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Sample records for continuous wave microwaves

  1. EFFECTS OF CONTINUOUS-WAVE, PULSED, AND SINUSOIDAL-AMPLITUDE-MODULATED MICROWAVES ON BRAIN ENERGY METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparison of the effects of continuous wave, sinusoidal-amplitude modulated, and pulsed square-wave-modulated 591-MHz microwave exposures on brain energy metabolism was made in male Sprague Dawley rats (175-225g). Brain NADH fluorescence, adensine triphosphate (ATP) concentrat...

  2. Longevity of microwave-treated (2. 45 GHz continuous wave) honey bees in observation hives

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, N.E.; Westerdahl, B.B.

    1981-12-15

    Adult honey bees were exposed for 30 min to 2.45 GHz of continuous wave microwave radiation at power densities ranging from 3 to 50 mW/cm/sup 2/. After exposure, bees were returned to glass-walled observation hives, and their longevity was compared with that of control bees. No significant differences were found between microwave- and sham-treated bees at any of the power densities tested.

  3. Study of a Continuous Microwave Discharge in Two Crossed Wave Beams of the Millimeter Wavelength Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikharev, A. L.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Radischev, D. B.; Chernov, V. V.; Kozlov, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of studying a microwave discharge produced by continuous-wave gyrotron radiation with a frequency of 30 GHz in a mixture of argon and hydrogen with an admixture of methane in the region of crossing of two wave beams. The discharge wave maintained over a substrate and had the form of a thin plasma layer. The gas temperature and electron density in the plasma were measured by the methods of optical spectroscopy of radiation. Features of determining Stark broadening of spectral lines of atomic hydrogen at a relatively low (of about 1013 cm-3) electron density are discussed. Dependences of the electron density and gas temperature on the pressure and gas composition, as well as the power of the incident microwave radiation are presented. The prospects of using the discharge under consideration for plasmochemical deposition of diamond films from the gaseous phase are considered.

  4. Chronic exposure of a honey bee colony to 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerdahl, B. B.; Gary, N. E.

    1981-01-01

    A honey bee colony (Apis mellifera L.) was exposed 28 days to 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwaves at a power density (1 mW/sq cm) expected to be associated with rectennae in the solar power satellite power transmission system. Differences found between the control and microwave-treated colonies were not large, and were in the range of normal variation among similar colonies. Thus, there is an indication that microwave treatment had little, if any, effect on (1) flight and pollen foraging activity, (2) maintenance of internal colony temperature, (3) brood rearing activity, (4) food collection and storage, (5) colony weight, and (6) adult populations. Additional experiments are necessary before firm conclusions can be made.

  5. Chronic exposure of a honey bee colony to 2. 45 GHz continuous wave microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Westerdahl, B.B.; Gary, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    A honey bee colony (Apis mellifera L.) was exposed 28 days to 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwaves at a power density (1 mW/sq cm) expected to be associated with rectennae in the solar power satellite power transmission system. Differences found between the control and microwave-treated colonies were not large, and were in the range of normal variation among similar colonies. Thus, there is an indication that microwave treatment had little, if any, effect on (1) flight and pollen foraging activity, (2) maintenance of internal colony temperature, (3) brood rearing activity, (4) food collection and storage, (5) colony weight, and (6) adult populations. Additional experiments are necessary before firm conclusions can be made.

  6. Stepped-frequency continuous-wave microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Hao Arbabian, Amin

    2014-06-02

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic (TA) imaging combines the dielectric contrast of microwave imaging with the resolution of ultrasound imaging. Prior studies have only focused on time-domain techniques with short but powerful microwave pulses that require a peak output power in excess of several kilowatts to achieve sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This poses safety concerns as well as to render the imager expensive and bulky with requiring a large vacuum radio frequency source. Here, we propose and demonstrate a coherent stepped-frequency continuous-wave (SFCW) technique for TA imaging which enables substantial improvements in SNR and consequently a reduction in peak power requirements for the imager. Constructive and destructive interferences between TA signals are observed and explained. Full coherency across microwave and acoustic domains, in the thermo-elastic response, is experimentally verified and this enables demonstration of coherent SFCW microwave-induced TA imaging. Compared to the pulsed technique, an improvement of 17 dB in SNR is demonstrated.

  7. High power continuous wave microwave test bench at 4.6 GHz for experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wendong; Hu, Huaichuan; Shan, Jiafang; Xu, Handong; Wang, Mao; Wu, Zege; Zhu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is an effective approach for auxiliary heating and non-inductive current drive in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The 6 MW/4.6 GHz LHCD system is being designed and installed with twenty-four 250 KW/4.6 GHz high power klystron amplifiers. The test bench operating at 250 KW/4.6 GHz in continuous wave mode has been set up, which can test and train microwave components for the 6 MW/4.6 GHz LHCD system. In this paper, the system architecture and software of the microwave test bench are presented. Moreover, the test results of these klystrons and microwave units are described here in detail. The long term operation of the test bench and improved performance of all microwave component samples indicated that the related technologies on test bench can be applied in the large scale LHCD systems. PMID:23387646

  8. High power continuous wave microwave system at 3.7 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, D.; Dani, S.; Gangopadhyay, S.; Jadav, B.; Jha, M.; Kadia, B. R.; Khilar, P. L.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Kushwah, M.; Patel, A. P.; Parmar, K. G.; Parmar, K. M.; Parmar, P.; Rajnish, K.; Raghuraj, S.; Rao, S. L.; Samanta, K. K.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Shah, P.; Sharma, P. K.; Srinivas, Y. S. S.; Trivedi, R. G.; Verghese, G.

    2001-03-01

    The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system is an important system in superconducting steady state tokamak (SST-1). It is used to drive and maintain the plasma current for 1000 s with a duty cycle of 17%. The LHCD system is being designed to launch 1 MW of radio frequency (rf) power at 3.7 GHz. The rf source is comprised of two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of delivering 500 kW rf power. In this article, the results obtained during installation and commissioning of these klystrons are presented. Two klystrons (model TH2103D) have been successfully installed and commissioned on dummy loads, delivering ˜200 kW power for more than 1000 s. The maximum output power that could be obtained is limited due to the available direct current (dc) power supply. The test system is comprised of a TH2103D klystron, a low power rf (3.7 GHz/25 W) source, two high power four port circulators, two high power dual directional couplers, two arc detector systems, and two dummy water loads. To avoid rf breakdown in the rf components of the transmission line, the system has been pressurized with dry air to 3 bar. To energize and operate the klystron, a high voltage dc power supply, a magnet power supply, an ion pump power supply, a -65 kV floating anode modulator power supply, and a filament power supply are used. An arc detector unit has been installed to detect and initiate action within a few microseconds to protect the klystron, waveguides, and other rf passive components during arcing. To protect the klystron in the event of an arc, a fast responding (<10 μs), rail gap based pressurized crowbar unit has been used. The entire system is water cooled to avoid excess temperature rise during high power continuous wave operation of the klystron and other rf components. The tube requires initial conditioning. Thereafter, the output rf power is studied as a function of beam parameters such as cathode voltage and beam current.

  9. Automated Microwave Complex on the Basis of a Continuous-Wave Gyrotron with an Operating Frequency of 263 GHz and an Output Power of 1 kW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Morozkin, M. V.; Tsvetkov, A. I.; Lubyako, L. V.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Kuftin, A. N.; Zapevalov, V. E.; V. Kholoptsev, V.; Eremeev, A. G.; Sedov, A. S.; Malygin, V. I.; Chirkov, A. V.; Fokin, A. P.; Sokolov, E. V.; Denisov, G. G.

    2016-02-01

    We study experimentally the automated microwave complex for microwave spectroscopy and diagnostics of various media, which was developed at the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in cooperation with GYCOM Ltd. on the basis of a gyrotron with a frequency of 263 GHz and operated at the first gyrofrequency harmonic. In the process of the experiments, a controllable output power of 0 .1 -1 kW was achieved with an efficiency of up to 17 % in the continuous-wave generation regime. The measured radiation spectrum with a relative width of about 10 -6 and the frequency values measured at various parameters of the device are presented. The results of measuring the parameters of the wave beam, which was formed by a built-in quasioptical converter, as well as the data obtained by measuring the heat loss in the cavity and the vacuum output window are analyzed.

  10. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  11. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Smatlak, Donna L.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Wittle, J. Kenneth; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  12. Continuous microwave regeneration apparatus for absorption media

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.D.

    1999-09-07

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for continuously drying and regenerating ceramic beads for use in process gas moisture drying operations such as glove boxes. A microwave energy source is coupled to a process chamber to internally heat the ceramic beads and vaporize moisture contained therein. In a preferred embodiment, the moisture laden ceramic beads are conveyed toward the microwave source by a screw mechanism. The regenerated beads flow down outside of the screw mechanism and are available to absorb additional moisture.

  13. Continuous microwave regeneration apparatus for absorption media

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuously drying and regenerating ceramic beads for use in process gas moisture drying operations such as glove boxes. A microwave energy source is coupled to a process chamber to internally heat the ceramic beads and vaporize moisture contained therein. In a preferred embodiment, the moisture laden ceramic beads are conveyed toward the microwave source by a screw mechanism. The regenerated beads flow down outside of the screw mechanism and are available to absorb additional moisture.

  14. Microwave continuous sterilization of injection ampoules.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Honda, W; Shimizu, K; Iizima, K; Ehara, T; Okuzawa, K; Miyake, Y

    1996-01-01

    A new microwave continuous sterilizer (MWS) for applying microwave dielectric heating as an alternative to an autoclave was developed. The developmental objectives of the MWS were: 1. Achieving sufficient sterilization for the drugs containing heat-sensitive ingredients. 2. Measuring and recording sterilization temperature of each ampoule. 3. Ensuring automatic continuous operation and linkage with the preceding and following machines in an injection ampoule production process. The temperature of the drug solution in an ampoule was heated to 140 degrees C within about 30 seconds by the MWS. Target F0 value is achieved through the maintaining heater to maintain the target temperature for 12 seconds. Ampoules are cooled with air and water after completion of heating. The MWS is capable of processing 150 ampoules per minute. The newly developed techniques which minimized temperature distribution of heated ampoule solution were: 1. Microwave irradiation in a direction opposite to the direction of ampoules transportation. 2. Microwave irradiation in the lower part of ampoule solution (i.e., heating up the drug solution by thermal convection.) 3. Microwave power control by feedback of measured temperatures. 4. Heating rate control corresponding to the dielectric property of ampoule solution. The drug stability test was performed using 3% pyridoxamine phosphate solution, and the inactivation of spores in 3% pyridoxamine phosphate solution was examined using Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 spores. The MWS was proved to have an adequate efficiency of sterilization with less chemical degradation of the contents than an autoclave. PMID:8696781

  15. Discrete photon statistics from continuous microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virally, Stéphane; Simoneau, Jean Olivier; Lupien, Christian; Reulet, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    Photocount statistics are an important tool for the characterization of electromagnetic fields, especially for fields with an irrelevant phase. In the microwave domain, continuous rather than discrete measurements are the norm. Using a different approach, we recover discrete photon statistics from the cumulants of a continuous distribution of field quadrature measurements. The use of cumulants allows the separation between the signal of interest and experimental noise. Using a parametric amplifier as the first stage of the amplification chain, we extract useful data from up to the sixth cumulant of the continuous distribution of a coherent field, hence recovering up to the third moment of the discrete statistics associated with a signal with much less than one average photon.

  16. Microwave sintering of continuous zirconia ceramic fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Unruh, W.P.; Plovnick, R.H.

    1994-04-01

    Continuous yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic fibers approximately 10-15 {mu}m in diameter have been rapidly sintered by pulling them through a tuned, 2.45 GHz single-mode TE{sub 103} microwave cavity in ambient air. The resulting fibers were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and single-filament tensile tests. They were found to be unsplit, to have a submicron grain structure and a tetragonal crystal structure, and to exhibit considerable strength and flexibility.

  17. Ocean waves. [remote sensing microwave measurement methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartsch, N.; Vogel, M.; Kjelaas, A. G.; Parr, H.; Thomas, J.; Valenzuela, G.; Williams, P. D. L.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1978-01-01

    Ocean wave data can be obtained from such active microwave probe techniques as monostatic HF and VHF, bistatic HF, HF synthetic aperture radar, altimeters, satellite and airborne synthetic aperture radar, carrier wave or pulsed dual-frequency radars, and coastal surveillance radar. Approaches to texture analysis of ocean wave imagery are discussed, with attention given to transform techniques or spatial frequency analysis, and the analysis of second-order gray level statistics. In addition, recommendations are made for further work on the modulation of short gravity waves by longer waves as a function of wind speed and wave direction, and the derivation of transfer functions for the ocean response of dual-frequency radars.

  18. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierinen, Juha; Chau, Jorge L.; Pfeffer, Nico; Clahsen, Matthias; Stober, Gunter

    2016-03-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products.

  19. Path entanglement of continuous-variable quantum microwaves.

    PubMed

    Menzel, E P; Di Candia, R; Deppe, F; Eder, P; Zhong, L; Ihmig, M; Haeberlein, M; Baust, A; Hoffmann, E; Ballester, D; Inomata, K; Yamamoto, T; Nakamura, Y; Solano, E; Marx, A; Gross, R

    2012-12-21

    Path entanglement constitutes an essential resource in quantum information and communication protocols. Here, we demonstrate frequency-degenerate entanglement between continuous-variable quantum microwaves propagating along two spatially separated paths. We combine a squeezed and a vacuum state using a microwave beam splitter. Via correlation measurements, we detect and quantify the path entanglement contained in the beam splitter output state. Our experiments open the avenue to quantum teleportation, quantum communication, or quantum radar with continuous variables at microwave frequencies. PMID:23368439

  20. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierinen, J.; Chau, J. L.; Pfeffer, N.; Clahsen, M.; Stober, G.

    2015-07-01

    The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs); continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after performing a measurement, as it does not depend on pulse spacing; and the low signal to noise ratio allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band without significantly interfering with each other. The latter allows the same receiver antennas to be used to receive multiple transmitters. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. This would, for example, provide higher spatio-temporal resolution for mesospheric wind field measurements.

  1. Continuous-wave submillimeter-wave gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D.; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Torrezan, Antonio C.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2006-10-01

    Recently, dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) has emerged as a powerful technique to obtain significant enhancements in spin spectra from biological samples. For DNP in modern NMR systems, a high power continuous-wave source in the submillimeter wavelength range is necessary. Gyrotrons can deliver tens of watts of CW power at submillimeter wavelengths and are well suited for use in DNP/NMR spectrometers. To date, 140 GHz and 250 GHz gyrotrons are being employed in DNP spectrometer experiments at 200 MHz and 380 MHz at MIT. A 460 GHz gyrotron, which has operated with 8 W of CW output power, will soon be installed in a 700 MHz NMR spectrometer. High power radiation with good spectral and spatial resolution from these gyrotrons should provide NMR spectrometers with high signal enhancement through DNP. Also, these tubes operating at submillimeter wavelengths should have important applications in research in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine.

  2. Continuous-wave Submillimeter-wave Gyrotrons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D.; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Torrezan, Antonio C.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) has emerged as a powerful technique to obtain significant enhancements in spin spectra from biological samples. For DNP in modern NMR systems, a high power continuous-wave source in the submillimeter wavelength range is necessary. Gyrotrons can deliver tens of watts of CW power at submillimeter wavelengths and are well suited for use in DNP/NMR spectrometers. To date, 140 GHz and 250 GHz gyrotrons are being employed in DNP spectrometer experiments at 200 MHz and 380 MHz at MIT. A 460 GHz gyrotron, which has operated with 8 W of CW output power, will soon be installed in a 700 MHz NMR spectrometer. High power radiation with good spectral and spatial resolution from these gyrotrons should provide NMR spectrometers with high signal enhancement through DNP. Also, these tubes operating at submillimeter wavelengths should have important applications in research in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine. PMID:17404605

  3. Continuous-wave Submillimeter-wave Gyrotrons.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Torrezan, Antonio C; Woskov, Paul P

    2006-01-01

    Recently, dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) has emerged as a powerful technique to obtain significant enhancements in spin spectra from biological samples. For DNP in modern NMR systems, a high power continuous-wave source in the submillimeter wavelength range is necessary. Gyrotrons can deliver tens of watts of CW power at submillimeter wavelengths and are well suited for use in DNP/NMR spectrometers. To date, 140 GHz and 250 GHz gyrotrons are being employed in DNP spectrometer experiments at 200 MHz and 380 MHz at MIT. A 460 GHz gyrotron, which has operated with 8 W of CW output power, will soon be installed in a 700 MHz NMR spectrometer. High power radiation with good spectral and spatial resolution from these gyrotrons should provide NMR spectrometers with high signal enhancement through DNP. Also, these tubes operating at submillimeter wavelengths should have important applications in research in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine. PMID:17404605

  4. Industrial scale microwave processing of tomato juice using a novel continuous microwave system.

    PubMed

    Stratakos, Alexandros Ch; Delgado-Pando, Gonzalo; Linton, Mark; Patterson, Margaret F; Koidis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of an industrial scale continuous flow microwave volumetric heating system in comparison to conventional commercial scale pasteurisation for the processing of tomato juice in terms of physicochemical properties, microbial characteristics and antioxidant capacity. The effect against oxidative stress in Caco-2 cells, after in vitro digestion was also investigated. Physicochemical and colour characteristics of juices were very similar between technologies and during storage. Both conventional and microwave pasteurisation inactivated microorganisms and kept them in low levels throughout storage. ABTS[Symbol: see text](+) values, but not ORAC, were higher for the microwave pasteurised juice at day 0 however no significant differences between juices were observed during storage. Juice processed with the microwave system showed an increased cytoprotective effect against H2O2 induced oxidation in Caco-2 cells. Organoleptic analysis revealed that the two tomato juices were very similar. The continuous microwave volumetric heating system appears to be a viable alternative to conventional pasteurisation. PMID:26213019

  5. Quantum and wave dynamical chaos in superconducting microwave billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, B. Richter, A.

    2015-09-15

    Experiments with superconducting microwave cavities have been performed in our laboratory for more than two decades. The purpose of the present article is to recapitulate some of the highlights achieved. We briefly review (i) results obtained with flat, cylindrical microwave resonators, so-called microwave billiards, concerning the universal fluctuation properties of the eigenvalues of classically chaotic systems with no, a threefold and a broken symmetry; (ii) summarize our findings concerning the wave-dynamical chaos in three-dimensional microwave cavities; (iii) present a new approach for the understanding of the phenomenon of dynamical tunneling which was developed on the basis of experiments that were performed recently with unprecedented precision, and finally, (iv) give an insight into an ongoing project, where we investigate universal properties of (artificial) graphene with superconducting microwave photonic crystals that are enclosed in a microwave resonator, i.e., so-called Dirac billiards.

  6. Path Entanglement of Continuous-Variable Quantum Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, E. P.; Deppe, F.; Eder, P.; Zhong, L.; Haeberlein, M.; Baust, A.; Hoffmann, E.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.; di Candia, R.; Solano, E.; Ballester, D.; Ihmig, M.; Inomata, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakamura, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Entanglement is a quantum mechanical phenomenon playing a key role in quantum communication and information processing protocols. Here, we report on frequency-degenerate entanglement between continuous-variable quantum microwaves propagating along two separated paths. In our experiment, we combine a squeezed and a vacuum state via a beam splitter. Overcoming the challenges imposed by the low photon energies in the microwave regime, we reconstruct the squeezed state and, independently from this, detect and quantify the produced entanglement via correlation measurements (E. P. Menzel et al., arXiv:1210.4413). Our work paves the way towards quantum communication and teleportation with continuous variables in the microwave regime. This work is supported by SFB 631, German Excellence Initiative via NIM, EU projects SOLID, CCQED and PROMISCE, MEXT Kakenhi ``Quantum Cybernetics'', JSPS FIRST Program, the NICT Commissioned Research, EPSRC EP/H050434/1, Basque Government IT472-10, and Spanish MICINN FIS2009-12773-C02-01.

  7. PROCESS INTENSIFICATION: MICROWAVE INITIATED REACTIONS USING A CONTINUOUS FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concept of process intensification has been used to develop a continuous narrow channel reactor at Clarkson capable of carrying out reactions under isothermal conditions whilst being exposed to microwave (MW) irradiation thereby providing information on the true effect of mi...

  8. Pseudo continuous wave instrument. [ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic properties and their changes in a sample of liquid, gas, plasma or solid are measured by applying a variable frequency source to the sample by means of a transducer to produce sound waves within the sample. The application of the variable frequency source to the sample is periodically interrupted for a short duration. Means are connected to the transducer for receiving the resulting acoustic signals during the interruptions for producing a control signal indicative of a difference in the frequency of the output of the variable frequency source and the frequency of a mechanical resonant peak in the sample. The control signal is applied to the variable frequency source to maintain its output frequency at the frequency of the mechanical resonant peak. The change in frequency of the variable frequency source indicates the shift in frequency of the mechanical resonant peak and the amplitude of the acoustic signals indicates the attenuation of the acoustic signals in the sample.

  9. Detecting continuous gravitational waves with a jug of superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Swati; Delorenzo, Laura; Pearlman, Adam; Pikovski, Igor; Blencowe, Miles; Schwab, Keith

    We investigate the sensitivity to narrow band, continuous-wave strain fields of a kg-scale optomechanical system formed by the acoustic motion of superfluid helium-4 parametrically coupled to a super-conducting microwave cavity. This narrowband detection scheme is tunable through pressurization of the helium, thereby making both doppler tracking of astrophysical sources and tuning the detector on/off from the source possible. For reasonable experimental parameters, we find that gravitational metric strain fields from nearby pulsars could be detected with a few weeks of integration time.

  10. Detecting continuous gravitational waves with a jug of superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Swati; de Lorenzo, Laura; Pearlman, Adam; Pikovski, Igor; Schwab, Keith

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the sensitivity to narrow band, continuous-wave strain fields of a kg-scale optomechanical system formed by the acoustic motion of superfluid helium-4 parametrically coupled to a super-conducting microwave cavity. This narrowband detection scheme is tunable through pressurization of the helium, thereby making both doppler tracking of astrophysical sources and tuning the detector on/off from the source possible. For reasonable experimental parameters, we find that gravitational metric strain fields from nearby pulsars could be detected with a few weeks of integration time.

  11. Interval velocity analysis using wave field continuation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhusheng, Z. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the author proposes a new interval velocity inversion method which, based on wave field continuation theory and fuzzy decision theory, uses CMP seismic gathers to automatically estimate interval velocity and two-way travel time in layered medium. The interval velocity calculated directly from wave field continuation is not well consistent with that derived from VSP data, the former is usually higher than the latter. Three major factors which influence the accuracy of interval velocity from wave field continuation are corrected, so that the two kinds of interval velocity are well consistent. This method brings better interval velocity, adapts weak reflection waves and resists noise well. It is a feasible method.

  12. Microwave absorption in s- and d-wave disordered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mai Suan

    2001-10-01

    We model s- and d-wave ceramic superconductors with a three-dimensional lattice of randomly distributed 0 and π Josephson junctions with finite self-inductance. The field and temperature dependences of the microwave absoption are obtained by solving the corresponding Langevin dynamical equations. We find that at magnetic field H=0 the microwave absoption of the s-wave samples, when plotted against the field, has a minimum at any temperature. In the case of d-wave superconductors one has a peak at H=0 in the temperature region where the paramagnetic Meissner effect is observable. These results agree with experiments. The dependence of the microwave absorption on the screening strength was found to be nontrivial due to the crossover from the weak to the strong screening regime.

  13. Microwave excitation of spin wave beams in thin ferromagnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszecki, P.; Kasprzak, M.; Serebryannikov, A. E.; Krawczyk, M.; Śmigaj, W.

    2016-03-01

    An inherent element of research and applications in photonics is a beam of light. In magnonics, which is the magnetic counterpart of photonics, where spin waves are used instead of electromagnetic waves to transmit and process information, the lack of a beam source limits exploration. Here, we present an approach enabling generation of narrow spin wave beams in thin homogeneous nanosized ferromagnetic films by microwave current. We show that the desired beam-type behavior can be achieved with the aid of a properly designed coplanar waveguide transducer generating a nonuniform microwave magnetic field. We test this idea using micromagnetic simulations, confirming numerically that the resulting spin wave beams propagate over distances of several micrometers. The proposed approach requires neither inhomogeneity of the ferromagnetic film nor nonuniformity of the biasing magnetic field. It can be generalized to different magnetization configurations and yield multiple spin wave beams of different width at the same frequency.

  14. Microwave excitation of spin wave beams in thin ferromagnetic films

    PubMed Central

    Gruszecki, P.; Kasprzak, M.; Serebryannikov, A. E.; Krawczyk, M.; Śmigaj, W.

    2016-01-01

    An inherent element of research and applications in photonics is a beam of light. In magnonics, which is the magnetic counterpart of photonics, where spin waves are used instead of electromagnetic waves to transmit and process information, the lack of a beam source limits exploration. Here, we present an approach enabling generation of narrow spin wave beams in thin homogeneous nanosized ferromagnetic films by microwave current. We show that the desired beam-type behavior can be achieved with the aid of a properly designed coplanar waveguide transducer generating a nonuniform microwave magnetic field. We test this idea using micromagnetic simulations, confirming numerically that the resulting spin wave beams propagate over distances of several micrometers. The proposed approach requires neither inhomogeneity of the ferromagnetic film nor nonuniformity of the biasing magnetic field. It can be generalized to different magnetization configurations and yield multiple spin wave beams of different width at the same frequency. PMID:26971711

  15. Microwave excitation of spin wave beams in thin ferromagnetic films.

    PubMed

    Gruszecki, P; Kasprzak, M; Serebryannikov, A E; Krawczyk, M; Śmigaj, W

    2016-01-01

    An inherent element of research and applications in photonics is a beam of light. In magnonics, which is the magnetic counterpart of photonics, where spin waves are used instead of electromagnetic waves to transmit and process information, the lack of a beam source limits exploration. Here, we present an approach enabling generation of narrow spin wave beams in thin homogeneous nanosized ferromagnetic films by microwave current. We show that the desired beam-type behavior can be achieved with the aid of a properly designed coplanar waveguide transducer generating a nonuniform microwave magnetic field. We test this idea using micromagnetic simulations, confirming numerically that the resulting spin wave beams propagate over distances of several micrometers. The proposed approach requires neither inhomogeneity of the ferromagnetic film nor nonuniformity of the biasing magnetic field. It can be generalized to different magnetization configurations and yield multiple spin wave beams of different width at the same frequency. PMID:26971711

  16. Ice Water Path Retrieval Using Microwave and Submillimetre Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brath, Manfred; Grützun, Verena; Mendrok, Jana; Fox, Stuart; Eriksson, Patrick; Buehler, Stefan A.

