed children, but the differences did not reach significance levels. Conclusions Confirmation of effects of breastfeeding on lung volumes would have important implications for public health. Further investigations with larger sample sizes are warranted. PMID:26180638

  20. Anesthetic Efficacy of Lidocaine/Meperidine for Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Amanda; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a single-blind manner, inferior alveolar nerve blocks using 36 mg of lidocaine with 18 μg of epinephrine or a combination of 36 mg of lidocaine with 18 μg epinephrine plus 36 mg meperidine with 18 μg of epinephrine, at 2 separate appointments, to 52 subjects. An electric pulp tester was used to test for anesthesia, in 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes, of the molars, premolars, and central and lateral incisors. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive 80 readings were obtained within 15 minutes and the 80 reading was continuously sustained for 60 minutes. Using the lidocaine solution, successful pulpal anesthesia ranged from 8 to 58% from the central incisor to the second molar. Using the lidocaine/meperidine solution, successful pulpal anesthesia ranged from 0 to 17%. There was a significant difference (P < .05) between the lidocaine and lidocaine/meperidine solutions for the lateral incisors through the second molars. We conclude that the addition of meperidine to a standard lidocaine solution does not increase the success of the inferior alveolar nerve block. PMID:17177592

  1. Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver: percutaneous stent therapy in Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, J; Görich, J; Kramme, E; Merkle, E; Sokiranski, R; Kern, P; Brambs, H J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Infiltration of the hepatic veins in the alveolar echinococcosis can lead to the development of the Budd-Chiari syndrome. The medical and surgical treatment of this condition is generally unsatisfactory. The results of successful interventional treatment with percutaneous stent implantation in the hepatic veins are reported. METHODS: Using a transjugular approach, metal mesh stents (Boston Scientific, Medi-Tech Accuflex 8/60 mm) were placed in the median and left hepatic veins of a 53 year old woman. After the intervention, oral chemotherapy with albendazole (2 x 400 mg/day) was continued, but no anticoagulants were given. RESULTS: Stent placement was performed without complications. The clinical picture improved rapidly: normalisation of portal blood flow was confirmed by Doppler ultrasound and there was improvement of liver function, reduction of oesophageal varices, and disappearance of ascites. A follow-up examination at 15 months showed no evidence of stent occlusion. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of portal hypertension in alveolar echinococcosis of the liver is problematic. In selected patients with portal hypertension secondary to hepatic vein stenoses but no cirrhosis, percutaneous stent placement in the hepatic veins represents a promising treatment alternative. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9026484

  2. Label-free quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis reveals differentially regulated proteins and pathway in PRRSV-infected pulmonary alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rui; Fang, Liurong; Jin, Hui; Wang, Dang; An, Kang; Xu, Ningzhi; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2014-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an important pathogen of swine worldwide and causes significant economic losses. Through regulating the host proteins phosphorylation, PRRSV was found to manipulate the activities of several signaling molecules to regulate innate immune responses. However, the role of protein phosphorylation during PRRSV infection and the signal pathways responsible for it are relatively unknown. Here liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to systematically investigate the global phosphorylation events in PRRSV-infected pulmonary alveolar macrophages. In total, we identified 2125 unique phosphosites, of which the phosphorylation level of 292 phosphosites on 242 proteins and 373 phosphosites on 249 proteins was significantly altered at 12 and 36 h pi, respectively. The phosphoproteomics data were analyzed using ingenuity pathways analysis to identify defined canonical pathways and functional networks. Pathway analysis revealed that PRRSV-induced inflammatory cytokines production was probably due to the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB signal pathway, which were regulated by several protein kinases during virus infection. Interacting network analysis indicated that altered phosphoproteins were involved in cellular assembly and organization, protein synthesis, molecular transport, and signal transduction in PRRSV infected cells. These pathways and functional networks analysis could provide direct insights into the biological significance of phosphorylation events modulated by PRRSV and may help us elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of PRRSV infection. PMID:24533505

  3. Development of a diphtheria toxin-based recombinant porcine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting porcine CD25+ cells.

    PubMed

    Peraino, Jaclyn Stromp; Schenk, Marian; Li, Guoying; Zhang, Huiping; Farkash, Evan A; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Wang, Zhirui

    2013-12-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been widely recognized as crucial players in controlling immune responses. Because their major role is to ensure that the immune system is not over reactive, Tregs have been the focus of multiple research studies including those investigating transplantation tolerance, autoimmunity and cancer treatment. On their surface Tregs constitutively express CD25, a high affinity receptor for the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). The reagents constructed in this study were generated by genetically linking porcine IL-2 to the truncated diphtheria toxin (DT390). This reagent functions by first binding to the cell surface via the porcine IL-2/porcine CD25 interaction then the DT390 domain facilitates internalization followed by inhibition of protein synthesis resulting in cell death. Four versions of the porcine IL-2 fusion toxin were designed in an interest to find the most effective isoform: 1) monovalent glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Gly); 2) monovalent non-N-glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (NonGly); 3) bivalent glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Bi-Gly); 4) bivalent non-N-glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Bi-NonGly). Using a porcine CD25(+) B cell lymphoma cell line (LCL13271) in vitro analysis of the fusion toxins' ability to inhibit protein synthesis demonstrated that the Bi-NonGly fusion toxin is the most efficient reagent. These in vitro results are consistent with binding affinity as the Bi-NonGly fusion toxin binds strongest to CD25 on the same LCL13271 cells. The Bi-Gly fusion toxin significantly prolonged the survival (p=0.028) of tumor-bearing NOD/SCID IL-2 receptor γ(-/-) (NSG) mice injected with LCL13271 cells compared with untreated controls. This recombinant protein has great potential to function as a useful tool for in vivo depletion of porcine CD25(+) cells for studying immune regulation. PMID:24055128

  4. Development of a Diphtheria Toxin-Based Recombinant Porcine IL-2 Fusion Toxin for Depleting Porcine CD25+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peraino, Jaclyn Stromp; Schenk, Marian; Li, Guoying; Zhang, Huiping; Farkash, Evan A.; Sachs, David H.; Huang, Christene A.; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Wang, Zhirui

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been widely recognized as crucial players in controlling immune responses. Because their major role is to ensure that the immune system is not over reactive, Tregs have been the focus of multiple research studies including those investigating transplantation tolerance, autoimmunity and cancer treatment. On their surface Tregs constitutively express CD25, a high affinity receptor for the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). The reagents constructed in this study were generated by genetically linking porcine IL-2 to the truncated diphtheria toxin (DT390). This reagent functions by first binding to the cell surface via the porcine IL-2/porcine CD25 interaction then the DT390 domain facilitates internalization followed by inhibition of protein synthesis resulting in cell death. Four versions of the porcine IL-2 fusion toxin were designed in an interest to find the most effective isoform: 1) monovalent glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Gly); 2) monovalent non-N-glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (NonGly); 3) bivalent glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Bi-Gly); 4) bivalent non-N-glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Bi-NonGly). Using a porcine CD25+ B cell lymphoma cell line (LCL13271) in vitro analysis of the fusion toxins’ ability to inhibit protein synthesis demonstrated that the Bi-NonGly fusion toxin is the most efficient reagent. These in vitro results are consistent with binding affinity as the Bi-NonGly fusion toxin binds strongest to CD25 on the same LCL13271 cells. The Bi-Gly fusion toxin significantly prolonged the survival (p=0.028) of tumor-bearing NOD/SCID IL-2 receptor γ−/− (NSG) mice injected with LCL13271 cells compared with untreated controls. This recombinant protein has great potential to function as a useful tool for in vivo depletion of porcine CD25+ cells for studying immune regulation. PMID:24055128

  5. Alveolar lining fluid regulates mononuclear phagocyte 5-lipoxygenase metabolism.

    PubMed

    Phare, S M; Peters-Golden, M; Coffey, M J

    1998-11-01

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyses the synthesis of leukotrienes (LT), which are important in phagocytosis and killing of microorganisms. The alveolar macrophage (AM), the primary resident defender of the alveolar space, has a greater capacity for LT synthesis than its precursor, the peripheral blood monocyte (PBM). This study investigated whether the alveolar lining fluid (ALF) upregulates LT synthetic capacity in mononuclear phagocytes. Rat AM, peritoneal macrophages (PM) and ALF were obtained by lavage from pathogen-free animals. Human PBM were isolated from normal subjects. 5-LO metabolism and expression were measured with and without ALF. Rat ALF increased 5-LO metabolism (136.4+/-15.1% of control) in cultured PBM. This was associated with increased 5-LO activating protein (FLAP) (357+/-29.5 %), and 5-LO expression (188+/-31.3%). Culture of AM for 3 days resulted in a greater decrement in LTB4 synthesis (LTB4 15.4+/-6.9% of day 1) than in PM (54.7+/-8.3% of day 1), suggesting a greater dependence of AM 5-LO metabolism on ALF. 5-LO and FLAP expression decreased to a greater degree in AM than PM in culture. Furthermore, AM cultured with ALF maintained their LT synthetic capacity, FLAP and 5-LO expression compared with control cells cultured in medium alone. In conclusion, alveolar lining fluid increased 5-lipoxygenase metabolism in peripheral blood monocytes and maintained it in cultured alveolar macrophages, by a mechanism of increased 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase activating protein expression. This may boost host defence capabilities. PMID:9864011

  6. Immunosuppressive properties of surfactant and plasma on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Allen, J N; Moore, S A; Pope-Harman, A L; Marsh, C B; Wewers, M D

    1995-03-01

    Alveolar macrophages have been shown to be major producers of the potent proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and of the antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. During the adult respiratory distress syndrome the normally surfactant-coated alveolus becomes flooded with plasma proteins, altering the milieu of alveolar cells such as alveolar macrophages. To understand alveolar macrophage function during the adult respiratory distress syndrome, the individual and combined effects of surfactant and plasma on alveolar macrophage cytokine production was examined. A synthetic surfactant (Exosurf) and a bovine-derived surfactant (Survanta) both inhibited production of interleukin-1 beta, pro-interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibition was noted when both endotoxin and heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus were used as stimuli. Autologous plasma also inhibited interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in a dose-dependent manner, but, unlike surfactant, plasma did not inhibit interleukin-1 receptor antagonist release. Similarly, the combination of plasma and surfactant inhibited interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha release but not interleukin-1 receptor antagonist release. In support of these data, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was detectable in five of six bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples from patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome at a mean concentration of 465 pg/ml; on the other hand, interleukin-1 beta was not detectable in any of these samples. These results indicate that the relative production of interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist can be altered depending on the local concentration of both surfactant and plasma. PMID:7897303

  7. N-acetylcysteine inhibits alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Felton, V. M.; Borok, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in vitro and in vivo, together with the demonstration of EMT in biopsies of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients, suggests a role for TGF-β1-induced EMT in disease pathogenesis. We investigated the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on TGF-β1-induced EMT in a rat epithelial cell line (RLE-6TN) and in primary rat alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). RLE-6TN cells exposed to TGF-β1 for 5 days underwent EMT as evidenced by acquisition of a fibroblast-like morphology, downregulation of the epithelial-specific protein zonula occludens-1, and induction of the mesenchymal-specific proteins α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin. These changes were inhibited by NAC, which also prevented Smad3 phosphorylation. Similarly, primary alveolar epithelial type II cells exposed to TGF-β1 also underwent EMT that was prevented by NAC. TGF-β1 decreased cellular GSH levels by 50–80%, whereas NAC restored them to ∼150% of those found in TGF-β1-treated cells. Treatment with glutathione monoethyl ester similarly prevented an increase in mesenchymal marker expression. Consistent with its role as an antioxidant and cellular redox stabilizer, NAC dramatically reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species production in the presence of TGF-β1. Finally, inhibition of intracellular ROS generation during TGF-β1 treatment prevented alveolar EMT, but treatment with H2O2 alone did not induce EMT. We conclude that NAC prevents EMT in AEC in vitro, at least in part through replenishment of intracellular GSH stores and limitation of TGF-β1-induced intracellular ROS generation. We speculate that beneficial effects of NAC on pulmonary function in IPF may be mediated by inhibitory effects on alveolar EMT. PMID:19648289

  8. N-acetylcysteine inhibits alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Felton, V M; Borok, Z; Willis, B C

    2009-11-01

    The ability of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in vitro and in vivo, together with the demonstration of EMT in biopsies of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients, suggests a role for TGF-beta1-induced EMT in disease pathogenesis. We investigated the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on TGF-beta1-induced EMT in a rat epithelial cell line (RLE-6TN) and in primary rat alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). RLE-6TN cells exposed to TGF-beta1 for 5 days underwent EMT as evidenced by acquisition of a fibroblast-like morphology, downregulation of the epithelial-specific protein zonula occludens-1, and induction of the mesenchymal-specific proteins alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and vimentin. These changes were inhibited by NAC, which also prevented Smad3 phosphorylation. Similarly, primary alveolar epithelial type II cells exposed to TGF-beta1 also underwent EMT that was prevented by NAC. TGF-beta1 decreased cellular GSH levels by 50-80%, whereas NAC restored them to approximately 150% of those found in TGF-beta1-treated cells. Treatment with glutathione monoethyl ester similarly prevented an increase in mesenchymal marker expression. Consistent with its role as an antioxidant and cellular redox stabilizer, NAC dramatically reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species production in the presence of TGF-beta1. Finally, inhibition of intracellular ROS generation during TGF-beta1 treatment prevented alveolar EMT, but treatment with H2O2 alone did not induce EMT. We conclude that NAC prevents EMT in AEC in vitro, at least in part through replenishment of intracellular GSH stores and limitation of TGF-beta1-induced intracellular ROS generation. We speculate that beneficial effects of NAC on pulmonary function in IPF may be mediated by inhibitory effects on alveolar EMT. PMID:19648289

  9. DA-Raf–dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells controls alveolar formation

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe-Takano, Haruko; Takano, Kazunori; Sakamoto, Akemi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Endo, Takeshi; Hatano, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar formation is coupled to the spatiotemporally regulated differentiation of alveolar myofibroblasts (AMYFs), which contribute to the morphological changes of interalveolar walls. Although the Ras-ERK signaling pathway is one of the key regulators for alveolar formation in developing lungs, the intrinsic molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying its role remain largely unknown. By analyzing the Ras-ERK signaling pathway during postnatal development of lungs, we have identified a critical role of DA-Raf1 (DA-Raf)—a dominant-negative antagonist for the Ras-ERK signaling pathway—in alveolar formation. DA-Raf–deficient mice displayed alveolar dysgenesis as a result of the blockade of AMYF differentiation. DA-Raf is predominantly expressed in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s) in developing lungs, and DA-Raf–dependent MEK1/2 inhibition in AEC2s suppresses expression of tissue inhibitor of matalloprotienase 4 (TIMP4), which prevents a subsequent proteolytic cascade matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)14–MMP2. Furthermore, MMP14–MMP2 proteolytic cascade regulates AMYF differentiation and alveolar formation. Therefore, DA-Raf–dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in AEC2s is required for alveolar formation via triggering MMP2 activation followed by AMYF differentiation. These findings reveal a pivotal role of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in the dynamic regulation of alveolar development. PMID:24843139

  10. Development of pulmonary bronchiolo-alveolar adenocarcinomas in transgenic mice overexpressing murine c- myc and epidermal growth factor in alveolar type II pneumocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, A; Bartels, T; Geick, A; Klocke, R; Paul, D; Halter, R

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic mouse models were established to study tumorigenesis of bronchiolo-alveolar adenocarcinomas derived from alveolar type II pneumocytes (AT-II cells). Transgenic lines expressing the murine oncogene c- myc under the control of the lung-specific surfactant protein C promoter developed multifocal bronchiolo-alveolar hyperplasias, adenomas and carcinomas respectively, whereas transgenic lines expressing a secretable form of the epidermal growth factor (IgEGF), a structural and functional homologue of transforming growth factor α (TGFα), developed hyperplasias of the alveolar epithelium. Since the oncogenes c- myc and TGFα are frequently overexpressed in human lung bronchiolo-alveolar adenocarcinomas, these mouse lines are useful as models for human lung bronchiolo-alveolar adenocarcinomas. The average life expectancies of hemizygous and homozygous c- myc transgenics were 14.25 months and 9.2 months, respectively, suggesting that a dosage effect of c- myc caused an accelerated bronchiolo-alveolar adenocarcinoma formation. First analyses of double transgenics, hemizygous for both c- myc and IgEGF, show that these mice develop bronchiolo-alveolar adenocarcinomas at the average age of 9 months, indicating that these oncogenes cooperate during the lung cancer formation. Our results demonstrate that c- myc and EGF are directly involved and cooperate with one another during formation of bronchiolo-alveolar adenocarcinomas in the lung. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11259097

  11. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of the gene coding for the porcine beta(3) integrin subunit (CD61).

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Marín, Angeles; Yubero, Noemí; Esteso, Gloria; Moreno, Angela; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Morera, Luis; Llanes, Diego; Barbancho, Manuel; Garrido, Juan J

    2008-01-31

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell adhesion molecules with major roles in a variety of biological processes ranging from cell migration to tissue organization, immune and non-immune defense mechanisms and oncogenic transformation. Members of the beta(3) integrin subfamily are composed of a beta(3) subunit (CD61) non-covalently associated with two alpha subunits, alpha(IIb) (CD41) and alpha(v) (CD51), to constitute a group of transmembrane glycoproteins that participate in many physiologically important events. This investigation has focused on the molecular characterization of the cDNA encoding the porcine beta(3) integrin subunit. The deduced 762-amino acid sequence was 93, 92, 91, 89, 79 and 73% homologous to human, dog, rabbit, mouse, chicken and Xenopus laevis CD61 protein, respectively. Porcine CD61 molecule shares many structural features with human CD61, including a region containing a metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) folding into an I domain-like structure. Through PCR-SSCP analysis and sequencing, six polymorphic positions were detected in the cDNA sequence of porcine CD61, and their frequencies were observed from a collection of 47 pigs. Expression analysis was done at two different levels: expression of the CD61 mRNA by RT-PCR and localization of the protein by immunohistochemistry. Our results show that CD61 transcripts were detected mainly in platelets and hematopoietic tissues. The immunohistochemical tissue localization of CD61 protein by a specific monoclonal antibody against CD61 recombinant protein showed that CD61 was expressed on vascular and non-vascular smooth muscle, epithelium and myeloid cells, being undetectable in cells of the lymphoid lineage. Furthermore, pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIM), a subpopulation of macrophages which seem to play an important role in blood clearance, expressed much more CD61 when compared to pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM). The knowledge of the structure and distribution of the CD61 provides

  12. Accidental injury of the inferior alveolar nerve due to the extrusion of calcium hydroxide in endodontic treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yooseok; Roh, Byoung-Duck; Kim, Yemi; Kim, Taehyeon; Kim, Hyungjun

    2016-02-01

    During clinical endodontic treatment, we often find radiopaque filling material beyond the root apex. Accidental extrusion of calcium hydroxide could cause the injury of inferior alveolar nerve, such as paresthesia or continuous inflammatory response. This case report presents the extrusion of calcium hydroxide and treatment procedures including surgical intervention. A 48 yr old female patient experienced Calcipex II extrusion in to the inferior alveolar canal on left mandibular area during endodontic treatment. After completion of endodontic treatment on left mandibular first molar, surgical intervention was planned under general anesthesia. After cortical bone osteotomy and debridement, neuroma resection and neurorrhaphy was performed, and prognosis was observed. But no improvement in sensory nerve was seen following surgical intervention after 20 mon. A clinician should be aware of extrusion of intracanal medicaments and the possibility of damage on inferior alveolar canal. Injectable type of calcium hydroxide should be applied with care for preventing nerve injury. The alternative delivery method such as lentulo spiral was suggested on the posterior mandibular molar. PMID:26877992

  13. Accidental injury of the inferior alveolar nerve due to the extrusion of calcium hydroxide in endodontic treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    During clinical endodontic treatment, we often find radiopaque filling material beyond the root apex. Accidental extrusion of calcium hydroxide could cause the injury of inferior alveolar nerve, such as paresthesia or continuous inflammatory response. This case report presents the extrusion of calcium hydroxide and treatment procedures including surgical intervention. A 48 yr old female patient experienced Calcipex II extrusion in to the inferior alveolar canal on left mandibular area during endodontic treatment. After completion of endodontic treatment on left mandibular first molar, surgical intervention was planned under general anesthesia. After cortical bone osteotomy and debridement, neuroma resection and neurorrhaphy was performed, and prognosis was observed. But no improvement in sensory nerve was seen following surgical intervention after 20 mon. A clinician should be aware of extrusion of intracanal medicaments and the possibility of damage on inferior alveolar canal. Injectable type of calcium hydroxide should be applied with care for preventing nerve injury. The alternative delivery method such as lentulo spiral was suggested on the posterior mandibular molar. PMID:26877992

  14. Endovascular embolization for the management of inferior alveolar artery bleeding after a third molar extraction: A case report.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Bernardo; Varazzani, Anea; Ferri, Anea; Menozzi, Roberto; Sesenna, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Removal of third molars is a common surgical procedure with low complication rates. Localized alveolar osteitis, infection, bleeding, and paresthesia are the four most common postoperative complications of third molar extraction reported in the literature. Postoperative severe hemorrhages are rare and are usually related to inferior alveolar artery damage. Although most bleeding is usually managed effectively by local compression or packing of the socket, even life-threatening complications may occur. Endovascular embolization has been rarely reported as treatment for such a complication and represents an ideal solution, with a low complication rate and excellent control of bleeding. The authors report a case of potentially life-threatening hemorrhage continuing 4 days after extraction of the mandibular right third molar, resulting in significant anemia (Hb 6.6 g/dL) and treated successfully with endovascular embolization of the inferior alveolar artery. The authors consider it important for general practitioners to know this treatment and how to manage this rare complication in the correct way, saving time if satisfactory hemostasis cannot be reached with common procedures. PMID:26665260

  15. Clinical grade allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells restore alveolar fluid clearance in human lungs rejected for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Curley, G. F.; Hamid, U. I.; Laffey, J. G.; Abbott, J.; McKenna, D. H.; Fang, X.; Matthay, M. A.; Lee, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of suitable donors for all solid-organ transplant programs is exacerbated in lung transplantation by the low utilization of potential donor lungs, due primarily to donor lung injury and dysfunction, including pulmonary edema. The current studies were designed to determine if intravenous clinical-grade human mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (hMSCs) would be effective in restoring alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) in the human ex vivo lung perfusion model, using lungs that had been deemed unsuitable for transplantation and had been subjected to prolonged ischemic time. The human lungs were perfused with 5% albumin in a balanced electrolyte solution and oxygenated with continuous positive airway pressure. Baseline AFC was measured in the control lobe and if AFC was impaired (defined as <10%/h), the lungs received either hMSC (5 × 106 cells) added to the perfusate or perfusion only as a control. AFC was measured in a different lung lobe at 4 h. Intravenous hMSC restored AFC in the injured lungs to a normal level. In contrast, perfusion only did not increase AFC. This positive effect on AFC was reduced by intrabronchial administration of a neutralizing antibody to keratinocyte growth factor (KGF). Thus, intravenous allogeneic hMSCs are effective in restoring the capacity of the alveolar epithelium to remove alveolar fluid at a normal rate, suggesting that this therapy may be effective in enhancing the resolution of pulmonary edema in human lungs deemed clinically unsuitable for transplantation. PMID:24532289

  16. Molecular characterization and expression of porcine Siglec-5.

    PubMed

    Escalona, Z; Álvarez, B; Uenishi, H; Toki, D; Yuste, M; Revilla, C; Gómez del Moral, M; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J

    2014-05-01

    In this study we describe the characterization of the porcine orthologue of Siglec-5. A cDNa clone was obtained from a porcine cDNa library derived from swine small intestine which encodes a 555 a-a type 1 transmembrane protein with sequence homology to human Siglec-5. This protein consists of four Ig-like domains, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tail with two tyrosine-based signalling motifs. When expressed as a recombinant protein fused to the Fc region of human IgG1, porcine Siglec-5 was able to bind porcine red blood cells in a sialic acid-dependent manner. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were developed against porcine Siglec-5 and used to analyse its expression in bone marrow and blood cells, and lymphoid tissues. Porcine Siglec-5 expression was mainly restricted to myelomonocytic cells and their precursors, being detected also, although at low levels, on plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B lymphocytes. In lymphoid tissues, ellipsoids of the spleen and subcapsular and medullar sinuses of lymph nodes were positive for Siglec-5. These mAbs were able to precipitate, from granulocyte lysates, a protein of approximately 85 kDa under non-reducing conditions, indicating that porcine Siglec-5 is expressed as a monomer in the plasma membrane. PMID:24382335

  17. A novel culture system for adult porcine intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hassan A; Lei, Nan Ye; Brinkley, Garrett; Scott, Andrew; Wang, Jiafang; Kar, Upendra K; Jabaji, Ziyad B; Lewis, Michael; Martín, Martín G; Dunn, James C Y; Stelzner, Matthias G

    2016-07-01

    Porcine models are useful for investigating therapeutic approaches to short bowel syndrome and potentially to intestinal stem cell (ISC) transplantation. Whereas techniques for the culture and genetic manipulation of ISCs from mice and humans are well established, similar methods for porcine stem cells have not been reported. Jejunal crypts were isolated from murine, human, and juvenile and adult porcine small intestine, suspended in Matrigel, and co-cultured with syngeneic intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs) or cultured without feeder cells in various culture media. Media containing epidermal growth factor, noggin, and R-spondin 1 (ENR medium) were supplemented with various combinations of Wnt3a- or ISEMF-conditioned medium (CM) and with glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitor (GSK3i), and their effects were studied on cultured crypts. Cell lineage differentiation was assessed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cultured porcine cells were serially passaged and transduced with a lentiviral vector. Whereas ENR medium supported murine enteroid growth, it did not sustain porcine crypts beyond 5 days. Supplementation of Wnt3a-CM and GSK3i resulted in the formation of complex porcine enteroids with budding extensions. These enteroids contained a mixture of stem and differentiated cells and were successfully passaged in the presence of GSK3i. Crypts grown in media supplemented with porcine ISEMF-CM formed spheroids that were less well differentiated than enteroids. Enteroids and spheroids were transfected with a lentivirus with high efficiency. Thus, our method maintains juvenile and adult porcine crypt cells long-term in culture. Porcine enteroids and spheroids can be successfully passaged and transduced by using lentiviral vectors. PMID:26928041

  18. Amino-Acid Sequence of Porcine Pepsin

    PubMed Central

    Tang, J.; Sepulveda, P.; Marciniszyn, J.; Chen, K. C. S.; Huang, W-Y.; Tao, N.; Liu, D.; Lanier, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    As the culmination of several years of experiments, we propose a complete amino-acid sequence for porcine pepsin, an enzyme containing 327 amino-acid residues in a single polypeptide chain. In the sequence determination, the enzyme was treated with cyanogen bromide. Five resulting fragments were purified. The amino-acid sequence of four of the fragments accounted for 290 residues. Because the structure of a 37-residue carboxyl-terminal fragment was already known, it was not studied. The alignment of these fragments was determined from the sequence of methionyl-peptides we had previously reported. We also discovered the locations of activesite aspartyl residues, as well as the pairing of the three disulfide bridges. A minor component of commercial crystalline pepsin was found to contain two extra amino-acid residues, Ala-Leu-, at the amino-terminus of the molecule. This minor component was apparently derived from a different site of cleavage during the activation of porcine pepsinogen. PMID:4587252

  19. Tissue Remodelling following Resection of Porcine Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nygård, Ingvild Engdal; Mortensen, Kim Erlend; Hedegaard, Jakob; Conley, Lene Nagstrup; Bendixen, Christian; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur; Revhaug, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To study genes regulating the extracellular matrix (ECM) and investigate the tissue remodelling following liver resection in porcine. Methods. Four pigs with 60% partial hepatectomy- (PHx-) induced liver regeneration were studied over six weeks. Four pigs underwent sham surgery and another four pigs were used as controls of the normal liver growth. Liver biopsies were taken upon laparotomy, after three and six weeks. Gene expression profiles were obtained using porcine-specific oligonucleotide microarrays. Immunohistochemical staining was performed and a proliferative index was assessed. Results. More differentially expressed genes were associated with the regulation of ECM in the resection group compared to the sham and control groups. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) and collagen 1, alpha 2 (COL1A2) were both upregulated in the early phase of liver regeneration, validated by immunopositive cells during the remodelling phase of liver regeneration. A broadened connective tissue was demonstrated by Masson's Trichrome staining, and an immunohistochemical staining against pan-Cytokeratin (pan-CK) demonstrated a distinct pattern of migrating cells, followed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive nuclei. Conclusions. The present study demonstrates both a distinct pattern of PCNA positive nuclei and a deposition of ECM proteins in the remodelling phase of liver regeneration. PMID:26240819

  20. Phylogeny and evolution of porcine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaofeng; Tao, Ye; Cui, Jin; Suo, Siqingaowa; Cong, Yingying; Tijssen, Peter

