Science.gov

Sample records for continuum electrostatic calculations

  1. Variable atomic radii for continuum-solvent electrostatics calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Baojing; Agarwal, Manish; Wong, Chung F.

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a method to improve the description of solute cavity defined by the interlocking-sphere model for continuum-solvent electrostatics calculations. Many models choose atomic radii from a finite set of atom types or uses an even smaller set developed by Bondi [J. Phys. Chem. 68, 441 (1964)]. The new model presented here allowed each atom to adapt its radius according to its chemical environment. This was achieved by first approximating the electron density of a molecule by a superposition of atom-centered spherical Gaussian functions. The parameters of the Gaussian functions were then determined by optimizing a function that minimized the difference between the properties from the model and those from ab initio quantum calculations. These properties included the electrostatics potential on molecular surface and the electron density within the core of each atom. The size of each atom was then determined by finding the radius at which the electron density associated with the atom fell to a prechosen value. This value was different for different chemical elements and was chosen such that the averaged radius for each chemical element in a training set of molecules matched its Bondi radius. Thus, our model utilized only a few adjustable parameters—the above density cutoff values for different chemical elements—but had the flexibility of allowing every atom to adapt its radius according to its chemical environment. This variable-radii model gave better solvation energy for 31 small neutral molecules than the Bondi radii did, especially for a quantum mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann approach we developed earlier. The improvement was most significant for molecules with large dipole moment. Future directions for further improvement are also discussed.

  2. Combining conformational flexibility and continuum electrostatics for calculating pK(a)s in proteins.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Roxana E; Alexov, Emil G; Gunner, Marilyn R

    2002-10-01

    Protein stability and function relies on residues being in their appropriate ionization states at physiological pH. In situ residue pK(a)s also provides a sensitive measure of the local protein environment. Multiconformation continuum electrostatics (MCCE) combines continuum electrostatics and molecular mechanics force fields in Monte Carlo sampling to simultaneously calculate side chain ionization and conformation. The response of protein to charges is incorporated both in the protein dielectric constant (epsilon(prot)) of four and by explicit conformational changes. The pK(a) of 166 residues in 12 proteins was determined. The root mean square error is 0.83 pH units, and >90% have errors of <1 pH units whereas only 3% have errors >2 pH units. Similar results are found with crystal and solution structures, showing that the method's explicit conformational sampling reduces sensitivity to the initial structure. The outcome also changes little with protein dielectric constant (epsilon(prot) 4-20). Multiconformation continuum electrostatics titrations show coupling of conformational flexibility and changes in ionization state. Examples are provided where ionizable side chain position (protein G), Asn orientation (lysozyme), His tautomer distribution (RNase A), and phosphate ion binding (RNase A and H) change with pH. Disallowing these motions changes the calculated pK(a). PMID:12324397

  3. Combining conformational flexibility and continuum electrostatics for calculating pK(a)s in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Roxana E; Alexov, Emil G; Gunner, Marilyn R

    2002-01-01

    Protein stability and function relies on residues being in their appropriate ionization states at physiological pH. In situ residue pK(a)s also provides a sensitive measure of the local protein environment. Multiconformation continuum electrostatics (MCCE) combines continuum electrostatics and molecular mechanics force fields in Monte Carlo sampling to simultaneously calculate side chain ionization and conformation. The response of protein to charges is incorporated both in the protein dielectric constant (epsilon(prot)) of four and by explicit conformational changes. The pK(a) of 166 residues in 12 proteins was determined. The root mean square error is 0.83 pH units, and >90% have errors of <1 pH units whereas only 3% have errors >2 pH units. Similar results are found with crystal and solution structures, showing that the method's explicit conformational sampling reduces sensitivity to the initial structure. The outcome also changes little with protein dielectric constant (epsilon(prot) 4-20). Multiconformation continuum electrostatics titrations show coupling of conformational flexibility and changes in ionization state. Examples are provided where ionizable side chain position (protein G), Asn orientation (lysozyme), His tautomer distribution (RNase A), and phosphate ion binding (RNase A and H) change with pH. Disallowing these motions changes the calculated pK(a). PMID:12324397

  4. Ion Transport through Membrane-Spanning Nanopores Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Continuum Electrostatics Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Christine; Hummer, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    Narrow hydrophobic regions are a common feature of biological channels, with possible roles in ion-channel gating. We study the principles that govern ion transport through narrow hydrophobic membrane pores by molecular dynamics simulation of model membranes formed of hexagonally packed carbon nanotubes. We focus on the factors that determine the energetics of ion translocation through such nonpolar nanopores and compare the resulting free-energy barriers for pores with different diameters corresponding to the gating regions in closed and open forms of potassium channels. Our model system also allows us to compare the results from molecular dynamics simulations directly to continuum electrostatics calculations. Both simulations and continuum calculations show that subnanometer wide pores pose a huge free-energy barrier for ions, but a small increase in the pore diameter to ∼1 nm nearly eliminates that barrier. We also find that in those wider channels the ion mobility is comparable to that in the bulk phase. By calculating local electrostatic potentials, we show that the long range Coulomb interactions of ions are strongly screened in the wide water-filled channels. Whereas continuum calculations capture the overall energetics reasonably well, the local water structure, which is not accounted for in this model, leads to interesting effects such as the preference of hydrated ions to move along the pore wall rather than through the center of the pore. PMID:16006629

  5. Semi-continuum electrostatic calculations of redox potentials in photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Ptushenko, Vasily V; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Krishtalik, Lev I; Semenov, Alexey Yu

    2008-07-01

    The midpoint redox potentials (E(m)) of all cofactors in photosystem I from Synechococcus elongatus as well as of the iron-sulfur (Fe(4)S(4)) clusters in two soluble ferredoxins from Azotobacter vinelandii and Clostridium acidiurici were calculated within the framework of a semi-continuum dielectric approach. The widely used treatment of proteins as uniform media with single dielectric permittivity is oversimplified, particularly, because permanent charges are considered both as a source for intraprotein electric field and as a part of dielectric polarizability. Our approach overcomes this inconsistency by using two dielectric constants: optical epsilon(o)=2.5 for permanent charges pre-existing in crystal structure, and static epsilon(s) for newly formed charges. We also take into account a substantial dielectric heterogeneity of photosystem I revealed by photoelectric measurements and a liquid junction potential correction for E(m) values of relevant redox cofactors measured in aprotic solvents. We show that calculations based on a single permittivity have the discrepancy with experimental data larger than 0.7 V, whereas E(m) values calculated within our approach fall in the range of experimental estimates. The electrostatic analysis combined with quantum chemistry calculations shows that (i) the energy decrease upon chlorophyll dimerization is essential for the downhill mode of primary charge separation between the special pair P(700) and the primary acceptor A(0); (ii) the primary donor is apparently P(700) but not a pair of accessory chlorophylls; (iii) the electron transfer from the A branch quinone Q(A) to the iron-sulfur cluster F(X) is most probably downhill, whereas that from the B branch quinone Q(B) to F(X) is essentially downhill. PMID:18483776

  6. Accuracy of continuum electrostatic calculations based on three common dielectric boundary definitions

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Boris

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influence of three common definitions of the solute/solvent dielectric boundary (DB) on the accuracy of the electrostatic solvation energy ΔGel computed within the Poisson Boltzmann and the generalized Born models of implicit solvation. The test structures include small molecules, peptides and small proteins; explicit solvent ΔGel are used as accuracy reference. For common atomic radii sets BONDI, PARSE (and ZAP9 for small molecules) the use of van der Waals (vdW) DB results, on average, in considerably larger errors in ΔGel than the molecular surface (MS) DB. The optimal probe radius ρw for which the MS DB yields the most accurate ΔGel varies considerably between structure types. The solvent accessible surface (SAS) DB becomes optimal at ρw ~ 0.2 Å (exact value is sensitive to the structure and atomic radii), at which point the average accuracy of ΔGel is comparable to that of the MS-based boundary. The geometric equivalence of SAS to vdW surface based on the same atomic radii uniformly increased by ρw gives the corresponding optimal vdW DB. For small molecules, the optimal vdW DB based on BONDI + 0.2 Å radii can yield ΔGel estimates at least as accurate as those based on the optimal MS DB. Also, in small molecules, pairwise charge-charge interactions computed with the optimal vdW DB are virtually equal to those computed with the MS DB, suggesting that in this case the two boundaries are practically equivalent by the electrostatic energy criteria. In structures other than small molecules, the optimal vdW and MS dielectric boundaries are not equivalent: the respective pairwise electrostatic interactions in the presence of solvent can differ by up to 5 kcal/mol for individual atomic pairs in small proteins, even when the total ΔGel are equal. For small proteins, the average decrease in pairwise electrostatic interactions resulting from the switch from optimal MS to optimal vdW DB definition can be mimicked within the MS DB definition

  7. Understanding and Manipulating Electrostatic Fields at the Protein-Protein Interface Using Vibrational Spectroscopy and Continuum Electrostatics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Andrew W; Webb, Lauren J

    2015-11-01

    Biological function emerges in large part from the interactions of biomacromolecules in the complex and dynamic environment of the living cell. For this reason, macromolecular interactions in biological systems are now a major focus of interest throughout the biochemical and biophysical communities. The affinity and specificity of macromolecular interactions are the result of both structural and electrostatic factors. Significant advances have been made in characterizing structural features of stable protein-protein interfaces through the techniques of modern structural biology, but much less is understood about how electrostatic factors promote and stabilize specific functional macromolecular interactions over all possible choices presented to a given molecule in a crowded environment. In this Feature Article, we describe how vibrational Stark effect (VSE) spectroscopy is being applied to measure electrostatic fields at protein-protein interfaces, focusing on measurements of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins of the Ras superfamily binding with structurally related but functionally distinct downstream effector proteins. In VSE spectroscopy, spectral shifts of a probe oscillator's energy are related directly to that probe's local electrostatic environment. By performing this experiment repeatedly throughout a protein-protein interface, an experimental map of measured electrostatic fields generated at that interface is determined. These data can be used to rationalize selective binding of similarly structured proteins in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Furthermore, these data can be used to compare to computational predictions of electrostatic fields to explore the level of simulation detail that is necessary to accurately predict our experimental findings. PMID:26375183

  8. Comparative redox and pKa calculations on cytochrome c3 from several Desulfovibrio species using continuum electrostatic methods.

    PubMed

    Martel, P J; Soares, C M; Baptista, A M; Fuxreiter, M; Náray-Szabó, G; Louro, R O; Carrondo, M A

    1999-02-01

    A comparative study of the pH-dependent redox mechanisms of several members of the cytochrome c3 family has been carried out. In a previous work, the molecular determinants of this dependency (the so-called redox-Bohr effect) were investigated for one species using continuum electrostatic methods to find groups with a titrating range and strength of interaction compatible with a mediating role in the redox-Bohr effect. Here we clarify these aspects in the light of new and improved pKa calculations, our findings supporting the hypothesis of propionate D from heme I being the main effector in the pH-dependent modulation of the cytochrome c3 redox potentials in all the c3 molecules studied here. However, the weaker (but significant) role of other titrating groups cannot be excluded, their importance and identity changing with the particular molecule under study. We also calculate the relative redox potentials of the four heme centers among the selected members of the c3 family, using a continuum electrostatic method that takes into account both solvation and interaction effects. Comparison of the calculated values with available data for the microscopic redox potentials was undertaken, the quality of the agreement being dependent upon the choice of the dielectric constant for the protein interior. We find that high dielectric constants give best correlations, while low values result in better magnitudes for the calculated potentials. The possibility that the crystallographic calcium ion in c3 from Desulfovibrio gigas may be present in the solution structure was tested, and found to be likely. PMID:10499105

  9. Structural Determinants of Improved Fluorescence in a Family of Bacteriophytochrome-Based Infrared Fluorescent Proteins: Insights from Continuum Electrostatic Calculations and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Feliks, Mikolaj; Lafaye, Céline; Shu, Xiaokun; Royant, Antoine; Field, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Using X-ray crystallography, continuum electrostatic calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the structure, protonation behavior, and dynamics of the biliverdin chromophore and its molecular environment in a series of genetically engineered infrared fluorescent proteins (IFPs) based on the chromophore-binding domain of the Deinococcus radiodurans bacteriophytochrome. Our study suggests that the experimentally observed enhancement of fluorescent properties results from the improved rigidity and planarity of the biliverdin chromophore, in particular of the first two pyrrole rings neighboring the covalent linkage to the protein. We propose that the increases in the levels of both motion and bending of the chromophore out of planarity favor the decrease in fluorescence. The chromophore-binding pocket in some of the studied proteins, in particular the weakly fluorescent parent protein, is shown to be readily accessible to water molecules from the solvent. These waters entering the chromophore region form hydrogen bond networks that affect the otherwise planar conformation of the first three rings of the chromophore. On the basis of our simulations, the enhancement of fluorescence in IFPs can be achieved either by reducing the mobility of water molecules in the vicinity of the chromophore or by limiting the interactions of the nearby protein residues with the chromophore. Finally, simulations performed at both low and neutral pH values highlight differences in the dynamics of the chromophore and shed light on the mechanism of fluorescence loss at low pH. PMID:27471775

  10. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  11. Electrostatic ion thruster optics calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whealton, John H.; Kirkman, David A.; Raridon, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations have been performed which encompass both a self-consistent ion source extraction plasma sheath and the primary ion optics including sheath and electrode-induced aberrations. Particular attention is given to the effects of beam space charge, accelerator geometry, and properties of the downstream plasma sheath on the position of the electrostatic potential saddle point near the extractor electrode. The electron blocking potential blocking is described as a function of electrode thickness and secondary plasma processes.

  12. Bounding the electrostatic free energies associated with linear continuum models of molecular solvation.

    PubMed

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P; Knepley, Matthew G; Anitescu, Mihai

    2009-03-14

    The importance of electrostatic interactions in molecular biology has driven extensive research toward the development of accurate and efficient theoretical and computational models. Linear continuum electrostatic theory has been surprisingly successful, but the computational costs associated with solving the associated partial differential equations (PDEs) preclude the theory's use in most dynamical simulations. Modern generalized-Born models for electrostatics can reproduce PDE-based calculations to within a few percent and are extremely computationally efficient but do not always faithfully reproduce interactions between chemical groups. Recent work has shown that a boundary-integral-equation formulation of the PDE problem leads naturally to a new approach called boundary-integral-based electrostatics estimation (BIBEE) to approximate electrostatic interactions. In the present paper, we prove that the BIBEE method can be used to rigorously bound the actual continuum-theory electrostatic free energy. The bounds are validated using a set of more than 600 proteins. Detailed numerical results are presented for structures of the peptide met-enkephalin taken from a molecular-dynamics simulation. These bounds, in combination with our demonstration that the BIBEE methods accurately reproduce pairwise interactions, suggest a new approach toward building a highly accurate yet computationally tractable electrostatic model. PMID:19292524

  13. Bounding the electrostatic free energies associated with linear continuum models of molecular solvation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bardhan, J. P.; Knepley, M. G.; Anitescu, M.

    2009-03-01

    The importance of electrostatic interactions in molecular biology has driven extensive research toward the development of accurate and efficient theoretical and computational models. Linear continuum electrostatic theory has been surprisingly successful, but the computational costs associated with solving the associated partial differential equations (PDEs) preclude the theory's use in most dynamical simulations. Modern generalized-Born models for electrostatics can reproduce PDE-based calculations to within a few percent and are extremely computationally efficient but do not always faithfully reproduce interactions between chemical groups. Recent work has shown that a boundary-integral-equation formulation of the PDE problem leads naturally to a new approach called boundary-integral-based electrostatics estimation (BIBEE) to approximate electrostatic interactions. In the present paper, we prove that the BIBEE method can be used to rigorously bound the actual continuum-theory electrostatic free energy. The bounds are validated using a set of more than 600 proteins. Detailed numerical results are presented for structures of the peptide met-enkephalin taken from a molecular-dynamics simulation. These bounds, in combination with our demonstration that the BIBEE methods accurately reproduce pairwise interactions, suggest a new approach toward building a highly accurate yet computationally tractable electrostatic model.

  14. Using Programmable Calculators to Solve Electrostatics Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerian, Stephen C.; Denker, Dennis A.

    1985-01-01

    Provides a simple routine which allows first-year physics students to use programmable calculators to solve otherwise complex electrostatic problems. These problems involve finding electrostatic potential and electric field on the axis of a uniformly charged ring. Modest programing skills are required of students. (DH)

  15. Continuum electrostatics fails to describe ion permeation in the gramicidin channel.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Scott; Corry, Ben; Kuyucak, Serdar; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the validity of continuum electrostatics in the gramicidin A channel using a recently determined high-resolution structure. The potential and electric field acting on ions in and around the channel are computed by solving Poisson's equation. These are then used in Brownian dynamics simulations to obtain concentration profiles and the current passing through the channel. We show that regardless of the effective dielectric constant used for water in the channel or the channel protein, it is not possible to reproduce all the experimental data on gramicidin A; thus, continuum electrostatics cannot provide a valid framework for the description of ion dynamics in gramicidin channels. Using experimental data and molecular dynamics simulations as guides, we have constructed potential energy profiles that can satisfactorily describe the available physiological data. These profiles provide useful benchmarks for future potential of mean force calculations of permeating ions from molecular dynamics simulations of gramicidin A. They also offer a convenient starting point for studying structure-function relationships in modified gramicidin channels. PMID:12202360

  16. Continuum electrostatic approach for evaluating positions and interactions of proteins in a bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Supunyabut, Chirayut; Fuklang, Sunit; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-06-01

    Orientations of proteins in the membranes are crucial to their function and stability. Unfortunately the exact positions of these proteins in the lipid bilayer are mostly undetermined. Here, the spatial orientation of membrane proteins within the lipid membrane was evaluated using a Poisson-Boltzmann solvent continuum approach to calculate the electrostatic free energy of the protein solvation at various orientations in an implicit bilayer. The solvation energy was obtained by computing the difference in electrostatic energies of the protein in water and in lipid/water environments, treating each as an implicit solvent model. The optimal position of transmembrane proteins (TMP) in a lipid bilayer is identified by the minimum in the "downhill" pathway of the solvation energy landscape. The energy landscape pattern was considerably conserved in various TMP classes. Evaluation of the position of 1060 membrane proteins from the orientations of proteins in membranes (OPM) database revealed that most of the polytopic and β-barrel proteins were in good agreement with those of the OPM database. The study provides a useful scheme for estimating the membrane solvation energy made by lipid-exposed amino acids in membrane proteins. In addition, our results tested with the bacterial potassium channel model demonstrated the potential usefulness of the approach in assessing the quality of membrane protein models. The present approach should be applicable for constructing transmembrane proteins-lipid configuration suitable for membrane protein simulations and will have utility for the structural modeling of membrane proteins. PMID:25912455

  17. Electronic structure calculations in arbitrary electrostatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Mark A.; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Lee, Elizabeth M. Y.; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of electronic structure of molecules in electrostatic environments is of considerable relevance for surface-enhanced spectroscopy and molecular electronics. We have developed and implemented a novel approach to the molecular electronic structure in arbitrary electrostatic environments that is compatible with standard quantum chemical methods and can be applied to medium-sized and large molecules. The scheme denoted CheESE (chemistry in electrostatic environments) is based on the description of molecular electronic structure subject to a boundary condition on the system/environment interface. Thus, it is particularly suited to study molecules on metallic surfaces. The proposed model is capable of describing both electrostatic effects near nanostructured metallic surfaces and image-charge effects. We present an implementation of the CheESE model as a library module and show example applications to neutral and negatively charged molecules.

  18. The Calculation of the Electrostatic Potential of Infinite Charge Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redzic, Dragan V.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss some interesting aspects in the calculation of the electrostatic potential of charge distributions extending to infinity. The presentation is suitable for the advanced undergraduate level. (Contains 3 footnotes.)

  19. Fast Calculations of Electrostatic Solvation Free Energy from Reconstructed Solvent Density using proximal Radial Distribution Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Hu, Char; Kokubo, Hironori; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2011-01-01

    Although detailed atomic models may be applied for a full description of solvation, simpler phenomenological models are particularly useful to interpret the results for scanning many, large, complex systems where a full atomic model is too computationally expensive to use. Among the most costly are solvation free energy evaluations by simulation. Here we develop a fast way to calculate electrostatic solvation free energy while retaining much of the accuracy of explicit solvent free energy simulation. The basis of our method is to treat the solvent not as a structureless dielectric continuum, but as a structured medium by making use of universal proximal radial distribution functions. Using a deca-alanine peptide as a test case, we compare the use of our theory with free energy simulations and traditional continuum estimates of the electrostatic solvation free energy. PMID:21765968

  20. Fast Calculations of Electrostatic Solvation Free Energy from Reconstructed Solvent Density Using Proximal Radial Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Bin; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Hu, Char Y.; Kokubo, Hironori; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2011-07-07

    Although detailed atomic models may be applied for a full description of solvation, simpler phenomenologicalmodels are particularly useful to interpret the results for scanning many large, complex systems, where a full atomic model is too computationally expensive to use. Among the most costly are solvation free-energy evaluations by simulation. Here we develop a fast way to calculate electrostatic solvation free energy while retaining much of the accuracy of explicit solvent free-energy simulation. The basis of our method is to treat the solvent not as a structureless dielectric continuum but as a structured medium by making use of universal proximal radial distribution functions. Using a deca-alanine peptide as a test case, we compare the use of our theory with free-energy simulations and traditional continuum estimates of the electrostatic solvation free energy.

  1. Multiconformation continuum electrostatics analysis of the NhaA Na+/H+ antiporter of Escherichia coli with functional implications

    PubMed Central

    Olkhova, Elena; Hunte, Carola; Screpanti, Emanuela; Padan, Etana; Michel, Hartmut

    2006-01-01

    Sodium proton antiporters are essential enzymes that catalyze the exchange of sodium ions for protons across biological membranes. Protonations and deprotonations of individual amino acid residues and of clusters formed by these residues play an important role in activating these enzymes and in the mechanism of transport. We have used multiconformation continuum electrostatics method to investigate the protonation states of residues in the sodium proton exchanger NhaA from Escherichia coli, the structure of which has been determined recently by x-ray crystallography. Our calculations identify four clusters of electrostatically tightly interacting residues as well as long-range interactions between residues required for activation. The importance of many of these residues has been demonstrated by the characterization of site-directed mutants. A number of residues with extreme pKa values, including several of the “pH sensor,” can only undergo protonation/deprotonation reactions subsequent to conformational changes. The results of the calculations provide valuable information on the activation of the antiporter and the role of individual amino acid residues, and provide a solid framework for further experiments. PMID:16477015

  2. Efficient Ewald electrostatic calculations for large systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Paul E.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    1995-09-01

    A method is described which improves the efficiency of Ewald simulations of large condensed phase systems. This is achieved by partitioning the real space sum into a short and long range component. The long range component is calculated every time the pair list is generated and included in subsequent steps using a multiple time step algorithm. The corresponding increase in the effective cutoff distance results in an algorithm which is only slightly more expensive than a traditional cutoff simulation, but with fewer artifacts than obtained using a cutoff. The method is tested on a 1.0 M solution of sodium chloride.

  3. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multi-spectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/ml, which compared to the 4 W/m' magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/m' estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude tuning

  4. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multispectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/sq m, which compared to the 4 W/sq m magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/sq m estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude

  5. APBSmem: A Graphical Interface for Electrostatic Calculations at the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Callenberg, Keith M.; Choudhary, Om P.; de Forest, Gabriel L.; Gohara, David W.; Baker, Nathan A.; Grabe, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic forces are one of the primary determinants of molecular interactions. They help guide the folding of proteins, increase the binding of one protein to another and facilitate protein-DNA and protein-ligand binding. A popular method for computing the electrostatic properties of biological systems is to numerically solve the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation, and there are several easy-to-use software packages available that solve the PB equation for soluble proteins. Here we present a freely available program, called APBSmem, for carrying out these calculations in the presence of a membrane. The Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver (APBS) is used as a back-end for solving the PB equation, and a Java-based graphical user interface (GUI) coordinates a set of routines that introduce the influence of the membrane, determine its placement relative to the protein, and set the membrane potential. The software Jmol is embedded in the GUI to visualize the protein inserted in the membrane before the calculation and the electrostatic potential after completing the computation. We expect that the ease with which the GUI allows one to carry out these calculations will make this software a useful resource for experimenters and computational researchers alike. Three examples of membrane protein electrostatic calculations are carried out to illustrate how to use APBSmem and to highlight the different quantities of interest that can be calculated. PMID:20949122

  6. Membrane protein properties revealed through data-rich electrostatics calculations

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Grabe, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The electrostatic properties of membrane proteins often reveal many of their key biophysical characteristics, such as ion channel selectivity and the stability of charged membrane-spanning segments. The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is the gold standard for calculating protein electrostatics, and the software APBSmem enables the solution of the PB equation in the presence of a membrane. Here, we describe significant advances to APBSmem including: full automation of system setup, per-residue energy decomposition, incorporation of PDB2PQR, calculation of membrane induced pKa shifts, calculation of non-polar energies, and command-line scripting for large scale calculations. We highlight these new features with calculations carried out on a number of membrane proteins, including the recently solved structure of the ion channel TRPV1 and a large survey of 1,614 membrane proteins of known structure. This survey provides a comprehensive list of residues with large electrostatic penalties for being embedded in the membrane potentially revealing interesting functional information. PMID:26118532

  7. Electrostatic calculations of amino acid titration and electron transfer, Q-AQB-->QAQ-B, in the reaction center.

    PubMed Central

    Beroza, P; Fredkin, D R; Okamura, M Y; Feher, G

    1995-01-01

    The titration of amino acids and the energetics of electron transfer from the primary electron acceptor (QA) to the secondary electron acceptor (QB) in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are calculated using a continuum electrostatic model. Strong electrostatic interactions between titrating sites give rise to complex titration curves. Glu L212 is calculated to have an anomalously broad titration curve, which explains the seemingly contradictory experimental results concerning its pKa. The electrostatic field following electron transfer shifts the average protonation of amino acids near the quinones. The pH dependence of the free energy between Q-AQB and QAQ-B calculated from these shifts is in good agreement with experiment. However, the calculated absolute free energy difference is in severe disagreement (by approximately 230 meV) with the observed experimental value, i.e., electron transfer from Q-A to QB is calculated to be unfavorable. The large stabilization energy of the Q-A state arises from the predominantly positively charged residues in the vicinity of QA in contrast to the predominantly negatively charged residues near QB. The discrepancy between calculated and experimental values for delta G(Q-AQB-->QAQ-B) points to limitations of the continuum electrostatic model. Inclusion of other contributions to the energetics (e.g., protein motion following quinone reduction) that may improve the agreement between theory and experiment are discussed. PMID:7647231

  8. Calculating Free Energy Changes in Continuum Solvation Models.

    PubMed

    Ho, Junming; Ertem, Mehmed Z

    2016-02-25

    We recently showed for a large data set of pKas and reduction potentials that free energies calculated directly within the SMD continuum model compares very well with corresponding thermodynamic cycle calculations in both aqueous and organic solvents [ Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 17 , 2859 ]. In this paper, we significantly expand the scope of our study to examine the suitability of this approach for calculating general solution phase kinetics and thermodynamics, in conjunction with several commonly used solvation models (SMD-M062X, SMD-HF, CPCM-UAKS, and CPCM-UAHF) for a broad range of systems. This includes cluster-continuum schemes for pKa calculations as well as various neutral, radical, and ionic reactions such as enolization, cycloaddition, hydrogen and chlorine atom transfer, and SN2 and E2 reactions. On the basis of this benchmarking study, we conclude that the accuracies of both approaches are generally very similar-the mean errors for Gibbs free energy changes of neutral and ionic reactions are approximately 5 and 25 kJ mol(-1), respectively. In systems where there are significant structural changes due to solvation, as is the case for certain ionic transition states and amino acids, the direct approach generally afford free energy changes that are in better agreement with experiment. PMID:26878566

  9. Conformation and hydrogen ion titration of proteins: a continuum electrostatic model with conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    You, T J; Bashford, D

    1995-11-01

    A new method for including local conformational flexibility in calculations of the hydrogen ion titration of proteins using macroscopic electrostatic models is presented. Intrinsic pKa values and electrostatic interactions between titrating sites are calculated from an ensemble of conformers in which the positions of titrating side chains are systematically varied. The method is applied to the Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues of hen lysozyme. The effects of different minimization and/or sampling protocols for both single-conformer and multi-conformer calculations are studied. For single-conformer calculations it is found that the results are sensitive to the choice of all-hydrogen versus polar-hydrogen-only atomic models and to the minimization protocol chosen. The best overall agreement of single-conformer calculations with experiment is obtained with an all-hydrogen model and either a two-step minimization process or minimization using a high dielectric constant. Multi-conformational calculations give significantly improved agreement with experiment, slightly smaller shifts between model compound pKa values and calculated intrinsic pKa values, and reduced sensitivity of the intrinsic pKa calculations to the initial details of the structure compared to single-conformer calculations. The extent of these improvements depends on the type of minimization used during the generation of conformers, with more extensive minimization giving greater improvements. The ordering of the titrations of the active-site residues, Glu-35 and Asp-52, is particularly sensitive to the minimization and sampling protocols used. The balance of strong site-site interactions in the active site suggests a need for including site-site conformational correlations. PMID:8580316

  10. MPBEC, a Matlab Program for Biomolecular Electrostatic Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Vergara-Perez, Sandra; Marucho, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    One of the most used and efficient approaches to compute electrostatic properties of biological systems is to numerically solve the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. There are several software packages available that solve the PB equation for molecules in aqueous electrolyte solutions. Most of these software packages are useful for scientists with specialized training and expertise in computational biophysics. However, the user is usually required to manually take several important choices, depending on the complexity of the biological system, to successfully obtain the numerical solution of the PB equation. This may become an obstacle for researchers, experimentalists, even students with no special training in computational methodologies. Aiming to overcome this limitation, in this article we present MPBEC, a free, cross-platform, open-source software that provides non-experts in the field an easy and efficient way to perform biomolecular electrostatic calculations on single processor computers. MPBEC is a Matlab script based on the Adaptative Poisson Boltzmann Solver, one of the most popular approaches used to solve the PB equation. MPBEC does not require any user programming, text editing or extensive statistical skills, and comes with detailed user-guide documentation. As a unique feature, MPBEC includes a useful graphical user interface (GUI) application which helps and guides users to configure and setup the optimal parameters and approximations to successfully perform the required biomolecular electrostatic calculations. The GUI also incorporates visualization tools to facilitate users pre- and post- analysis of structural and electrical properties of biomolecules. PMID:26924848

  11. MPBEC, a Matlab Program for Biomolecular Electrostatic Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara-Perez, Sandra; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    One of the most used and efficient approaches to compute electrostatic properties of biological systems is to numerically solve the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. There are several software packages available that solve the PB equation for molecules in aqueous electrolyte solutions. Most of these software packages are useful for scientists with specialized training and expertise in computational biophysics. However, the user is usually required to manually take several important choices, depending on the complexity of the biological system, to successfully obtain the numerical solution of the PB equation. This may become an obstacle for researchers, experimentalists, even students with no special training in computational methodologies. Aiming to overcome this limitation, in this article we present MPBEC, a free, cross-platform, open-source software that provides non-experts in the field an easy and efficient way to perform biomolecular electrostatic calculations on single processor computers. MPBEC is a Matlab script based on the Adaptative Poisson-Boltzmann Solver, one of the most popular approaches used to solve the PB equation. MPBEC does not require any user programming, text editing or extensive statistical skills, and comes with detailed user-guide documentation. As a unique feature, MPBEC includes a useful graphical user interface (GUI) application which helps and guides users to configure and setup the optimal parameters and approximations to successfully perform the required biomolecular electrostatic calculations. The GUI also incorporates visualization tools to facilitate users pre- and post-analysis of structural and electrical properties of biomolecules.