    2016-04-01

    There is an ongoing need for data on ice clouds. The ice water path as an essential climate variable is a fundamental parameter to describe ice clouds. Combined passive microwave and submillimetre wave measurements are capable to sample the size distribution of the ice particles and are sensitive to relevant particle sizes. This makes combined microwave and submillimetre wave measurements useful for estimates of ice water path. Furthermore, instead of being sensitive for the upper ice column as for example for passive visible and passive infrared measurements, combined microwave and submillimetre wave measurements can sample the full ice column. We developed a retrieval algorithm for ice water path based on a neural network approach using combined microwave and submillimetre wave measurements, from about 20 channels in the range between 89 GHz and 664 GHz of the electromagnetic sprectra. We trained a neural network by using 1D radiative transfer simulations which were conducted using the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS). The radiative transfer simulations were fed by atmospheric profiles from a numerical weather prediction model. We will present an analysis of the retrieval. Additionally, we will present results of retrieved IWP from combined ISMAR (International SubMillimetre Airborne Radiometer) and MARSS (Microwave Airborne Radiometer Scanning System) measurements on board of the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) aircraft during March 2015 over the North Atlantic.

  17. Continuing Higher Education: The Coming Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Allan W., Ed.; King, B. Kay, Ed.

    This book, containing seven chapters and an epilogue, describes how continuing education--as a structure and a function--can become a unique tool for reorienting major universities toward confronting new societal challenges. "The Coming Wave" (Lerner) discusses relevant organizational theory to explain the special role of continuing education in…

  18. Acoustic wave generation by microwaves and applications to nondestructive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hosten, Bernard; Bacon, Christophe; Guilliorit, Emmanuel

    2002-05-01

    Although acoustic wave generation by electromagnetic waves has been widely studied in the case of laser-generated ultrasounds, the literature on acoustic wave generation by thermal effects due to electromagnetic microwaves is very sparse. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain the phenomenon of microwave generation, i.e. radiation pressure, electrostriction or thermal expansion. Now it is known that the main cause is the thermal expansion due to the microwave absorption. This paper will review the recent advances in the theory and experiments that introduce a new way to generate ultrasonic waves without contact for the purpose of nondestructive evaluation and control. The unidirectional theory based on Maxwell's equations, heat equation and thermoviscoelasticity predicts the generation of acoustic waves at interfaces and inside stratified materials. Acoustic waves are generated by a pulsed electromagnetic wave or a burst at a chosen frequency such that materials can be excited with a broad or narrow frequency range. Experiments show the generation of acoustic waves in water, viscoelastic polymers and composite materials shaped as rod and plates. From the computed and measured accelerations at interfaces, the viscoelastic and electromagnetic properties of materials such as polymers and composites can be evaluated (NDE). Preliminary examples of non-destructive testing applications are presented. PMID:12159977

  19. S-Band Shallow Bulk Acoustic Wave (SBAW) microwave source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Techniques necessary to fabricate a high performance S-band microwave single source using state-of-the-art shallow bulk acoustic wave (SBAW) were explored. The bulk wave structures of the AlN/Al 2O3 were investigated for both the R plane and basal plane of sapphire. A 1.072 GHz SBAW delay line and oscillators were developed. A method of selecting and setting oscillator output frequency by selecting substrate orientation angle was also established.

  20. Magnetostatic wave application to microwave analog signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degasperis, P.; Digregorio, C.; Miccoli, G.; Roveda, R.

    The physical principles underlying the operation of magnetostatic wave (MSW) devices are presented, and developments and applications are outlined. The technique promises direct handling at microwave frequencies (0.5 to 20 GHz) thanks to the control of the propagation of MSW in thin magnetic garnet films grown by liquid phase epitaxy.

  1. 17 THz continuous-wave optical modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. J.; Green, J. T.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2012-01-01

    We use coherently rotating hydrogen molecules and demonstrate a continuous-wave optical modulator at a frequency of 17.6 THz that can modulate any laser within the optical region of the spectrum. The molecules are coherently excited using two intense laser beams spaced by the Raman transition frequency inside a high-finesse cavity.

  2. Wave shadowing and modulation of microwave backscatter from the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, William J.; Farquharson, Gordon

    Shadowing and modulation of microwave backscatter by ocean waves are studied using coherent X-band radars. Two types of shadowing are investigated: geometric shadowing (complete blockage of incident rays) and partial shadowing (polarization-dependent diffraction combined with weak scatterers). We point out that the frequency of occurrence of zero signal-to-noise ratio samples cannot depend on the incident power level or the polarization if geometric shadowing occurs but can if partial shadowing exists. We then compare this behavior with observations, and show that the data do not support the hypothesis that geometric shadowing plays a significant role in low-grazing-angle microwave scattering from the ocean surface. Furthermore, our data indicate that partial shadowing only depends significantly on polarization for the steep waves found near shorelines. We also study the modulation of microwave backscatter by ocean waves using these data by looking at the phase differences between received power and scatterer velocity. These phase differences appear to be rather well explained by standard composite surface theory at VV polarization, having values that are positive looking up wave and negative looking down wave. For HH polarization, however, breaking effects come into play and overshadow composite surface effects of free waves. They cause the phase difference to be near zero for up wave looks and near 180° for down-wave looks. A simple model that involves both breaking and freely propagating waves but does not include any shadowing effects is shown to account for observed phase differences at both polarizations to within about 10°.

  3. Direct observation of negative-index microwave surface waves.

    PubMed

    Dockrey, J A; Horsley, S A R; Hooper, I R; Sambles, J R; Hibbins, A P

    2016-01-01

    Waves propagating in a negative-index material have wave-front propagation (wavevector, k) opposite in direction to that of energy flow (Poynting vector, S). Here we present an experimental realisation at microwave frequencies of an analogous surface wave phenomenon whereby a metasurface supports a surface mode that has two possible wavevector eigenstates within a narrow band of frequencies: one that supports surface waves with positive mode index, and another that supports surface waves with negative mode index. Phase sensitive measurements of the near-field of surface waves across the metasurface show the contrasting spatial evolution of the two eigenstates, providing a unique opportunity to directly observe the negative-index phenomenon. PMID:26903284

  4. Direct observation of negative-index microwave surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dockrey, J. A.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Hooper, I. R.; Sambles, J. R.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2016-02-01

    Waves propagating in a negative-index material have wave-front propagation (wavevector, k) opposite in direction to that of energy flow (Poynting vector, S). Here we present an experimental realisation at microwave frequencies of an analogous surface wave phenomenon whereby a metasurface supports a surface mode that has two possible wavevector eigenstates within a narrow band of frequencies: one that supports surface waves with positive mode index, and another that supports surface waves with negative mode index. Phase sensitive measurements of the near-field of surface waves across the metasurface show the contrasting spatial evolution of the two eigenstates, providing a unique opportunity to directly observe the negative-index phenomenon.

  5. Direct observation of negative-index microwave surface waves

    PubMed Central

    Dockrey, J. A.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Hooper, I. R.; Sambles, J. R.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Waves propagating in a negative-index material have wave-front propagation (wavevector, k) opposite in direction to that of energy flow (Poynting vector, S). Here we present an experimental realisation at microwave frequencies of an analogous surface wave phenomenon whereby a metasurface supports a surface mode that has two possible wavevector eigenstates within a narrow band of frequencies: one that supports surface waves with positive mode index, and another that supports surface waves with negative mode index. Phase sensitive measurements of the near-field of surface waves across the metasurface show the contrasting spatial evolution of the two eigenstates, providing a unique opportunity to directly observe the negative-index phenomenon. PMID:26903284

  6. Excitation of propagating spin waves with global uniform microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Y.; Davison, T.; Ahmad, E.; Keatley, P. S.; Hicken, R. J.; Kruglyak, V. V.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate a magnonic architecture that converts global free-space uniform microwaves into spin waves propagating in a stripe magnonic waveguide. The architecture is based upon dispersion mismatch between the narrow magnonic waveguide and a wide "antenna" patch, both patterned from the same magnetic film. The spin waves injected into the waveguide travel to distances as large as several tens of micrometers. The antennas can be placed at multiple positions on a magnonic chip and used to excite mutually coherent multiple spin waves for magnonic logic operations. This demonstration paves way for "magnonics" to become a pervasive technology for information processing.

  7. Hough transform search for continuous gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Badri; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Sintes, Alicia M.; Schutz, Bernard F.; Frasca, Sergio; Palomba, Cristiano

    2004-10-15

    This paper describes an incoherent method to search for continuous gravitational waves based on the Hough transform, a well-known technique used for detecting patterns in digital images. We apply the Hough transform to detect patterns in the time-frequency plane of the data produced by an earth-based gravitational wave detector. Two different flavors of searches will be considered, depending on the type of input to the Hough transform: either Fourier transforms of the detector data or the output of a coherent matched-filtering type search. We present the technical details for implementing the Hough transform algorithm for both kinds of searches, their statistical properties, and their sensitivities.

  8. Advanced Microwave/Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zuowei; Yang, Lu; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Domier, C. W.; Ito, N.; Kogi, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mase, A.; Park, H.; Sakata, E.; Tsai, W.; Xia, Z. G.; Zhang, P.

    Millimeter wave technology advances have made possible active and passive millimeter wave imaging for a variety of applications including advanced plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, atmospheric radiometry, concealed weapon detection, all-weather aircraft landing, contraband goods detection, harbor navigation/surveillance in fog, highway traffic monitoring in fog, helicopter and automotive collision avoidance in fog, and environmental remote sensing data associated with weather, pollution, soil moisture, oil spill detection, and monitoring of forest fires, to name but a few. The primary focus of this paper is on technology advances which have made possible advanced imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations and microturbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis include frequency selective surfaces, planar Schottky diode mixer arrays, electronically controlled beam shaping/steering arrays, and high power millimeter wave local oscillator and probe sources.

  9. Airborne microwave Doppler measurements of ocean wave directional spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Reeves, A. B.; Uliana, E. A.; Johnson, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is presented for measuring ocean wave directional spectra from aircraft using microwave Doppler radar. The technique involves backscattering coherent microwave radiation from a patch of sea surface which is small compared to dominant ocean wavelengths in the antenna look direction, and large compared to these lengths in the perpendicular (azimuthal) direction. The mean Doppler shift of the return signal measured over short time intervals is proportional to the mean sea surface velocity of the illuminated patch. Variable sea surface velocities induced by wave motion therefore produce time-varying Doppler shifts in the received signal. The large azimuthal dimension of the patch implies that these variations must be produced by surface waves traveling near the horizontal antenna look direction thus allowing determination of the direction of wave travel. Linear wave theory is used to convert the measured velocities into ocean wave spectral densities. Spectra measured simultaneously with this technique and two laser profilometers, and nearly simultaneous with this technique and two laser profilometers, and nearly simultaneous with a surface buoy, are presented. Applications and limitations of this airborne Doppler technique are discussed.

  10. Continuous wave laser for wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Loren

    1991-01-01

    Details of the design and development of a continuous-wave heterodyne carbon dioxide laser which has wind shear detection capabilities are given in viewgraph form. The goal of the development was to investigate the lower cost CW (rather than pulsed) lidar option for look-ahead wind shear detection from aircraft. The device has potential utility for ground based wind shear detection at secondary airports where the high cost of a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar system is not justifiable.

  11. Development, Test, and Evaluation of Microwave Radar Water Level (MWWL) Sensors' Wave Measurement Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, S. K.; Heitsenrether, R.

    2015-12-01

    Waves can have a significant impact on many coastal operations including navigational safety, recreation, and even the economy. Despite this, as of 2009, there were only 181 in situ real-time wave observation networks nationwide (IOOS 2009). There has recently been interest in adding real-time wave measurement systems to already existing NOAA Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) stations. Several steps have already been taken in order to achieve this, such as integrating information from existing wave measurement buoys and initial testing of multiple different wave measurement systems (Heitsenrether et al. 2012). Since wave observations can be derived from high frequency water level changes, we will investigate water level sensors' capability to measure waves. Recently, CO-OPS has been transitioning to new microwave radar water level (MWWL) sensors which have higher resolution and theoretically a greater potential wave measurement capability than the acoustic sensors in stilling wells. In this study, we analyze the wave measurement capability of MWWL sensors at two high energy wave environments, Duck, NC and La Jolla, CA, and compare results to two "reference" sensors (A Nortek acoustic waves and currents profiler (AWAC) at Duck and a single point pressure sensor at La Jolla). A summary of results from the two field test sites will be presented, including comparisons of wave energy spectra, significant wave height, and peak period measured by the test MWWL sensors and both reference AWAC and pressure sensors. In addition, relationships between MWWL versus reference wave sensor differences and specific wave conditions will be discussed. Initial results from spectral analysis and the calculation of bulk wave parameters indicate that MWWL sensors set to the "NoFilter" processing setting can produce wave measurements capability that compare well to the two reference sensors. These results support continued development to enable the

  12. Dirac leaky-wave antennas for continuous beam scanning from photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memarian, Mohammad; Eleftheriades, George V.

    2015-01-01

    Leaky-Wave Antennas (LWAs) enable directive and scannable radiation patterns, which are highly desirable attributes at terahertz, infrared and optical frequencies. However, a LWA is generally incapable of continuous beam scanning through broadside, due to an open stopband in its dispersion characteristic. This issue is yet to be addressed at frequencies beyond microwaves, mainly as existing microwave solutions (for example, transmission line metamaterials) are unavailable at these higher frequencies. Here we report leaky-wave radiation from the interface of a photonic crystal (PC) with a Dirac-type dispersion and air. The resulting Dirac LWA (DLWA) can radiate at broadside, chiefly owing to the closed Γ-point bandgap of the Dirac PC. Thus, the DLWA can continuously scan a directive beam over a wide range of angles by varying the frequency. These DLWAs can be designed at microwave as well as terahertz to optical frequencies, with feasible dimensions and low losses.

  13. Dirac leaky-wave antennas for continuous beam scanning from photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Memarian, Mohammad; Eleftheriades, George V

    2015-01-01

    Leaky-Wave Antennas (LWAs) enable directive and scannable radiation patterns, which are highly desirable attributes at terahertz, infrared and optical frequencies. However, a LWA is generally incapable of continuous beam scanning through broadside, due to an open stopband in its dispersion characteristic. This issue is yet to be addressed at frequencies beyond microwaves, mainly as existing microwave solutions (for example, transmission line metamaterials) are unavailable at these higher frequencies. Here we report leaky-wave radiation from the interface of a photonic crystal (PC) with a Dirac-type dispersion and air. The resulting Dirac LWA (DLWA) can radiate at broadside, chiefly owing to the closed Γ-point bandgap of the Dirac PC. Thus, the DLWA can continuously scan a directive beam over a wide range of angles by varying the frequency. These DLWAs can be designed at microwave as well as terahertz to optical frequencies, with feasible dimensions and low losses. PMID:25556705

  14. Continuous waves probing in dynamic acoustoelastic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Ait Ouarabi, M.; Boubenider, F.

    2016-05-01

    Consolidated granular media display a peculiar nonlinear elastic behavior, which is normally analysed with dynamic ultrasonic testing exploiting the dependence on amplitude of different measurable quantities, such as the resonance frequency shift, the amount of harmonics generation, or the break of the superposition principle. However, dynamic testing allows measuring effects which are averaged over one (or more) cycles of the exciting perturbation. Dynamic acoustoelastic testing has been proposed to overcome this limitation and allow the determination of the real amplitude dependence of the modulus of the material. Here, we propose an implementation of the approach, in which the pulse probing waves are substituted by continuous waves. As a result, instead of measuring a time-of-flight as a function of the pump strain, we study the dependence of the resonance frequency on the strain amplitude, allowing to derive the same conclusions but with an easier to implement procedure.

  15. A continuous-wave THz imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ting-Hang; Huang, Yang-Tung; Wang, Yu-Jiu; Chen, Wei-Zen; Kuo, Chien-Nan; Cheng, Yu-Ting

    2013-08-01

    We develop a continuous wave terehertz (THz) imaging system operating at 288 GHz. This imaging system simply consitutes three parts including the source, two optical lenses, and the detector. The entire size is smaller than the tranditional pulsed THz imaging system. In this developed system, the THz wave is generated by a horn attenna which concentrates the wave in an azimuth angle of 3° ~ 5°. The source originates from a singnal generator, and then the frequency increases to 288 GHz after passing through an 8X multiplier. Next, THz wave is focused by a THz lens on the test sample. By controling the sample position in the x-z plane, we can scan it pixel-by-pixel in which each step along the x- or z- axes is 0.1 mm. After penetrating the test sample, another lens collects the transmitted THz wave and focuses them into the thermal detector. This detector can disply the collected THz power. Finally, by drawing the detected power of each pixel, a transmitted-intensity figure for all pixels is obtained. The resolution of this THz imaging system is about 1~2 mm at present. We have measured human molar tooth and obtained its transmitted figures. Besides, we also develop a technology to adjust the positions of the source and detector by a system containing one laser, one beamsplitter, and two mirrors. The relative positions between the source and detector is very important. The input of the source and the output of the detector are small so that they have to aim at each other very accurately in order to collect maximum transmitted power in the detector.

  16. Wave interactions with continuous fractal layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y.; Jaggard, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Many natural structures possess self-similar multiscales which can be characterized by power law spectra. Under appropriate conditions, knowledge of the strength of these scale sizes provides information on the physical processes which formed these objects. In this paper, we investigate wave interactions with continuous fractal layers which model geological and variegated structures. Since fractal characteristics of the layers are embedded in the scattered field, they can be retrieved under appropriate conditions. This inversion can be performed in either the frequency or the time domain as desired.

  17. Surface wave multipath signals in near-field microwave imaging.

    PubMed

    Meaney, Paul M; Shubitidze, Fridon; Fanning, Margaret W; Kmiec, Maciej; Epstein, Neil R; Paulsen, Keith D

    2012-01-01

    Microwave imaging techniques are prone to signal corruption from unwanted multipath signals. Near-field systems are especially vulnerable because signals can scatter and reflect from structural objects within or on the boundary of the imaging zone. These issues are further exacerbated when surface waves are generated with the potential of propagating along the transmitting and receiving antenna feed lines and other low-loss paths. In this paper, we analyze the contributions of multi-path signals arising from surface wave effects. Specifically, experiments were conducted with a near-field microwave imaging array positioned at variable heights from the floor of a coupling fluid tank. Antenna arrays with different feed line lengths in the fluid were also evaluated. The results show that surface waves corrupt the received signals over the longest transmission distances across the measurement array. However, the surface wave effects can be eliminated provided the feed line lengths are sufficiently long independently of the distance of the transmitting/receiving antenna tips from the imaging tank floor. Theoretical predictions confirm the experimental observations. PMID:22566992

  18. Surface Wave Multipath Signals in Near-Field Microwave Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Meaney, Paul M.; Shubitidze, Fridon; Fanning, Margaret W.; Kmiec, Maciej; Epstein, Neil R.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave imaging techniques are prone to signal corruption from unwanted multipath signals. Near-field systems are especially vulnerable because signals can scatter and reflect from structural objects within or on the boundary of the imaging zone. These issues are further exacerbated when surface waves are generated with the potential of propagating along the transmitting and receiving antenna feed lines and other low-loss paths. In this paper, we analyze the contributions of multi-path signals arising from surface wave effects. Specifically, experiments were conducted with a near-field microwave imaging array positioned at variable heights from the floor of a coupling fluid tank. Antenna arrays with different feed line lengths in the fluid were also evaluated. The results show that surface waves corrupt the received signals over the longest transmission distances across the measurement array. However, the surface wave effects can be eliminated provided the feed line lengths are sufficiently long independently of the distance of the transmitting/receiving antenna tips from the imaging tank floor. Theoretical predictions confirm the experimental observations. PMID:22566992

  19. Supercontinuum generation using continuous-wave pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Lopez, Sonia; Carrasco-Sanz, Ana; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel; Corredera, Pedro; Hernanz, Maria L.

    2005-07-01

    Supercontinuum (SC) generation in optical fibers and waveguides is a phenomenon of increasing interest that has found applications in fields like time-resolved spectroscopy, ultrashort pulse compression, multiwavelength optical sources for WDM and optical frequency metrology. Most of the experiments performed up to now have been accomplished using femtosecond or picosecond-pulsed laser sources and special fibers such as highly-nonlinear photonic crystal fibers. Supercontinuum generation using continuous-wave laser sources was demonstrated only recently, but the initial results demonstrate that high power density (>1 mW/nm), broadband supercontinuums (more than 250 nm) can be achieved with good long-term stability. In this paper we show different experimental setups to produce continuous-wave supercontinuums in optical fibers. We show how the supercontinuum varies depending upon the pump source used in the experiment. We believe that such an incoherent source can have very interesting applications in optical fiber and component characterization, fiber sensing and optical coherence tomography for biomedical applications. As a sample application, we show that this source can be used to measure polarization mode dispersion (PMD) in optical fibers very accurately and with an extremely large dynamic range (>200 km).

  20. Low-pressure sustainment of surface-wave microwave plasma with modified microwave coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, Kensuke; Suzuki, Haruka; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Sustainment of long-scale surface-wave plasma (SWP) at pressures below 1 Pa is investigated for the application of the SWP as an assisting plasma source for roll-to-roll sputter deposition. A modified microwave coupler (MMC) for easier surface-wave propagation is proposed, on the basis of the concept of the power direction alignment of the slot antenna and surface-wave propagation. The superiority of the MMC-SWP over conventional SWPs is shown at a sustainment pressure as low as 0.6 Pa and an electron density as high as 3 × 1017 m-3. A polymer film is treated with the MMC-SWP at a low pressure of 0.6 Pa, and surface modification at a low pressure is proved using Ar plasma. These results show the availability of the MMC-SWP as the surface treatment plasma source that is compatible with sputter deposition in the same processing chamber.

  1. System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave assisted plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    White, Terry L; Paulauskas, Felix L; Bigelow, Timothy S

    2014-03-25

    A method for continuously processing carbon fiber including establishing a microwave plasma in a selected atmosphere contained in an elongated chamber having a microwave power gradient along its length defined by a lower microwave power at one end and a higher microwave power at the opposite end of the elongated chamber. The elongated chamber having an opening in each of the ends of the chamber that are adapted to allow the passage of the fiber tow while limiting incidental gas flow into or out of said chamber. A continuous fiber tow is introduced into the end of the chamber having the lower microwave power. The fiber tow is withdrawn from the opposite end of the chamber having the higher microwave power. The fiber to is subjected to progressively higher microwave energy as the fiber is being traversed through the elongated chamber.

  2. The microwave-to-flow paradigm: translating high-temperature batch microwave chemistry to scalable continuous-flow processes.

    PubMed

    Glasnov, Toma N; Kappe, C Oliver

    2011-10-17

    The popularity of dedicated microwave reactors in many academic and industrial laboratories has produced a plethora of synthetic protocols that are based on this enabling technology. In the majority of examples, transformations that require several hours when performed using conventional heating under reflux conditions reach completion in a few minutes or even seconds in sealed-vessel, autoclave-type, microwave reactors. However, one severe drawback of microwave chemistry is the difficulty in scaling this technology to a production-scale level. This Concept article demonstrates that this limitation can be overcome by translating batch microwave chemistry to scalable continuous-flow processes. For this purpose, conventionally heated micro- or mesofluidic flow devices fitted with a back-pressure regulator are employed, in which the high temperatures and pressures attainable in a sealed-vessel microwave chemistry batch experiment can be mimicked. PMID:21932289

  3. Near Field Imaging at Microwave and Millemeter Wave Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2007-06-03

    Near field imaging at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies is useful for a wide variety of applications including concealed weapon detection, through-wall and inner-wall imaging, ground penetrating radar imaging, radar cross section analysis, and non-destructive evaluation of materials. A variety of novel imaging techniques have been developed for many of these applications at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) . These techniques make use of wideband holographic wavefront reconstruction methods, and have been developed to optimize the image quality and resolution. This paper will summarize several of these techniques and show imaging results for several interesting application areas.

  4. Optimal directed searches for continuous gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Jing; Krishnan, Badri; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Aulbert, Carsten; Fehrmann, Henning

    2016-03-01

    Wide parameter space searches for long-lived continuous gravitational wave signals are computationally limited. It is therefore critically important that the available computational resources are used rationally. In this paper we consider directed searches, i.e., targets for which the sky position is known accurately but the frequency and spin-down parameters are completely unknown. Given a list of such potential astrophysical targets, we therefore need to prioritize. On which target(s) should we spend scarce computing resources? What parameter space region in frequency and spin-down should we search through? Finally, what is the optimal search setup that we should use? In this paper we present a general framework that allows us to solve all three of these problems. This framework is based on maximizing the probability of making a detection subject to a constraint on the maximum available computational cost. We illustrate the method for a simplified problem.

  5. HYDRODECHLORINATION OF CHLORINATED BENZENES IN A CONTINUOUS MICROWAVE REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    An expeditious hydrodechlorination of chlorobenzenes is observed over 0.5% Pd/Al2O3 catalyst by conducting the reaction under microwave irradiation conditions. Even though the loss of active metal surface area is substantial and identical in both microwave ...

  6. CONTINUOUS MICROWAVE REACTORS FOR ORGANIC SYNTHESIS: HYDRODECHLORINATION AND HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave heating has been sought as a convenient way of enhancing chemical processes. The advantages of microwave heating, such as selective direct heating of materials of a catalytic site, minimized fouling on hot surfaces, process simplicity, rapid startup, as well as the poss...

  7. CONTINUOUS FLOW MICROWAVE REACTORS FOR ORGANIC SYNTHESIS: HYDRODECHLORINATION, HETROCYCLIZATION, ISOMERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave heating has been sought as a convenient way of enhancing chemical processes. The advantages of microwave heating, such as selective direct heating of materials of a catalytic site, minimized fouling on hot surfaces, process simplicity, rapid startup, as well as the pos...

  8. Propagating Structure Of A Microwave Driven Shock wave Inside A Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Yutaka; Shibata, Teppei; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-05-06

    The thrust generation process of a microwave rocket is similar to a pulse detonation engine, and understanding the interactions between microwave plasma and shock waves is important. Shadowgraph images of the microwave plasma generated in a tube under atmospheric air were taken. The observed plasma and shock wave were propagating one-dimensionally at constant velocity inside the tube. In order to understand the flow field inside the rocket, one-dimensional CFD analysis was conducted. With the change of microwave power density, the structure of the flow field was classified into two regimes: Microwave Supported Combustion (MSC), and Microwave Supported Detonation (MSD). The structure of the MSD was different from the structure of a chemical detonation, which implied the existence of a preheating in front of the shock wave. Furthermore, the flight performance was estimated by calculating the momentum coupling coefficient. It was confirmed that the efficiency was nearly constant in the MSD regime, with the increase of microwave power density.

  9. Wave propagation in reconfigurable broadband gain metamaterials at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yifeng; Nagarkoti, Deepak S.; Rajab, Khalid Z.; Hao, Yang; Zhang, Hao Chi; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-05-01

    The wave dispersion characteristics for loop array-based metamaterials were analyzed, based on the general transmission line model of a one-dimensional host medium interacting with a chain of coupled loops. By relating the wave propagation constant and the effective parameters of the coupled host medium, we showed that an active medium embedded with non-Foster loaded loop array can be designed to exhibit broadband negative material parameters with positive gain. Accounting for all interactions, the stability of the active medium was investigated, further yielding necessary design specifications for the non-Foster loads. Subsequently, an experimental demonstration was provided to verify the theoretical analysis, showing that stable reconfigurable broadband gain metamaterials at microwave frequencies can be obtained with proper negative impedance converter design.