    2013-12-26

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV), a member of the genus Parvovirus, family Parvoviridae, is a significant causative agent in porcine reproductive failure, causing serious economic losses in the swine industry. Previous phylogenetic studies based on the NS1 or VP2 genes indicated that current PPV strains diverged 30 years ago and that VP2 was under neutral or positive selection. Our analysis of NS1, VP2 and complete ORFs indicated that the most recent common ancestor of PPV strains existed about 250 years ago and that the 127-nt repeat in the 3'NTR was present in viruses of some subclades that evolved about 80 years ago. Nucleotide substitution rates of NS1 and VP2 genes were 3.03 × 10(-5) and 1.07 × 10(-4), respectively. Both the NS1 and VP2 proteins were under purifying selection and recombination did not contribute to the genetic diversity of PPV. As expected, surface amino acids are hydrophilic and make up the majority of mutations in the VP2 protein; residues in VP2 interfaces were substituted gradually, often in conjunction with complementary substitutions in the neighboring VP2. PMID:24050995

  1. Molecular epidemiology and evolution of porcine parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Streck, André Felipe; Canal, Cláudio Wageck; Truyen, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV), recently named Ungulate protoparvovirus 1, is considered to be one of the most important causes of reproductive failure in swine. Fetal death, mummification, stillbirths and delayed return to estrus are predominant clinical signs commonly associated with PPV infection in a herd. It has recently been shown that certain parvoviruses exhibit a nucleotide substitution rate close to that commonly determined for RNA viruses. However, the PPV vaccines broadly used in the last 30 years have most likely reduced the genetic diversity of the virus and led to the predominance of strains with a capsid profile distinct from that of the original vaccine-based strains. Furthermore, a number of novel porcine parvovirus species with yet-unknown veterinary relevance and characteristics have been described during the last decade. In this review, an overview of PPV molecular evolution is presented, highlighting characteristics of the various genetic elements, their evolutionary rate and the discovery of new capsid profiles driven by the currently used vaccines. PMID:26453771

  2. Interactions of porcine circovirus 2 with its hosts.

    PubMed

    Ren, Linzhu; Chen, Xinrong; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2016-08-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) can cause porcine circovirus diseases and porcine circovirus-associated diseases (PCVD/PCVAD), which are widely presented in swine-producing countries. Since the discovery of this virus, considerable efforts have been devoted to understanding this pathogen and its interactions with its host. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on interactions between host cell factors and PCV2 with respect to viral proliferation, virus-induced cell apoptosis and autophagy, and host antiviral defenses during PCV2 infection. We also review mouse model systems for PCV2 infection. PMID:27016220

  3. Effect of alveolar pressure on pulmonary artery pressure in chronically hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Wach, R; Emery, C J; Bee, D; Barer, G R

    1987-02-01

    The effect on pulmonary artery pressure of a rise in alveolar pressure differed in chronically hypoxic rats (10% O2 for 3-5 weeks) compared with control rats. Chronically hypoxic rats have newly muscularised walls in arterioles in the alveolar region. Isolated lungs of chronically hypoxic and control rats were perfused with blood under conditions in which alveolar pressure was greater than left atrial pressure during both normoxia and hypoxia. Alveolar pressure was the effective downstream pressure. Pressure-flow lines were measured at low and high alveolar pressure (5 and 15 mmHg). During normoxia pressure-flow lines of chronically hypoxic rats had a steeper slope (higher resistance) and greater extrapolated intercept on the pressure axis (effective downstream pressure) than control rats. In both groups of rats the change from low to high alveolar pressure during normoxia caused an approximately parallel shift in the pressure-flow line similar to the change in alveolar pressure. During hypoxia, which led to an increase in slope and intercept in both groups of rats, the effect of a rise in alveolar pressure differed in chronically hypoxic from control rats. In control rats there was a small parallel shift in the pressure-flow line that was much less than the increase in alveolar pressure; in chronically hypoxic rats there was a large parallel shift in the pressure-flow line that was greater than the increase in alveolar pressure. Thus in chronically hypoxic rats hypoxic vasoconstriction probably occurred mainly in muscular alveolar vessels, whereas in control rats it probably occurred upstream in extra-alveolar vessels. At constant blood flow the relation between pulmonary artery pressure and alveolar pressure was measured while alveolar pressure was reduced from approximately 15 mmHg to zero during both normoxia and hypoxia. In control and chronically hypoxic rats the slope of this line was less than 1. At an alveolar pressure of 2-3 mmHg there was an inflection

  4. A novel 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-activin A pathway in human alveolar macrophages is dysfunctional in patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP).

    PubMed

    Barna, Barbara P; Malur, Anagha; Dalrymple, Heidi; Karnekar, Reema; Culver, Daniel A; Abraham, Susamma; Singh, Ravinder J; Brescia, Donald; Kavuru, Mani S; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2009-01-01

    We have shown that activin A, a cytokine implicated in regulating B-cell proliferation, is severely deficient in alveolar macrophages from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), an autoimmune disorder characterized by surfactant accumulation and neutralizing autoantibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. Mechanisms of activin regulation in alveolar macrophages are not well understood. Based on previous gene array results from PAP bronchoalveolar lavage cells suggesting deficiencies in vitamin D target genes, and on recent evidence of vitamin D receptor elements (VDREs) in the human activin A gene promoter, we investigated the effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (vitamin D(3)) on activin A expression in alveolar macrophages from healthy individuals and PAP patients. Activin A expression was stimulated by LPS in cultures of either healthy control or PAP alveolar macrophages; in contrast, vitamin D(3) increased activin A only in healthy controls but not in PAP. Compared to healthy controls, freshly obtained (uncultured) PAP alveolar macrophages displayed healthy intrinsic vitamin D receptor expression but deficient expression of vitamin D target genes, cathelicidin and thioredoxin interacting protein. PAP patients also demonstrated a relative insufficiency of circulating vitamin D. Investigation of activin A in murine alveolar macrophages confirmed a lack of functional response to vitamin D as anticipated since murine activin A does not contain VDREs. Results suggest that mechanisms of activin A deficiency in PAP alveolar macrophages may involve dysregulation of a novel species-specific vitamin D-activin A pathway. PMID:18803071

  5. Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cell Dysfunction in Rat Experimental Hepatopulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenli; Hu, Bingqian; Wu, Wei; Batra, Sachin; Blackburn, Michael R.; Alcorn, Joseph L.; Fallon, Michael B.; Zhang, Junlan

    2014-01-01

    The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) develops when pulmonary vasodilatation leads to abnormal gas exchange. However, in human HPS, restrictive ventilatory defects are also observed supporting that the alveolar epithelial compartment may also be affected. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AT2) play a critical role in maintaining the alveolar compartment by producing four surfactant proteins (SPs, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D) which also facilitate alveolar repair following injury. However, no studies have evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment in experimental HPS. In this study, we evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment and particularly AT2 cells in experimental HPS induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL). We found a significant reduction in pulmonary SP production associated with increased apoptosis in AT2 cells after CBDL relative to controls. Lung morphology showed decreased mean alveolar chord length and lung volumes in CBDL animals that were not seen in control models supporting a selective reduction of alveolar airspace. Furthermore, we found that administration of TNF-α, the bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and FXR nuclear receptor activation (GW4064) induced apoptosis and impaired SP-B and SP-C production in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. These results imply that AT2 cell dysfunction occurs in experimental HPS and is associated with alterations in the alveolar epithelial compartment. Our findings support a novel contributing mechanism in experimental HPS that may be relevant to humans and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25419825

  6. An automatic early stage alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation method on digital dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hiroki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a kind of typical dental diseases, which affects many adults. The presence of alveolar bone resorption, which can be observed from dental panoramic radiographs, is one of the most important signs of the progression of periodontal disease. Automatically evaluating alveolar-bone resorption is of important clinic meaning in dental radiology. The purpose of this study was to propose a novel system for automated alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation from digital dental panoramic radiographs for the first time. The proposed system enables visualization and quantitative evaluation of alveolar bone resorption degree surrounding the teeth. It has the following procedures: (1) pre-processing for a test image; (2) detection of tooth root apices with Gabor filter and curve fitting for the root apex line; (3) detection of features related with alveolar bone by using image phase congruency map and template matching and curving fitting for the alveolar line; (4) detection of occlusion line with selected Gabor filter; (5) finally, evaluation of the quantitative alveolar-bone-resorption degree in the area surrounding teeth by simply computing the average ratio of the height of the alveolar bone and the height of the teeth. The proposed scheme was applied to 30 patient cases of digital panoramic radiographs, with alveolar bone resorption of different stages. Our initial trial on these test cases indicates that the quantitative evaluation results are correlated with the alveolar-boneresorption degree, although the performance still needs further improvement. Therefore it has potential clinical practicability.

  7. Relationship of Anterior Alveolar Dimensions with Mandibular Divergence in Class I Malocclusion – A Cephalometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Korath, Vinoth Abraham; Nagachandran; Vijayalakshmi, Devaki; Parameswaran, Ratna; Raman, Priya; Sunitha, Catherine; Khan, Nayeemullah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the major limiting factors in retraction of proclined teeth is the width of the alveolus both in maxilla and mandible. Aim The objective of this study was to assess the maxillary and mandibular anterior alveolar dimensions and to correlate with mandibular divergence in Class I bi-dento-alveolar protrusion patients. Materials and Methods Pretreatment lateral cephalograms (n=88) were analysed using a composite analysis with cephalometric software. Both maxillary and mandibular anterior alveolar widths and heights were measured and correlated with mandibular divergence. One-way analysis (ANOVA) and Pearson correlation test were used to compare and establish the significance between groups. Results Segregation of the data based on variation in the bi-cortical widths and heights showed that lesser alveolar widths and greater alveolar heights were associated with the high angled subjects and greater alveolar widths and lesser heights were associated with low angled subjects. Conclusion Patients with hyperdivergent mandible exhibited thin anterior alveolar width and greater alveolar height whereas low angled subjects had wider alveolar width and lesser alveolar height. Orthodontic treatment plan for retraction of anterior teeth must be based on these differences caused by variations in mandibular divergence. PMID:27437356

  8. Direct trabecular meshwork imaging in porcine eyes through multiphoton gonioscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Ammar, David A.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Gibson, Emily A.; Lei, Tim C.

    2013-03-01

    The development of technologies to characterize the ocular aqueous outflow system (AOS) is important for the understanding of the pathophysiology of glaucoma. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) offers the advantage of high-resolution, label-free imaging with intrinsic image contrast because the emitted signals result from the specific biomolecular content of the tissue. Previous attempts to use MPM to image the murine irido-corneal region directly through the sclera have suffered from degradation in image resolution due to scattering of the focused laser light. As a result, transscleral MPM has limited ability to observe fine structures in the AOS. In this work, the porcine irido-corneal angle was successfully imaged through the transparent cornea using a gonioscopic lens to circumvent the highly scattering scleral tissue. The resulting high-resolution images allowed the detailed structures in the trabecular meshwork (TM) to be observed. Multimodal imaging by two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic generation allowed visualization of different features in the TM without labels and without disruption of the TM or surrounding tissues. MPM gonioscopy is a promising noninvasive imaging tool for high-resolution studies of the AOS, and research continues to explore the potential for future clinical applications in humans.

  9. Treatment of porcine Pseudomonas ARDS with combination drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Sielaff, T D; Sugerman, H J; Tatum, J L; Kellum, J M; Blocher, C R

    1987-12-01

    A combination drug therapy (Poly-5: ibuprofen 12.5 mg/kg, methylprednisolone 30 mg/kg, cimetidine 150 mg, diphenhydramine 10 mg/kg, and ketanserin 0.2 mg/kg) given at 20 and 120 minutes after starting continuous intravenous Pseudomonas (Ps, 5 X 10(8) CFU/20 kg/min) was studied in three groups of swine: saline control (C, n = 9), Ps alone (Ps, n = 8), and Ps plus Poly-5 (n = 5). PaO2, systemic (SAP) and pulmonary arterial (PAP) pressures, cardiac index (CI), thermal-cardiogreen extravascular lung water (EVLW), pulmonary albumin flux (slope index, SI), and arterial blood serotonin levels (5-HT) were measured. Ps produced significant (p less than 0.05) increases in PAP, EVLW, and SI with decreases in PaO2, CI, and SAP. 5-HT fell significantly compared to baseline. Poly-5 prevented (p less than 0.05) the rise in EVLW and SI and the fall in PaO2 and CI compared to Ps. PAP and SI were maintained at C until 90 and 150 minutes, respectively. SAP fell significantly from C at 30, 60, and 180 minutes. 5-HT was significantly lower than Ps throughout, and significantly lower than baseline at 180 minutes. Combined blockade of arachidonic acid metabolites, histamine, and serotonin receptors prevented hypoxemia, increased pulmonary capillary permeability, and cardiovascular deterioration in this porcine septic ARDS model. PMID:3694722

  10. Rare Presentation of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Causing Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Ryan R; Kumar, Sameer; Grossman, Ronald F; Price, Charles; Srigley, John R

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare condition characterized by dysfunctional alveolar macrophages, which ineffectively clear surfactant and typically cause mild hypoxemia. Characteristic Computed Tomography findings are septal reticulations superimposed on ground-glass opacities in a crazy paving pattern, with a clear juxtaposition between affected and unaffected parenchyma. While traditionally PAP was diagnosed via biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is usually sufficient; the fluid appears milky, and on microscopic examination there are foamy macrophages with eosinophilic granules and extracellular hyaline material that is Periodic Acid-Schiff positive. Standard therapy is whole lung lavage (WLL), although novel treatments are under development. The case presented is a 55-year-old woman with six months of progressive dyspnea, who developed hypoxemic respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation; she had typical findings of PAP on imaging and BAL. WLL was ultimately successful in restoring adequate oxygenation. Respiratory failure of this magnitude is a rare finding in PAP. PMID:27445536

  11. Alveolar surfactant homeostasis and the pathogenesis of pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Weaver, Timothy E

    2010-01-01

    The alveolar region of the lung creates an extensive epithelial surface that mediates the transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide required for respiration after birth. Maintenance of pulmonary function depends on the function of type II epithelial cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant lipids and proteins, reducing the collapsing forces created at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic and acquired disorders associated with the surfactant system cause both acute and chronic lung disease. Mutations in the ABCA3, SFTPA, SFTPB, SFTPC, SCL34A2, and TERT genes disrupt type II cell function and/or surfactant homeostasis, causing neonatal respiratory failure and chronic interstitial lung disease. Defects in GM-CSF receptor function disrupt surfactant clearance, causing pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Abnormalities in the surfactant system and disruption of type II cell homeostasis underlie the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic, providing the basis for improved diagnosis and therapies of these rare lung diseases. PMID:19824815

  12. Alveolar Surfactant Homeostasis and the Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    The alveolar region of the lung creates an extensive epithelial surface that mediates the transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide required for respiration after birth. Maintenance of pulmonary function depends on the function of type II epithelial cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant lipids and proteins, reducing the collapsing forces created at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic and acquired disorders associated with the surfactant system cause both acute and chronic lung disease. Mutations in the ABCA3, SFTPA, SFTPB, SFTPC, SCL34A2, and TERT genes disrupt type II cell function and/or surfactant homeostasis, causing neonatal respiratory failure and chronic interstitial lung disease. Defects in GM-CSF receptor function disrupt surfactant clearance, causing pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Abnormalities in the surfactant system and disruption of type II cell homeostasis underlie the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic, providing the basis for improved diagnosis and therapies of these rare lung diseases. PMID:19824815

  13. Alveolar bone loss in osteoporosis: a loaded and cellular affair?

    PubMed Central

    Jonasson, Grethe; Rythén, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary and mandibular bone mirror skeletal bone conditions. Bone remodeling happens at endosteal surfaces where the osteoclasts and osteoblasts are situated. More surfaces means more cells and remodeling. The bone turnover rate in the mandibular alveolar process is probably the fastest in the body; thus, the first signs of osteoporosis may be revealed here. Hormones, osteoporosis, and aging influence the alveolar process and the skeletal bones similarly, but differences in loading between loaded, half-loaded, and unloaded bones are important to consider. Bone mass is redistributed from one location to another where strength is needed. A sparse trabeculation in the mandibular premolar region (large intertrabecular spaces and thin trabeculae) is a reliable sign of osteopenia and a high skeletal fracture risk. Having dense trabeculation (small intertrabecular spaces and well-mineralized trabeculae) is generally advantageous to the individual because of the low fracture risk, but may imply some problems for the clinician. PMID:27471408

  14. Expression of β-Defensin Genes in Bovine Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lisa K.; Rhodes, Janice; Bhat, Meenakshi; Diamond, Gill

    1998-01-01

    Bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) were examined for the expression of β-defensins and to determine whether their expression could be upregulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as observed with β-defensins expressed in bovine tracheal epithelial cells. Four β-defensins were expressed constitutively in BAM, with bovine neutrophil β-defensin (BNBD)-4 and BNBD-5 being the most predominant. This is the first evidence of β-defensin gene expression in a mature myeloid cell. LPS had no effect on β-defensin expression in BAM, even though tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production was induced. Nonbacterial inflammatory particles had little effect on β-defensin gene expression or TNF-α production in BAM. We hypothesize that constitutively expressed β-defensins of alveolar macrophages may have a role in lung host defense. PMID:9453661

  15. Porcine circovirus type 2 detection in in vitro produced porcine blastocysts after virus sperm exposure.

    PubMed

    Galeati, Giovanna; Zannoni, Augusta; Spinaci, Marcella; Bucci, Diego; Ostanello, Fabio; Panarese, Serena; Tamanini, Carlo; Sarli, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the capability of semen experimentally infected with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) to produce porcine blastocysts PCR positive for PCV2. Embryos were obtained from in vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) of porcine oocytes or by parthenogenesis. Sperm suspension was exposed to PCV2b and utilized for IVF. PCV2 spiked semen did not reveal any reduction in sperm viability or motility but its ability to produce infected blastocysts was irrelevant as only one out of 15 blastocysts obtained by IVF were PCV2b; however two blastocysts were PCV2a positive. Furthermore, the presence of PCV2 was demonstrated also in embryos obtained by parthenogenesis (one out of 17 was PCV2b and one PCV2a positive). Even if PCV2 firmly attaches to the surface of spermatozoa, experimentally spiked sperm were not effective in infecting oocytes during IVF and in producing PCR positive embryos. The infected blastocysts we obtained derived most probably from infected oocytes recovered at the abattoir. PMID:26434667

  16. Porcine aminopeptidase N mediated polarized infection by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cong, Yingying; Li, Xiaoxue; Bai, Yunyun; Lv, Xiaonan; Herrler, Georg; Enjuanes, Luis; Zhou, Xingdong; Qu, Bo; Meng, Fandan; Cong, Chengcheng; Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxing

    2015-04-15

    Infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was characterized. Indirect immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed PEDV can be successfully propagated in immortalized swine small intestine epithelial cells (IECs). Infection involved porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN), a reported cellular receptor for PEDV, transient expression of pAPN and siRNA targeted pAPN increased and decreased the infectivity of PEDV in IECs, respectively. Subsequently, polarized entry into and release from both Vero E6 and IECs was analyzed. PEDV entry into polarized cells and pAPN grown on membrane inserts occurs via apical membrane. The progeny virus released into the medium was also quantified which demonstrated that PEDV is preferentially released from the apical membrane. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pAPN, the cellular receptor for PEDV, mediates polarized PEDV infection. These results imply the possibility that PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in intestinal epithelial cells. - Highlights: • PEDV infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was characterized. • Porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN) facilitated PEDV infection in IECs. • PEDV entry into and release from polarized cell via its apical membrane. • PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in IECs.

  17. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia preceding diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Antoon, James W; Hernandez, Michelle L; Roehrs, Phillip A; Noah, Terry L; Leigh, Margaret W; Byerley, Julie S

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is an under-reported and under-diagnosed condition, with a high percentage of cases found on autopsy or late stage disease. The etiology of PAP includes genetic, primary (anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies) and secondary (oncologic, rheumatologic, infectious, chemical and immunologic) causes. Here, we present the first reported pediatric case of endogenous lipoid pneumonia and non-specific interstitial pneumonitis preceding the development of PAP. PMID:25103284

  18. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  19. Alveolar cell carcinoma: diagnostic pitfalls in evaluating the chest roentgenogram

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, M.S.; Bailey, W.C.

    1985-02-01

    A report is given of two patients with initial symptoms of congestive heart failure who had an extensive work-up that failed to reveal any signs of pulmonary malignancy. Subsequent biopsy by fiberoptic bronchoscopy confirmed alveolar cell carcinoma in both cases, suggesting that bronchoscopy with biopsy should be considered in patients with congestive heart failure if pulmonary edema does not resolve with appropriate therapy. 11 references, 2 figures.

  20. Respiratory gas exchange using a triaxial alveolar gas diagram.

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, J. F.; Pages, T.; Palacios, L.

    1993-01-01

    A triaxial alveolar gas diagram to depict fractional concentration of oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen is described, in which the R = 1 line is always implicit. Although it is not claimed that this representation leads to new insights into respiratory physiology, a method of plotting on a triaxial coordinate system has been found to be well suited to many applications when a direct display of fractional nitrogen concentration is required. PMID:8303637

  1. Hyperoxia induces alveolar epithelial-to-mesenchymal cell transition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenyi; Kato, Satomi; Colvocoresses-Dodds, Jennifer; Fifadara, Nimita H.; Gauthier, Theresa W.; Helms, My N.; Carlton, David P.; Brown, Lou Ann S.

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblast accumulation is a pathological feature of lung diseases requiring oxygen therapy. One possible source for myofibroblasts is through the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). To study the effects of oxygen on alveolar EMT, we used RLE-6TN and ex vivo lung slices and found that hyperoxia (85% O2, H85) decreased epithelial proteins, presurfactant protein B (pre-SpB), pro-SpC, and lamellar protein by 50% and increased myofibroblast proteins, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and vimentin by over 200% (P < 0.05). In AEC freshly isolated from H85-treated rats, mRNA for pre-SpB and pro-SpC was diminished by ∼50% and α-SMA was increased by 100% (P < 0.05). Additionally, H85 increased H2O2 content, and H2O2 (25–50 μM) activated endogenous transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), as evident by H2DCFDA immunofluorescence and ELISA (P < 0.05). Both hyperoxia and H2O2 increased SMAD3 phosphorylation (260% of control, P < 0.05). Treating cultured cells with TGF-β1 inhibitors did not prevent H85-induced H2O2 production but did prevent H85-mediated α-SMA increases and E-cadherin downregulation. Finally, to determine the role of TGF-β1 in hyperoxia-induced EMT in vivo, we evaluated AEC from H85-treated rats and found that vimentin increased ∼10-fold (P < 0.05) and that this effect was prevented by intraperitoneal TGF-β1 inhibitor SB-431542. Additionally, SB-431542 treatment attenuated changes in alveolar histology caused by hyperoxia. Our studies indicate that hyperoxia promotes alveolar EMT through a mechanism that is dependent on activation of TGF-β1 signaling. PMID:24375795

  2. Hyperoxia induces alveolar epithelial-to-mesenchymal cell transition.

    PubMed

    Vyas-Read, Shilpa; Wang, Wenyi; Kato, Satomi; Colvocoresses-Dodds, Jennifer; Fifadara, Nimita H; Gauthier, Theresa W; Helms, My N; Carlton, David P; Brown, Lou Ann S

    2014-02-15

    Myofibroblast accumulation is a pathological feature of lung diseases requiring oxygen therapy. One possible source for myofibroblasts is through the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). To study the effects of oxygen on alveolar EMT, we used RLE-6TN and ex vivo lung slices and found that hyperoxia (85% O2, H85) decreased epithelial proteins, presurfactant protein B (pre-SpB), pro-SpC, and lamellar protein by 50% and increased myofibroblast proteins, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and vimentin by over 200% (P < 0.05). In AEC freshly isolated from H85-treated rats, mRNA for pre-SpB and pro-SpC was diminished by ∼50% and α-SMA was increased by 100% (P < 0.05). Additionally, H85 increased H2O2 content, and H2O2 (25-50 μM) activated endogenous transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), as evident by H2DCFDA immunofluorescence and ELISA (P < 0.05). Both hyperoxia and H2O2 increased SMAD3 phosphorylation (260% of control, P < 0.05). Treating cultured cells with TGF-β1 inhibitors did not prevent H85-induced H2O2 production but did prevent H85-mediated α-SMA increases and E-cadherin downregulation. Finally, to determine the role of TGF-β1 in hyperoxia-induced EMT in vivo, we evaluated AEC from H85-treated rats and found that vimentin increased ∼10-fold (P < 0.05) and that this effect was prevented by intraperitoneal TGF-β1 inhibitor SB-431542. Additionally, SB-431542 treatment attenuated changes in alveolar histology caused by hyperoxia. Our studies indicate that hyperoxia promotes alveolar EMT through a mechanism that is dependent on activation of TGF-β1 signaling. PMID:24375795

  3. SOCS-3 Regulates Alveolar Bone Loss in Experimental Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Papathanasiou, E; Kantarci, A; Konstantinidis, A; Gao, H; Van Dyke, T E

    2016-08-01

    The host immune response plays a key role in bacteria-induced alveolar bone resorption. Endogenous control of the magnitude and duration of inflammatory signaling is considered an important determinant of the extent of periodontal pathology. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are inhibitors of cytokine signaling pathways and may play a role in restraining periodontal inflammation. We hypothesized that SOCS-3 regulates alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis. Periodontal bone loss was induced in 16-wk-old myeloid-specific SOCS-3-knockout and wild-type (WT) C57Bl6-B.129 mice by oral inoculation 9 times with 10(9) colony-forming units of Porphyromonas gingivalis A7436 through an oral gavage model for periodontitis. Sham controls for both types of mice received vehicle without bacteria. The mice were euthanized 6 wk after the last oral inoculation. Increased bone loss was demonstrated in P. gingivalis-infected SOCS-3-knockout mice as compared with P. gingivalis-infected WT mice by direct morphologic measurements, micro-computed tomography analyses, and quantitative histology. Loss of SOCS-3 function resulted in an increased number of alveolar bone osteoclasts and increased RANKL expression after P. gingivalis infection. SOCS-3 deficiency in myeloid cells also promotes a higher P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response with higher secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, and KC (IL-8) by peritoneal macrophages as compared with WT controls. Our data implicate SOCS-3 as a critical negative regulator of alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. PMID:27126447

  4. Surface morphology and morphometry of rat alveolar macrophages after ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dormans, J.A.; Rombout, P.J.; van Loveren, H. )

    1990-09-01

    As the ultrastructural data on the effects of ozone on pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) are lacking, transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscopy were performed on rat PAM present in alveolar lavages following exposure to ozone. Rats were continuously exposed for 7 d to ozone concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 1.50 mg/m3 for 7 d followed by a 5-d recovery period. Additionally, morphometry on lung sections was performed to quantitate PAM. In a second experiment rats were continuously exposed to 1.50 mg O3/m3 for 1, 3, 5, or 7 d. To study the influence of concurrent ozone exposure and lung infection, due to Listeria monocytogenes, rats were exposed for 7 d to 1.50 mg O3/m3 after a Listeria infection. The surface area of lavaged control PAM was uniformly covered with ruffles as shown by SEM and TEM. Exposure to 0.5 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d resulted in cells partly covered with microvilli and blebs in addition to normal ruffles. The number of large size PAM increased with an increase in ozone concentration. After 1 d of exposure, normal-appearing as well as many small macrophages with ruffles and scattered lymphocytes were seen. Lavage samples taken after 5 or 7 d of exposure showed an identical cell composition to that taken after 3 d of exposure. After Listeria infection alone, lavage samples consisted of mainly lymphocytes and some macrophages. Small quantitative changes, such as an increase in the number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and large-size PAM, occurred in lavages after ozone exposure and infection with L. monocytogenes. Morphometric examination of lung sections revealed a concentration-related increase in the number of PAM, even in animals exposed to 0.25 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d. Centriacinar regions were more severely affected than other regions of lung tissue.