  12. Calculation of far wing of allowed spectra: The water continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.; Ma, Q.

    1995-01-01

    A far-wing line shape theory based on the binary collision and quasistatic approximations that is applicable for both the low- and high-frequency wings of allowed vibrational-rotational lines has been developed. This theory has been applied in order to calculate the frequency and temperature dependence of the continuous absorption coefficient for frequencies up to 10,000 cm(exp -1) for pure H2O and for H2O-N2 mixtures. The calculations are made assuming an interaction potential consisting of an isotropic Lennard-Jones part and the leading long-range anisotropic part, and utilizing the measured line strengths and transition frequencies. The results compare well with existing data, both in magnitude and in temperature dependence. This leads us to the conclusion that although dimer and collision-induced absorptions are present, the primary mechanism responsible for the observed water continuum is the far-wing absorption of allowed lines. Recent progress on near-wing corrections to the theory and validations with recent laboratory measurements are discussed briefly.

  13. The coupling of electron transfer and proton translocation: electrostatic calculations on Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Kannt, A; Lancaster, C R; Michel, H

    1998-01-01

    We have calculated the electrostatic potential and interaction energies of ionizable groups and analyzed the response of the protein environment to redox changes in Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase by using a continuum dielectric model and finite difference technique. Subsequent Monte Carlo sampling of protonation states enabled us to calculate the titration curves of all protonatable groups in the enzyme complex. Inclusion of a model membrane allowed us to restrict the calculations to the functionally essential subunits I and II. Some residues were calculated to have complex titration curves, as a result of strong electrostatic coupling, desolvation, and dipolar interactions. Around the heme a3-CuB binuclear center, we have identified a cluster of 18 strongly interacting residues that account for most of the proton uptake linked to electron transfer. This was calculated to be between 0.7 and 1.1 H+ per electron, depending on the redox transition considered. A hydroxide ion bound to CuB was determined to become protonated to form water upon transfer of the first electron to the binuclear site. The bulk of the protonation changes linked to further reduction of the heme a3-CuB center was calculated to be due to proton uptake by the interacting cluster and Glu(II-78). Upon formation of the three-electron reduced state (P1), His325, modeled in an alternative orientation away from CuB, was determined to become protonated. The agreement of these results with experiment and their relevance in the light of possible mechanisms of redox-coupled proton transfer are discussed. PMID:9533684

  14. The coupling of electron transfer and proton translocation: electrostatic calculations on Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kannt, A; Lancaster, C R; Michel, H

    1998-02-01

    We have calculated the electrostatic potential and interaction energies of ionizable groups and analyzed the response of the protein environment to redox changes in Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase by using a continuum dielectric model and finite difference technique. Subsequent Monte Carlo sampling of protonation states enabled us to calculate the titration curves of all protonatable groups in the enzyme complex. Inclusion of a model membrane allowed us to restrict the calculations to the functionally essential subunits I and II. Some residues were calculated to have complex titration curves, as a result of strong electrostatic coupling, desolvation, and dipolar interactions. Around the heme a3-CuB binuclear center, we have identified a cluster of 18 strongly interacting residues that account for most of the proton uptake linked to electron transfer. This was calculated to be between 0.7 and 1.1 H+ per electron, depending on the redox transition considered. A hydroxide ion bound to CuB was determined to become protonated to form water upon transfer of the first electron to the binuclear site. The bulk of the protonation changes linked to further reduction of the heme a3-CuB center was calculated to be due to proton uptake by the interacting cluster and Glu(II-78). Upon formation of the three-electron reduced state (P1), His325, modeled in an alternative orientation away from CuB, was determined to become protonated. The agreement of these results with experiment and their relevance in the light of possible mechanisms of redox-coupled proton transfer are discussed. PMID:9533684

  15. Investigation of Multipole Electrostatics in Hydration Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yue; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W.; Ren, Pengyu

    2010-01-01

    Hydration free energy (HFE) is generally used for evaluating molecular solubility, which is an important property for pharmaceutical and chemical engineering processes. Accurately predicting HFE is also recognized as one fundamental capability of molecular mechanics force field. Here we present a systematic investigation on HFE calculations with AMOEBA polarizable force field at various parameterization and simulation conditions. The HFEs of seven small organic molecules have been obtained alchemically using the Bennett Acceptance Ratio (BAR) method. We have compared two approaches to derive the atomic multipoles from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations: one directly from the new distributed multipole analysis (DMA) and the other involving fitting to the electrostatic potential around the molecules. Wave functions solved at the MP2 level with four basis sets (6-311G*, 6-311++G(2d,2p), cc-pVTZ, and aug-cc-pVTZ) are used to derive the atomic multipoles. HFEs from all four basis sets show a reasonable agreement with experimental data (root mean square error 0.63 kcal/mol for aug-ccpVTZ). We conclude that aug-cc-pVTZ gives the best performance when used with AMOEBA, and 6-311++G(2d,2p) is comparable but more efficient for larger systems. The results suggest that the inclusion of diffuse basis functions is important for capturing intermolecular interactions. The effect of long-range correction to van der Waals interaction on the hydration free energies is about 0.1 kcal/mol when the cutoff is 12Å, and increases linearly with the number of atoms in the solute/ligand. In addition, we also discussed the results from a hybrid approach that combines polarizable solute with fixed-charge water in the hydration free energy calculation. PMID:20925089

  16. Self-consistent continuum random-phase approximation calculations of {sup 4}He electromagnetic responses

    SciTech Connect

    De Donno, V.; Co', G.; Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2011-09-15

    We study the electromagnetic responses of {sup 4}He within the framework of the self-consistent continuum random-phase approximation theory. In this approach, the ground-state properties are described by a Hartree-Fock calculation. The single-particle basis constructed in this manner is used in the calculations of the continuum responses of the system. Finite-range interactions are considered in the calculations. We compare our results with photon-absorption cross sections and electron-scattering quasielastic data. From this comparison, and also from the comparison with the results of microscopic calculations, we deduce that our approach describes well the continuum excitation.

  17. Comparison of methods for numerical calculation of continuum damping

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G. W.; Hole, M. J.; Dennis, G. R.; Könies, A.; Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2014-05-15

    Continuum resonance damping is an important factor in determining the stability of certain global modes in fusion plasmas. A number of analytic and numerical approaches have been developed to compute this damping, particularly, in the case of the toroidicity-induced shear Alfvén eigenmode. This paper compares results obtained using an analytical perturbative approach with those found using resistive and complex contour numerical approaches. It is found that the perturbative method does not provide accurate agreement with reliable numerical methods for the range of parameters examined. This discrepancy exists even in the limit where damping approaches zero. When the perturbative technique is implemented using a standard finite element method, the damping estimate fails to converge with radial grid resolution. The finite elements used cannot accurately represent the eigenmode in the region of the continuum resonance, regardless of the number of radial grid points used.

  18. On the origin and the calculation of the force in electrostatic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakoby, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews fundamental ways to calculate the forces between charged electrodes as they appear, e.g., in electrostatic drives. In particular the consideration of the force acting on the surface charge layers on the electrodes, the principle of virtual displacement, and the Maxwell stress tensor are considered for two examples: a parallel plate capacitor and an electrostatic comb drive featuring interdigitated electrodes.

  19. Self-consistent continuum random-phase approximation calculations with finite-range interactions

    SciTech Connect

    De Donno, V.; Co', G.; Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2011-04-15

    We present a technique that treats, without approximations, the continuum part of the excitation spectrum in random phase approximation calculations with finite-range interactions. The interaction used in Hartree-Fock calculations to generate the single-particle basis is also used in continuum random phase approximation calculations. We show results for electric dipole and quadrupole excitations in {sup 16}O, {sup 22}O, {sup 24}O, {sup 40}Ca, {sup 48}Ca, and {sup 52}Ca nuclei. We compare our results with those of the traditional discrete random phase approximation, with continuum independent-particle model results, and with results obtained by a phenomenological random phase approximation approach. We study the relevance of the continuum, of the residual interaction, and of the self-consistency. We also compare our results with the available total photoabsorption cross-section data.

  20. A singular finite element technique for calculating continuum damping of Alfvén eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G. W.; Hole, M. J.

    2015-02-15

    Damping due to continuum resonances can be calculated using dissipation-less ideal magnetohydrodynamics provided that the poles due to these resonances are properly treated. We describe a singular finite element technique for calculating the continuum damping of Alfvén waves. A Frobenius expansion is used to determine appropriate finite element basis functions on an inner region surrounding a pole due to the continuum resonance. The location of the pole due to the continuum resonance and mode frequency is calculated iteratively using a Galerkin method. This method is used to find the complex frequency and mode structure of a toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmode in a large aspect ratio circular tokamak and is shown to agree closely with a complex contour technique.

  1. Electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.; Wallace, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum mechanics should be able to generate the basic properties of a particle. One of the most basic properties are charge and the associated electrostatic electric field. Electrostatic force is a fundamental characteristics of a charged fermion and should have its nature described by the fermion's structure. To produce the particle properties require two spaces that define both their dynamics and their base structure. Relativity and the conservation of energy dictate how these two separate spaces are connected and the differential equations that describe behavior within these two spaces. The main static characteristic of an elementary fermion are mass and charge. Mass represents a scale measure of the fermion and it appears that charge results from the detailed structure of the fermion, which must merge into the electric field description of Maxwell. Coulomb's law is a good approximation for large distances, but it is a poor approximation at dimension on the order of a particle's Compton wavelength. The relativistic description of the fermion in its own frame of reference contains the information required for producing the electrostatic field over all space without a singularity as a source. With this description it is possible to understand the first order correction to the ionization energy of hydrogen. The role of nuclear effects on ionization energies can now be better defined for nuclei heavier than hydrogen.

  2. Electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.; Wallace, Michael J.

    2015-12-04

    Quantum mechanics should be able to generate the basic properties of a particle. One of the most basic properties are charge and the associated electrostatic electric field. Electrostatic force is a fundamental characteristics of a charged fermion and should have its nature described by the fermion’s structure. To produce the particle properties require two spaces that define both their dynamics and their base structure. Relativity and the conservation of energy dictate how these two separate spaces are connected and the differential equations that describe behavior within these two spaces. The main static characteristic of an elementary fermion are mass and charge. Mass represents a scale measure of the fermion and it appears that charge results from the detailed structure of the fermion, which must merge into the electric field description of Maxwell. Coulomb’s law is a good approximation for large distances, but it is a poor approximation at dimension on the order of a particle’s Compton wavelength. The relativistic description of the fermion in its own frame of reference contains the information required for producing the electrostatic field over all space without a singularity as a source. With this description it is possible to understand the first order correction to the ionization energy of hydrogen. The role of nuclear effects on ionization energies can now be better defined for nuclei heavier than hydrogen.

  3. Continuum calculations of continental deformation in transcurrent environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonder, L. J.; England, P. C.; Houseman, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    A thin viscous sheet approximation is used to investigate continental deformation near a strike-slip boundary. The vertically averaged velocity field is calculated for a medium characterized by a power law rheology with stress exponent n. Driving stresses include those applied along boundaries of the sheet and those arising from buoyancy forces related to lateral differences in crustal thickness. Exact and approximate analytic solutions for a region with a sinusoidal strike-slip boundary condition are compared with solutions for more geologically relevant boundary conditions obtained using a finite element technique. The across-strike length scale of the deformation is approximately 1/4pi x sq rt n times the dominant wavelength of the imposed strike-slip boundary condition for both the analytic and the numerical solutions; this result is consistent with length scales observed in continental regions of large-scale transcurrent faulting. An approximate, linear relationship between displacement and rotation is found that depends only on the deformation length scale and the rheology. Calculated displacements, finite rotations, and distribution of crustal thicknesses are consistent with those observed in the region of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in California.

  4. Calculation of continuum damping of Alfvén eigenmodes in tokamak and stellarator equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, G. W.; Hole, M. J.; Könies, A.

    2015-09-01

    In an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma, shear Alfvén eigenmodes may experience dissipationless damping due to resonant interaction with the shear Alfvén continuum. This continuum damping can make a significant contribution to the overall growth/decay rate of shear Alfvén eigenmodes, with consequent implications for fast ion transport. One method for calculating continuum damping is to solve the MHD eigenvalue problem over a suitable contour in the complex plane, thereby satisfying the causality condition. Such an approach can be implemented in three-dimensional ideal MHD codes which use the Galerkin method. Analytic functions can be fitted to numerical data for equilibrium quantities in order to determine the value of these quantities along the complex contour. This approach requires less resolution than the established technique of calculating damping as resistivity vanishes and is thus more computationally efficient. The complex contour method has been applied to the three-dimensional finite element ideal MHD Code for Kinetic Alfvén waves. In this paper, we discuss the application of the complex contour technique to calculate the continuum damping of global modes in tokamak as well as torsatron, W7-X and H-1NF stellarator cases. To the authors' knowledge, these stellarator calculations represent the first calculation of continuum damping for eigenmodes in fully three-dimensional equilibria. The continuum damping of global modes in W7-X and H-1NF stellarator configurations investigated is found to depend sensitively on coupling to numerous poloidal and toroidal harmonics.

  5. Calculation of continuum damping of Alfvén eigenmodes in tokamak and stellarator equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G. W.; Hole, M. J.; Könies, A.

    2015-09-15

    In an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma, shear Alfvén eigenmodes may experience dissipationless damping due to resonant interaction with the shear Alfvén continuum. This continuum damping can make a significant contribution to the overall growth/decay rate of shear Alfvén eigenmodes, with consequent implications for fast ion transport. One method for calculating continuum damping is to solve the MHD eigenvalue problem over a suitable contour in the complex plane, thereby satisfying the causality condition. Such an approach can be implemented in three-dimensional ideal MHD codes which use the Galerkin method. Analytic functions can be fitted to numerical data for equilibrium quantities in order to determine the value of these quantities along the complex contour. This approach requires less resolution than the established technique of calculating damping as resistivity vanishes and is thus more computationally efficient. The complex contour method has been applied to the three-dimensional finite element ideal MHD Code for Kinetic Alfvén waves. In this paper, we discuss the application of the complex contour technique to calculate the continuum damping of global modes in tokamak as well as torsatron, W7-X and H-1NF stellarator cases. To the authors' knowledge, these stellarator calculations represent the first calculation of continuum damping for eigenmodes in fully three-dimensional equilibria. The continuum damping of global modes in W7-X and H-1NF stellarator configurations investigated is found to depend sensitively on coupling to numerous poloidal and toroidal harmonics.

  6. Revised self-consistent continuum solvation in electronic-structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Dabo, Ismaila; Marzari, Nicola

    2012-02-14

    The solvation model proposed by Fattebert and Gygi [J. Comput. Chem. 23, 662 (2002)] and Scherlis et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 074103 (2006)] is reformulated, overcoming some of the numerical limitations encountered and extending its range of applicability. We first recast the problem in terms of induced polarization charges that act as a direct mapping of the self-consistent continuum dielectric; this allows to define a functional form for the dielectric that is well behaved both in the high-density region of the nuclear charges and in the low-density region where the electronic wavefunctions decay into the solvent. Second, we outline an iterative procedure to solve the Poisson equation for the quantum fragment embedded in the solvent that does not require multigrid algorithms, is trivially parallel, and can be applied to any Bravais crystallographic system. Last, we capture some of the non-electrostatic or cavitation terms via a combined use of the quantum volume and quantum surface [M. Cococcioni, F. Mauri, G. Ceder, and N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 145501 (2005)] of the solute. The resulting self-consistent continuum solvation model provides a very effective and compact fit of computational and experimental data, whereby the static dielectric constant of the solvent and one parameter allow to fit the electrostatic energy provided by the polarizable continuum model with a mean absolute error of 0.3 kcal/mol on a set of 240 neutral solutes. Two parameters allow to fit experimental solvation energies on the same set with a mean absolute error of 1.3 kcal/mol. A detailed analysis of these results, broken down along different classes of chemical compounds, shows that several classes of organic compounds display very high accuracy, with solvation energies in error of 0.3-0.4 kcal/mol, whereby larger discrepancies are mostly limited to self-dissociating species and strong hydrogen-bond-forming compounds. PMID:22360164

  7. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION FOR THE TEXAS INSTRUMENTS PROGRAMMABLE 59 CALCULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a version of EPA's electrostatic precipitator (ESP) model suitable for use on a Texas Instruments Programmable 59 (TI-59) hand-held calculator. This version of the model allows the calculation of ESP collection efficiency, including corrections for non-ideal ...

  8. Electrostatics of the photosynthetic bacterial reaction center. Protonation of Glu L 212 and Asp L 213 - A new method of calculation.

    PubMed

    Ptushenko, Vasily V; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Krishtalik, Lev I

    2015-12-01

    Continuum electrostatic calculation of the transfer energies of anions from water into aprotic solvents gives the figures erroneous by order of magnitude. This is due to the hydrogen bond disruption that suggests the necessity to reconsider the traditional approach of the purely electrostatic calculation of the transfer energy from water into protein. In this paper, the method combining the experimental estimates of the transfer energies from water into aprotic solvent and the electrostatic calculation of the transfer energies from aprotic solvent into protein is proposed. Hydrogen bonds between aprotic solvent and solute are taken into account by introducing an imaginary aprotic medium incapable to form hydrogen bonds with the solute. Besides, a new treatment of the heterogeneous intraprotein dielectric permittivity based on the microscopic protein structure and electrometric measurements is elaborated. The method accounts semi-quantitatively for the electrostatic effect of diverse charged amino acid substitutions in the donor and acceptor parts of the photosynthetic bacterial reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Analysis of the volatile secondary acceptor site QB revealed that in the conformation with a minimal distance between quinone QB and Glu L 212 the proton uptake upon the reduction of QB is prompted by Glu L 212 in alkaline and by Asp L 213 in slightly acidic regions. This agrees with the pH dependences of protonation degrees and the proton uptake. The method of pK calculation was applied successfully also for dissociation of Asp 26 in bacterial thioredoxin. PMID:26210154

  9. Unified calculation of generalized oscillator strength of argon ranging from bound to continuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Jin, Rui; Zeng, De-Ling; Han, Xiao-Ying; Yan, Jun; Li, Jia-Ming

    2015-11-01

    The electron and photon scattering data of an atom are crucial for many scientific fields, including plasma physics, astrophysics, and so on. For high enough but nonrelativistic incident energies, the first Born approximation is applicable for calculating these data, in which the key physics quantity is the generalized oscillator strength (GOS). In high-energy electron impact excitation processes, atoms will be excited into various excited states including strongly perturbed Rydberg and adjacent continuum states. How to calculate these quantities of a nontrivial many-electron atom rapidly and accurately is still a great challenge. Based on our eigenchannel R -matrix method R -eigen, we further extend it to calculate the GOS of a whole channel in an atom, which includes all Rydberg and adjacent continuum states. The Jπ=1- states of argon are chosen as an illustrating example. The calculation results are in good agreement with the available benchmark absolute experimental measurements. The calculated eigenchannel GOS matrix elements are smooth functions of the excitation energy and momentum transfer. From such smooth eigenchannel GOS matrix elements, we can obtain the GOS of any specific excited state through multichannel quantum defect theory, e.g., infinite Rydberg (including a strongly perturbed one), autoionization, and continuum states.

  10. TI-59 PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR PROGRAMS FOR IN-STACK OPACITY, VENTURI SCRUBBERS, AND ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report explains the basic concepts of in-stack opacity as measured by in-stack opacity monitors. Also included are calculator programs that model the performance of venturi scrubbers and electrostatic precipitators. The effect of particulate control devices on in-stack opacit...

  11. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR CALCULATING ELECTRICAL CONDITIONS IN WIRE-DUCT ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article reports the development of a new method of calculating electrical conditions in wire-duct electrostatic precipitation devices. The method, based on a numerical solution to the governing differential equations under a suitable choice of boundary conditions, accounts fo...

  12. FINITE EXPANSION METHOD FOR THE CALCULATION AND INTERPRETATION OF MOLECULAR ELECTROSTATIC POTENTIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because it is useful to have the molecular electrostatic potential as an element in a complex scheme to assess the toxicity of large molecules, efficient and reliable methods are needed for the calculation and characterization of these potentials. A multicenter multipole expansio...

  13. Quantitative assessment of electrostatic embedding in Density Functional Theory calculations of biomolecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fattebert, J; Law, R J; Bennion, B; Lau, E Y; Schwegler, E; Lightstone, F C

    2009-04-24

    We evaluate the accuracy of density functional theory quantum calculations of biomolecular subsystems using a simple electrostatic embedding scheme. Our scheme is based on dividing the system of interest into a primary and secondary subsystem. A finite difference discretization of the Kohn-Sham equations is used for the primary subsystem, while its electrostatic environment is modeled with a simple one-electron potential. Force-field atomic partial charges are used to generate smeared Gaussian charge densities and to model the secondary subsystem. We illustrate the utility of this approach with calculations of truncated dipeptide chains. We analyze quantitatively the accuracy of this approach by calculating atomic forces and comparing results with fullQMcalculations. The impact of the choice made in terminating dangling bonds at the frontier of the QM region is also investigated.

  14. Extension and evaluation of the multilevel summation method for fast long-range electrostatics calculations.

    PubMed

    Moore, Stan G; Crozier, Paul S

    2014-06-21

    Several extensions and improvements have been made to the multilevel summation method (MSM) of computing long-range electrostatic interactions. These include pressure calculation, an improved error estimator, faster direct part calculation, extension to non-orthogonal (triclinic) systems, and parallelization using the domain decomposition method. MSM also allows fully non-periodic long-range electrostatics calculations which are not possible using traditional Ewald-based methods. In spite of these significant improvements to the MSM algorithm, the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) method was still found to be faster for the periodic systems we tested on a single processor. However, the fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) that PPPM relies on represent a major scaling bottleneck for the method when running on many cores (because the many-to-many communication pattern of the FFT becomes expensive) and MSM scales better than PPPM when using a large core count for two test problems on Sandia's Redsky machine. This FFT bottleneck can be reduced by running PPPM on only a subset of the total processors. MSM is most competitive for relatively low accuracy calculations. On Sandia's Chama machine, however, PPPM is found to scale better than MSM for all core counts that we tested. These results suggest that PPPM is usually more efficient than MSM for typical problems running on current high performance computers. However, further improvements to MSM algorithm could increase its competitiveness for calculation of long-range electrostatic interactions. PMID:24952528

  15. Importance of self-consistency in relativistic continuum random-phase approximation calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ding; Cao Ligang; Tian Yuan; Ma Zhongyu

    2010-11-15

    A fully consistent relativistic continuum random phase approximation (RCRPA) is constructed, where the contribution of the continuum spectrum to nuclear excitations is treated exactly by the single-particle Green's function technique. The full consistency of the calculations is achieved that the same effective Lagrangian is adopted for the ground state and the excited states. The negative energy states in the Dirac sea are also included in the single-particle Green's function in the no-sea approximation. The currents from the vector meson and photon exchanges and the Coulomb interaction in RCRPA are treated exactly. The spin-orbit interaction is included naturally in the relativistic frame. Numerical results of the RCRPA are checked with the constrained relativistic mean-field theory. We study the effects of the inconsistency, particularly the currents and Coulomb interaction in various collective multipole excitations.

  16. Web servers and services for electrostatics calculations with APBS and PDB2PQR

    SciTech Connect

    Unni, Samir; Huang, Yong; Hanson, Robert M.; Tobias, Malcolm; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred; Nielsen, Jens E.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-04-02

    APBS and PDB2PQR are widely utilized free software packages for biomolecular electrostatics calculations. Using the Opal toolkit, we have developed a web services framework for these software packages that enables the use of APBS and PDB2PQR by users who do not have local access to the necessary amount of computational capabilities. This not only increases accessibility of the software to a wider range of scientists, educators, and students but it also increases the availability of electrostatics calculations on portable computing platforms. Users can access this new functionality in two ways. First, an Opal-enabled version of APBS is provided in current distributions, available freely on the web. Second, we have extended the PDB2PQR web server to provide an interface for the setup, execution, and visualization electrostatics potentials as calculated by APBS. This web interface also uses the Opal framework which ensures the scalability needed to support the large APBS user community. Both of these resources are available from the APBS/PDB2PQR website: http://www.poissonboltzmann.org/.

  17. Web servers and services for electrostatics calculations with APBS and PDB2PQR.

    PubMed

    Unni, Samir; Huang, Yong; Hanson, Robert M; Tobias, Malcolm; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred W; Nielsen, Jens E; Baker, Nathan A

    2011-05-01

    APBS and PDB2PQR are widely utilized free software packages for biomolecular electrostatics calculations. Using the Opal toolkit, we have developed a Web services framework for these software packages that enables the use of APBS and PDB2PQR by users who do not have local access to the necessary amount of computational capabilities. This not only increases accessibility of the software to a wider range of scientists, educators, and students but also increases the availability of electrostatics calculations on portable computing platforms. Users can access this new functionality in two ways. First, an Opal-enabled version of APBS is provided in current distributions, available freely on the web. Second, we have extended the PDB2PQR web server to provide an interface for the setup, execution, and visualization of electrostatic potentials as calculated by APBS. This web interface also uses the Opal framework which ensures the scalability needed to support the large APBS user community. Both of these resources are available from the APBS/PDB2PQR website: http://www.poissonboltzmann.org/. PMID:21425296

  18. A new smoothing function to introduce long-range electrostatic effects in QM/MM calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Dong; Duke, Robert E.; Andrés Cisneros, G.

    2015-07-28

    A new method to account for long range electrostatic contributions is proposed and implemented for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics long range electrostatic correction (QM/MM-LREC) calculations. This method involves the use of the minimum image convention under periodic boundary conditions and a new smoothing function for energies and forces at the cutoff boundary for the Coulomb interactions. Compared to conventional QM/MM calculations without long-range electrostatic corrections, the new method effectively includes effects on the MM environment in the primary image from its replicas in the neighborhood. QM/MM-LREC offers three useful features including the avoidance of calculations in reciprocal space (k-space), with the concomitant avoidance of having to reproduce (analytically or approximately) the QM charge density in k-space, and the straightforward availability of analytical Hessians. The new method is tested and compared with results from smooth particle mesh Ewald (PME) for three systems including a box of neat water, a double proton transfer reaction, and the geometry optimization of the critical point structures for the rate limiting step of the DNA dealkylase AlkB. As with other smoothing or shifting functions, relatively large cutoffs are necessary to achieve comparable accuracy with PME. For the double-proton transfer reaction, the use of a 22 Å cutoff shows a close reaction energy profile and geometries of stationary structures with QM/MM-LREC compared to conventional QM/MM with no truncation. Geometry optimization of stationary structures for the hydrogen abstraction step by AlkB shows some differences between QM/MM-LREC and the conventional QM/MM. These differences underscore the necessity of the inclusion of the long-range electrostatic contribution.