  10. Fiber optic links for microwave/millimeter-wave systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in device technology for microwave/mm-wave (M/MMW) analog fiber-optic communication systems are surveyed, with discussion of system parameters, design optimization methods, and hardware selection and manufacturing considerations. Particular attention is given to 1-km-link systems operating at 21, 30, and 12 GHz for satellite-communication, electronic-warfare, and radar applications. The design and fabrication simplicity of direct modulation is weighed against the wide bandwidth, low distortion, and mm-wave and frequency operation advantages of external modulation. Homodyne or heterodyne coherent detection is shown to improve system S/N by 10-20 dB over conventional detection methods. Diagrams, drawings, photographs, and graphs of typical performance data are included.

  11. Zonal wave number variance spectra of stratospheric microwave brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Russell L.; Stanford, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Well-known theoretical predictions suggest that variances of large-scale atmospheric fluctuations, for scales somewhat shorter than those of the forcing mechanisms, should obey a power law, k exp -b, where k is the horizontal wave number. The invariance of the exponent b with season, hemisphere, and latitude is tested using satellite-measured brightness temperatures. Global grids of Tiros-N Microwave Sounding Unit channel 4 measurements, which closely approximate the 30- to 150-mbar layer mean temperature, are constructed for January, March, and August 1979. These grids are zonally Fourier-transformed, and the resulting spectra are averaged over four 18 deg-wide latitude bands. Fits of a power law to these spectra over wave numbers 10-36 and 10-26 give values of b which are independent of season, hemisphere, and latitude band, to within statistical uncertainties. The observed values of b are about 3.6, as compared to theoretical predictions of 3.

  12. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Transverse electron-beam waves for microwave electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanke, Vladimir A.

    2005-09-01

    A brief discussion is given of the state of the art, challenges, and prospects in the application of transverse (cyclotron and synchronous) electron-beam waves in microwave electronic devices, including protectors, parametric and electrostatic amplifiers, tunable filters, circularly polarized traveling wave tubes, microwave/DC converters, and combined interaction klystrons.

  13. Imprints of relic gravitational waves in cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, D.; Grishchuk, L. P.; Polnarev, A. G.

    2006-10-01

    A strong variable gravitational field of the very early Universe inevitably generates relic gravitational waves by amplifying their zero-point quantum oscillations. We begin our discussion by contrasting the concepts of relic gravitational waves and inflationary “tensor modes”. We explain and summarize the properties of relic gravitational waves that are needed to derive their effects on cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies. The radiation field is characterized by four invariants I, V, E, B. We reduce the radiative transfer equations to a single integral equation of Voltairre type and solve it analytically and numerically. We formulate the correlation functions CℓXX' for X, X'=T, E, B and derive their amplitudes, shapes and oscillatory features. Although all of our main conclusions are supported by exact numerical calculations, we obtain them, in effect, analytically by developing and using accurate approximations. We show that the TE correlation at lower ℓ’s must be negative (i.e. an anticorrelation), if it is caused by gravitational waves, and positive if it is caused by density perturbations. This difference in TE correlation may be a signature more valuable observationally than the lack or presence of the BB correlation, since the TE signal is about 100 times stronger than the expected BB signal. We discuss the detection by WMAP of the TE anticorrelation at ℓ≈30 and show that such an anticorrelation is possible only in the presence of a significant amount of relic gravitational waves (within the framework of all other common assumptions). We propose models containing considerable amounts of relic gravitational waves that are consistent with the measured TT, TE and EE correlations.

  14. Continuous-wave circular polarization terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jillian P.; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2016-07-01

    Biomedical applications of terahertz (THz) radiation are appealing because THz radiation is nonionizing and has the demonstrated ability to detect intrinsic contrasts between cancerous and normal tissue. A linear polarization-sensitive detection technique for tumor margin delineation has already been demonstrated; however, utilization of a circular polarization-sensitive detection technique has yet to be explored at THz frequencies. A reflective, continuous-wave THz imaging system capable of illuminating a target sample at 584 GHz with either linearly or circularly polarized radiation, and capable of collecting both cross- and copolarized signals remitted from the target, is implemented. To demonstrate the system's utility, a fresh ex vivo human skin tissue specimen containing nonmelanoma skin cancer was imaged. Both polarization-sensitive detection techniques showed contrast between tumor and normal skin tissue, although some differences in images were observed between the two techniques. Our results indicate that further investigation is required to explain the contrast mechanism, as well as to quantify the specificity and sensitivity of the circular polarization-sensitive detection technique.

  15. Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

  16. Measurement of optical-beat frequency in a photoconductive terahertz-wave generator using microwave higher harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murasawa, Kengo; Sato, Koki; Hidaka, Takehiko

    2011-05-01

    A new method for measuring optical-beat frequencies in the terahertz (THz) region using microwave higher harmonics is presented. A microwave signal was applied to the antenna gap of a photoconductive (PC) device emitting a continuous electromagnetic wave at about 1 THz by the photomixing technique. The microwave higher harmonics with THz frequencies are generated in the PC device owing to the nonlinearity of the biased photoconductance, which is briefly described in this article. Thirteen nearly periodic peaks in the photocurrent were observed when the microwave was swept from 16 to 20 GHz at a power of -48 dBm. The nearly periodic peaks are generated by the homodyne detection of the optical beat with the microwave higher harmonics when the frequency of the harmonics coincides with the optical-beat frequency. Each peak frequency and its peak width were determined by fitting a Gaussian function, and the order of microwave harmonics was determined using a coarse (i.e., lower resolution) measurement of the optical-beat frequency. By applying the Kalman algorithm to the peak frequencies of the higher harmonics and their standard deviations, the optical-beat frequency near 1 THz was estimated to be 1029.81 GHz with the standard deviation of 0.82 GHz. The proposed method is applicable to a conventional THz-wave generator with a photomixer.

  17. FETAL AND MATERNAL EFFECTS OF CONTINUAL EXPOSURE OF RATS TO 970-MHZ CIRCULARLY-POLARIZED MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Virtually continual exposure to 970-MHz microwaves in circularly-polarized waveguides was used to elicit fetal responses in Sprague-Dawley rats during gestation. wo hundred fifty rats were exposed to microwave radiation at whole-body averaged specific absorption rates (SAR) of 0....

  18. Improvement of heating uniformity in packaged acidified vegetables pasteurized with a 915 MHz continuous microwave system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous microwave processing to produce shelf-stable acidified vegetables with moderate to high salt contents poses challenges in pasteurization due to reduced microwave penetration depths and non-uniform heating. Cups of sweetpotato, red bell pepper, and broccoli acidified to pH 3.8 with citric...

  19. Continuous flow microwave-assisted processing and aseptic packaging of purple-fleshed sweetpotato purees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pumpable purees from purple-flesh sweetpotatoes (PFSP) were subjected to microwave heating using a 915 MHz continuous flow system, followed by aseptic packaging in flexible containers to obtain a shelf-stable product. Initial test runs were conducted using a 5 kW microwave unit to measure dielectr...

  20. Microwave and millimeter-wave systems for wall penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, David D., Jr.; Currie, Nicholas C.

    1998-07-01

    The need for through-the-wall surveillance sensors has existed for many years. Recent advances in microwave and millimeter-wave (MMW) technologies provide new applications for law enforcement use. These applications include the potential to conduct surveillance through walls and the ability to detect the presence of living persons behind doors or other barriers. Covert surveillance and personnel detection are of high interest to both the Department of Defense in support of Small Unit Operations and the Justice Department for civilian law enforcement applications. Microwave sensors are under development that can detect the presence of persons (and even weapons) behind walls and track moving persons behind walls. MMW sensors are under development which can provide pseudo-images of persons behind the walls including radiometric sensors at 95 GHz, active 95 GHz real aperture radars, and heartbeat detection radars. Radiometric sensors include 2D FPA systems, 1D FPA, scanned systems, and single element scanned sensors. Active FPA radars include illuminated radiometric systems and coherent radar systems. Real aperture MMW radar systems include raster scanned and non-scanned (hand-held) sensors.

  1. Millimeter-wave Driven Shock Wave for a Pulsed Detonation Microwave Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komatsu, Reiji; Fukunari, Masafumi; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2011-11-01

    A shock wave driven by millimeter wave ionization can be applied into a pulsed detonation engine as a Microwave Rocket. A high pressure induced inside the thruster generates the thrust, thus the shock wave propagation driven by the plasma is important. In this study, to obtain a different propagating structure, the beam profile was transformed from a Gaussian into a Ring and a Flat-top profile by using a pair of phase correcting mirrors. As a result, the shape of the propagating plasma was changed into a no-center shape in case of the Ring beam, and it was changed to a wider shape in case of the Flat-top beam. The propagating velocity of the ionization front of the Flat-top beam was much lower than that of the Gaussian due to the lower peak power density, and a higher plateau pressure and higher thrust impulse were generated by the Flat-top beam.

  2. Microwave/mm wave magnetics and MMIC compatibility (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J. D.

    1987-04-01

    Ferrite devices can be loosely classified into three different categories, namely: control components using polycrystalline ferrites, tunable filters and oscillators using YIG spheres, and devices based on epitaxial YIG or ferrite films. Ferrite control components such as circulators, isolators, and switches are used in almost all microwave and millimeter wave systems. Tunable YIG sphere devices see more limited use in radar and EW systems, and microwave test equipment while epitaxial YIG devices have yet to make a significant systems impact. GaAs chips for phased array modules are under development by several companies for both radar and EW applications. The GaAs chips can contain small signal and power gain, phase shifters, filters, mixers, and switches. The modules are usually designed, however, with discrete circulators or isolators which are often significantly larger than the MMIC chips. Further reduction in module size and cost will require the design of the module without nonreciprocal components, or the development of ferrite devices which are more compatible with the size, bandwidth, and fabrication of the GaAs device. Integration of nonreciprocal ferrite components on the GaAs chip could have a large impact but presents a significant challenge both in terms of processing compatibility between the ferrite and the GaAs and in terms of cost. The impact in the areas of tunable YIG filters and oscillators and MSW devices are smaller but, fortunately, so are the difficulties. Here the YIG films or spheres, or hexagonal ferrite films can be laid on the GaAs substrate thus forming a hybrid device. Having integrated the ferrite with the GaAs it is necessary to consider the magnetic bias field requirement. Bias fields are not required in latching devices and can be minimized in other devices by use of hexagonal ferrite films with their large anisotropy fields. It may even be possible to integrate a permanent magnet film onto the GaAs chip.

  3. 77 FR 1017 - Export and Reexport License Requirements for Certain Microwave and Millimeter Wave Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ...This rule imposes a license requirement on exports and reexports to all destinations other than Canada of two types of microwave and millimeter wave electronic components. The two components are packaged high electron mobility transistors and packaged microwave ``monolithic integrated circuits'' power amplifiers that meet certain criteria with respect to frequency range, size and output power.......

  4. Continuous Time Series of Water Vapor Profiles from a Combination of Raman Lidar and Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foth, Andreas; Baars, Holger; Di Girolamo, Paolo; Pospichal, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a method to retrieve continuous water vapor profiles from a combination of a Raman lidar and a microwave radiometer. The integrated water vapor from the microwave radiometer is used to calibrate the Raman lidar operationally resulting in small biases compared to radiosondes. The height limitations for Raman lidars (cloud base and daylight contamination) can be well compensated by the application of a two-step algorithm combining the Raman lidars mass mixing ratio and the microwave radiometers brightness temperatures.

  5. Electrically controlling single-spin qubits in a continuous microwave field

    PubMed Central

    Laucht, Arne; Muhonen, Juha T.; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Kalra, Rachpon; Dehollain, Juan P.; Freer, Solomon; Hudson, Fay E.; Veldhorst, Menno; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Itoh, Kohei M.; Jamieson, David N.; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Morello, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale quantum computers must be built upon quantum bits that are both highly coherent and locally controllable. We demonstrate the quantum control of the electron and the nuclear spin of a single 31P atom in silicon, using a continuous microwave magnetic field together with nanoscale electrostatic gates. The qubits are tuned into resonance with the microwave field by a local change in electric field, which induces a Stark shift of the qubit energies. This method, known as A-gate control, preserves the excellent coherence times and gate fidelities of isolated spins, and can be extended to arbitrarily many qubits without requiring multiple microwave sources. PMID:26601166

  6. Electrically controlling single-spin qubits in a continuous microwave field.

    PubMed

    Laucht, Arne; Muhonen, Juha T; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A; Kalra, Rachpon; Dehollain, Juan P; Freer, Solomon; Hudson, Fay E; Veldhorst, Menno; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Itoh, Kohei M; Jamieson, David N; McCallum, Jeffrey C; Dzurak, Andrew S; Morello, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale quantum computers must be built upon quantum bits that are both highly coherent and locally controllable. We demonstrate the quantum control of the electron and the nuclear spin of a single (31)P atom in silicon, using a continuous microwave magnetic field together with nanoscale electrostatic gates. The qubits are tuned into resonance with the microwave field by a local change in electric field, which induces a Stark shift of the qubit energies. This method, known as A-gate control, preserves the excellent coherence times and gate fidelities of isolated spins, and can be extended to arbitrarily many qubits without requiring multiple microwave sources. PMID:26601166

  7. New cosmic microwave background constraint to primordial gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tristan L; Pierpaoli, Elena; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2006-07-14

    Primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with frequencies > or approximately equal to 10(-15) Hz contribute to the radiation density of the Universe at the time of decoupling of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This affects the CMB and matter power spectra in a manner identical to massless neutrinos, unless the initial density perturbation for the GWs is nonadiabatic, as may occur if such GWs are produced during inflation or some post-inflation phase transition. In either case, current observations provide a constraint to the GW amplitude that competes with that from big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), although it extends to much lower frequencies (approximately 10(-15) Hz rather than the approximately 10(-10) Hz from BBN): at 95% confidence level, omega(gw)h(2)

  8. Continuous-wave terahertz imaging of nonmelanoma skin cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Cecil Sudhir

    Continuous wave terahertz imaging has the potential to offer a safe, non-invasive medical imaging modality for detecting different types of human skin cancers. Terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) has already shown that there is contrast between basal cell carcinoma and normal skin. Continuous-wave imaging offers a simpler, lower cost alternative to terahertz pulse imaging. This project aims to isolate the optimal contrast frequency for a continuous wave terahertz imaging system and demonstrate transmission based, in-vitro , imaging of thin sections of non-melanoma skin cancers and correlate the images to sample histology. The aim of this project is to conduct a proof-of-principle experiment that establishes whether continuous-wave terahertz imaging can detect differences between cancerous and normal tissue while outlining the basic requirements for building a system capable of performing in vivo tests.

  9. System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave assisted plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L [Knoxville, TN; Paulauskas, Felix L [Knoxville, TN; Bigelow, Timothy S [Knoxville, TN

    2010-11-02

    A system to continuously produce fully carbonized or graphitized carbon fibers using microwave-assisted plasma (MAP) processing comprises an elongated chamber in which a microwave plasma is excited in a selected gas atmosphere. Fiber is drawn continuously through the chamber, entering and exiting through openings designed to minimize in-leakage of air. There is a gradient of microwave power within the chamber with generally higher power near where the fiber exits and lower power near where the fiber enters. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN), pitch, or any other suitable organic/polymeric precursor fibers can be used as a feedstock for the inventive system. Oxidized or partially oxidized PAN or pitch or other polymeric fiber precursors are run continuously through a MAP reactor in an inert, non-oxidizing atmosphere to heat the fibers, drive off the unwanted elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen, and produce carbon or graphite fibers faster than conventionally produced carbon fibers.

  10. Continuous wave Praseodymium solid-state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Guenter; Richter, André; Heumann, Ernst

    2007-02-01

    We review spectroscopic properties, basic laser parameters, and efficient lasing of Pr-doped fluoride materials. Continuous output powers up to 600 mW in the visible spectral range as well as intracavity frequency doubling to the UV spectral region under semiconductor laser pumping is reported. We achieved powers of 600 mW in the visible spectral region and 360 mW of UV radiation corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 61% with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 22%.

  11. The application of wave field continuation for seismic refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lijun; Feng, Rui; Huang, Zhiming

    1992-02-01

    Based on wave equation a fundamental formula for plane wave propagaton is derived, the theoretical method of inverting wave volocity structure of earth interior through the observational wave field is discussed in this paper. The observational wave field can be decomposed into the surface plane wave field by using τ - p transform. The maximum amplitude curve in the plane wave field can show stably the change tendency of wave velocity with depth in the Earth. This property can be used to restrict the solution space. By using the wave field continuation method more useful information from the observational wave field can be extracted and the inverion solution not only can be obtained simply and quickly, but also is stable and less influenced by the subjective factor. The wave field continuation is a fine inversion method. Theoretical analysis and numerical modelling are carried out in the study of wave field continuation. By applying homomorphic decovolution the signal — to — noese ratio is improved. Finaly a sonar refraction profile in the northern part of the South China Sea is interpreted and computed. It is found as a result that there is a velocity interface from 1.76 km/s to 2.21 km/s at the depth of 1.4 km. The velocity gradients in the upper and lower layers are 0.54 km · s-1/km and 0.63 km · s-1/km respectively. A discussion of the characteristics of shallow sea structure in the view of tectonic movements is geven.

  12. Hydrodynamic and thermal effects of continuous microwave-sustained plasma in capillary tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dap, S.; Leroy, O.; Andrieu, J.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Stancu, G. D.; Minea, T.

    2015-12-01

    Argon micro-plasmas can be generated at low power (10-100 W) in hollow-core capillaries 100-700 μm in diameter and over a few cm in length using continuous wave (CW) microwave surfatron excitation at 2.45 GHz. Electromagnetic simulations have been performed in order to design the surfatron cavity for optimal discharge ignition and stable plasma CW operation. The plasma characterization was carried out by optical emission spectroscopy on excited species present as impurities in argon. The rotational spectra of OH molecules were used to determine the gas temperature, and Stark broadening of the H β line was used to obtain the electron density. The gas temperature turns out to be in the 500-1200 K range along the plasma column, and the maximum electron density (at the surfatron gap) in the 8  ×  1014-5  ×  1015 cm-3 range. The electron density was also obtained by a semi-empirical analysis of the power coupled to the plasma along the axial direction and was found to be in good agreement with the Stark measurements. The hydrodynamic and thermal effects of plasma were investigated by the modelling of neutral gas flow and heat transfer which is of interest for the remote control of gas flow properties along the capillary.

  13. Directed search for continuous gravitational waves from the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S. H.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Bessis, D.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bowers, J.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brannen, C. A.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Deleeuw, E.; Deléglise, S.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Dmitry, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, E.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B.; Hall, E.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Horrom, T.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hua, Z.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Iafrate, J.; Ingram, D. R.

    2013-11-01

    We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO’s fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semicoherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first-order spindown values down to -7.86×10-8Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. The 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic center are ˜3.35×10-25 for frequencies near 150 Hz. These upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

  14. Influence of voltage rise time on microwave generation in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Sun, Jun; Teng, Yan; Deng, Yuqun; Shi, Yanchao; Chen, Changhua

    2015-10-01

    In relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWOs), although the slow wave structure (SWS) and electron beam determine the main characteristics of beam-wave interaction, many other factors can also significantly affect the microwave generation process. This paper investigates the influence of voltage rise time on beam-wave interaction in RBWOs. Preliminary analysis and PIC simulations demonstrate if the voltage rise time is moderately long, the microwave frequency will gradually increase during the startup process until the voltage reaches its amplitude, which can be explained by the dispersion relation. However, if the voltage rise time is long enough, the longitudinal resonance of the finitely-long SWS will force the RBWO to work with unwanted longitudinal modes for a while and then gradually hop to the wanted longitudinal mode, and this will lead to an impure microwave frequency spectrum. Besides, a longer voltage rise time will delay the startup process and thus lead to a longer microwave saturation time. And if unwanted longitudinal modes are excited due to long voltage rise time, the microwave saturation time will be further lengthened. Therefore, the voltage rise time of accelerators adopted in high power microwave technology should not be too long in case unwanted longitudinal modes are excited.

  15. Influence of voltage rise time on microwave generation in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Yuqun; Sun, Jun; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Chen, Changhua

    2015-10-15

    In relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWOs), although the slow wave structure (SWS) and electron beam determine the main characteristics of beam-wave interaction, many other factors can also significantly affect the microwave generation process. This paper investigates the influence of voltage rise time on beam-wave interaction in RBWOs. Preliminary analysis and PIC simulations demonstrate if the voltage rise time is moderately long, the microwave frequency will gradually increase during the startup process until the voltage reaches its amplitude, which can be explained by the dispersion relation. However, if the voltage rise time is long enough, the longitudinal resonance of the finitely-long SWS will force the RBWO to work with unwanted longitudinal modes for a while and then gradually hop to the wanted longitudinal mode, and this will lead to an impure microwave frequency spectrum. Besides, a longer voltage rise time will delay the startup process and thus lead to a longer microwave saturation time. And if unwanted longitudinal modes are excited due to long voltage rise time, the microwave saturation time will be further lengthened. Therefore, the voltage rise time of accelerators adopted in high power microwave technology should not be too long in case unwanted longitudinal modes are excited.

  16. Plasma filamentation and shock wave enhancement in microwave rockets by combining low-frequency microwaves with external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    A filamentary plasma is reproduced based on a fully kinetic model of electron and ion transports coupled with electromagnetic wave propagation. The discharge plasma transits from discrete to diffusive patterns at a 110-GHz breakdown, with decrease in the ambient pressure, because of the rapid electron diffusion that occurs during an increase in the propagation speed of the ionization front. A discrete plasma is obtained at low pressures when a low-frequency microwave is irradiated because the ionization process becomes more dominant than the electron diffusion, when the electrons are effectively heated by the low-frequency microwave. The propagation speed of the plasma increases with decrease in the incident microwave frequency because of the higher ionization frequency and faster plasma diffusion resulting from the increase in the energy-absorption rate. An external magnetic field is applied to the breakdown volume, which induces plasma filamentation at lower pressures because the electron diffusion is suppressed by the magnetic field. The thrust performance of a microwave rocket is improved by the magnetic fields corresponding to the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) and its higher-harmonic heating, because slower propagation of the ionization front and larger energy-absorption rates are obtained at lower pressures. It would be advantageous if the fundamental mode of ECR heating is coupled with a lower frequency microwave instead of combining the higher-harmonic ECR heating with the higher frequency microwave. This can improve the thrust performance with smaller magnetic fields even if the propagation speed increases because of the decrease in the incident microwave frequency.

  17. Theoretical and experimental investigations of collective microwave phenomena in solids. [generating microwave shear waves, gunn effect, and gunn oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kino, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    Methods of generating microwave shear waves efficiently were studied. A new technique of mode conversion from a longitudinal wave to a shear wave was investigated and virtually 100% conversion efficiency could be obtained. Several aspects of Gunn oscillators were studied. One involved the detailed study of domains in Gunn oscillators using long samples of bulk gallium arsenide. Several new techniques were devised for measuring the properties of the domains. A fundamental theory of the efficiency of a Gunn oscillator was worked out. A computer program was devised to study the transient effect of domains passing through Gunn diodes. Some of the first planar epitaxial Gunn oscillators were made using liquid epitaxial material grown by liquid phase techniques on semi-insulating substrate. A new theory which predicted the properties of RF signals propagating in a thin film layer of GaAs was developed. The theory of the operation of a traveling wave amplifier is described.

  18. Traveling-Wave Tube Cold-Test Circuit Optimization Using CST MICROWAVE STUDIO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Christine T.; Kory, Carol L.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The internal optimizer of CST MICROWAVE STUDIO (MWS) was used along with an application-specific Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) script to develop a method to optimize traveling-wave tube (TWT) cold-test circuit performance. The optimization procedure allows simultaneous optimization of circuit specifications including on-axis interaction impedance, bandwidth or geometric limitations. The application of Microwave Studio to TWT cold-test circuit optimization is described.

  19. Quality evaluation of packaged acidified vegetables subjected to continuous microwave pasteurization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study evaluated the use of 915 MHz continuous microwave processing with a rotation apparatus for pasteurization of acidified vegetable packages. Broccoli florets, and 1.2 cm cubes of broccoli stems, red bell pepper, and sweetpotato were pre-equilibrated to 1 g/100 g NaCl and 0.38 g/100 mL citric...

  20. Effects of continuous and pulsed chronic microwave exposure on rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chung-Kwang; Guy, Arthur W.; McDougall, John A.; Han, Lock-Fong

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen young adult New Zealand rabbits (nine males, nine females) were equally divided into three groups. One group was exposed to CW 2450-MHz fields at an incident power density of 1.5 mW/cm2 for 2 hours daily for 3 months. Another group was exposed to pulsed fields with pulses of 10 μ s duration occurring 100 times per second. The third group was sham exposed. Each rabbit was placed in a Plexiglas cage and exposed in a miniature plane wave exposure chamber. An S band horn was mounted 1 m above the animal. Thermographic data showed a peak specific absorption rate of 1.64 W/kg in the head and 2.1 W/kg in the back. Body weights were measured every other day. Electroencephalogram and evoked potentials were recorded weekly via implanted carbon-loaded Teflon electrodes. Blood samples were taken monthly for hematological, chemical, and morphological studies. Eyes were examined for cataract formation. Before the animals were sacrificed, apomorphine-induced behavioral excitation and hyperthermia were studied. Finally, pathological examinations on many tissues and organs were performed. Statistically, there were no significant differences in measured parameters observed between the exposed and sham animals.

  1. Continuous-wave light modulation at molecular frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J. T.; Weber, J. J.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2010-07-15

    By using continuous-wave (CW)-stimulated Raman scattering inside a high-finesse cavity, we generate three CW spectral components covering about one octave of optical bandwidth. We investigate the mutual coherence of these three beams by studying phase-dependent second harmonic generation. From the high contrast of the observed interference fringes, we infer very good phase coherence across the spectrum and thereby infer the synthesis of a near single-cycle optical wave form.

  2. Characteristics of surface-wave and volume-wave plasmas produced with internally mounted large-area planar microwave launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Nagatsu, Masaaki; Naito, Katsutoshi; Ogino, Akihisa; Ninomiya, Keigo; Nanko, Shohei

    2005-10-17

    We studied discharge characteristics of microwave plasmas excited with a large-area planar microwave launcher installed internally in a 600-mm-diam cylindrical vacuum chamber. With the microwave power less than roughly 400 W, we demonstrated the large volumetric volume-wave plasma (VWP) spread in the entire chamber at a pressure of 14-27 Pa in He. Above 400 W, the plasma discharge made a sudden transition to higher-density, uniform surface-wave plasma (SWP) having a spatial uniformity of {+-}3.5% over 300 mm in diameter. Electron energy probability functions in the downstream region were studied using Langmuir probe measurements with Druyvesteyn method in both the SWP and VWP discharges.