  5. Genome-wide inactivation of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs).

    PubMed

    Yang, Luhan; Güell, Marc; Niu, Dong; George, Haydy; Lesha, Emal; Grishin, Dennis; Aach, John; Shrock, Ellen; Xu, Weihong; Poci, Jürgen; Cortazio, Rebeca; Wilkinson, Robert A; Fishman, Jay A; Church, George

    2015-11-27

    The shortage of organs for transplantation is a major barrier to the treatment of organ failure. Although porcine organs are considered promising, their use has been checked by concerns about the transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) to humans. Here we describe the eradication of all PERVs in a porcine kidney epithelial cell line (PK15). We first determined the PK15 PERV copy number to be 62. Using CRISPR-Cas9, we disrupted all copies of the PERV pol gene and demonstrated a >1000-fold reduction in PERV transmission to human cells, using our engineered cells. Our study shows that CRISPR-Cas9 multiplexability can be as high as 62 and demonstrates the possibility that PERVs can be inactivated for clinical application of porcine-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:26456528

  6. Potassium transport across rat alveolar epithelium: evidence for an apical Na+-K+ pump.

    PubMed

    Basset, G; Bouchonnet, F; Crone, C; Saumon, G

    1988-06-01

    1. Experiments were performed on rat lungs into which various solutions were instilled whilst the lungs were perfused with either whole blood or Ringer solution. Instillation of ion-free glucose solution led to a net flux of fluid and ions into the alveolar spaces. K+ ions entered faster than Na+ ions and reached a concentration about twice that in the perfusate. Ouabain in the perfusate (basolateral side) prevented the rise in alveolar K+ concentration above that in the perfusate, indicating a transcellular pathway. Ba2+ in the instillate (apical side) hindered the entry of K+ into alveoli, suggesting the presence of apical K+ channels. 2. When Ringer solution was instilled, K+ was continuously removed from the alveoli and the K+ concentration in the instillate remained constant or decreased slightly depending on the rate of fluid absorption. The net K+ efflux from alveoli to blood was 0.23 pmol/(cm2 s). When Ba2+ was added to the instillate the net K+ efflux increased to 0.36 pmol/(cm2 s). Apical ouabain reversed the K+ flux resulting in a net K+ flux of 0.19 pmol/(cm2 s) into the alveoli. This suggests the presence of an Na+-K+-ATPase located in the apical membrane of some alveolar cells. 3. The K+ transport from instillate (Ringer solution) to perfusate was traced by means of 86Rb which was added to the instillate. Ouabain in the instillate did not affect fluid absorption but reduced the apparent 86Rb permeability by 50% although the paracellular permeability (estimated with [3H]mannitol) was unaffected. This also indicates the presence of an apical Na+-K+-ATPase. When ouabain was added to the perfusate, the apparent 86Rb permeability doubled. These findings indicate that recirculation of 86Rb (and K+) occurs due to the activity of both apical and basolateral Na+-K+-ATPases. 4. When ouabain was placed on both sides of the epithelium, preventing transcellular transport, the passive 86Rb permeability was 10.3 x 10(-8) cm/s (assuming an alveolar surface area of

  7. Alveolar epithelial type II cell: defender of the alveolus revisited

    PubMed Central

    Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2001-01-01

    In 1977, Mason and Williams developed the concept of the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cell as a defender of the alveolus. It is well known that AE2 cells synthesise, secrete, and recycle all components of the surfactant that regulates alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. AE2 cells influence extracellular surfactant transformation by regulating, for example, pH and [Ca2+] of the hypophase. AE2 cells play various roles in alveolar fluid balance, coagulation/fibrinolysis, and host defence. AE2 cells proliferate, differentiate into AE1 cells, and remove apoptotic AE2 cells by phagocytosis, thus contributing to epithelial repair. AE2 cells may act as immunoregulatory cells. AE2 cells interact with resident and mobile cells, either directly by membrane contact or indirectly via cytokines/growth factors and their receptors, thus representing an integrative unit within the alveolus. Although most data support the concept, the controversy about the character of hyperplastic AE2 cells, reported to synthesise profibrotic factors, proscribes drawing a definite conclusion today. PMID:11686863

  8. Three Dimensional Alveolar Flow Phenomena Using a CFD Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznitman, Josue

    2005-11-01

    Respiratory flows in the lung periphery are characterized by low Reynolds numbers (typically Re<1) in sub-millimeter airways marked by the presence of alveoli (gas exchange units). We present for realistic breathing conditions using CFD simulations (CFX-5.7.1), 3D velocity fields and flow patterns induced by the expansion/contraction of alveoli and acinar ducts during oscillatory flow. Based on anatomical data, the alveolus and airway are modeled as a spherical cap connected to a cylindrical duct, both subject to moving wall boundary conditions simulating respiration. The resulting 3D flow patterns are complex and governed by the ratio of the alveolar to ductal flow rates. This ratio describes the interplay between alveolar recirculation, induced by the ductal shear flow over the alveolus opening, and alveolar radial flow, induced by the expansion/contraction motion. Our 3D results are in good agreement with 2D simulations reported in the literature. Although convection mechanisms may transport gas along acinar ducts and deeper into the acinus, velocity fields within alveoli predict that upon gas entering them, transport is then solely dominated by diffusion mechanisms.

  9. Requirement of alveolar bone formation for eruption of rat molars.

    PubMed

    Wise, Gary E; He, Hongzhi; Gutierrez, Dina L; Ring, Sherry; Yao, Shaomian

    2011-10-01

    Tooth eruption is a localized event that requires a dental follicle (DF) to regulate the resorption of alveolar bone to form an eruption pathway. During the intra-osseous phase of eruption, the tooth moves through this pathway. The mechanism or motive force that propels the tooth through this pathway is controversial but many studies have shown that alveolar bone growth at the base of the crypt occurs during eruption. To determine if this bone growth (osteogenesis) was causal, experiments were designed in which the expression of an osteogenic gene in the DF, bone morphogenetic protein-6 (Bmp6), was inhibited by injection of the first mandibular molar of the rat with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted against Bmp6. The injection was followed by electroporation to promote uptake of the siRNA. In 45 first molars injected, eruption was either delayed or completely inhibited (seven molars). In the impacted molars, an eruption pathway formed but bone growth at the base of the crypt was greatly reduced compared with the erupted first-molar controls. These studies show that alveolar bone growth at the base of the crypt is required for tooth eruption and that Bmp6 may be essential for promoting this growth. PMID:21896048

  10. Requirement of alveolar bone formation for eruption of rat molars

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Gary E.; He, Hongzhi; Gutierrez, Dina L.; Ring, Sherry; Yao, Shaomian

    2011-01-01

    Tooth eruption is a localized event that requires a dental follicle (DF) to regulate the resorption of alveolar bone to form an eruption pathway. During the intra-osseous phase of eruption, the tooth moves through this pathway. The mechanism or motive force that propels the tooth through this pathway is controversial but many studies have shown that alveolar bone growth at the base of the crypt occurs during eruption. To determine if this bone growth (osteogenesis) was causal, experiments were designed in which the expression of an osteogenic gene in the DF, bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP6), was inhibited by injection of the 1st mandibular molar of the rat with an siRNA targeted against BMP6. The injection was followed by electroporation to promote uptake of the siRNA. In 45 first molars injected, eruption either was delayed or completely inhibited (7 molars). In the impacted molars, an eruption pathway formed but bone growth at the base of the crypt was greatly reduced as compared to the erupted first molar controls. These studies show that alveolar bone growth at the base of the crypt is required for tooth eruption and that BMP6 may be an essential gene for promoting this growth. PMID:21896048

  11. Cigarette smoke extract affects mitochondrial function in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ballweg, Korbinian; Mutze, Kathrin; Königshoff, Melanie; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoke is the main risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Exposure of cells to cigarette smoke induces an initial adaptive cellular stress response involving increased oxidative stress and induction of inflammatory signaling pathways. Exposure of mitochondria to cellular stress alters their fusion/fission dynamics. Whereas mild stress induces a prosurvival response termed stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion, severe stress results in mitochondrial fragmentation and mitophagy. In the present study, we analyzed the mitochondrial response to mild and nontoxic doses of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in alveolar epithelial cells. We characterized mitochondrial morphology, expression of mitochondrial fusion and fission genes, markers of mitochondrial proteostasis, as well as mitochondrial functions such as membrane potential and oxygen consumption. Murine lung epithelial (MLE)12 and primary mouse alveolar epithelial cells revealed pronounced mitochondrial hyperfusion upon treatment with CSE, accompanied by increased expression of the mitochondrial fusion protein mitofusin 2 and increased metabolic activity. We did not observe any alterations in mitochondrial proteostasis, i.e., induction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response or mitophagy. Therefore, our data indicate an adaptive prosurvival response of mitochondria of alveolar epithelial cells to nontoxic concentrations of CSE. A hyperfused mitochondrial network, however, renders the cell more vulnerable to additional stress, such as sustained cigarette smoke exposure. As such, cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion, although part of a beneficial adaptive stress response in the first place, may contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:25326581

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELLS CULTURED IN SEMIPERMEABLE HOLLOW FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Grek, Christina L.; Newton, Danforth A.; Qiu, Yonhzhi; Wen, Xuejun; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.; Baatz, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Cell culture methods commonly used to represent alveolar epithelial cells in vivo have lacked airflow, a 3-dimensional air-liquid interface, and dynamic stretching characteristics of native lung tissue—physiological parameters critical for normal phenotypic gene expression and cellular function. Here the authors report the development of a selectively semipermeable hollow fiber culture system that more accurately mimics the in vivo microenvironment experienced by mammalian distal airway cells than in conventional or standard air-liquid interface culture. Murine lung epithelial cells (MLE-15) were cultured within semipermeable polyurethane hollow fibers and introduced to controlled airflow through the microfiber interior. Under these conditions, MLE-15 cells formed confluent monolayers, demonstrated a cuboidal morphology, formed tight junctions, and produced and secreted surfactant proteins. Numerous lamellar bodies and microvilli were present in MLE-15 cells grown in hollow fiber culture. Conversely, these alveolar type II cell characteristics were reduced in MLE-15 cells cultured in conventional 2D static culture systems. These data support the hypothesis that MLE-15 cells grown within our microfiber culture system in the presence of airflow maintain the phenotypic characteristics of type II cells to a higher degree than those grown in standard in vitro cell culture models. Application of our novel model system may prove advantageous for future studies of specific gene and protein expression involving alveolar epithelial or bronchiolar epithelial cells. PMID:19263283

  13. Characterization of stem cells from alveolar periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Shen, Huan; Zheng, Wei; Tang, Liang; Yang, Zhenhua; Gao, Yuan; Yang, Qingtian; Wang, Chen; Duan, Yinzhong; Jin, Yan

    2011-04-01

    Complete and predicable regeneration of complex periodontal structures, which include cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL), and alveolar bone, has been a great challenge for periodontal researchers. It is generally believed that human PDL from the root surface contains stem cells (r-PDLSCs), which can enhance cementum/PDL-like tissues regeneration in vivo. In this work, PDL was found to possess asymmetrically distributed stem cells observed by long-term bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling. Putative stem cells from human PDL on the alveolar bone surface (a-PDLSCs) were then isolated and characterized. It was shown that a-PDLSCs exhibited strong proliferation capability and expressed high percentages of mesenchymal stem cell markers. Comparatively, a-PDLSCs had higher multilineage differentiation potential than r-PDLSCs with regard to both osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of mineralization-related markers of a-PDLSCs were also higher than those of r-PDLSCs. In vivo, a-PDLSCs could regenerate bone/PDL-like structures and repair critical-size defects created in calvarial bone of NOD/SCID mice. Autologous PDLSC-mediated periodontal regeneration showed that a-PDLSCs could accomplish reconstruction of alveolar bone more perfectly than r-PDLSCs. Our data suggest that PDLSCs may have quite different characteristics depending on locations. a-PDLSCs may take a synergistic effect with r-PDLSCs in periodontal regeneration. PMID:21186958

  14. Pulmonary surfactant: no mere paint on the alveolar wall.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, T E

    1996-12-01

    The gas-liquid interface within the alveolus is completely lined with a complex mixture of lipids and unique proteins termed pulmonary surfactant, which both reduces surface tension and permits it to vary directly with the radius of curvature. In this way it minimizes the work of breathing and permits alveoli of different sizes to exist in equilibrium. However, surfactant does far more in that it also controls fluid balance in the lung and appears to play a key role in host defence. Either a deficiency in surfactant or an aberrant surfactant results in atelectasis and oedema. The surfactant system is very dynamic: alveolar surfactant phosphatidylcholine, the principal component, having a half life of only a few hours, with as much as 85% being recycled. Although distortion of the alveolar type II cell is now accepted as the principal stimulus for release, much remains to be discovered of modulating factors and intracellular signalling in the control of surfactant homeostasis. Likewise, many questions remain concerning the control of synthesis of the surfactant phospholipids, neutral lipids and proteins and their assembly into the tubular myelin form of alveolar surfactant, the refining of the monolayer with breathing, the control of re-uptake of different components into the type II cells and the roles of the proteins. PMID:9441113

  15. Evaluation of optical reflectance techniques for imaging of alveolar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglert, Carolin I.; Namati, Eman; Warger, William C.; Liu, Linbo; Yoo, Hongki; Kang, DongKyun; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the fine structures within the lung parenchyma could advance our understanding of alveolar physiology and pathophysiology. Current knowledge has been primarily based on histology, but it is a destructive two-dimensional (2-D) technique that is limited by tissue processing artifacts. Micro-CT provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging within a limited sample size, but is not applicable to intact lungs from larger animals or humans. Optical reflectance techniques offer the promise to visualize alveolar regions of the large animal or human lung with sub-cellular resolution in three dimensions. Here, we present the capabilities of three optical reflectance techniques, namely optical frequency domain imaging, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy, and full field optical coherence microscopy, to visualize both gross architecture as well as cellular detail in fixed, phosphate buffered saline-immersed rat lung tissue. Images from all techniques were correlated to each other and then to corresponding histology. Spatial and temporal resolution, imaging depth, and suitability for in vivo probe development were compared to highlight the merits and limitations of each technology for studying respiratory physiology at the alveolar level.

  16. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: review of the 1022 cases reported worldwide.

    PubMed

    Castellana, Giuseppe; Castellana, Giorgio; Gentile, Mattia; Castellana, Roberto; Resta, Onofrio

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterised by the widespread intra-alveolar accumulation of minute calculi called microliths. It is caused by mutation of the SLC34A2 gene encoding the type IIb sodium phosphate cotransporter in alveolar type II cells. The present study explores the epidemiological, familial, genetic, clinical, diagnostic, radiological and therapeutic aspects with the aim of contributing to a better understanding of this uncommon disease.We searched articles on PAM published up to December 2014 and 544 papers were found, accounting for 1022 cases.PAM is present in all continents and in many nations, in particular in Turkey, China, Japan, India, Italy and the USA. Familiality is frequent. The clinical course is not uniform and the causes of this clinical variability seem to be largely nongenetic. The optimal diagnostic procedure is the association of chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with bronchoalveolar lavage, but a chest radiograph may suffice in families in which a case has already been diagnosed. Moreover, chest radiography and HRCT allow the classification of the evolutionary phase of the disease and its severity. At present lung transplantation is the only effective therapy. However, better knowledge of the gene responsible offers hope for new therapies. PMID:26621975

  17. Chronic alcohol ingestion changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Trac, David; Brewer, Elizabeth M; Brown, Lou Ann; Helms, My N

    2013-01-01

    Similar to effects of alcohol on the heart, liver, and brain, the effects of ethanol (EtOH) on lung injury are preventable. Unlike other vital organ systems, however, the lethal effects of alcohol on the lung are underappreciated, perhaps because there are no signs of overt pulmonary disorder until a secondary insult, such as a bacterial infection or injury, occurs in the lung. This paper provides overview of the complex changes in the alveolar environment known to occur following both chronic and acute alcohol exposures. Contemporary animal and cell culture models for alcohol-induced lung dysfunction are discussed, with emphasis on the effect of alcohol on transepithelial transport processes, namely, epithelial sodium channel activity (ENaC). The cascading effect of tissue and phagocytic Nadph oxidase (Nox) may be triggered by ethanol exposure, and as such, alcohol ingestion and exposure lead to a prooxidative environment; thus impacting alveolar macrophage (AM) function and oxidative stress. A better understanding of how alcohol changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium can lead to improvements in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which hospitalized alcoholics are at an increased risk. PMID:23509726

  18. Quality assessment of systematic reviews on alveolar socket preservation.

    PubMed

    Moraschini, V; Barboza, E Dos S P

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this overview was to evaluate and compare the quality of systematic reviews, with or without meta-analysis, that have evaluated studies on techniques or biomaterials used for the preservation of alveolar sockets post tooth extraction in humans. An electronic search was conducted without date restrictions using the Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science databases up to April 2015. Eligibility criteria included systematic reviews, with or without meta-analysis, focused on the preservation of post-extraction alveolar sockets in humans. Two independent authors assessed the quality of the included reviews using AMSTAR and the checklist proposed by Glenny et al. in 2003. After the selection process, 12 systematic reviews were included. None of these reviews obtained the maximum score using the quality assessment tools implemented, and the results of the analyses were highly variable. A significant statistical correlation was observed between the scores of the two checklists. A wide structural and methodological variability was observed between the systematic reviews published on the preservation of alveolar sockets post tooth extraction. None of the reviews evaluated obtained the maximum score using the two quality assessment tools implemented. PMID:27061478

  19. Continuous Problem of Function Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakody, Gaya; Zazkis, Rina

    2015-01-01

    We examine different definitions presented in textbooks and other mathematical sources for "continuity of a function at a point" and "continuous function" in the context of introductory level Calculus. We then identify problematic issues related to definitions of continuity and discontinuity: inconsistency and absence of…

  20. Proinflammatory response of alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced by alveolar macrophage-produced TNF-alpha during pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish K; Fernandez, Lucas G; Awad, Alaa S; Kron, Irving L; Laubach, Victor E

    2007-07-01

    Pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury entails acute activation of alveolar macrophages followed by neutrophil sequestration. Although proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines such as TNF-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from macrophages are known to modulate acute IR injury, the contribution of alveolar epithelial cells to IR injury and their intercellular interactions with other cell types such as alveolar macrophages and neutrophils remain unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that following IR, alveolar macrophage-produced TNF-alpha further induces alveolar epithelial cells to produce key chemokines that could then contribute to subsequent lung injury through the recruitment of neutrophils. Cultured RAW264.7 macrophages and MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells were subjected to acute hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) as an in vitro model of pulmonary IR. H/R (3 h/1 h) significantly induced KC, MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), RANTES, and IL-6 (but not TNF-alpha) by MLE-12 cells, whereas H/R induced TNF-alpha, MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-2 (but not KC) by RAW264.7 cells. These results were confirmed using primary murine alveolar macrophages and primary alveolar type II cells. Importantly, using macrophage and epithelial coculture methods, the specific production of TNF-alpha by H/R-exposed RAW264.7 cells significantly induced proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression (KC, MCP-1, MIP-2, RANTES, and IL-6) by MLE-12 cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that alveolar type II cells, in conjunction with alveolar macrophage-produced TNF-alpha, contribute to the initiation of acute pulmonary IR injury via a proinflammatory cascade. The release of key chemokines, such as KC and MIP-2, by activated type II cells may thus significantly contribute to neutrophil sequestration during IR injury. PMID:17416740

  1. Sequence and regulation of the porcine FSHR gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wangjun; Han, Jing; Cao, Rui; Zhang, Jinbi; Li, Bojiang; Liu, Zequn; Liu, Kaiqing; Li, Qifa; Pan, Zengxiang; Chen, Jie; Liu, Honglin

    2015-03-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) plays a crucial role in animal reproduction and exerts its physiological functions by interacting with the FSH receptor (FSHR). The FSHR is exclusively expressed in granulose cells in the ovary and its expression level is closely related to granulose cell differentiation and follicle maturation. In mammal, most of the follicles undergo atresia, while follicle atresia is mainly caused by granulosa cell apoptosis. However, knowledge on the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of the porcine FSHR gene in granulosa cell is still limited. In this study, approximately 2.1kb of the proximal promoter sequence of the porcine FSHR gene were obtained by genome walking, and the regulatory elements and transcription factors in the porcine FSHR promoter sequence were predicted. Furthermore, the core promoter region (-1195/-598) of the porcine FSHR gene was identified using a luciferase assay. Subsequently, the relationship between expression levels of the porcine FSHR gene and histone H3K9 acetylation levels around the core promoter region (-787/-572) in vivo and invitro were analyzed. Our results showed that an increased FSHR gene expression level was accompanied with an increase in histone H3K9 acetylation levels, suggesting that histone H3K9 acetylation could regulate the expression of the porcine FSHR gene. PMID:25599592

  2. [Research Advances in the Porcine Deltacoronavirus].

    PubMed

    Fang, Puxian; Fang, Liurong; Dong, Nan; Xiao, Shaobo

    2016-03-01

    The deltacoronavirus is a new member of the subfamily Coronaviridae of the family Coronaviridae. Deltacoronaviruses can infect birds and mammals. Deltacoronaviruses were detected in early 2007 in Asian leopard cats and Chinese ferret badgers. In 2014, porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) infection spread rapidly in the USA. Moreover, cell culture-adapted PDCoV has been obtained from infected piglets. Animal experiments have confirmed that the isolated PDCoV is highly pathogenic and causes severe diarrhea in piglets. Thus, the PDCoV can be considered to be a good model to study the deltacoronavirus. In this review, we discuss the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenicity, culture, and diagnostic methods of the PDCoV. PMID:27396171

  3. Tiamulin resistance in porcine Brachyspira pilosicoli isolates.

    PubMed

    Pringle, M; Landén, A; Franklin, A

    2006-02-01

    There are few studies on antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira pilosicoli, therefore this study was performed to investigate the situation among isolates from pigs. The tiamulin and tylosin susceptibility was determined by broth dilution for 93 and 86 porcine B. pilosicoli isolates, respectively. The isolates came from clinical samples taken in Swedish pig herds during the years 2002 and 2003. The tylosin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was >16 microg/ml for 50% (n=43) of the isolates tested. A tiamulin MIC >2 microg/ml was obtained for 14% (n=13) of the isolates and these were also tested against doxycycline, salinomycin, valnemulin, lincomycin and aivlosin. For these isolates the susceptibility to salinomycin and doxycycline was high but the MICs for aivlosin varied. The relationship between the 13 tiamulin resistant isolates was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among the 13 isolates 10 different PFGE patterns were identified. PMID:16253666

  4. Elemental analysis of lung tissue particles and intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophages in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease occurred by idiopathic (autoimmune) or secondary to particle inhalation. The in-air microparticle induced X-ray emission (in-air micro-PIXE) system performs elemental analysis of materials by irradiation with a proton microbeam, and allows visualization of the spatial distribution and quantitation of various elements with very low background noise. The aim of this study was to assess the secondary PAP due to inhalation of harmful particles by employing in-air micro-PIXE analysis for particles and intracellular iron in parafin-embedded lung tissue specimens obtained from a PAP patient comparing with normal lung tissue from a non-PAP patient. The iron inside alveolar macrophages was stained with Berlin blue, and its distribution was compared with that on micro-PIXE images. Results The elements composing particles and their locations in the PAP specimens could be identified by in-air micro-PIXE analysis, with magnesium (Mg), aluminum (Al), silicon (Si), phosphorus (P), sulfur (S), scandium (Sc), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), titanium (Ti), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganase (Mn), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn) being detected. Si was the major component of the particles. Serial sections stained by Berlin blue revealed accumulation of sideromacrophages that had phagocytosed the particles. The intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophage from the surfactant-rich area in PAP was higher than normal lung tissue in control lung by both in-air micro-PIXE analysis and Berlin blue staining. Conclusion The present study demonstrated the efficacy of in-air micro-PIXE for analyzing the distribution and composition of lung particles. The intracellular iron content of single cells was determined by simultaneous two-dimensional and elemental analysis of paraffin-embedded lung tissue sections. The results suggest that secondary PAP is associated with exposure to inhaled particles and accumulation of iron in alveolar

  5. Nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K M; Lovich, J E; Lam, C; Camp, M E; Wiley, A A; Bartol, F F; Bagnell, C A

    2014-07-01

    The lactocrine hypothesis suggests a mechanism whereby milk-borne bioactive factors delivered to nursing offspring affect development of neonatal tissues. The objective of this study was to assess whether nursing affects testicular development in neonatal boars as reflected by: (1) Sertoli cell number and proliferation measured by GATA-4 expression and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining patterns; (2) Leydig cell development and steroidogenic activity as reflected by insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3), and P450 side chain cleavage (scc) enzyme expression; and (3) expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A, and relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP) 1. At birth, boars were randomly assigned (n = 6-7/group) to nurse ad libitum or to be pan fed porcine milk replacer for 48 h. Testes were collected from boars at birth, before nursing and from nursed and replacer-fed boars at 50 h on postnatal day (PND) 2. Sertoli cell proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index increased (P < 0.01) from birth to PND 2 in nursed, but not in replacer-fed boars. Sertoli cell number and testicular GATA-4 protein levels increased (P < 0.01) from PND 0 to PND 2 only in nursed boars. Neither age nor nursing affected testicular INSL3, P450scc, ESR1, or VEGFA levels. However, testicular relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) levels increased (P < 0.01) with age and were greater in replacer-fed boars on PND 2. Results suggest that nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development and provide additional evidence for the importance of lactocrine signaling in pigs. PMID:24906933

  6. How Active Are Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERVs)?

    PubMed Central

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) represent a risk factor if porcine cells, tissues, or organs were to be transplanted into human recipients to alleviate the shortage of human transplants; a procedure called xenotransplantation. In contrast to human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which are mostly defective and not replication-competent, PERVs are released from normal pig cells and are infectious. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic viruses infecting cells of several species, among them humans; whereas PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Virus infection was shown in co-culture experiments, but also in vivo, in the pig, leading to de novo integration of proviruses in certain organs. This was shown by measurement of the copy number per cell, finding different numbers in different organs. In addition, recombinations between PERV-A and PERV-C were observed and the recombinant PERV-A/C were found to be integrated in cells of different organs, but not in the germ line of the animals. Here, the evidence for such in vivo activities of PERVs, including expression as mRNA, protein and virus particles, de novo infection and recombination, will be summarised. These activities make screening of pigs for provirus number and PERV expression level difficult, especially when only blood or ear biopsies are available for analysis. Highly sensitive methods to measure the copy number and the expression level will be required when selecting pigs with low copy number and low expression of PERV as well as when inactivating PERVs using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease (CRISPR/Cas) technology. PMID:27527207

  7. Electromechanical Reshaping of Ex Vivo Porcine Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed; Manuel, Cyrus T.; Protsenko, Dmitriy E.; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The trachea is a composite cartilaginous structure particularly prone to various forms of convexities. Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) is an emerging technique used to reshape cartilaginous tissues by applying electric current in tandem with imposed mechanical deformation to achieve shape change. In this study, EMR was used to reshape tracheal cartilage rings to demonstrate the feasibility of this technology as a potentially minimally invasive procedure to alter tracheal structure. Study Design Controlled laboratory study using ex vivo porcine tracheae. Methods The natural concavity of each porcine tracheal ring was reversed around a cork mandrel. Two pairs of electrodes were inserted along the long axis of the tracheal ring and placed 1.5 millimeters from the midline. Current was applied over a range of voltages (3 volts [V], 4V, and 5V) for either 2 or 3 minutes. The degree of EMR-induced reshaping was quantified from photographs using digital techniques. Confocal imaging with fluorescent live and dead assays was conducted to determine viability of the tissue after EMR. Results Specimens that underwent EMR for 2 or 3 minutes at 4V or 5V were observed to have undergone significant (P <.05) reshaping relative to the control. Viability results demonstrated that EMR reshaping occurs at the expense of tissue injury, although the extent of injury is modest relative to conventional techniques. Conclusion EMR reshapes tracheal cartilage rings as a function of voltage and application time. It has potential as a minimally invasive and cost-efficient endoscopic technology to treat pathologic tracheal convexities. Given our findings, consideration of EMR for use in larger ex vivo tracheal segments and animal studies is now plausible. Level of Evidence N/A. PMID:25692713

  8. Porcine circovirus diseases: a review of PMWS.

    PubMed

    Baekbo, P; Kristensen, C S; Larsen, L E

    2012-03-01

    This article is a review on post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), the first described disease among the porcine circovirus diseases (PCVD). Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome has, since its appearance in Canada in 1991, been seen in all major pig producing countries. To diagnose PMWS at herd level typical clinical appearance consisting of wasting and increased mortality must be combined with finding at autopsy of diseased pigs, where typical microscopic findings in the lymphatic tissue must be present. Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome significantly increases the mortality and reduces the daily weight gain in weaner pig and/or in finishing pigs. Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome can be transmitted by pig-to-pig contact and some studies point at airborne transmission as a possibility. Studies in Europe have shown several risk factors that either increase or decrease the risk for a pig herd to be affected by PMWS. At the pig level, studies have shown the importance of maternal immunity as protection for subsequent development of PMWS. To control PMWS, good production management and control of other diseases are crucial. Since 2004, commercial vaccines against Porcine Circo Virus type 2 have been coming on the market and many studies have shown great benefits of these to control PMWS. Today, sow vaccines as well as piglet vaccines are available in most countries. An extensive meta-analysis of many of the vaccines has shown a comparable good efficacy of the vaccines in significantly reducing mortality and increasing weight gain of the pigs. PMID:22252114

  9. Porcine Models of Muscular Dystrophy1

    PubMed Central

    Selsby, Joshua T.; Ross, Jason W.; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease. PMID:25991703

  10. Therapeutic Whole-Lung Lavage for Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis: A Procedural Update.

    PubMed

    Abdelmalak, Basem B; Khanna, Ashish K; Culver, Daniel A; Popovich, Marc J

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a disease caused by increased accumulation and impaired clearance of surfactant by alveolar macrophages. This narrative review summarizes the role of therapeutic whole-lung lavage in the management of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. We describe the preprocedural evaluation, indications, and anesthetic considerations, along with step-by step technical aspects of the procedure, postoperative recovery, potential complications, and long-term outcomes. PMID:26165897

  11. Isolation and Culture of Alveolar Epithelial Type I and Type II Cells from Rat Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Robert F.; Dobbs, Leland G.