  19. A new smoothing function to introduce long-range electrostatic effects in QM/MM calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Dong; Duke, Robert E.; Cisneros, G. Andrés

    2015-07-01

    A new method to account for long range electrostatic contributions is proposed and implemented for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics long range electrostatic correction (QM/MM-LREC) calculations. This method involves the use of the minimum image convention under periodic boundary conditions and a new smoothing function for energies and forces at the cutoff boundary for the Coulomb interactions. Compared to conventional QM/MM calculations without long-range electrostatic corrections, the new method effectively includes effects on the MM environment in the primary image from its replicas in the neighborhood. QM/MM-LREC offers three useful features including the avoidance of calculations in reciprocal space (k-space), with the concomitant avoidance of having to reproduce (analytically or approximately) the QM charge density in k-space, and the straightforward availability of analytical Hessians. The new method is tested and compared with results from smooth particle mesh Ewald (PME) for three systems including a box of neat water, a double proton transfer reaction, and the geometry optimization of the critical point structures for the rate limiting step of the DNA dealkylase AlkB. As with other smoothing or shifting functions, relatively large cutoffs are necessary to achieve comparable accuracy with PME. For the double-proton transfer reaction, the use of a 22 Å cutoff shows a close reaction energy profile and geometries of stationary structures with QM/MM-LREC compared to conventional QM/MM with no truncation. Geometry optimization of stationary structures for the hydrogen abstraction step by AlkB shows some differences between QM/MM-LREC and the conventional QM/MM. These differences underscore the necessity of the inclusion of the long-range electrostatic contribution.

  20. A new smoothing function to introduce long-range electrostatic effects in QM/MM calculations

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Dong; Duke, Robert E.; Cisneros, G. Andrés

    2015-01-01

    A new method to account for long range electrostatic contributions is proposed and implemented for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics long range electrostatic correction (QM/MM-LREC) calculations. This method involves the use of the minimum image convention under periodic boundary conditions and a new smoothing function for energies and forces at the cutoff boundary for the Coulomb interactions. Compared to conventional QM/MM calculations without long-range electrostatic corrections, the new method effectively includes effects on the MM environment in the primary image from its replicas in the neighborhood. QM/MM-LREC offers three useful features including the avoidance of calculations in reciprocal space (k-space), with the concomitant avoidance of having to reproduce (analytically or approximately) the QM charge density in k-space, and the straightforward availability of analytical Hessians. The new method is tested and compared with results from smooth particle mesh Ewald (PME) for three systems including a box of neat water, a double proton transfer reaction, and the geometry optimization of the critical point structures for the rate limiting step of the DNA dealkylase AlkB. As with other smoothing or shifting functions, relatively large cutoffs are necessary to achieve comparable accuracy with PME. For the double-proton transfer reaction, the use of a 22 Å cutoff shows a close reaction energy profile and geometries of stationary structures with QM/MM-LREC compared to conventional QM/MM with no truncation. Geometry optimization of stationary structures for the hydrogen abstraction step by AlkB shows some differences between QM/MM-LREC and the conventional QM/MM. These differences underscore the necessity of the inclusion of the long-range electrostatic contribution. PMID:26233103

  1. Optimizing electrostatic field calculations with the adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver to predict electric fields at protein-protein interfaces. I. Sampling and focusing.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Andrew W; Webb, Lauren J

    2013-10-01

    Continuum electrostatics methods are commonly used to calculate electrostatic potentials in proteins and at protein-protein interfaces to aid many types of biophysical studies. Despite their ubiquity throughout the biophysical literature, these calculations are difficult to test against experimental data to determine their accuracy and validity. To address this, we have calculated the Boltzmann-weighted electrostatic field at the midpoint of a nitrile bond placed at a variety of locations on the surface of the protein RalGDS, both in its monomeric form as well as when docked to four different constructs of the protein Rap, and compared the computation results to vibrational absorption energy measurements of the nitrile oscillator. This was done by generating a statistical ensemble of protein structures using enhanced molecular dynamics sampling with the Amber03 force field, followed by solving the linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation for each structure using the Applied Poisson-Boltzmann Solver (APBS) software package. Using a two-stage focusing strategy, we examined numerous second stage box dimensions, grid point densities, box locations, and compared the numerical result to the result obtained from the sum of the numeric reaction field and the analytic Coulomb field. It was found that the reaction field method yielded higher correlation with experiment for the absolute calculation of fields, while the numeric solutions yielded higher correlation with experiment for the relative field calculations. Finer grid spacing typically improved the calculation, although this effect was less pronounced in the reaction field method. These sorts of calculations were also very sensitive to the box location, particularly for the numeric calculations of absolute fields using a 10(3) Å(3) box. PMID:24041016

  2. Transfer to the continuum calculations of quasifree (p,pn) and (p,2p) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Ramos, M.; Moro, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    Nucleon removal (p, pn) and (p, 2p) reactions at intermediate energies have gained renewed attention in recent years as a tool to extract information from exotic nuclei. The information obtained from these experiments is expected to be sensitive to deeper portions of the wave function of the removed nucleon than knockout reactions with heavier targets. In this contribution, we present calculations for (p, 2p) and (p, pn) reactions performed within the so-called transfer to the continuum method (TR*). Results for stable and unstable nuclei are presented, and compared with experimental data, when available.

  3. Calculation and observation of thermal electrostatic noise in solar wind plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Calculations, both approximate algebraic and numerical, have been carried out for the noise due to electrostatic waves incident on a dipole antenna. The noise is calculated both for a thermal equilibrium plasma, and one having several components at different temperatures. The results are compared with measurements from the IMP-6 satellite. In various frequency ranges, the noise power is dominated by Langmuir oscillations, by electron acoustic waves and by ion acoustic waves. The measurements are consistent with all of these, although the ion waves are not definitely observed, due to interference from shot noise.

  4. The calculation of electrostatic interactions and their role in determining the energies and geometries of explosive molecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.P.; Kober, E.M.; Copenhaver, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Three different procedures were used to calculate electrostatic interactions in explosive molecular crystals. The use of Potential Derived Charges (PDC's) and atom-centered multipole expansions (ACME's) provides reasonable fits of the molecular electrostatic potential. The ability of these approaches to reproduce observed crystal structures was also evaluated.

  5. Electrostatic embedding in large-scale first principles quantum mechanical calculations on biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Fox, Stephen J; Pittock, Chris; Fox, Thomas; Tautermann, Christofer S; Malcolm, Noj; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-12-14

    Biomolecular simulations with atomistic detail are often required to describe interactions with chemical accuracy for applications such as the calculation of free energies of binding or chemical reactions in enzymes. Force fields are typically used for this task but these rely on extensive parameterisation which in cases can lead to limited accuracy and transferability, for example for ligands with unusual functional groups. These limitations can be overcome with first principles calculations with methods such as density functional theory (DFT) but at a much higher computational cost. The use of electrostatic embedding can significantly reduce this cost by representing a portion of the simulated system in terms of highly localised charge distributions. These classical charge distributions are electrostatically coupled with the quantum system and represent the effect of the environment in which the quantum system is embedded. In this paper we describe and evaluate such an embedding scheme in which the polarisation of the electronic density by the embedding charges occurs self-consistently during the calculation of the density. We have implemented this scheme in a linear-scaling DFT program as our aim is to treat with DFT entire biomolecules (such as proteins) and large portions of the solvent. We test this approach in the calculation of interaction energies of ligands with biomolecules and solvent and investigate under what conditions these can be obtained with the same level of accuracy as when the entire system is described by DFT, for a variety of neutral and charged species. PMID:22168680

  6. The low-frequency continuum as observed in the solar wind from ISEE 3 - Thermal electrostatic noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, S.; Steinberg, J.-L.; Epstein, G.; Tilloles, P.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The low frequency continuum (LFC) noise between 30 and 200 kHz has been investigated from the ISEE 3 spacecraft in the solar wind by means of a radio astronomy experiment more sensitive than previously available. It is demonstrated that the LFC radiation observed in the solar wind is in the form of longitudinal plasma waves rather than transverse electromagnetic waves. The observed spectral characteristics are found to be a function of antenna length. In addition, both the absence of antenna spin modulation and the fact that these plasma waves do not propagate to large distances imply a local origin for the LFC.

  7. Electronic coupling calculations with transition charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles derived from electrostatic potential fitting.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro J

    2014-12-01

    A transition charge, dipole, and quadrupole from electrostatic potential (TrESP-CDQ) method for electronic coupling calculations is proposed. The TrESP method is based on the classical description of electronic Coulomb interaction between transition densities for individual molecules. In the original TrESP method, only the transition charge interactions were considered as the electronic coupling. In the present study, the TrESP method is extended to include the contributions from the transition dipoles and quadrupoles as well as the transition charges. Hence, the self-consistent transition density is employed in the ESP fitting procedure. To check the accuracy of the present approach, several test calculations are performed to a helium dimer, a methane dimer, and an ethylene dimer. As a result, the TrESP-CDQ method gives a much improved description of the electronic coupling, compared with the original TrESP method. The calculated results also show that the self-consistent treatment to the transition densities contributes significantly to the accuracy of the electronic coupling calculations. Based on the successful description of the electronic coupling, the contributions to the electronic coupling are also analyzed. This analysis clearly shows a negligible contribution of the transition charge interaction to the electronic coupling. Hence, the distribution of the transition density is found to strongly influence the magnitudes of the transition charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles. The present approach is useful for analyzing and understanding the mechanism of excitation-energy transfer. PMID:25481127

  8. Electronic coupling calculations with transition charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles derived from electrostatic potential fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro J.

    2014-12-07

    A transition charge, dipole, and quadrupole from electrostatic potential (TrESP-CDQ) method for electronic coupling calculations is proposed. The TrESP method is based on the classical description of electronic Coulomb interaction between transition densities for individual molecules. In the original TrESP method, only the transition charge interactions were considered as the electronic coupling. In the present study, the TrESP method is extended to include the contributions from the transition dipoles and quadrupoles as well as the transition charges. Hence, the self-consistent transition density is employed in the ESP fitting procedure. To check the accuracy of the present approach, several test calculations are performed to a helium dimer, a methane dimer, and an ethylene dimer. As a result, the TrESP-CDQ method gives a much improved description of the electronic coupling, compared with the original TrESP method. The calculated results also show that the self-consistent treatment to the transition densities contributes significantly to the accuracy of the electronic coupling calculations. Based on the successful description of the electronic coupling, the contributions to the electronic coupling are also analyzed. This analysis clearly shows a negligible contribution of the transition charge interaction to the electronic coupling. Hence, the distribution of the transition density is found to strongly influence the magnitudes of the transition charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles. The present approach is useful for analyzing and understanding the mechanism of excitation-energy transfer.

  9. Water vapor millimeter wave foreign continuum: A Lanczos calculation in the coordinate representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    2002-12-01

    The water vapor foreign-continuum absorption has been calculated theoretically from first principles for the millimeter wave spectral region as a function of frequency f and temperature T. The calculations are made using the Lanczos algorithm by writing the resolvent operator (ω-L)-1 as continued fractions. In order to guarantee the quick convergence of the continued fractions, the line space of H2O is divided into two subspaces: one consists of the positive resonance lines and the other the negative ones. By ignoring the coupling between them, (ω-L)-1 is expressed as a sum of two continued fractions. The parameters appearing in each of the fractions are functions of the matrix elements of powers of the Liouville operator L between the starting vectors spanning the corresponding subspaces. In the present work, we have taken into account all powers of L up to 5. With the coordinate representation in which the orientations of the H2O-N2 collision pair are chosen as the basis functions in Hilbert space, the anisotropic interaction potential is diagonal, and calculations of the matrix elements are transformed to multidimensional integrations. The latter are evaluated with the Monte Carlo method. In order to reduce the lengthy calculations, we assume that the anisotropic potential has rotational symmetry about the Z axis of H2O, and consists of the long-range dipole-quadrupole part and a short-range repulsive site-site model. Once the parameters of the continued fractions are known, one can calculate the poles and residues and then carry out the ensemble average over the translational motion. Within the quasistatic approximation, one can treat the latter classically and obtain contributions to the absorption coefficient at the poles. Finally, the absorption coefficient at frequency f can be derived by an interpolation method. The results are fitted to a simple function of f and T, and are compared with experimental data and with two different versions of Liebe

  10. An auxilliary grid method for the calculation of electrostatic terms in density functional theory on a real-space grid.

    PubMed

    Zuzovski, Michael; Boag, Amir; Natan, Amir

    2015-12-21

    In this work we show the implementation of a linear scaling algorithm for the calculation of the Poisson integral. We use domain decomposition and non-uniform auxiliary grids (NGs) to calculate the electrostatic interaction. We demonstrate the approach within the PARSEC density functional theory code and perform calculations of long 1D carbon chains and other long molecules. Finally, we discuss possible applications to additional problems and geometries. PMID:26123448

  11. SR-52 PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR PROGRAMS FOR VENTURI SCRUBBERS AND ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides useful tools for estimating particulate removal by venturi scrubbers and electrostatic precipitators. Detailed descriptions are given for programs to predict the penetration (one minus efficiency) for each device. These programs are written specifically for th...

  12. MULTIPOLE EXPANSION TECHNIQUES FOR THE CALCULATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MOLECULAR ELECTROSTATIC POTENTIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrostatic interaction between a chemical and its site of biological action is often important in determining biological activity. In order to include this interaction in methods to assess the potential biological activity of large molecules, rapid and reliable techniques ...

  13. Continuum Diffusion Reaction Rate Calculations of Wild-Type and Mutant Mouse Acetylcholinesterase: Adaptive Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuhua; Zhang, Yongjie; Bajaj, Chandrajit L.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2004-01-01

    As described previously, continuum models, such as the Smoluchowski equation, offer a scalable framework for studying diffusion in biomolecular systems. This work presents new developments in the efficient solution of the continuum diffusion equation. Specifically, we present methods for adaptively refining finite element solutions of the Smoluchowski equation based on a posteriori error estimates. We also describe new, molecular-surface-based models, for diffusional reaction boundary criteria and compare results obtained from these models with the traditional spherical criteria. The new methods are validated by comparison of the calculated reaction rates with experimental values for wild-type and mutant forms of mouse acetylcholinesterase. The results show good agreement with experiment and help to define optimal reactive boundary conditions. PMID:15345536

  14. Confusing Aspects in the Calculation of the Electrostatic Potential of an Infinite Line of Charge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, J. L.; Campos, I.; Roa-Neri, J. A. E.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we discuss the trick of eliminating infinite potential of reference arguing that it corresponds to a constant of integration, in the problem of determining the electrostatic potential of an infinite line of charge with uniform density, and show how the problem must be tackled properly. The usual procedure is confusing for most…

  15. Determination of variable atom parameters in ionic crystals by electrostatic calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, T.; Morss, L.R.

    1987-03-01

    An electrostatic method to determine variable atom parameters in ionic crystals with experimentally determined unit cell parameters and space group is proposed. The atom parameters are usually chosen to give the maximum Madelung constant. However, when these atom parameters generate interatomic distances at least one of which is less than a critical distance, which comes from repulsion between atoms, the atom parameters corresponding to that distance are assigned. Applicability was examined for three cases: TiO/sub 2/ (rutile), UCl/sub 3/, and ..beta..-Rb/sub 2/GeF/sub 6/. Agreement between the atom parameters of this method and of literature was good. Some discussion is presented on the basis of this method. In ionic crystals, the atoms with variable parameters are set first using the geometrical arrangement which is the most stable in an electrostatic sense, and then real distances are fixed under the interaction of repulsive forces. 34 references, 7 figures, 5 tables.

  16. DelPhi Web Server: A comprehensive online suite for electrostatic calculations of biological macromolecules and their complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Subhra; Witham, Shawn; Zhang, Jie; Zhenirovskyy, Maxim; Rocchia, Walter; Alexov, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Here we report a web server, the DelPhi web server, which utilizes DelPhi program to calculate electrostatic energies and the corresponding electrostatic potential and ionic distributions, and dielectric map. The server provides extra services to fix structural defects, as missing atoms in the structural file and allows for generation of missing hydrogen atoms. The hydrogen placement and the corresponding DelPhi calculations can be done with user selected force field parameters being either Charmm22, Amber98 or OPLS. Upon completion of the calculations, the user is given option to download fixed and protonated structural file, together with the parameter and Delphi output files for further analysis. Utilizing Jmol viewer, the user can see the corresponding structural file, to manipulate it and to change the presentation. In addition, if the potential map is requested to be calculated, the potential can be mapped onto the molecule surface. The DelPhi web server is available from http://compbio.clemson.edu/delphi_webserver. PMID:24683424

  17. Experimental Measurements and Density Functional Theory Calculations of Continuum Lowering in Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, Sam

    2014-10-01

    An accurate description of the ionization potential depression (IPD) of ions in plasmas due to their interaction with the environment is a fundamental problem in plasma physics, playing a key role in determining the ionization balance, charge state distribution, opacity and plasma equation of state. Here I present the first experimental investigation of the IPD as a function of ionic charge state in a range of dense Mg, Al and Si plasmas, using the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. The measurements show significantly larger IPDs than are predicted by the most commonly used models, such as that of Stewart-Pyatt, or the ion-sphere model of Zimmerman-More. Instead, plasma simulations using finite-temperature density functional theory with excited-state projector augmented-wave potentials show excellent agreement with the experimental results and explain the stronger-than-expected continuum lowering through the electronic structure of the valence states in these strong-coupling conditions, which retain much of their atomic characteristics close to the ion core regions. These results have a profound impact on the understanding and modelling of plasmas over a wide range of warm- and hot-dense matter conditions.

  18. Calculation of electromagnetic fields induced on a geostationary satellite by an electrostatic discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froger, E.; Marque, J. P.

    The electromagnetic response of an orbiting satellite to an electrostatic discharge is compared to that of the same object subjected (in a susceptibility test) to an injection current. In the absence of actual data, the comparison was performed on the basis of two numerical simulations: one using the GEODE particle code for the orbiting case, and the other using the ALICE code for a representative injection configuration. It is found that the evolution of the electromagnetic fields is controlled in particular by the particle emission rhythm, giving rise to an ejection flux 'slit' whose rise time is about several tens of nanoseconds.

  19. AFMPB: An adaptive fast multipole Poisson Boltzmann solver for calculating electrostatics in biomolecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for rapid evaluation of the electrostatic potentials and forces in biomolecular systems modeled by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The numerical solver utilizes a well-conditioned boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation, a node-patch discretization scheme, a Krylov subspace iterative solver package with reverse communication protocols, and an adaptive new version of fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole-to-local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related libraries and utility tools are available at http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/. This paper is a brief summary of the program: the algorithms, the implementation and the usage.

  20. Electrostatic considerations affecting the calculated HOMO-LUMO gap in protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Lever, Greg; Cole, Daniel J; Hine, Nicholas D M; Haynes, Peter D; Payne, Mike C

    2013-04-17

    A detailed study of energy differences between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMO-LUMO gaps) in protein systems and water clusters is presented. Recent work questioning the applicability of Kohn-Sham density-functional theory to proteins and large water clusters (Rudberg 2012 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 24 072202) has demonstrated vanishing HOMO-LUMO gaps for these systems, which is generally attributed to the treatment of exchange in the functional used. The present work shows that the vanishing gap is, in fact, an electrostatic artefact of the method used to prepare the system. Practical solutions for ensuring the gap is maintained when the system size is increased are demonstrated. This work has important implications for the use of large-scale density-functional theory in biomolecular systems, particularly in the simulation of photoemission, optical absorption and electronic transport, all of which depend critically on differences between energies of molecular orbitals. PMID:23470878

  1. Protonation state and free energy calculation of HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex based on electrostatic polarisation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Maoyou; Jiang, Xiaonan; Jiang, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The protonation states of catalytic Asp25/25‧ residues remarkably affect the binding mechanism of the HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study, which includes electrostatic polarisation effect, to investigate the influence of Asp25/25‧ protonation states upon the binding free energy of the HIV-1 protease and a C2-symmetric inhibitor. Good agreements are obtained on inhibitor structure, hydrogen bond network, and binding free energy between our theoretical calculations and the experimental data. The calculations show that the Asp25 residue is deprotonated, and the Asp25‧ residue is protonated. Our results reveal that the Asp25/25‧ residues can have different protonation states when binding to different inhibitors although the protease and the inhibitors have the same symmetry. This study offers some insights into understanding the protonation state of HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex, which could be helpful in designing new inhibitor molecules.

  2. AFMPB: An adaptive fast multipole Poisson-Boltzmann solver for calculating electrostatics in biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-11-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for rapid evaluation of the electrostatic potentials and forces in biomolecular systems modeled by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The numerical solver utilizes a well-conditioned boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation, a node-patch discretization scheme, a Krylov subspace iterative solver package with reverse communication protocols, and an adaptive new version of the fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole-to-local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related libraries and utility tools are available at http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/~lubz/afmpb.html and a mirror site at http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/. This paper is a brief summary of the program: the algorithms, the implementation and the usage. Restrictions: Only three or six significant digits options are provided in this version. Unusual features: Most of the codes are in Fortran77 style. Memory allocation functions from Fortran90 and above are used in a few subroutines. Additional comments: The current version of the codes is designed and written for single core/processor desktop machines. Check http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/lubz/afmpb.html for updates and changes. Running time: The running time varies with the number of discretized elements (N) in the system and their distributions. In most cases, it scales linearly as a function of N.

  3. Optimizing electrostatic field calculations with the Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver to predict electric fields at protein-protein interfaces II: explicit near-probe and hydrogen-bonding water molecules.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Andrew W; Webb, Lauren J

    2014-07-17

    We have examined the effects of including explicit, near-probe solvent molecules in a continuum electrostatics strategy using the linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation with the Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver (APBS) to calculate electric fields at the midpoint of a nitrile bond both at the surface of a monomeric protein and when docked at a protein-protein interface. Results were compared to experimental vibrational absorption energy measurements of the nitrile oscillator. We examined three methods for selecting explicit water molecules: (1) all water molecules within 5 Å of the nitrile nitrogen; (2) the water molecule closest to the nitrile nitrogen; and (3) any single water molecule hydrogen-bonding to the nitrile. The correlation between absolute field strengths with experimental absorption energies were calculated and it was observed that method 1 was only an improvement for the monomer calculations, while methods 2 and 3 were not significantly different from the purely implicit solvent calculations for all protein systems examined. Upon taking the difference in calculated electrostatic fields and comparing to the difference in absorption frequencies, we typically observed an increase in experimental correlation for all methods, with method 1 showing the largest gain, likely due to the improved absolute monomer correlations using that method. These results suggest that, unlike with quantum mechanical methods, when calculating absolute fields using entirely classical models, implicit solvent is typically sufficient and additional work to identify hydrogen-bonding or nearest waters does not significantly impact the results. Although we observed that a sphere of solvent near the field of interest improved results for relative field calculations, it should not be consider a panacea for all situations. PMID:24446740

  4. Defining the contributions of permanent electrostatics, Pauli repulsion, and dispersion in density functional theory calculations of intermolecular interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Horn, Paul R; Mao, Yuezhi; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-03-21

    In energy decomposition analysis of Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations, the so-called frozen (or pre-polarization) interaction energy contains contributions from permanent electrostatics, dispersion, and Pauli repulsion. The standard classical approach to separate them suffers from several well-known limitations. We introduce an alternative scheme that employs valid antisymmetric electronic wavefunctions throughout and is based on the identification of individual fragment contributions to the initial supersystem wavefunction as determined by an energetic optimality criterion. The density deformations identified with individual fragments upon formation of the initial supersystem wavefunction are analyzed along with the distance dependence of the new and classical terms for test cases that include the neon dimer, ammonia borane, water-Na(+), water-Cl(-), and the naphthalene dimer. PMID:27004862

  5. An improved fast multipole method for electrostatic potential calculations in a class of coarse-grained molecular simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Poursina, Mohammad; Anderson, Kurt S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm to approximate the long-range electrostatic potential field in the Cartesian coordinates applicable to 3D coarse-grained simulations of biopolymers. In such models, coarse-grained clusters are formed via treating groups of atoms as rigid and/or flexible bodies connected together via kinematic joints. Therefore, multibody dynamic techniques are used to form and solve the equations of motion of such coarse-grained systems. In this article, the approximations for the potential fields due to the interaction between a highly negatively/positively charged pseudo-atom and charged particles, as well as the interaction between clusters of charged particles, are presented. These approximations are expressed in terms of physical and geometrical properties of the bodies such as the entire charge, the location of the center of charge, and the pseudo-inertia tensor about the center of charge of the clusters. Further, a novel substructuring scheme is introduced to implement the presented far-field potential evaluations in a binary tree framework as opposed to the existing quadtree and octree strategies of implementing fast multipole method. Using the presented Lagrangian grids, the electrostatic potential is recursively calculated via sweeping two passes: assembly and disassembly. In the assembly pass, adjacent charged bodies are combined together to form new clusters. Then, the potential field of each cluster due to its interaction with faraway resulting clusters is recursively calculated in the disassembly pass. The method is highly compatible with multibody dynamic schemes to model coarse-grained biopolymers. Since the proposed method takes advantage of constant physical and geometrical properties of rigid clusters, improvement in the overall computational cost is observed comparing to the tradition application of fast multipole method.

  6. Continuum treatment of electronic polarization effect.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yu-Hong; Luo, Ray

    2007-03-01

    A continuum treatment of electronic polarization has been explored for in molecular mechanics simulations in implicit solvents. The dielectric constant for molecule interior is the only parameter in the continuum polarizable model. A value of 4 is found to yield optimal agreement with high-level ab initio quantum mechanical calculations for the tested molecular systems. Interestingly, its performance is not sensitive to the definition of molecular volume, in which the continuum electronic polarization is defined. In this model, quantum mechanical electrostatic field in different dielectric environments from vacuum, low-dielectric organic solvent, and water can be used simultaneously in atomic charge fitting to achieve consistent treatment of electrostatic interactions. The tests show that a single set of atomic charges can be used consistently in different dielectric environments and different molecular conformations, and the atomic charges transfer well from training monomers to tested dimers. The preliminary study gives us the hope of developing a continuum polarizable force field for more consistent simulations of proteins and nucleic acids in implicit solvents. PMID:17362100

  7. Continuum treatment of electronic polarization effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yu-Hong; Luo, Ray

    2007-03-01

    A continuum treatment of electronic polarization has been explored for in molecular mechanics simulations in implicit solvents. The dielectric constant for molecule interior is the only parameter in the continuum polarizable model. A value of 4 is found to yield optimal agreement with high-level ab initio quantum mechanical calculations for the tested molecular systems. Interestingly, its performance is not sensitive to the definition of molecular volume, in which the continuum electronic polarization is defined. In this model, quantum mechanical electrostatic field in different dielectric environments from vacuum, low-dielectric organic solvent, and water can be used simultaneously in atomic charge fitting to achieve consistent treatment of electrostatic interactions. The tests show that a single set of atomic charges can be used consistently in different dielectric environments and different molecular conformations, and the atomic charges transfer well from training monomers to tested dimers. The preliminary study gives us the hope of developing a continuum polarizable force field for more consistent simulations of proteins and nucleic acids in implicit solvents.

  8. A self-consistent, microenvironment modulated screened coulomb potential approximation to calculate pH-dependent electrostatic effects in proteins.

    PubMed

    Mehler, E L; Guarnieri, F

    1999-07-01

    An improved approach is presented for calculating pH-dependent electrostatic effects in proteins using sigmoidally screened Coulomb potentials (SCP). It is hypothesized that a key determinant of seemingly aberrant behavior in pKa shifts is due to the properties of the unique microenvironment around each residue. To help demonstrate this proposal, an approach is developed to characterize the microenvironments using the local hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity around each residue of the protein. The quantitative characterization of the microenvironments shows that the protein is a complex mosaic of differing dielectric regions that provides a physical basis for modifying the dielectric screening functions: in more hydrophobic microenvironments the screening decreases whereas the converse applies to more hydrophilic regions. The approach was applied to seven proteins providing more than 100 measured pKa values and yielded a root mean square deviation of 0.5 between calculated and experimental values. The incorporation of the local hydrophobicity characteristics into the algorithm allowed the resolution of some of the more intractable problems in the calculation of pKa. Thus, the divergent shifts of the pKa of Glu-35 and Asp-66 in hen egg white lysozyme, which are both about 90% buried, was correctly predicted. Mechanistically, the divergence occurs because Glu-35 is in a hydrophobic microenvironment, while Asp-66 is in a hydrophilic microenvironment. Furthermore, because the calculation of the microenvironmental effects takes very little CPU time, the computational speed of the SCP formulation is conserved. Finally, results from different crystal structures of a given protein were compared, and it is shown that the reliability of the calculated pKa values is sufficient to allow identification of conformations that may be more relevant for the solution structure. PMID:10388736

  9. Numerical calculation of dielectrophoretic and electrostatic forces acting on micro-scale particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praeger, M.; Li, Z.; Smallwood, J. M.; Lewin, P. L.