  3. Continuous-terahertz-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Wang, Ruixue; Zuo, Shasha; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Molecular imaging techniques are becoming increasingly important in biomedical research and potentially in clinical practice. We present a continuous-terahertz (THz)-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications, in which an infrared (IR) laser is integrated into a 0.2-THz reflection-mode continuous-THz-wave imaging system to induce surface plasmon polaritons on the nanoparticles and further improve the intensity of the reflected signal from the water around the nanoparticles. A strong and rapid increment of the reflected THz signal in the nanoparticle solution upon the IR laser irradiation is demonstrated, using either gold or silver nanoparticles. This low-cost, simple, and stable continuous-THz-wave molecular imaging system is suitable for miniaturization and practical imaging applications; in particular, it shows great promise for cancer diagnosis and nanoparticle drug-delivery monitoring.

  4. Continuous Dependence on the Density for Stratified Steady Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Walsh, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    There are two distinct regimes commonly used to model traveling waves in stratified water: continuous stratification, where the density is smooth throughout the fluid, and layer-wise continuous stratification, where the fluid consists of multiple immiscible strata. The former is the more physically accurate description, but the latter is frequently more amenable to analysis and computation. By the conservation of mass, the density is constant along the streamlines of the flow; the stratification can therefore be specified by prescribing the value of the density on each streamline. We call this the streamline density function. Our main result states that, for every smoothly stratified periodic traveling wave in a certain small-amplitude regime, there is an L ∞ neighborhood of its streamline density function such that, for any piecewise smooth streamline density function in that neighborhood, there is a corresponding traveling wave solution. Moreover, the mapping from streamline density function to wave is Lipschitz continuous in a certain function space framework. As this neighborhood includes piecewise smooth densities with arbitrarily many jump discontinues, this theorem provides a rigorous justification for the ubiquitous practice of approximating a smoothly stratified wave by a layered one. We also discuss some applications of this result to the study of the qualitative features of such waves.

  5. Modular Low-Heater-Power Cathode/Electron Gun Assembly for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Traveling Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2000-01-01

    A low-cost, low-mass, electrically efficient, modular cathode/electron gun assembly has been developed by FDE Inc. of Beaverton, Oregon, under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. This new assembly offers significant improvements in the design and manufacture of microwave and millimeter wave traveling-wave tubes (TWT's) used for radar and communications. It incorporates a novel, low-heater-power, reduced size and mass, high-performance barium dispenser type thermionic cathode and provides for easy integration of the cathode into a large variety of conventional TWT circuits. Among the applications are TWT's for Earth-orbiting communication satellites and for deep space communications, where future missions will require smaller spacecraft, higher data transfer rates (higher frequencies and radiofrequency output power), and greater electrical efficiency. A particularly important TWT application is in the microwave power module (a hybrid microwave/millimeter wave amplifier consisting of a low-noise solid-state driver, a small TWT, and an electronic power conditioner integrated into a single compact package), where electrical efficiency and thermal loading are critical factors and lower cost is needed for successful commercialization. The design and fabrication are based on practices used in producing cathode ray tubes (CRT's), which is one of the most competitive and efficient manufacturing operations in the world today. The approach used in the design and manufacture of thermionic cathodes and electron guns for CRT's has been optimized for fully automated production, standardization of parts, and minimization of costs. It is applicable to the production of similar components for microwave tubes, with the additional benefits of low mass and significantly lower cathode heater power (less than half that of dispenser cathodes presently used in TWT s). Modular cathode/electron gun assembly. The modular

  6. Dressed-state engineering for continuous detection of itinerant microwave photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshino, Kazuki; Lin, Zhirong; Inomata, Kunihiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2016-02-01

    We propose a scheme for continuous detection of itinerant microwave photons in circuit quantum electrodynamics. In the proposed device, a superconducting qubit is coupled dispersively to two resonators: one is used to form an impedance-matched Λ system that deterministically captures incoming photons, and the other is used for continuous monitoring of the event. The present scheme enables efficient photon detection: for realistic system parameters, the detection efficiency reaches 0.9 with a bandwidth of about 10 MHz.

  7. An adjustable RF tuning element for microwave, millimeter wave, and submillimeter wave integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubecke, Victor M.; Mcgrath, William R.; Rutledge, David B.

    1991-01-01

    Planar RF circuits are used in a wide range of applications from 1 GHz to 300 GHz, including radar, communications, commercial RF test instruments, and remote sensing radiometers. These circuits, however, provide only fixed tuning elements. This lack of adjustability puts severe demands on circuit design procedures and materials parameters. We have developed a novel tuning element which can be incorporated into the design of a planar circuit in order to allow active, post-fabrication tuning by varying the electrical length of a coplanar strip transmission line. It consists of a series of thin plates which can slide in unison along the transmission line, and the size and spacing of the plates are designed to provide a large reflection of RF power over a useful frequency bandwidth. Tests of this structure at 1 GHz to 3 Ghz showed that it produced a reflection coefficient greater than 0.90 over a 20 percent bandwidth. A 2 GHz circuit incorporating this tuning element was also tested to demonstrate practical tuning ranges. This structure can be fabricated for frequencies as high as 1000 GHz using existing micromachining techniques. Many commercial applications can benefit from this micromechanical RF tuning element, as it will aid in extending microwave integrated circuit technology into the high millimeter wave and submillimeter wave bands by easing constraints on circuit technology.

  8. Overcoming issues associated with the scale-up of a continuous flow microwave system for aseptic processing of vegetable purees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous flow microwave heating is a promising alternative to conventional heating for aseptic processing of low-acid vegetable purees. However, non-uniform temperature distribution and control of processing parameters are the major hurdles in the implementation of continuous flow microwave heatin...

  9. Fluorescence excitation by enhanced plasmon upconversion under continuous wave illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasgin, Mehmet Emre; Salakhutdinov, Ildar; Kendziora, Dania; Abak, Musa Kurtulus; Turkpence, Deniz; Piantanida, Luca; Fruk, Ljiljana; Lazzarino, Marco; Bek, Alpan

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate effective background-free continuous wave nonlinear optical excitation of molecules that are sandwiched between asymmetrically constructed plasmonic gold nanoparticle clusters. We observe that near infrared photons are converted to visible photons through efficient plasmonic second harmonic generation. Our theoretical model and simulations demonstrate that Fano resonances may be responsible for being able to observe nonlinear conversion using a continuous wave light source. We show that nonlinearity enhancement of plasmonic nanostructures via coupled quantum mechanical oscillators such as molecules can be several orders larger as compared to their classical counterparts.

  10. Elements of a continuous-wave borehole radar. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Caffey, T.W.H.

    1997-08-01

    The theory is developed for the antenna array for a proposed continuous-wave, ground-penetrating radar for use in a borehole, and field measurements are presented. Accomplishments include the underground measurement of the transmitting beam in the azimuth plane, active azimuth-steering of the transmitting beam, and the development of a range-to-target algorithm. The excellent performance of the antenna array supports the concept of a continuous-wave borehole radar. A field-prototype should be developed for use in both geothermal zones and for the exploration and recovery of oil and gas.

  11. Continuous-wave lasing between Landau levels in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongrui; Tokman, Mikhail; Belyanin, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    We predict the general feasibility and demonstrate the design of the continuous-wave terahertz laser operating between Landau levels in graphene placed on a polar substrate in a magnetic field of order 1 T. Steady-state population inversion under a continuous-wave optical pumping becomes possible due to surface-phonon-mediated relaxation of carriers. The scheme is scalable to other materials with massless Dirac fermions, for example, surface states in three-dimensional topological insulators such as Bi2Se3 or Bi2Te3 .

  12. Development of continuous microwave-assisted protein digestion with immobilized enzyme.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengyi; Li, Yongle; Lin, Shuhai; Wei, Meiping; Du, Fuyou; Ruan, Guihua

    2014-03-01

    In this study, an easy and efficiency protein digestion method called continuous microwave-assisted protein digestion (cMAED) with immobilized enzyme was developed and applied for proteome analysis by LC-MS(n). Continuous microwave power outputting was specially designed and applied. Trypsin and bromelain were immobilized onto magnetic micropheres. To evaluate the method of cMAED, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and protein extracted from ginkgo nuts were used as model and real protein sample to verify the digestion efficiency of cMAED. Several conditions including continuous microwave power, the ratio of immobilized trypsin/BSA were optimized according to the analysis of peptide fragments by Tricine SDS-PAGE and LC-MS(n). Subsequently, the ginkgo protein was digested with the protocols of cMAED, MAED and conventional heating enzymatic digestion (HED) respectively and the LC-MS(n) profiles of the hydrolysate was compared. Results showed that cMAED combined with immobilized enzyme was a fast and efficient digestion method for protein digestion and microwave power tentatively affected the peptide producing. The cMAED method will be expanded for large-scale preparation of bioactive peptides and peptide analysis in biological and clinical research. PMID:24530398

  13. Highly tunable microwave and millimeter wave filtering using photonic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seregelyi, Joe; Lu, Ping; Paquet, Stéphane; Celo, Dritan; Mihailov, Stephen J.

    2015-05-01

    The design for a photonic microwave filter tunable in both bandwidth and operating frequency is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The circuit is based on a single sideband modulator used in conjunction with two or more transmission fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) cascaded in series. It is demonstrated that the optical filtering characteristics of the FBGs are instrumental in defining the shape of the microwave filter, and the numerical modeling was used to optimize these characteristics. A multiphase-shift transmission FBG design is used to increase the dynamic range of the filter, control the filter ripple, and maximize the slope of the filter skirts. Initial measurements confirmed the design theory and demonstrated a working microwave filter with a bandwidth tunable from approximately 2 to 3.5 GHz and an 18 GHz operating frequency tuning range. Further work is required to refine the FBG manufacturing process and reduce the impact of fabrication errors.

  14. Experimental data in support of continuous microwave effect on emulsion polymerization of styrene.

    PubMed

    Ergan, Başak Temur; Bayramoğlu, Mahmut; Özcan, Seval

    2015-09-01

    This article contains original experimental data, figures and methods to the study of Microwave-assisted emulsion polymerization of styrene under the frame of "Enhanced Microwave Synthesis" (EMS), has been examined to investigate the advantages of Microwave (MW) power use in emulsion polymerization (Ergan et al., Eur. Polym. J. 69, 2015, 374-384). For comparative purpose, MW and conventional heating (CH) method experiments were conducted under similar conditions. By externally cooling the reaction vessel with 1,4-dioxane, constant and continuous MW power was successfully applied at isothermal condition during the polymerization. Here we give the MW power calibration data of MW-experimental system, the complete set of the experimental polymerization data and the analysis data obtained from different polymer characterization test devices (GPC, DSC and Viscometer). PMID:26306319

  15. Ultrabright continuously tunable terahertz-wave generation at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shin'ichiro; Nawata, Kouji; Taira, Takunori; Shikata, Jun-ichi; Kawase, Kodo; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    The hottest frequency region in terms of research currently lies in the ‘frequency gap' region between microwaves and infrared: terahertz waves. Although new methods for generating terahertz radiation have been developed, most sources cannot generate high-brightness terahertz beams. Here we demonstrate the generation of ultrabright terahertz waves (brightness ~0.2 GW/sr·cm2, brightness temperature of ~1018 K, peak power of >50 kW) using parametric wavelength conversion in a nonlinear crystal; this is brighter than many specialized sources such as far-infrared free-electron lasers (~1016 K, ~2 kW). We revealed novel parametric wavelength conversion using stimulated Raman scattering in LiNbO3 without stimulated Brillouin scattering using recently-developed microchip laser. Furthermore, nonlinear up-conversion techniques allow the intense terahertz waves to be visualized and their frequency determined. These results are very promising for extending applied research into the terahertz region, and we expect that this source will open up new research fields such as nonlinear optics in the terahertz region. PMID:24898269

  16. Ultrabright continuously tunable terahertz-wave generation at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shin'ichiro; Nawata, Kouji; Taira, Takunori; Shikata, Jun-ichi; Kawase, Kodo; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    The hottest frequency region in terms of research currently lies in the 'frequency gap' region between microwaves and infrared: terahertz waves. Although new methods for generating terahertz radiation have been developed, most sources cannot generate high-brightness terahertz beams. Here we demonstrate the generation of ultrabright terahertz waves (brightness ~0.2 GW/sr·cm(2), brightness temperature of ~10(18) K, peak power of >50 kW) using parametric wavelength conversion in a nonlinear crystal; this is brighter than many specialized sources such as far-infrared free-electron lasers (~10(16) K, ~2 kW). We revealed novel parametric wavelength conversion using stimulated Raman scattering in LiNbO3 without stimulated Brillouin scattering using recently-developed microchip laser. Furthermore, nonlinear up-conversion techniques allow the intense terahertz waves to be visualized and their frequency determined. These results are very promising for extending applied research into the terahertz region, and we expect that this source will open up new research fields such as nonlinear optics in the terahertz region. PMID:24898269

  17. Electron Density Measurements on LTX Using Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Peebles, W. A.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Schmitt, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic evolution of the electron density profile is tracked using microwave and millimeter-wave diagnostics on LTX. The 296 GHz (λ =1 mm) interferometer provides a radial line density measurement at the midplane, while an FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) reflectometer (13.5 -33 GHz, or O-mode 0 . 2 - 1 . 3 ×1013 cm-3) provides density profile measurements for the low-field side. Data taken during FY2015 will be compared with measurements from Thomson scattering and estimates of the plasma position from LRDFIT. Measurements of density fluctuations due to low-frequency (<100 kHz) MHD instabilities will also be shown. Future plans include the installation of a correlation reflectomter (Ka-band, 27-40 GHz) with dual tuneable sources and a frequency bandwidth of up to 5 MHz. This system will utilize the same antennas as the profile reflectometer to provide radial and/or toroidal/poloidal correlations. Further diagnostic details will be presented at the meeting. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. RF characterization of monolithic microwave and mm-wave ICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Ponchak, G. E.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1986-01-01

    A number of fixturing techniques compatible with automatic network analysis are presented. The fixtures are capable of characterizing GaAs Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs) at K and Ka band. Several different transitions are used to couple the RF test port to microstrip. Fixtures which provide chip level de-embedding are included. In addition, two advanced characterization techniques are assessed.

  19. Microwave Three-Wave Mixing Experiments for Chirality Determination: Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Cristobal; Shubert, V. Alvin; Schmitz, David; Medcraft, Chris; Krin, Anna; Schnell, Melanie

    2015-06-01

    Microwave three-wave mixing experiments have been shown to provide a novel and sensitive way to generate and measure enantiomer-specific molecular signatures. The handedness of the sample can be obtained from the phase of the molecular free induction decay whereas the enantiomeric excess can be determined by the amplitude of the chiral signal. After the introduction of this technique by Patterson et al. remarkable improvements have been realized and experimental strategies for both absolute phase determination and enantiomeric excess have been presented. This technique has been also successfully implemented at higher microwave frequencies. Here we present the current status of this technique as well future directions and perspectives. This will be illustrated through our systematic study of chiral terpenes as well as preliminary results in molecular clusters. Patterson, D.; Schnell, M.; Doyle, J. M. Enantiomer-Specific Detection of Chiral Molecules via Microwave Spectroscopy. Nature 2013, 497, 475-477. Patterson, D.; Doyle, J. M. Sensitive Chiral Analysis via Microwave Three-Wave Mixing. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2013, 111, 023008. Shubert, V. A.; Schmitz, D.; Patterson, D.; Doyle, J. M.; Schnell, M. Identifying Enantiomers in Mixtures of Chiral Molecules with Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 1152-1155. Lobsiger, S.; Perez, C.; Evangelisti, L.; Lehmann, K. K.; Pate, B. H. Molecular Structure and Chirality Detection by Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2014, 6, 196-200.

  20. Multifrequency continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy for absolute thickness determination

    SciTech Connect

    Scheller, Maik; Baaske, Kai; Koch, Martin

    2010-04-12

    We present a tunable multifrequency continuous wave terahertz spectrometer based on two laser diodes, photoconductive antennas, and a coherent detection scheme. The system is employed to determine the absolute thickness of samples utilizing a proposed synthetic difference frequency method to circumvent the 2pi uncertainty known from conventional photomixing systems while preserving a high spatial resolution.

  1. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber.

    PubMed

    Chiang, W Y; Wu, M H; Wu, K L; Lin, M H; Teng, H H; Tsai, Y F; Ko, C C; Yang, E C; Jiang, J A; Barnett, L R; Chu, K R

    2014-08-01

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system. PMID:25173291

  2. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, W. Y.; Wu, M. H.; Wu, K. L.; Lin, M. H.; Teng, H. H.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.; Tsai, Y. F.; Ko, C. C.; Yang, E. C.; Jiang, J. A.

    2014-08-15

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system.

  3. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, W. Y.; Wu, M. H.; Wu, K. L.; Lin, M. H.; Teng, H. H.; Tsai, Y. F.; Ko, C. C.; Yang, E. C.; Jiang, J. A.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.

    2014-08-01

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system.

  4. Aircraft and satellite measurement of ocean wave directional spectra using scanning-beam microwave radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Baker, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    A microwave radar technique for remotely measuring the vector wave number spectrum of the ocean surface is described. The technique which employs short-pulse, noncoherent radars in a conical scan mode near vertical incidence, is shown to be suitable for both aircraft and satellite application, the technique was validated at 10 km aircraft altitude, where we have found excellent agreement between buoy and radar-inferred absolute wave height spectra.

  5. Aircraft and satellite measurement of ocean wave directional spectra using scanning-beam microwave radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Baker, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave radar technique for remotely measuring the vector wave number spectrum of the ocean surface is described. The technique, which employs short-pulse, noncoherent radars in a conical scan mode near vertical incidence, is shown to be suitable for both aircraft and satellite application, the technique was validated at 10 km aircraft altitude, where we have found excellent agreement between buoy and radar-inferred absolute wave height spectra.

  6. Printed circuit board impedance matching step for microwave (millimeter wave) devices

    DOEpatents

    Pao, Hsueh-Yuan; Aguirre, Jerardo; Sargis, Paul

    2013-10-01

    An impedance matching ground plane step, in conjunction with a quarter wave transformer section, in a printed circuit board provides a broadband microwave matching transition from board connectors or other elements that require thin substrates to thick substrate (>quarter wavelength) broadband microwave (millimeter wave) devices. A method of constructing microwave and other high frequency electrical circuits on a substrate of uniform thickness, where the circuit is formed of a plurality of interconnected elements of different impedances that individually require substrates of different thicknesses, by providing a substrate of uniform thickness that is a composite or multilayered substrate; and forming a pattern of intermediate ground planes or impedance matching steps interconnected by vias located under various parts of the circuit where components of different impedances are located so that each part of the circuit has a ground plane substrate thickness that is optimum while the entire circuit is formed on a substrate of uniform thickness.

  7. Mountain Waves in the Middle Atmosphere: Microwave Limb Sounder Observations and Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Ma, Jun

    2003-01-01

    Observations and analyses of mesoscale gravity waves in the stratosphere from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are summarized, with focus on global distribution of topography related wave activities. We found most of the orographical wave activities occur during the winter seasons over high latitude mountain ridges. In the northern hemisphere, the strongest waves are those over Scandinavia, Central Eurasia, and southern Greenland, whereas in the southern hemisphere, wave activities are outstanding over the Andes, New Zealand, and Antarctic rim;, MLS observations suggest that these orographic waves are located mostly on the down stream side of the mountain ridge with downward phase progression and have horizontal phase velocities opposite to the stratospheric jet-stream. Future studies using MLS data and numerical modeling will lead to better understanding of gravity wave effects on dynamics and chemistry in the middle atmosphere.

  8. Microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor for trace-metals in furnace exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P. P.; Rhee, D. Y.; Thomas, P.; Cohn, D. R.; Surma, J. E.; Titus, C. H.

    1996-10-01

    A microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor has been successfully demonstrated for sensitive (<1 ppb), real time measurements of trace metals in furnace exhaust. The instrument uses a robust, up to 1.5 kW, 2.45 GHz microwave plasma sustained in a portion of the undiluted furnace exhaust flow for atomic emission spectroscopy. The waveguide device is constructed of refractory materials compatible with high-temperature environments (≳500 °C) and is flange mountable into the inside of the furnace exhaust duct. Fused quartz fiber optics in close proximity to the plasma flame transmit the UV through visible emission (190-690 nm) to three spectrometers for simultaneous monitoring of several metals. This instrument has been used for continuous monitoring for a 49 h period with 0.5 s time resolution on a dc graphite electrode arc furnace during a soil vitrification test. Results are presented for chromium, manganese, and iron emissions during soil loading operations.

  9. Spatially continuous distributed fiber optic sensing using optical carrier based microwave interferometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Lan, Xinwei; Luo, Ming; Xiao, Hai

    2014-07-28

    This paper reports a spatially continuous distributed fiber optic sensing technique using optical carrier based microwave interferometry (OCMI), in which many optical interferometers with the same or different optical path differences are interrogated in the microwave domain and their locations can be unambiguously determined. The concept is demonstrated using cascaded weak optical reflectors along a single optical fiber, where any two arbitrary reflectors are paired to define a low-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer. While spatially continuous (i.e., no dark zone), fully distributed strain measurement was used as an example to demonstrate the capability, the proposed concept may also be implemented on other types of waveguide or free-space interferometers and used for distributed measurement of various physical, chemical and biological quantities. PMID:25089493

  10. Dressed-state engineering for continuous detection of itinerant microwave photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshino, Kazuki; Lin, Zhirong; Inomata, Kunihiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Yasunobu

    Microwave quantum optics using superconducting qubits and transmission lines enables various quantum-optical phenomena that have not been reached in the visible light domain. However, the lack of an efficient detector for itinerant microwave photons has been a long-standing problem. A promising approach is to use the deterministic switching of a Λ system induced by individual photons. Recently, we realized a Λ system by the dressed-state engineering of a qubit-resonator system and achieved a detection efficiency ~ 66 %. However, this detector should be operated in the time-gated mode, since the drive field to generate the Λ-type transition must be turned off during the qubit readout. Here, we propose a scheme for continuous detection of itinerant microwave photons. In the proposed device, a superconducting qubit is coupled dispersively to two resonators: one is used to form a Λ system that deterministically captures incoming photons and the other is used for continuous monitoring of the event. The proposed device enables continuous operation of the photon detector, preserving the advantages of our previous scheme, such as a high detection efficiency, insensitivity to the signal pulse shape, and short dead times after detection.

  11. Tuning the microwave absorption through engineered nanostructures in co-continuous polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna Kar, Goutam; Biswas, Sourav; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we report tailor-made properties by dispersing nanostructured materials in a co-continuous polymer blend (PVDF/ABS) that is capable of shielding electromagnetic (EM) radiation. To accomplish this, lossy materials were employed like multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), and barium titanate (BT), (which exhibit relaxation losses in the microwave frequency domain) and ferrites (like Fe3O4). To improve the state of dispersion, the MWNTs were non-covalently modified using 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCD) via π–π stacking, and for effective shielding the MWNTs were conjugated with either BT or Fe3O4 nanoparticles through suitable modifications. The hybrid nanoparticles were selectively localized in the PVDF phase, governed by its polarity, and exhibited excellent microwave attenuation. In order to gain insight into the dielectric and magnetic attributes, the microwave parameters were assessed systematically. Taken together, our results uncover polymer blend as a promising candidate for designing lightweight, thermally stable microwave absorber materials.

  12. System design development for microwave and millimeter-wave materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feher, Lambert; Thumm, Manfred

    2002-06-01

    The most notable effect in processing dielectrics with micro- and millimeter-waves is volumetric heating of these materials, offering the opportunity of very high heating rates for the samples. In comparison to conventional heating where the heat transfer is diffusive and depends on the thermal conductivity of the material, the microwave field penetrates the sample and acts as an instantaneous heat source at each point of the sample. By this unique property, microwave heating at 2.45 GHz and 915 MHz ISM (Industrial, Medical, Scientific) frequencies is established as an important industrial technology since more than 50 years ago. Successful application of microwaves in industries has been reported e.g. by food processing systems, domestic ovens, rubber industry, vacuum drying etc. The present paper shows some outlines of microwave system development at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM by transferring properties from the higher frequency regime (millimeter-waves) to lower frequency applications. Anyway, the need for using higher frequencies like 24 GHz (ISM frequency) for industrial applications has to be carefully verified with respect to special physical/engineering advantages or to limits the standard microwave technology meets for the specific problem.

  13. High power continuous wave injection-locked solid state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nabors, C.D.; Byer, R.L.

    1991-06-25

    This patent describes an injection locked laser system. It comprises a master laser, the master laser including a solid state gain medium and having a continuous wave, single frequency output; a slave laser including a solid state gain medium located in a resonant cavity and having a continuous wave output at a power at least ten times greater than the master laser, with the output of the master laser being injected into the slave laser in order to cause the slave laser to oscillate at the same frequency as the output of the master laser; and means for actively stabilizing the slave laser so that its output frequency remains locked with the output frequency of the master laser.

  14. Continuous wave room temperature external ring cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Revin, D. G. Hemingway, M.; Vaitiekus, D.; Cockburn, J. W.; Hempler, N.; Maker, G. T.; Malcolm, G. P. A.

    2015-06-29

    An external ring cavity quantum cascade laser operating at ∼5.2 μm wavelength in a continuous-wave regime at the temperature of 15 °C is demonstrated. Out-coupled continuous-wave optical powers of up to 23 mW are observed for light of one propagation direction with an estimated total intra-cavity optical power flux in excess of 340 mW. The uni-directional regime characterized by the intensity ratio of more than 60 for the light propagating in the opposite directions was achieved. A single emission peak wavelength tuning range of 90 cm{sup −1} is realized by the incorporation of a diffraction grating into the cavity.

  15. Continuous wave room temperature external ring cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Vaitiekus, D.; Cockburn, J. W.; Hempler, N.; Maker, G. T.; Malcolm, G. P. A.

    2015-06-01

    An external ring cavity quantum cascade laser operating at ˜5.2 μm wavelength in a continuous-wave regime at the temperature of 15 °C is demonstrated. Out-coupled continuous-wave optical powers of up to 23 mW are observed for light of one propagation direction with an estimated total intra-cavity optical power flux in excess of 340 mW. The uni-directional regime characterized by the intensity ratio of more than 60 for the light propagating in the opposite directions was achieved. A single emission peak wavelength tuning range of 90 cm-1 is realized by the incorporation of a diffraction grating into the cavity.

  16. Infrastructure for the design and fabrication of MEMS for RF/microwave and millimeter wave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerguizian, Vahe; Rafaf, Mustapha

    2004-08-01

    This article describes and provides valuable information for companies and universities with strategies to start fabricating MEMS for RF/Microwave and millimeter wave applications. The present work shows the infrastructure developed for RF/Microwave and millimeter wave MEMS platforms, which helps the identification, evaluation and selection of design tools and fabrication foundries taking into account packaging and testing. The selected and implemented simple infrastructure models, based on surface and bulk micromachining, yield inexpensive and innovative approaches for distributed choices of MEMS operating tools. With different educational or industrial institution needs, these models may be modified for specific resource changes using a careful analyzed iteration process. The inputs of the project are evaluation selection criteria and information sources such as financial, technical, availability, accessibility, simplicity, versatility and practical considerations. The outputs of the project are the selection of different MEMS design tools or software (solid modeling, electrostatic/electromagnetic and others, compatible with existing standard RF/Microwave design tools) and different MEMS manufacturing foundries. Typical RF/Microwave and millimeter wave MEMS solutions are introduced on the platform during the evaluation and development phases of the project for the validation of realistic results and operational decision making choices. The encountered challenges during the investigation and the development steps are identified and the dynamic behavior of the infrastructure is emphasized. The inputs (resources) and the outputs (demonstrated solutions) are presented in tables and flow chart mode diagrams.