    2014-01-01

    The pulmonary alveolar epithelium, comprised of alveolar Type I (TI) and Type II (TII) cells, covers more than 99% of the internal surface area of the lungs. The study of isolated and cultured alveolar epithelial TI and TII cells has provided a large amount of information about the functions of both cell types. This chapter provides information about methods for isolating and culturing both of these cell types from rat lungs. PMID:23097106

  12. A Case of Alveolar Echinococcosis Presenting as Cerebral and Spinal Intradural Metastases.

    PubMed

    Atalan, Guneri; Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Sönmez, Güner; Celik, Mahir; Simsek, Berksan

    2016-06-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a chronic and serious, even lethal, parasitic infection caused by the helminth Echinococcus multilocularis. The involvement of Central Nervous System is reported to be 1-3% in literature. Brain involvement is considered a sign of the terminal phase of alveolar echinococcosis. We here in reported a 67-year-old female who had liver alveolar hydatid disease with brain and spinal intradural metastases. PMID:27551181

  13. A Case of Alveolar Echinococcosis Presenting as Cerebral and Spinal Intradural Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Atalan, Guneri; Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Sönmez, Güner; Celik, Mahir; Simsek, Berksan

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a chronic and serious, even lethal, parasitic infection caused by the helminth Echinococcus multilocularis. The involvement of Central Nervous System is reported to be 1–3% in literature. Brain involvement is considered a sign of the terminal phase of alveolar echinococcosis. We here in reported a 67-year-old female who had liver alveolar hydatid disease with brain and spinal intradural metastases. PMID:27551181

  14. Alveolar recruitment in patients in the immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Cauê; Cavenaghi, Odete Mauad

    2011-01-01

    Lung complications during postoperative period of cardiac surgery are frequently, highlighting atelectasis and hypoxemia. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers have an important role in the prevention and treatment of these complications. Thus, this study reviewed and updated the alveolar recruitment maneuvers performance in the immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery. We noted the efficacy of alveolar recruitment through different specific techniques and the need for development of new studies. PMID:21881720

  15. Magnetic thermal ablation using ferrofluids: influence of administration mode on biological effect in different porcine tissues.

    PubMed

    Bruners, Philipp; Hodenius, Michael; Baumann, Martin; Oversohl, Jessica; Günther, Rolf W; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of magnetic thermal ablation in different porcine tissues using either a singular injection or a continuous infusion of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. In the first setting samples of three ferrofluids containing different amounts of iron (1:171, 2:192, and 3:214 mg/ml) were singularly interstitially injected into specimens of porcine liver, kidney, and muscle (n = 5). Then the specimens were exposed to an alternating magnetic field (2.86 kA/m, 190 kHz) generated by a circular coil for 5 min. In the second experimental setup ferrofluid samples were continuously interstitially infused into the tissue specimens during the exposure to the magnetic field. To measure the temperature increase two fiber-optic temperature probes with a fixed distance of 0.5 cm were inserted into the specimens along the puncture tract of the injection needle and the temperature was measured every 15 s. Finally, the specimens were dissected, the diameters of the created thermal lesions were measured, and the volumes were calculated and compared. Compared to continuous infusion, a single injection of ferrofluids resulted in smaller coagulation volumes in all tissues. Significant differences regarding coagulation volume were found in kidney and muscle specimens. The continuous infusion technique led to more elliptically shaped coagulation volumes due to larger diameters along the puncture tract. Our data show the feasibility of magnetic thermal ablation using either a single interstitial injection or continuous infusion for therapy of lesions in muscle, kidney, and liver. Continuous infusion of ferrofluids results in larger zones of necrosis compared to a single injection technique. PMID:18592306

  16. Magnetic Thermal Ablation Using Ferrofluids: Influence of Administration Mode on Biological Effect in Different Porcine Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Bruners, Philipp Hodenius, Michael Baumann, Martin Oversohl, Jessica; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of magnetic thermal ablation in different porcine tissues using either a singular injection or a continuous infusion of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. In the first setting samples of three ferrofluids containing different amounts of iron (1:171, 2:192, and 3:214 mg/ml) were singularly interstitially injected into specimens of porcine liver, kidney, and muscle (n = 5). Then the specimens were exposed to an alternating magnetic field (2.86 kA/m, 190 kHz) generated by a circular coil for 5 min. In the second experimental setup ferrofluid samples were continuously interstitially infused into the tissue specimens during the exposure to the magnetic field. To measure the temperature increase two fiber-optic temperature probes with a fixed distance of 0.5 cm were inserted into the specimens along the puncture tract of the injection needle and the temperature was measured every 15 s. Finally, the specimens were dissected, the diameters of the created thermal lesions were measured, and the volumes were calculated and compared. Compared to continuous infusion, a single injection of ferrofluids resulted in smaller coagulation volumes in all tissues. Significant differences regarding coagulation volume were found in kidney and muscle specimens. The continuous infusion technique led to more elliptically shaped coagulation volumes due to larger diameters along the puncture tract. Our data show the feasibility of magnetic thermal ablation using either a single interstitial injection or continuous infusion for therapy of lesions in muscle, kidney, and liver. Continuous infusion of ferrofluids results in larger zones of necrosis compared to a single injection technique.

  17. Involvement of CD16 in antibody-dependent enhancement of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weihong; Guo, Longjun; Yu, Haidong; Niu, Junwei; Huang, Mingming; Luo, Xiaolei; Li, Ren; Tian, Zhijun; Feng, Li; Wang, Yue

    2015-07-01

    The immunological effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome disease virus (PRRSV) vaccines is thought to be influenced by a variety of host factors, in which antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection is one crucial factor. Here, we assessed the mechanism of ADE of PRRSV infection. First, we found that subneutralizing serum could induce ADE of PRRSV infection in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Quantitative PCR, Western blotting and flow cytometry revealed that CD16 is the most abundant Fcγ receptor (FcγR) expressed on the surface of PAMs; thus, the role of CD16 in ADE of PRRSV infection was examined in PAMs. By using functional blocking antibodies, we demonstrated that CD16 is involved in enhanced virus production in PRRSV-antibody immune complex-infected PAMs. Because PAMs co-express different FcγR isoforms, we evaluated the effects of CD16 in FcγR-non-bearing cells by transfection. Using these engineered cells, we found that CD16 could specifically bind to the PRRSV-antibody immune complex and subsequently mediate internalization of the virus, resulting in the generation of progeny virus. We also showed that efficient expression of CD16 required association of the FcR γ-chain. Together, our findings provide significant new insights into PRRSV infection, which can be enhanced by CD16-mediated PRRSV-antibody immune complexes. This CD16-mediated ADE may induce a shift in PRRSV tropism towards CD16-expressing cells, distributing virus to more organs during virus infection. PMID:25752917

  18. Global Gene Expression Profiling of Myeloid Immune Cell Subsets in Response to In Vitro Challenge with Porcine Circovirus 2b

    PubMed Central

    Mavrommatis, Bettina; Offord, Victoria; Patterson, Robert; Watson, Mick; Kanellos, Theo; Steinbach, Falko; Grierson, Sylvia; Werling, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that the early interaction between porcine circovirus 2 (PCV-2) and the innate immune system is the key event in the pathogenesis of Post-Weaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS). Furthermore, PCV2 has been detected in bone-marrow samples, potentially enabling an easy spread and reservoir for the virus. To assess the gene-expression differences induced by an in-vitro PCV2b infection in different three different myeloid innate immune cell subsets generated from the same animal, we used the Agilent Porcine Gene Expression Microarray (V2). Alveolar macrophages (AMØs), monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) and bone-marrow cells (BMCs) were generated from each animal, and challenged with a UK-isolate of a PCV2 genotype b-strain at a MOI of 0.5. Remarkably, analysis showed a highly distinct and cell-type dependent response to PCV2b challenge. Overall, MoDCs showed the most marked response to PCV2b challenge in vitro and revealed a key role for TNF in the interaction with PCV2b, whereas only few genes were affected in BMCs and AMØs. These observations were further supported by an enrichment of genes in the downstream NF-κB Signalling pathway as well as an up regulation of genes with pro-apoptotic functions post-challenge. PCV2b challenge increases the expression of a large number of immune-related and pro-apoptotic genes mainly in MoDC, which possibly explain the increased inflammation, granulomatous inflammation and lymphocyte depletion seen in PMWS-affected pigs. PMID:24618842

  19. Developing a Triple Transgenic Cell Line for High-Efficiency Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; Cui, Zhengzhi; Zhou, Lei; Kang, Youmin; Li, Li; Li, Jinxiu; Dai, Yunping; Yu, Shuyang; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most devastating pathogens in the swine industry worldwide. Due to the lack of robust cell lines and small animal models, the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection and mechanism for protective vaccination are still not yet well understood. To obtain useful cell lines, several groups have attempted to construct different transgenic cell lines with three PRRSV receptors: CD163, CD169, and CD151. The results showed that CD163 is essential for PRRSV entry into target cells and replication, and both CD169 and CD151 play key roles during PRRSV infection. However, their interplay and combined effect remains unclear. In this study, we generated transgenic BHK-21 derived cell lines co-expressing different combinations of the three receptors, which were transfected with CD163 alone, or the combination of CD163 and CD169, or the combination of CD163 and CD151, or the combination of CD163, CD169, and CD151 using the PiggyBac transposon system. Our results showed that the synergistic interaction among the three receptors was important to improve the susceptibility of cells during PRRSV infection. Through a series of comparable analyses, we confirmed that the cell line co-expressing triple receptors sustained viral infection and replication, and was superior to the current cell platform used for the PRRSV study, MARC-145 cells. Moreover, we found that PRRSV infection of the transgenic cell lines could trigger IFN-stimulated gene responses similar to those of porcine alveolar macrophages and MARC-145 cells. In summary, we developed a stable transgenic cell line susceptible to PRRSV, which may not only provide a useful tool for virus propagation, vaccine development, and pathogenesis studies, but also establish the foundation for small animal model development. PMID:27182980

  20. Safety of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Modified Live Virus (MLV) vaccine strains in a young pig infection model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the safety of all modified live virus vaccines commercially available in Europe against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) under the same experimental conditions. For this purpose, one hundred and twenty three-week-old piglets, divided into five groups, were used. On day 0 of the experiment, nine pigs per group were removed and the remaining fifteen were vaccinated with the commercial vaccines Ingelvac PRRS MLV, Amervac PRRS, Pyrsvac-183 and Porcilis PRRS by the IM route or were mock vaccinated and used as controls. On day 3, the nine unvaccinated pigs were re-introduced into their respective groups and served as sentinel pigs. Clinical signs were recorded daily and lung lesions were determined on days 7, 14 and 21, when 5 vaccinated pigs per group were euthanized. Blood samples and swabs were taken every three days and different organs were collected at necropsy to determine the presence of PRRSV. None of the vaccines studied caused detectable clinical signs in vaccinated pigs although lung lesions were found. Altogether, these results indicate that all vaccines can be considered clinically safe. However, some differences were found in virological parameters. Thus, neither Pyrsvac-183 nor Porcilis PRRS could be detected in porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM) cultures or in lung sections used to determine PRRSV by immunohistochemistry, indicating that these viruses might have lost their ability to replicate in PAM. This inability to replicate in PAM might be related to the lower transmission rate and the delay in the onset of viremia observed in these groups PMID:24308693

  1. Modulation of CD163 Expression by Metalloprotease ADAM17 Regulates Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Longjun; Niu, Junwei; Yu, Haidong; Gu, Weihong; Li, Ren; Luo, Xiaolei; Huang, Mingming; Tian, Zhijun; Feng, Li

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT As a consequence of their effects on ectodomain shedding, members of the A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) family have been implicated in the control of various cellular processes. Although ADAM family members are also involved in cancer, inflammation, and other pathologies, it is unclear whether they affect porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that inhibition of ADAM17 enhances PRRSV entry in Marc-145 and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). We also demonstrate that the inhibition of ADAM17 upregulates membrane CD163 expression, a putative PRRSV receptor that is exogenously expressed in BHK-21 and endogenously expressed in Marc-145 and PAMs. Furthermore, overexpression of ADAM17 induced downregulation of CD163 expression and a reduction in PRRSV infection, whereas ablation of ADAM17 expression using specific small interfering RNA resulted in upregulation of CD163 expression with a corresponding increase in PRRSV infection. These ADAM17-mediated effects were confirmed with PRRSV nonpermissive BHK-21 cells transfected with CD163 cDNA. Overall, these findings indicate that ADAM17 downregulates CD163 expression and hinders PRRSV entry. Hence, downregulation of ADAM17 particular substrates may be an additional component of the anti-infection defenses. IMPORTANCE ADAM17 is one of the important membrane-associated metalloproteases that mediate various cellular events, as well as inflammation, cancer, and other pathologies. Here, we investigate for the first time the role of the metalloprotease ADAM17 in PRRSV infection. By using inhibitor and genetic modification methods, we demonstrate that ADAM17 negatively regulate PRRSV entry by regulating its substrate(s). More specifically, ADAM 17 mediates the downregulation of the PRRSV cellular receptor CD163. The reduction in CD163 expression represents another component of the anti-infection response initiated by ADAM17. PMID:24965453

  2. The Endoribonuclease Activity Essential for the Nonstructural Protein 11 of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus to Inhibit NLRP3 Inflammasome-Mediated IL-1β Induction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Shi, Xibao; Zhang, Xiaozhuan; Wang, Aiping; Wang, Li; Chen, Jing; Deng, Ruiguang; Zhang, Gaiping

    2015-12-01

    NLRP3 inflammasome, which is multiprotein complex that induces the maturity and secretion of proinflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β), takes a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune responses to the invading pathogens. It has been shown that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) could activate the NLRP3 inflammasome but induce the host's immunosuppression. This study aims to explore whether PRRSV could encode the component to antagonize the NLRP3 inflammasome. The obtained results showed that PRRSV could induce the expression and secretion of IL-1β in early infection through the pathway of NLRP3 inflammasome in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), but the levels of pro-IL-1β mRNA and IL-1β protein decreased to a degree that was similar to the level of the mock-infected group in later infection. This work also found that PRRSV nonstructural protein (nsp) 11 could inhibit the expression of pro-IL-1β mRNA induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the secretion of IL-1β induced by LPS plus nigericin in PAMs. Furthermore, the mutation studies showed that the endoribonuclease activity was essential for nsp11 to inhibit the secretion of IL-1β. Therefore, it could be indicated that PRRSV could induce the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, but the virus encoded nsp11 to inhibit this action. PMID:26398903

  3. The non-structural protein Nsp2TF of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus down-regulates the expression of Swine Leukocyte Antigen class I.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qian M; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Ni, Yan-Yan; Cao, Dianjun; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is arguably the most economically-important global swine pathogen. Here we demonstrated that PRRSV down-regulates Swine Leukocyte Antigen class I (SLA-I) expression in porcine alveolar macrophages, PK15-CD163 cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. To identify the viral protein(s) involved in SLA-I down-regulation, we tested all 22 PRRSV structural and non-structural proteins and identified that Nsp1α and Nsp2TF, and GP3 significantly down-regulated SLA-I expression with Nsp2TF showing the greatest effect. We further generated a panel of mutant viruses in which the Nsp2TF protein synthesis was abolished, and found that the two mutants with disrupted -2 ribosomal frameshifting elements and additional stop codons in the TF domain were unable to down-regulate SLA-I expression. Additionally we demonstrated that the last 68 amino acids of TF domain in Nsp2TF are critical for this function. Collectively, the results indicate a novel function of Nsp2TF in negative modulation of SLA-I expression. PMID:26895249

  4. National reduction in porcine circovirus type 2 prevalence following introduction of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Cheryl M T; Yang, Yan; Haley, Charles; Sharma, Nikita; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2016-06-30

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), a small, single-stranded circular DNA virus and the causative agent of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD), was first observed in the mid-1990s in pigs with a post-weaning wasting disease. In 2006 the number of PCVAD cases greatly increased, marking it as an important viral pathogen for the United States (US) swine industry. PCV2 vaccines were introduced to the US in 2006 in response to widespread outbreaks of PCVAD. These vaccines were effective in preventing disease, but did not eliminate virus from the animals. In 2006, prior to vaccine use, a study of PCV2 prevalence in pig herds across the US was performed in conjunction with the US National Animal Health Monitoring System. In 2012, 6 years after widespread PCV2 vaccination, this study was repeated. Since the introduction of PCV2 vaccines in 2006, viral presence and viral loads have greatly decreased, and a genotypic shift dominated by PCV2b has occurred. Antibody levels have decreased in the pig population, but approximately 95% of sites continue to be antibody-positive. Widespread vaccination has controlled PCVAD and decreased PCV2 prevalence to the point that viremia is not detected on many sites. Thus, continued vaccination may lead to PCV2 elimination in the national herd over time. PMID:27259831

  5. Relationship of structural to functional impairment during alveolar-capillary membrane development.

    PubMed

    Ahlfeld, Shawn K; Gao, Yong; Conway, Simon J; Tepper, Robert S

    2015-04-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is a chronic lung disease of extreme preterm infants and results in impaired gas exchange. Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia is characterized histologically by alveolar-capillary simplification in animal models, it is clinically defined by impaired gas diffusion. With the use of a developmentally relevant model, we correlated alveolar-capillary structural simplification with reduced functional gas exchange as measured by the diffusing factor for carbon monoxide (DFCO). Neonatal mouse pups were exposed to >90% hyperoxia or room air during postnatal days 0 to 7, and then all pups were returned to room air from days 7 to 56. At day 56, DFCO was measured as the ratio of carbon monoxide uptake to neon dilution, and lungs were fixed for histologic assessment of alveolar-capillary development. Neonatal hyperoxia exposure inhibited alveolar-capillary septal development as evidenced by significantly increased mean linear intercept, increased airspace-to-septal ratio, decreased nodal density, and decreased pulmonary microvasculature. Importantly, alveolar-capillary structural deficits in hyperoxia-exposed pups were accompanied by a significant 28% decrease in DFCO (0.555 versus 0.400; P < 0.0001). In addition, DFCO was highly and significantly correlated with structural measures of reduced alveolar-capillary growth. Simplification of alveolar-capillary structure is highly correlated with impaired gas exchange function. Current mechanistic and therapeutic animal models of inhibited alveolar development may benefit from application of DFCO as an alternative physiologic indicator of alveolar-capillary development. PMID:25661110

  6. Epithelial β1 integrin is required for lung branching morphogenesis and alveolarization.

    PubMed

    Plosa, Erin J; Young, Lisa R; Gulleman, Peter M; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Benjamin, John T; Im, Amanda M; van der Meer, Riet; Gleaves, Linda A; Bulus, Nada; Han, Wei; Prince, Lawrence S; Blackwell, Timothy S; Zent, Roy

    2014-12-01

    Integrin-dependent interactions between cells and extracellular matrix regulate lung development; however, specific roles for β1-containing integrins in individual cell types, including epithelial cells, remain incompletely understood. In this study, the functional importance of β1 integrin in lung epithelium during mouse lung development was investigated by deleting the integrin from E10.5 onwards using surfactant protein C promoter-driven Cre. These mutant mice appeared normal at birth but failed to gain weight appropriately and died by 4 months of age with severe hypoxemia. Defects in airway branching morphogenesis in association with impaired epithelial cell adhesion and migration, as well as alveolarization defects and persistent macrophage-mediated inflammation were identified. Using an inducible system to delete β1 integrin after completion of airway branching, we showed that alveolarization defects, characterized by disrupted secondary septation, abnormal alveolar epithelial cell differentiation, excessive collagen I and elastin deposition, and hypercellularity of the mesenchyme occurred independently of airway branching defects. By depleting macrophages using liposomal clodronate, we found that alveolarization defects were secondary to persistent alveolar inflammation. β1 integrin-deficient alveolar epithelial cells produced excessive monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and reactive oxygen species, suggesting a direct role for β1 integrin in regulating alveolar homeostasis. Taken together, these studies define distinct functions of epithelial β1 integrin during both early and late lung development that affect airway branching morphogenesis, epithelial cell differentiation, alveolar septation and regulation of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25395457

  7. Further examination of alveolar septal adaptation to left pneumonectomy in the adult lung.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Connie C W; Johnson, Robert L

    2006-04-28

    Recent data from our laboratory are presented concerning alveolar septal adaptation following 42-45% lung resection by left pneumonectomy (PNX) in adult foxhounds compared to sham-operated control animals. Results confirm our previous conclusion that compensation in the remaining lung occurs without a net growth of additional alveolar septal tissue. The major ultrastructural responses are (a) alveolar capillary distention, which recruits capillary blood volume and surface area, leading to a 30-50% increase in lung diffusing capacity estimated by morphometry, a magnitude similar to that measured by physiologic methods; (b) a selectively increased volume of type 2 alveolar epithelial cells. These data, taken together with the balanced compensatory growth of alveolar septal cells observed in adult dogs following 55-58% lung resection by right PNX, support a graded alveolar cellular response to chronic mechanical strain with the alveolar epithelial cells being activated first; as strain increases further with greater lung resection other alveolar cells also become activated leading to an overt increase in septal tissue volume. The spatial distribution of lobar mechanical strain and lobar tissue volume assessed by high resolution computed tomography was markedly non-uniform after PNX, suggesting possible non-uniform distribution of alveolar cellular response. The sequential activation of physiologic recruitment and cellular adaptation confer additive functional benefits that optimize long-term exercise performance after PNX. PMID:16563882

  8. Identification of Putative ORF5 Protein of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 and Functional Analysis of GFP-Fused ORF5 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Han; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the essential infectious agent responsible for causing porcine circovirus-associated diseases in pigs. To date, eleven RNAs and five viral proteins of PCV2 have been detected. Here, we identified a novel viral gene within the PCV2 genome, termed ORF5, that exists at both the transcriptional and translational level during productive infection of PCV2 in porcine alveolar macrophages 3D4/2 (PAMs). Northern blot analysis was used to demonstrate that the ORF5 gene measures 180 bp in length and overlaps completely with ORF1 when read in the same direction. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to show that the ORF5 protein is not essential for PCV2 replication. To investigate the biological functions of the novel protein, we constructed a recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid capable of expressing PCV2 ORF5. The results show that the GFP-tagged PCV2 ORF5 protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is degraded via the proteasome, inhibits PAM growth and prolongs the S-phase of the cell cycle. Further studies show that the GFP-tagged PCV2 ORF5 protein induces ER stress and activates NF-κB, which was further confirmed by a significant upregulation in IL-6, IL-8 and COX-2 expression. In addition, five cellular proteins (GPNMB, CYP1A1, YWHAB, ZNF511 and SRSF3) were found to interact with ORF5 via yeast two-hybrid assay. These findings provide novel information on the identification and functional analysis of the PCV2 ORF5 protein and are likely to be of benefit in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of PCV2 pathogenicity. However, additional experiments are needed to validate the expression and function of the ORF5 protein during PCV2 infection in vitro before any definitive conclusion can be drawn. PMID:26035722

  9. Characterization of integrin expression in islets isolated from hamster, canine, porcine, and human pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wang, R N; Paraskevas, S; Rosenberg, L

    1999-04-01

    The reasons for the failure of clinical islet transplantation remain obscure. Islet isolation, however, exposes the islet to variety of cellular stresses, including disruption of the cell-matrix relationship, an event associated with apoptosis. The cell-matrix relationship is characterized by an interaction between cell surface integrin receptors and matrix molecules of the surrounding basement membrane (BM). The purpose of this study was to characterize integrin expression and the distribution of the peri-insular BM in human, porcine, canine, and hamster pancreas, and after routine islet isolation. Whereas islets in the porcine pancreas do not have a demonstrable BM, islets in the human, canine, and hamster pancreas have an almost continuous BM with very little direct exocrine to endocrine cell-cell contact. After islet isolation, the BM was destroyed, only to be reestablished during the period of culture. In the pancreas of all four species, integrin alpha3 was expressed only on islet cells, and integrin alpha5 was present on islet cells as well as on acinar, centroacinar, and duct cells. Integrin alphaV was detected only in human and canine pancreas. Integrin beta1 was demonstrated only in the human pancreas. In isolated islets, integrin alpha3, alpha5, and alphaV expression decreased during the culture period and the intensity of the staining was observed to be coincident with the distribution of the BM. In summary, this is the first report of integrin expression in hamster, canine, porcine, and human islets. After islet isolation, the altered islet cell-matrix relationship is reflected both in the decrease in integrin expression and in the destruction of the peri-insular BM. These profound changes will need to be considered as the process of islet isolation for transplantation is refined. (J Histochem Cytochem 47:499-506, 1999) PMID:10082751

  10. ULTRASOUND-ENHANCED rt-PA THROMBOLYSIS IN AN EX VIVO PORCINE CAROTID ARTERY MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Kathryn E.; Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Caudell Stamper, Danielle N.; Vela, Deborah C.; Sutton, Jonathan T.; Pyne-Geithman, Gail J.; Holland, Christy K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is known to enhance recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) thrombolysis. In this study, occlusive porcine whole blood clots were placed in flowing plasma within living porcine carotid arteries. Ultrasonically induced stable cavitation was investigated as an adjuvant to rt-PA thrombolysis. Aged, retracted clots were exposed to plasma alone, plasma containing rt-PA (7.1 ± 3.8 μg/mL) or plasma with rt-PA and Definity® ultrasound contrast agent (0.79 ± 0.47 μL/mL) with and without 120-kHz continuous wave ultrasound at a peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of 0.44 MPa. An insonation scheme was formulated to promote and maximize stable cavitation activity by incorporating ultrasound quiescent periods that allowed for the inflow of Definity®-rich plasma. Cavitation was measured with a passive acoustic detector throughout thrombolytic treatment. Thrombolytic efficacy was measured by comparing clot mass before and after treatment. Average mass loss for clots exposed to rt-PA and Definity® without ultrasound (n = 7) was 34%, and with ultrasound (n = 6) was 83%, which constituted a significant difference (p < 0.0001). Without Definity® there was no thrombolytic enhancement by ultrasound exposure alone at this pressure amplitude (n = 5, p < 0.0001). In the low-oxygen environment of the ischemic artery, significant loss of endothelium occurred but no correlation was observed between arterial tissue damage and treatment type. Acoustic stable cavitation nucleated by an infusion of Definity® enhances rt-PA thrombolysis without apparent treatment-related damage in this ex vivo porcine carotid artery model. PMID:21723448

  11. Analyses of the involvement of PKA regulation mechanism in meiotic incompetence of porcine growing oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takanori; Fujii, Wataru; Kano, Kiyoshi; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko

    2012-09-01

    Mammalian growing oocytes (GOs) lack the ability to resume meiosis, although the molecular mechanism of this limitation is not fully understood. In the present study, we cloned cDNAs of cAMP-dependent protein-kinase (PKA) subunits from porcine oocytes and analyzed the involvement of the PKA regulation mechanism in the meiotic incompetence of GOs at the molecular level. We found a cAMP-independent high PKA activity in GOs throughout the in vitro culture using a porcine PKA assay system we established, and inhibition of the activity by injection of the antisense RNA of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKA-C) induced meiotic resumption in GOs. Then we examined the possibility that the amount of the PKA regulatory subunit (PKA-R), which can bind and inhibit PKA-C, was insufficient to suppress PKA activity in GOs because of the overexpression of two PKA-Rs, PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A. We found that neither of them affected PKA activity and induced meiotic resumption in GO although PRKAR2A could inhibit PKA activity and induce meiosis in cAMP-treated full-grown oocytes (FGOs). Finally, we analyzed the subcellular localization of PKA subunits and found that all the subunits were localized in the cytoplasm during meiotic arrest and that PKA-C and PRKAR2A, but not PRKAR1A, entered into the nucleus just before meiotic resumption in FGOs, whereas all of them remained in the cytoplasm in GOs throughout the culture period. Our findings suggest that the continuous high PKA activity is a primary cause of the meiotic incompetence of porcine GOs and that this PKA activity is not simply caused by an insufficient expression level of PKA-R, but can be attributed to more complex spatial-temporal regulation mechanisms. PMID:22674394

  12. Effects of alveolar ridge preservation on delayed implant osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shan; Li, Bin; Xue, Hui-Min; Huang, Hai-Yun; Liu, Gang-Li