    2015-10-01

    Much of the current literature on dielectrophoresis (DEP) relates to micro or nano scale particles; typically in micro-fluidic type experiment geometries. In contrast, this work focusses on the application of DEP forces to larger, micro-scale particles in air. Since DEP scales with particle volume, it can apply a significant force on surprisingly large objects. When using very small particles it is often sufficient to use Pohl's method [1] whereby the particle is considered to be spherical and where it does not interact with the externally applied electric field. For the larger particles used in this work, the spherical approximation does not necessarily hold. DEP forces are therefore calculated using the finite element method (FEM) which permits the use of arbitrary particle shapes. In this model the electric field is solved in the presence of a polarizable particle, the DEP force is then calculated using the Maxwell stress tensor method [2]. The development of this model allows the investigation of the DEP forces acting on non-spherical particles for a specific experimental electrode geometry.

  10. Efficient calculation of many-body induced electrostatics in molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Keith Cioce, Christian R.; Pham, Tony; Space, Brian; Belof, Jonathan L.

    2013-11-14

    Potential energy functions including many-body polarization are in widespread use in simulations of aqueous and biological systems, metal-organics, molecular clusters, and other systems where electronically induced redistribution of charge among local atomic sites is of importance. The polarization interactions, treated here via the methods of Thole and Applequist, while long-ranged, can be computed for moderate-sized periodic systems with extremely high accuracy by extending Ewald summation to the induced fields as demonstrated by Nymand, Sala, and others. These full Ewald polarization calculations, however, are expensive and often limited to very small systems, particularly in Monte Carlo simulations, which may require energy evaluation over several hundred-thousand configurations. For such situations, it shall be shown that sufficiently accurate computation of the polarization energy can be produced in a fraction of the central processing unit (CPU) time by neglecting the long-range extension to the induced fields while applying the long-range treatments of Ewald or Wolf to the static fields; these methods, denoted Ewald E-Static and Wolf E-Static (WES), respectively, provide an effective means to obtain polarization energies for intermediate and large systems including those with several thousand polarizable sites in a fraction of the CPU time. Furthermore, we shall demonstrate a means to optimize the damping for WES calculations via extrapolation from smaller trial systems.

  11. Conversion of electrostatic plasma waves into electromagnetic waves - Numerical calculation of the dispersion relation for all wavelengths.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oya, H.

    1971-01-01

    The dispersion curves have been computed for a wide range of wavelengths from electromagnetic waves to electrostatic waves in a magnetoactive warm plasma with a Maxwellian velocity distribution function. The computation was carried out mainly for the perpendicular propagation mode. The upper hybrid resonance is the connection point of the electrostatic waves and the electromagnetic waves. The electrostatic waves not associated with the upper hybrid resonance are subjected to electron cyclotron damping when the wavelength becomes long. Oblique propagation is allowed for the electrostatic waves in a frequency range from the plasma frequency to the upper hybrid resonance frequency in the long-wavelength region where Landau damping can be neglected and where the electrostatic mode smoothly connects to the electromagnetic X-mode. In a slightly inhomogeneous plasma, the Bernstein-mode electrostatic wave can escape by being converted into the O-mode electromagnetic wave; two reflections take place during this escape process.

  12. Nanofluidization electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, J. M.; Quintanilla, M. A. S.; Espin, M. J.; Castellanos, A.

    2008-03-01

    Electrostatic charging of powders is a relevant phenomenon for a number of industrial applications. The design of new processes and the use of high resistivity materials and ultrafine powders may lead to higher charging rates and to higher levels of charge accumulation that can become a serious problem. In this work we investigate experimentally electrostatic charging in nanofluidization. The behavior of a fluidized bed of silica nanoparticles under the influence of an electrostatic field is studied. The electric field is applied in the horizontal direction and perpendicular to the gas flow. On one hand, we observe the influence of the electric field on the bulk behavior of the fluidized bed, which suffers a collapse when the electric field is turned on. For strong electric fields the stationary state of the fluidized bed reminds one of that of a spouted bed, with a solid layer adhered to the wall and a low density core region of local high gas velocity. On the other hand, and in order to gain additional insight, we look at the trajectories of nanoparticle agglomerates as affected by the electric field. This images analysis reveals that these agglomerates are horizontally deflected towards the wall as a consequence of being charged. From the analysis of agglomerate trajectories the charge per agglomerate is estimated. Using these measurements the electrostatic forces between agglomerates are calculated and compared to van der Waals attractive forces.

  13. Nanofluidization electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Valverde, J M; Quintanilla, M A S; Espin, M J; Castellanos, A

    2008-03-01

    Electrostatic charging of powders is a relevant phenomenon for a number of industrial applications. The design of new processes and the use of high resistivity materials and ultrafine powders may lead to higher charging rates and to higher levels of charge accumulation that can become a serious problem. In this work we investigate experimentally electrostatic charging in nanofluidization. The behavior of a fluidized bed of silica nanoparticles under the influence of an electrostatic field is studied. The electric field is applied in the horizontal direction and perpendicular to the gas flow. On one hand, we observe the influence of the electric field on the bulk behavior of the fluidized bed, which suffers a collapse when the electric field is turned on. For strong electric fields the stationary state of the fluidized bed reminds one of that of a spouted bed, with a solid layer adhered to the wall and a low density core region of local high gas velocity. On the other hand, and in order to gain additional insight, we look at the trajectories of nanoparticle agglomerates as affected by the electric field. This images analysis reveals that these agglomerates are horizontally deflected towards the wall as a consequence of being charged. From the analysis of agglomerate trajectories the charge per agglomerate is estimated. Using these measurements the electrostatic forces between agglomerates are calculated and compared to van der Waals attractive forces. PMID:18517364

  14. Intrinsic electrostatic resonances of heterostructures with negative permittivity from finite-element calculations: Application to core-shell inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejdoubi, Abdelilah; Brosseau, Christian

    2007-11-01

    Herein, we report finite-element calculations of the effective (relative) permittivity of composite materials consisting of inclusions and inclusion arrays with a core-shell structure embedded in a surrounding host. The material making up the core of the two-dimensional structures, or cross sections of infinite three-dimensional objects (parallel, infinitely long, and identical cylinders) where the properties and characteristics are invariant along the perpendicular cross sectional plane, is assumed to have a negative real part of the permittivity, while the coating material (annular shell) is considered to be lossless. While strictly valid only in a dc situation, our analysis can be extended to treat electric fields that oscillate with time, provided that the wavelengths and attenuation lengths associated with the fields are much larger than the microstructure dimension in order that the homogeneous (effective-medium) representation of the composite structure makes sense. While one may identify features of the electrostatic resonance (ER) which are common to core-shell structures characterized by permittivities with real parts of opposite signs, it appears that the predicted ER positions are sensitive to the shell thickness and can be tuned through varying this geometric parameter. For example, we observe that the ER is broadened and shifted as the loss and the shell thickness are increased, respectively. We also argue that such core shell may also be valuable in controlling ER characteristics via polarization in an external electric field. In addition, by considering calculations of the electric field distribution, we find that the ER results in very strong and local-field enhancements into small parts of the shell perimeter. Our findings open up possibilities for the development of hybrid structures that could exploit the ER features for a particular application.

  15. The pKa Cooperative: a collaborative effort to advance structure-based calculations of pKa values and electrostatic effects in proteins.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens E; Gunner, M R; García-Moreno, Bertrand E

    2011-12-01

    The pK(a) Cooperative (http://www.pkacoop.org) was organized to advance development of accurate and useful computational methods for structure-based calculation of pK(a) values and electrostatic energies in proteins. The Cooperative brings together laboratories with expertise and interest in theoretical, computational, and experimental studies of protein electrostatics. To improve structure-based energy calculations, it is necessary to better understand the physical character and molecular determinants of electrostatic effects. Thus, the Cooperative intends to foment experimental research into fundamental aspects of proteins that depend on electrostatic interactions. It will maintain a depository for experimental data useful for critical assessment of methods for structure-based electrostatics calculations. To help guide the development of computational methods, the Cooperative will organize blind prediction exercises. As a first step, computational laboratories were invited to reproduce an unpublished set of experimental pK(a) values of acidic and basic residues introduced in the interior of staphylococcal nuclease by site-directed mutagenesis. The pK(a) values of these groups are unique and challenging to simulate owing to the large magnitude of their shifts relative to normal pK(a) values in water. Many computational methods were tested in this first Blind Prediction Challenge and critical assessment exercise. A workshop was organized in the Telluride Science Research Center to objectively assess the performance of many computational methods tested on this one extensive data set. This volume of Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics introduces the pK(a) Cooperative, presents reports submitted by participants in the Blind Prediction Challenge, and highlights some of the problems in structure-based calculations identified during this exercise. PMID:22002877

  16. The pKa Cooperative: A Collaborative Effort to Advance Structure-Based Calculations of pKa values and Electrostatic Effects in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jens E.; Gunner, M. R.; Bertrand García-Moreno, E.

    2012-01-01

    The pKa Cooperative http://www.pkacoop.org was organized to advance development of accurate and useful computational methods for structure-based calculation of pKa values and electrostatic energy in proteins. The Cooperative brings together laboratories with expertise and interest in theoretical, computational and experimental studies of protein electrostatics. To improve structure-based energy calculations it is necessary to better understand the physical character and molecular determinants of electrostatic effects. The Cooperative thus intends to foment experimental research into fundamental aspects of proteins that depend on electrostatic interactions. It will maintain a depository for experimental data useful for critical assessment of methods for structure-based electrostatics calculations. To help guide the development of computational methods the Cooperative will organize blind prediction exercises. As a first step, computational laboratories were invited to reproduce an unpublished set of experimental pKa values of acidic and basic residues introduced in the interior of staphylococcal nuclease by site-directed mutagenesis. The pKa values of these groups are unique and challenging to simulate owing to the large magnitude of their shifts relative to normal pKa values in water. Many computational methods were tested in this 1st Blind Prediction Challenge and critical assessment exercise. A workshop was organized in the Telluride Science Research Center to assess objectively the performance of many computational methods tested on this one extensive dataset. This volume of PROTEINS: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics introduces the pKa Cooperative, presents reports submitted by participants in the blind prediction challenge, and highlights some of the problems in structure-based calculations identified during this exercise. PMID:22002877

  17. INTERACTIVE COMPUTER MODEL FOR CALCULATING V-I CURVES IN ESPS (ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS) VERSION 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual describes two microcomputer programs written to estimate the performance of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs): the first, to estimate the electrical conditions for round discharge electrodes in the ESP; and the second, a modification of the EPA/SRI ESP model, to estim...

  18. Electronic continuum model for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Leontyev, I V; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2009-02-28

    A simple model for accounting for electronic polarization in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is discussed. In this model, called molecular dynamics electronic continuum (MDEC), the electronic polarization is treated explicitly in terms of the electronic continuum (EC) approximation, while the nuclear dynamics is described with a fixed-charge force field. In such a force-field all atomic charges are scaled to reflect the screening effect by the electronic continuum. The MDEC model is rather similar but not equivalent to the standard nonpolarizable force-fields; the differences are discussed. Of our particular interest is the calculation of the electrostatic part of solvation energy using standard nonpolarizable MD simulations. In a low-dielectric environment, such as protein, the standard MD approach produces qualitatively wrong results. The difficulty is in mistreatment of the electronic polarizability. We show how the results can be much improved using the MDEC approach. We also show how the dielectric constant of the medium obtained in a MD simulation with nonpolarizable force-field is related to the static (total) dielectric constant, which includes both the nuclear and electronic relaxation effects. Using the MDEC model, we discuss recent calculations of dielectric constants of alcohols and alkanes, and show that the MDEC results are comparable with those obtained with the polarizable Drude oscillator model. The applicability of the method to calculations of dielectric properties of proteins is discussed. PMID:19256627

  19. Calculating the binding free energies of charged species based on explicit-solvent simulations employing lattice-sum methods: An accurate correction scheme for electrostatic finite-size effects

    PubMed Central

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Mobley, David L.; Dill, Ken A.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of a protein-ligand binding free energy based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generally relies on a thermodynamic cycle in which the ligand is alchemically inserted into the system, both in the solvated protein and free in solution. The corresponding ligand-insertion free energies are typically calculated in nanoscale computational boxes simulated under periodic boundary conditions and considering electrostatic interactions defined by a periodic lattice-sum. This is distinct from the ideal bulk situation of a system of macroscopic size simulated under non-periodic boundary conditions with Coulombic electrostatic interactions. This discrepancy results in finite-size effects, which affect primarily the charging component of the insertion free energy, are dependent on the box size, and can be large when the ligand bears a net charge, especially if the protein is charged as well. This article investigates finite-size effects on calculated charging free energies using as a test case the binding of the ligand 2-amino-5-methylthiazole (net charge +1 e) to a mutant form of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase in water. Considering different charge isoforms of the protein (net charges −5, 0, +3, or +9 e), either in the absence or the presence of neutralizing counter-ions, and sizes of the cubic computational box (edges ranging from 7.42 to 11.02 nm), the potentially large magnitude of finite-size effects on the raw charging free energies (up to 17.1 kJ mol−1) is demonstrated. Two correction schemes are then proposed to eliminate these effects, a numerical and an analytical one. Both schemes are based on a continuum-electrostatics analysis and require performing Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) calculations on the protein-ligand system. While the numerical scheme requires PB calculations under both non-periodic and periodic boundary conditions, the latter at the box size considered in the MD simulations, the analytical scheme only requires three non-periodic PB

  20. Calculating the binding free energies of charged species based on explicit-solvent simulations employing lattice-sum methods: An accurate correction scheme for electrostatic finite-size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Mobley, David L.; Dill, Ken A.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2013-11-14

    The calculation of a protein-ligand binding free energy based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generally relies on a thermodynamic cycle in which the ligand is alchemically inserted into the system, both in the solvated protein and free in solution. The corresponding ligand-insertion free energies are typically calculated in nanoscale computational boxes simulated under periodic boundary conditions and considering electrostatic interactions defined by a periodic lattice-sum. This is distinct from the ideal bulk situation of a system of macroscopic size simulated under non-periodic boundary conditions with Coulombic electrostatic interactions. This discrepancy results in finite-size effects, which affect primarily the charging component of the insertion free energy, are dependent on the box size, and can be large when the ligand bears a net charge, especially if the protein is charged as well. This article investigates finite-size effects on calculated charging free energies using as a test case the binding of the ligand 2-amino-5-methylthiazole (net charge +1 e) to a mutant form of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase in water. Considering different charge isoforms of the protein (net charges −5, 0, +3, or +9 e), either in the absence or the presence of neutralizing counter-ions, and sizes of the cubic computational box (edges ranging from 7.42 to 11.02 nm), the potentially large magnitude of finite-size effects on the raw charging free energies (up to 17.1 kJ mol{sup −1}) is demonstrated. Two correction schemes are then proposed to eliminate these effects, a numerical and an analytical one. Both schemes are based on a continuum-electrostatics analysis and require performing Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) calculations on the protein-ligand system. While the numerical scheme requires PB calculations under both non-periodic and periodic boundary conditions, the latter at the box size considered in the MD simulations, the analytical scheme only requires three non

  1. A polarizable continuum model for molecules at spherical diffuse interfaces.

    PubMed

    Di Remigio, Roberto; Mozgawa, Krzysztof; Cao, Hui; Weijo, Ville; Frediani, Luca

    2016-03-28

    We present an extension of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) to simulate solvent effects at diffuse interfaces with spherical symmetry, such as nanodroplets and micelles. We derive the form of the Green's function for a spatially varying dielectric permittivity with spherical symmetry and exploit the integral equation formalism of the PCM for general dielectric environments to recast the solvation problem into a continuum solvation framework. This allows the investigation of the solvation of ions and molecules in nonuniform dielectric environments, such as liquid droplets, micelles or membranes, while maintaining the computationally appealing characteristics of continuum solvation models. We describe in detail our implementation, both for the calculation of the Green's function and for its subsequent use in the PCM electrostatic problem. The model is then applied on a few test systems, mainly to analyze the effect of interface curvature on solvation energetics. PMID:27036423

  2. A polarizable continuum model for molecules at spherical diffuse interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Remigio, Roberto; Mozgawa, Krzysztof; Cao, Hui; Weijo, Ville; Frediani, Luca

    2016-03-01

    We present an extension of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) to simulate solvent effects at diffuse interfaces with spherical symmetry, such as nanodroplets and micelles. We derive the form of the Green's function for a spatially varying dielectric permittivity with spherical symmetry and exploit the integral equation formalism of the PCM for general dielectric environments to recast the solvation problem into a continuum solvation framework. This allows the investigation of the solvation of ions and molecules in nonuniform dielectric environments, such as liquid droplets, micelles or membranes, while maintaining the computationally appealing characteristics of continuum solvation models. We describe in detail our implementation, both for the calculation of the Green's function and for its subsequent use in the PCM electrostatic problem. The model is then applied on a few test systems, mainly to analyze the effect of interface curvature on solvation energetics.

  3. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d3 (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles.

  4. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d(3) (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles. PMID:27394119

  5. Long Dynamics Simulations of Proteins Using Atomistic Force Fields and a Continuum Representation of Solvent Effects: Calculation of Structural and Dynamic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianfeng; Hassan, Sergio A.; Mehler, Ernest L.

    2006-01-01

    Long dynamics simulations were carried out on the B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (ProtG) and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) using atomistic descriptions of the proteins and a continuum representation of solvent effects. To mimic frictional and random collision effects, Langevin dynamics (LD) were used. The main goal of the calculations was to explore the stability of tens-of-nanosecond trajectories as generated by this molecular mechanics approximation and to analyze in detail structural and dynamical properties. Conformational fluctuations, order parameters, cross correlation matrices, residue solvent accessibilities, pKa values of titratable groups, and hydrogen-bonding (HB) patterns were calculated from all of the trajectories and compared with available experimental data. The simulations comprised over 40 ns per trajectory for ProtG and over 30 ns per trajectory for BPTI. For comparison, explicit water molecular dynamics simulations (EW/MD) of 3 ns and 4 ns, respectively, were also carried out. Two continuum simulations were performed on each protein using the CHARMM program, one with the all-atom PAR22 representation of the protein force field (here referred to as PAR22/LD simulations) and the other with the modifications introduced by the recently developed CMAP potential (CMAP/LD simulations). The explicit solvent simulations were performed with PAR22 only. Solvent effects are described by a continuum model based on screened Coulomb potentials (SCP) reported earlier, i.e., the SCP-based implicit solvent model (SCP–ISM). For ProtG, both the PAR22/LD and the CMAP/LD 40-ns trajectories were stable, yielding Cα root mean square deviations (RMSD) of about 1.0 and 0.8 Å respectively along the entire simulation time, compared to 0.8 Å for the EW/MD simulation. For BPTI, only the CMAP/LD trajectory was stable for the entire 30-ns simulation, with a Cα RMSD of ≈ 1.4 Å, while the PAR22/LD trajectory became unstable

  6. Charge-density distribution and electrostatic flexibility of ZIF-8 based on high-resolution X-ray diffraction data and periodic calculations.

    PubMed

    Novaković, Sladjana B; Bogdanović, Goran A; Heering, Christian; Makhloufi, Gamall; Francuski, Djordje; Janiak, Christoph

    2015-03-16

    The electron-density distribution in a prototypical porous coordination polymer ZIF-8 has been obtained in an approach combining high-resolution X-ray diffraction data and Invariom refinement. In addition, the periodic quantum-chemical calculation has been used to describe the theoretical density features of ZIF-8 in the same geometry (m1) and also in a "high-pressure" form of ZIF-8 (m2) characterized by conformational change with respect to the methylimidazolate linker. A thorough comparison of the electronic and electrostatic properties in two limiting structural forms of ZIF-8 proposes additional aspects on diffusion and adsorption processes occurring within the framework. The dimensions of the four-membered (FM) and six-membered (SM) apertures of the β cage are reliably determined from the total electron-density distribution. The analysis shows that FM in m2 becomes competitive in size to the SM aperture and should be considered for the diffusion of small molecules and cations. Bader's topological analysis (quantum theory of atoms in molecules) shows similar properties of both ZIF-8 forms. On the other hand, analysis of their electrostatic properties reveals tremendous differences. The study suggests exceptional electrostatic flexibility of the ZIF-8 framework, where small conformational changes lead to a significantly different electrostatic potential (EP) distribution, a feature that could be important for the function and dynamics of the ZIF-8 framework. The cavity surface in m1 contains 38 distinct regions with moderately positive, negative, or neutral EP and weakly positive EP in the cavity volume. In contrast to m1, the m2 form displays only two regions of different EP, with the positive one taking the whole cavity surface and the strong negative one localized entirely in the FM apertures. The EP in the cavity volume is also more positive than that in m1. A pronounced influence of the linker reorientation on the EP of the ZIF-8 forms is related to the

  7. Interactions of aromatic heterocycles with water: the driving force from free-jet rotational spectroscopy and model electrostatic calculations.

    PubMed

    Maris, Assimo; Melandri, Sonia; Miazzi, Marta; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2008-06-23

    The interaction of isolated aromatic nitrogen atoms with water is explored within free jets by using rotational spectroscopy. To the existing data on diazines, we add the case of the 1:1 complex of 1,3,5-triazine and water (where water donates a proton to one of the nitrogen heterocyclic atoms to form a planar adduct). An electrostatic model based on distributed multipoles accurately reproduces the structures of the four azine-water complexes and allows us to understand the forces that stabilize these structures. The applied intermolecular potential allows us to estimate the changes in the thermodynamic functions of the complexes-compared to the separated constituents-and evaluate the temperature at which the complexes are stable under standard conditions. PMID:18470857

  8. Improving the treatment of coarse-grain electrostatics: CVCEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ceres, N.; Lavery, R.

    2015-12-28

    We propose an analytic approach for calculating the electrostatic energy of proteins or protein complexes in aqueous solution. This method, termed CVCEL (Circular Variance Continuum ELectrostatics), is fitted to Poisson calculations and is able to reproduce the corresponding energies for different choices of solute dielectric constant. CVCEL thus treats both solute charge interactions and charge self-energies, and it can also deal with salt solutions. Electrostatic damping notably depends on the degree of solvent exposure of the charges, quantified here in terms of circular variance, a measure that reflects the vectorial distribution of the neighbors around a given center. CVCEL energies can be calculated rapidly and have simple analytical derivatives. This approach avoids the need for calculating effective atomic volumes or Born radii. After describing how the method was developed, we present test results for coarse-grain proteins of different shapes and sizes, using different internal dielectric constants and different salt concentrations and also compare the results with those from simple distance-dependent models. We also show that the CVCEL approach can be used successfully to calculate the changes in electrostatic energy associated with changes in protein conformation or with protein-protein binding.

  9. Improving the treatment of coarse-grain electrostatics: CVCEL.

    PubMed

    Ceres, N; Lavery, R

    2015-12-28

    We propose an analytic approach for calculating the electrostatic energy of proteins or protein complexes in aqueous solution. This method, termed CVCEL (Circular Variance Continuum ELectrostatics), is fitted to Poisson calculations and is able to reproduce the corresponding energies for different choices of solute dielectric constant. CVCEL thus treats both solute charge interactions and charge self-energies, and it can also deal with salt solutions. Electrostatic damping notably depends on the degree of solvent exposure of the charges, quantified here in terms of circular variance, a measure that reflects the vectorial distribution of the neighbors around a given center. CVCEL energies can be calculated rapidly and have simple analytical derivatives. This approach avoids the need for calculating effective atomic volumes or Born radii. After describing how the method was developed, we present test results for coarse-grain proteins of different shapes and sizes, using different internal dielectric constants and different salt concentrations and also compare the results with those from simple distance-dependent models. We also show that the CVCEL approach can be used successfully to calculate the changes in electrostatic energy associated with changes in protein conformation or with protein-protein binding. PMID:26723603

  10. Electronic excitation of molecules in solution calculated using the symmetry-adapted cluster–configuration interaction method in the polarizable continuum model

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Ryoichi Ehara, Masahiro

    2015-12-31

    The effects from solvent environment are specific to the electronic states; therefore, a computational scheme for solvent effects consistent with the electronic states is necessary to discuss electronic excitation of molecules in solution. The PCM (polarizable continuum model) SAC (symmetry-adapted cluster) and SAC-CI (configuration interaction) methods are developed for such purposes. The PCM SAC-CI adopts the state-specific (SS) solvation scheme where solvent effects are self-consistently considered for every ground and excited states. For efficient computations of many excited states, we develop a perturbative approximation for the PCM SAC-CI method, which is called corrected linear response (cLR) scheme. Our test calculations show that the cLR PCM SAC-CI is a very good approximation of the SS PCM SAC-CI method for polar and nonpolar solvents.

  11. Electrostatic Interaction-Induced Room-Temperature Phosphorescence in Pure Organic Molecules from QM/MM Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huili; Shi, Wen; Ren, Jiajun; Li, Wenqiang; Peng, Qian; Shuai, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    Room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) from pure organic material is rare due to the low phosphorescence quantum efficiency. That is why the recent discovery of crystallization induced RTP for several organic molecules aroused strong interests. Through a combined quantum and molecular mechanics CASPT2/AMBER scheme taking terephthalic acid (TPA) as example, we found that electrostatic interaction not only can induce an enhanced radiative decay T1 → S0 through the dipole-allowed S1 intermediate state, but also can hinder the nonradiative decay process upon crystallization. From gas phase to crystal, the nature of S1 state is converted to (1)(π,π*) from (1)(n,π*) character, enhancing transition dipole moment and serving as an efficient intermediate radiative pathway for T1 → S0 transition, and eventually leading to a boosted RTP. The intermolecular packing also blocks the nonradiative decay channel of the high-frequency C═O stretching vibration with large vibronic coupling, rather than the conventional low-frequency aromatic rotation in crystal. This mechanism also holds for other organic compounds that contain both ketones and aromatic rings. PMID:27414718

  12. Thermodynamic properties and solidification kinetics of intermetallic Ni7Zr2 alloy investigated by electrostatic levitation technique and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. H.; Hu, L.; Yang, S. J.; Wang, W. L.; Wei, B.

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties, including the density, volume expansion coefficient, ratio of specific heat to emissivity of intermetallic Ni7Zr2 alloy, have been measured using the non-contact electrostatic levitation technique. These properties vary linearly with temperature at solid and liquid states, even down to the obtained maximum undercooling of 317 K. The enthalpy, glass transition, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, and surface tension were obtained by using molecular dynamics simulations. Ni7Zr2 has a relatively poor glass forming ability, and the glass transition temperature is determined as 1026 K. The inter-diffusivity of Ni7Zr2 alloy fitted by Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law yields a fragility parameter of 8.49, which indicates the fragile nature of this alloy. Due to the competition of increased thermodynamic driving force and decreased atomic diffusion, the dendrite growth velocity of Ni7Zr2 compound exhibits double-exponential relationship to the undercooling. The maximum growth velocity is predicted to be 0.45 m s-1 at the undercooling of 335 K. Theoretical analysis reveals that the dendrite growth is a diffusion-controlled process and the atomic diffusion speed is only 2.0 m s-1.

  13. Electronic excitation spectra of molecules in solution calculated using the symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction method in the polarizable continuum model with perturbative approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Ryoichi Ehara, Masahiro; Cammi, Roberto

    2014-02-14

    A perturbative approximation of the state specific polarizable continuum model (PCM) symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method is proposed for efficient calculations of the electronic excitations and absorption spectra of molecules in solutions. This first-order PCM SAC-CI method considers the solvent effects on the energies of excited states up to the first-order with using the zeroth-order wavefunctions. This method can avoid the costly iterative procedure of the self-consistent reaction field calculations. The first-order PCM SAC-CI calculations well reproduce the results obtained by the iterative method for various types of excitations of molecules in polar and nonpolar solvents. The first-order contribution is significant for the excitation energies. The results obtained by the zeroth-order PCM SAC-CI, which considers the fixed ground-state reaction field for the excited-state calculations, are deviated from the results by the iterative method about 0.1 eV, and the zeroth-order PCM SAC-CI cannot predict even the direction of solvent shifts in n-hexane for many cases. The first-order PCM SAC-CI is applied to studying the solvatochromisms of (2,2{sup ′}-bipyridine)tetracarbonyltungsten [W(CO){sub 4}(bpy), bpy = 2,2{sup ′}-bipyridine] and bis(pentacarbonyltungsten)pyrazine [(OC){sub 5}W(pyz)W(CO){sub 5}, pyz = pyrazine]. The SAC-CI calculations reveal the detailed character of the excited states and the mechanisms of solvent shifts. The energies of metal to ligand charge transfer states are significantly sensitive to solvents. The first-order PCM SAC-CI well reproduces the observed absorption spectra of the tungsten carbonyl complexes in several solvents.