  17. Enhanced polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation from thermal gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Mohanty, Subhendra; Nautiyal, Akhilesh

    2006-12-22

    If inflation was preceded by a radiation era, then at the time of inflation there will exist a decoupled thermal distribution of gravitons. Gravitational waves generated during inflation will be amplified by the process of stimulated emission into the existing thermal distribution of gravitons. Consequently, the usual zero temperature scale invariant tensor spectrum is modified by a temperature dependent factor. This thermal correction factor amplifies the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation by an order of magnitude at large angles, which may now be in the range of observability of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. PMID:17280339

  18. Bragg scattering of electromagnetic waves by microwave-produced plasma layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1990-01-01

    A set of parallel plasma layers is generated by two intersecting microwave pulses in a chamber containing dry air at a pressure comparable to the upper atmosphere. The dependencies of breakdown conditions on the pressure and pulse length are examined. The results are shown to be consistent with the appearance of tail erosion of the microwave pulse caused by air breakdown. A Bragg scattering experiment, using the plasma layers as a Bragg reflector, is then performed. Both time domain and frequency domain measurements of wave scattering are conducted. The experimental results are found to agree very well with the theory.

  19. Feasibility of utilizing bio-indicators for testing microbial inactivation in sweetpotato purees processed with a continuous flow microwave system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous flow microwave heating has potential in aseptic processing of various food products, including the purees from sweetpotatoes and other vegetables. Establishing the feasibility of a new processing technology for achieving commercial sterility requires evaluating microbial inactivation. Thi...

  20. The microwave and millimeter-wave spectra of hypochlorous acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis Singbeil, H. E.; Anderson, W. D.; Davis, R. Wellington; Gerry, M. C. L.; Cohen, E. A.; Pickett, H. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Suenram, R. D.

    1984-02-01

    To permit atmospheric monitoring of the molecule, the microwave spectra of two isotopic species of hypochlorous acid, HOCl, have been measured in the frequency range 8-650 GHz. Three b-type branches and an a-type Q branch have all been measured for the first time; improved measurements have been made for the a-type R branches. The analysis has included combination differences of earlier high-resolution infrared spectra to give accurate values for all rotational constants, five quartic and five higher degree centrifugal distortion constants, as well as the chlorine nuclear quadrupole and spin-rotation coupling constants. From the Stark effect, accurate values have also been obtained for both components of the molecular dipole moment. A table of transition frequencies of potential use in atmospheric monitoring is presented.

  1. Strongly disordered s-wave superconductors probed by microwave electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driessen, E. F. C.; Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Tromp, R. R.; de Visser, P. J.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2013-03-01

    In contrast to Anderson's theorem, recently evidence has emerged that superconductivity is susceptible to strong disorder and that there is a disorder-induced superconductor-to-insulator transition (SIT). We probe the effects of strong disorder (8 . 6 >kF l > 2 . 4 , approaching the SIT) in thin films of niobium titanium nitride and titanium nitride by measuring the microwave electrodynamics in coplanar waveguide resonators. The electromagnetic response gradually evolves with disorder, deviating from conventional Mattis-Bardeen theory, for both materials. The result is understood as due to changes in the quasiparticle density of states, as a consequence of the short elastic scattering length. Our observations are consistent with a model that uses an effective pair breaker, which is inversely proportional to the value of kF l . Currently at CEA Grenoble

  2. Acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity with Lamb waves in microwave K band

    SciTech Connect

    Tadesse, Semere A.; Li, Huan; Liu, Qiyu; Li, Mo

    2015-11-16

    Integrating nanoscale electromechanical transducers and nanophotonic devices potentially can enable acousto-optic devices to reach unprecedented high frequencies and modulation efficiency. Here, we demonstrate acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity using Lamb waves with frequency up to 19 GHz, reaching the microwave K band. The devices are fabricated in suspended aluminum nitride membrane. Excitation of acoustic waves is achieved with interdigital transducers with period as small as 300 nm. Confining both acoustic wave and optical wave within the thickness of the membrane leads to improved acousto-optic modulation efficiency in these devices than that obtained in previous surface acoustic wave devices. Our system demonstrates a scalable optomechanical platform where strong acousto-optic coupling between cavity-confined photons and high frequency traveling phonons can be explored.

  3. Elastic Wave Propagation in Concrete and Continuous Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Gi, Yu-Fung; Pan, Chi-Ling; Cheng, Chia-Chi

    2005-04-01

    Elastic wave methods, such as the ultrasonic pulse velocity and the impact echo, are often subject to multiple reflections at the boundaries of various constituents of concrete. Current study aims to improve the feature identification of elastic wave propagation due to buried objects in concrete slabs and cylinders. Embedded steel reinforcement, steel and PVC tubes, wooden disks, and rubber spheres are tested. The received signals are analyzed using continuous wavelet transform. As a result, signals are decomposed into distinctive frequency bands with transient information preserved. The interpretation of multiple reflections at different boundary conditions thus becomes more straightforward. Features related to reflections from steel bar, PVC tube, and steel tube can be readily identified in the magnitude plot of wavelet coefficients. Vibration modes of the concrete slab corresponding to different buried objects can also be separated based on corresponding time duration.

  4. Elastic Wave Propagation in Concrete and Continuous Wavelet Transform

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.-H.; Gi, Y.-F.; Pan, C.-L.; Cheng, C.-C.

    2005-04-09

    Elastic wave methods, such as the ultrasonic pulse velocity and the impact echo, are often subject to multiple reflections at the boundaries of various constituents of concrete. Current study aims to improve the feature identification of elastic wave propagation due to buried objects in concrete slabs and cylinders. Embedded steel reinforcement, steel and PVC tubes, wooden disks, and rubber spheres are tested. The received signals are analyzed using continuous wavelet transform. As a result, signals are decomposed into distinctive frequency bands with transient information preserved. The interpretation of multiple reflections at different boundary conditions thus becomes more straightforward. Features related to reflections from steel bar, PVC tube, and steel tube can be readily identified in the magnitude plot of wavelet coefficients. Vibration modes of the concrete slab corresponding to different buried objects can also be separated based on corresponding time duration.

  5. Biological studies with continuous-wave radiofrequency (28 MHz) radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, N.A.; Borland, R.G.; Cookson, J.H.; Coward, R.F.; Davies, J.A.; Nicholson, A.N.; Christie, J.L.; Flanagan, N.G.; Goodridge, V.D.

    1984-03-01

    Effects of high-frequency (28 MHz) continous-wave radiation have been studied in the rat and monkey. No histopathological or hematological changes could be attributed to the radiation. In the monkey there was an increase in urinary calcium concentration which was most likely due to restricted movement. In the rat there was reduced uptake of iodine by the thyroid, lower levels of plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone, and reduced ratio of protein bound to nonprotein bound iodine. Food consumption was also decreased. The changes are likely to have arisen as a compensatory response to an induced heat load. A nonthermal effect of continuous-wave high-frequency radiation has not been shown in this study. The effects were likely to be associated with either physiological compensation for induced heating or restriction of movement.

  6. Factors influencing the microwave pulse duration in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Renzhen; Zhang Xiaowei; Zhang Ligang; Li Xiaoze; Zhang Lijun

    2012-07-15

    In this paper, we analyze the factors that affect the microwave pulse duration in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO), including the diode voltage, the guiding magnetic field, the electron beam collector, the extraction cavity, and the gap between the electron beam and the slow wave structure (SWS). The results show that the microwave pulse duration increases with the diode voltage until breakdown occurs on the surface of the extraction cavity. The pulse duration at low guiding magnetic field is generally 5-10 ns smaller than that at high magnetic field due to the asymmetric electron emission and the larger energy spread of the electron beam. The electron beam collector can affect the microwave pulse duration significantly because of the anode plasma generated by bombardment of the electron beam on the collector surface. The introduction of the extraction cavity only slightly changes the pulse duration. The decrease of the gap between the electron beam and the SWS can increase the microwave pulse duration greatly.

  7. High power microwave source with a three dimensional printed metamaterial slow-wave structure.

    PubMed

    French, David M; Shiffler, Don

    2016-05-01

    For over the last decade, the concept of metamaterials has led to new approaches for considering the interaction of radiation with complex structures. However, practical manifestations of such a device operating at high power densities have proven difficult to achieve due to the resonant nature of metamaterials and the resultant high electric fields, which place severe constraints on manufacturing the slow wave structures. In this paper, we describe the first experimental manifestation of a high power microwave device utilizing a metallic slow wave structure (metamaterial-like) fabricated using additive manufacturing. The feasibility of utilizing additive manufacturing as a technique for building these relatively complicated structures has thus been demonstrated. The MW class microwave source operates in the C-band and shows frequency tunablility with electron beam voltage. The basic electromagnetic characteristics of this device, the construction using additive manufacturing, and the basic performance as a microwave oscillator are considered. Due to the tunable nature of the device, it shows promise not only as an oscillator but also as a microwave amplifier. Therefore, the dispersive characteristics and a discussion of the anticipated gain is included as it relates to an amplifier configuration. PMID:27250415

  8. Temperature measurements with two different IR sensors in a continuous-flow microwave heated system.

    PubMed

    Rydfjord, Jonas; Svensson, Fredrik; Fagrell, Magnus; Sävmarker, Jonas; Thulin, Måns; Larhed, Mats

    2013-01-01

    In a continuous-flow system equipped with a nonresonant microwave applicator we have investigated how to best assess the actual temperature of microwave heated organic solvents with different characteristics. This is non-trivial as the electromagnetic field will influence most traditional methods of temperature measurement. Thus, we used a microwave transparent fiber optic probe, capable of measuring the temperature inside the reactor, and investigated two different IR sensors as non-contact alternatives to the internal probe. IR sensor 1 measures the temperature on the outside of the reactor whilst IR sensor 2 is designed to measure the temperature of the fluid through the borosilicate glass that constitutes the reactor wall. We have also, in addition to the characterization of the before mentioned IR sensors, developed statistical models to correlate the IR sensor reading to a correct value of the inner temperature (as determined by the internal fiber optic probe), thereby providing a non-contact, indirect, temperature assessment of the heated solvent. The accuracy achieved with these models lie well within the range desired for most synthetic chemistry applications. PMID:24204419

  9. A Microwave Driven Ion Source for Continuous-Flow AMS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, J.; Schneider, R.J.; Reden, K.F. von; Hayes, J.M.; Roberts, M.L.; Benthien, A.

    2005-03-15

    A microwave-driven, gas-fed ion source originally developed as a high-current positive ion injector for a Tandem accelerator at Chalk River has been the subject of a three-year development program at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution NOSAMS facility. Off-line tests have demonstrated positive carbon currents of 1 mA and negative carbon currents of 80 {mu}A from CO2 gas feed. This source and a magnesium charge-exchange canal were coupled to the recombinator of the NOSAMS Tandetron for on-line tests, with the source fed with reference gasses and a combustion device.The promising results obtained have prompted the redesign of the microwave source for use as an on-line, continuous-flow injector for a new AMS facility under construction at NOSAMS. The new design is optimized for best transmission of the extracted positive-ion beam through the charge-exchange canal and for reliable operation at 40 kV extraction voltage. Other goals of the re-design include improved lifetime of the microwave window and the elimination of dead volumes in the plasma generator that increase sample hold-up time.This talk will include a summary of results obtained to date at NOSAMS with the Chalk River source and a detailed description of the new design.

  10. Multiphysics numerical modeling of the continuous flow microwave-assisted transesterification process.

    PubMed

    Muley, Pranjali D; Boldor, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Use of advanced microwave technology for biodiesel production from vegetable oil is a relatively new technology. Microwave dielectric heating increases the process efficiency and reduces reaction time. Microwave heating depends on various factors such as material properties (dielectric and thermo-physical), frequency of operation and system design. Although lab scale results are promising, it is important to study these parameters and optimize the process before scaling up. Numerical modeling approach can be applied for predicting heating and temperature profiles including at larger scale. The process can be studied for optimization without actually performing the experiments, reducing the amount of experimental work required. A basic numerical model of continuous electromagnetic heating of biodiesel precursors was developed. A finite element model was built using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2 software by coupling the electromagnetic problem with the fluid flow and heat transfer problem. Chemical reaction was not taken into account. Material dielectric properties were obtained experimentally, while the thermal properties were obtained from the literature (all the properties were temperature dependent). The model was tested for the two different power levels 4000 W and 4700 W at a constant flow rate of 840ml/min. The electric field, electromagnetic power density flow and temperature profiles were studied. Resulting temperature profiles were validated by comparing to the temperatures obtained at specific locations from the experiment. The results obtained were in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:24432470

  11. Multi-photon transitions and Rabi resonance in continuous wave EPR.

    PubMed

    Saiko, Alexander P; Fedaruk, Ryhor; Markevich, Siarhei A

    2015-10-01

    The study of microwave-radiofrequency multi-photon transitions in continuous wave (CW) EPR spectroscopy is extended to a Rabi resonance condition, when the radio frequency of the magnetic-field modulation matches the Rabi frequency of a spin system in the microwave field. Using the non-secular perturbation theory based on the Bogoliubov averaging method, the analytical description of the response of the spin system is derived for all modulation frequency harmonics. When the modulation frequency exceeds the EPR linewidth, multi-photon transitions result in sidebands in absorption EPR spectra measured with phase-sensitive detection at any harmonic. The saturation of different-order multi-photon transitions is shown to be significantly different and to be sensitive to the Rabi resonance. The noticeable frequency shifts of sidebands are found to be the signatures of this resonance. The inversion of two-photon lines in some spectral intervals of the out-of-phase first-harmonic signal is predicted under passage through the Rabi resonance. The inversion indicates the transition from absorption to stimulated emission or vice versa, depending on the sideband. The manifestation of the primary and secondary Rabi resonance is also demonstrated in the time evolution of steady-state EPR signals formed by all harmonics of the modulation frequency. Our results provide a theoretical framework for future developments in multi-photon CW EPR spectroscopy, which can be useful for samples with long spin relaxation times and extremely narrow EPR lines. PMID:26295168

  12. Power detectors for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging systems in mainstream silicon technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qun Jane; Li, James C.; Tang, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes and compares three different types of detectors, including CMOS power detectors, bipolar power detectors, and super-regenerative detectors, deployed in the literature for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging systems in mainstream silicon technologies. Each detector has unique working mechanism and demonstrates different behavior with respects to bias conditions, input signal power, as well as bandwidth responses. Two Figure-of-Merits for both wideband and narrowband imaging have been defined to quantify the detector performance comparison. CMOS and Bipolar detectors are good for passive imaging, while super regenerative detectors are superior for active imaging. The analytical results have been verified by both simulation and measurement results. These analyses intend to provide design insights and guidance for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging power detectors.

  13. Impacts of microwave pretreatments on the semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of dairy waste activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Uma Rani, R.; Adish Kumar, S.; Kaliappan, S.; Yeom, IckTae; Rajesh Banu, J.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Microwave pretreatment of dairy WAS was studied. ► MW pretreatment at 70% intensity for 12 min, COD solubilization was 18.6%. ► Biogas production and SS reduction was 35% and 14% higher than control. ► In digester at 15 days SRT with medium OLR, SS and VS reduction was 67% and 64%. ► Biogas and methane production was 57% and 49% higher than control, in digesters. - Abstract: Microwave (MW) irradiation is one of the new and possible methods used for pretreating the sludge. Following its use in different fields, this MW irradiation method has proved to be more appropriate in the field of environmental research. In this paper, we focused on the effects of MW irradiation at different intensities on solubilization, biodegradation and anaerobic digestion of sludge from the dairy sludge. The changes in the soluble fractions of the organic matter, the biogas yield, the methane content in the biogas were used as control parameters for evaluating the efficiency of the MW pretreatment. Additionally, the energetic efficiency was also examined. In terms of an energetic aspect, the most economical pretreatment of sludge was at 70% intensity for 12 min irradiation time. At this, COD solubilization, SS reduction and biogas production were found to be 18.6%, 14% and 35% higher than the control, respectively. Not only the increase in biogas production was investigated, excluding protein and carbohydrate hydrolysis was also performed successfully by this microwave pretreatment even at low irradiation energy input. Also, experiments were carried out in semi continuous anaerobic digesters, with 3.5 L working volume. Combining microwave pretreatment with anaerobic digestion led to 67%, 64% and 57% of SS reduction, VS reduction and biogas production higher than the control, respectively.

  14. Continuous detonation wave engine studies for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidenko, D. M.; Jouot, F.; Kudryavtsev, A. N.; Dupré, G.; Gökalp, I.; Daniau, E.; Falempin, F.

    2009-09-01

    Continuous Detonation Wave Rocket Engine (CDWRE) for space application is considered in the framework of French R&D and scientific research. A CDWRE demonstrator and a dedicated test bench are designed by MBDA France. At ICARE-CNRS, theoretical and experimental studies on the CDWRE internal processes are under progress. Twodimensional (2D) Euler simulations of a CDWRE combustion chamber have been performed to investigate the effect of geometrical and injection parameters on the internal process and combustion chamber performance. An experimental study is prepared to investigate liquid oxygen breakup and vaporization in a helium flow as well as detonation initiation and propagation in a spray of liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen.

  15. A model for a continuous-wave iodine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, In H.; Tabibi, Bagher M.

    1990-01-01

    A model for a continuous-wave (CW) iodine laser has been developed and compared with the experimental results obtained from a solar-simulator-pumped CW iodine laser. The agreement between the calculated laser power output and the experimental results is generally good for various laser parameters even when the model includes only prominent rate coefficients. The flow velocity dependence of the output power shows that the CW iodine laser cannot be achieved with a flow velocity below 1 m/s for the present solar-simulator-pumped CW iodine laser system.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Continuous-Wave Laser Ionization of Krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Bret D.; Shannon, Robert F.

    2001-10-30

    This report describes experimental investigations of a method that uses continuous-wave (CW) lasers to ionize selected isotopes of krypton with high isotopic selectivity. The experiments show that the ionization rate is at least a factor of 100 lower than calculated with our model that has been described in a previous report. This discrepancy may be due to a much smaller excitation cross section that expected based on previous work and/or the aberrations in the ultraviolet beam used for the first step in the excitation. Additional problems with damage to mirrors, alignment instabilities, and manufacturers halting production of key products make this approach not worth further development at this time

  17. Compact and efficient continuous wave UV DPSS laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellström, Jo.; Elgcrona, G.; Illy, E.; Karlsson, H.

    2010-02-01

    A compact and efficient continuous wave, single mode, diode-pumped solid state laser is reported. The laser is based on cascaded 2:nd order non-linear processes for intra-cavity frequency tripling to 355 nm wavelength using periodically poled materials. CW emission exceeding 30 mW has been reached. The total size of the laser head is 125x70x45 mm3 (LxWxH), the ring cavity itself takes an area of only 30x20 mm2 (LxW).

  18. All-optoelectronic continuous-wave terahertz systems.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Torsten; Siebert, Karsten J; Quast, Holger; Hasegawa, Noburu; Loata, Gabriel; Wipf, Robert; Hahn, Tobias; Thomson, Mark; Leonhardt, Rainer; Roskos, Hartmut G

    2004-02-15

    We discuss the optoelectronic generation and detection of continuous-wave terahertz (THz) radiation by the mixing of visible/near-infrared laser radiation in photoconductive antennas. We review attempts to reach higher THz output-power levels by reverting from mobility-lifetime-limited photomixers to transit-time-limited p-i-n photodiodes. We then describe our implementation of a THz spectroscopy and imaging-measurement system and demonstrate its imaging performance with several examples. Possible application areas of THz imaging in the biomedical field and in surface characterization for industrial purposes are explored. PMID:15306519

  19. Continuous-wave organic dye lasers and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Ofer; Chua, Song-Liang; Zhen, Bo; Lee, Jeongwon; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-16

    An organic dye laser produces a continuous-wave (cw) output without any moving parts (e.g., without using flowing dye streams or spinning discs of solid-state dye media to prevent photobleaching) and with a pump beam that is stationary with respect to the organic dye medium. The laser's resonant cavity, organic dye medium, and pump beam are configured to excite a lasing transition over a time scale longer than the associated decay lifetimes in the organic dye medium without photobleaching the organic dye medium. Because the organic dye medium does not photobleach when operating in this manner, it may be pumped continuously so as to emit a cw output beam. In some examples, operation in this manner lowers the lasing threshold (e.g., to only a few Watts per square centimeter), thereby facilitating electrical pumping for cw operation.

  20. Acoustic waves generated by pulsed microwaves in viscoelastic rods: modeling and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Bacon, C; Guilliorit, E; Hosten, B; Chimenti, D E

    2001-09-01

    The acoustic wave generation in a specimen irradiated by a pulsed microwave is predicted theoretically. The specimen is a viscoelastic rod inserted into a wave guide. The model is based on Maxwell's equations, heat equation and thermoviscoelasticity theory. Computations show the presence of temperature oscillations due to the electromagnetic interferences in the irradiated rod if its electromagnetic absorption is low. An experimental method to infer indirectly the detailed behavior of microwave-generated acoustic waves in polymer rods, including the influence of electromagnetic wave reflection at the rod ends, is presented. The method consists of measuring the oscillations in the particle acceleration detected at the end of the rod that are induced by variations in the polymer rod length. The oscillations are caused by changing electromagnetic standing-wave conditions within the rod. It is found that these oscillations are in agreement in period, amplitude, and phase, with independent values of the complex dielectric constant and complex acoustic slowness of the polyvinyl chloride samples used in the study. PMID:11572350

  1. Asymptotic analysis of surface waves in continuous strip casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluwick, Alfred; Scheichl, Stefan

    2000-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional analysis of surface waves possibly emerging in a specific open channel flow with continuous solidification, i.e. the fluid consisting of molten material is cooled from below and solidifies. In modern metallurgical engineering such processes are of importance for the strip casting of steel and other metals. The study is based on the assumption that the wavelengths are large compared to the characteristic depth of the melt but small compared to the solidification length. Within the framework of a weakly nonlinear theory the use of the Euler equations supplemented with the appropriate boundary conditions at the solidification front and the free surface yields two Korteweg-de Vries equations with varying coefficients, which govern the propagation of the waves. However, the adopted form of the asymptotic expansions ceases to be valid as the point of complete solidification is approached, where the displacements at the free boundary and the depth of the melt are of the same order. Thus, a separate investigation for this region is carried out in order to describe the further evolution of the surface waves and its influence on the final shape of the fully solidified metal sheet.

  2. Dye laser pumped, continuous-wave KTP optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M. E.; Scheidt, M.; Boller, K.-J.; Wallenstein, R.

    1998-06-01

    We report on dye-laser-pumped, continuous-wave (CW) KTiOPO4 (KTP) optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) with pump and idler resonant cavities. With a linear two-mirror cavity the pump power at threshold was 70 mW. The single-frequency signal and idler output wavelengths were tuned in the range of 1025 to 1040 nm and 1250 to 1380 nm by tuning the dye laser in the range of 565 to 588 nm. With a dual three-mirror cavity the threshold was 135 mW. Pumped by 500 mW of 578 nm radiation the 1040 nm single-frequency signal wave output power was 84 mW. Power and frequency stable operation with a spectral bandwidth of less than 9 MHz was obtained by piezo-electrically locking the length of the pump resonant cavity to the dye laser wavelength. Similar performance was achieved by placing the idler resonant OPO inside the resonator of the dye laser. With this system power stable and single-frequency operation was achieved with a spectral bandwidth of less than 11 MHz for the idler wave.

  3. Initial Stage of the Microwave Ionization Wave Within a 1D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. E.; Rakova, E. I.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of the microwave breakdown in a gas is simulated numerically within a simple 1D model which takes into account such processes as the impact ionization of gas molecules, the attachment of electrons to neutral molecules, and plasma diffusion. Calculations are carried out for different spatial distributions of seed electrons with account for reflection of the incident electromagnetic wave from the plasma. The results reveal considerable dependence of the ionization wave evolution on the relation between the field frequency and gas pressure, as well as on the existence of extended rarefied halo of seed electrons. At relatively low gas pressures (or high field frequencies), the breakdown process is accompanied by the stationary ionization wave moving towards the incident electromagnetic wave. In the case of a high gas pressure (or a relatively low field frequency), the peculiarities of the breakdown are associated with the formation of repetitive jumps of the ionization front.

  4. The space microwave interferometer and the search for cosmic background gravitational wave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel

    1989-01-01

    Present and planned investigations which use interplanetary spacecraft for gravitational wave searches are severely limited in their detection capability. This limitation has to do both with the Earth-based tracking procedures used and with the configuration of the experiments themselves. It is suggested that a much improved experiment can now be made using a multiarm interferometer designed with current operating elements. An important source of gravitational wave radiation, the cosmic background, may well be within reach of detection with these procedures. It is proposed to make a number of experimental steps that can now be carried out using TDRSS spacecraft and would conclude in the establishment of an operating multiarm microwave interferometer. This interferometer is projected to have a sensitivity to cosmic background gravitational wave radiation with an energy of less than 10(exp -4) cosmic closure density and to periodic waves generating spatial strain approaching 10(exp -19) in the range 0.1 to 0.001 Hz.

  5. High ratio long-wave infrared continuous zoom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Sun, Quan; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Hao; Huan, Kewei; Shi, Xiao-guang

    2013-09-01

    As infrared zoom systems change the focal length continuously, remain images stability and keep good image quality during the process of zoom, it is widely applied to infrared navigation, infrared detection, infrared-guided etc vehicular and airborne area. In order to satisfy the growing demand of infrared continuous zoom system, a zoom ratio of ten times long-wave infrared continuous zoom optical system that based on an uncooled detector was designed. System guided by the zoom theory of positive groups of compensation, calculated the initial structure of the system and according to the system of optical parameters with using ZEMAX software for optical design did an aberration balance and optimized, then the optical system image quality was systematically analyzed and evaluated. The result showed that the modulation transfer function (MTF) was above 0.4 within the whole focal range at spatial frequency 16 lp/mm, the root mean square radius of maximum dispersion spot was smaller than a pixel dimension and it met the requirements of the system imaging quality when F/# was 2, continuous zoom range was from 40 mm to 400 mm and the image size was 12 mm. The design of the system realized the requirements of compact structure, large zoom ratio, easily assembled and excellent image quality to optical system for infrared imaging.

  6. Microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor for trace-metals in furnace exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, P.P.; Rhee, D.Y.; Thomas, P.; Cohn, D.R.; Surma, J.E.; Titus, C.H.

    1996-10-01

    A microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor has been successfully demonstrated for sensitive ({lt}1 ppb), real time measurements of trace metals in furnace exhaust. The instrument uses a robust, up to 1.5 kW, 2.45 GHz microwave plasma sustained in a portion of the undiluted furnace exhaust flow for atomic emission spectroscopy. The waveguide device is constructed of refractory materials compatible with high-temperature environments ({approx_gt}500{degree}C) and is flange mountable into the inside of the furnace exhaust duct. Fused quartz fiber optics in close proximity to the plasma flame transmit the UV through visible emission (190{endash}690 nm) to three spectrometers for simultaneous monitoring of several metals. This instrument has been used for continuous monitoring for a 49 h period with 0.5 s time resolution on a dc graphite electrode arc furnace during a soil vitrification test. Results are presented for chromium, manganese, and iron emissions during soil loading operations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Communication with a chaotic traveling wave tube microwave generator.