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of alveolar ridge preservation with Bio-Oss bone substitute (Geistlich Pharma) on delayed implant osseointegration. The 3rd and 4th left and right mandibular premolars were extracted from four adult healthy male and female dogs. For the experimental group, we randomly selected two extraction sockets in each dog to be filled with Bio-Oss bone substitute (Geistlich Pharma). The two remaining extraction sockets remained untreated and served as the control group. Three months after Bio-Oss placement, dental implants were inserted into the alveolar bone of the experimental group and the control group. The osteogenic activity of the bone around the implants was assessed by evaluating the histological morphology and by estimating histomorphometric parameters at 3 and 6 months after delayed implantation. At 3 months, Goldner’s trichrome staining analysis showed that the bone-implant contact rate and mineralised bone area around the implant were significantly higher in the experimental group (75.98% ± 8.97% and 69.52% ± 9.63%, respectively) than in the control group (56.13% ± 8.18% and 52.82% ± 7.25%, respectively; P < 0.05). However, at 6 months, the two groups showed no significant difference. Fluorescence microscopy analysis revealed that the average mineralisation apposition rate of the bone tissue around the dental implant in the experimental group at 3 and 6 months was 6.80 ± 0.43 μm and 8.38 ± 0.84 μm, respectively, which was significantly higher than the rate in the control group (P < 0.05). These data indicated that alveolar ridge preservation by using Bio-Oss placement can promote osseointegration of delayed implantation. This may be a promising option for clinical use. PMID:26379871

  13. Autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: clinical course and diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Ben-Dov, Issahar; Segel, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is caused by accumulation of surfactant components in the alveoli and terminal airways. All forms of PAP are caused by insufficient surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages. Autoimmune PAP, a rare, antibody-mediated disease, that compromises 90% of cases of PAP, is causes by IgG autoantibodies that block GM-CSF effect, a crucial step for macrophage maturation. Alveolar filling may progress to respiratory insufficiency, but the course of the disease is variable. Patients usually complain of dyspnea, mainly with exertion, and cough. Chest CT shows highly suggestive ground grass opacification crossed by heavy septal lines, leading to the typical "crazy paving" appearance. Bronchoalveolar lavage reveals "milky" fluid, containing semisolid remnants of surfactant components, packed as lamellar bodies. The surfactant appears granular and pink on PAS staining, and lung architecture is preserved. These cytological and pathological characteristics are diagnostic for PAP. In addition, a high titer of IgG anti GM-CSF autoantibodies is highly sensitive and specific for the diagnosis. The trigger for antibodies formation and their role (if any) in regulation GM-CSF activity in the normal state are unknown. Based on the specificity of these characteristics we suggest a structured framework for the diagnosis of Autoimmune PAP. Lung lavage with a large volume of saline is the standard therapy, and is effective in most patients. However, immune-modulatory therapy, by either supplying exogenous GM-CSF, or by inhibiting the CD20+ antibody forming cells, with Rituximab, is also effective in many patients. The precise role of each therapy, alone or in combination, should be systematically studied. PMID:24424195

  14. Proposal of a computed tomography classification for hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Graeter, Tilmann; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Oeztuerk, Suemeyra; Haenle, Mark Martin; Mason, Richard Andrew; Hillenbrand, Andreas; Kull, Thomas; Barth, Thomas F; Kern, Peter; Gruener, Beate

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a computed tomography (CT)-morphological classification for hepatic alveolar echinococcosis was the aim of the study. METHODS: The CT morphology of hepatic lesions in 228 patients with confirmed alveolar echinococcosis (AE) drawn from the Echinococcus Databank of the University Hospital of Ulm was reviewed retrospectively. For this reason, CT datasets of combined positron emission tomography (PET)-CT examinations were evaluated. The diagnosis of AE was made in patients with unequivocal seropositivity; positive histological findings following diagnostic puncture or partial resection of the liver; and/or findings typical for AE at either ultrasonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging or PET-CT. The CT-morphological findings were grouped into the new classification scheme. RESULTS: Within the classification a lesion was dedicated to one out of five “primary morphologies” as well as to one out of six “patterns of calcification”. “primary morphology” and “pattern of calcification” are primarily focussed on separately from each other and combined, whereas the “primary morphology” V is not further characterized by a “pattern of calcification”. Based on the five primary morphologies, further descriptive sub-criteria were appended to types I-III. An analysis of the calcification pattern in relation to the primary morphology revealed the exclusive association of the central calcification with type IV primary morphology. Similarly, certain calcification patterns exhibited a clear predominance for other primary morphologies, which underscores the delimitation of the individual primary morphological types from each other. These relationships in terms of calcification patterns extend into the primary morphological sub-criteria, demonstrating the clear subordination of those criteria. CONCLUSION: The proposed CT-morphological classification (EMUC-CT) is intended to facilitate the recognition and interpretation of lesions in hepatic

  15. Metabolic shift in lung alveolar cell mitochondria following acrolein exposure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit R; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2013-11-15

    Acrolein, an α,β unsaturated electrophile, is an environmental pollutant released in ambient air from diesel exhausts and cooking oils. This study examines the role of acrolein in altering mitochondrial function and metabolism in lung-specific cells. RLE-6TN, H441, and primary alveolar type II (pAT2) cells were exposed to acrolein for 4 h, and its effect on mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates was studied by XF Extracellular Flux analysis. Low-dose acrolein exposure decreased mitochondrial respiration in a dose-dependent manner because of alteration in the metabolism of glucose in all the three cell types. Acrolein inhibited glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, leading to decreased substrate availability for mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN, H441, and pAT2 cells; the reduced GAPDH activity was compensated in pAT2 cells by an increase in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the regulatory control of the pentose phosphate pathway. The decrease in pyruvate from glucose metabolism resulted in utilization of alternative sources to support mitochondrial energy production: palmitate-BSA complex increased mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN and pAT2 cells. The presence of palmitate in alveolar cells for surfactant biosynthesis may prove to be the alternative fuel source for mitochondrial respiration. Accordingly, a decrease in phosphatidylcholine levels and an increase in phospholipase A2 activity were found in the alveolar cells after acrolein exposure. These findings have implications for understanding the decrease in surfactant levels frequently observed in pathophysiological situations with altered lung function following exposure to environmental toxicants. PMID:24056970

  16. Notch signaling promotes airway mucous metaplasia and inhibits alveolar development.

    PubMed

    Guseh, J Sawalla; Bores, Sam A; Stanger, Ben Z; Zhou, Qiao; Anderson, William J; Melton, Douglas A; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2009-05-01

    The airways are conduits that transport atmospheric oxygen to the distal alveolus. Normally, airway mucous cells are rare. However, diseases of the airway are often characterized by mucous metaplasia, in which there are dramatic increases in mucous cell numbers. As the Notch pathway is known to regulate cell fate in many contexts, we misexpressed the active intracellular domain of the mouse Notch1 receptor in lung epithelium. Notch misexpression resulted in an increase in mucous cells and a decrease in ciliated cells in the airway. Similarly, mouse embryonic tracheal explants and adult human airway epithelium treated with Notch agonists displayed increased mucous cell numbers and decreased ciliated cell numbers. Notch antagonists had the opposite effect. Notably, Notch antagonists blocked IL13-induced mucous metaplasia. IL13 has a well-established role as an inflammatory mediator of mucous metaplasia and functions through Stat6-mediated gene transcription. We found that Notch ligands, however, are able to cause mucous metaplasia in Stat6-null cultured trachea, thus identifying a novel pathway that stimulates mucous metaplasia. Notch signaling may therefore play an important role in airway disease and, by extension, Notch antagonists may have therapeutic value. Conversely, in the distal lung, Notch misexpression prevented the differentiation of alveolar cell types. Instead, the distal lung formed cysts composed of cells that were devoid of alveolar markers but that expressed some, but not all, markers of proximal airway epithelium. Occasional distal cystic cells appeared to differentiate into normal proximal airway cells, suggesting that ectopic Notch signaling arrests the normal differentiation of distal lung progenitors before they initiate an alveolar program. PMID:19369400

  17. Effect of Alveolar Ridge Preservation after Tooth Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Ortiz, G.; Elangovan, S.; Kramer, K.W.O.; Blanchette, D.; Dawson, D.V.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation strategies are indicated to minimize the loss of ridge volume that typically follows tooth extraction. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effect that socket filling with a bone grafting material has on the prevention of postextraction alveolar ridge volume loss as compared with tooth extraction alone in nonmolar teeth. Five electronic databases were searched to identify randomized clinical trials that fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Literature screening and article selection were conducted by 3 independent reviewers, while data extraction was performed by 2 independent reviewers. Outcome measures were mean horizontal ridge changes (buccolingual) and vertical ridge changes (midbuccal, midlingual, mesial, and distal). The influence of several variables of interest (i.e., flap elevation, membrane usage, and type of bone substitute employed) on the outcomes of ridge preservation therapy was explored via subgroup analyses. We found that alveolar ridge preservation is effective in limiting physiologic ridge reduction as compared with tooth extraction alone. The clinical magnitude of the effect was 1.89 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.41, 2.36; p < .001) in terms of buccolingual width, 2.07 mm (95% CI: 1.03, 3.12; p < .001) for midbuccal height, 1.18 mm (95% CI: 0.17, 2.19; p = .022) for midlingual height, 0.48 mm (95% CI: 0.18, 0.79; p = .002) for mesial height, and 0.24 mm (95% CI: –0.05, 0.53; p = .102) for distal height changes. Subgroup analyses revealed that flap elevation, the usage of a membrane, and the application of a xenograft or an allograft are associated with superior outcomes, particularly on midbuccal and midlingual height preservation. PMID:24966231

  18. A Distinctive Alveolar Macrophage Activation State Induced by Cigarette Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Prescott G.; Koth, Laura L.; Yang, Yee Hwa; Rodriguez, Madeleine W.; Favoreto, Silvio; Dolganov, Gregory M.; Paquet, Agnes C.; Erle, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Macrophages are believed to play a central role in emphysema based largely on data from mouse models. However, the relevance of these models to smoking-related lung disease in humans is uncertain. Objectives: We sought to comprehensively characterize the effects of smoking on gene expression in human alveolar macrophages and to compare these with effects seen in transgenic mouse models of emphysema. Methods: We used DNA microarrays with genomewide coverage to analyze alveolar macrophages from 15 smokers, 15 nonsmokers, and 15 subjects with asthma (disease control). Selected gene expression changes were validated by polymerase chain reaction and ELISA. Expression changes were compared with those identified by microarray analysis of interleukin-13–overexpressing and integrin-β6–deficient mice, which both develop emphysema. Measurements and Main Results: All 15 smokers shared a common pattern of macrophage gene expression that distinguished them from nonsmokers, a finding not observed in subjects with asthma. We identified 110 genes as differentially expressed in smokers despite using conservative statistical methods. Matrix metalloproteinase 12, a proteinase that plays a critical role in mouse models, was the third most highly induced gene in smokers (ninefold, p < 0.0001). However, most changes in smokers were not reflected in mouse models. One such finding was increased osteopontin expression in smokers (fourfold, p = 0.006), which was confirmed at the protein level and correlated with the degree of airway obstruction. Conclusions: Smoking induces a remarkably consistent and distinctive pattern of alveolar macrophage activation. These studies identify aspects of mouse models that are directly relevant to human smokers and also reveal novel potential mediators of smoking-related diseases. PMID:16166618

  19. Prediction of the alveolar bone level after the extraction of maxillary anterior teeth with severe periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose After extraction, the alveolar bone tends to undergo atrophy in three-dimensions. The amount of alveolar bone loss in the horizontal dimension has been reported to be greater than the amount of bone loss in the vertical dimension, and is most pronounced in the buccal aspect. The aim of this study was to monitor the predictive alveolar bone level following the extraction of anterior teeth seriously involved with advanced chronic periodontitis. Methods This study included 25 patients with advanced chronic periodontitis, whose maxillary anterior teeth had been extracted due to extensive attachment loss more than one year before the study. Periapical radiographs were analyzed to assess the vertical level of alveolar bone surrounding the edentulous area. An imaginary line connecting the mesial and the distal ends of the alveolar crest facing the adjacent tooth was arbitrarily created. Several representative coordinates were established in the horizontal direction, and the vertical distance from the imaginary line to the alveolar crest was measured at each coordinate for each patient using image analysis software. Regression functions predicting the vertical level of the alveolar bone in the maxillary anterior edentulous area were identified for each patient. Results The regression functions demonstrated a tendency to converge to parabolic shapes. The predicted maximum distance between the imaginary line and the alveolar bone calculated using the regression function was 1.43±0.65 mm. No significant differences were found between the expected and actual maximum distances. Likewise, the predicted and actual maximum horizontal distances did not show any significant differences. The distance from the alveolar bone crest to the imaginary lines was not influenced by the mesio-distal spans of the edentulous area. Conclusions After extraction, the vertical level of the alveolar ridge increased to become closer to the reference line connecting the mesial and distal

  20. Genome Sequences of the Novel Porcine Parvovirus 3, Identified in Guangxi Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hui; Li, Xiangmin; Zhao, Zekai; An, Chunjing; Wan, Peng; Wu, Mengge; Chen, Huanchun; Qian, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Porcine parvovirus 3 is a novel parvovirus that infects pigs. Here, we report two genome sequences of porcine parvovirus 3 strains GX1 and GX2, which are highly prevalent in Guangxi province. It will help in understanding the epidemiology and molecular characteristics of the porcine parvovirus 3. PMID:26941135

  1. Genome Sequences of the Novel Porcine Parvovirus 3, Identified in Guangxi Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hui; Li, Xiangmin; Zhao, Zekai; An, Chunjing; Wan, Peng; Wu, Mengge; Chen, Huanchun

    2016-01-01

    Porcine parvovirus 3 is a novel parvovirus that infects pigs. Here, we report two genome sequences of porcine parvovirus 3 strains GX1 and GX2, which are highly prevalent in Guangxi province. It will help in understanding the epidemiology and molecular characteristics of the porcine parvovirus 3. PMID:26941135

  2. Porcine arterivirus activates the NF-{kappa}B pathway through I{kappa}B degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Myeong; Kleiboeker, Steven B. . E-mail: KleiboekerS@Missouri.edu

    2005-11-10

    Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) is a critical regulator of innate and adaptive immune function as well as cell proliferation and survival. The present study demonstrated for the first time that a virus belonging to the Arteriviridae family activates NF-{kappa}B in MARC-145 cells and alveolar macrophages. In porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected cells, NF-{kappa}B activation was characterized by translocation of NF-{kappa}B from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, increased DNA binding activity, and NF-{kappa}B-regulated gene expression. NF-{kappa}B activation was increased as PRRSV infection progressed and in a viral dose-dependent manner. UV-inactivation of PRRSV significantly reduced the level of NF-{kappa}B activation. Degradation of I{kappa}B protein was detected late in PRRSV infection, and overexpression of the dominant negative form of I{kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}DN) significantly suppressed NF-{kappa}B activation induced by PRRSV. However, I{kappa}B{alpha}DN did not affect viral replication and viral cytopathic effect. PRRSV infection induced oxidative stress in cells by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidants inhibited NF-{kappa}B DNA binding activity in PRRSV-infected cells, suggesting ROS as a mechanism by which NF-{kappa}B was activated by PRRSV infection. Moreover, NF-{kappa}B-dependent expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 was observed in PRRSV-infected cells, an observation which implies that NF-{kappa}B activation is a biologically significant aspect of PRRSV pathogenesis. The results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular pathways of pathology and immune evasion associated with disease caused by PRRSV.

  3. Porcine arterivirus activates the NF-kappaB pathway through IkappaB degradation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Myeong; Kleiboeker, Steven B

    2005-11-10

    Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) is a critical regulator of innate and adaptive immune function as well as cell proliferation and survival. The present study demonstrated for the first time that a virus belonging to the Arteriviridae family activates NF-kappaB in MARC-145 cells and alveolar macrophages. In porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected cells, NF-kappaB activation was characterized by translocation of NF-kappaB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, increased DNA binding activity, and NF-kappaB-regulated gene expression. NF-kappaB activation was increased as PRRSV infection progressed and in a viral dose-dependent manner. UV-inactivation of PRRSV significantly reduced the level of NF-kappaB activation. Degradation of IkappaB protein was detected late in PRRSV infection, and overexpression of the dominant negative form of IkappaBalpha (IkappaBalphaDN) significantly suppressed NF-kappaB activation induced by PRRSV. However, IkappaBalphaDN did not affect viral replication and viral cytopathic effect. PRRSV infection induced oxidative stress in cells by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidants inhibited NF-kappaB DNA binding activity in PRRSV-infected cells, suggesting ROS as a mechanism by which NF-kappaB was activated by PRRSV infection. Moreover, NF-kappaB-dependent expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 was observed in PRRSV-infected cells, an observation which implies that NF-kappaB activation is a biologically significant aspect of PRRSV pathogenesis. The results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular pathways of pathology and immune evasion associated with disease caused by PRRSV. PMID:16129468

  4. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: another autoimmune disease associated with sarcoidosis?

    PubMed

    Boerner, Eda Burcu; Costabel, Ulrich; Wessendorf, Thomas Ernst; Theegarten, Dirk; Hetzel, Martin; Drent, Marjolein; Bonella, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant phospholipids and lipoproteins within the alveoli.  Here we report on a female patient who was diagnosed with autoimmune PAP and successfully treated with whole lung lavage (WLL). 15 months after PAP diagnosis the patient developed marked fatigue. Additional tests revealed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. We can only speculate that PAP and sarcoidosis in our patient are linked to each other based on the fact that other autoimmune disorders have also been associated with sarcoidosis. PMID:27055841

  5. A 3-step therapeutic strategy for severe alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Noirez, Leslie; Koutsokera, Angela; Pantet, Olivier; Duss, François-Régis; Eggimann, Philippe; Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Gonzalez, Michel; Coronado, Marcos; Nicod, Laurent P; Lovis, Alban

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is characterized by accumulation of lipoproteinaceous material in the terminal airways. Whole lung lavage (WLL) remains the gold standard treatment but may be particularly challenging in cases of severe hypoxemia. We present a 3-step strategy that was used in a patient with PAP-associated refractory hypoxemia and that combined venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vvECMO), double-lumen orotracheal intubation, and bilateral multisegmental sequential lavage (MSL). The procedure was well tolerated and permitted weaning from the ventilator. PMID:25841841

  6. Alveolar hemorrhage after scuba diving: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Mee-Sun; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Lien, Chi-Tun; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2010-07-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving is increasingly popular in Taiwan. There are few references in the literature regarding pulmonary hemorrhage as the sole manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma in scuba divers, and no study from Taiwan was found in the literature. We present the case of a 25-year-old man who suffered alveolar hemorrhage related to pulmonary barotrauma as a complication of scuba diving. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a Taiwanese subject suffering from non-fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after scuba diving. PMID:20638043

  7. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in children: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Seyyed Ahmad; Karimi, Abdollah; Tabatabaei, Sedigheh Rafiee; Radpay, Badiozzaman; Jadali, Farzaneh; Shiva, Farideh; Jahromy, Mana Hadipour

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, (PAP) is a rare disease of unknown etiology, characterized by accumulation of intraalveolar proteinaceous material which is rich in lipid and positive on periodic acid-Schiff stain. Two clinically different pediatric types have been defined as congenital PAP which is fulminant and fatal, and a late-onset PAP which is similar to the adult form and less severe. Eight children with late-onset PAP were hospitalized from 1998 to 2005 in Mofid Children Hospital. Characteristics of these patients and the methods of diagnosis and treatment are presented in this case series. PMID:21526069

  8. Bruxism elicited by inferior alveolar nerve injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Melis, Marcello; Coiana, Carlo; Secci, Simona

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the history of a patient who received an injury to the right inferior alveolar nerve after placement of a dental implant, with bruxism noted afterward. The symptoms were managed by the use of an occlusal appliance worn at night and occasionally during the day, associated with increased awareness of parafunction during the day to reduce muscle pain and fatigue. Paresthesia of the teeth, gingiva, and lower lip persisted but were reduced during appliance use. PMID:22254232

  9. Nocardial brain abscess in a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shirani, Kiana; Poulsen, Asger Nyborg; Hakamifard, Atousa

    2015-01-01

    Brain abscesses caused by Nocardia are rare but have a very high mortality and specific requirements of antibiotic treatment. Nocardial brain abscesses are mainly found in patients with predisposing conditions such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disease associated with chronic exposure to silica dust. We present a case of multiple nocardial brain abscesses in a man with PAP probably due to long-term occupational exposure to silica dust. Conclusively, in patients presenting brain abscesses and a history of chronic exposure to silica dust, PAP and opportunistic nocardial infection should always be considered as possible diagnoses. PMID:26605224

  10. Nocardial brain abscess in a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Poulsen, Asger Nyborg; Hakamifard, Atousa

    2015-01-01

    Brain abscesses caused by Nocardia are rare but have a very high mortality and specific requirements of antibiotic treatment. Nocardial brain abscesses are mainly found in patients with predisposing conditions such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disease associated with chronic exposure to silica dust. We present a case of multiple nocardial brain abscesses in a man with PAP probably due to long-term occupational exposure to silica dust. Conclusively, in patients presenting brain abscesses and a history of chronic exposure to silica dust, PAP and opportunistic nocardial infection should always be considered as possible diagnoses. PMID:26605224

  11. Tissue lesion created by HIFU in continuous scanning mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Tingbo; Liu, Zhenbo; Zhang, Dong

    2012-09-01

    The lesion formation was numerically and experimentally investigated by the continuous scanning mode. Simulations were presented based on the combination of Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetov (KZK) equation and bio-heat equation. Measurements were performed on porcine liver tissues using a 1.01 MHz single-element focused transducer at various acoustic powers, confirmed the predicted results. Controlling of the peak temperature and lesion by the scanning speed may be exploited for improvement of efficiency in HIFU therapy.

  12. Functional verification of a porcine myostatin propeptide mutant.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dezun; Jiang, Shengwang; Gao, Pengfei; Qian, Lili; Wang, Qingqing; Cai, Chunbo; Xiao, Gaojun; Yang, Jinzeng; Cui, Wentao

    2015-10-01

    Myostatin is a member of TGF-β superfamily that acts as a key negative regulator in development and growth of embryonic and postnatal muscles. In this study, the inhibitory activities of recombinant porcine myostatin propeptide and its mutated form (at the cleavage site of metalloproteinases of BMP-1/TLD family) against murine myostatin was evaluated in vivo by intraperitoneal injection into mice. Results showed that both wild type and mutated form of porcine propeptide significantly inhibited myostatin activity in vivo. The average body weight of mice receiving wild type propeptide or its mutated form increased by 12.5 % and 24.14%, respectively, compared to mice injected with PBS, implying that the in vivo efficacy of porcine propeptide mutant is greater than its wild type propeptide. Transgenic mice expressing porcine myostatin propeptide mutant were generated to further verify the results obtained from mice injected with recombinant porcine propeptide mutant. Compared with wild type (non-transgenic) mice, relative weight of gastrocnemius, rectusfemoris, and tibialis anterior increased by 22.14 %, 34.13 %, 25.37%, respectively, in transgenic male mice, and by 19.90 %, 42.47 %, 45.61%, respectively, in transgenic female mice. Our data also demonstrated that the mechanism by which muscle growth enhancement is achieved by these propeptides is due to an increase in fiber sizes, not by an increase in number of fiber cells. PMID:26174475

  13. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo-jiang; Li, Ping-hua; Huang, Rui-hua; Sun, Wen-xing; Wang, Han; Li, Qi-fa; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wang-jun; Liu, Hong-lin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse) have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells. PMID:26104526

  14. Clinical comparison of St. Jude and porcine mitral valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Douglas, P S; Hirshfeld, J W; Edie, R N; Stephenson, L W; Gleason, K; Edmunds, L H

    1988-01-01

    One hundred and six consecutive patients who had mitral valve replacement with either a St. Jude or porcine heterograft prosthesis were prospectively studied. The 2 groups are similar with respect to 67 clinical and operative factors and allow comparison of valve performance as an independent variable. Total follow-up is 3,312 patient-months (mean 36 months, range 2-57 months, 94% complete). There are no statistical differences in symptomatic improvement or mortality by life table analysis. Valve-related complications expressed as percent per patient-year are: reoperation: 1.8 St. Jude and 3.8 porcine; endocarditis: 1.2 and 1.9; regurgitant murmur: 2.3 and 1.9; hemolysis: 1.8 and 0.0; late thromboembolism: 1.8 and 1.0; hemorrhage: 2.9 and 2.9; and valve failure: 0.0 and 1.0. There were no significant differences found. Actuarial survival at 3 years was 78% in St. Jude and 81% in porcine patients. Forty-six percent of patients with St. Jude valves and 55% of patients with porcine valves were alive and free of all complications at latest follow-up. The clinical performance of St. Jude and porcine mitral valves are similar over this period of intermediate follow-up. PMID:3360831

  15. The cytological observation of immune adherence of porcine erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yao-Gui; Yin, Wei; Fan, Xin-Feng; Fan, Kuo-Hai; Jiang, Jun-Bing; Li, Hong-Quan

    2012-10-01

    The immune adherence (IA) between the porcine erythrocytes and the opsonized Escherichia coli carried green fluorescent protein gene (GFP-E.coli) were detected by the fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with an attempt to verify the existence of IA between the porcine erythrocytes and complemented-opsonized microbes. Under fluorescence microscopy, GFP-E.coli opsonized by fresh rabbit serum complement adhered to the erythrocytes and could not be detached by PBS washing, and no IA was observed between the erythrocytes and nonopsonized GFP-E.coli after co-incubation. SEM and TEM also revealed the existence of IA between the serum complement-opsonized GFP-E.coli membrane and the erythrocyte membrane. The partial complement receptor type 1 (CR1)-like gene from porcine was generated by RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA 3' end (3' RACE) (157bp and 578bp), both of which have high similarity with published mammal's CR1 gene. The sequences were spliced based on homology comparison and submitted to GenBank (GenBank Accession No. JX033989). These results indicated that the porcine erythrocytes were able to bind to the opsonized microorganisms. Furthermore, the sequencing results confirmed that the CR1-like gene exists in porcine. PMID:23150925

  16. Porcine respiratory disease complex: Interaction of vaccination and porcine circovirus type 2, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Chae, Chanhee

    2016-06-01

    Porcine respiratory disease is a multifactorial and complex disease caused by a combination of infectious pathogens, environmental stressors, differences in production systems, and various management practices; hence the name porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is used. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae are considered to be the most important pathogens that cause PRDC. Although interactions among the three major respiratory pathogens are well documented, it is also necessary to understand the interaction between vaccines and the three major respiratory pathogens. PRRSV and M. hyopneumoniae are well known to potentiate PCV2-associated lesions; however, PRRSV and mycoplasmal vaccines can both enhance PCV2 viraemia regardless of the effects of the actual PRRSV or M. hyopneumoniae infection. On the other hand, M. hyopneumoniae potentiates the severity of pneumonia induced by PRRSV, and vaccination against M. hyopneumoniae alone is also able to decrease PRRSV viraemia and PRRSV-induced lung lesions in dually infected pigs. This review focuses on (1) interactions between PCV2, PRRSV, and M. hyopneumoniae; and (2) interactions between vaccines and the three major respiratory pathogens. PMID:27256017

  17. Sonicated Protein Fractions of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Induce Inflammatory Responses and Differential Gene Expression in a Murine Alveolar Macrophage Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Damte, Dereje; Lee, Seung-Jin; Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2015-12-28

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is known to cause porcine enzootic pneumonia (EP), an important disease in swine production. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of sonicated protein fractions of M. hyopneumoniae on inflammatory response and gene expression in the murine alveolar macrophage MH-S cell line. The effects of sonicated protein fractions and intact M. hyopneumoniae on the gene expression of cytokines and iNOS were assessed using RT-PCR. The Annealing Control Primer (ACP)-based PCR method was used to screen differentially expressed genes. Increased transcription of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA was observed after exposure to the supernatant (SPT), precipitant (PPT), and intact M. hyopneumoniae protein. A time-dependent analysis of the mRNA expression revealed an upregulation after 4 h for IL-6 and iNOS and after 12 h for IL-1β and TNF-α, for both SPT and PPT; the fold change in COX-2 expression was less. A dose- and time-dependent correlation was observed in nitrite (NO) production for both protein fractions; however, there was no significant difference between the effects of the two protein fractions. In a differential gene analysis, PCR revealed differential expression for nine gene bands after 3 h of stimulation - only one gene was downregulated, while the remaining eight were upregulated. The results of this study provide insights that help improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of and macrophage defenses against M. hyopneumoniae assault, and suggest targets for future studies on therapeutic interventions for M. hyopneumoniae infections. PMID:26370797

  18. Is there a relation between local bone quality as assessed on panoramic radiographs and alveolar bone level?

    PubMed

    Nackaerts, Olivia; Gijbels, Frieda; Sanna, Anna-Maria; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2008-03-01