  14. Cluster-continuum quasichemical theory calculation of the lithium ion solvation in water, acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide: an absolute single-ion solvation free energy scale.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Nathalia F; Pliego, Josefredo R

    2015-10-28

    Absolute single-ion solvation free energy is a very useful property for understanding solution phase chemistry. The real solvation free energy of an ion depends on its interaction with the solvent molecules and on the net potential inside the solute cavity. The tetraphenyl arsonium-tetraphenyl borate (TATB) assumption as well as the cluster-continuum quasichemical theory (CC-QCT) approach for Li(+) solvation allows access to a solvation scale excluding the net potential. We have determined this free energy scale investigating the solvation of the lithium ion in water (H2O), acetonitrile (CH3CN) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvents via the CC-QCT approach. Our calculations at the MP2 and MP4 levels with basis sets up to the QZVPP+diff quality, and including solvation of the clusters and solvent molecules by the dielectric continuum SMD method, predict the solvation free energy of Li(+) as -116.1, -120.6 and -123.6 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively (1 mol L(-1) standard state). These values are compatible with the solvation free energy of the proton of -253.4, -253.2 and -261.1 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively. Deviations from the experimental TATB scale are only 1.3 kcal mol(-1) in H2O and 1.8 kcal mol(-1) in DMSO solvents. However, in the case of CH3CN, the deviation reaches a value of 9.2 kcal mol(-1). The present study suggests that the experimental TATB scale is inconsistent for CH3CN. A total of 125 values of the solvation free energy of ions in these three solvents were obtained. These new data should be useful for the development of theoretical solvation models. PMID:26395146

  15. Calculation of the Gibbs Free Energy of Solvation and Dissociation of HCl in Water via Monte Carlo Simulations and Continuum Solvation Models

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, Matthew; Kuo, I-F W.; Ngouana, Brice F.; Ghogomu, Julius N.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Marenich, Aleksandr; Cramer, Christopher J.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Siepmann, Joern I.

    2013-08-28

    The free energy of solvation and dissociation of hydrogen chloride in water is calculated through a combined molecular simulation quantum chemical approach at four temperatures between T = 300 and 450 K. The free energy is first decomposed into the sum of two components: the Gibbs free energy of transfer of molecular HCl from the vapor to the aqueous liquid phase and the standard-state free energy of acid dissociation of HCl in aqueous solution. The former quantity is calculated using Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations using either Kohn-Sham density functional theory or a molecular mechanics force field to determine the system’s potential energy. The latter free energy contribution is computed using a continuum solvation model utilizing either experimental reference data or micro-solvated clusters. The predicted combined solvation and dissociation free energies agree very well with available experimental data. CJM was supported by the US Department of Energy,Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  16. Calculating Standard Reduction Potentials of [4Fe–4S] Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, Bradley S.; Niu, Shuqiang; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2013-03-15

    The oxidation–reduction potentials of electron transfer proteins determine the driving forces for their electron transfer reactions. Although the type of redox site determines the intrinsic energy required to add or remove an electron, the electrostatic interaction energy between the redox site and its surrounding environment can greatly shift the redox potentials. Here, a method for calculating the reduction potential versus the standard hydrogen electrode, E°, of a metalloprotein using a combinatio of density functional theory and continuum electrostatics is presented. This work focuses on the methodology for the continuum electrostatics calculations, including various factors that may affect the accuracy. The calculations are demonstrated using crystal structures of six homologous HiPIPs, which give E° that are in excellent agreement with experimental results.

  17. Continuum kinetic modeling of the tokamak plasma edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, M. A.; Dorr, M. R.; Hittinger, J. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-05-01

    The first 4D (axisymmetric) high-order continuum gyrokinetic transport simulations that span the magnetic separatrix of a tokamak are presented. The modeling is performed with the COGENT code, which is distinguished by fourth-order finite-volume discretization combined with mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the strong anisotropy of plasma transport and the complex X-point divertor geometry with high accuracy. The calculations take into account the effects of fully nonlinear Fokker-Plank collisions, electrostatic potential variations, and anomalous radial transport. Topics discussed include: (a) ion orbit loss and the associated toroidal rotation and (b) edge plasma relaxation in the presence of anomalous radial transport.

  18. Long dynamics simulations of proteins using atomistic force fields and a continuum representation of solvent effects: calculation of structural and dynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Hassan, Sergio A; Mehler, Ernest L

    2005-08-15

    Long dynamics simulations were carried out on the B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (ProtG) and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) using atomistic descriptions of the proteins and a continuum representation of solvent effects. To mimic frictional and random collision effects, Langevin dynamics (LD) were used. The main goal of the calculations was to explore the stability of tens-of-nanosecond trajectories as generated by this molecular mechanics approximation and to analyze in detail structural and dynamical properties. Conformational fluctuations, order parameters, cross correlation matrices, residue solvent accessibilities, pKa values of titratable groups, and hydrogen-bonding (HB) patterns were calculated from all of the trajectories and compared with available experimental data. The simulations comprised over 40 ns per trajectory for ProtG and over 30 ns per trajectory for BPTI. For comparison, explicit water molecular dynamics simulations (EW/MD) of 3 ns and 4 ns, respectively, were also carried out. Two continuum simulations were performed on each protein using the CHARMM program, one with the all-atom PAR22 representation of the protein force field (here referred to as PAR22/LD simulations) and the other with the modifications introduced by the recently developed CMAP potential (CMAP/LD simulations). The explicit solvent simulations were performed with PAR22 only. Solvent effects are described by a continuum model based on screened Coulomb potentials (SCP) reported earlier, i.e., the SCP-based implicit solvent model (SCP-ISM). For ProtG, both the PAR22/LD and the CMAP/LD 40-ns trajectories were stable, yielding C(alpha) root mean square deviations (RMSD) of about 1.0 and 0.8 A respectively along the entire simulation time, compared to 0.8 A for the EW/MD simulation. For BPTI, only the CMAP/LD trajectory was stable for the entire 30-ns simulation, with a C(alpha) RMSD of approximately 1.4 A, while the PAR22/LD trajectory

  19. Electrostatic Explorations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallai, Ditta; Stewart, Gay

    1998-01-01

    Presents a set of hands-on electrostatics experiments in the form of an activity guide and worksheet through which students discover the different types of electric charge, Coulomb's Law, induced charge separation, and grounding. (DDR)

  20. Continuum Nanofluidics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jesper S; Dyre, Jeppe C; Daivis, Peter; Todd, Billy D; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-15

    This paper introduces the fundamental continuum theory governing momentum transport in isotropic nanofluidic systems. The theory is an extension of the classical Navier-Stokes equation, and includes coupling between translational and rotational degrees of freedom as well as nonlocal response functions that incorporate spatial correlations. The continuum theory is compared with molecular dynamics simulation data for both relaxation processes and fluid flows, showing excellent agreement on the nanometer length scale. We also present practical tools to estimate when the extended theory should be used. It is shown that in the wall-fluid region the fluid molecules align with the wall, and in this region the isotropic model may fail and a full anisotropic description is necessary. PMID:26457405

  1. Protein-membrane electrostatic interactions: Application of the Lekner summation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juffer, André H.; Shepherd, Craig M.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2001-01-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the electrostatic interaction between biomolecules and lipid bilayers. The effect of ionic strength is included by means of explicit ions, while water is described as a background continuum. The bilayer is considered at the atomic level. The Lekner summation technique is employed to calculate the long-range electrostatic interactions. The new method is employed to estimate the electrostatic contribution to the free energy of binding of sandostatin, a cyclic eight-residue analogue of the peptide hormone somatostatin, to lipid bilayers with thermodynamic integration. Monte Carlo simulation techniques were employed to determine ion distributions and peptide orientations. Both neutral as well as negatively charged lipid bilayers were used. An error analysis to judge the quality of the computation is also presented. The applicability of the Lekner summation technique to combine it with computer simulation models that simulate the adsorption of peptides (and proteins) into the interfacial region of lipid bilayers is discussed.

  2. Numerical solution of boundary-integral equations for molecular electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P

    2009-03-01

    Numerous molecular processes, such as ion permeation through channel proteins, are governed by relatively small changes in energetics. As a result, theoretical investigations of these processes require accurate numerical methods. In the present paper, we evaluate the accuracy of two approaches to simulating boundary-integral equations for continuum models of the electrostatics of solvation. The analysis emphasizes boundary-element method simulations of the integral-equation formulation known as the apparent-surface-charge (ASC) method or polarizable-continuum model (PCM). In many numerical implementations of the ASC/PCM model, one forces the integral equation to be satisfied exactly at a set of discrete points on the boundary. We demonstrate in this paper that this approach to discretization, known as point collocation, is significantly less accurate than an alternative approach known as qualocation. Furthermore, the qualocation method offers this improvement in accuracy without increasing simulation time. Numerical examples demonstrate that electrostatic part of the solvation free energy, when calculated using the collocation and qualocation methods, can differ significantly; for a polypeptide, the answers can differ by as much as 10 kcal/mol (approximately 4% of the total electrostatic contribution to solvation). The applicability of the qualocation discretization to other integral-equation formulations is also discussed, and two equivalences between integral-equation methods are derived. PMID:19275391

  3. The Contribution of Electrostatic and van der Waals Interactions to the Stereospecificity of the Reaction Catalyzed by Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Jeroen; Callender, Robert; Gunner, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    Continuum electrostatic calculations in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the source of the stereospecificity in the hydride transfer reaction catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). These studies show that favorable electrostatic interactions between the carboxamide group of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme and protein residues of the active site of LDH can account for much if not all of the stereospecificity of the LDH-catalyzed reaction, with A-side hydride transfer more than 107 times greater than B-side transfer. Unfavorable steric interactions within the binding complex for B-side transfer are not found. ImagesFIGURE 2 PMID:9017191

  4. Continuum radiation in planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    With the completion of the Voyager tour of the outer planets, radio and plasma wave instruments have executed the first survey of the wave spectra of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. One of the most notable conclusions of this survey is that there is a great deal of qualitative similarity in both the plasma wave and radio wave spectra from one magnetosphere to the next. In particular, in spite of detailed differences, most of the radio emissions at each of the planets have been tentatively classified into two primary categories. First, the most intense emissions are generally associated with the cyclotron maser instability. Second, a class of weaker emissions can be found at each of the magnetospheres which appears to be the result of conversion from intense electrostatic emissions at the upper hybrid resonance frequency into (primarily) ordinary mode radio emission. It is this second category, often referred to as nonthermal continuum radiation, which we will discuss in this review. We review the characteristics of the continuum spectrum at each of the planets, discuss the source region and direct observations of the generation of the emissions where available, and briefly describe the theories for the generation of the emissions. Over the past few years evidence has increased that the linear mode conversion of electrostatic waves into the ordinary mode can account for at least some of the continuum radiation observed. There is no definitive evidence which precludes the possibility that a nonlinear mechanism may also be important.

  5. Electrostatic interactions play an essential role in DNA repair and cold-adaptation of uracil DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Olufsen, Magne; Smalås, Arne O; Brandsdal, Bjørn O

    2008-03-01

    Life has adapted to most environments on earth, including low and high temperature niches. The increased catalytic efficiency and thermoliability observed for enzymes from organisms living in constantly cold regions when compared to their mesophilic and thermophilic cousins are poorly understood at the molecular level. Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) from cod (cUNG) catalyzes removal of uracil from DNA with an increased k(cat) and reduced K(m) relative to its warm-active human (hUNG) counterpart. Specific issues related to DNA repair and substrate binding/recognition (K(m)) are here investigated by continuum electrostatics calculations, MD simulations and free energy calculations. Continuum electrostatic calculations reveal that cUNG has surface potentials that are more complementary to the DNA potential at and around the catalytic site when compared to hUNG, indicating improved substrate binding. Comparative MD simulations combined with free energy calculations using the molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method show that large opposing energies are involved when forming the enzyme-substrate complexes. Furthermore, the binding free energies obtained reveal that the Michaelis-Menten complex is more stable for cUNG, primarily due to enhanced electrostatic properties, suggesting that energetic fine-tuning of electrostatics can be utilized for enzymatic temperature adaptation. Energy decomposition pinpoints the residual determinants responsible for this adaptation. PMID:18196298

  6. Electrostatic forces in planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Shan, Linhua; Havnes, O.

    1988-01-01

    The average charge on a particle in a particle-plasma cloud, the plasma potential inside the cloud, and the Coulomb force acting on the particle are calculated. The net repulsive electrostatic force on a particle depends on the plasma density, temperature, density of particles, particle size, and the gradient of the particle density. In a uniformly dense ring the electrostatic repulsion is zero. It is also shown that the electrostatic force acts like a pressure force, that even a collisionless ring can be stable against gravitational collapse, and that a finite ring thickness does not necessarily imply a finite velocity dispersion. A simple criterion for the importance of electrostatic forces in planetary rings is derived which involves the calculation of the vertical ring thickness which would result if only electrostatic repulsion were responsible for the finite ring thickness. Electrostatic forces are entirely negligible in the main rings of Saturn and the E and G rings. They may also be negligible in the F ring. However, the Uranian rings and Jupiter's ring seem to be very much influenced by electrostatic repulsion. In fact, electrostatic forces could support a Jovian ring which is an order of magnitude more dense than observed.

  7. Electrostatic monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

  8. Continuous development of schemes for parallel computing of the electrostatics in biological systems: Implementation in DelPhi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan; Petukh, Marharyta; Li, Lin; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Due to the enormous importance of electrostatics in molecular biology, calculating the electrostatic potential and corresponding energies has become a standard computational approach for the study of biomolecules and nano-objects immersed in water and salt phase or other media. However, the electrostatics of large macromolecules and macromolecular complexes, including nano-objects, may not be obtainable via explicit methods and even the standard continuum electrostatics methods may not be applicable due to high computational time and memory requirements. Here, we report further development of the parallelization scheme reported in our previous work (J Comput Chem. 2012 Sep 15; 33(24):1960–6.) to include parallelization of the molecular surface and energy calculations components of the algorithm. The parallelization scheme utilizes different approaches such as space domain parallelization, algorithmic parallelization, multi-threading, and task scheduling, depending on the quantity being calculated. This allows for efficient use of the computing resources of the corresponding computer cluster. The parallelization scheme is implemented in the popular software DelPhi and results in speedup of several folds. As a demonstration of the efficiency and capability of this methodology, the electrostatic potential and electric field distributions are calculated for the bovine mitochondrial supercomplex illustrating their complex topology which cannot be obtained by modeling the supercomplex components alone. PMID:23733490

  9. Continuum kinetic modeling of the tokamak plasma edge

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dorf, M. A.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T.; Hittinger, J.; Cohen, R.

    2016-03-10

    In this study, the first 4D (axisymmetric) high-order continuum gyrokinetic transport simulations that span the magnetic separatrix of a tokamak are presented. The modeling is performed with the COGENT code, which is distinguished by fourth-order finite-volume discretization combined with mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the strong anisotropy of plasmatransport and the complex X-point divertor geometry with high accuracy. The calculations take into account the effects of fully nonlinear Fokker-Plank collisions, electrostatic potential variations, and anomalous radial transport. Topics discussed include: (a) ion orbit loss and the associated toroidal rotation and (b) edge plasma relaxation in the presence of anomalousmore » radial transport.« less

  10. Perspective: Polarizable continuum models for quantum-mechanical descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipparini, Filippo; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-04-01

    Polarizable continuum solvation models are nowadays the most popular approach to describe solvent effects in the context of quantum mechanical calculations. Unexpectedly, despite their widespread use in all branches of quantum chemistry and beyond, important aspects of both their theoretical formulation and numerical implementation are still not completely understood. In particular, in this perspective we focus on the numerical issues of their implementation when applied to large systems and on the theoretical framework needed to treat time dependent problems and excited states or to deal with electronic correlation. Possible extensions beyond a purely electrostatic model and generalizations to environments beyond common solvents are also critically presented and discussed. Finally, some possible new theoretical approaches and numerical strategies are suggested to overcome the obstacles which still prevent a full exploitation of these models.

  11. PowderSim: Lagrangian Discrete and Mesh-Free Continuum Simulation Code for Cohesive Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Scott; Walton, Otis; Settgast, Randolph

    2013-01-01

    PowderSim is a calculation tool that combines a discrete-element method (DEM) module, including calibrated interparticle-interaction relationships, with a mesh-free, continuum, SPH (smoothed-particle hydrodynamics) based module that utilizes enhanced, calibrated, constitutive models capable of mimicking both large deformations and the flow behavior of regolith simulants and lunar regolith under conditions anticipated during in situ resource utilization (ISRU) operations. The major innovation introduced in PowderSim is to use a mesh-free method (SPH-based) with a calibrated and slightly modified critical-state soil mechanics constitutive model to extend the ability of the simulation tool to also address full-scale engineering systems in the continuum sense. The PowderSim software maintains the ability to address particle-scale problems, like size segregation, in selected regions with a traditional DEM module, which has improved contact physics and electrostatic interaction models.

  12. Electrostatic Return of Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rantanen, R.; Gordon, T.

    2003-01-01

    A Model has been developed capable of calculating the electrostatic return of spacecraft-emitted molecules that are ionized and attracted back to the spacecraft by the spacecraft electric potential on its surfaces. The return of ionized contaminant molecules to charged spacecraft surfaces is very important to all altitudes. It is especially important at geosynchronous and interplanetary environments, since it may be the only mechanism by which contaminants can degrade a surface. This model is applicable to all altitudes and spacecraft geometries. In addition to results of the model will be completed to cover a wide range of potential space systems.

  13. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION: REVISION 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program performs the calculations in the mathematical model of electrostatic precipitation and is documented in other publications. The program predicts collection efficiency in an electrostatic precipitator as a function of particle diameter, electrical operating co...

  14. A unified electrostatic and cavitation model for first-principles molecular dynamics in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherlis, Damián A.; Fattebert, Jean-Luc; Gygi, François; Cococcioni, Matteo; Marzari, Nicola

    2006-02-01

    The electrostatic continuum solvent model developed by [Fattebert and Gygi J. Comput. Chem. 23, 662 (2002); Int. J. Quantum Chem. 93, 139 (2003)] is combined with a first-principles formulation of the cavitation energy based on a natural quantum-mechanical definition for the surface of a solute. Despite its simplicity, the cavitation contribution calculated by this approach is found to be in remarkable agreement with that obtained by more complex algorithms relying on a large set of parameters. Our model allows for very efficient Car-Parrinello simulations of finite or extended systems in solution and demonstrates a level of accuracy as good as that of established quantum-chemistry continuum solvent methods. We apply this approach to the study of tetracyanoethylene dimers in dichloromethane, providing valuable structural and dynamical insights on the dimerization phenomenon.

  15. A unified electrostatic and cavitation model for first-principles molecular dynamics in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Scherlis, D A; Fattebert, J; Gygi, F; Cococcioni, M; Marzari, N

    2005-11-14

    The electrostatic continuum solvent model developed by Fattebert and Gygi is combined with a first-principles formulation of the cavitation energy based on a natural quantum-mechanical definition for the surface of a solute. Despite its simplicity, the cavitation contribution calculated by this approach is found to be in remarkable agreement with that obtained by more complex algorithms relying on a large set of parameters. The model allows for very efficient Car-Parrinello simulations of finite or extended systems in solution, and demonstrates a level of accuracy as good as that of established quantum-chemistry continuum solvent methods. They apply this approach to the study of tetracyanoethylene dimers in dichloromethane, providing valuable structural and dynamical insights on the dimerization phenomenon.

  16. Effects of electrostatic correlations on electrokinetic phenomena.

    PubMed

    Storey, Brian D; Bazant, Martin Z

    2012-11-01

    The classical theory of electrokinetic phenomena is based on the mean-field approximation that the electric field acting on an individual ion is self-consistently determined by the local mean charge density. This paper considers situations, such as concentrated electrolytes, multivalent electrolytes, or solvent-free ionic liquids, where the mean-field approximation breaks down. A fourth-order modified Poisson equation is developed that captures the essential features in a simple continuum framework. The model is derived as a gradient approximation for nonlocal electrostatics of interacting effective charges, where the permittivity becomes a differential operator, scaled by a correlation length. The theory is able to capture subtle aspects of molecular simulations and allows for simple calculations of electrokinetic flows in correlated ionic fluids. Charge-density oscillations tend to reduce electro-osmotic flow and streaming current, and overscreening of surface charge can lead to flow reversal. These effects also help to explain the suppression of induced-charge electrokinetic phenomena at high salt concentrations. PMID:23214872

  17. Electrostatic potential map modelling with COSY Infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. A.; Baartman, R.; Planche, T.; Saminathan, S.

    2016-06-01

    COSY Infinity (Makino and Berz, 2005) is a differential-algebra based simulation code which allows accurate calculation of transfer maps to arbitrary order. COSY's existing internal procedures were modified to allow electrostatic elements to be specified using an array of field potential data from the midplane. Additionally, a new procedure was created allowing electrostatic elements and their fringe fields to be specified by an analytic function. This allows greater flexibility in accurately modelling electrostatic elements and their fringe fields. Applied examples of these new procedures are presented including the modelling of a shunted electrostatic multipole designed with OPERA, a spherical electrostatic bender, and the effects of different shaped apertures in an electrostatic beam line.

  18. Four-component relativistic calculations in solution with the polarizable continuum model of solvation: theory, implementation, and application to the group 16 dihydrides H2X (X = O, S, Se, Te, Po).

    PubMed

    Remigio, Roberto Di; Bast, Radovan; Frediani, Luca; Saue, Trond

    2015-05-28

    We present a formulation of four-component relativistic self-consistent field (SCF) theory for a molecular solute described within the framework of the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for solvation. The linear response function for a four-component PCM-SCF state is also derived, as well as the explicit form of the additional contributions to the first-order response equations. The implementation of such a four-component PCM-SCF model, as carried out in a development version of the DIRAC program package, is documented. In particular, we present the newly developed application programming interface PCMSolver used in the actual implementation with DIRAC. To demonstrate the applicability of the approach, we present and analyze calculations of solvation effects on the geometries, electric dipole moments, and static electric dipole polarizabilities for the group 16 dihydrides H2X (X = O, S, Se, Te, Po). PMID:25412410

  19. Continuum Kinetic Modeling of the Tokamak Plasma Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    The problem of edge plasma transport provides substantial challenges for analytical or numerical analysis due to (a) complex magnetic geometry including both open and closed magnetic field lines B, (b) steep radial gradients comparable to ion drift-orbit excursions, and (c) a variation in the collision mean-free path along B from long to short compared to the magnetic connection length. Here, the first 4D continuum drift-kinetic transport simulations that span the magnetic separatrix of a tokamak are presented, motivated in part by the success of continuum kinetic codes for core physics and in part by the potential for high accuracy. The calculations include fully-nonlinear Fokker-Plank collisions and electrostatic potential variations. The problem of intrinsic toroidal rotation driven by ion orbit loss is addressed in detail. The code, COGENT, developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory collaboration, is distinguished by a fourth-order finite-volume discretization combined with mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the strong anisotropy of plasma transport and the complex magnetic X-point divertor geometry with high accuracy. Previously, successful performance of high-order algorithms has been demonstrated in a simpler closed magnetic-flux-surface geometry for the problems of neoclassical transport and collisionless relaxation of geodesic acoustic modes in a tokamak pedestal, including the effects of a strong radial electric field under H-mode conditions. Work performed for USDOE, at LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Dielectric relaxation of cytochrome c oxidase: Comparison of the microscopic and continuum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontyev, I. V.; Stuchebrukhov, A. A.

    2009-02-01

    We have studied a charge-insertion process that models the deprotonation of a histidine side chain in the active site of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) using both the continuum electrostatic calculations and the microscopic simulations. The group of interest is a ligand to CuB center of CcO, which has been previously suggested to play the role of the proton pumping element in the enzyme; the group is located near a large internal water cavity in the protein. Using the nonpolarizable Amber-99 force field in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have calculated the nuclear part of the reaction-field energy of charging of the His group and combined it with the electronic part, which we estimated in terms of the electronic continuum (EC) model, to obtain the total reaction-field energy of charging. The total free energy obtained in this MDEC approach was then compared with that calculated using pure continuum electrostatic model with variable dielectric parameters. The dielectric constant for the "dry" protein and that of the internal water cavity of CcO were determined as those parameters that provide best agreement between the continuum and microscopic MDEC model. The nuclear (MD) polarization alone (without electronic part) of a dry protein was found to correspond to an unphysically low dielectric constant of only about 1.3, whereas the inclusion of electronic polarizability increases the protein dielectric constant to 2.6-2.8. A detailed analysis is presented as to how the protein structure should be selected for the continuum calculations, as well as which probe and atomic radii should be used for cavity definition. The dielectric constant of the internal water cavity was found to be 80 or even higher using "standard" parameters of water probe radius, 1.4Å, and protein atomic radii from the MD force field for cavity description; such high values are ascribed to the fact that the standard procedure produces unphysically small cavities. Using x-ray data for internal

  1. Dielectric relaxation of cytochrome c oxidase: Comparison of the microscopic and continuum models.

    PubMed

    Leontyev, I V; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2009-02-28

    We have studied a charge-insertion process that models the deprotonation of a histidine side chain in the active site of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) using both the continuum electrostatic calculations and the microscopic simulations. The group of interest is a ligand to Cu(B) center of CcO, which has been previously suggested to play the role of the proton pumping element in the enzyme; the group is located near a large internal water cavity in the protein. Using the nonpolarizable Amber-99 force field in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have calculated the nuclear part of the reaction-field energy of charging of the His group and combined it with the electronic part, which we estimated in terms of the electronic continuum (EC) model, to obtain the total reaction-field energy of charging. The total free energy obtained in this MDEC approach was then compared with that calculated using pure continuum electrostatic model with variable dielectric parameters. The dielectric constant for the "dry" protein and that of the internal water cavity of CcO were determined as those parameters that provide best agreement between the continuum and microscopic MDEC model. The nuclear (MD) polarization alone (without electronic part) of a dry protein was found to correspond to an unphysically low dielectric constant of only about 1.3, whereas the inclusion of electronic polarizability increases the protein dielectric constant to 2.6-2.8. A detailed analysis is presented as to how the protein structure should be selected for the continuum calculations, as well as which probe and atomic radii should be used for cavity definition. The dielectric constant of the internal water cavity was found to be 80 or even higher using "standard" parameters of water probe radius, 1.4 A, and protein atomic radii from the MD force field for cavity description; such high values are ascribed to the fact that the standard procedure produces unphysically small cavities. Using x-ray data for

  2. Relationship between ion pair geometries and electrostatic strengths in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Nussinov, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    The electrostatic free energy contribution of an ion pair in a protein depends on two factors, geometrical orientation of the side-chain charged groups with respect to each other and the structural context of the ion pair in the protein. Conformers in NMR ensembles enable studies of the relationship between geometry and electrostatic strengths of ion pairs, because the protein structural contexts are highly similar across different conformers. We have studied this relationship using a dataset of 22 unique ion pairs in 14 NMR conformer ensembles for 11 nonhomologous proteins. In different NMR conformers, the ion pairs are classified as salt bridges, nitrogen-oxygen (N-O) bridges and longer-range ion pairs on the basis of geometrical criteria. In salt bridges, centroids of the side-chain charged groups and at least a pair of side-chain nitrogen and oxygen atoms of the ion-pairing residues are within a 4 A distance. In N-O bridges, at least a pair of the side-chain nitrogen and oxygen atoms of the ion-pairing residues are within 4 A distance, but the distance between the side-chain charged group centroids is greater than 4 A. In the longer-range ion pairs, the side-chain charged group centroids as well as the side-chain nitrogen and oxygen atoms are more than 4 A apart. Continuum electrostatic calculations indicate that most of the ion pairs have stabilizing electrostatic contributions when their side-chain charged group centroids are within 5 A distance. Hence, most (approximately 92%) of the salt bridges and a majority (68%) of the N-O bridges are stabilizing. Most (approximately 89%) of the destabilizing ion pairs are the longer-range ion pairs. In the NMR conformer ensembles, the electrostatic interaction between side-chain charged groups of the ion-pairing residues is the strongest for salt bridges, considerably weaker for N-O bridges, and the weakest for longer-range ion pairs. These results suggest empirical rules for stabilizing electrostatic interactions in

  3. Accelerating electrostatic interaction calculations with graphical processing units based on new developments of Ewald method using non-uniform fast Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Chun; Wang, Yong-Lei; Jiao, Gui-Sheng; Qian, Hu-Jun; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2016-01-30

    We present new algorithms to improve the performance of ENUF method (F. Hedman, A. Laaksonen, Chem. Phys. Lett. 425, 2006, 142) which is essentially Ewald summation using Non-Uniform FFT (NFFT) technique. A NearDistance algorithm is developed to extensively reduce the neighbor list size in real-space computation. In reciprocal-space computation, a new algorithm is developed for NFFT for the evaluations of electrostatic interaction energies and forces. Both real-space and reciprocal-space computations are further accelerated by using graphical processing units (GPU) with CUDA technology. Especially, the use of CUNFFT (NFFT based on CUDA) very much reduces the reciprocal-space computation. In order to reach the best performance of this method, we propose a procedure for the selection of optimal parameters with controlled accuracies. With the choice of suitable parameters, we show that our method is a good alternative to the standard Ewald method with the same computational precision but a dramatically higher computational efficiency. PMID:26584145

  4. Density Functional Theory Calculation of pKa's of Thiols in Aqueous Solution Using Explicit Water Molecules and the Polarizable Continuum Model.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Bishnu; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2016-07-21

    The pKa's of substituted thiols are important for understanding their properties and reactivities in applications in chemistry, biochemistry, and material chemistry. For a collection of 175 different density functionals and the SMD implicit solvation model, the average errors in the calculated pKa's of methanethiol and ethanethiol are almost 10 pKa units higher than for imidazole. A test set of 45 substituted thiols with pKa's ranging from 4 to 12 has been used to assess the performance of 8 functionals with 3 different basis sets. As expected, the basis set needs to include polarization functions on the hydrogens and diffuse functions on the heavy atoms. Solvent cavity scaling was ineffective in correcting the errors in the calculated pKa's. Inclusion of an explicit water molecule that is hydrogen bonded with the H of the thiol group (in neutral) or S(-) (in thiolates) lowers error by an average of 3.5 pKa units. With one explicit water and the SMD solvation model, pKa's calculated with the M06-2X, PBEPBE, BP86, and LC-BLYP functionals are found to deviate from the experimental values by about 1.5-2.0 pKa units whereas pKa's with the B3LYP, ωB97XD and PBEVWN5 functionals are still in error by more than 3 pKa units. The inclusion of three explicit water molecules lowers the calculated pKa further by about 4.5 pKa units. With the B3LYP and ωB97XD functionals, the calculated pKa's are within one unit of the experimental values whereas most other functionals used in this study underestimate the pKa's. This study shows that the ωB97XD functional with the 6-31+G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets, and the SMD solvation model with three explicit water molecules hydrogen bonded to the sulfur produces the best result for the test set (average error -0.11 ± 0.50 and +0.15 ± 0.58, respectively). The B3LYP functional also performs well (average error -1.11 ± 0.82 and -0.78 ± 0.79, respectively). PMID:27327957

  5. Electrostatically screened, voltage-controlled electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott

    2001-01-01

    Employing an electrostatically screened, voltage-controlled electrostatic chuck particularly suited for holding wafers and masks in sub-atmospheric operations will significantly reduce the likelihood of contaminant deposition on the substrates. The electrostatic chuck includes (1) an insulator block having a outer perimeter and a planar surface adapted to support the substrate and comprising at least one electrode (typically a pair of electrodes that are embedded in the insulator block), (2) a source of voltage that is connected to the at least one electrode, (3) a support base to which the insulator block is attached, and (4) a primary electrostatic shield ring member that is positioned around the outer perimeter of the insulator block. The electrostatic chuck permits control of the voltage of the lithographic substrate; in addition, it provides electrostatic shielding of the stray electric fields issuing from the sides of the electrostatic chuck. The shielding effectively prevents electric fields from wrapping around to the upper or front surface of the substrate, thereby eliminating electrostatic particle deposition.