    PubMed

    Dronov, Vasily; Hendrey, Matthew R; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ott, Edward

    2004-03-01

    Traveling wave tubes (TWTs) are vacuum electronic amplifiers (see Beck, Gittins, and Pierce) that are commonly used for communication in the centimeter wavelength range. Increasing demand for high data flow in wireless communication systems (satellite communication systems are a good example) raises needs for making TWT's more compact and efficient. Motivated by this we suggest a scheme in which a TWT with feedback is operated in a highly nonlinear regime where the device behaves chaotically. The chaos is controlled using small controls. Then, at the receiving end a receiving TWT synchronizes to the chaotic transmitter and amplifies the received signal with nearly no distortion. Results on numerical simulations of the proposed scheme are reported and used to evaluate its effectiveness. PMID:15003042

  8. Microwave bulk-acoustic-wave reflection-grating resonators.

    PubMed

    Oates, D E; Pan, J Y

    1988-01-01

    A technique for fabrication of bulk-acoustic-wave (BAW) resonators operating at fundamental frequencies between 1 and 10 GHz is presented. The resonators utilize a reflection grating made by optical holographic methods in iron-doped lithium niobate. Q factors of 30000 at 1 GHz have been demonstrated. Extension to Q of 10000 at 10 GHz appears feasible. Projected limitations to performance are discussed. The high Q at the high fundamental frequency directly results in low-phase noise. Phase-noise measurements of BAW resonator-stabilized oscillators operating at 1.14 GHz are presented. The single-sideband noise floor of <-140 dBc/Hz is shown to be in agreement with an analytical model. Projected improvements in the devices and circuits promise performance of <-160 dBc/Hz. PMID:18290157

  9. Design, development and evaluation of an automatic fruit-juice pasteurization system using microwave - ultrasonic waves.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Samani, Bahram; Khoshtaghaza, Mohammad Hadi; Minaei, Saeid; Zareifourosh, Hemad; Eshtiaghi, Mohammad Naghi; Rostami, Sajad

    2016-01-01

    Conventional pasteurization treatments often lead to substantial decrease in fruits juice quality. Due to these issues, the objective of this research was to compare the combined effect of a novel thermal (microwave) and non-thermal (ultrasonic) treatments with conventional thermal pasteurization on some qualitative characteristics of sour cherry juice (vitamins, phenolics, anthocyanins, etc.). For this purpose, an automatic control system comprising of ultrasonic generator, ultrasonic transducer, horn, pump, circulator, microwave oven, container, pipe interface, temperature sensor, float, data acquisition card, microwave power control circuit, and reactor was designed and developed. Moreover, in order to optimize the effect of ultrasonic waves on the existing micro-organisms in the sour cherry juice, some preliminary experiments were carried out to optimize the ultrasonic probe and reactor design. The results of evaluations showed that using the combined automatic system, the qualitative properties of sour cherry (vitamin C content 14 %, total phenolics content 1 %, total anthocyanins content 6 %) can be better maintained compared with the conventional thermal method. Based on the results obtained in this study, the following processing conditions: microwave power of 541.7 W, temperature of 41 °C, ultrasonic power of 799.57 W and ultrasonic exposure time of 6 min were recommended for optimum processing of sour cherry juice. PMID:26787934

  10. Implementation of barycentric resampling for continuous wave searches in gravitational wave data

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Pinkesh; Dupuis, Rejean; Betzwieser, Joseph; Siemens, Xavier

    2010-04-15

    We describe an efficient implementation of a coherent statistic for searches of continuous gravitational wave from neutron stars. The algorithm works by transforming the data taken by a gravitational wave detector from a moving Earth bound frame to one that sits at the Solar System barycenter. Many practical difficulties arise in the implementation of this algorithm, some of which have not been discussed previously. These difficulties include constraints of small computer memory, discreteness of the data, losses due to interpolation, and gaps in real data. This implementation is considerably more efficient than previous implementations of these kinds of searches on Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave (LIGO) detector data. The speed-up factors range from 10, when applied to Einstein-Home, to about 2000 for targeted searches which integrate over months of data.

  11. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. on catfish exposed to microwave heating in a continuous mode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave (MW) heating using continuous output may provide better and consistent cooking for foods. Currently, household units with a build-in inverter device are available in which the output is continuous vs. the traditional on-off mode. With an inverter, these MW ovens may provide consistent he...

  12. Enhanced generation of a second-harmonic wave in a composite of metamaterial and microwave plasma with various permittivities.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Akinori; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Osamu

    2015-09-01

    The generation of a second-harmonic wave, which is one typical nonlinear feature, is enhanced in a composite of plasma and metamaterial. When we generate plasma by an injection of microwaves, whose frequencies are fundamental, we observe intensified second-harmonic waves in the cases of negative-refractive-index states in which both metamaterial permeability and plasma permittivity are negative for the fundamental waves. We performed the measurements at multiple levels of microwave input power up to 300 W to regulate permittivity in the negative polarity for the fundamental wave and in the transient region, including the positive-zero-negative values, for the second-harmonic wave. We clarified that the observed enhancement results from high electron density in negative-permittivity plasma, the propagating fundamental frequency wave not being attenuated in the negative-refractive-index state, and partial phase matching between the fundamental and second-harmonic waves. PMID:26465573

  13. Enhanced generation of a second-harmonic wave in a composite of metamaterial and microwave plasma with various permittivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Akinori; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Osamu

    2015-09-01

    The generation of a second-harmonic wave, which is one typical nonlinear feature, is enhanced in a composite of plasma and metamaterial. When we generate plasma by an injection of microwaves, whose frequencies are fundamental, we observe intensified second-harmonic waves in the cases of negative-refractive-index states in which both metamaterial permeability and plasma permittivity are negative for the fundamental waves. We performed the measurements at multiple levels of microwave input power up to 300 W to regulate permittivity in the negative polarity for the fundamental wave and in the transient region, including the positive-zero-negative values, for the second-harmonic wave. We clarified that the observed enhancement results from high electron density in negative-permittivity plasma, the propagating fundamental frequency wave not being attenuated in the negative-refractive-index state, and partial phase matching between the fundamental and second-harmonic waves.

  14. Sub-optical wavelength acoustic wave modulation of integrated photonic resonators at microwave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Semere Ayalew; Li, Mo

    2014-01-01

    Light-sound interactions have long been exploited in various acousto-optic devices based on bulk crystalline materials. Conventionally, these devices operate in megahertz frequency range where the acoustic wavelength is much longer than the optical wavelength and a long interaction length is required to attain significant coupling. With nanoscale transducers, acoustic waves with sub-optical wavelengths can now be excited to induce strong acousto-optic coupling in nanophotonic devices. Here we demonstrate microwave frequency surface acoustic wave transducers co-integrated with nanophotonic resonators on piezoelectric aluminum nitride substrates. Acousto-optic modulation of the resonance modes at above 10 GHz with the acoustic wavelength significantly below the optical wavelength is achieved. The phase and modal matching conditions in this scheme are investigated for efficient modulation. The new acousto-optic platform can lead to novel optical devices based on nonlinear Brillouin processes and provides a direct, wideband link between optical and microwave photons for microwave photonics and quantum optomechanics. PMID:25400144

  15. Influence of wall plasma on microwave frequency and power in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jun; Cao, Yibing; Teng, Yan; Zhang, Yuchuan; Chen, Changhua; Wu, Ping

    2015-07-15

    The RF breakdown of the slow wave structure (SWS), which will lead to the generation of the wall plasma, is an important cause for pulse shortening in relativistic backward wave oscillators. Although many researchers have performed profitable studies about this issue, the influence mechanism of this factor on the microwave generation still remains not-so-clear. This paper simplifies the wall plasma with an “effective” permittivity and researches its influence on the microwave frequency and power. The dispersion relation of the SWS demonstrates that the introduction of the wall plasma will move the dispersion curves upward to some extent, which is confirmed by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and experiments. The plasma density and volume mainly affect the dispersion relation at the upper and lower frequency limits of each mode, respectively. Meanwhile, PIC simulations show that even though no direct power absorption exists since the wall plasma is assumed to be static, the introduction of the wall plasma may also lead to the decrease in microwave power by changing the electrodynamic property of the SWS.

  16. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Imaging Using Synthetic Aperture Focusing and Holographical Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Joseph Tobias

    2005-01-01

    Microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) methods have shown great potential for determining material composition in composite structures, determining material thickness or debond thickness between two layers, and determining the location and size of flaws, defects, and anomalies. The same testing methods have also shown great potential to produce relatively high-resolution images of voids inside Spray On Foam Insulation (SOFI) test panels using real focused methods employing lens antennas. An alternative to real focusing methods are synthetic focusing methods. The essence of synthetic focusing is to match the phase of the scattered signal to measured points spaced regularly on a plane. Many variations of synthetic focusing methods have already been developed for radars, ultrasonic testing applications, and microwave concealed weapon detection. Two synthetic focusing methods were investigated; namely, a) frequency-domain synthetic aperture focusing technique (FDSAFT), and b) wide-band microwave holography. These methods were applied towards materials whose defects were of low dielectric contrast like air void in SOFI. It is important to note that this investigation used relatively low frequencies from 8.2 GHz to 26.5 GHz that are not conducive for direct imaging of the SOFI. The ultimate goal of this work has been to demonstrate the capability of these methods before they are applied to much higher frequencies such as the millimeter wave frequency spectrum (e.g., 30-300 GHz).

  17. Continuous-wave terahertz scanning image resolution analysis and restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Yin, Qiguo; Yao, Rui; Ding, Shenghui; Wang, Qi

    2010-03-01

    Resolution of continuous-wave (CW) terahertz scanning image is limited by many factors among which the aperture effect of finite focus diameter is very important. We have investigated the factors that affect terahertz (THz) image resolution in details through theory analysis and simulation. On the other hand, in order to enhance THz image resolution, Richardson-Lucy algorithm has been introduced as a promising approach to improve image details. By analyzing the imaging theory, it is proposed that intensity distribution function of actual THz laser focal spot can be approximatively used as point spread function (PSF) in the restoration algorithm. The focal spot image could be obtained by applying the pyroelectric camera, and mean filtering result of the focal spot image is used as the PSF. Simulation and experiment show that the algorithm implemented is comparatively effective.

  18. Kinetic model of continuous-wave flow chemical lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z.; X., E.

    1982-02-01

    A kinetic approach to modeling the gain in a chemical wave continuous laser when the lasing frequency is coincident with the center of the line shape is presented. Governing equations are defined for the relaxing behavior of an initially nonequilibrium distribution toward the local equilibrium Boltzmann-Maxwellian distribution. A new gain is introduced which is related to the thermal motion of the molecules and cold-reaction and premixed CW models are discussed. Coincidence of the lasing frequency with the line shape is demonstrated to result in a radiative intensity within the homogeneous broadening limit. The rate model predictions are compared with those of the kinetic model. It is found that when the broadening parameter is less than 0.2 the kinetic model more accurately describes the behavior of the CW chemical laser.

  19. Sensitivity limits of continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haifeng; Lehmann, Kevin K

    2013-12-19

    An optimized nonlinear least-squares fit algorithm for data processing in cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) is discussed, which improves the calculation efficiency substantially over using a general purpose fitting package. Theoretical absorption sensitivity limits for both the detector noise and the shot noise limited situations are derived and compared with experimental results. The effect of limiting the bandwidth of detection system on ring-down signal is discussed and compared with real ring-down data. The optimal trigger level and fitting interval are obtained for continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) in both the detector noise and shot noise limits, with the resulting sensitivity in units of cm(-1) per (Hz(1/2)) derived. Interestingly, it is found that the optimized shot noise limited sensitivity in cw-CRDS method is, in principle, comparable with the ultimate sensitivity of noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). PMID:23978273

  20. Continuous-wave laser generated jets for needle free applications.

    PubMed

    Berrospe-Rodriguez, Carla; Visser, Claas Willem; Schlautmann, Stefan; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben; Fernandez Rivas, David

    2016-01-01

    We designed and built a microfluidic device for the generation of liquid jets produced by thermocavitation. A continuous wave (CW) laser was focused inside a micro-chamber filled with a light-absorbing solution to create a rapidly expanding vapor bubble. The chamber is connected to a micro-channel which focuses and ejects the liquid jet through the exit. The bubble growth and the jet velocity were measured as a function of the devices geometry (channel diameter D and chamber width A). The fastest jets were those for relatively large chamber size with respect to the channel diameter. Elongated and focused jets up to 29 m/s for a channel diameter of [Formula: see text] and chamber size of [Formula: see text] were obtained. The proposed CW laser-based device is potentially a compact option for a practical and commercially feasible needle-free injector. PMID:26858816

  1. Continuous-Wave Stimulated Raman Scattering (cwSRS) Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a powerful tool for chemically-sensitive non-invasive optical imaging. However, ultrafast laser sources, which are currently employed, are still expensive and require substantial maintenance to provide temporal overlap and spectral tuning. SRS imaging, which utilizes continuous-wave laser sources, has a major advantage, as it eliminates the cell damage due to exposure to the high-intensity light radiation, while substantially reducing the cost and complexity of the set-up. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate microscopic imaging of dimethyl sulfoxide using two independent, commonly used lasers, a diode-pumped, intracavity doubled 532-nm laser and a He-Ne laser operating at 632.8-nm PMID:24058269

  2. Continuous-wave phase-matched molecular optical modulator

    PubMed Central

    Zaitsu, Shin-ichi; Izaki, Hirotomo; Tsuchiya, Takao; Imasaka, Totaro

    2016-01-01

    In optical modulation, the highest available modulation rate is basically limited to the GHz frequency range at best. This is because optical modulation is often performed using electro-optic or acousto-optic effects that require application of an external signal to solid-state nonlinear optical materials. Here we describe optical modulation of continuous-wave radiation at frequencies exceeding 10 THz based on ultrafast variation of molecule polarizability arising from coherent molecular motion. The optical modulation efficiency is extensively enhanced by fulfilling phase-matching conditions with the help of dispersion control of the optical cavity, generating sidebands with a highest ratio of 7.3 × 10−3. These results will pave the way for development of versatile optical modulation-based techniques in a wide range of research fields in optical sciences, such as mode-locked lasers operating in the THz range. PMID:26887500

  3. Theory of continuous-wave excitation of the sodium beacon

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.; Fearn, H.; Telle, J.M.; Fugate, R.Q.

    1999-10-01

    We extend our previous analysis of the sodium beacon [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A {bold 15}, 217 (1998)] to the case of continuous-wave excitation. Various effects that could be ignored in the case of pulsed excitation, such as the geomagnetic field, the recoil of the sodium atoms upon absorption and emission, and collisions of the sodium atoms with other mesospheric species, are included. Spin-relaxation collisions are among the most important of these effects for the cases considered. Analytical approximations to numerical results are presented, and using a semi-empirical estimate for Na-O{sub 2} spin relaxation, we compute photon returns in good agreement with recently reported measurements at the Steward Observatory. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  4. Application of a continuous wave radar for human gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Michael

    2005-05-01

    A continuous wave (CW) radar has been used for the detection and classification of people based on the Doppler signatures they produce when walking. When humans walk, the motion of various components of the body including the torso, arms, and legs produce a very characteristic Doppler signature. Fourier transform techniques were used to analyze these signatures and key features were identified that are very representative of the human walking motion. Data was collected on a number of human subjects and a simple classifier was developed to recognize people walking. The results of this study could have a wide range of security and perimeter protection applications involving the use of low-cost CW radars as remote sensors.

  5. High power continuous-wave Alexandrite laser with green pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Shirin; Major, Arkady

    2016-07-01

    We report on a continuous-wave (CW) Alexandrite (Cr:BeAl2O4) laser, pumped by a high power green source at 532 nm with a diffraction limited beam. An output power of 2.6 W at 755 nm, a slope efficiency of 26%, and wavelength tunability of 85 nm have been achieved using 11 W of green pump. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest CW output power of a high brightness laser pumped Alexandrite laser reported to date. The results obtained in this experiment can lead to the development of a high power tunable CW and ultrafast sources of the near-infrared or ultraviolet radiation through frequency conversion.

  6. Continuous subsurface velocity measurement with coda wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoshan; Zhu, Ping; Chen, Yong; Niu, Fenglin; Wang, Bin

    2008-12-01

    A 1-month field experiment was conducted near Kunming in Yunnan Province, China, to continuously monitor subsurface velocity variations along different baselines. The experiment site is located 10 km west to the seismically very active Xiaojiang fault zone. An electric hammer was used as a source to generate highly repeatable seismic waves, which were recorded by 5 short-period seismometers deployed at ˜10 m to 1.2 km away from the source. Velocity variation was estimated by using coda wave interferometry technique. The technique measures changes in differential time between the coda and the first arrival, which is in principal insensitive to timing errors. We obtained a fractional velocity perturbation (δv/v) of 10-3 to 10-2 with a precision of 10-4. The measured velocity variation is consistent among different components and stations and appears to well correlate with deep water level. The velocity variation is featured by a long-term linear trend and well-developed daily cycles. The latter is interpreted as the velocity response to the barometric pressure. A multivariate linear regression analysis of the data indicates that the velocity change exhibits a negative correlation with barometric pressure, with a stress sensitivity of 10-6/Pa at the experimental site.

  7. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves from Nine Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña na-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Ro´ska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-11-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in data from the sixth Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of 10. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering {F}-statistic. We found no evidence of GW signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as 4 × 10-25 on intrinsic strain, 2 × 10-7 on fiducial ellipticity, and 4 × 10-5 on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  8. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves from Nine Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D’Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in data from the sixth Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of 10. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3–25.3 days using the matched-filtering {F}-statistic. We found no evidence of GW signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as 4 × 10‑25 on intrinsic strain, 2 × 10‑7 on fiducial ellipticity, and 4 × 10‑5 on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  9. Measurements of ICRF wave-induced density fluctuations in LHD by a microwave reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, A.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsujii, N.; Saito, K.; Seki, T.; Kasahara, H.; Kamio, S.; Seki, R.; Mutoh, T.; Yamada, I.; Takase, Y.

    2015-12-01

    An O-mode microwave reflectometer has been developed to measure ICRF wave induced electron density fluctuations in LHD plasmas. The system has two probing frequencies (28.8 and 30.1 GHz) to measure two spatial points simultaneously. The rms density fluctuation levels are typically 0.01%. The linearity between the measured density fluctuation amplitude and the square root of the RF power is discussed. The decay length of the RF field was estimated to be 1 to 7 m under the operational condition investigated. A typical spatial distance between the two measurement points corresponding to the two probing frequencies is a few centimeters, and the fluctuation amplitudes at the two points are similar in amplitude. The phase difference between the two fluctuations show in-phase relationship on average. Out-of phase relationships, which implies a standing wave structure, are often observed when the wave absorption is expected to be poor.

  10. High power water load for microwave and millimeter-wave radio frequency sources

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.; Schumacher, Richard V.; Pendleton, Rand P.

    1999-01-01

    A high power water load for microwave and millimeter wave radio frequency sources has a front wall including an input port for the application of RF power, a cylindrical dissipation cavity lined with a dissipating material having a thickness which varies with depth, and a rear wall including a rotating reflector for the reflection of wave energy inside the cylindrical cavity. The dissipation cavity includes a water jacket for removal of heat generated by the absorptive material coating the dissipation cavity, and this absorptive material has a thickness which is greater near the front wall than near the rear wall. Waves entering the cavity reflect from the rotating reflector, impinging and reflecting multiple times on the absorptive coating of the dissipation cavity, dissipating equal amounts of power on each internal reflection.

  11. Deciphering inflation with gravitational waves: Cosmic microwave background polarization vs direct detection with laser interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tristan L.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Cooray, Asantha

    2006-06-15

    A detection of the primordial gravitational wave background is considered to be the 'smoking-gun' evidence for inflation. While superhorizon waves are probed with cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization, the relic background will be studied with laser interferometers. The long lever arm spanned by the two techniques improves constraints on the inflationary potential and validation of consistency relations expected under inflation. If gravitational waves with a tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio greater than 0.01 are detected by the CMB, then a direct-detection experiment with a sensitivity consistent with current concept studies should be pursued vigorously. If no primordial tensors are detected by the CMB, a direct-detection experiment to understand the simplest form of inflation must have a sensitivity improved by two to 3 orders of magnitude over current plans.

  12. Two-frequency /Delta k/ microwave scatterometer measurements of ocean wave spectra from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Jones, W. L.; Weissman, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for remotely sensing the large-scale gravity wave spectrum on the ocean surface using a two frequency (Delta k) microwave scatterometer has been demonstrated from stationary platforms and proposed from moving platforms. This measurement takes advantage of Bragg type resonance matching between the electromagnetic wavelength at the difference frequency and the length of the large-scale surface waves. A prominent resonance appears in the cross product power spectral density (PSD) of the two backscattered signals. Ku-Band aircraft scatterometer measurements were conducted by NASA in the North Sea during the 1979 Maritime Remote Sensing (MARSEN) experiment. Typical examples of cross product PSD's computed from the MARSEN data are presented. They demonstrate strong resonances whose frequency and bandwidth agree with the surface characteristics and the theory. Directional modulation spectra of the surface reflectivity are compared to the gravity wave spectrum derived from surface truth measurements.

  13. Microwave-Excited Microplasma Thrusters Using Surface Wave and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Daisuke; Kawanabe, Tetsuo; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2012-10-01

    Downsizing spacecrafts has recently been focused on to decrease mission costs and to increase launch rates, and missions with small satellites would bring a great advantage of reducing their risks. Such a concept supports a new approach to developing precise, reliable, and low-cost micropropulsion systems. We have studied two types of microwave-excited microplasma thrusters, using surface wave-excited and electron cyclotron resonance-excited discharges. Microwaves of S-band (4 GHz) and X-band (11 GHz) were employed to excite the plasma in these experiments, with the feed or propellant gases of Ar and He. A microplasma thruster of electrothermal type consisted of a surface wave-excited microplasma source, and a converging-diverging micronozzle to obtain the thrust. For 11-GHz microwaves at a power of 6 W, a thrust of 1.1 mN and a specific impulse of 90 s were obtained at an Ar gas flow rate of 40 sccm, where the plasma electron density was 1.2x10^20 m-3, and the gas temperature was 1.5x10^3 K; under the same conditions for 4-GHz microwaves, the thrust, specific impulse, electron density, and gas temperature were 0.93 mN, 80 s, 7.0x10^19 m-3, and 8.0x10^2 K, respectively. A microplasma thruster of electromagnetic type had a microplasma source excited by electron cyclotron resonance with external magnetic fields, to obtain the thrust through accelerating ions by ambipolar electric fields. Optical emission spectrum was dominated by Ar^+ ion lines in the microplasma thruster of electromagnetic type, owing to higher electron temperatures at lower feed-gas pressures.

  14. Compact continuously tunable microwave photonic filters based on cascaded silicon microring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; He, Mengying; Dong, Jianji

    2016-03-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a photonic approach to achieving tunable bandpass microwave photonic filters (MPFs) based on cascaded microring resonators (CMRRs). The optical spectrum of the silicon CMRRs could offer two bandpass response to separately filter the optical carrier and one of the sidebands generated by the phase modulation. Thus we could achieve a bandpass MPF. Moreover, as the central frequencies and bandwidths of the two bandpass response can be tuned by adjusting the laser wavelength and voltages applied on one MRR, the central operating frequency or 3-dB bandwidth of the MPF can be continuously tuned in wide ranges respectively. A proof-of-concept experiment illustrates a central frequency tuning range from 19 GHz to 40 GHz, and a wide bandwidth tuning range from 5.5 GHz to 17.5 GHz.

  15. Numerical modeling of continuous flow microwave heating: a critical comparison of COMSOL and ANSYS.

    PubMed

    Salvi, D; Boldor, Dorin; Ortego, J; Aita, G M; Sabliov, C M

    2010-01-01

    Numerical models were developed to simulate temperature profiles in Newtonian fluids during continuous flow microwave heating by one way coupling electromagnetism, fluid flow, and heat transport in ANSYS 8.0 and COMSOL Multiphysics v3.4. Comparison of the results from the COMSOL model with the results from a pre-developed and validated ANSYS model ensured accuracy of the COMSOL model. Prediction of power Loss by both models was in close agreement (5-13% variation) and the predicted temperature profiles were similar. COMSOL provided a flexible model setup whereas ANSYS required coupling incompatible elements to transfer load between electromagnetic, fluid flow, and heat transport modules. Overall, both software packages provided the ability to solve multiphysics phenomena accurately. PMID:21721467

  16. Continuous synthesis of monodispersed silver nanoparticles using a homogeneous heating microwave reactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Masateru; Miyakawa, Masato; Kataoka, Haruki; Koda, Hidekazu; Sato, Koichi; Suzuki, Toshishige M.

    2011-06-01

    Continuous synthesis of silver nanoparticles based on a polyol process was conducted using a microwave-assisted flow reactor installed in a cylindrical resonance cavity. Silver nitrate (AgNO3) and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) dissolved in ethylene glycol were used respectively as a silver metal precursor and as a capping agent of nanoparticles. Ethylene glycol worked as the solvent and simultaneously as the reductant. Silver nanoparticles of narrow size distributions were synthesized steadily for 5 h, maintaining almost constant yield (>93%) and quality. The reaction was achieved within 2.8 s of residence time, although nanoparticles were not formed under this flow rate by conventional heating. A narrower particle size distribution was realized by the increased flow rate of the reaction solution. Nanoparticles of 9.8 nm average size with a standard deviation of 0.9 nm were synthesized at the rate of 100 ml h-l.

  17. Continuous-wave and quasi-continuous wave thulium-doped all-fiber laser: implementation on kidney stone fragmentations.

    PubMed

    Pal, Debasis; Ghosh, Aditi; Sen, Ranjan; Pal, Atasi

    2016-08-10

    A continuous-wave (CW) as well as quasi-continuous wave (QCW) thulium-doped all-fiber laser at 1.94 μm has been designed for targeting applications in urology. The thulium-doped active fiber with an octagonal-shaped inner cladding is pumped at 793 nm to achieve stable CW laser power of 10 W with 32% lasing efficiency (against launched pump power). The linear variation of laser power with pump offers a scope of further power scaling. A QCW operation with variation of duty cycle from 0.5% to 90%, repetition rate from 0.1 Hz to 1 kHz, and pulse width from 40 μs to 2 s has been presented. Laser power of 9.5 W in CW mode of operation and average power of 5.2 W with energy range of 10.4-104 mJ in QCW mode of operation has been employed to fragment calcium oxalate monohydrate kidney stones (size of 1.5-4 cm) having different colors and composition. Dependence of ablation threshold, ablation rate, and average fragmented particle size on the average power and energy has been studied. One minute of laser exposure results in fragmentation of a stone surface with ablation rate of 8  mg/min having minimum particle size of 6.54 μm with an average size of 20-100 μm ensuring the natural removal of fragmented parts through the urethra. PMID:27534454

  18. Correlations of whitecap coverage and gas transfer velocity with microwave brightness temperature for plunging and spilling breaking waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qin; Monahan, E.C.; Asher, W.E.