    The aim was to explore the relation between radiographic bone quality on panoramic radiographs and relative alveolar bone level. Digital panoramic radiographs of 94 female patients were analysed (mean age, 44.5; range, 35-74). Radiographic density of the alveolar bone in the premolar region was determined using Agfa Musica software. Alveolar bone level and bone quality index (BQI) were also assessed. Relationships between bone density and BQI on one hand and the relative loss of alveolar bone level on the other were assessed. Mandibular bone density and loss of alveolar bone level were weakly but significantly negatively correlated for the lower premolar area (r = -.27). The BQI did not show a statistically significant relation to alveolar bone level. Radiographic mandibular bone density on panoramic radiographs shows a weak but significant relation to alveolar bone level, with more periodontal breakdown for less dense alveolar bone. PMID:17690924

  19. Challenges for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccinology.

    PubMed

    Kimman, Tjeerd G; Cornelissen, Lisette A; Moormann, Rob J; Rebel, Johanna M J; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert

    2009-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) continues to be a threat for the pig industry. Vaccines have been developed, but these failed to provide sustainable disease control, in particular against genetically unrelated strains. Here we give an overview of current knowledge and gaps in our knowledge that may be relevant for the development of a future generation of more effective vaccines. PRRSV replicates in cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, induces apoptosis and necrosis, interferes with the induction of a proinflammatory response, only slowly induces a specific antiviral response, and may cause persistent infections. The virus appears to use several evasion strategies to circumvent both innate and acquired immunity, including interference with antigen presentation, antibody-mediated enhancement, reduced cell surface expression of viral proteins, and shielding of neutralizing epitopes. In particular the downregulation of type I interferon-alpha production appears to interfere with the induction of acquired immunity. Current vaccines are ineffective because they suffer both from the immune evasion strategies of the virus and the antigenic heterogeneity of field strains. Future vaccines therefore must "uncouple" the immune evasion and apoptogenic/necrotic properties of the virus from its immunogenic properties, and they should induce a broad immune response covering the plasticity of its major antigenic sites. Alternatively, the composition of the vaccine should be changed regularly to reflect presently and locally circulating strains. Preferably new vaccines should also allow discriminating infected from vaccinated pigs to support a virus elimination strategy. Challenges in vaccine development are the incompletely known mechanisms of immune evasion and immunity, lack of knowledge of viral sequences that are responsible for the pathogenic and immunosuppressive properties of the virus, lack of knowledge of the forces that drive antigenic

  20. Retinoic acid promotes primary fetal alveolar epithelial type II cell proliferation and differentiation to alveolar epithelial type I cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui-wei; Kong, Xiang-yong; Zhu, Xiao-xi; Zhu, Guo-qing; Ma, Jin-shuai; Liu, Xiu-xiang

    2015-05-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in lung development and maturation. Many stimuli can induce alveolar epithelial cell damage which will result in the injury of lung parenchyma. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of RA on the proliferation and differentiation of primary fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells (fAECIIs). Primary fAECIIs were isolated from fetal rats at 19 d of gestation and purified by a differential centrifugation and adhesion method. The cells were randomly divided into control (dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO) and RA groups. Cell proliferation, viability, apoptosis, cycle, and expression of target protein were examined at 24, 48, and 72 h. We found that the proliferation and viability of cells in the RA-exposed group significantly increased compared with the DMSO control group. The proportion (%) of cells in the G2 and S phases in the RA group was significantly higher than that in control group cells. The proportion (%) of both early apoptotic cells and late apoptotic cells decreased significantly in cells exposed to RA compared with cells exposed to DMSO. RA significantly enhanced the expression of aquaporin 5 (AQP5). The expression level of pulmonary surfactant C (SPC) was elevated after cells were exposed to RA for 24 and 72 h but was inhibited when cells were exposed to RA for 48 h. These results suggest that RA promotes fAECII proliferation by improving cell viability, promoting S phase entry and inhibiting apoptosis and RA promotes fAECIIs differentiation to alveolar epithelial type I cells (AECIs). PMID:25515249

  1. A Rare Case of Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Secondary to Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Kunal; Zainah, Hadeel; Bhatnagar, Shubhita; Stein, Tricia

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a rare presentation of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. While histoplasmosis has been reported to cause hemoptysis and alveolar hemorrhage in children, the English language literature lacks any adult case reports documenting this association. We report a case of pulmonary histoplasmosis where the initial presentation was pneumonia with a subsequent diagnosis of DAH. PMID:26435863

  2. Changes in alveolar bone support induced by the Herbst appliance: a tomographic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, João Paulo; Raveli, Taisa Boamorte; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto Osvaldo; Raveli, Dirceu Barnabé

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study evaluated alveolar bone loss around mandibular incisors, induced by the Herbst appliance. Methods: The sample consisted of 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean age of 15.76 ± 1.75 years), Class II, Division 1 malocclusion, treated with the Herbst appliance. CBCT scans were obtained before treatment (T0) and after Herbst treatment (T1). Vertical alveolar bone level and alveolar bone thickness of mandibular incisors were assessed. Buccal (B), lingual (L) and total (T) bone thicknesses were assessed at crestal (1), midroot (2) and apical (3) levels of mandibular incisors. Student's t-test and Wilcoxon t-test were used to compare dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Pearson's and Spearman's rank correlation analyses were performed to determine the relationship of changes in alveolar bone thickness. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%. Results: Mandibular incisors showed no statistical significance for vertical alveolar bone level. Alveolar bone thickness of mandibular incisors significantly reduced after treatment at B1, B2, B3, T1 and significantly increased at L2. The magnitude of the statistically significant changes was less than 0.2 mm. The changes in alveolar bone thickness showed no statistical significance with incisor inclination degree. Conclusions: CBCT scans showed an association between the Herbst appliance and alveolar bone loss on the buccal surface of mandibular incisors; however, without clinical significance. PMID:27275621

  3. Genesis of amorphous calcium carbonate containing alveolar plates in the ciliate Coleps hirtus (Ciliophora, Prostomatea).

    PubMed

    Lemloh, Marie-Louise; Marin, Frédéric; Herbst, Frédéric; Plasseraud, Laurent; Schweikert, Michael; Baier, Johannes; Bill, Joachim; Brümmer, Franz

    2013-02-01

    In the protist world, the ciliate Coleps hirtus (phylum Ciliophora, class Prostomatea) synthesizes a peculiar biomineralized test made of alveolar plates, structures located within alveolar vesicles at the cell cortex. Alveolar plates are arranged by overlapping like an armor and they are thought to protect and/or stiffen the cell. Although their morphology is species-specific and of complex architecture, so far almost nothing is known about their genesis, their structure and their elemental and mineral composition. We investigated the genesis of new alveolar plates after cell division and examined cells and isolated alveolar plates by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, FTIR and X-ray diffraction. Our investigations revealed an organic mesh-like structure that guides the formation of new alveolar plates like a template and the role of vesicles transporting inorganic material. We further demonstrated that the inorganic part of the alveolar plates is composed out of amorphous calcium carbonate. For stabilization of the amorphous phase, the alveolar vesicles, the organic fraction and the element phosphorus may play a role. PMID:23228488

  4. MODULATION OF HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE PROPERTIES BY OZONE EXPOSURE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have investigated changes in human alveolar macrophage (HAM) function after exposure in vitro to ozone (O3) (0.1-1.0 ppm for 2-4 hours). he functions studied reflect concern that 03 is detrimental to host defense mechanisms in the broncho-alveolar spaces. xposure of HAM to cau...

  5. MORPHOMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CELLS IN THE ALVEOLAR REGION OF MAMMALIAN LUNGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Morphometric procedures have been used to study the characteristics of cells in the alveolar region of the lungs of rats, dogs, baboons, and humans. Compared with the other species, human lungs were found to contain greater numbers of macrophages and to have larger alveolar type ...

  6. Francisella tularensis replicates within alveolar type II epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo following inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Joshua D; Craven, Robin R; Fuller, James R; Pickles, Raymond J; Kawula, Thomas H

    2007-02-01

    Francisella tularensis replicates in macrophages and dendritic cells, but interactions with other cell types have not been well described. F. tularensis LVS invaded and replicated within alveolar epithelial cell lines. Following intranasal inoculation of C57BL/6 mice, Francisella localized to the alveolus and replicated within alveolar type II epithelial cells. PMID:17088343

  7. Rare case report of Traumatic neuroma of anterior superior alveolar nerve associated with high frenal attachment

    PubMed Central

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Srilekha, Namala; Guduru, Vijay Srinivas; Kiresur, Mohammad Asif

    2015-01-01

    We present an incredible case of traumatic neuroma (TN) in the anterior superior alveolar nerve leading to the swelling in the upper labial mucosa. This paper attempts to highlight the rarity of site of occurrence of this lesion and reports the first case of TN of anterior superior alveolar nerve. PMID:25972959

  8. Regional differences in alveolar density in the human lung are related to lung height.

    PubMed

    McDonough, John E; Knudsen, Lars; Wright, Alexander C; Elliott, W Mark; Ochs, Matthias; Hogg, James C

    2015-06-01

    The gravity-dependent pleural pressure gradient within the thorax produces regional differences in lung inflation that have a profound effect on the distribution of ventilation within the lung. This study examines the hypothesis that gravitationally induced differences in stress within the thorax also influence alveolar density in terms of the number of alveoli contained per unit volume of lung. To test this hypothesis, we measured the number of alveoli within known volumes of lung located at regular intervals between the apex and base of four normal adult human lungs that were rapidly frozen at a constant transpulmonary pressure, and used microcomputed tomographic imaging to measure alveolar density (number alveoli/mm3) at regular intervals between the lung apex and base. These results show that at total lung capacity, alveolar density in the lung apex is 31.6 ± 3.4 alveoli/mm3, with 15 ± 6% of parenchymal tissue consisting of alveolar duct. The base of the lung had an alveolar density of 21.2 ± 1.6 alveoli/mm3 and alveolar duct volume fraction of 29 ± 6%. The difference in alveolar density can be negated by factoring in the effects of alveolar compression due to the pleural pressure gradient at the base of the lung in vivo and at functional residual capacity. PMID:25882386

  9. Porcine aminopeptidase N mediated polarized infection by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in target cells.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yingying; Li, Xiaoxue; Bai, Yunyun; Lv, Xiaonan; Herrler, Georg; Enjuanes, Luis; Zhou, Xingdong; Qu, Bo; Meng, Fandan; Cong, Chengcheng; Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxing

    2015-04-01

    Infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was characterized. Indirect immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed PEDV can be successfully propagated in immortalized swine small intestine epithelial cells (IECs). Infection involved porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN), a reported cellular receptor for PEDV, transient expression of pAPN and siRNA targeted pAPN increased and decreased the infectivity of PEDV in IECs, respectively. Subsequently, polarized entry into and release from both Vero E6 and IECs was analyzed. PEDV entry into polarized cells and pAPN grown on membrane inserts occurs via apical membrane. The progeny virus released into the medium was also quantified which demonstrated that PEDV is preferentially released from the apical membrane. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pAPN, the cellular receptor for PEDV, mediates polarized PEDV infection. These results imply the possibility that PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:25681796

  10. Preservation and transplantation of porcine testis tissue.

    PubMed

    Zeng, W; Snedaker, A K; Megee, S; Rathi, R; Chen, F; Honaramooz, A; Dobrinski, I

    2009-01-01

    Grafting of immature mammalian testis tissue to mouse hosts can preserve the male germline. To make this approach applicable to a clinical or field situation, it is imperative that the testis tissue and/or spermatozoa harvested from grafted tissue are preserved successfully. The aim of the present study was to evaluate protocols for the preservation of testis tissue in a porcine model. Testis tissue was stored at 4 degrees C for short-term preservation or cryopreserved by slow-freezing, automated slow-freezing or vitrification for long-term storage. Preserved tissue was transplanted ectopically to mouse hosts and recovered xenografts were analysed histologically. In addition, spermatozoa were harvested from xenografts and cryopreserved. Total cell viability and germ cell viability remained high after tissue preservation. Complete spermatogenesis occurred in xenografts preserved by cooling up to 48 h, whereas spermatogenesis progressed to round spermatids in the xenografts that were frozen-thawed before grafting. Approximately 50% of spermatozoa harvested from xenografts remained viable after freezing and thawing. The in vivo developmental potential of cryopreserved tissue was reduced despite high post-thaw viability. Therefore, it is important to evaluate germ cell differentiation in vivo in addition to cell viability in vitro when optimising freezing protocols for testis tissue. PMID:19261226

  11. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I.; Trujillo, María E.; Mendoza, Susana E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A.

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  12. Antioxidant capacity of hydrolyzed porcine tissues

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Trine D; Otte, Jeanette A H; Meinert, Lene; Jensen, Kirsten; Lametsch, René

    2014-01-01

    The antioxidative capacity of seven different porcine tissue hydrolysates (colon, appendix, rectum, pancreas, heart, liver, and lung) were tested by four different assays, including iron chelation, 2,2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging, 2,2-Diphenyl-1-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, and inhibition of lipid oxidation. All hydrolyzed tissues displayed antioxidant capacity in all four assays, with colon, liver, and appendix as the three most potent inhibitors of lipid oxidation (47, 29, and 27 mmol/L trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity [TEAC], respectively) and liver, colon, pancreas, and appendix as the four most potent iron chelators (92% ± 1.1, 79.3% ± 3.2, 77.1% ± 1.8, and 77% ± 2.3, respectively). Furthermore, colon and appendix showed good radical scavenging capacities with ABTS scavenging of 86.4% ± 2.1 and 84.4% ± 2.9 and DPPH scavenging of 17.6% ± 0.3 and 17.1% ± 0.2, respectively. Our results provide new knowledge about the antioxidant capacity of a variety of animal by-products, which can be transformed into antioxidant hydrolysates, thereby creating added value. PMID:24936298

  13. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I; Trujillo, María E; Mendoza, Susana E; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  14. Ultrafast laser machining of porcine sclera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, W. S.; Carter, R. M.; Dhillon, B.; Hand, D. P.; Shephard, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    The use of ultrafast lasers (pulsed lasers with pulse lengths of a few picoseconds or less) offers the possibility for minimally invasive removal of soft ophthalmic tissue. The potential for using pico- and femtosecond pulses for modification of scleral tissue has been reported elsewhere [1-6] and has resulted in the introduction of new, minimally invasive, procedures into clinical practice [3, 5-10]. Our research is focused on finding optimal parameters for picosecond laser machining of scleral tissue without introducing any unwanted collateral damage to the tissue. Experiments were carried out on hydrated porcine sclera in vitro, which has similar collagen organization, histology and water content (~70%) to human tissue. In this paper we present a 2D finite element ablation model which employs a one-step heating process. It is assumed that the incident laser radiation that is not reflected is absorbed in the tissue according to the Beer-Lambert law and transformed into heat energy. The experimental setup uses an industrial picosecond laser (TRUMPF TruMicro 5x50) with 5.9 ps pulses at 1030 nm, with pulse energies up to 125 μJ and a focused spot diameter of 35 μm. The use of a scan head allows flexibility in designing various scanning patterns. We show that picosecond pulses are capable of modifying scleral tissue without introducing collateral damage. This offers a possible route for minimally invasive sclerostomy. Many scanning patterns including single line ablation, square and circular cavity removal were tested.

  15. Picosecond laser ablation of porcine sclera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, Wojciech S.; Harvey, Eleanor M.; Dhillon, Baljean; Parson, Simon H.; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2013-03-01

    Lasers have been shown to be successful in certain medical procedures and they have been identified as potentially making a major contribution to the development of minimally invasive procedures. However, the uptake is not as widespread and there is scope for many other applications where laser devices may offer a significant advantage in comparison to the traditional surgical tools. The purpose of this research is to assess the potential of using a picosecond laser for minimally invasive laser sclerostomy. Experiments were carried out on porcine scleral samples due to the comparable properties to human tissue. Samples were prepared with a 5mm diameter trephine and were stored in lactated Ringer's solution. After laser machining, the samples were fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, then dried and investigated under SEM. The laser used in the experiments is an industrial picosecond TRUMPF TruMicro laser operating at a wavelength of 1030nm, pulse length of 6ps, repetition rate of 1 kHz and a focused spot diameter of 30μm. The laser beam was scanned across the samples with the use of a galvanometer scan head and various ablation patterns were investigated. Processing parameters (pulse energy, spot and line separation) which allow for the most efficient laser ablation of scleral tissue without introducing any collateral damage were investigated. The potential to create various shapes, such as linear incisions, square cavities and circular cavities was demonstrated.

  16. Porcine parvovirus: DNA sequence and genome organization.

    PubMed

    Ranz, A I; Manclús, J J; Díaz-Aroca, E; Casal, J I

    1989-10-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of an almost full-length clone of porcine parvovirus (PPV). The sequence is 4973 nucleotides (nt) long. The 3' end of virion DNA shows a Y-shaped configuration homologous to rodent parvoviruses. The 5' end of virion DNA shows a repetition of 127 nt at the carboxy terminus of the capsid proteins. The overall organization of the PPV genome is similar to those of other autonomous parvoviruses. There are two large open reading frames (ORFs) that almost entirely cover the genome, both located in the same frame of the complementary strand. The left ORF encodes the non-structural protein NS1 and the right ORF encodes the capsid proteins (VP1, VP2 and VP3). Promoter analysis, location of splicing sites and putative amino acid sequences for the viral proteins show a high homology of PPV with feline panleukopenia virus and canine parvoviruses (FPV and CPV) and rodent parvovirus. Therefore we conclude that PPV is related to the Kilham rat virus (KRV) group of autonomous parvoviruses formed by KRV, minute virus of mice, Lu III, H-1, FPV and CPV. PMID:2794971

  17. Identification and Analysis of the Porcine MicroRNA in Porcine Cytomegalovirus-Infected Macrophages Using Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Liao, Shan; Xu, Zhiwen; Zhu, Ling; Yang, Fan; Guo, Wanzhu

    2016-01-01

    Porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV; genus Cytomegalovirus, subfamily Betaherpesvirinae, family Herpesviridae) is an immunosuppressive virus that mainly inhibits the immune function of T lymphocytes and macrophages, which has caused substantial damage in the farming industry. In this study, we obtained the miRNA expression profiles of PCMV-infected porcine macrophages via high-throughput sequencing. The comprehensive analysis of miRNA profiles showed that 239 miRNA database-annotated and 355 novel pig-encoded miRNAs were detected. Of these, 130 miRNAs showed significant differential expression between the PCMV-infected and uninfected porcine macrophages. The 10 differentially expressed pig-encoded miRNAs were further determined by stem-loop reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and the results were consistent with the high-throughput sequencing. Gene Ontology analysis of the target genes of miRNAs in PCMV-infected porcine macrophages showed that the differentially expressed miRNAs are mainly involved in immune and metabolic processes. This is the first report of the miRNA transcriptome in porcine macrophages and an analysis of the miRNA regulatory mechanisms during PCMV infection. Further research into the regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs during immunosuppressive viral infections should contribute to the treatment and prevention of immunosuppressive viruses. PMID:26943793

  18. Alveolar hemorrhage in systemic lupus erythematosus: a cohort review.

    PubMed

    Andrade, C; Mendonça, T; Farinha, F; Correia, J; Marinho, A; Almeida, I; Vasconcelos, C

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a rare but potentially catastrophic manifestation with a high mortality. Among rheumatologic diseases, it occurs most frequently in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic vasculitis. Despite new diagnostic tools and therapies, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of this work was to characterize the SLE patients with an episode of alveolar hemorrhage followed in our Clinical Immunology Unit (CIU). A retrospective chart review was carried out for all patients with SLE followed in CIU between 1984 and the end of 2013. We reviewed the following data: demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory data, radiologic investigations, histologic studies, treatment, and outcome. We identified 10 episodes of DAH, corresponding to seven patients, all female. These represent 1.6% of SLE patients followed in our Unit. The age at DAH attack was 42.75 ± 18.9 years. The average time between diagnosis of SLE and the onset of DAH was 7.1 years. Three patients had the diagnosis of SLE and the DAH attack at the same time. Disease activity according to SLEDAI was high, ranging from 15 to 41. All patients were treated with methylprednisolone, 37.5% cyclophosphamide and 28.6% plasmapheresis. The overall mortality rate was 28.6%. PMID:26385219

  19. Magnetometric evaluation for the effect of chrysotile on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Keira, T; Okada, M; Katagiri, H; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1998-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages are thought to play an important role in fibrogenesis due to asbestos exposure. In this experiment, we evaluated the effect mainly by unique magnetometry and also by conventional methods such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity measurement and morphological observations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from Syrian golden hamsters by bronchoalveolar lavages were exposed 18 hours in vitro to Fe3O4 as an indicator for magnetometry and chrysotile for experiments. A rapid decrease of the remanent magnetic field, so called "relaxation", was observed after the cessation of an external magnetic field in macrophages phagocytizing Fe3O4 alone, while relaxation was delayed in those concurrently exposed to chrysotile. Since relaxation is thought due to the cytoskeleton-driven random rotation of phagosomes containing iron oxide particles, chrysotile is considered to interfere with the cytoskeletal function of macrophages. Release of LDH from chrysotile-exposed macrophages into the medium was recognized, but it was not significantly higher than the controls. Apoptosis was negligible in macrophages exposed to chrysotile by the DNA ladder detection, the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling method and morphological observations. Electron microscopical examinations revealed early necrotic changes in macrophages exposed to chrysotile. These findings indicate that cell magnetometry detects impaired cytoskeletal function due to in vitro exposure to chrysotile. PMID:10223613

  20. Transpleural Ventilation via Spiracles in Severe Emphysema Increases Alveolar Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Mayy; Larson, Christopher D; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Reed, Robert M; Terry, Peter; Schmidt, Gregory A; Eberlein, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In emphysema airway resistance can exceed collateral airflow resistance, causing air to flow preferentially through collateral pathways. In severe emphysema ventilation through openings directly through the chest wall into the parenchyma (spiracles) could bypass airway obstruction and increase alveolar ventilation via transpleural expiration. During lung transplant operations, spiracles occasionally can occur inadvertently. We observed transpleural expiration via spiracles in three subjects undergoing lung transplant for emphysema. During transpleural spiracle ventilation, inspiratory tidal volumes (TV) were unchanged; however, expiration was entirely transpleural in two patients whereas the expired TV to the ventilator circuit was reduced to 25% of the inspired TV in one. At baseline, mean PCO2 was 61 ± 5 mm Hg, which decreased to a mean PCO2 of 49 ± 5 mm Hg (P = .05) within minutes after transpleural spiracle ventilation and further decreased at 1 to 2 h (36 ± 4 mm Hg; P = .002 compared with baseline) on unchanged ventilator settings. This observation of increased alveolar ventilation supports further studies of spiracles as a possible therapy for advanced emphysema. PMID:27287591

  1. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Clinical manifestations and optimal treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Venkateshiah, Saiprakash B; Thomassen, Mary Jane; Kavuru, Mani S

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is characterized by the accumulation of surfactant phospholipids and proteins within the lung alveoli. Important advances have been made over the past 8 years in our understanding of this disease, offering new directions for research and patient care. First, genetically altered mice that are homozygous for a disrupted granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene developed a lung lesion with histologic resemblance to PAP. The surfactant is thought to be catabolized or cleared mostly by alveolar macrophages, this process being dependent on GM-CSF. Second, a neutralizing autoantibody against GM-CSF was found in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with idiopathic PAP but not in healthy controls, thereby raising the suspicion that human PAP may be an autoimmune disease. The relationship between the antibody and disease pathogenesis remains unclear but data suggest that the GM-CSF antibody may have a potential role as a diagnostic test. No specific therapy exists for PAP. Sequential whole lung lavage is the standard of care. Exogenous therapy with GM-CSF may improve the lung disease in some patients with PAP but this therapy is still experimental. Interventions directed at treating a relative GM-CSF deficiency by administration of GM-CSF or lowering the antibody level (i.e. by plasmapheresis or immunosuppression) may hold promise as future therapy for this rare disease. PMID:15350160

  2. Role of alveolar macrophage lysosomes in metal detoxification.

    PubMed

    Berry, J P; Zhang, L; Galle, P; Ansoborlo, E; Hengé-Napoli, M H; Donnadieu-Claraz, M

    1997-02-15

    The intracellular behaviour of different toxic mineral elements inhaled as soluble aerosols or as insoluble particles was studied in the rat by electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and electron microdiffraction. This study showed that, after inhalation, aerosols of soluble elements like cerous chloride, chromic chloride, uranyl nitrate, and aluminium chloride, are concentrated in the lysosomes of alveolar macrophages and are precipitated in the lysosomes in the form of insoluble phosphate, probably due to the activity of acid phosphatase (intralysosomial enzyme). Also, after inhalation of crystalline particles that are insoluble or poorly soluble in water such as the illites (phyllosilicates), ceric oxides (opaline), and industrial uranium oxides (U3O8), the small crystals are captured by the alveolar macrophage lysosomes and transformed over time into an amorphous form. This structural transformation is associated with changes in the chemical nature of particles inhaled in the oxide form. Microanalysis of amorphous deposits observed after inhalation of uranium or ceric oxides has shown that they contain high concentrations of phosphorus associated with the initial elements cerium and uranium. These different processes tend to limit the diffusion of these toxic elements within the organism, whether they are inhaled in soluble form or not. PMID:9140931

  3. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  4. Porous calcium phosphate cement for alveolar bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Félix Lanao, R P; Hoekstra, J W M; Wolke, J G C; Leeuwenburgh, S C G; Plachokova, A S; Boerman, O C; van den Beucken, J J J P; Jansen, J A

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to provide information on material degradation and subsequent alveolar bone formation, using composites consisting of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) with different microsphere morphology (hollow vs dense). In addition to the plain CPC-PLGA composites, loading the microspheres with the growth factors platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) was investigated. A total of four different CPC composites were applied into one-wall mandible bone defects in beagle dogs in order to evaluate them as candidates for alveolar bone regeneration. These composites consisted of CPC and hollow or dense PLGA microspheres, with or without the addition of PDGF-IGF growth factor combination (CPC-hPLGA, CPC-dPLGA, CPC-hPLGAGF , CPC-dPLGAGF ). Histological evaluation revealed significantly more bone formation in CPC-dPLGA than in CPC-hPLGA composites. The combination PDGF-IGF enhanced bone formation in CPC-hPLGA materials, but significantly more bone formation occurred when CPC-dPLGA was used, with or without the addition of growth factors. The findings demonstrated that CPC-dPLGA composite was the biologically superior material for use as an off-the-shelf material, due to its good biocompatibility, enhanced degradability and superior bone formation. PMID:22777771

  5. Microtomography of the human tooth-alveolar bone complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalstra, Michel; Cattaneo, Paolo M.; Beckmann, Felix; Sakima, Maurício T.; Lemor, Carsten; Laursen, Morten G.; Melsen, Birte

    2006-08-01

    In this study the structure of the adult human dentoalveolar process is examined using conventional and synchrotron radiation-based microtomography (SRμCT). Mandibular and maxillary segments containing two to five adjacent teeth were harvested at autopsy from 49 adult donors. These segments were embedded in blocks of methylmetacrylate and scanned using a conventional table-top μCT-scanner at a pixel size and slice thickness of 35 μm. A few segments were also scanned at a synchrotron facility at an initial pixel size of 16.4 μm, which was binned by a factor 2 to result in an effective voxel size of almost 32.8 μm. The three-dimensional reconstructions revealed how intricately the teeth are supported by the alveolar bone. Furthermore, this support is highly inhomogeneous with respect to the buccal, mesial, lingual and distal quadrants. Reflecting their various degrees of mineralization, tissues like bone, dentine, enamel and cementum, could well be identified, especially in the scans made with SRμCT. Despite comparable voxel sizes, the reconstructed data-sets obtained with conventional μCT were less detailed and somewhat fuzzy in appearance compared to the data-sets of SRμCT. However, for quantification of macroscopical features like the thickness of the alveolar wall or the presence of dehiscences/fenestrations this seemed sufficient.

  6. Are Panoramic Radiographs Reliable to Diagnose Mild Alveolar Bone Resorption?

    PubMed Central

    Semenoff, Larissa; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle; Pedro, Fabio Luiz Miranda; Volpato, Evaristo Ricci; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    It is extremely important to assess variations between the most used radiographs in dental practice, since minimum distortion on obtained images may change diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis for the patient. For this, the distance between the enamel-cementum junction and the alveolar bone crest was measured on conventional and digitized periapical, bitewing, and panoramic radiographs and compared among them. From a total of 1484 records, 39 sets of radiographs that fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the study sample were selected. The measurements were grouped according to the intensity of bone loss. Statistically significant difference was found in the averages of the measurements assessed in radiographs with absence of bone loss between conventional panoramic and periapical radiographs, between digitized panoramic and periapical radiographs and between digitized bitewing and panoramic radiographs. By analyzing the results of this work and considering the research protocol used, one can conclude that small losses in height of alveolar bone crest observed in panoramic radiographs should be cautiously evaluated, as they may be overestimated. PMID:21991470

  7. Are panoramic radiographs reliable to diagnose mild alveolar bone resorption?

    PubMed

    Semenoff, Larissa; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle; Pedro, Fabio Luiz Miranda; Volpato, Evaristo Ricci; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    It is extremely important to assess variations between the most used radiographs in dental practice, since minimum distortion on obtained images may change diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis for the patient. For this, the distance between the enamel-cementum junction and the alveolar bone crest was measured on conventional and digitized periapical, bitewing, and panoramic radiographs and compared among them. From a total of 1484 records, 39 sets of radiographs that fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the study sample were selected. The measurements were grouped according to the intensity of bone loss. Statistically significant difference was found in the averages of the measurements assessed in radiographs with absence of bone loss between conventional panoramic and periapical radiographs, between digitized panoramic and periapical radiographs and between digitized bitewing and panoramic radiographs. By analyzing the results of this work and considering the research protocol used, one can conclude that small losses in height of alveolar bone crest observed in panoramic radiographs should be cautiously evaluated, as they may be overestimated. PMID:21991470

  8. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers: are your patients missing out?