  6. Electrostatic disruption of a charged conducting spheroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. R.; Mendis, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic disruption of elongated parent grains following sudden charging to high electrostatic potentials is proposed as a specific mechanism for the appearance of striae or pseudosynchronic bands which have been observed in several comets. The polar and equatorial electrostatic tension for axis ratios between 0.01 and 1000 are calculated, and the polar pressure is found to be larger than the equatorial pressure for prolate spheroids. The electrostatic polar pressure profile along the polar axis for prolate spheroids is calculated, and the pressure is found to increase monotonically from a minimum at the center to a maxima at the ends. This indicates that as a prolate spheroid of uniform tensile strength is charged up, it will continue to chip off at the ends when the electrostatic pressure there exceeds the uniform tensile strength of the grain. The result can be a prolate grain or a grain which continues chipping until it explodes.

  7. A continuum solvent model of the multipolar dispersion solvation energy.

    PubMed

    Duignan, Timothy T; Parsons, Drew F; Ninham, Barry W

    2013-08-15

    The dispersion energy is an important contribution to the total solvation energies of ions and neutral molecules. Here, we present a new continuum model calculation of these energies, based on macroscopic quantum electrodynamics. The model uses the frequency dependent multipole polarizabilities of molecules in order to accurately calculate the dispersion interaction of a solute particle with surrounding water molecules. It includes the dipole, quadrupole, and octupole moment contributions. The water is modeled via a bulk dielectric susceptibility with a spherical cavity occupied by the solute. The model invokes damping functions to account for solute-solvent wave function overlap. The assumptions made are very similar to those used in the Born model. This provides consistency and additivity of electrostatic and dispersion (quantum mechanical) interactions. The energy increases in magnitude with cation size, but decreases slightly with size for the highly polarizable anions. The higher order multipole moments are essential, making up more than 50% of the dispersion solvation energy of the fluoride ion. This method provides an accurate and simple way of calculating the notoriously problematic dispersion contribution to the solvation energy. The result establishes the importance of using accurate calculations of the dispersion energy for the modeling of solvation. PMID:23837890

  8. Phase separation and coarsening in electrostatically driven granular media.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Meerson, B.; Sasorov, P. V.; Vinokur, V. M.; Materials Science Division; Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem; Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics

    2002-05-20

    A continuum model for the phase separation and coarsening in electrostatically driven granular media is formulated in terms of a Ginzburg-Landau equation subject to conservation of the total number of grains. In the regime of well-developed clusters, the continuum model is used to derive 'sharp-interface' equations that govern the dynamics of the interphase boundary. The model captures the essential physics of this system.

  9. A robust, coupled approach for atomistic-continuum simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubry, Sylvie; Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III; Wagner, Gregory John; Klein, Patrick A.; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Kimmer, Christopher J.

    2004-09-01

    This report is a collection of documents written by the group members of the Engineering Sciences Research Foundation (ESRF), Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project titled 'A Robust, Coupled Approach to Atomistic-Continuum Simulation'. Presented in this document is the development of a formulation for performing quasistatic, coupled, atomistic-continuum simulation that includes cross terms in the equilibrium equations that arise due to kinematic coupling and corrections used for the calculation of system potential energy to account for continuum elements that overlap regions containing atomic bonds, evaluations of thermo-mechanical continuum quantities calculated within atomistic simulations including measures of stress, temperature and heat flux, calculation used to determine the appropriate spatial and time averaging necessary to enable these atomistically-defined expressions to have the same physical meaning as their continuum counterparts, and a formulation to quantify a continuum 'temperature field', the first step towards constructing a coupled atomistic-continuum approach capable of finite temperature and dynamic analyses.

  10. The Suicide Prevention Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    The suicide prevention continuum illustrates a practical approach to the complex issue of suicide prevention. The continuum evolved from discussions with two Aboriginal communities in Atlantic Canada about suicide and the different types of interventions available. The continuum offers a framework and reference tool to differentiate between the different stages of suicide risk. It illustrates where the Aboriginal Community Youth Resilience Network (ACYRN) fits into suicide prevention and how it contributes to prevention knowledge, capacity building, and policy development. PMID:20835376

  11. Electrostatics of aquaporin and aquaglyceroporin channels correlates with their transport selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Romina; Calamita, Giuseppe; Thornton, Janet M.; Pellegrini-Calace, Marialuisa

    2010-01-01

    Aquaporins are homotetrameric channel proteins, which allow the diffusion of water and small solutes across biological membranes. According to their transport function, aquaporins can be divided into “orthodox aquaporins”, which allow the flux of water molecules only, and “aquaglyceroporins”, which facilitate the diffusion of glycerol and other small solutes in addition to water. The contribution of individual residues in the pore to the selectivity of orthodox aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins is not yet fully understood. To gain insights into aquaporin selectivity, we focused on the sequence variation and electrostatics of their channels. The continuum Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic potential along the channel was calculated and compared for ten three-dimensional-structures which are representatives of different aquaporin subfamilies, and a panel of functionally characterized mutants, for which high-accuracy three-dimensional-models could be derived. Interestingly, specific electrostatic profiles associated with the main selectivity to water or glycerol could be identified. In particular: (i) orthodox aquaporins showed a distinctive electrostatic potential maximum at the periplasmic side of the channel around the aromatic/Arg (ar/R) constriction site; (ii) aquaporin-0 (AQP0), a mammalian aquaporin with considerably low water permeability, had an additional deep minimum at the cytoplasmic side; (iii) aquaglyceroporins showed a rather flat potential all along the channel; and (iv) the bifunctional protozoan PfAQP had an unusual all negative profile. Evaluation of electrostatics of the mutants, along with a thorough sequence analysis of the aquaporin pore-lining residues, illuminated the contribution of specific residues to the electrostatics of the channels and possibly to their selectivity. PMID:20147624

  12. Modeling the Electrostatic Potential of Asymmetric Lipopolysaccharide Membranes: The MEMPOT Algorithm Implemented in DelPhi

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Thereza A.; Alexov, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Four chemotypes of the Rough lipopolysaccharides (LPS) membrane from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated by a combined approach of explicit water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics with the goal to deliver the distribution of the electrostatic potential across the membrane. For the purpose of this investigation, a new tool for modeling the electrostatic potential profile along the axis normal to the membrane, MEMPOT, was developed and implemented in DelPhi. Applying MEMPOT on the snapshots obtained by MD simulations, two observations were made: (a) the average electrostatic potential has a complex profile, but is mostly positive inside the membrane due to the presence of Ca2+ ions which overcompensate for the negative potential created by lipid phosphate groups; and (b) correct modeling of the electrostatic potential profile across the membrane requires taking into account the water phase, while neglecting it (vacuum calculations) results in dramatic changes including a reversal of the sign of the potential inside the membrane. Furthermore, using DelPhi to assign different dielectric constants for different regions of the LPS membranes, it was investigated whether a single frame structure before MD simulations with appropriate dielectric constants for the lipid tails, inner, and the external leaflet regions, can deliver the same average electrostatic potential distribution as obtained from the MD-generated ensemble of structures. Indeed, this can be attained by using smaller dielectric constant for the tail and inner leaflet regions (mostly hydrophobic) than for the external leaflet region (hydrophilic) and the optimal dielectric constant values are chemotype-specific. PMID:24799021

  13. Electrostatics and the gating pore of Shaker potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Islas, L D; Sigworth, F J

    2001-01-01

    Various experiments have suggested that the S4 segment in voltage-dependent Na(+) and K(+) channels is in contact with a solvent-accessible cavity. We explore the consequences of the existence of such a cavity through the electrostatic effects on the gating currents of Shaker K(+) channels under conditions of reduced ionic strength S. We observe that approximately 10-fold reductions of intracellular S produce reductions of the measured gating charge of approximately 10%. These effects continue at even lower values of S. The reduction of gating charge when S is reduced by 10-fold at the extracellular surface is much smaller (approximately 2%). Shifts of the Q(V) curve because of a reduced S are small (<10 mV in size), which is consistent with very little fixed surface charge. Continuum electrostatic calculations show that the S effects on gating charge can be explained by the alteration of the local potential in an intracellular conical cavity of 20-24-A depth and 12-A aperture, and a smaller extracellular cavity of 3-A depth and the same aperture. In this case, the attenuation of the membrane potential at low S leads to reduction of the apparent gating charge. We suggest that this cavity is made by a bundle of transmembrane helices, and that the gating charge movement occurs by translocation of charged residues across a thin septum of approximately 3-7 A thickness. PMID:11134232

  14. Measurement of solar disc polarization in a number of Fraunhofer lines and their adjacent continuum. III - Comparison with independent measurements and with calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiehr, E.

    1981-02-01

    High-sensitivity measurements of resonance line polarization in the Sr(+) 4078, Sr 4607, Ba(+) 4554, Na D2, Mg b, Fe 4063 and Cr 4275 lines of the solar disk are presented in an attempt to resolve discrepancies between previous measurements (Wiehr, 1975, 1978) and the data of Stenflo et al. (1980). The present observations were made with the Locarno polarimeter improved by the insertion of a new KDP crystal having double transmission and double modulation amplitude to increase spectral resolution. The F3 4063.6 line is found to show resonance polarization, whereas Cr 4274.8 requires further observations to establish the possible presence of polarization. The present results for Ba(+) 4554 and Sr 4607 agree with both sets of previous results, however an excess polarization is observed in the blue wing rather than the red for Sr(+) 4087, in agreement with Wiehr (1975); the double reversal found by Stenflo et al. in the Na D2 core has also not been observed. Finally, the center-to-limb variation of the polarization maximum in the blue wings of Ca 4227 and Na D2 given by Wiehr (1975) are shown to yield different damping parameters when fitted to the calculations of Auer et al. (1980) than those deduced from the data of Stenflo et al.

  15. Electrostatic properties of fullerenes under an external electric field: First-principles calculations of energetics for all IPR isomers from C60 to C78

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorimachi, Jun-ya; Okada, Susumu

    2016-08-01

    Based on first-principles total energy calculations, we analyze the energetics of the fullerene isomers from C60 to C78, all of which satisfy the isolated pentagon rule, under a parallel electric field. Our calculations show that the total energy of the fullerene is proportional to the square of the external electric field. On the other hand, the coefficient of the quadratic energy profile is sensitive to the fullerene species and their orientation. Furthermore, fullerenes possessing lower symmetry exhibit asymmetric quadratic energy profiles with respect to the field, indicating that they possess intrinsic polarization along particular molecular orientations.

  16. Electrostatically Guided Rydberg Positronium.

    PubMed

    Deller, A; Alonso, A M; Cooper, B S; Hogan, S D; Cassidy, D B

    2016-08-12

    We report experiments in which positronium (Ps) atoms were guided using inhomogeneous electric fields. Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number n=10 and electric dipole moments up to 610 D were prepared via two-color two-photon optical excitation in the presence of a 670  V cm^{-1} electric field. The Ps atoms were created at the entrance of a 0.4 m long electrostatic quadrupole guide, and were detected at the end of the guide via annihilation gamma radiation. When the lasers were tuned to excite low-field-seeking Stark states, a fivefold increase in the number of atoms reaching the end of the guide was observed, whereas no signal was detected when high-field-seeking states were produced. The data are consistent with the calculated geometrical guide acceptance. PMID:27563960

  17. Electrostatically Guided Rydberg Positronium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A.; Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-08-01

    We report experiments in which positronium (Ps) atoms were guided using inhomogeneous electric fields. Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number n =10 and electric dipole moments up to 610 D were prepared via two-color two-photon optical excitation in the presence of a 670 V cm-1 electric field. The Ps atoms were created at the entrance of a 0.4 m long electrostatic quadrupole guide, and were detected at the end of the guide via annihilation gamma radiation. When the lasers were tuned to excite low-field-seeking Stark states, a fivefold increase in the number of atoms reaching the end of the guide was observed, whereas no signal was detected when high-field-seeking states were produced. The data are consistent with the calculated geometrical guide acceptance.

  18. Continuum methods in lattice perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas G

    2002-11-15

    We show how methods of continuum perturbation theory can be used to simplify perturbative lattice calculations. We use the technique of asymptotic expansions to expand lattice loop integrals around the continuum limit. After the expansion, all nontrivial dependence on momenta and masses is encoded in continuum loop integrals and the only genuine lattice integrals left are tadpole integrals. Using integration-by-parts relations all of these can be expressed in terms of a small number of master integrals. Four master integrals are needed for bosonic one loop integrals, sixteen in QCD with Wilson or staggered fermions.

  19. "Caught in the Continuum"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbet, Jan

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a critical review of Steve Taylor's Caught in the Continuum. Steve Taylor describes the flawed thinking associated with the "least restrictive environment" (LRE) principle and the related continuum model of human services that linked severity of disability with segregation, and required improvements in skills as a…

  20. A Role for Weak Electrostatic Interactions in Peripheral Membrane Protein Binding.

    PubMed

    Khan, Hanif M; He, Tao; Fuglebakk, Edvin; Grauffel, Cédric; Yang, Boqian; Roberts, Mary F; Gershenson, Anne; Reuter, Nathalie

    2016-03-29

    Bacillus thuringiensis phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (BtPI-PLC) is a secreted virulence factor that binds specifically to phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers containing negatively charged phospholipids. BtPI-PLC carries a negative net charge and its interfacial binding site has no obvious cluster of basic residues. Continuum electrostatic calculations show that, as expected, nonspecific electrostatic interactions between BtPI-PLC and membranes vary as a function of the fraction of anionic lipids present in the bilayers. Yet they are strikingly weak, with a calculated ΔGel below 1 kcal/mol, largely due to a single lysine (K44). When K44 is mutated to alanine, the equilibrium dissociation constant for small unilamellar vesicles increases more than 50 times (∼2.4 kcal/mol), suggesting that interactions between K44 and lipids are not merely electrostatic. Comparisons of molecular-dynamics simulations performed using different lipid compositions reveal that the bilayer composition does not affect either hydrogen bonds or hydrophobic contacts between the protein interfacial binding site and bilayers. However, the occupancies of cation-π interactions between PC choline headgroups and protein tyrosines vary as a function of PC content. The overall contribution of basic residues to binding affinity is also context dependent and cannot be approximated by a rule-of-thumb value because these residues can contribute to both nonspecific electrostatic and short-range protein-lipid interactions. Additionally, statistics on the distribution of basic amino acids in a data set of membrane-binding domains reveal that weak electrostatics, as observed for BtPI-PLC, might be a less unusual mechanism for peripheral membrane binding than is generally thought. PMID:27028646

  1. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  2. Electrostatic interactions of Hsp-organizing protein tetratricopeptide domains with Hsp70 and Hsp90: computational analysis and protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Kajander, Tommi; Sachs, Jonathan N; Goldman, Adrian; Regan, Lynne

    2009-09-11

    The Hsp-organizing protein (HOP) binds to the C termini of the chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, thus bringing them together so that substrate proteins can be passed from Hsp70 to Hsp90. Because Hsp90 is essential for the correct folding and maturation of many oncogenic proteins, it has become a significant target for anti-cancer drug design. HOP binds to Hsp70 and Hsp90 via two independent tetratricopeptide (TPR) domains, TPR1 and TPR2A, respectively. We have analyzed ligand binding using Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatic calculations, free energy perturbation, molecular dynamics simulations, and site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the contribution of different interactions to the affinity and specificity of the TPR-peptide interactions. We found that continuum electrostatic calculations could be used to guide protein design by removing unfavorable interactions to increase binding affinity, with an 80-fold increase in affinity for TPR2A. Contributions at buried charged residues, however, were better predicted by free energy perturbation calculations. We suggest using a combination of the two approaches for increasing the accuracy of results, with free energy perturbation calculations used only at selected buried residues of the ligand binding pocket. Finally we present the crystal structure of TPR2A in complex with its non-cognate Hsp70 ligand, which provides insight on the origins of specificity in TPR domain-peptide recognition. PMID:19586912

  3. Electrostatics in protein–protein docking

    PubMed Central

    Heifetz, Alexander; Katchalski-Katzir, Ephraim; Eisenstein, Miriam

    2002-01-01

    A novel geometric-electrostatic docking algorithm is presented, which tests and quantifies the electrostatic complementarity of the molecular surfaces together with the shape complementarity. We represent each molecule to be docked as a grid of complex numbers, storing information regarding the shape of the molecule in the real part and information regarding the electrostatic character of the molecule in the imaginary part. The electrostatic descriptors are derived from the electrostatic potential of the molecule. Thus, the electrostatic character of the molecule is represented as patches of positive, neutral, or negative values. The potential for each molecule is calculated only once and stored as potential spheres adequate for exhaustive rotation/translation scans. The geometric-electrostatic docking algorithm is applied to 17 systems, starting form the structures of the unbound molecules. The results—in terms of the complementarity scores of the nearly correct solutions, their ranking in the lists of sorted solutions, and their statistical uniqueness—are compared with those of geometric docking, showing that the inclusion of electrostatic complementarity in docking is very important, in particular in docking of unbound structures. Based on our results, we formulate several "good electrostatic docking rules": The geometric-electrostatic docking procedure is more successful than geometric docking when the potential patches are large and when the potential extends away from the molecular surface and protrudes into the solvent. In contrast, geometric docking is recommended when the electrostatic potential around the molecules to be docked appears homogenous, that is, with a similar sign all around the molecule. PMID:11847280

  4. Continuum radiation at Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S.; Gurnett, D.A. ); Desch, M.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Uranus has proven to be a radio source of remarkable complexity with as many as six distinctly different types of emission. One Uranian radio emission which has thus far escaped attention is an analog of continuum radiation at Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn. The emission is found to be propagating in the ordinary mode in the range of one to a few kHz on the inbound leg of the Voyager 2 encounter, shortly after the magnetopause crossing. The continuum radiation spectrum at Uranus also includes bands with frequencies as high as 12 kHz or greater on both the inbound and outbound legs. The Uranian continuum radiation is notably weak, making it more like that detected at Saturn than the extremely intense Jovian continuum radiation. The Uranian emission shows some evidence for narrow-band components lying in the same frequency regime as the continuum, completing the analogy with the other planets, which also show narrow-band components superimposed on the continuum spectrum. The authors argue that the low intensity of the Uranian continuum is most likely related to the lack of a density cavity within the Uranian magnetosphere that is deep relative to the solar wind plasma density.

  5. Rationalizing the effects of modified electrostatic interactions in computer simulations: The dielectric self-consistent field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boresch, Stefan; Steinhauser, Othmar

    1999-11-01

    The dielectric self-consistent field method, a novel tool to study solvated systems based on continuum electrostatics, is introduced. It permits the qualitative and even semiquantitative calculation of orientational correlation functions, i.e., it gives insights into the orientational structure of a solute-solvent system. Further, modified Coulomb potentials and periodic boundary conditions can easily be integrated. One possible application is rapid, yet detailed methodological studies of the effects resulting from the various modified electrostatic interactions that are used regularly in computer simulations with explicit solvent molecules. As an example, we report the distance dependent Kirkwood g-factor and ion-dipole correlation functions of a solvated glycine zwitterion obtained with a simple cutoff, a shifted potential, two reaction field techniques, and Ewald summation. For the reaction fields and Ewald summation, conducting and adjusted dielectric boundary conditions are compared.

  6. Kernel Continuum Regression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Hee; Liu, Yufeng

    2013-12-01

    The continuum regression technique provides an appealing regression framework connecting ordinary least squares, partial least squares and principal component regression in one family. It offers some insight on the underlying regression model for a given application. Moreover, it helps to provide deep understanding of various regression techniques. Despite the useful framework, however, the current development on continuum regression is only for linear regression. In many applications, nonlinear regression is necessary. The extension of continuum regression from linear models to nonlinear models using kernel learning is considered. The proposed kernel continuum regression technique is quite general and can handle very flexible regression model estimation. An efficient algorithm is developed for fast implementation. Numerical examples have demonstrated the usefulness of the proposed technique. PMID:24058224

  7. Electrostatic Environment of Hemes in Proteins: pKas of Hydroxyl Ligands†

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yifan; Mao, Junjun; Gunner, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    The pKas of ferric aquo–heme and aquo–heme electrochemical midpoints (Ems) at pH 7 in sperm whale myoglobin, Aplysia myoblogin, hemoglobin I, heme oxygenase 1, horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c oxidase were calculated with Multi-Conformation Continuum Electrostatics (MCCE). The pKas span 3.3 pH units from 7.6 in heme oxygenase 1 to 10.9 in peroxidase, and the Ems range from −250 mv in peroxidase to 125 mV in Aplysia myoglobin. Proteins with higher in situ ferric aquo–heme pKas tend to have lower Ems. Both changes arise from the protein stabilizing a positively charged heme. However, compared with values in solution, the protein shifts the aquo–heme Ems more than the pKas. Thus, the protein has a larger effective dielectric constant for the protonation reaction, showing that electron and proton transfers are coupled to different conformational changes that are captured in the MCCE analysis. The calculations reveal a breakdown in the classical continuum electrostatic analysis of pairwise interactions. Comparisons with DFT calculations show that Coulomb’s law overestimates the large unfavorable interactions between the ferric water–heme and positively charged groups facing the heme plane by as much as 60%. If interactions with CuB in cytochrome c oxidase and Arg 38 in horseradish peroxidase are not corrected, the pKa calculations are in error by as much as 6 pH units. With DFT corrected interactions calculated pKas and Ems differ from measured values by less than 1 pH unit or 35 mV, respectively. The in situ aquo–heme pKa is important for the function of cytochrome c oxidase since it helps to control the stoichiometry of proton uptake coupled to electron transfer PMID:16800621

  8. Continuum Absorption Coefficient of Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armaly, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of heat transfer to the heat shield of a Jupiter probe has been estimated to be one order of magnitude higher than any previously experienced in an outer space exploration program. More than one-third of this heat load is due to an emission of continuum radiation from atoms and ions. The existing computer code for calculating the continuum contribution to the total load utilizes a modified version of Biberman's approximate method. The continuum radiation absorption cross sections of a C - H - O - N ablation system were examined in detail. The present computer code was evaluated and updated by being compared with available exact and approximate calculations and correlations of experimental data. A detailed calculation procedure, which can be applied to other atomic species, is presented. The approximate correlations can be made to agree with the available exact and experimental data.

  9. Polarizable Atomic Multipole Solutes in a Poisson-Boltzmann Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Schnieders, Michael J.; Baker, Nathan A.; Ren, Pengyu; Ponder, Jay W.

    2008-01-01

    Modeling the change in the electrostatics of organic molecules upon moving from vacuum into solvent, due to polarization, has long been an interesting problem. In vacuum, experimental values for the dipole moments and polarizabilities of small, rigid molecules are known to high accuracy; however, it has generally been difficult to determine these quantities for a polar molecule in water. A theoretical approach introduced by Onsager used vacuum properties of small molecules, including polarizability, dipole moment and size, to predict experimentally known permittivities of neat liquids via the Poisson equation. Since this important advance in understanding the condensed phase, a large number of computational methods have been developed to study solutes embedded in a continuum via numerical solutions to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE). Only recently have the classical force fields used for studying biomolecules begun to include explicit polarization in their functional forms. Here we describe the theory underlying a newly developed Polarizable Multipole Poisson-Boltzmann (PMPB) continuum electrostatics model, which builds on the Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications (AMOEBA) force field. As an application of the PMPB methodology, results are presented for several small folded proteins studied by molecular dynamics in explicit water as well as embedded in the PMPB continuum. The dipole moment of each protein increased on average by a factor of 1.27 in explicit water and 1.26 in continuum solvent. The essentially identical electrostatic response in both models suggests that PMPB electrostatics offers an efficient alternative to sampling explicit solvent molecules for a variety of interesting applications, including binding energies, conformational analysis, and pKa prediction. Introduction of 150 mM salt lowered the electrostatic solvation energy between 2–13 kcal/mole, depending on the formal charge of the protein, but had only a

  10. Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Facility established at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) supports NASA's Microgravity Materials Science Research Program. NASA materials science investigations include ground-based, flight definition and flight projects. Flight definition projects, with demanding science concept review schedules, receive highest priority for scheduling experiment time in the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Facility.

  11. Edutainment Science: Electrostatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlers, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Electrostatics should find a special place in all primary school science curricula. It is a great learning area that reinforces the basics that underpin electricity and atomic structure. Furthermore, it has many well documented hands-on activities. Unfortunately, the "traditional" electrostatics equipment such as PVC rods, woollen cloths, rabbit…

  12. Electrostatic Levitator (ESL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Rulison of Space System LORAl working with the Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) prior to the donation. Space System/LORAL donated the electrostatic containerless processing system to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The official hand over took place in July 1998.

  13. The Aquatic Systems Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, T. C.

    2004-12-01

    The Aquatic Systems Continuum is a proposed framework for interrelating the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of aquatic ecosystems. The continuum can be represented by a three-dimensional matrix that relates aquatic ecosystems to their position within hydrologic flow paths (x-axis, a spatial dimension) and their response to climate variability (y-axis). The z-axis describes the structure of biological communities as they relate to the hydrological conditions defined by the x and y axes. The concept is an extension of the Wetland Continuum that was derived from field studies of a prairie pothole wetland complex in North Dakota. At that site, the hydrologic continuum in space is defined by ground-water flow systems. The wetlands are surface-water expressions of larger ground-water watersheds, in which wetlands serve recharge, flow-through, and discharge functions with respect to ground water. The water balance of the wetlands is dominated by precipitation and evaporation. However, the interaction of the wetlands with ground water, although a small part of their water budget, provides the primary control on delivery of major solutes to and from the wetlands. Having monitored these wetlands for more than 25 years, during which time the site had a complete range of climate conditions from drought to deluge, the response of the aquatic communities to a wide variety of climate conditions has been well documented. The Aquatic Systems Continuum extends the model provided by the Wetland Continuum to include rivers and their interaction with ground water. As a result, both ground water and surface water are used to describe terrestrial water flows for all types of aquatic ecosystems. By using the Aquatic Systems Continuum to describe the hydrologic flow paths in all types of terrain, including exchange with atmospheric water, it is possible to design studies, monitoring programs, and management plans for nearly any type of aquatic ecosystem.