    1995-07-01

    Bubbles and bubble plumes generated by wind-induced breaking waves significantly enhance the gas exchange across the interface between the ocean and atmosphere under high-wind conditions. Whitcaps, or active spilling wave crests, are the sea-surface manifestation of the bubbles and bubble plumes in the subsurface mixed layer, and the fractional area of the sea surface covered by which has been proposed to correlate linearly with the air-sea gas transfer velocity. The presence of whitecaps substantially increases the microwave brightness temperature of the sea surface. It could be possible to estimate the whitecap coverage from the sea-surface microwave brightness temperature would also be very helpful in developing a remote-sensing model for predicting air-sea gas transfer velocities from microwave brightness temperatures. As a part of an air-water gas exchange experiment conducted in an outdoor surf pool, measurements were made that were designed to investigate the correlation between whitecap coverage and microwave brightness temperature. A mechanical wave maker was located at the deep end of the pool and the generated waves propagate and break towards the shallow end of the pool. Two wave patterns characteristic of plunging and spilling breaking waves at four wave heights from 0.3 m to 1.2 m were produced.

  19. Monitoring internal organ motion with continuous wave radar in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pfanner, Florian; Maier, Joscha; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To avoid motion artifacts in medical imaging or to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues in radiation therapy, medical devices are often synchronized with the patient's respiratory motion. Today's respiratory motion monitors require additional effort to prepare the patients, e.g., mounting a motion belt or placing an optical reflector on the patient's breast. Furthermore, they are not able to measure internal organ motion without implanting markers. An interesting alternative to assess the patient's organ motion is continuous wave radar. The aim of this work is to design, implement, and evaluate such a radar system focusing on application in CT.Methods: The authors designed a radar system operating in the 860 MHz band to monitor the patient motion. In the intended application of the radar system, the antennas are located close to the patient's body inside the table of a CT system. One receive and four transmitting antennas are used to avoid the requirement of exact patient positioning. The radar waves propagate into the patient's body and are reflected at tissue boundaries, for example at the borderline between muscle and adipose tissue, or at the boundaries of organs. At present, the authors focus on the detection of respiratory motion. The radar system consists of the hardware mentioned above as well as of dedicated signal processing software to extract the desired information from the radar signal. The system was evaluated using simulations and measurements. To simulate the radar system, a simulation model based on radar and wave field equations was designed and 4D respiratory-gated CT data sets were used as input. The simulated radar signals and the measured data were processed in the same way. The radar system hardware and the signal processing algorithms were tested with data from ten volunteers. As a reference, the respiratory motion signal was recorded using a breast belt simultaneously with the radar measurements.Results: Concerning the

  20. Continuous wave terahertz wave spectrometer based on diode laser pumping: potential applications in high resolution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Tadao; Ragam, Srinivasa; Oyama, Yutaka

    2009-11-01

    We constructed a high resolution terahertz (THz) spectroscopic system with an automatic scanning control using a continuous wave (cw) THz wave generator based on difference frequency generation method by excitation of phonon-polariton mode in GaP. The pump and signals lasers were compact, tunable external cavity laser, and distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, respectively. The generated THz waves were tuned automatically by changing the temperature of the DFB laser using a system control. We present the water vapor transmission characteristics of the THz wave and also absorption spectrum of a white polyethylene in the frequency range of 1.97-2.45 THz. The spectroscopic measurements performed at an output power level of 2 nW, which was obtained with a 15-mm-long GaP crystal at 2 THz. The advantage of this cw THz spectrometer is wide frequency tuning range (0.7-4.42 THz) with an estimated linewidth of full width at quarter maximum <8 MHz and this system has a potential application in high resolution spectroscopy. PMID:19947715

  1. High-performance packaging for monolithic microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Li, K.; Shih, Y. C.

    1992-01-01

    Packaging schemes are developed that provide low-loss, hermetic enclosure for enhanced monolithic microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits. These package schemes are based on a fused quartz substrate material offering improved RF performance through 44 GHz. The small size and weight of the packages make them useful for a number of applications, including phased array antenna systems. As part of the packaging effort, a test fixture was developed to interface the single chip packages to conventional laboratory instrumentation for characterization of the packaged devices.

  2. Advanced sine wave modulation of continuous wave laser system for atmospheric CO(2) differential absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Joel F; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R

    2014-02-10

    In this theoretical study, modulation techniques are developed to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. A continuous wave (CW) lidar system using sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) pseudo-noise (PN) codes is described for making simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Amplitude and phase-shift keying (PSK) modulated intensity modulation (IM) carriers, in addition to a hybrid-pulse technique are investigated, which exhibit optimal autocorrelation properties. A method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions, which does not significantly degrade the resolution or introduce sidelobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth. PMID:24663259

  3. Continuous pig iron making by microwave heating with 12.5 kW at 2.45 GHz.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kyosuke; Hayashi, Miyuki; Sato, Motoyasu; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    A continuous process of pig iron making using microwave of 2.45 GHz was constructed in a microwave furnace with maximum power of 12.5 kW. Pig iron was produced from the mixed powder of magnetite ore and carbon such as coal, coke and graphite. Molten pig iron initially poured from reaction chamber after about 40 min when temperature attained over 1200 degrees C. After temperature attained at 1400 degrees C, 50 or 200 g of mixed powder was added several times in regular interval and pig iron continuously dropped out from reaction chamber. When mixed powder was supplied, temperature in reaction chamber decreased by about 200 degrees C and recovered during 5 min. Finally, the recovery time of temperature lengthened. In order to make the scale-up of the microwave furnace for iron making, it has been discussed how to improve energy efficiency and to make a preferable construction. PMID:24427877

  4. Exciting Alfven Waves using Modulated Electron Heating by High Power Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhou; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; van Compernolle, Bart; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-10-01

    Experiments exploring the physics of ionospheric modification with intense perpendicular propagating waves (k-> ⊥B->0) on the Large Plasma Device (LaPD) at UCLA have been upgraded with the addition of a high power rapidly pulsed microwave source. The plasma is irradiated with ten pulses (250 kW X-band) near the upper-hybrid frequency. The pulses are modulated at a frequency of a fraction (0.1-1.0) of fci (ion cyclotron frequency). Based on a previous single-pulse experiment, the modulated electron heating may drive a large amplitude shear Alfvén wave (f wave driving mechanism may have important application in terrestrial radio communications by low frequency waves, which are difficult to launch directly due to their enormous wavelengths. Various heating methods involving X-mode, O-mode, and electron Bernstein mode are investigated in plasmas with controllable parameters (ne =108 ~1012 cm-3 ,Te = 0 . 1 ~ 6 eV ,Ti <waves and the subsequent structural changes of the plasma near the conversion region are also under investigation. This work is supported by an AFOSR MURI award, and conducted at the Basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA funded by DoE and NSF.

  5. Search for continuous gravitational waves: Improving robustness versus instrumental artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keitel, David; Prix, Reinhard; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Leaci, Paola; Siddiqi, Maham

    2014-03-01

    The standard multidetector F-statistic for continuous gravitational waves is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artifacts, for example monochromatic sinusoidal disturbances ("lines"). This vulnerability to line artifacts arises because the F-statistic compares the signal hypothesis to a Gaussian-noise hypothesis, and hence is triggered by anything that resembles the signal hypothesis more than Gaussian noise. Various ad-hoc veto methods to deal with such line artifacts have been proposed and used in the past. Here we develop a Bayesian framework that includes an explicit alternative hypothesis to model disturbed data. We introduce a simple line model that defines lines as signal candidates appearing only in one detector. This allows us to explicitly compute the odds between the signal hypothesis and an extended noise hypothesis, resulting in a new detection statistic that is more robust to instrumental artifacts. We present and discuss results from Monte-Carlo tests on both simulated data and on detector data from the fifth LIGO science run. We find that the line-robust statistic retains the detection power of the standard F-statistic in Gaussian noise. In the presence of line artifacts it is more sensitive, even compared to the popular F-statistic consistency veto, over which it improves by as much as a factor of two in detectable signal strength.

  6. Pump and probe spectroscopy with continuous wave quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkbride, James M. R.; Causier, Sarah K.; Dalton, Andrew R.; Ritchie, Grant A. D.; Weidmann, Damien

    2014-02-07

    This paper details infra-red pump and probe studies on nitric oxide conducted with two continuous wave quantum cascade lasers both operating around 5 μm. The pump laser prepares a velocity selected population in a chosen rotational quantum state of the v = 1 level which is subsequently probed using a second laser tuned to a rotational transition within the v = 2 ← v = 1 hot band. The rapid frequency scan of the probe (with respect to the molecular collision rate) in combination with the velocity selective pumping allows observation of marked rapid passage signatures in the transient absorption profiles from the polarized vibrationally excited sample. These coherent transient signals are influenced by the underlying hyperfine structure of the pump and probe transitions, the sample pressure, and the coherent properties of the lasers. Pulsed pump and probe studies show that the transient absorption signals decay within 1 μs at 50 mTorr total pressure, reflecting both the polarization and population dephasing times of the vibrationally excited sample. The experimental observations are supported by simulation based upon solving the optical Bloch equations for a two level system.

  7. Model Calculations of Continuous-Wave Laser Ionization of Krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Bret D. Cannon

    1999-07-27

    This report describes modeling of a scheme that uses continuous-wave (CW) lasers to ionize selected isotopes of krypton with high isotopic selectivity. The models predict that combining this ionization scheme with mass spectrometric measurement of the resulting ions can be the basis for ultra-sensitive methods to measure {sup 85}Kr in the presence of a 10{sup 11} excess of the stable krypton isotopes. Two experimental setups are considered in this model: the first setup is for krypton as a static gas, the second is for krypton in an atomic beam. In the static gas experiment, for a total krypton press of 10{sup {minus}4} torr and 10 W of power in the cavity, the model predicts a total krypton ion current of 4.6 x 10{sup 8} s{sup {minus}1} and for a {sup 85}Kr/Kr of 10{sup {minus}11} a {sup 85}Kr ion current of 3.5 s{sup {minus}1} or about 10,000 per hour. The atomic beam setup allowed higher isotopic selectivity; the model predicts a {sup 85}Kr ion current of 18 s{sup {minus}1} or 65,000 per hour.

  8. The Feasibility of Monitoring Continuous Wave Sources with Seismic Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Claassen, J.P.; Elbring, G.; Ladd, M.

    1999-03-15

    This paper identifies and explores the technical requirements and issues associated with remotely monitoring continuous wave (CW) sources with seismic arrays. Potential approaches to this monitoring problem will be suggested and partially evaluated to expose the monitoring challenges which arise when realistic local geologies and cultural noise sources are considered. The selective directionality and the adaptive noise cancellation properties of arrays are required to observe weak signals while suppressing a colored background punctuated with an unknown distribution of point and sometimes distributive sources. The array is also required to characterize the emitters and propagation environment so as to properly focus on the CW sources of interest while suppressing the remaining emitters. The proper application of arrays requires an appreciation of the complexity of propagation in a non-homogeneous earth. The heterogeneity often limits the available spatial coherence and therefore the size of the army. This adversely impacts the array gain and the array's ability to carefully resolve various emitters. Arrays must also contend with multipath induced by the source and the heterogeneous earth. If the array is to focus on an emitter and realize an enhancement in the signal to noise ratio, methods must be sought to coherently add the desired signal components while suppressing interference which may be correlated with the desired signal. The impact of these and other issues on army design and processing are described and discussed.

  9. Higher Order Mode Coupler Heating in Continuous Wave Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solyak, N.; Awida, M.; Hocker, A.; Khabibobulline, T.; Lunin, A.

    Electromagnetic heating due to higher order modes (HOM) propagation is particularly a concern for continuous wave (CW) particle accelerator machines. Power on the order of several watts could flow out of the cavity's HOM ports in CW operations. The upgrade of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS-II) at SLAC requires a major modification of the design of the higher order mode (HOM) antenna and feed through of the conventional ILC elliptical 9-cell cavity in order to utilize it for LCLS-II. The HOM antenna is required to bear higher RF losses, while relatively maintaining the coupling level of the higher order modes. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the heating expected in the HOM coupler with a thorough thermal quench study in comparison with the conventional ILC design. We discuss also how the heat will be removed from the cavity through RF cables with specially designed cooling straps. Finally, we report on the latest experimental results of cavity testing in vertical and horizontal cryostats.

  10. Continuous wave terahertz reflection imaging of human colorectal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2013-03-01

    Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging has the potential to offer a safe, non-ionizing, and nondestructive medical imaging modality for delineating colorectal cancer. Fresh excisions of normal colon tissue were obtained from surgeries performed at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. Reflection measurements of thick sections of colorectal tissues, mounted in an aluminum sample holder, were obtained for both fresh and formalin fixed tissues. The two-dimensional reflection images were acquired by using an optically pumped far-infrared molecular gas laser operating at 584 GHz with liquid Helium cooled silicon bolometer detector. Using polarizers in the experiment both co-polarized and cross-polarized remittance form the samples was collected. Analysis of the images showed the importance of understanding the effects of formalin fixation while determining reflectance level of tissue response. The resulting co- and cross-polarized images of both normal and formalin fixed tissues showed uniform terahertz response over the entire sample area. Initial measurements indicated a co-polarized reflectance of 16%, and a cross-polarized reflectance of 0.55% from fresh excisions of normal colonic tissues.

  11. High power continuous-wave titanium:sapphire laser

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, G.V.; Bass, I.L.; Hackel, R.P.; Jenkins, S.L.; Kanz, V.K.; Paisner, J.A.

    1993-09-21

    A high-power continuous-wave laser resonator is provided, wherein first, second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth mirrors form a double-Z optical cavity. A first Ti:sapphire rod is disposed between the second and third mirrors and at the mid-point of the length of the optical cavity, and a second Ti:sapphire rod is disposed between the fourth and fifth mirrors at a quarter-length point in the optical cavity. Each Ti:sapphire rod is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a pair of argon-ion lasers. For narrow band operation, a 3-plate birefringent filter and an etalon are disposed in the optical cavity so that the spectral output of the laser consists of 5 adjacent cavity modes. For increased power, seventy and eighth mirrors are disposed between the first and second mirrors to form a triple-Z optical cavity. A third Ti:sapphire rod is disposed between the seventh and eighth mirrors at the other quarter-length point in the optical cavity, and is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a third pair of argon-ion lasers. 5 figures.

  12. High power continuous-wave titanium:sapphire laser

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Bass, Isaac L.; Hackel, Richard P.; Jenkins, Sherman L.; Kanz, Vernon K.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    A high-power continuous-wave laser resonator (10) is provided, wherein first, second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth mirrors (11-16) form a double-Z optical cavity. A first Ti:Sapphire rod (17) is disposed between the second and third mirrors (12,13) and at the mid-point of the length of the optical cavity, and a second Ti:Sapphire rod (18) is disposed between the fourth and fifth mirrors (14,15) at a quarter-length point in the optical cavity. Each Ti:Sapphire rod (17,18) is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a pair of argon-ion lasers (21-22, 23-24). For narrow band operation, a 3-plate birefringent filter (36) and an etalon (37) are disposed in the optical cavity so that the spectral output of the laser consists of 5 adjacent cavity modes. For increased power, seventy and eighth mirrors (101, 192) are disposed between the first and second mirrors (11, 12) to form a triple-Z optical cavity. A third Ti:Sapphire rod (103) is disposed between the seventh and eighth mirrors (101, 102) at the other quarter-length point in the optical cavity, and is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a third pair of argon-ion lasers (104, 105).

  13. Nonlinear Guided Waves in Continuously Welded Rails for Buckling Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Robert; Bartoli, Ivan; Coccia, Stefano; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Salamone, Salvatore; Nucera, Claudio; Fateh, Mahmood; Carr, Gary

    2011-06-01

    Most modern railways use Continuous Welded Rail (CWR). A major problem is the almost total absence of expansion joints that can create severe issues such as buckling in hot weather and breakage in cold weather. A related critical parameter is the rail Neutral Temperature (NT), or the temperature at which the net longitudinal force in the rail is zero. In June 2008 the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), under the sponsorship of a Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development (R&D) grant, began work to develop a technique for in-situ measurement of NT and detection of incipient buckling in CWR. The method under investigation is based on ultrasonic guided waves, and the ultimate goal is to build and test a prototype that can be used in motion. A large-scale full rail track (70 feet in length) has been constructed at UCSD's Powell Structural Laboratories, the largest laboratories in the country for structural testing, to validate the NT measurement and buckling detection technique under rail heating conditions well controlled in the laboratory. This paper reports on the status of this project, including proof-of-principle results of stress measurement and buckling detection on a steel I-beam, and initial test results from the large-scale rail testbed at the Powell Labs. These results pave the road for the future development of the rail NT/buckling detection prototype.

  14. Terahertz polarization imaging based on the continuous wave terahertz radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Shen, Yanchun; Zhao, Guozhong

    2015-08-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging is a hot topic in the current imaging technology. THz imaging has the advantage to penetrate most of non-metal and non-polar materials for the detection of concealed objects, while it is harmless to biological organism. Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging is enable to offer a safe and noninvasive imaging for the investigated objects. In this paper, THz real-time polarization imaging system is demonstrated based on the SIFIR-50 THz laser as a radiation source and a NEC Terahertz Imager as an array detector. The experimental system employs two wire grid polarizers to acquire the intensity images in four different directions. The polarization information of the measured object is obtained based on the Stokes-Mueller matrix. Imaging experiments on the currency with water mark and the hollowed-out metal ring have been done. Their polarization images are acquired and analyzed. The results show that the extracted polarization images include the valuable information which can effectively detect and recognize the different kinds of objects.

  15. Low-current traveling wave tube for use in the microwave power module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Raymond W.; Ramins, Peter; Force, Dale A.; Dayton, James A.; Ebihara, Ben T.; Gruber, Robert P.

    1993-07-01

    The results of a traveling-wave-tube/multistage depressed-collector (TWT-MDC) design study in support of the Advanced Research Projects Agency/Department of Defense (ARPA/DOD) Microwave Power Module (MPM) Program are described. The study stressed the possible application of dynamic and other tapers to the RF output circuit of the MPM traveling wave tube as a means of increasing the RF and overall efficiencies and reducing the required beam current (perveance). The results indicate that a highly efficient, modified dynamic velocity taper (DVT) circuit can be designed for the broadband MPM application. The combination of reduced cathode current (lower perveance) and increased RF efficiency leads to (1) a substantially higher overall efficiency and reduction in the prime power to the MPM, and (2) substantially reduced levels of MDC and MPM heat dissipation, which simplify the cooling problems. However, the selected TWT circuit parameters need to be validated by cold test measurements on actual circuits.

  16. Low-current traveling wave tube for use in the microwave power module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Raymond W.; Ramins, Peter; Force, Dale A.; Dayton, James A.; Ebihara, Ben T.; Gruber, Robert P.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a traveling-wave-tube/multistage depressed-collector (TWT-MDC) design study in support of the Advanced Research Projects Agency/Department of Defense (ARPA/DOD) Microwave Power Module (MPM) Program are described. The study stressed the possible application of dynamic and other tapers to the RF output circuit of the MPM traveling wave tube as a means of increasing the RF and overall efficiencies and reducing the required beam current (perveance). The results indicate that a highly efficient, modified dynamic velocity taper (DVT) circuit can be designed for the broadband MPM application. The combination of reduced cathode current (lower perveance) and increased RF efficiency leads to (1) a substantially higher overall efficiency and reduction in the prime power to the MPM, and (2) substantially reduced levels of MDC and MPM heat dissipation, which simplify the cooling problems. However, the selected TWT circuit parameters need to be validated by cold test measurements on actual circuits.

  17. Numerical simulation of pressure waves in the cochlea induced by a microwave pulse.

    PubMed

    Yitzhak, Nir M; Ruppin, Raphael; Hareuveny, Ronen

    2014-10-01

    The pressure waves developing at the cochlea by the irradiation of the body with a plane wave microwave pulse are obtained by numerical simulation, employing a two-step finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm. First, the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution is obtained by solving the Maxwell equations on a FDTD grid. Second, the temperature rise due to this SAR distribution is used to formulate the thermoelastic equations of motion, which are discretized and solved by the FDTD method. The calculations are performed for anatomically based full body human models, as well as for a head model. The dependence of the pressure amplitude at the cochlea on the frequency, the direction of propagation, and the polarization of the incident electromagnetic radiation, as well as on the pulse width, was investigated. PMID:25099875

  18. Achromatic half-wave plate for submillimeter instruments in cosmic microwave background astronomy: experimental characterization.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Giampaolo; Savini, Giorgio; Ade, Peter A R; Haynes, Vic; Gear, Walter K

    2006-09-20

    An achromatic half-wave plate (HWP) to be used in millimeter cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments has been designed, manufactured, and tested. The design is based on the 5-plates Pancharatnam recipe and it works in the frequency range 85-185 GHz. A model has been used to predict the transmission, reflection, absorption, and phase shift as a function of frequency. The HWP has been tested by using coherent radiation from a back-wave oscillator to investigate its modulation efficiency and with incoherent radiation from a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to explore its frequency behavior. The FTS measurements have been fitted with an optical performance model which is in excellent agreement with the data. A detailed analysis of the data also allows a precise determination of the HWP fast and slow axes in the frequency band of operation. A list of the HWP performance characteristics is reported including estimates of its cross polarization. PMID:16946775

  19. Characterization and Applications of Micro- and Nano- Ferrites at Microwave and Millimeter Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Liu

    Ferrite materials are one of the most widely used magnetic materials in microwave and millimeter wave applications such as radar, wireless communication. They provide unique properties for microwave and millimeter wave devices especially non-reciprocal devices. Some ferrite materials with strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy fields can extend these applications to tens of GHz range while reducing the size, weight and cost. This thesis focuses on characterization of such ferrite materials as micro- and nano-powder and the fabrication of the devices. The ferrite materials with strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy field are metal/non-metal substituted iron oxides oriented in low crystal symmetry. The ferrite materials characterized in this thesis include M-type hexagonal ferrites such as barium ferrite (BaFe12O19), strontium ferrite (SrFe12O19), epsilon phase iron oxide (epsilon-Fe 2O3), substituted epsilon phase iron oxide (epsilon-Ga xFe2-xO3, epsilon-AlxFe2-xO 3). These ferrites exhibit great anisotropic magnetic fields. A transmission-reflection based in-waveguide technique that employs a vector network analyzer was used to determine the scattering parameters for each sample in the microwave bands (8.2--40 GHz). From the S-parameters, complex dielectric permittivity and complex magnetic permeability are evaluated by an improved algorithm. The millimeter wave measurement is based on a free space quasi-optical spectrometer. Initially precise transmittance spectra over a broad millimeter wave frequency range from 40 GHz to 120 GHz are acquired. Later the transmittance spectra are converted into complex permittivity and permeability spectra. These ferrite powder materials are further characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) to understand the crystalline structure relating to the strength and the shift of the ferromagnetic resonance affected by the particle size. A Y-junction circulator working in the 60 GHz frequency band is designed based on characterized M

  20. Comparison of Obturation Quality in Modified Continuous Wave Compaction, Continuous Wave Compaction, Lateral Compaction and Warm Vertical Compaction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Namjou, Sara; Kharazifard, Mohamad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to introduce modified continuous wave compaction (MCWC) technique and compare its obturation quality with that of lateral compaction (LC), warm vertical compaction (WVC) and continuous wave compaction techniques (CWC). The obturation time was also compared among the four techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four single-rooted teeth with 0–5° root canal curve and 64 artificially created root canals with 15° curves in acrylic blocks were evaluated. The teeth and acrylic specimens were each divided into four subgroups of 16 for testing the obturation quality of four techniques namely LC, WVC, CWC and MCWC. Canals were prepared using the Mtwo rotary system and filled with respect to their group allocation. Obturation time was recorded. On digital radiographs, the ratio of area of voids to the total area of filled canals was calculated using the Image J software. Adaptation of the filling materials to the canal walls was assessed at three cross-sections under a stereomicroscope (X30). Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, Tukey’s post hoc HSD test, the Kruskal Wallis test and t-test. Results: No significant difference existed in adaptation of filling materials to canal walls among the four subgroups in teeth samples (P ≥ 0.139); but, in artificially created canals in acrylic blocks, the frequency of areas not adapted to the canal walls was significantly higher in LC technique compared to MCWC (P ≤ 0.02). The void areas were significantly more in the LC technique than in other techniques in teeth (P < 0.001). The longest obturation time belonged to WVC technique followed by LC, CW and MCWC techniques (P<0.05). The difference between the artificially created canals in blocks and teeth regarding the obturation time was not significant (P = 0.41). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, MCWC technique resulted in better adaptation of gutta-percha to canal walls than LC at all cross-sections with

  1. Hybrid Matter-Wave-Microwave Solitons Produced by the Local-Field Effect.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jieli; Dong, Guangjiong; Malomed, Boris A

    2015-07-10

    It was recently found that the electric local-field effect (LFE) can lead to a strong coupling of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) to off-resonant optical fields. We demonstrate that the magnetic LFE gives rise to a previously unexplored mechanism for coupling a (pseudo-) spinor BEC or fermion gas to microwaves (MWs). We present a theory for the magnetic LFE and find that it gives rise to a short-range attractive interaction between two components of the (pseudo) spinor, and a long-range interaction between them. The latter interaction, resulting from deformation of the magnetic field, is locally repulsive but globally attractive, in sharp contrast with its counterpart for the optical LFE, produced by phase modulation of the electric field. Our analytical results, confirmed by the numerical computations, show that the long-range interaction gives rise to modulational instability of the spatially uniform state, and it creates stable ground states in the form of hybrid matter-wave-microwave solitons (which seem like one-dimensional magnetic monopoles), with a size much smaller than the MW wavelength, even in the presence of arbitrarily strong contact intercomponent repulsion. The setting is somewhat similar to exciton-polaritonic condensates in semiconductor microcavities. The release of matter waves from the soliton may be used for the realization of an atom laser. The analysis also applies to molecular BECs with rotational states coupled by the electric MW field. PMID:26207469

  2. Hybrid Matter-Wave-Microwave Solitons Produced by the Local-Field Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jieli; Dong, Guangjiong; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-07-01

    It was recently found that the electric local-field effect (LFE) can lead to a strong coupling of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) to off-resonant optical fields. We demonstrate that the magnetic LFE gives rise to a previously unexplored mechanism for coupling a (pseudo-) spinor BEC or fermion gas to microwaves (MWs). We present a theory for the magnetic LFE and find that it gives rise to a short-range attractive interaction between two components of the (pseudo) spinor, and a long-range interaction between them. The latter interaction, resulting from deformation of the magnetic field, is locally repulsive but globally attractive, in sharp contrast with its counterpart for the optical LFE, produced by phase modulation of the electric field. Our analytical results, confirmed by the numerical computations, show that the long-range interaction gives rise to modulational instability of the spatially uniform state, and it creates stable ground states in the form of hybrid matter-wave-microwave solitons (which seem like one-dimensional magnetic monopoles), with a size much smaller than the MW wavelength, even in the presence of arbitrarily strong contact intercomponent repulsion. The setting is somewhat similar to exciton-polaritonic condensates in semiconductor microcavities. The release of matter waves from the soliton may be used for the realization of an atom laser. The analysis also applies to molecular BECs with rotational states coupled by the electric MW field.