    PubMed

    Hartland, Benjamin L; Newell, Timothy J; Damico, Nicole

    2014-08-01

    Awake, spontaneously breathing humans sigh on average 9 to 10 times per hour. The sigh is a normal homeostatic reflex proposed to maintain pulmonary compliance and decrease the formation of atelectasis by recruiting collapsed alveoli. The induction and maintenance of anesthesia with muscle paralysis and a fixed tidal volume abolish the sigh. Without periodic sighs, patients are left susceptible to atelectasis and its negative sequelae. The prevalence of atelectasis has been estimated to be as high as 100% in patients undergoing general anesthesia. A strong correlation between atelectasis and postoperative pulmonary complications has been demonstrated. Postoperative pulmonary complications lengthen hospital stays and increase healthcare costs. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers, which make up one component of open lung ventilation, have been described as vital capacity breaths, double tidal volume breaths, and sigh breaths. These simple maneuvers result in a sustained increase in airway pressure that serves to recruit collapsed alveoli and improve arterial oxygenation. This article examines the literature regarding the application of alveolar recruitment maneuvers in the perioperative setting. The format is a series of clinically oriented questions posed to help the reader translate available evidence into practice. PMID:25167611

  9. Avoiding injury to the inferior alveolar nerve by routine use of intraoperative radiographs during implant placement.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Jeffrey; Mastin, Chris; Le, Bach

    2008-01-01

    Injury to the inferior alveolar nerve during implant placement in the posterior atrophic mandible is a rare but serious complication. Although a preoperative computerized tomography scan can help determine the distance from the alveolar ridge to the nerve canal, variables such as magnification errors, ridge anatomy, and operator technique can increase the chance for complications. The routine use of intraoperative periapical radiographs during the drilling sequence is an inexpensive and reliable tool, allowing the operator to confidently adjust the direction and depth of the implant during placement. Most important, it helps avoid the risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve in cases in which there is limited vertical alveolar bone. Using this technique for 21 implants placed in the posterior atrophic mandible, with less than 10 mm of vertical bone to the inferior alveolar nerve canal, the authors observed no incidents of postoperative paresthesia. PMID:18390241

  10. Alveolar Subphase pH in the Lungs of Anesthetized Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, D. W.; Goerke, J.; Clements, J. A.

    1981-11-01

    We measured the pH of the alveolar subphase fluid by puncturing the most superficial alveoli of the exposed lungs of anesthetized rabbits with H+-selective and nonselective KCl microelectrodes. In these experiments, we bathed the lung surface with paraffin oil or buffered Ringer's solutions that had a CO2 tension of 40 Torr (1 Torr = 133.3 Pa) and found an alveolar pH of 6.92± 0.01 (mean ± SEM). When the pH of the surface buffer was below 6.7 or above 7.5, alveolar pH varied with surface buffer pH. With the nonselective electrode, we did not find a significant electrical potential difference between the alveolar fluid and the pleural surface. These results are consistent with active transport of H+ (or HCO3-) across alveolar epithelium.

  11. Immunological methods for the detection of porcine lymphotropic herpesviruses (PLHV).

    PubMed

    Plotzki, Elena; Keller, Martina; Ehlers, Bernhard; Denner, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Porcine lymphotropic herpesviruses (PLHV-1, -2, and -3) are widespread in pigs and closely related to the human pathogenic gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (human herpesvirus 4, HHV-4) and Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (HHV-8). In minipigs, PLHV-1 causes a porcine post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after experimental transplantations. Porcine PTLD comes with clinical symptoms similar to those of human PTLD, a serious complication of solid organ and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation linked to HHV-4. Since PLHVs may be transmitted from donor pigs to the human recipient of xenotransplants (pig cells, tissues or organs), sensitive and specific methods should be developed to detect and eliminate PLHVs. Here we describe an ELISA and a Western blot assay using recombinant glycoprotein B of PLHV-1. Using both assays, the presence of specific antibodies in different pig breeds as well as in German slaughterhouse workers was analysed. Antibodies were detected in some animals, but not in human subjects. PMID:27036503

  12. Comparison of human and porcine skin for characterization of sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigmann, Hans-Jürgen; Schanzer, Sabine; Patzelt, Alexa; Bahaban, Virginie; Durat, Fabienne; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    The universal sun protection factor (USPF) characterizing sunscreen efficacy based on spectroscopically determined data, which were obtained using the tape stripping procedure. The USPF takes into account the complete ultraviolet (UV) spectral range in contrast to the classical sun protection factor (SPF). Until now, the USPF determination has been evaluated only in human skin. However, investigating new filters not yet licensed excludes in vivo investigation on human skin but requires the utilization of a suitable skin model. The penetration behavior and the protection efficacy of 10 commercial sunscreens characterized by USPF were investigated, comparing human and porcine skin. The penetration behavior found for typical UV filter substances is nearly identical for both skin types. The comparison of the USPF obtained for human and porcine skin results in a linear relation between both USPF values with a correlation factor R2=0.98. The results demonstrate the possibility for the use of porcine skin to determine the protection efficacy of sunscreens.

  13. Spatial Clustering of Porcine Cysticercosis in Mbulu District, Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Ngowi, Helena A.; Kassuku, Ayub A.; Carabin, Hélène; Mlangwa, James E. D.; Mlozi, Malongo R. S.; Mbilinyi, Boniface P.; Willingham, Arve L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Porcine cysticercosis is caused by a zoonotic tapeworm, Taenia solium, which causes serious disease syndromes in human. Effective control of the parasite requires knowledge on the burden and pattern of the infections in order to properly direct limited resources. The objective of this study was to establish the spatial distribution of porcine cysticercosis in Mbulu district, northern Tanzania, to guide control strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings This study is a secondary analysis of data collected during the baseline and follow-up periods of a randomized community trial aiming at reducing the incidence rate of porcine cysticercosis through an educational program. At baseline, 784 randomly selected pig-keeping households located in 42 villages in 14 wards were included. Lingual examination of indigenous pigs aged 2–12 (median 8) months, one randomly selected from each household, were conducted. Data from the control group of the randomized trial that included 21 of the 42 villages were used for the incidence study. A total of 295 pig-keeping households were provided with sentinel pigs (one each) and reassessed for cysticercosis incidence once or twice for 2–9 (median 4) months using lingual examination and antigen ELISA. Prevalence of porcine cysticercosis was computed in Epi Info 3.5. The prevalence and incidence of porcine cysticercosis were mapped at household level using ArcView 3.2. K functions were computed in R software to assess general clustering of porcine cysticercosis. Spatial scan statistics were computed in SatScan to identify local clusters of the infection. The overall prevalence of porcine cysticercosis was 7.3% (95% CI: 5.6, 9.4; n = 784). The K functions revealed a significant overall clustering of porcine cysticercosis incidence for all distances between 600 m and 5 km from a randomly chosen case household based on Ag-ELISA. Lingual examination revealed clustering from 650 m to 6 km and between 7.5 and 10 km. The

  14. Porcine survival model to simulate acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Prosst, Ruediger L; Schurr, Marc O; Schostek, Sebastian; Krautwald, Martina; Gottwald, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The existing animal models used for the simulation of acute gastrointestinal bleedings are usually non-survival models. We developed and evaluated a new porcine model (domestic pig, German Landrace) in which the animal remains alive and survives the artificial bleeding without any cardiovascular impairment. This consists of a bleeding catheter which is implanted into the stomach, then subcutaneously tunnelled from the abdomen to the neck where it is exteriorized and fixed with sutures. Using the injection of porcine blood, controllable and reproducible acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding can be simulated while maintaining normal gastrointestinal motility and physiology. Depending on the volume of blood applied through the gastric catheter, the bleeding intensity can be varied from traces of blood to a massive haemorrhage. This porcine model could be valuable, e.g. for testing the efficacy of new bleeding diagnostics in large animals before human use. PMID:26306615

  15. Imaging of the three-dimensional alveolar structure and the alveolar mechanics of a ventilated and perfused isolated rabbit lung with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Alexander; Wendel, Martina; Knels, Lilla; Koch, T.; Koch, Edmund

    2006-01-01

    In this feasibility study, Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) is used for visualizing the 3-D structure of fixated lung parenchyma and to capture real-time cross sectional images of the subpleural alveolar mechanics in a ventilated and perfused isolated rabbit lung. The compact and modular setup of the FDOCT system allows us to image the first 500 µm of subpleural lung parenchyma with a 3-D resolution of 16×16×8 µm (in air). During mechanical ventilation, real-time cross sectional FDOCT images visualize the inflation and deflation of alveoli and alveolar sacks (acini) in successive images of end-inspiratory and end-expiratory phase. The FDOCT imaging shows the relation of local alveolar mechanics to the setting of tidal volume (VT), peak airway pressure, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Application of PEEP leads to persistent recruitment of alveoli and acini in the end-expiratory phase, compared to ventilation without PEEP where alveolar collapse and reinflation are observed. The imaging of alveolar mechanics by FDOCT will help to determine the amount of mechanical stress put on the alveolar walls during tidal ventilation, which is a key factor in understanding the development of ventilator induced lung injury (VILI).

  16. Imaging of the three-dimensional alveolar structure and the alveolar mechanics of a ventilated and perfused isolated rabbit lung with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Popp, Alexander; Wendel, Martina; Knels, Lilla; Koch, Thea; Koch, Edmund

    2006-01-01

    In this feasibility study, Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) is used for visualizing the 3-D structure of fixated lung parenchyma and to capture real-time cross sectional images of the subpleural alveolar mechanics in a ventilated and perfused isolated rabbit lung. The compact and modular setup of the FDOCT system allows us to image the first 500 microm of subpleural lung parenchyma with a 3-D resolution of 16 x 16 x 8 microm (in air). During mechanical ventilation, real-time cross sectional FDOCT images visualize the inflation and deflation of alveoli and alveolar sacks (acini) in successive images of end-inspiratory and end-expiratory phase. The FDOCT imaging shows the relation of local alveolar mechanics to the setting of tidal volume (VT), peak airway pressure, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Application of PEEP leads to persistent recruitment of alveoli and acini in the end-expiratory phase, compared to ventilation without PEEP where alveolar collapse and reinflation are observed. The imaging of alveolar mechanics by FDOCT will help to determine the amount of mechanical stress put on the alveolar walls during tidal ventilation, which is a key factor in understanding the development of ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). PMID:16526892

  17. Local abnormalities of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways that promote alveolar fibrin deposition in the lungs of baboons with diffuse alveolar damage.

    PubMed Central

    Idell, S; Peters, J; James, K K; Fair, D S; Coalson, J J

    1989-01-01

    Because alveolar fibrin is a prominent histologic feature of diffuse lung injury in baboons, we hypothesized that local abnormalities of pathways of fibrin turnover would favor fibrin deposition in the alveolar space. To test this hypothesis, procoagulant and fibrinolytic activities were characterized in serial bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of baboons with evolving diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) induced by exposure to 100% O2. BAL procoagulant activity, characterized mainly as the tissue factor-Factor VII complex, was markedly increased after induction of DAD. Extrinsic pathway inhibitor was likewise increased in BAL during evolving DAD but was insufficient to control coagulation. Urokinase-like fibrinolytic activity was usually detectable in baseline BAL but was undetectable after 7 d of O2. DAD BAL contained significantly increased plasminogen levels, plasmin inhibitor activity sufficient to neutralize all plasmin produced by BAL plasminogen activator found in control BAL and detectable plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Antiplasmin activity was due, in part, to increased alpha 2-antiplasmin. These changes correlated with quantitatively increased alveolar fibrin deposition demonstrated by histologic and morphometric analyses. Multiple abnormalities of pathways of fibrin turnover occur concurrently in the alveolar compartment of the lungs of baboons with DAD, which collectively predispose to diffuse alveolar fibrin deposition. Images PMID:2738151

  18. Molecular and functional characterization of porcine Siglec-3/CD33 and analysis of its expression in blood and tissues.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, B; Escalona, Z; Uenishi, H; Toki, D; Revilla, C; Yuste, M; Del Moral, M Gómez; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J

    2015-08-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a 380 a-a type 1 transmembrane protein with homology to human Siglec-3/CD33 was obtained from a swine small intestine library. An analysis of protein sequence identified two immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane region, and a carboxi-terminal tail with two tyrosine-based signalling motifs. Binding assays of Siglec-3 transfected CHO cells to polyacrylamide glycoconjugates showed a preference for α2-6-linked sialic acids. Using mAbs raised against a fragment containing the two Ig-like domains, porcine Siglec-3 was found to be expressed on monocytes and granulocytes, and their bone marrow precursors. It was also detected in lymph node, splenic and alveolar macrophages. MAbs immunoprecipitated, from granulocyte lysates, a protein of 51-60 kDa under both non-reducing and reducing conditions. MAbs were also used to analyse functional activity of Siglec-3 on bone marrow and blood cells. Engagement of Siglec-3 by mAb had no apparent effect on cell proliferation or cytokine production. PMID:25892023

  19. Activation of NF-κB by nucleocapsid protein of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rui; Fang, Liurong; Jiang, Yunbo; Jin, Hui; Wang, Yanwei; Wang, Dang; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2011-02-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a critical transcription factor in innate and adaptive immune response as well as cell proliferation and survival. Previous studies have demonstrated that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection activated NF-κB pathways through IκB degradation in MARC-145 cells and alveolar macrophages. To evaluate the mechanisms behind this, we investigated the role of PRRSV structural proteins in the regulation of NF-κB. In this study, we screened the structural proteins of PRRSV by NF-κB DNA-binding assay and luciferase activity assay and demonstrated that PRRSV nucleocapsid (N) protein could activate NF-κB in MARC-145 cells. Furthermore, we revealed that the region between aa 30 and 73 of N protein was essential for its function in the activation of NF-κB. These results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular mechanism of PRRSV infection and inflammation response. PMID:21063763

  20. Downregulation of protein kinase PKR activation by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus at its early stage infection.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yueqiang; Ma, Zexu; Wang, Rong; Yang, Liping; Nan, Yuchen; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2016-05-01

    The interferon-induced double-strand RNA activated protein kinase (PKR) plays an important role in antiviral response. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) on PKR activation. Here we report that PRRSV inhibited PKR activation during its early stage infection of primary pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). PRRSV infection led to lower level of phosphorylated PKR in comparison with mock-infected cells. The PKR inhibition was sustained until 10h post infection in the presence of polyI:C, a synthetic analog of double-stranded RNA activating PKR. PKR-mediated phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2α was also lower in the PRRSV-infected PAMs during the early stage infection. Interestingly, inactivated PRRSV was capable to inhibit the PKR activation until 6h post infection. This suggests that structural components of PRRSV virions were responsible for the inhibition, although PRRSV replication was needed for longer inhibition. These results indicate that the downregulation of PKR activation during early infection stage should be essential for PRRSV to avoid the antiviral response to initiate replication. This finding contributes to our understanding on PRRSV interaction with host innate immune response and reveal a target for control of PRRSV infection. PMID:27066702

  1. Cryotop vitrification of porcine parthenogenetic embryos at the early developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Quan; Quan, Guo-Bo; Shao, Qing-Yong; Lv, Chun-Rong; Jiang, Yan-Ting; Zhao, Zhi-Yong; Hong, Qiong-Hua

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of early developmental stages at which Cryotop vitrification is performed on subsequent survival and in vitro development of porcine parthenogenetic activation embryos. The zygotes that were cultured for 4, 8, and 18 hours post electric activation (h.p.a.) and two- and four-cell embryos were vitrified, warmed, and continuously cultured for the remaining period. The zygotes vitrified at 4, 8, and 18 h.p.a. showed similar percentages of survival, cleavage, and blastocyst formation. No difference in viability was observed after vitrification of two- and four-cell embryos, but the embryos vitrified at the two-cell stage exhibited significantly higher blastocyst formation rate than those vitrified at the four-cell stage. However, vitrifying embryos resulted in significantly decreased survival and development rates, regardless of the developmental stage of the embryos. In addition, the final developmental stage, diameter, apoptotic index, and the number of inner cell mass, trophectoderm, and total cells of blastocysts derived from embryos vitrified at any stage of the early culture were similar to those of fresh blastocysts. In conclusion, our data indicate that the early-stage porcine parthenogenetically activated embryos including the zygote, two cells, and four cells have a high ability to survive cryopreservation; these viable embryos after vitrification can produce respectable development rates and good-quality blastocysts. PMID:26462660

  2. Variation in electrosurgical vessel seal quality along the length of a porcine carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Hayley Louise; Richards, Rosie; Pullin, Rhys; Yang, TH Jimmy; Blain, Emma J; Evans, Sam L

    2016-01-01

    Electrosurgical vessel sealing has been demonstrated to have benefits for both patients and practitioners, but significant variation in the strength of the seal continues to be a concern. This study aims to examine the variation in electrosurgical seal quality along the length of a porcine common carotid artery and explore the relationships between seal quality, vessel size and morphology. Additionally, the study aimed to investigate the minimum safety threshold for successful seals and the influence of vessel characteristics on meeting this requirement. A total of 35 porcine carotid arteries were sealed using the PlasmaKinetic Open Seal device (Gyrus). Each seal was burst pressure tested and a sample taken for staining with elastin van Gieson’s stain, with morphological quantification using image processing software ImageJ. With increasing distance from the bifurcation, there was an increase in seal strength and a reduction in both elastin content and vessel outer diameter. A significant correlation was found between burst pressure with both outer diameter (p < 0.0001) and elastin content (p = 0.001). When considering the safe limits of operation, vessels of less than 5 mm in outer diameter were shown to consistently produce a seal of a sufficient strength (burst pressure > 360 mmHg) irrespective of vessel morphology. PMID:26743899

  3. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: genetic diversity of recent British isolates.

    PubMed

    Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Hughes, Gareth J; Westcott, David G; Naidu, Brindha; Williamson, Susanna; Woodger, Nicholas G A; Steinbach, Falko; Drew, Trevor W

    2013-03-23

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) continues to be a significant problem for European pig producers, contributing to porcine respiratory disease complex, neonatal piglet mortality, infertility and occasional abortion storms. PRRS virus (PRRSV), a member of the arterivirus family with two defined major genotypes, has been shown to be quite genetically diverse. In the present study, genetic analysis of multiple gene regions of over 100 viruses isolated in Britain between 2003 and 2007 revealed that the diversity of British strains is now far greater than during the early 1990s. All isolates belong to genotype 1 (European). While some recent isolates are still very similar to early isolates, a wide range of more diverse viruses is now also circulating. Interestingly, some isolates were found to be very similar to a modified-live vaccine strain, and it is suggested that use of the vaccine has affected the evolution pattern of PRRS virus strains in Britain. Evidence of deletions in one viral gene, ORF3, and of genome recombination was also seen. A molecular clock model using the ORF7 sequences estimates the rate of substitution as 3.8 × 10(-3) per site per year, thereby dating the most recent common ancestor of all British viruses to 1991, coincident with the first outbreak of disease. Our findings therefore have implications for both the diagnostic and prophylactic methods currently being used, which are discussed. PMID:23218831

  4. Variation in electrosurgical vessel seal quality along the length of a porcine carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Hayley Louise; Richards, Rosie; Pullin, Rhys; Yang, Th Jimmy; Blain, Emma J; Evans, Sam L

    2016-03-01

    Electrosurgical vessel sealing has been demonstrated to have benefits for both patients and practitioners, but significant variation in the strength of the seal continues to be a concern. This study aims to examine the variation in electrosurgical seal quality along the length of a porcine common carotid artery and explore the relationships between seal quality, vessel size and morphology. Additionally, the study aimed to investigate the minimum safety threshold for successful seals and the influence of vessel characteristics on meeting this requirement. A total of 35 porcine carotid arteries were sealed using the PlasmaKinetic Open Seal device (Gyrus). Each seal was burst pressure tested and a sample taken for staining with elastin van Gieson's stain, with morphological quantification using image processing software ImageJ. With increasing distance from the bifurcation, there was an increase in seal strength and a reduction in both elastin content and vessel outer diameter. A significant correlation was found between burst pressure with both outer diameter (p < 0.0001) and elastin content (p = 0.001). When considering the safe limits of operation, vessels of less than 5 mm in outer diameter were shown to consistently produce a seal of a sufficient strength (burst pressure > 360 mmHg) irrespective of vessel morphology. PMID:26743899

  5. Porcine epidemic diarrhea: a review of current epidemiology and available vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Song, Daesub; Moon, Hyoungjoon

    2015-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), an Alphacoronavirus in the family Coronaviridae, causes acute diarrhea, vomiting, dehydration, and high mortality rates in neonatal piglets. PEDV can also cause diarrhea, agalactia, and abnormal reproductive cycles in pregnant sows. Although PEDV was first identified in Europe, it has resulted in significant economic losses in many Asian swine-raising countries, including Korea, China, Japan, Vietnam, and the Philippines. However, from April 2013 to the present, major outbreaks of PEDV have been reported in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Moreover, intercontinental transmission of PEDV has increased mortality rates in seronegative neonatal piglets, resulting in 10% loss of the US pig population. The emergence and re-emergence of PEDV indicates that the virus is able to evade current vaccine strategies. Continuous emergence of multiple mutant strains from several regions has aggravated porcine epidemic diarrhea endemic conditions and highlighted the need for new vaccines based on the current circulating PEDV. Epidemic PEDV strains tend to be more pathogenic and cause increased death in pigs, thereby causing substantial financial losses for swine producers. In this review, we described the epidemiology of PEDV in several countries and present molecular characterization of current strains. We also discuss PEDV vaccines and related issues. PMID:26273575

  6. MicroRNA expression profiles of porcine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, B; Liu, H L; Shi, F X; Wang, J Y

    2010-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous non-coding RNAs of ∼22 nucleotides in length that play important roles in multiple biological processes by degrading targeted mRNAs or repressing mRNA translation. To evaluate the roles of miRNA in porcine skeletal muscle, miRNA expression profiles were investigated using longissimus muscle tissue from pigs at embryonic day 90 (E90) and postpartum day 120 (PD120). First, we used previously known miRNA sequences from humans and mice to perform blast searches against the porcine expressed sequence tag (EST) database; 98 new miRNA candidates were identified according to a range of filtering criteria. These miRNA candidates and 73 known miRNAs (miRBase 13.0) from pigs were chosen for porcine miRNA microarray analysis. A total of 16 newly identified miRNAs and 31 previously known miRNAs were detected in porcine skeletal muscle tissues. During later foetal development at E90, miR-1826, miR-26a, miR-199b and let-7 were highly expressed, whilst miR-1a, miR-133a, miR-26a and miR-1826 showed highest abundance during the fast growing stage at PD120. Using the 47 miRNAs detected by the microarray assay, we performed further investigations using the publicly available porcine mRNA database from NCBI and computed potential target hits using the software rnahybrid. This study identified 16 new miRNA candidates, computed potential target hits for 18 miRNA families and determined the miRNA expression profiles in porcine skeletal muscle tissues at different developmental stages. These results provide a valuable resource for investigators interested in post-transcriptional gene regulation in pigs and related animals. PMID:20331612

  7. Membrane barrier of a porcine hepatocyte bioartificial liver.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Scott L; Yagi, Toshikazu; Matsushita, Takakazu; Hardin, Joseph; Grande, Joseph P; Gibson, Lawrence E; Platt, Jeffrey L

    2003-03-01

    Pores in the membrane of a bioartificial liver (BAL) allow it to function as a semipermeable barrier between its contents (i.e., liver cells) and components of the recipient's immune system. This study is designed to assess the influence of pore size on immune response to a BAL containing porcine hepatocytes. Sixteen healthy dogs were divided into four groups (four dogs per group) based on pore size of the BAL membrane and level of exposure to porcine hepatocytes. Group 1 dogs were administered porcine hepatocytes by intraperitoneal injection and served as positive controls. Group 2 dogs were exposed to porcine hepatocytes in a large-pore (200-nm) BAL, and group 3 dogs were exposed to porcine hepatocytes in a small-pore (10-nm) BAL. Group 4 dogs were exposed to a no-cell (unloaded) BAL and served as negative controls. Intraperitoneal injection of hepatocytes or 3 hours of BAL hemoperfusion was performed day 0 and 3 weeks later on day 21. Biochemical, humoral, and cellular measures of immune response were collected until day 44. The initiation of BAL hemoperfusion was associated with a rapid decline in CH(50) levels of complement and transient neutropenia and thrombocytopenia during all BAL exposures. Xenoreactive antibody response to BAL was increased by use of membranes with large pores and secondary exposures. Skin testing on day 42 showed a delayed-type hypersensitivity response to porcine hepatocytes that also correlated with level of previous antigen exposure. BAL treatment was associated with both immediate and elicited immunologic responses. The immediate response was transient and not influenced by membrane pore size, whereas elicited responses were influenced by pore size of the BAL during previous exposures. PMID:12619028

  8. Presurgical orthodontic decompensation alters alveolar bone condition around mandibular incisors in adults with skeletal Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Boyang; Tang, Jun; Xiao, Ping; Ding, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study is to use cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to acquire accurate radiographic images for alveolar bone in lower incisors and the change after presurgical orthodontic treatment. Seventeen patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion, ten normal occlusion subjects, and fifteen patients treated with orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery were included. CBCT images were obtained. The labial and lingual inclinations of mandibular incisors, the thickness of alveolar bone, the vertical alveolar height and root length were measured. Alveolar bone thickness at the apex in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion was thinner than normal subjects. The vertical alveolar bone heights at labial and lingual sides in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion were both reduced compared with normal subjects, especially at the labial side. There were statistically significant correlations between lower incisor inclination and alveolar bone morphology. After orthodontics, the incisors root apex was closer to the lingual side of alveolar bone. The alveolar bone thickness at apex was not statistically changed. The vertical alveolar bone heights at the labial and lingual sides were both significantly reduced especially the lingual side after presurgical orthodontic treatment. The root length was not significantly changed. In conclusion, the alveolar bone thickness at apex is thinner and the vertical alveolar height is reduced at the labial side. Forward movement of lower incisors during presurgical orthodontic treatment can render the lower incisors root apex closer to the lingual side and the vertical alveolar height is reduced. PMID:26550202

  9. Inhibition of immunological function mediated DNA damage of alveolar macrophages caused by cigarette smoke in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takahiro; Hirono, Yuriko; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Hutei, Yoshimi; Miyagawa, Mayuko; Sakaguchi, Ikuyo; Pinkerton, Kent E; Takeuchi, Minoru

    2009-12-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke impairs the pulmonary immune system, including alveolar macrophage function, although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not fully elucidated. This study investigates the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on the antigen-presenting activity of alveolar macrophages, which is required for antigen-specific response to T cells. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 10 days using a Hamburg II smoking machine, and alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. The antigen-presenting activity of alveolar macrophages was significantly inhibited in mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with mice not exposed to cigarette smoke. Major histocompatibility complex class II cell surface molecule-positive cells, B7-1 molecule-positive cells, and interleukin-1beta messenger RNA gene expression in alveolar macrophages were significantly decreased in mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with mice not exposed to cigarette smoke. In contrast, DNA damage and generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in alveolar macrophages were significantly increased by cigarette smoke exposure. These results suggest that inhibition of the antigen-presenting activity of alveolar macrophages may result from decreased expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and B7-1 molecules and interleukin-1beta messenger RNA gene expression following cigarette smoke exposure. Furthermore, inhibition of antigen presentation in alveolar macrophage may result from DNA damage induced by excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species being generated by alveolar macrophages following cigarette smoke exposure. These findings suggest that cigarette smoke impairs the immunological function of alveolar macrophages and, as a result, increases the risk for pulmonary infection. PMID:19922407

  10. Prevalence of emerging porcine parvoviruses and their co-infections with porcine circovirus type 2 in China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianhui; Huang, Liping; Wei, Yanwu; Wang, Yiping; Chen, Dongjie; Du, Wenjuan; Wu, Hongli; Liu, Changming