  14. Electrostatic effects in unfolded staphylococcal nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Fitzkee, Nicholas C.; García-Moreno E, Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    Structure-based calculations of pK a values and electrostatic free energies of proteins assume that electrostatic effects in the unfolded state are negligible. In light of experimental evidence showing that this assumption is invalid for many proteins, and with increasing awareness that the unfolded state is more structured and compact than previously thought, a detailed examination of electrostatic effects in unfolded proteins is warranted. Here we address this issue with structure-based calculations of electrostatic interactions in unfolded staphylococcal nuclease. The approach involves the generation of ensembles of structures representing the unfolded state, and calculation of Coulomb energies to Boltzmann weight the unfolded state ensembles. Four different structural models of the unfolded state were tested. Experimental proton binding data measured with a variant of nuclease that is unfolded under native conditions were used to establish the validity of the calculations. These calculations suggest that weak Coulomb interactions are an unavoidable property of unfolded proteins. At neutral pH, the interactions are too weak to organize the unfolded state; however, at extreme pH values, where the protein has a significant net charge, the combined action of a large number of weak repulsive interactions can lead to the expansion of the unfolded state. The calculated pK a values of ionizable groups in the unfolded state are similar but not identical to the values in small peptides in water. These studies suggest that the accuracy of structure-based calculations of electrostatic contributions to stability cannot be improved unless electrostatic effects in the unfolded state are calculated explicitly. PMID:18227429

  15. Electrostatic Changes Observed with Narrow Bipolar Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunarathne, S.; Marshall, T. C.; Stolzenburg, M.; Karunarathna, N.

    2015-12-01

    Narrow bipolar pulses (NBPs) or compact intracloud discharges are impulsive discharges that are considered to be the strongest natural emitters in the HF radio band; they usually occur at high altitudes in some thunderstorms. In the summer of 2011, we collected E-change data with wideband flat-plate antennas (0.16 Hz - 2.5 MHz) at ten stations covering an area of nearly 70 km x 100 km in and around Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. On one thunderstorm day, 14 August 2011, we detected 226 positive NBPs, and some observations of these pulses were published in Karunarathne et al. [2015, JGR-atmospheres]. Of these 226 NBPs, 50 (22.1 %) occurred within 10 km horizontally of at least one sensor. All of these closer sensors show electrostatic changes associated with corresponding NBPs, with a net electrostatic change in the main bipolar pulse and with a slower electrostatic change after the bipolar pulse that seems similar to short continuing current immediately after some cloud-to-ground return strokes. Although NBPs have been considered as short duration pulses (10 - 20 microseconds), the electrostatic changes after the main bipolar pulse ranged from 0.7 ms to 34 ms and associated charge moments were calculated. The total duration of the electrostatic E-change was strongly dependent on the distance to the sensors. In this presentation, we will present data for these electrostatic changes, some statistics, and physical background and reasoning for the electrostatic changes.

  16. Analysis of fast boundary-integral approximations for modeling electrostatic contributions of molecular binding

    PubMed Central

    Kreienkamp, Amelia B.; Liu, Lucy Y.; Minkara, Mona S.; Knepley, Matthew G.; Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Radhakrishnan, Mala L.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze and suggest improvements to a recently developed approximate continuum-electrostatic model for proteins. The model, called BIBEE/I (boundary-integral based electrostatics estimation with interpolation), was able to estimate electrostatic solvation free energies to within a mean unsigned error of 4% on a test set of more than 600 proteins—a significant improvement over previous BIBEE models. In this work, we tested the BIBEE/I model for its capability to predict residue-by-residue interactions in protein–protein binding, using the widely studied model system of trypsin and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). Finding that the BIBEE/I model performs surprisingly less well in this task than simpler BIBEE models, we seek to explain this behavior in terms of the models’ differing spectral approximations of the exact boundary-integral operator. Calculations of analytically solvable systems (spheres and tri-axial ellipsoids) suggest two possibilities for improvement. The first is a modified BIBEE/I approach that captures the asymptotic eigenvalue limit correctly, and the second involves the dipole and quadrupole modes for ellipsoidal approximations of protein geometries. Our analysis suggests that fast, rigorous approximate models derived from reduced-basis approximation of boundary-integral equations might reach unprecedented accuracy, if the dipole and quadrupole modes can be captured quickly for general shapes. PMID:24466561

  17. Analysis of fast boundary-integral approximations for modeling electrostatic contributions of molecular binding.

    PubMed

    Kreienkamp, Amelia B; Liu, Lucy Y; Minkara, Mona S; Knepley, Matthew G; Bardhan, Jaydeep P; Radhakrishnan, Mala L

    2013-06-01

    We analyze and suggest improvements to a recently developed approximate continuum-electrostatic model for proteins. The model, called BIBEE/I (boundary-integral based electrostatics estimation with interpolation), was able to estimate electrostatic solvation free energies to within a mean unsigned error of 4% on a test set of more than 600 proteins-a significant improvement over previous BIBEE models. In this work, we tested the BIBEE/I model for its capability to predict residue-by-residue interactions in protein-protein binding, using the widely studied model system of trypsin and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). Finding that the BIBEE/I model performs surprisingly less well in this task than simpler BIBEE models, we seek to explain this behavior in terms of the models' differing spectral approximations of the exact boundary-integral operator. Calculations of analytically solvable systems (spheres and tri-axial ellipsoids) suggest two possibilities for improvement. The first is a modified BIBEE/I approach that captures the asymptotic eigenvalue limit correctly, and the second involves the dipole and quadrupole modes for ellipsoidal approximations of protein geometries. Our analysis suggests that fast, rigorous approximate models derived from reduced-basis approximation of boundary-integral equations might reach unprecedented accuracy, if the dipole and quadrupole modes can be captured quickly for general shapes. PMID:24466561

  18. An improved proximity force approximation for electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Fosco, Cesar D.; Lombardo, Fernando C.; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.

    2012-08-15

    A quite straightforward approximation for the electrostatic interaction between two perfectly conducting surfaces suggests itself when the distance between them is much smaller than the characteristic lengths associated with their shapes. Indeed, in the so called 'proximity force approximation' the electrostatic force is evaluated by first dividing each surface into a set of small flat patches, and then adding up the forces due two opposite pairs, the contributions of which are approximated as due to pairs of parallel planes. This approximation has been widely and successfully applied in different contexts, ranging from nuclear physics to Casimir effect calculations. We present here an improvement on this approximation, based on a derivative expansion for the electrostatic energy contained between the surfaces. The results obtained could be useful for discussing the geometric dependence of the electrostatic force, and also as a convenient benchmark for numerical analyses of the tip-sample electrostatic interaction in atomic force microscopes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proximity force approximation (PFA) has been widely used in different areas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PFA can be improved using a derivative expansion in the shape of the surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use the improved PFA to compute electrostatic forces between conductors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results can be used as an analytic benchmark for numerical calculations in AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insight is provided for people who use the PFA to compute nuclear and Casimir forces.

  19. Examining the Psychosis Continuum

    PubMed Central

    DeRosse, Pamela; Karlsgodt, Katherine H.

    2015-01-01

    The notion that psychosis may exist on a continuum with normal experience has been proposed in multiple forms throughout the history of psychiatry. However, in recent years there has been an exponential increase in efforts aimed at elucidating what has been termed the ‘psychosis continuum’. The present review seeks to summarize some of the more basic characteristics of this continuum and to present some of the recent findings that provide support for its validity. While there is still considerable work to be done, the emerging data holds considerable promise for advancing our understanding of both risk and resilience to psychiatric disorders characterized by psychosis. PMID:26052479

  20. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications. PMID:26552343

  1. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications. PMID:26552343

  2. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-11-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications.

  3. Voltage limitations of electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, H. R. McK.

    1999-04-26

    The history of electrostatic accelerators has been punctuated by a series of projects in which innovative designs have failed to meet the expectations of their designers. From the early, air-insulated Van de Graaffs at Round Hill to certain of the large pressurized heavy ion accelerators of the 1970s and 1980s, increases in size or changes in design and materials have not always led to the maximum voltages expected or extrapolated. Since these failures have continued beyond childhood into a mature technology, it is reasonable to assume that the causes of voltage limitation are varied and complex. They have remained poorly understood for a number of reasons: resources for an extended program of research into breakdown and failure of electrostatic generators have always been meager, especially for large machines devoted to nuclear research; the inaccessibility of pressurized generators makes instrumentation difficult and testing slow; the calculation of transient and dynamic effects is laborious and the results difficult to verify; voltage test experiments on operating accelerators are inhibited by the significant risk of damage due to energy release on breakdown: and the total voltages (though not the local fields) achieved in many electrostatic accelerators exceed those produced in any other man-made environment. In this review, the behavior of several generators of different designs is examined in order to assess the importance of the various design features and operating conditions that control the maximum voltage achievable in a working machine.

  4. Voltage limitations of electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, H.R. )

    1999-04-01

    The history of electrostatic accelerators has been punctuated by a series of projects in which innovative designs have failed to meet the expectations of their designers. From the early, air-insulated Van de Graaffs at Round Hill to certain of the large pressurized heavy ion accelerators of the 1970s and 1980s, increases in size or changes in design and materials have not always led to the maximum voltages expected or extrapolated. Since these failures have continued beyond childhood into a mature technology, it is reasonable to assume that the causes of voltage limitation are varied and complex. They have remained poorly understood for a number of reasons: resources for an extended program of research into breakdown and failure of electrostatic generators have always been meager, especially for large machines devoted to nuclear research; the inaccessibility of pressurized generators makes instrumentation difficult and testing slow; the calculation of transient and dynamic effects is laborious and the results difficult to verify; voltage test experiments on operating accelerators are inhibited by the significant risk of damage due to energy release on breakdown: and the total voltages (though not the local fields) achieved in many electrostatic accelerators exceed those produced in any other man-made environment. In this review, the behavior of several generators of different designs is examined in order to assess the importance of the various design features and operating conditions that control the maximum voltage achievable in a working machine. [copyright] [ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Electrostatic coupling of ion pumps.

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Frausto, J; Lüger, P; Apell, H J

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the electrostatic interactions between membrane-embedded ion-pumps and their consequences for the kinetics of pump-mediated transport processes have been examined. We show that the time course of an intrinsically monomolecular transport reaction can become distinctly nonexponential, if the reaction is associated with charge translocation and takes place in an aggregate of pump molecules. First we consider the electrostatic coupling of a single dimer of ion-pumps embedded in the membrane. Then we apply the treatment to the kinetic analysis of light-driven proton transport by bacteriorhodopsin which forms two-dimensional hexagonal lattices. Finally, for the case of nonordered molecules, we also consider a model in which the pumps are randomly distributed over the nodes of a lattice. Here the average distance is equal to that deduced experimentally and the elemental size of the lattice is the effective diameter of one single pump. This latter model is applied to an aggregate of membrane-embedded Na, K- and Ca-pumps. In all these cases the electrostatic potential considered is the exact solution calculated from the method of electrical images for a plane membrane of finite thickness immersed in an infinite aqueous solution environment. The distributions of charges (ions or charged binding sites) are considered homogeneous or discrete in the membrane and/or in the external solution. In the case of discrete distributions we compare the results from a mean field approximation and a stochastic simulation. PMID:1371705

  6. Theoretical studies of "stabilizing" behavior about carbon nanotubes under the electrostatic force.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Wei; Hu, Li-Chun; Chang, Chun-Rui

    2013-04-01

    We study the dispersion and stability of carbon nanotube (CNT) suspensions under the electrostatic interactions. The potential energies of van der Waals (vdW) attractions between the CNT themselves are obtained on the continuum Lennard-Jones (LJ) model. The potential energies of electrostatic repulsions are based upon the Yukawa-segment model. We explore the overall interactions mediated by the vdW force and the electrostatic force between two identical, parallel CNTs. Consequently, we preliminarily confirm the accuracy and reliability of the electrostatic model. PMID:23763212

  7. The Continuum of Listening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rud, A. G.; Garrison, Jim

    2007-01-01

    The distinction between "apophatic" and "cataphatic" listening is defined and analyzed. "Apophatic" listening is more or less devoid of cognitivist claims, whereas "cataphatic" listening involves cognition and questioning. Many of the papers in this volume are discussed along the continuum determined by these two types of listening.…

  8. Teacher Education: A Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momentum, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This document is a theme issue of the journal "Momentum", devoted to the topic "Teacher Education: A Continuum." It contains 15 articles in the central section and 7 articles in a special section subtitled "The Multicultural Challenge." The following articles on the central theme are presented: (1) "Closing the Gap" concerns fusing the college and…

  9. The Creativity Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    Children are innately creative, and the youngest often are the most original because they have yet to be influenced by the creativity of others. One way to think of creative expression is as a continuum. At one end is originality, or the creation of something wholly new, "original." At the other end is replication, or the re-creation of something…

  10. Extragalactic continuum sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtaoja, E.

    1989-09-01

    As with most other high-frequency radio telescopes, continuum work occupies only a small fraction - currently about 5% - of SEST's total time. The importance of these observations in increasing our understanding of quasars and other extragalactic sources is, however, large.

  11. Studying Electrostatic Levitator Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Kevin Croat of Washington University in St. Louis, MO, examines samples processed in NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC)Electrostatic Levitator Facility. Croat is working with Prof. Kerneth Kelton in investigating undercooling of polytetrahedral phase-forming liquids.

  12. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  13. More Electrostatic Explorations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay; Gallai, Ditta

    1998-01-01

    Presents worksheet activities that enable students to explore the concept of electrostatic induction and learn the meaning of grounding. Students build two classic devices, the electrophorus and the leaf electroscope. (DDR)

  14. Electrostatic discharge test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William Conrad (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Electrostatic discharge properties of materials are quantitatively measured and ranked. Samples are rotated on a turntable beneath selectable, co-available electrostatic chargers, one being a corona charging element and the other a sample-engaging triboelectric charging element. Samples then pass under a voltage meter to measure the amount of residual charge on the samples. After charging is discontinued, measurements are continued to record the charge decay history over time.

  15. Graphene Electrostatic Microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qin; Onishi, Seita; Zettl, A.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a wideband electrostatic graphene microphone displaying flat frequency response over the entire human audible region as well as into the ultrasonic regime. Using the microphone, low-level ultrasonic bat calls are successfully recorded. The microphone can be paired with a similarly constructed electrostatic graphene loudspeaker to create a wideband ultrasonic radio. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at the University of California - Berkeley.

  16. Electrostatic discharge test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Electrostatic discharge properties of materials are quantitatively measured and ranked. Samples (20) are rotated on a turntable (15) beneath selectable, co-available electrostatic chargers (30/40), one being a corona charging element (30) and the other a sample-engaging triboelectric charging element (40). They then pass under a voltage meter (25) to measure the amount of residual charge on the samples (20). After charging is discontinued, measurements are continued to record the charge decay history over time.

  17. Electrostatic Levitator Electrode Layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Schematic of Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) electrodes and controls system. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  18. Continuum damping of ideal toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.D.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1993-08-01

    A perturbation theory based on the two dimensional (2D) ballooning transform is systematically developed for ideal toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs). A formula, similar to the Fermi golden rule for decaying systems in quantum mechanics, is derived for the continuum damping rate of the TAE; the decay (damping) rate is expressed explicitly in terms of the coupling of the TAE to the continuum spectrum. Numerical results are compared with previous calculations. It is found that in some narrow intervals of the parameter m{cflx {epsilon}} the damping rate varies very rapidly. These regions correspond precisely to the root missing intervals of the numerical solution by Rosenbluth et al.

  19. Electrostatic Contributions to the Stability of the GCN4 Leucine Zipper Structure

    PubMed Central

    Matousek, William M.; Ciani, Barbara; Fitch, Carolyn A.; Bertrand García-Moreno, E.; Kammerer, Richard A.; Alexandrescu, Andrei T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Ion pairs are ubiquitous in X-ray structures of coiled coils, and mutagenesis of charged residues can result in large stability losses. By contrast, pKa values determined by NMR in solution often predict only small contributions to stability from charge interactions. To help reconcile these results we used triple-resonance NMR to determine pKa values for all groups that ionize between pH 1 and 13 in the 33-residue leucine zipper fragment, GCN4p. In addition to the native state we also determined comprehensive pKa values for two models of the GCN4p denatured state: the protein in 6 M urea, and unfolded peptide fragments of the protein in water. Only residues that form ion pairs in multiple X-ray structures of GCN4p gave large pKa differences between the native and denatured states. Moreover, electrostatic contributions to stability were not equivalent for oppositely charged partners in ion pairs, suggesting that the interactions between a charge and its environment are as important as those within the ion pair. The pH dependence of protein stability calculated from NMR-derived pKa values agreed with the stability profile measured from equilibrium urea-unfolding experiments as a function of pH. The stability profile was also reproduced with structure-based continuum electrostatic calculations, although contributions to stability were overestimated at the extremes of pH. We consider potential sources of errors in the calculations, and how pKa predictions could be improved. Our results show that although hydrophobic packing and hydrogen bonding have dominant roles, electrostatic interactions also make significant contributions to the stability of the coiled coil. PMID:17920624

  20. Continuum modeling of charging process and piezoelectricity of ferroelectrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bai-Xiang; von Seggern, Heinz; Zhukov, Sergey; Gross, Dietmar

    2013-09-01

    Ferroelectrets in the form of electrically charged micro-porous foams exhibit a very large longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient d33. The structure has hence received wide application interests as sensors particularly in acoustic devices. During charging process, electrical breakdown (Paschen breakdown) takes place in the air pores of the foam and introduces free charge pairs. These charges are separated by electrostatic forces and relocated at the interfaces between the polymer and the electrically broken-down medium, where they are trapped quasistatically. The development of this trapped charge density along the interfaces is key for enabling the piezoelectricity of ferroelectrets. In this article, an internal variable based continuum model is proposed to calculate the charge density development at the interfaces, whereas a Maxwell stress based electromechanical model is used for the bulk behavior, i.e., of the polymer and of the medium where the Paschen breakdown takes place. In the modeling, the electrostatic forces between the separated charge pairs are included, as well as the influence of deformation of the solid layers. The material models are implemented in a nonlinear finite element scheme, which allows a detailed analysis of different geometries. A ferroelectret unit with porous expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) surrounded by fluorinated ethylene propylene is studied first. The simulated hysteresis curves of charge density at the surfaces and the calculated longitudinal piezoelectric constant are in good agreement with experimental results. Simulations show a strong dependency of the interface charge development and thus the remnant charges on the thicknesses of the layers and the permittivity of the materials. According to the calculated relation between d33 and the Young's modulus of ePTFE, the value of the Young's modulus of ePTFE is identified to be around 0.75 MPa, which lies well in the predicted range of 0.45 to 0.80 MPa, determined from

  1. Electrostatic Solvation Energy for Two Oppositely Charged Ions in a Solvated Protein System: Salt Bridges Can Stabilize Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Haipeng; Freed, Karl F.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Born-type electrostatic continuum methods have been an indispensable ingredient in a variety of implicit-solvent methods that reduce computational effort by orders of magnitude compared to explicit-solvent MD simulations and thus enable treatment using larger systems and/or longer times. An analysis of the limitations and failures of the Born approaches serves as a guide for fundamental improvements without diminishing the importance of prior works. One of the major limitations of the Born theory is the lack of a liquidlike description of the response of solvent dipoles to the electrostatic field of the solute and the changes therein, a feature contained in the continuum Langevin-Debye (LD) model applied here to investigate how Coulombic interactions depend on the location of charges relative to the protein/water boundary. This physically more realistic LD model is applied to study the stability of salt bridges. When compared head to head using the same (independently measurable) physical parameters (radii, dielectric constants, etc.), the LD model is in good agreement with observations, whereas the Born model is grossly in error. Our calculations also suggest that a salt bridge on the protein's surface can be stabilizing when the charge separation is ≤4 Å. PMID:20141761

  2. A new constituent of electrostatic energy in semiconductors. An attempt to reformulate electrostatic energy in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallese, Jean-Michel

    2016-06-01

    The concept of electric energy is revisited in detail for semiconductors. We come to the conclusion that the main relationship used to calculate the energy related to the penetration of the electric field in semiconductors is missing a fundamental term. For instance, spatial derivate of the electrostatic energy using the traditional formula fails at giving the correct electrostatic force between semiconductor based capacitor plates, and reveals unambiguously the existence of an extra contribution to the standard electrostatic free energy. The additional term is found to be related to the generation of space charge regions which are predicted when combining electrostatics with semiconductor physics laws, such as for accumulation and inversion layers. On the contrary, no such energy is needed when relying on electrostatics only, as for instance when adopting the so-called full depletion approximation. The same holds for neutral and charged insulators that are still consistent with the customary definition, but these two examples are in fact singular cases. In semiconductors for instance, this additional energy can largely exceed the energy gained by the dipoles, thus becoming the dominant term. This unexpected result clearly asks for a generalization of electrostatic energy in matter in order to reconcile basic concepts of electrostatic energy in the framework of classical physics.

  3. Screened Electrostatic Interactions in Molecular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-10-14

    In a typical application of molecular mechanics (MM), the electrostatic interactions are calculated from parametrized partial atomic charges treated as point charges interacting by radial Coulomb potentials. This does not usually yield accurate electrostatic interactions at van der Waals distances, but this is compensated by additional parametrized terms, for example Lennard-Jones potentials. In the present work, we present a scheme involving radial screened Coulomb potentials that reproduces the accurate electrostatics much more accurately. The screening accounts for charge penetration of one subsystem's charge cloud into that of another subsystem, and it is incorporated into the interaction potential in a way similar to what we proposed in a previous article (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010, 6, 3330) for combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations, but the screening parameters are reoptimized for MM. The optimization is carried out with electrostatic-potential-fitted partial atomic charges, but the optimized parameters should be useful with any realistic charge model. In the model we employ, the charge density of an atom is approximated as the sum of a point charge representing the nucleus and inner electrons and a smeared charge representing the outermost electrons; in particular, for all atoms except hydrogens, the smeared charge represents the two outermost electrons in the present model. We find that the charge penetration effect can cause very significant deviations from the popular point-charge model, and by comparison to electrostatic interactions calculated by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, we find that the present results are considerably more accurate than point-charge electrostatic interactions. The mean unsigned error in electrostatics for a large and diverse data set (192 interaction energies) decreases from 9.2 to 3.3 kcal/mol, and the error in the electrostatics for 10 water dimers decreases from 1.7 to 0.5 kcal

  4. Electron-ion continuum-continuum mixing in dissociative recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1993-01-01

    In recent calculations on the dissociative recombination (DR) of the v=1 vibrational level of the ground state of N2(+), N2(+)(v=1) + e(-) yields N + N, we have observed an important continuun-continuum mixing process involving the open channels on both sides of N2(+)(v=1) + e(-) yields N2(+)(v=0) + e(-). In vibrational relaxation by electron impact (immediately above) the magnitude of the cross section depends upon the strength of the interaction between these continua. In DR of the v=1 ion level, these continua can also interact in the entrance channel, and the mixing can have a profound effect upon the DR cross section from v=1, as we illustrate in this paper. In our theoretical calculations of N2(+) DR using multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT), the reactants and products in the two above equations are described simultaneously. This allows us to calculate vibrational relaxation and excitation cross sections as well as DR cross sections. In order to understand the mixing described above, we first present a brief review of the prior results for DR of the v=0 level of N2(+).

  5. Electrostatic graphene loudspeaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qin; Zettl, A.

    2013-06-01

    Graphene has extremely low mass density and high mechanical strength, and key qualities for efficient wide-frequency-response electrostatic audio speaker design. Low mass ensures good high frequency response, while high strength allows for relatively large free-standing diaphragms necessary for effective low frequency response. Here, we report on construction and testing of a miniaturized graphene-based electrostatic audio transducer. The speaker/earphone is straightforward in design and operation and has excellent frequency response across the entire audio frequency range (20 Hz-20 kHz), with performance matching or surpassing commercially available audio earphones.

  6. 3D holography: from discretum to continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzom, Valentin; Dittrich, Bianca

    2016-03-01

    We study the one-loop partition function of 3D gravity without cosmological constant on the solid torus with arbitrary metric fluctuations on the boundary. To this end we employ the discrete approach of (quantum) Regge calculus. In contrast with similar calculations performed directly in the continuum, we work with a boundary at finite distance from the torus axis. We show that after taking the continuum limit on the boundary — but still keeping finite distance from the torus axis — the one-loop correction is the same as the one recently found in the continuum in Barnich et al. for an asymptotically flat boundary. The discrete approach taken here allows to identify the boundary degrees of freedom which are responsible for the non-trivial structure of the one-loop correction. We therefore calculate also the Hamilton-Jacobi function to quadratic order in the boundary fluctuations both in the discrete set-up and directly in the continuum theory. We identify a dual boundary field theory with a Liouville type coupling to the boundary metric. The discrete set-up allows again to identify the dual field with degrees of freedom associated to radial bulk edges attached to the boundary. Integrating out this dual field reproduces the (boundary diffeomorphism invariant part of the) quadratic order of the Hamilton-Jacobi functional. The considerations here show that bulk boundary dualities might also emerge at finite boundaries and moreover that discrete approaches are helpful in identifying such dualities.

  7. The electrostatic surface term: (I) periodic systems.

    PubMed

    Herce, Henry David; Garcia, Angel Enrique; Darden, Thomas

    2007-03-28

    The authors propose a new approach to understand the electrostatic surface contributions to the interactions of large but finite periodic distributions of charges. They present a simple method to derive and interpret the surface contribution to any electrostatic field produced by a periodic distribution of charges. They discuss the physical and mathematical interpretations of this term. They present several examples and physical details associated with the calculation of the surface term. Finally, they provide a simple derivation of the surface contribution to the virial. This term does not disappear even if tinfoil boundary conditions are applied. PMID:17411107

  8. The Response Continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Caltagirone, Sergio; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2005-06-17

    Active response is a sequence of actions per- formed speci¯cally to mitigate a detected threat. Response decisions always follow detection: a decision to take `no ac- tion' remains a response decision. However, active response is a complex subject that has received insu±cient formal attention. To facilitate discussion, this paper provides a framework that proposes a common de¯nition, describes the role of response and the major issues surrounding response choices, and ¯nally, provides a model for the process of re- sponse. This provides a common starting point for discus- sion of the full response continuum as an integral part of contemporary computer security.

  9. Studying Electrostatic Levitator Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Prof. Kerneth Kelton of Washington University in St. Lous, MO, (L) and Dr. Michael Robinson of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) examine a titanium-iron silicate (TiFeSiO)sample processed in MSFC's Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Facility (background). Kelton is investigating undercooling of polytetrahedral phase-forming liquids.

  10. Electrostatic heat flux instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, P. J.; Ionson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The electrostatic cyclotron and ion acoustic instabilities in a plasma driven by a combined heat flux and current were investigated. The minimum critical heat conduction speed (above which the plasma is unstable) is given as a function of the ratio of electron to ion temperatures.

  11. Electrostatically Enhanced Vortex Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed device removes fine particles from high-pressure exhaust gas of chemical reactor. Negatively charged sectors on rotating disks in vortex generator attracts positively charged particles from main stream of exhaust gas. Electrostatic charge enhances particle-separating action of vortex. Gas without particles released to atmosphere.

  12. An asymmetry in electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2013-11-01

    This paper outlines a misuse of the electrostatic induction concept. A non-symmetrical behaviour was observed in a charge by the induction of an insulated hollow metallic conductor (the Faraday ice pail experiment). The major consequence of this experiment is a quick demonstration that the Earth must have a net negative charge.

  13. Magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, P.

    1977-01-01

    The spectrum of electrostatic plasma waves in the terrestrial magnetosheath was studied using the plasma wave experiment on the IMP-6 satellite. Electrostatic plasma wave turbulence is almost continuously present throughout the magnetosheath with broadband (20 Hz- 70 kHz) r.m.s. field intensities typically 0.01 - 1.0 millivolts/m. Peak intensities of about 1.0 millivolts/m near the electron plasma frequency (30 - 60 kHz) were detected occasionally. The components usually identified in the spectrum of magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence include a high frequency ( or = 30 kHz) component peaking at the electron plasma frequency f sub pe, a low frequency component with a broad intensity maximum below the nominal ion plasma frequency f sub pi (approximately f sub pe/43), and a less well defined intermediate component in the range f sub pi f f sub pe. The intensity distribution of magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence clearly shows that the low frequency component is associated with the bow shock, suggesting that the ion heating begun at the shock continues into the downstream magnetosheath.