  3. Ultrasonic, microwave, and millimeter wave inspection techniques for adhesively bonded stacked open honeycomb core composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Clint D.; Cox, Ian; Ghasr, Mohammad Tayeb Ahmed; Ying, Kuang P.; Zoughi, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Honeycomb sandwich composites are used extensively in the aerospace industry to provide stiffness and thickness to lightweight structures. A common fabrication method for thick, curved sandwich structures is to stack and bond multiple honeycomb layers prior to machining core curvatures. Once bonded, each adhesive layer must be inspected for delaminations and the presence of unwanted foreign materials. From a manufacturing and cost standpoint, it can be advantageous to inspect the open core prior to face sheet closeout in order to reduce end-article scrap rates. However, by nature, these honeycomb sandwich composite structures are primarily manufactured from low permittivity and low loss materials making detection of delamination and some of the foreign materials (which also are low permittivity and low loss) quite challenging in the microwave and millimeter wave regime. Likewise, foreign materials such as release film in adhesive layers can be sufficiently thin as to not cause significant attenuation in through-transmission ultrasonic signals, making them difficult to detect. This paper presents a collaborative effort intended to explore the efficacy of different non-contact NDI techniques for detecting flaws in a stacked open fiberglass honeycomb core panel. These techniques primarily included air-coupled through-transmission ultrasonics, single-sided wideband synthetic aperture microwave and millimeter-wave imaging, and lens-focused technique. The goal of this investigation has been to not only evaluate the efficacy of these techniques, but also to determine their unique advantages and limitations for evaluating parameters such as flaw type, flaw size, and flaw depth.

  4. Analysis of upper mantle structure using wave field continuation of P waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.; Clayton, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Wave field continuation theory, which allows transformation of the seismic record section data directly into velocity-depth space, is tested for upper mantle analysis using a large array-recorded data set obtained at the 200-station Caltech-USGS Southern California Seismic Network that is representative of the structure beneath the gulf of California. The method's resolution capability is illustrated by the comparison of the slant stacks and downward continuation of both synthetic and data record sections. It is stressed that when high-quality, densely sampled digital data are available, the technique is easy to implement, provides an inversion which contains all the data in the global format, and produces an objective estimate of depth resolution as a function of ray parameter.

  5. The POLARBEAR Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiment and Anti-Reflection Coatings for Millimeter Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quealy, Erin Elizabeth

    New technology has rapidly advanced the field of observational cosmology over the last 30 years. This trend will continue with the development of technologies to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization. The B-mode component of the polarization map will place limits on the energy scale of inflation and the sum of the neutrino masses. This thesis describes the pb instrument which will measure the CMB polarization anisotropy to unprecedented sensitivity. POLARBEAR-I is currently observing, and an upgraded version, POLARBEAR-II, is planned for the future. The first version of the experiment, POLARBEAR-I, is fielding several new technologies for the first time. POLARBEAR-I has high sensitivity due to its detector count. It employs a 1274 detector Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer array. The bolometers are coupled to a planar array of polarization sensitive antennas. These antennas are lithographed on the same substrate as the TES detectors, allowing on-chip band defining filters between the antenna and detector. The focal plane is composed of seven hexagonal detector modules. This modular scheme can be extended to create larger focal plane arrays in the future. POLARBEAR-I is observing at a single band near 150 GHz, the peak in the CMB blackbody curve. The lenslet antenna coupled detector technology, fielding for the first time in POLARBEAR-I, is naturally scalable to larger arrays with multi-chroic pixels. This broadband technology will have higher sensitivity and better capability for astronomical foreground contaminant removal. The antenna geometry can be changed to receive a wider frequency bandwidth. This bandwidth can be broken into multiple frequency bands with the on-chip band defining filters. Each band will be read out by one TES detector. A dual band instrument, pbtwo, is in development with bands at 90 and 150 GHz. One challenge for all CMB polarization measurements is minimization of systematic errors. One source of error is

  6. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, Sebastian; Achatz, Ulrich; Rieper, Felix; Fruman, Mark

    2013-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate the GWs in a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between inner and outer cylinder walls. In this atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, various analyses suggest a distinct gravity wave activity. To identify regions of GW emission we decompose the flow into the geostrophic and ageostrophic part through the inversion of the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity (e.g. Verkley, 2009). The analysis of the geostrophic sources of the ageostrophic flow indicates that, in addition to boundary layer instabilities, spontaneous imbalance in the jet region acts as an important source mechanism. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011: Generation of inertia-gravity waves in the rotating thermal annulus by a localised boundary layer instability. Geophys

  7. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, S.; Achatz, U.; Rieper, F.; Fruman, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a new finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate whether such an experiment might be useful for studies of spontaneous imbalance. A major problem was the identification of experimental parameters yielding an atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, so that energy transport by the lowest-frequency waves is predominantly horizontal while high-frequency GWs transport energy vertically. We show that this is indeed the case for a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between the inner and outer cylinder walls. We also show that this set-up yields a conspicuous signal in the horizontal divergence field close to the meandering jet. Various analyses support the notion that this signal is predominantly due to GWs superposed on a geostrophic flow. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011

  8. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  9. Excitation of propagating spin waves in ferromagnetic nanowires by microwave voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Verba, Roman; Carpentieri, Mario; Finocchio, Giovanni; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Slavin, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect, which manifests itself as variation of anisotropy of a thin layer of a conductive ferromagnet on a dielectric substrate under the influence of an external electric voltage, can be used for the development of novel information storage and signal processing devices with low power consumption. Here it is demonstrated by micromagnetic simulations that the application of a microwave voltage to a nanosized VCMA gate in an ultrathin ferromagnetic nanowire results in the parametric excitation of a propagating spin wave, which could serve as a carrier of information. The frequency of the excited spin wave is twice smaller than the frequency of the applied voltage while its amplitude is limited by 2 mechanisms: (i) the so-called “phase mechanism” described by the Zakharov-L’vov-Starobinets “S-theory” and (ii) the saturation mechanism associated with the nonlinear frequency shift of the excited spin wave. The developed extension of the “S-theory”, which takes into account the second limitation mechanism, allowed us to estimate theoretically the efficiency of the parametric excitation of spin waves by the VCMA effect. PMID:27113392

  10. Excitation of propagating spin waves in ferromagnetic nanowires by microwave voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verba, Roman; Carpentieri, Mario; Finocchio, Giovanni; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Slavin, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    The voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect, which manifests itself as variation of anisotropy of a thin layer of a conductive ferromagnet on a dielectric substrate under the influence of an external electric voltage, can be used for the development of novel information storage and signal processing devices with low power consumption. Here it is demonstrated by micromagnetic simulations that the application of a microwave voltage to a nanosized VCMA gate in an ultrathin ferromagnetic nanowire results in the parametric excitation of a propagating spin wave, which could serve as a carrier of information. The frequency of the excited spin wave is twice smaller than the frequency of the applied voltage while its amplitude is limited by 2 mechanisms: (i) the so-called “phase mechanism” described by the Zakharov-L’vov-Starobinets “S-theory” and (ii) the saturation mechanism associated with the nonlinear frequency shift of the excited spin wave. The developed extension of the “S-theory”, which takes into account the second limitation mechanism, allowed us to estimate theoretically the efficiency of the parametric excitation of spin waves by the VCMA effect.

  11. Excitation of propagating spin waves in ferromagnetic nanowires by microwave voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Verba, Roman; Carpentieri, Mario; Finocchio, Giovanni; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Slavin, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect, which manifests itself as variation of anisotropy of a thin layer of a conductive ferromagnet on a dielectric substrate under the influence of an external electric voltage, can be used for the development of novel information storage and signal processing devices with low power consumption. Here it is demonstrated by micromagnetic simulations that the application of a microwave voltage to a nanosized VCMA gate in an ultrathin ferromagnetic nanowire results in the parametric excitation of a propagating spin wave, which could serve as a carrier of information. The frequency of the excited spin wave is twice smaller than the frequency of the applied voltage while its amplitude is limited by 2 mechanisms: (i) the so-called "phase mechanism" described by the Zakharov-L'vov-Starobinets "S-theory" and (ii) the saturation mechanism associated with the nonlinear frequency shift of the excited spin wave. The developed extension of the "S-theory", which takes into account the second limitation mechanism, allowed us to estimate theoretically the efficiency of the parametric excitation of spin waves by the VCMA effect. PMID:27113392

  12. Statistical reconstruction algorithms for continuous wave electron spin resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissos, Imry; Levit, Michael; Feuer, Arie; Blank, Aharon

    2013-06-01

    Electron spin resonance imaging (ESRI) is an important branch of ESR that deals with heterogeneous samples ranging from semiconductor materials to small live animals and even humans. ESRI can produce either spatial images (providing information about the spatially dependent radical concentration) or spectral-spatial images, where an extra dimension is added to describe the absorption spectrum of the sample (which can also be spatially dependent). The mapping of oxygen in biological samples, often referred to as oximetry, is a prime example of an ESRI application. ESRI suffers frequently from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which results in long acquisition times and poor image quality. A broader use of ESRI is hampered by this slow acquisition, which can also be an obstacle for many biological applications where conditions may change relatively quickly over time. The objective of this work is to develop an image reconstruction scheme for continuous wave (CW) ESRI that would make it possible to reduce the data acquisition time without degrading the reconstruction quality. This is achieved by adapting the so-called "statistical reconstruction" method, recently developed for other medical imaging modalities, to the specific case of CW ESRI. Our new algorithm accounts for unique ESRI aspects such as field modulation, spectral-spatial imaging, and possible limitation on the gradient magnitude (the so-called "limited angle" problem). The reconstruction method shows improved SNR and contrast recovery vs. commonly used back-projection-based methods, for a variety of simulated synthetic samples as well as in actual CW ESRI experiments.

  13. LDRD final report on continuous wave intersubband terahertz sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Samora, Sally; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.; Young, Erik W.; Fuller, Charles T.; Stephenson, Larry L.; Reno, John Louis; Wanke, Michael Clement; Hudgens, James J.

    2005-02-01

    There is a general lack of compact electromagnetic radiation sources between 1 and 10 terahertz (THz). This a challenging spectral region lying between optical devices at high frequencies and electronic devices at low frequencies. While technologically very underdeveloped the THz region has the promise to be of significant technological importance, yet demonstrating its relevance has proven difficult due to the immaturity of the area. While the last decade has seen much experimental work in ultra-short pulsed terahertz sources, many applications will require continuous wave (cw) sources, which are just beginning to demonstrate adequate performance for application use. In this project, we proposed examination of two potential THz sources based on intersubband semiconductor transitions, which were as yet unproven. In particular we wished to explore quantum cascade lasers based sources and electronic based harmonic generators. Shortly after the beginning of the project, we shifted our emphasis to the quantum cascade lasers due to two events; the publication of the first THz quantum cascade laser by another group thereby proving feasibility, and the temporary shut down of the UC Santa Barbara free-electron lasers which were to be used as the pump source for the harmonic generation. The development efforts focused on two separate cascade laser thrusts. The ultimate goal of the first thrust was for a quantum cascade laser to simultaneously emit two mid-infrared frequencies differing by a few THz and to use these to pump a non-linear optical material to generate THz radiation via parametric interactions in a specifically engineered intersubband transition. While the final goal was not realized by the end of the project, many of the completed steps leading to the goal will be described in the report. The second thrust was to develop direct THz QC lasers operating at terahertz frequencies. This is simpler than a mixing approach, and has now been demonstrated by a few groups

  14. Searches for continuous gravitational waves with LIGO and GEO600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, M.

    2008-02-01

    Current searches for astrophysically generated gravitational waves include the ground-based interferometers GEO600 and LIGO. The sensitive band of the detectors is at audio frequencies, from a few tens of Hz to several kHz. We report on efforts to search the data from these detectors for gravitational waves from spinning compact objects such as neutron or quark stars.

  15. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIC Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of thermoset resins will be studied because it hold the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  16. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymeric materials. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIM Materials Program, allows the authors, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of various thermoset resins will be studied because it holds the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components or in-situ curing of adhesives, including metal-to-metal. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  17. Laboratory microwave, millimeter wave and far-infrared spectra of dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabri, A.; Van, V.; Nguyen, H. V. L.; Mouhib, H.; Kwabia Tchana, F.; Manceron, L.; Stahl, W.; Kleiner, I.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Dimethyl sulfide, CH3SCH3 (DMS), is a nonrigid, sulfur-containing molecule whose astronomical detection is considered to be possible in the interstellar medium. Very accurate spectroscopic constants were obtained by a laboratory analysis of rotational microwave and millimeter wave spectra, as well as rotation-torsional far-infrared (FIR) spectra, which can be used to predict transition frequencies for a detection in interstellar sources. Aims: This work aims at the experimental study and theoretical analysis of the ground torsional state and ground torsional band ν15 of DMS in a large spectral range for astrophysical use. Methods: The microwave spectrum was measured in the frequency range 2-40 GHz using two Molecular Beam Fourier Transform MicroWave (MB-FTMW) spectrometers in Aachen, Germany. The millimeter spectrum was recorded in the 50-110 GHz range. The FIR spectrum was measured for the first time at high resolution using the FT spectrometer and the newly built cryogenic cell at the French synchrotron SOLEIL. Results: DMS has two equivalent methyl internal rotors with a barrier height of about 730 cm-1. We performed a fit, using the XIAM and BELGI-Cs-2Tops codes, that contained the new measurements and previous transitions reported in the literature for the ground torsional state νt = 0 (including the four torsional species AA, AE, EA and EE) and for the ground torsional band ν15 = 1 ← 0 (including only the AA species). In the microwave region, we analyzed 584 transitions with J ≤ 30 of the ground torsional state νt = 0 and 18 transitions with J ≤ 5 of the first excited torsional state νt = 1. In the FIR range, 578 transitions belonging to the torsional band ν15 = 1 ← 0 with J ≤ 27 were assigned. Totally, 1180 transitions were included in a global fit with 21 accurately determined parameters. These parameters can be used to produce a reliable line-list for an astrophysical detection of DMS. Full Tables B.1 and C.1, and Table E.1 are

  18. Establishing a Calibration for a Microwave Plasma Continuous Emissions Monitor For Stack Exhaust Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, G. J., III; Green, K. M.; Woskov, P. P.; Hadidi, K.; Thomas, P.

    1998-11-01

    A real-time continuous emissions monitor for hazardous metals in stack exhaust is in development to replace the regulatory standard, EPA Method 29. A microwave plasma is sustained in ambient stack exhaust flow for real-time atomic emission spectroscopy. A metals injection calibration subsystem using a pneumatic nebulizer and standard metals solution is attached to the exhaust flow for real-time span calibration of the monitored metals. A novel approach to determine the nebulizer injection efficiency during plasma operation was tested. A known metal mass on a tungsten filament attached to an alumina rod was introduced into a nitrogen plasma at different axial positions. These signals were then correlated to masses of metals aspirated into the plasma by the nebulizer. The metals injection efficiency as a function of rod insertion position was calculated by dividing the correlated mass by the total mass aspirated by the nebulizer, and extrapolated to the end of the sample line. The resulting efficiency was compared to samples collected directly by Gelman Science Type A/E glass fiber filters off line from the plasma. The results to date give the nebulizer metals injection efficiencies less than one percent.

  19. Continuous reversal of Hanle resonances of a counter-propagating pulse and continuous-wave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Jelena; Arsenović, Dušan; Jelenković, Branislav M.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study propagation dynamics of two counter-propagating lasers, a continuous-wave (CW) laser and the pulse of another laser, when both lasers are tuned to the Fg = 2 → Fe = 1 transition in 87Rb, and can therefore develop Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in Rb vapor. We calculate the transmission of both lasers as a function of applied magnetic field, and investigate how the propagation of the pulse affects the transmission of the CW laser. Vice versa, we have found conditions when the Gaussian pulse can either pass unchanged, or be significantly absorbed in the vacuum Rb cell. This configuration is therefore suitable for convenient control of the pulse propagation and the system is of interest for optically switching the laser pulses. In terms of the corresponding shapes of the coherent Hanle resonances, this is equivalent to turning the coherent resonance from Hanle EIT into an electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) peak. There is a range of intensities of both the CW laser and the laser pulse when strong drives of atomic coherences allow the two lasers to interact with each other through atomic coherence and can simultaneously reverse the signs of the Hanle resonances of both.

  20. Tunable, continuous-wave single-resonant optical parametric oscillator with output coupling for resonant wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong-Hua, Zheng; Bao-Fu, Zhang; Zhong-Xing, Jiao; Biao, Wang

    2016-01-01

    We present a continuous-wave singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator with 1.5% output coupling of the resonant signal wave, based on an angle-polished MgO-doped periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN), pumped by a commercial Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm. The output-coupled optical parametric oscillator delivers a maximum total output power of 4.19 W with 42.8% extraction efficiency, across a tuning range of 1717 nm in the near- and mid-infrared region. This indicates improvements of 1.87 W in output power, 19.1% in extraction efficiency and 213 nm in tuning range extension in comparison with the optical parametric oscillator with no output coupling, while at the expense of increasing the oscillation threshold by a factor of ˜ 2. Moreover, it is confirmed that the finite output coupling also contributes to the reduction of the thermal effects in crystal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61308056, 11204044, 11232015, and 11072271), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20120171110005 and 20130171130003), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. 14lgpy07), and the Opening Project of Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory, China (Grant No. ZHD201203).

  1. Effects of atmospheric turbulence on microwave and millimeter wave satellite communications systems. [attenuation statistics and antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasirvatham, D. M. J.; Hodge, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    A model of the microwave and millimeter wave link in the presence of atmospheric turbulence is presented with emphasis on satellite communications systems. The analysis is based on standard methods of statistical theory. The results are directly usable by the design engineer.

  2. Searching for continuous gravitational wave sources in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhurandhar, Sanjeev V.; Vecchio, Alberto

    2001-06-01

    We consider the problem of searching for continuous gravitational wave (cw) sources orbiting a companion object. This issue is of particular interest because the Low mass x-ray binaries (LMXB's), and among them Sco X-1, the brightest x-ray source in the sky, might be marginally detectable with ~2 y coherent observation time by the Earth-based laser interferometers expected to come on line by 2002 and clearly observable by the second generation of detectors. Moreover, several radio pulsars, which could be deemed to be cw sources, are found to orbit a companion star or planet, and the LIGO-VIRGO-GEO600 network plans to continuously monitor such systems. We estimate the computational costs for a search launched over the additional five parameters describing generic elliptical orbits (up to e<~0.8) using match filtering techniques. These techniques provide the optimal signal-to-noise ratio and also a very clear and transparent theoretical framework. Since matched filtering will be implemented in the final and the most computationally expensive stage of the hierarchical strategies, the theoretical framework provided here can be used to determine the computational costs. In order to disentangle the computational burden involved in the orbital motion of the cw source from the other source parameters (position in the sky and spin down) and reduce the complexity of the analysis, we assume that the source is monochromatic (there is no intrinsic change in its frequency) and its location in the sky is exactly known. The orbital elements, on the other hand, are either assumed to be completely unknown or only partly known. We provide ready-to-use analytical expressions for the number of templates required to carry out the searches in the astrophysically relevant regions of the parameter space and how the computational cost scales with the ranges of the parameters. We also determine the critical accuracy to which a particular parameter must be known, so that no search is needed

  3. Effect of Combined Spaceborne Microwave and Continuous Lightning Measurements on Precipitation Forecasts of the 1998 Ground-Hog Day Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinman, James A.; Chang, Dong-Eon; Morales, Carlos A.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of several newly available sources of meteorological data on mesoscale model forecasts of precipitation produced by the extra-tropical cyclone that struck Florida on February 2, 1998. Precipitation distributions of convective rainfall events were derived from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and Multi-Channel Passive Microwave Sensor (TMI) microwave radiometric data by means of the Goddard PROFiling (GPROF) algorithm. Continuous lightning distributions were obtained from sferics measurements obtained from a network of VLF radio receivers. Histograms of coincident sferics frequency distributions were matched to those of precipitation to derive bogus convective rainfall rates from the continuously available sferics measurements. SSM/I and TMI microwave data were used to derive Integrated Precipitable Water (IPW) distributions. The TMI also provided sea surface temperatures (SSTS) of the Loop Current and Gulf Stream with improved structural detail. A series of experiments assimilated IPW and latent heating from the bogus convective rainfall for six-hours in the MM5 mesoscale forecast model to produce nine-hour forecasts of all rainfall as well as other weather parameters. Although continuously assimilating latent heating only slightly improved the surface pressure distribution forecast, it significantly improved the precipitation forecasts. Correctly locating convective rainfall was found critical for assimilating latent heating in the forecast model, but measurement of the rainfall intensity proved to be less important. The improved SSTs also had a positive impact on rainfall forecasts for this case. Assimilating bogus rainfall in the model produced nine-hour forecasts of radar reflectivity distributions that agreed well with coincident observations from the TRMM spaceborne precipitation radar, ground based radar and spaceborne microwave measurements.

  4. Eddy-current effects on ferromagnetic resonance: Spin wave excitations and microwave screening effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flovik, Vegard; Pettersen, Bjørn Holst; Wahlström, Erik

    2016-04-01

    We investigate how controlling induced eddy currents in thin film ferromagnet-normal metal (FM/NM) structures can be used to tailor the local microwave (MW) fields in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) experiments. The MW fields produced by eddy currents will in general have a relative phase shift with respect to the applied MW field which depends on the sample geometry. The induced fields can thus partially compensate the applied MW field, effectively screening the FM in selected parts of the sample. The highly localized fields produced by eddy currents enable the excitation of spin wave modes with non-zero wave vectors ( k ≠ 0 ), in contrast to the uniform k = 0 mode normally excited in FMR experiments. We find that the orientation of the applied MW field is one of the key parameters controlling the eddy-current effects. The induced currents are maximized when the applied MW field is oriented perpendicular to the sample plane. Increasing the magnitude of the eddy currents results in a stronger induced MW field, enabling a more effective screening of the applied MW field as well as an enhanced excitation of spin wave modes. This investigation underlines that eddy currents can be used to control the magnitude and phase of the local MW fields in thin film structures.

  5. The 4-Day Wave as Observed from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.; Elson, L. S.; Fishbein, E. F.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    The "4-day wave" is an eastward moving quasi-nondispersive feature with period near 4 days occurring near the winter polar stratopause. This paper presents evidence of the 4-day feature in Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) temperature, geopotential height, and ozone data from the late southern winters of 1992 and 1993. Space-time spectral analyses reveal a double-peaked temperature structure consisting of one peak near the stratopause and another in the lower mesosphere, with an out-of-phase relationship between the two peaks. This double- peaked structure is reminiscent of recent three-dimensional barotropic/baroclinic instability model predictions and is observed here for the first time. The height variation of the 4-day ozone signal is shown to compare well with a linear advective-photochemical tracer model. Negative regions of quasigeostrophic potential vorticity (PV) gradient and positive Eliassen-Palm flux divergence are shown to occur, consistent with instability dynamics playing a role in wave forcing. Spectral analyses of PV derived from MLS geopotential height fields reveal a 4-day signal peaking near the polar stratopause. The three-dimensional structure of the 4-day wave resembles the potential vorticity "charge" concept, wherein a PV anomaly in the atmosphere (analogous to an electrical charge in a dielectric material) induces a geopotential field, a vertically oriented temperature dipole, and circulation about the vertical axis.

  6. COMPARATIVE DISINFECTION EFFICIENCY OF PULSED AND CONTINUOUS-WAVE UV IRRADIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulsed UV (PUV) is novel UV irradiation system that is a non-mercury lamp based alternative to currently used continuous-wave systems for water disinfection. To compare the polychromatic PUV irradiation disinfection efficiency with that from continuous wave monochromatic low-pre...

  7. Localized spin-wave excitation by the evanescent microwave scanning probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sakran, F.; Golosovsky, M.; Davidov, D.; Monod, P.

    2006-02-15

    We report a technique for the local contactless spin-wave excitation using the evanescent microwave scanning probe. Our probe is based on a dielectric resonator with the thin slit aperture. It operates at 8.8 GHz, has a spatial resolution of 10-100 {mu}m, and may be operated in the parallel and in the perpendicular magnetic field. The measurements can be performed in contact mode or by scanning the sample at constant probe-sample separation. Using 120-150 nm thick Permalloy films on a glass substrate as test samples, we show how our technique can be used for thickness measurements of thin magnetic films and for the mapping of their magnetic properties, such as magnetization and surface anisotropy.

  8. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Micro-Electro-Mechanical (MEMS) Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    2002-03-01

    The talk will describe the recent advances in RF MEMS from the physics and microwave perspective. RF MEMS are very small micromechanical devices (micron or nm size) which are used as high-Q resonators, very low-loss switches, and high-Q variable capacitors at RF to mm-wave frequencies. RF MEMS is well understood from a circuit perspective, and many state-of-the-art circuits employing a large number of MEMS switches and varactors have now been demonstrated. However, there are several areas related to the dynamic mechanical analysis of MEMS devices, contact physics, and reliability which are not well understood. The talk will summarize the recent challenges in RF MEMS, especially when they are taken to the nm scale.

  9. Reforming of ethanol in a microwave surface-wave plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, A.; Hueso, J.L.; Cotrino, J.; Caballero, A.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

    2004-11-01

    Hydrogen production through plasma reforming of ethanol at room temperature and moderate pressure has been carried out in a microwave surface-wave reactor. Both pure ethanol and mixtures ethanol-water have been studied. The reforming yield was almost 100% in all conditions with H{sub 2}, solid carbon, CO and CO{sub 2} as the main reaction products. In the mixture ethanol-water the formation of solid C was avoided. The optical emission spectroscopy analysis has shown that the formation of the excited species CO*, CH* and C{sub 2}* depends on the plasma mixture. The temperature of the OH* species was determined by analyzing the shape profile of its emission band.

  10. Fourier transform microwave and millimeter wave spectroscopy of quinazoline, quinoxaline, and phthalazine.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Don; Godfrey, Peter D; Jahn, Michaela K; Dewald, David A; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2011-04-21

    The pure rotational spectra of the bicyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycle molecules, quinazoline, quinoxaline, and phthalazine, have been recorded and assigned in the region 13-87 GHz. An analysis, guided by ab initio molecular orbital predictions, of frequency-scanned Stark modulated, jet-cooled millimeter wave absorption spectra (48-87 GHz) yielded a preliminary set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. Subsequent spectral analysis at higher resolution was carried out with Fourier transform microwave (FT-MW) spectroscopy (13-18 GHz) of a supersonic rotationally cold molecular beam. The high spectral resolution of the FT-MW instrument provided an improved set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants together with nitrogen quadrupole coupling constants for all three species. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP∕6-311+G∗∗ level of theory closely predict rotational constants and are useful in predicting quadrupole coupling constants and dipole moments for such species. PMID:21513385