    2015-05-01

    A total of 450 samples from domestic pigs in China were tested for porcine parvoviruses (PPVs) and co-infections with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), and their complete capsid genes were sequenced. The prevalence of PPV1, PPV2, PPV3, PPV4, and PCV2 was 5.56 %, 39.56 %, 45.11 %, 21.56 %, and 47.33 %, respectively, and co-infection with PCV2 occurred in 4 % (PPV1), 22.44 % (PPV2), 24 % (PPV3), and 12 % (PPV4) of the samples. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two main lineages for each virus, and residues that differentiated these viruses were identified. The co-infections of emerging PPVs and PCV2 were prevalent, indicating their cooperative roles in porcine circovirus-associated diseases. PMID:25742931

  11. Inhibition of Endosome-Lysosome System Acidification Enhances Porcine Circovirus 2 Infection of Porcine Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Misinzo, Gerald; Delputte, Peter L.; Nauwynck, Hans J.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, Misinzo et al. (G. Misinzo, P. Meerts, M. Bublot, J. Mast, H. M. Weingartl, and H. J. Nauwynck, J. Gen. Virol. 86:2057-2068, 2005) reported that inhibiting endosome-lysosome system acidification reduced porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) infection of monocytic 3D4/31 cells. The present study examined the effect of inhibiting endosome-lysosome system acidification in epithelial cells, since epithelial cells support PCV2 infection in vivo and are used in culturing PCV2 in vitro. Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), chloroquine diphosphate (CQ), and monensin were used to inhibit endosome-lysosome system acidification. NH4Cl, CQ, or monensin increased PCV2 (Stoon-1010) infection by 726% ± 110%, 1,212% ± 34%, and 1,100% ± 179%, respectively, in porcine kidney (PK-15) cells; by 128% ± 7%, 158% ± 3%, and 142% ± 11% in swine kidney cells; by 160% ± 28%, 446% ± 50%, and 162% ± 56% in swine testicle (ST) cells; and by 313% ± 25%, 611% ± 86%, and 352% ± 44% in primary kidney epithelial cells. Similarly, increased PCV2 infection was observed with six other PCV2 strains in PK-15 cells treated with endosome-lysosome system acidification inhibitors. The mechanism behind increased PCV2 infection was further investigated in PK-15 cells using CQ. PCV2 infection of PK-15 cells was increased only when CQ was added early during PCV2 infection. CQ did not affect PCV2 virus-like particle (VLP) attachment to PK-15 cells but increased the disassembly of internalized PCV2 VLPs. In untreated PK-15 cells, internalized PCV2 VLPs localized within the endosome-lysosome system. PCV2 infection of untreated 3D4/31 and PK-15 cells and CQ-treated PK-15 cells was blocked by a serine protease inhibitor [4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride] but not by aspartyl protease (pepstatin A), cysteine protease (E-64), and metalloprotease (phosphoramidon) inhibitors. These results suggest that serine protease-mediated PCV2 disassembly is enhanced in porcine epithelial cells but inhibited

  12. Analysis of porcine MHC using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Wahlberg, Per; Marthey, Sylvain; Esquerré, Diane; Jaffrézic, Florence; Lecardonnel, Jérome; Hugot, Karine; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire

    2012-07-15

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in Mammals is one of the most gene dense regions of the genome and contains the polymorphic histocompatibility gene families known to be involved in pathogen response and control of auto-immunity. The MHC is a complex genetic system that provides an interesting model system to study genome expression regulation and genetic diversity at the megabase scale. The pig MHC or SLA (Swine Leucocyte Antigen) complex spans 2.4 megabases and 151 loci have been annotated. We will review key results from previous RNA expression studies using microarrays containing probes specific to annotated loci within SLA and in addition present novel data obtained using high-density tiling arrays encompassing the whole SLA complex. We have focused on transcriptome modifications of porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with a mixture of phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin known to activate B and T cell proliferation. Our results show that numerous loci mapping to the SLA complex are affected by the treatment. A general decreased level of expression for class I and II genes and an up-regulation of genes involved in peptide processing and transport were observed. Tiling array-based experiments contributed to refined gene annotations as presented for one SLA class I gene referred to as SLA-11. In conclusion, high-density tiling arrays can serve as an excellent tool to draw comprehensive transcription maps, and improve genome annotations for the SLA complex. We are currently studying their relevance to characterize SLA genetic diversity in combination with high throughput next generation sequencing. PMID:21561666

  13. Gingival and localized alveolar bone necrosis related to the use of arsenic trioxide paste--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gin; Sung, Po-Ta

    2014-03-01

    The leakage of arsenic trioxide paste from tooth fillings has been associated with widespread necrosis of the supporting periodontal tissues. This report describes two cases of arsenic trioxide paste-induced gingival and localized alveolar bone necrosis in the mandible, following the use of arsenic trioxide paste as a pulp-devitalized agent. The first case was a 54-year-old female complaining of a painful white patch on the gingival tissue of the left mandibular second molar (tooth #37) after treatment by a private dentist. She underwent completely debridement of all necrotic soft tissue with physical saline irrigation. The gingival tissue was gradually replaced with vascular tissue and completely healed after 7 weeks. The second case was a 30-year-old female complaining of severe pain and continuous gingival bleeding from the right maxillary first bicuspid (tooth #14) following treatment by a private dentist. She finally accepted debridement of the sequestrum and necrotic alveolar bone with decortication to induce active bleeding. A partial thickness gingival flap was made to cover the wound. Four weeks later, the supporting tissues had completely healed. Arsenic trioxide paste is a cytotoxic agent and may cause harmful adverse effects on adjacent periodontium and supporting hard tissue if leakage occurs, or it is used carelessly. There is no indication for the use of arsenic trioxide paste in modern dental practice. PMID:24630037

  14. Phylogenetic comparison of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strains detected in domestic pigs until 2008 and in 2012 in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have been present for the last 2 decades in Croatia, causing large economical losses in the pig production. The clinical features of the infections are mostly manifested by the development of respiratory problems, weight loss and poor growth performance, as well as reproductive failure in pregnant sows. Even though the infections are continuously recognized in some regions in Croatia, the heterogeneity of the detected viral strains from 2012 has not yet been investigated. The objective of this study was to compare virus strains of PCV2 and PRRSV detected until 2008 in Croatia with strains isolated in 2012 to gain a better epidemiological understanding of these two infections. Results PCV2 and PRRSV strains detected in 2012 in fattening pigs from regions where these two diseases have been previously described were compared to strains that have been detected in the same regions within the past two decades. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the circulating PCV2 and PRRSV strains are distantly related to the previously described Croatian viral strains. However, when compared to known isolates from the GenBank a high genetic identity of PRRSV isolates with isolates from Hungary, Denmark and the Netherlands was found. Conclusion The results of this study reveal that even though PCV2 and PRRSV are constantly present in the investigated regions in Croatia, the viral strains found in 2012 genetically differ from those detected in earlier years. This indicates that new entries into the pig population appeared with regard to both infections, probably as a result of pig trade. PMID:24839544

  15. VEGF and endothelium-derived retinoic acid regulate lung vascular and alveolar development.

    PubMed

    Yun, Eun Jun; Lorizio, Walter; Seedorf, Gregory; Abman, Steven H; Vu, Thiennu H

    2016-02-15

    Prevention or treatment of lung diseases caused by the failure to form, or destruction of, existing alveoli, as observed in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and adults with emphysema, requires understanding of the molecular mechanisms of alveolar development. In addition to its critical role in gas exchange, the pulmonary circulation also contributes to alveolar morphogenesis and maintenance by the production of paracrine factors, termed "angiocrines," that impact the development of surrounding tissue. To identify lung angiocrines that contribute to alveolar formation, we disrupted pulmonary vascular development by conditional inactivation of the Vegf-A gene during alveologenesis. This resulted in decreased pulmonary capillary and alveolar development and altered lung elastin and retinoic acid (RA) expression. We determined that RA is produced by pulmonary endothelial cells and regulates pulmonary angiogenesis and elastin synthesis by induction of VEGF-A and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-18, respectively. Inhibition of RA synthesis in newborn mice decreased FGF-18 and elastin expression and impaired alveolarization. Treatment with RA and vitamin A partially reversed the impaired vascular and alveolar development induced by VEGF inhibition. Thus we identified RA as a lung angiocrine that regulates alveolarization through autocrine regulation of endothelial development and paracrine regulation of elastin synthesis via induction of FGF-18 in mesenchymal cells. PMID:26566904

  16. Depletion of resident alveolar macrophages does not prevent Fas-mediated lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Bem, R A; Farnand, A W; Wong, V; Koski, A; Rosenfeld, M E; van Rooijen, N; Frevert, C W; Martin, T R; Matute-Bello, G

    2008-08-01

    Activation of the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system in the lungs results in a form of injury characterized by alveolar epithelial apoptosis and neutrophilic inflammation. Studies in vitro show that Fas activation induces apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells and cytokine production in alveolar macrophages. The main goal of this study was to determine the contribution of alveolar macrophages to Fas-induced lung inflammation in mice, by depleting alveolar macrophages using clodronate-containing liposomes. Liposomes containing clodronate or PBS were instilled by intratracheal instillation. After 24 h, the mice received intratracheal instillations of the Fas-activating monoclonal antibody Jo2 or an isotype control antibody and were studied 18 h later. The Jo2 MAb induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) total neutrophils, lung caspase-3 activity, and BALF total protein and worsened histological lung injury in the macrophage-depleted mice. Studies in vitro showed that Fas activation induced the release of the cytokine KC in a mouse lung epithelial cell line, MLE-12. These results suggest that the lung inflammatory response to Fas activation is not primarily dependent on resident alveolar macrophages and may instead depend on cytokine release by alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:18556802

  17. The clinical application of rhBMP-7 for the reconstruction of alveolar cleft.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Ashraf; Roshan, Cherian P; Gillgrass, Toby; Naudi, Kurt; Ray, Arup

    2016-01-01

    In this study, radiographic assessment was performed to find out the effectiveness of bone regeneration following the application of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7 (rhBMP-7) for the reconstruction of alveolar cleft defects in 11 cases: nine unilateral and two bilateral alveolar clefs. Reconstruction of the alveolar cleft was performed by using 3.5 mg of rhBMP-7 (Osigraft OP1) on a type I collagen carrier. Radiographs were taken 6 months post operation using a Gendex Intraoral Unit with Agfa Dentus M2 Comfort occlusal film. The amount of bony infill was graded on a Kindelan four-point scale. The patients were followed up for an average of 6.6 years. Based on the radiographic analysis, eight out of the nine unilateral alveolar cleft cases received a score of grade I and one patient had a grade II score, using the Kindelan scale. In the two bilateral alveolar clefts, only one side had bone formation. The radiographic appearance showed a normal trabecular pattern similar to the adjacent bone. Thus, rhBMP-7 was radiographically and clinically successful in regenerating the bone at the alveolar cleft which resulted in shortening of the operation time, absence of donor-site morbidity and a shorter hospital stay. The promising results of this preliminary study should encourage a phase II trial to compare bone grafts with BMP for the reconstruction of alveolar defects. PMID:26507862

  18. Laser Microdissection of the Alveolar Duct Enables Single-Cell Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Robert D.; Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Belle, Janeil M.; Wagner, Willi L.; Konerding, Moritz A.; Blainey, Paul C.; Pyne, Saumyadipta; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Complex tissues such as the lung are composed of structural hierarchies such as alveoli, alveolar ducts, and lobules. Some structural units, such as the alveolar duct, appear to participate in tissue repair as well as the development of bronchioalveolar carcinoma. Here, we demonstrate an approach to conduct laser microdissection of the lung alveolar duct for single-cell PCR analysis. Our approach involved three steps. (1) The initial preparation used mechanical sectioning of the lung tissue with sufficient thickness to encompass the structure of interest. In the case of the alveolar duct, the precision-cut lung slices were 200 μm thick; the slices were processed using near-physiologic conditions to preserve the state of viable cells. (2) The lung slices were examined by transmission light microscopy to target the alveolar duct. The air-filled lung was sufficiently accessible by light microscopy that counterstains or fluorescent labels were unnecessary to identify the alveolar duct. (3) The enzymatic and microfluidic isolation of single cells allowed for the harvest of as few as several thousand cells for PCR analysis. Microfluidics based arrays were used to measure the expression of selected marker genes in individual cells to characterize different cell populations. Preliminary work suggests the unique value of this approach to understand the intra- and intercellular interactions within the regenerating alveolar duct. PMID:25309876

  19. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces.

    PubMed

    Mijailovich, S M; Kojic, M; Tsuda, A

    2010-10-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17-32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  20. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, M.; Tsuda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17–32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  1. Association of ICAM-1 with the cytoskeleton in rat alveolar epithelial cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Barton, W W; Wilcoxen, S E; Christensen, P J; Paine, R

    1996-11-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 ICAM-1) is a transmembrane adhesion protein that is expressed constitutively on the apical surface of type I cells in vivo and on type II cells in vitro as they spread in culture, assuming type I cell-like characteristics. To investigate the possible interaction of ICAM-1 with the alveolar epithelial cell cytoskeleton, rat type II cells in primary culture were extracted with nonionic detergent, and residual ICAM-1 associated with the cytoskeletal remnants was determined using immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoprecipitation, and cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A large fraction of alveolar epithelial cell ICAM-1 remained associated with the cytoskeleton after detergent extraction, whereas two other transmembrane molecules, transferrin receptor and class II major histocompatibility complex, were completely removed. ICAM-1 was redistributed on the cell surface after the disruption of actin filaments with cytochalasin B, suggesting interaction with the actin cytoskeleton. In contrast, ICAM-1 was completely detergent soluble in rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and rat alveolar macrophages. The association of ICAM-1 with the alveolar epithelial cell cytoskeleton was not altered after stimulation with inflammatory cytokines. However, detergent resistant ICAM-1 was significantly increased after crosslinking of ICAM-1 on the cell surface, suggesting that this cytoskeletal association may be modulated by interactions of alveolar epithelial cells with inflammatory cells. The association of ICAM-1 with the cytoskeleton in alveolar epithelial cells may provide a fixed intermediary between mobile inflammatory cells and the alveolar surface. PMID:8944713

  2. Sequential gas delivery provides precise control of alveolar gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Joseph A; Iscoe, Steve; Duffin, James

    2016-05-01

    Of the factors determining blood gases, only alveolar ventilation (V˙A) is amenable to manipulation. However, current physiology text books neither describe how breath-by-breath V˙A can be measured, nor how it can be precisely controlled in spontaneously breathing subjects. And such control must be effected independent of minute ventilation (V˙E) and the pattern of breathing. Control of V˙A requires the deliberate partition of inhaled gas between the alveoli and the anatomical deadspace. This distribution is accomplished by sequential gas delivery (SGD): each breath consists of a chosen volume of 'fresh' gas followed by previously exhaled gas. Control of V˙A through SGD is a simple, inexpensive, yet powerful tool with many applications. Here we describe how to implement SGD, how it precisely controls V˙A, and consequently how it controls arterial blood gases. PMID:26840836

  3. Regulation of surfactant secretion in alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Alexandra V; Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A

    2007-08-01

    Molecular mechanisms of surfactant delivery to the air/liquid interface in the lung, which is crucial to lower the surface tension, have been studied for more than two decades. Lung surfactant is synthesized in the alveolar type II cells. Its delivery to the cell surface is preceded by surfactant component synthesis, packaging into specialized organelles termed lamellar bodies, delivery to the apical plasma membrane and fusion. Secreted surfactant undergoes reuptake, intracellular processing, and finally resecretion of recycled material. This review focuses on the mechanisms of delivery of surfactant components to and their secretion from lamellar bodies. Lamellar bodies-independent secretion is also considered. Signal transduction pathways involved in regulation of these processes are discussed as well as disorders associated with their malfunction. PMID:17496061

  4. A rare occurrence of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Albores, Jeffrey; Seki, Atsuko; Fishbein, Michael C; Abtin, Fereidoun; Lynch, Joseph P; Wang, Tisha; Weigt, S Samuel

    2013-06-01

    We present a case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) initially diagnosed 28 months after left single-lung transplantation for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The diagnosis was based upon the presence of periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive and surfactant immunostain-positive acellular lipoproteinaceous material within alveoli seen on transbronchial biopsy as well as in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The patient eventually also displayed a characteristic "crazy paving" pattern on radiographic imaging. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor antibodies were negative, consistent with secondary PAP. PAP is a rare interstitial lung disease with only a few reported cases occurring after lung transplantation. The etiology is thought to be related to a defect in macrophage function caused by immunosuppression. Reduced immunosuppression has been associated with stabilization, but not reversal, of the condition in the case reported here. PAP is an exceptionally rare cause of dyspnea and radiographic infiltrates after lung transplantation and may be related to toxicity of immune-suppressive medications. PMID:23821516

  5. A case of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with Cor Pulmonale

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen; Gu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterized by the formation and deposition of microliths within the alveoli and a paucity of symptoms in contrast to the imaging findings. It has familial tendency and is thought to be an autosomal recessive disorder with the mutation in the SLC34A2 gene. We describe a case of PAM with Cor Pulmonale. Ultrasonic cardiogram showed pulmonary hypertension (82 mmHg). Chest radiography revealed diffuse, bilateral sandstorm-like micronodules with greater density in the lower lung fields. HRCT scans demonstrated diffuse ground-grass opacities, thickening and calcification of interlobular septa and confluent calcified nodules. A diagnosis of PAM was suggested and confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB). PMID:23256064

  6. A case of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with Cor Pulmonale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Gu, Tao

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterized by the formation and deposition of microliths within the alveoli and a paucity of symptoms in contrast to the imaging findings. It has familial tendency and is thought to be an autosomal recessive disorder with the mutation in the SLC34A2 gene. We describe a case of PAM with Cor Pulmonale. Ultrasonic cardiogram showed pulmonary hypertension (82 mmHg). Chest radiography revealed diffuse, bilateral sandstorm-like micronodules with greater density in the lower lung fields. HRCT scans demonstrated diffuse ground-grass opacities, thickening and calcification of interlobular septa and confluent calcified nodules. A diagnosis of PAM was suggested and confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB). PMID:23256064

  7. Lenition of intervocalic alveolar fricatives in Catalan and Spanish.

    PubMed

    Hualde, José Ignacio; Prieto, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    We offer an acoustic study of variation in the realization of intervocalic alveolar fricatives in Catalan and Spanish. We consider the effects of phonological inventory (Catalan has a distinction between /s/ and /z/ that Spanish lacks) and position in word (i.e. effects of word boundaries). An analysis of a corpus of Map Task interviews in Catalan and Spanish revealed that Spanish word-medial and initial intervocalic /s/ segments are shorter than in Catalan. Whereas our results are consistent with the predictions of theories incorporating functional principles (i.e. contrast preservation), we also consider other possible explanations of the facts. The analysis also revealed that Spanish word-final intervocalic /s/ segments are weaker along the two dimensions that we examined (duration and voicing) than their initial and medial counterparts. We suggest that this apparently morphological effect on lenition has an articulatory explanation in terms of gestural coordination. PMID:25376233

  8. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with low molecular weight heparin

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Takahashi, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) has a varied etiology, including anticoagulation drugs. There is conflicting evidence whether low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) has a low risk of bleeding complications compared to unfractionated heparin. We report here a case of DAH in a 74-year-old woman who was administered enoxaparin, a LMWH, after bilateral total knee arthroplasty. Although congestive heart failure after blood transfusion and fluid infusion could in part be associated with the bleeding, LMWH may be a major cause of DAH since the patient quickly recovered after its cessation. DAH should be of concern when acute respiratory failure with ground-glass shadow develops in both lungs during anticoagulation therapy with LMWH. PMID:25473525

  9. Hereditary Gingivo-Alveolar Hyperplasia: A Report of Two Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Prasetyono, Theddeus O.H.; Ekaputri, Krista

    2015-01-01

    Gingival hyperplasia is characterized by fibrotic gingival overgrowth. The lesion may bury all the crown of the teeth and lead to impairment in masticatory functions and aesthetic disfigurement. This inherited disease is considered rare. We presented two cases of gingival hyperplasia in two siblings: an 11-year-old girl and an 8-year-old boy, whose mother had also suffered from the disease. The two siblings presented with generalized gingival overgrowth involving the maxillary and mandibular arches and covering almost all of the teeth. We performed surgery to reduce the excessive gingivo-alveolar tissue and disclosed most of the teeth. The patients showed functional and aesthetic improvement. The last follow-up through a phone call, which was conducted 12 months after the surgery, revealed no recurrent hyperplasia. PMID:25692435

  10. Comparative damage to alveolar macrophages after phagocytosis of respirable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.O.; Gray, R.H.; DeNee, P.B.; Newton, G.J.

    1982-02-01

    Backscatter electron and secondary electron imaging were used in a scanning electron microscope study of the in vitro toxic effects of particles ingested by alveolar macrophages. Relatively nontoxic aluminosilicate fly ash particles from the Mount St. Helens eruption and from a coal-fired power plant as well as toxic quartz particles from the Westphalia (Germany) mine deposits were readily taken up by macrophages. The presence of fly ash particles inside the cells was not associated with any changes in surface morphology. The presence of intracellular quartz particles, on the other hand, was correlated with damage to the cell membrane as determined by alterations in surface morphology, uptake of trypan blue, and release of the cytoplasmic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase. The use of backscatter electron imaging is useful in scanning electron microscope studies which attempt to establish cause and effect relationships between exposure to respirable particles and the morphological and cytotoxic response.

  11. [Implant positioned buccally of the alveolar process; a complication].

    PubMed

    Abas, I; Meijer, G J

    2016-02-01

    Because of a blue discolouration of her mucosa a 58-year-old patient visited her new dentist. Her medical history revealed that several months before an implant in the region of dental element 22 had been installed. When palpating the alveolar region, a painless hard swelling was felt. As a malposition of the implant was suspected, it was decided to have a cone beam computed tomography-scan made. The sagittal scan revealed that apically the implant in the region of dental element 22 was not embedded in the jawbone. Following the placement of an implant, it is always necessary to verify that the implant procedure has been carried out successfully; palpating the implant bed is always required. PMID:26878714

  12. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Poncy, J.L.; Dhilly, M.; Verry, M. ); Metivier, H. ); Masse, R. )

    1992-07-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly function macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U[sub 3]O[sub 8]) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca[sup 2+]. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 [+-] 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 [mu]m([sigma][sub g] = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U[sub 3]O[sub g] preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  13. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Poncy, J L; Metivier, H; Dhilly, M; Verry, M; Masse, R

    1992-07-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. Macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly functional macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U3O8) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca2+. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 +/- 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 microns(sigma g = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U3O8 preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. PMID:1396447

  14. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Poncy, J L; Metivier, H; Dhilly, M; Verry, M; Masse, R

    1992-01-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. Macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly functional macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U3O8) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca2+. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 +/- 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 microns(sigma g = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U3O8 preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. PMID:1396447

  15. Dynamics of surfactant release in alveolar type II cells

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Thomas; Ortmayr, Jörg; Friedrich, Franz; Völkl, Harald; Dietl, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, secreted via exocytosis of lamellar bodies (LB) by alveolar type II (AT II) cells, maintains low alveolar surface tension and is therefore essential for normal lung function. Here we describe real-time monitoring of exocytotic activity in these cells by visualizing and quantifying LB fusion with the plasma membrane (PM). Two approaches were used. First, fluorescence of LysoTracker Green DND-26 (LTG) in LB disappeared when the dye was released after exocytosis. Second, phospholipid staining by FM 1–43 resulted in bright fluorescence when this dye entered the LB through the fusion pore. Both processes were restricted to and colocalized with LB and occurred simultaneously. In AT II cells, FM 1–43 offered the unique advantage to independently define the moment and cellular location of single exocytotic events as well as the amount of material released, and to monitor its extracellular fate. Furthermore, both dyes could be used in combination with fura-2. The results indicate considerable diversity in the dynamics of LB exocytosis. In the majority of cells stimulated with ATP and isoproterenol, the first fusion of LB coincided with the rise of [Ca2+]i, but subsequent response of other LB in the same cell considerably outlasted this signal. In other cells, however, the onset of exocytosis was delayed by several minutes. After LB fusion, release of surfactant from LB into an aqueous solution was slow. In summary, stimulated exocytosis in AT II cells occurs at a much slower rate than in most other secretory cells but is still a more dynamic process than predicted from conventional measurements of surfactant released into cell supernatants. PMID:9465058

  16. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: Oxidant mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, Amy; Ning Yaoyu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester . E-mail: lkobzik@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (20 mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 {mu}M) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by glucose oxidase, 10 {mu}M/h), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity.

  17. Alveolar Ridge Augmentation with Titanium Mesh. A Retrospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Pier P; Beretta, Mario; Cicciù, Marco; Maiorana, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    An adequate amount of bone all around the implant surface is essential in order to obtain long-term success of implant restoration. Several techniques have been described to augment alveolar bone volume in critical clinical situations, including guided bone regeneration, based on the use of barrier membranes to prevent ingrowth of the epithelial and gingival connective tissue cells. To achieve this goal, the use of barriers made of titanium micromesh has been advocated. A total of 13 patients were selected for alveolar ridge reconstruction treatment prior to implant placement. Each patient underwent a tridimensional bone augmentation by means of a Ti-mesh filled with intraoral autogenous bone mixed with deproteinized anorganic bovine bone in a 1:1 ratio. Implants were placed after a healing period of 6 months. Panoramic x-rays were performed after each surgical procedure and during the follow-up recalls. Software was used to measure the mesial and the distal peri-implant bone loss around each implant. The mean peri-implant bone loss was 1.743 mm on the mesial side and 1.913 mm on the distal side, from the top of the implant head to the first visible bone-implant contact, at a mean follow-up of 88 months. The use of Ti-mesh allows the regeneration of sufficient bone volume for ideal implant placement. The clinical advantages related to this technique include the possibility of correcting severe vertical atrophies associated with considerable reductions in width and the lack of major complications if soft-tissue dehiscence and mesh exposures do occur. PMID:25317209

  18. A Computational Approach to Understand In Vitro Alveolar Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sean H. J.; Yu, Wei; Mostov, Keith; Matthay, Michael A.; Hunt, C. Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Primary human alveolar type II (AT II) epithelial cells maintained in Matrigel cultures form alveolar-like cysts (ALCs) using a cytogenesis mechanism that is different from that of other studied epithelial cell types: neither proliferation nor death is involved. During ALC formation, AT II cells engage simultaneously in fundamentally different, but not fully characterized activities. Mechanisms enabling these activities and the roles they play during different process stages are virtually unknown. Identifying, characterizing, and understanding the activities and mechanisms are essential to achieving deeper insight into this fundamental feature of morphogenesis. That deeper insight is needed to answer important questions. When and how does an AT cell choose to switch from one activity to another? Why does it choose one action rather than another? We report obtaining plausible answers using a rigorous, multi-attribute modeling and simulation approach that leveraged earlier efforts by using new, agent and object-oriented capabilities. We discovered a set of cell-level operating principles that enabled in silico cells to self-organize and generate systemic cystogenesis phenomena that are quantitatively indistinguishable from those observed in vitro. Success required that the cell components be quasi-autonomous. As simulation time advances, each in silico cell autonomously updates its environment information to reclassify its condition. It then uses the axiomatic operating principles to execute just one action for each possible condition. The quasi-autonomous actions of individual in silico cells were sufficient for developing stable cyst-like structures. The results strengthen in silico to in vitro mappings at three levels: mechanisms, behaviors, and operating principles, thereby achieving a degree of validation and enabling answering the questions posed. We suggest that the in silico operating principles presented may have a biological counterpart and that a

  19. Nitric oxide alters metabolism in isolated alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Miles, P R; Bowman, L; Huffman, L

    1996-07-01

    Alveolar type II cells may be exposed to nitric oxide (.NO) from external sources, and these cells can also generate .NO. Therefore we studied the effects of altering .NO levels on various type II cell metabolic processes. Incubation of cells with the .NO generator, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 1 mM), leads to reductions of 60-70% in the synthesis of disaturated phosphatidylcholines (DSPC) and cell ATP levels. Cellular oxygen consumption, an indirect measure of cell ATP synthesis, is also reduced by SNAP. There is no direct effect of SNAP on lung mitochondrial ATP synthesis, suggesting that .NO does not directly inhibit this process. On the other hand, incubation of cells with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the enzyme responsible for .NO synthesis, results in increases in DSPC synthesis, cell ATP content, and cellular oxygen consumption. The L-NAME effects are reversed by addition of L-arginine, the substrate for NOS. Production of .NO by type II cells is inhibited by L-NAME, a better inhibitor of constitutive NOS (cNOS) than inducible NOS (iNOS), and is reduced in the absence of external calcium. Aminoguanidine, a specific inhibitor of iNOS, has no effect on cell ATP content or on .NO production. These results indicate that alveolar type II cell lipid and energy metabolism can be affected by .NO and suggest that there may be cNOS activity in these cells. PMID:8760128

  20. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: oxidant mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Imrich, Amy; Ning, YaoYu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-acetyl cysteine (20mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 uM) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H2O2 generated by glucose oxidase, 10 uM/hr), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H2O2. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H2O2 but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H2O2-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H2O2 released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity. PMID:17222881