  14. Electrostatics of Rigid Polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The organization of rigid biological polyelectrolytes by multivalent ions and macroions are important for many fundamental problems in biology and biomedicine, such as cytoskeletal regulation and antimicrobial sequestration in cystic fibrosis. These polyelectrolytes have been used as model systems for understanding electrostatics in complex fluids. Here, we review some recent results in theory, simulations, and experiments.

  15. Nanoscale Electrostatics in Mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, L. John; West, Patrick Michael

    2001-04-01

    Primitive biological cells had to divide with very little biology. This work simulates a physicochemical mechanism, based upon nanoscale electrostatics, which explains the anaphase A poleward motion of chromosomes. In the cytoplasmic medium that exists in biological cells, electrostatic fields are subject to strong attenuation by Debye screening, and therefore decrease rapidly over a distance equal to several Debye lengths. However, the existence of microtubules within cells changes the situation completely. Microtubule dimer subunits are electric dipolar structures, and can act as intermediaries that extend the reach of the electrostatic interaction over cellular distances. Experimental studies have shown that intracellular pH rises to a peak at mitosis, and decreases through cytokinesis. This result, in conjunction with the electric dipole nature of microtubule subunits and the Debye screened electrostatic force is sufficient to explain and unify the basic events during mitosis and cytokinesis: (1) assembly of asters, (2) motion of the asters to poles, (3) poleward motion of chromosomes (anaphase A), (4) cell elongation, and (5) cytokinesis. This paper will focus on a simulation of the dynamics if anaphase A motion based on this comprehensive model. The physicochemical mechanisms utilized by primitive cells could provide important clues regarding our understanding of cell division in modern eukaryotic cells.

  16. Continuum Edge Gyrokinetic Theory and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X Q; Xiong, Z; Dorr, M R; Hittinger, J A; Bodi, K; Candy, J; Cohen, B I; Cohen, R H; Colella, P; Kerbel, G D; Krasheninnikov, S; Nevins, W M; Qin, H; Rognlien, T D; Snyder, P B; Umansky, M V

    2007-01-09

    The following results are presented from the development and application of TEMPEST, a fully nonlinear (full-f) five dimensional (3d2v) gyrokinetic continuum edge-plasma code. (1) As a test of the interaction of collisions and parallel streaming, TEMPEST is compared with published analytic and numerical results for endloss of particles confined by combined electrostatic and magnetic wells. Good agreement is found over a wide range of collisionality, confining potential, and mirror ratio; and the required velocity space resolution is modest. (2) In a large-aspect-ratio circular geometry, excellent agreement is found for a neoclassical equilibrium with parallel ion flow in the banana regime with zero temperature gradient and radial electric field. (3) The four-dimensional (2d2v) version of the code produces the first self-consistent simulation results of collisionless damping of geodesic acoustic modes and zonal flow (Rosenbluth-Hinton residual) with Boltzmann electrons using a full-f code. The electric field is also found to agree with the standard neoclassical expression for steep density and ion temperature gradients in the banana regime. In divertor geometry, it is found that the endloss of particles and energy induces parallel flow stronger than the core neoclassical predictions in the SOL. (5) Our 5D gyrokinetic formulation yields a set of nonlinear electrostatic gyrokinetic equations that are for both neoclassical and turbulence simulations.

  17. Kilometric Continuum Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Boardsen, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Kilometric continuum (KC) is the high frequency component (approximately 100 kHz to approximately 800 kHz) of nonthermal continuum (NTC). Unlike the lower frequency portion of NTC (approximately 5 kHz to approximately 100 kHz) whose source is around the dawn sector, the source of KC occurs at all magnetic local times. The latitudinal beaming of KC as observed by GEOTAIL is, for most events, restricted to plus or minus 15 degrees magnetic latitude. KC has been observed during periods of both low and strong geomagnetic activity, with no significant correlation of wave intensity with K(sub p), index. However statistically the maximum observed frequency of KC emission tends to increase with K(sub p) index, the effect is more pronounced around solar maximum, but is also detected near solar minimum. There is strong evidence that the source region of KC is from the equatorial plasmapause during periods when a portion of the plasmapause moves significantly inwards from its nominal position. Case studies have shown that KC emissions are nearly always associated with plasmaspheric notches, shoulders, and tails. There is a recent focus on trying to understand the banded frequency structure of this emission and its relationship to plasmaspheric density ducts and irregularities in the source region.

  18. Electrostatics in sandstorms and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbrot, Troy; Thyagu, Nirmal; Paehtz, Thomas; Herrmann, Hans

    2010-11-01

    We present new data demonstrating (1) that electrostatic charging in sandstorms is a necessary outcome in a class of rapid collisional flows, and (2) that electrostatic precursors to slip events - long reported in earthquakes - can be reproduced in the laboratory.

  19. Electrostatic Interactions in Aminoglycoside-RNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kulik, Marta; Goral, Anna M.; Jasiński, Maciej; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions often play key roles in the recognition of small molecules by nucleic acids. An example is aminoglycoside antibiotics, which by binding to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) affect bacterial protein synthesis. These antibiotics remain one of the few valid treatments against hospital-acquired infections by Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to understand the amplitude of electrostatic interactions between aminoglycosides and their rRNA targets to introduce aminoglycoside modifications that would enhance their binding or to design new scaffolds. Here, we calculated the electrostatic energy of interactions and its per-ring contributions between aminoglycosides and their primary rRNA binding site. We applied either the methodology based on the exact potential multipole moment (EPMM) or classical molecular mechanics force field single-point partial charges with Coulomb formula. For EPMM, we first reconstructed the aspherical electron density of 12 aminoglycoside-RNA complexes from the atomic parameters deposited in the University at Buffalo Databank. The University at Buffalo Databank concept assumes transferability of electron density between atoms in chemically equivalent vicinities and allows reconstruction of the electron densities from experimental structural data. From the electron density, we then calculated the electrostatic energy of interaction using EPMM. Finally, we compared the two approaches. The calculated electrostatic interaction energies between various aminoglycosides and their binding sites correlate with experimentally obtained binding free energies. Based on the calculated energetic contributions of water molecules mediating the interactions between the antibiotic and rRNA, we suggest possible modifications that could enhance aminoglycoside binding affinity. PMID:25650932

  20. Intermolecular electrostatic energies using density fitting

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, G. Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Darden, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented to calculate the electron-electron and nuclear-electron intermolecular Coulomb interaction energy between two molecules by separately fitting the unperturbed molecular electron density of each monomer. This method is based on the variational Coulomb fitting method which relies on the expansion of the ab initio molecular electron density in site-centered auxiliary basis sets. By expanding the electron density of each monomer in this way the integral expressions for the intermolecular electrostatic calculations are simplified, lowering the operation count as well as the memory usage. Furthermore, this method allows the calculation of intermolecular Coulomb interactions with any level of theory from which a one-electron density matrix can be obtained. Our implementation is initially tested by calculating molecular properties with the density fitting method using three different auxiliary basis sets and comparing them to results obtained from ab initio calculations. These properties include dipoles for a series of molecules, as well as the molecular electrostatic potential and electric field for water. Subsequently, the intermolecular electrostatic energy is tested by calculating ten stationary points on the water dimer potential-energy surface. Results are presented for electron densities obtained at four different levels of theory using two different basis sets, fitted with three auxiliary basis sets. Additionally, a one-dimensional electrostatic energy surface scan is performed for four different systems (H2O dimer, Mg2+–H2O, Cu+–H2O, and n-methyl-formamide dimer). Our results show a very good agreement with ab initio calculations for all properties as well as interaction energies. PMID:16095348

  1. A new finite element and finite difference hybrid method for computing electrostatics of ionic solvated biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Jinyong; Xie, Dexuan

    2015-10-01

    The Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) is one widely-used implicit solvent continuum model for calculating electrostatics of ionic solvated biomolecule. In this paper, a new finite element and finite difference hybrid method is presented to solve PBE efficiently based on a special seven-overlapped box partition with one central box containing the solute region and surrounded by six neighboring boxes. In particular, an efficient finite element solver is applied to the central box while a fast preconditioned conjugate gradient method using a multigrid V-cycle preconditioning is constructed for solving a system of finite difference equations defined on a uniform mesh of each neighboring box. Moreover, the PBE domain, the box partition, and an interface fitted tetrahedral mesh of the central box can be generated adaptively for a given PQR file of a biomolecule. This new hybrid PBE solver is programmed in C, Fortran, and Python as a software tool for predicting electrostatics of a biomolecule in a symmetric 1:1 ionic solvent. Numerical results on two test models with analytical solutions and 12 proteins validate this new software tool, and demonstrate its high performance in terms of CPU time and memory usage.

  2. Biobriefcase electrostatic aerosol collector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Perry M.; Christian, Allen T.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Willis, Ladona; Masquelier, Donald A.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2009-03-17

    A system for sampling air and collecting particles entrained in the air comprising a receiving surface, a liquid input that directs liquid to the receiving surface and produces a liquid surface, an air input that directs the air so that the air with particles entrained in the air impact the liquid surface, and an electrostatic contact connected to the liquid that imparts an electric charge to the liquid. The particles potentially including bioagents become captured in the liquid by the air with particles entrained in the air impacting the liquid surface. Collection efficiency is improved by the electrostatic contact electrically charging the liquid. The effects of impaction and adhesion due to electrically charging the liquid allows a unique combination in a particle capture medium that has a low fluid consumption rate while maintaining high efficiency.

  3. Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos; Lewis, Dean C.; Buchanan, Randy K.; Buchanan, Aubri

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Electrostatics Chamber (MEC) is an environmental chamber designed primarily to create atmospheric conditions like those at the surface of Mars to support experiments on electrostatic effects in the Martian environment. The chamber is equipped with a vacuum system, a cryogenic cooling system, an atmospheric-gas replenishing and analysis system, and a computerized control system that can be programmed by the user and that provides both automation and options for manual control. The control system can be set to maintain steady Mars-like conditions or to impose temperature and pressure variations of a Mars diurnal cycle at any given season and latitude. In addition, the MEC can be used in other areas of research because it can create steady or varying atmospheric conditions anywhere within the wide temperature, pressure, and composition ranges between the extremes of Mars-like and Earth-like conditions.

  4. Electrostatically clean solar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Theodore Garry (Inventor); Krumweide, Duane Eric (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Provided are methods of manufacturing an electrostatically clean solar array panel and the products resulting from the practice of these methods. The preferred method uses an array of solar cells, each with a coverglass where the method includes machining apertures into a flat, electrically conductive sheet so that each aperture is aligned with and undersized with respect to its matched coverglass sheet and thereby fashion a front side shield with apertures (FSA). The undersized portion about each aperture of the bottom side of the FSA shield is bonded to the topside portions nearest the edges of each aperture's matched coverglass. Edge clips are attached to the front side aperture shield edges with the edge clips electrically and mechanically connecting the tops of the coverglasses to the solar panel substrate. The FSA shield, edge clips and substrate edges are bonded so as to produce a conductively grounded electrostatically clean solar array panel.

  5. PREFACE: Electrostatics 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, James

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatics 2015, supported by the Institute of Physics, was held in the Sir James Matthews building at Southampton Solent University, UK between 12th and 16th April 2015. Southampton is a historic city on the South Coast of England with a strong military and maritime history. Southampton is home to two Universities: Solent University, which hosted the conference, and the University of Southampton, where much work is undertaken related to electrostatics. 37 oral and 44 poster presentations were accepted for the conference, and 60 papers were submitted and accepted for the proceedings. The Bill Bright Memorial Lecture was delivered this year by Professor Mark Horenstein from Boston University who was, until recently, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Electrostatics. He spoke on The contribution of surface potential to diverse problems in electrostatics and his thorough knowledge of the subject of electrostatics was evident in the presentation. The first session was chaired by the Conference Chair, Dr Keith Davies, whose experience in the field showed through his frequent contributions to the discussions throughout the conference. Hazards and Electrostatic Discharge have formed a strong core to Electrostatics conferences for many years, and this conference contained sessions on both Hazards and on ESD, including an invited talk from Dr Jeremy Smallwood on ESD in Industry - Present and Future. Another strong theme to emerge from this year's programme was Non-Thermal Plasmas, which was covered in two sessions. There were two invited talks on this subject: Professor Masaaki Okubo gave a talk on Development of super-clean diesel engine and combustor using nonthermal plasma hybrid after treatment and Dr David Go presented a talk on Atmospheric-pressure ionization processes: New approaches and applications for plasmas in contact with liquids. A new innovation to the conference this year was the opportunity for conference sponsors to present to the delegates a technical

  6. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1994-12-31

    In the field of microelectronics, and in particular the fabrication of microelectronics during plasma etching processes, electrostatic chucks have been used to hold silicon wafers during the plasma etching process. Current electrostatic chucks that operate by the {open_quotes}Johnson-Rahbek Effect{close_quotes} consist of a metallic base plate that is typically coated with a thick layer of slightly conductive dielectric material. A silicon wafer of approximately the same size as the chuck is placed on top of the chuck and a potential difference of several hundred volts is applied between the silicon and the base plate of the electrostatic chuck. This causes an electrostatic attraction proportional to the square of the electric field in the gap between the silicon wafer and the chuck face. When the chuck is used in a plasma filled chamber the electric potential of the wafer tends to be fixed by the effective potential of the plasma. The purpose of the dielectric layer on the chuck is to prevent the silicon wafer from coming into direct electrical contact with the metallic part of the chuck and shorting out the potential difference. On the other hand, a small amount of conductivity appears to be desirable in the dielectric coating so that much of its free surface between points of contact with the silicon wafer is maintained near the potential of the metallic base plate; otherwise, a much larger potential difference would be needed to produce a sufficiently large electric field in the vacuum gap between the wafer and chuck. Typically, the face of the chuck has a pattern of grooves in which about 10 torr pressure of helium gas is maintained. This gas provides cooling (thermal contact) between the wafer and the chuck. A pressure of 10 torr is equivalent to about 0.2 psi.

  7. Electrostatic curtain studies

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L C

    1992-05-01

    This report presents the results of experiments using electrostatic curtains (ESCS) as a transuranic (TRU) contamination control technique. The TRU contaminants included small (micrometer to sub micrometer) particles of plutonium and americium compounds associated with defense-related waste. Three series of experiments were conducted. The first was with uncontaminated Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) soil, the second used contaminated soil containing plutonium-239 (from a mixture of Rocky Flats Plant contaminated soil and INEL uncontaminated soil), and the third was uncontaminated INEL soil spiked with plutonium-239. All experiments with contaminated soil were conducted inside a glove box containing a dust generator, low volume cascade impactor (LVCI), electrostatic separator, and electrostatic materials. The data for these experiments consisted of the mass of dust collected on the various material coupons, plates, and filters; radiochemical analysis of selected samples; and photographs, as well as computer printouts giving particle size distributions and dimensions from the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The following results were found: (a) plutonium content (pCi/g) was found to increase with smaller soil particle sizes and (b) the electrostatic field had a stronger influence on smaller particle sizes compared to larger particle sizes. The SEM analysis indicated that the particle size of the tracer Pu239 used in the spiked soil experiments was below the detectable size limit (0.5 {mu}m) of the SEM and, thus, may not be representative of plutonium particles found in defense-related waste. The use of radiochemical analysis indicated that plutonium could be found on separator plates of both polarities, as well as passing through the electric field and collecting on LVCI filters.

  8. Spherical electrostatic electron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.-S.; Kolk, B.; Kachnowski, T.; Trooster, J.; Benczer-Koller, N.

    1982-06-01

    A high transmission, low energy spherical electrostatic electron spectrometer particularly suited to the geometry required for Mössbauer-conversion electron spectroscopy was built. A transmission of 13% at an energy resolution of 2% was obtained with an 0.5 cm diameter source of 13.6 keV electrons. Applications to the study of hyperfine interactions of surfaces and interfaces are discussed.

  9. Electrostatic modeling for LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaul, Diana N.; Sumner, Timothy J.

    2003-03-01

    LISA employs a capacitive sensing and positioning system to maintain the drag free environment of the test masses acting as interferometer mirror elements. The need for detailed electrostatic modelling of the test mass environment arises because any electric field gradient or variation associated with test mass motion can couple the test mass to its housing, and ultimately the spacecraft. Cross-couplings between components in the system can introduce direct couplings between sensing signals, sensing axes and the drive signal. A variation in cross-couplings or asymmetry in the system can introduce capacitance gradients and second derivatives, giving rise to unwanted forces and spring constant modifications. These effects will vary dependent on the precise geometry of the system and will also tend to increase the sensitivity to accumulated charge on the test-mass. Presented are the results of a systematic study of the effect of the principal geometry elements (e.g. machining imperfections, the caging mechanism) on the test mass electrostatic environment, using the finite element code ANSYS. This work is part of an ongoing ESA study into drag-free control for LISA and the LTP on SMART 2 and ultimately aims to eliminate geometries that introduce too large a disturbance and optimise the electrostatic design.

  10. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass. The goal of the present program is to demonstrate feasibility of the EPA thruster concept through experimental and theoretical investigations of the EPA acceleration mechanism and discharge chamber performance. Experimental investigations will include operating the test bed ion (TBI) engine as an EPA thruster and parametrically varying the thruster geometry and operating conditions to quantify the electrostatic plasma acceleration effect. The theoretical investigations will include the development of a discharge chamber model which describes the relationships between the engine size, plasma properties, and overall performance. For the EPA thruster to be a viable propulsion concept, overall thruster efficiencies approaching 30% with specific impulses approaching 1000 s must be achieved.

  11. Electrostatics of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to continue developing an understanding of electrostatic phenomena in preparation for any future flight opportunities of the EGM experiment, originally slated for a 2004 Space Station deployment. Work would be based on theoretical assessments, ground-based lab experiments, and reduced-gravity experiments. The ability to examine dipoles in the lab proved to be elusive, and thus, effort was concentrated on monopoles -how materials become charged, the fate of the charge, the role of material type, and so forth. Several significant milestones were achieved in this regard. In regard of the dipoles, experiments were designed in collaboration with the University of Chicago school district who had access to reduced gravity on the KC-135 aircraft. Two experiments were slated to fly last year but were cancelled after the Columbia accident. One of the experiments has been given a second life and will fly sometime in 2005 if the Shuttle flights resume. There remains active interest in the question of electrostatic dipoles within the educational community, and experiments using magnetic dipoles as a substitute are to be examined. The KC-135 experiments will also examine dispersion methods for particles as a verification of possible future techniques in microgravity. Both laboratory and theoretical work established a number of breakthroughs in our understanding of electrostatic phenomena. These breakthroughs are listed in this paper.

  12. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  13. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  14. Dust continuum spectra from model HII regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aannestad, P. A.; Emery, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The infrared spectrum emitted by nebular dust, heated by the ionizing stars in H II blisters and spherical H II regions, is calculated for various model parameters. Absorption of the non-ionizing radiation in a neutral layer is included. Heating by the Lyman alpha photon field is taken into account. The dust is composed of silicate and graphite grains, and evaporation of the grains in the inner region is considered. The models are presented with a view to interpretation of infrared observations of dusty H II regions and can be applied directly to the infrared astronomy satellite survey data. The continuum emission is compared with calculated fine structure line emission.

  15. An analytical approach to computing biomolecular electrostatic potential. I. Derivation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Fenley, Andrew T; Gordon, John C; Onufriev, Alexey

    2008-08-21

    Analytical approximations to fundamental equations of continuum electrostatics on simple shapes can lead to computationally inexpensive prescriptions for calculating electrostatic properties of realistic molecules. Here, we derive a closed-form analytical approximation to the Poisson equation for an arbitrary distribution of point charges and a spherical dielectric boundary. The simple, parameter-free formula defines continuous electrostatic potential everywhere in space and is obtained from the exact infinite-series (Kirkwood) solution by an approximate summation method that avoids truncating the infinite series. We show that keeping all the terms proves critical for the accuracy of this approximation, which is fully controllable for the sphere. The accuracy is assessed by comparisons with the exact solution for two unit charges placed inside a spherical boundary separating the solute of dielectric 1 and the solvent of dielectric 80. The largest errors occur when the source charges are closest to the dielectric boundary and the test charge is closest to either of the sources. For the source charges placed within 2 A from the boundary, and the test surface located on the boundary, the root-mean-square error of the approximate potential is less than 0.1 kcal/mol/mid R:emid R: (per unit test charge). The maximum error is 0.4 kcal/mol/mid R:emid R:. These results correspond to the simplest first-order formula. A strategy for adopting the proposed method for realistic biomolecular shapes is detailed. An extensive testing and performance analysis on real molecular structures are described in Part II that immediately follows this work as a separate publication. Part II also contains an application example. PMID:19044802

  16. Negative-continuum dielectronic recombination for heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A.N.; Yerokhin, V.A.; Beier, T.; Kozhuharov, C.; Eichler, J.; Klasnikov, A.E.; Shabaev, V.M.; Stoehlker, T.

    2003-05-01

    The process of recombination of an electron with a bare heavy nucleus via the creation of a free-positron-bound-electron pair is considered. This process is denoted as 'negative-continuum dielectronic recombination' because it results in the capture of an incident electron into a bound state accompanied by a transition of a negative-continuum electron into a bound state. The calculations are performed for a wide range of incident electron energies for Z=82 and 92.

  17. Relativistic Continuum Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grineviciute, Janina; Halderson, Dean

    2011-04-01

    The R-matrix formalism of Lane and Thomas has been extended to the relativistic case so that the many-coupled channels problem may be solved for systems in which binary breakup channels satisfy a relative Dirac equation. The formalism was previously applied to the relativistic impulse approximation RIA and now we applied it to Quantum Hadrodynamics QHD in the continuum Tamm-Dancoff approximation TDA with the classical meson fields replaced by one-meson exchange potentials. None of the published QHD parameters provide a decent fit to the 15 N + p elastic cross section. The deficiency is also evident in inability of the QHD parameters with the one meson exchange potentials to reproduce the QHD single particle energies. Results with alternate parameters sets are presented. A. M. Lane and R. G. Thomas, R-Matrix Theory of Nuclear Reactions, Reviews of Modern Physics, 30 (1958) 257

  18. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  19. Bridging implicit and explicit solvent approaches for membrane electrostatics.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Hsin; Baker, Nathan A; McCammon, J Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Conformations of a zwitterionic bilayer were sampled from a molecular dynamics simulation and their electrostatic properties analyzed by solution of the Poisson equation. These traditionally implicit electrostatic calculations were performed in the presence of varying amounts of explicit solvent to assess the magnitude of error introduced by a uniform dielectric description of water surrounding the bilayer. It was observed that membrane dipole potential calculations in the presence of explicit water were significantly different than wholly implicit solvent calculations with the calculated dipole potential converging to a reasonable value when four or more hydration layers were included explicitly. PMID:12202363

  20. The virial theorem for the polarizable continuum model

    SciTech Connect

    Cammi, R.

    2014-02-28

    The electronic virial theorem is extended to molecular systems within the framework of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) to describe solvation effects. The theorem is given in the form of a relation involving the components of the energy (kinetic and potential) of a molecular solute and its electrostatic properties (potential and field) at the boundary of the cavity in the continuum medium. The virial theorem is also derived in the presence of the Pauli repulsion component of the solute-solvent interaction. Furthermore, it is shown that these forms of the PCM virial theorem may be related to the virial theorem of more simple systems as a molecule in the presence of fixed point charges, and as an atom in a spherical box with confining potential.

  1. The virial theorem for the Polarizable Continuum Model.

    PubMed

    Cammi, R

    2014-02-28

    The electronic virial theorem is extended to molecular systems within the framework of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) to describe solvation effects. The theorem is given in the form of a relation involving the components of the energy (kinetic and potential) of a molecular solute and its electrostatic properties (potential and field) at the boundary of the cavity in the continuum medium. The virial theorem is also derived in the presence of the Pauli repulsion component of the solute-solvent interaction. Furthermore, it is shown that these forms of the PCM virial theorem may be related to the virial theorem of more simple systems as a molecule in the presence of fixed point charges, and as an atom in a spherical box with confining potential. PMID:24588153

  2. PREFACE: Electrostatics 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, James

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatics 2015, supported by the Institute of Physics, was held in the Sir James Matthews building at Southampton Solent University, UK between 12th and 16th April 2015. Southampton is a historic city on the South Coast of England with a strong military and maritime history. Southampton is home to two Universities: Solent University, which hosted the conference, and the University of Southampton, where much work is undertaken related to electrostatics. 37 oral and 44 poster presentations were accepted for the conference, and 60 papers were submitted and accepted for the proceedings. The Bill Bright Memorial Lecture was delivered this year by Professor Mark Horenstein from Boston University who was, until recently, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Electrostatics. He spoke on The contribution of surface potential to diverse problems in electrostatics and his thorough knowledge of the subject of electrostatics was evident in the presentation. The first session was chaired by the Conference Chair, Dr Keith Davies, whose experience in the field showed through his frequent contributions to the discussions throughout the conference. Hazards and Electrostatic Discharge have formed a strong core to Electrostatics conferences for many years, and this conference contained sessions on both Hazards and on ESD, including an invited talk from Dr Jeremy Smallwood on ESD in Industry - Present and Future. Another strong theme to emerge from this year's programme was Non-Thermal Plasmas, which was covered in two sessions. There were two invited talks on this subject: Professor Masaaki Okubo gave a talk on Development of super-clean diesel engine and combustor using nonthermal plasma hybrid after treatment and Dr David Go presented a talk on Atmospheric-pressure ionization processes: New approaches and applications for plasmas in contact with liquids. A new innovation to the conference this year was the opportunity for conference sponsors to present to the delegates a technical

  3. Molecular Electrostatic Potentials from Invariom Point Charges.

    PubMed

    Wandtke, Claudia M; Lübben, Jens; Dittrich, Birger

    2016-07-18

    A set of look-up point charges for generating molecular electrostatic potentials is provided. The set relies on atom classification of the invariom database, which has already been applied to assign aspherical scattering factors in single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The focus of the investigation is on improving the accuracy of electrostatic potentials calculated by using tabulated point charges. In this respect, the performance of invariom point charges is compared with 1) those from a restrained fit to the electrostatic potential directly following quantum-chemical DFT computations, 2) semi-empirical AM1-bcc charges, and 3) conceptually similar TPACM4 look-up charges. Invariom classification gives charges that perform better than those from TPACM4, although tabulated charges remain inferior to those from molecule-specific computations. Point-charge electrostatic potentials also agree favorably with those from charge-density studies on the basis of X-ray experiments, without requiring the considerable effort of the latter. PMID:26999276

  4. Continuum lowering - A new perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, B. J. B.

    2014-12-01

    What is meant by continuum lowering and ionization potential depression (IPD) in a Coulomb system depends very much upon precisely what question is being asked. It is shown that equilibrium (equation of state) phenomena and non-equilibrium dynamical processes like photoionization are characterized by different values of the IPD. In the former, the ionization potential of an atom embedded in matter is the difference in the free energy of the many-body system between states of thermodynamic equilibrium differing by the ionization state of just one atom. Typically, this energy is less than that required to ionize the same atom in vacuo. Probably, the best known example of this is the IPD given by Stewart and Pyatt (SP). However, it is a common misconception that this formula should apply directly to the energy of a photon causing photoionization, since this is a local adiabatic process that occurs in the absence of a response from the surrounding plasma. To achieve the prescribed final equilibrium state, in general, additional energy, in the form of heat and work, is transferred between the atom and its surroundings. This additional relaxation energy is sufficient to explain the discrepancy between recent spectroscopic measurements of IPD in dense plasmas and the predictions of the SP formula. This paper provides a detailed account of an analytical approach, based on SP, to calculating thermodynamic and spectroscopic (adiabatic) IPDs in multicomponent Coulomb systems of arbitrary coupling strength with Te ≠ Ti. The ramifications for equilibrium Coulomb systems are examined in order to elucidate the roles of the various forms of the IPD and any possible connection with the plasma microfield. The formulation embodies an analytical equation of state (EoS) that is thermodynamically self-consistent, provided that the bound and free electrons are dynamically separable, meaning that the system is not undergoing pressure ionization. Apart from this restriction, the model is

  5. The wet solidus of silica: Predictions from the scaled particle theory and polarized continuum model

    SciTech Connect

    Ottonello, G. Vetuschi Zuccolini, M.; Richet, P.

    2015-02-07

    We present an application of the Scaling Particle Theory (SPT) coupled with an ab initio assessment of the electronic, dispersive, and repulsive energy terms based on the Polarized Continuum Model (PCM) aimed at reproducing the observed solubility behavior of OH{sub 2} over the entire compositional range from pure molten silica to pure water and wide pressure and temperature regimes. It is shown that the solution energy is dominated by cavitation terms, mainly entropic in nature, which cause a large negative solution entropy and a consequent marked increase of gas phase fugacity with increasing temperatures. Besides, the solution enthalpy is negative and dominated by electrostatic terms which depict a pseudopotential well whose minimum occurs at a low water fraction (X{sub H{sub 2O}}) of about 6 mol. %. The fine tuning of the solute-solvent interaction is achieved through very limited adjustments of the electrostatic scaling factor γ{sub el} which, in pure water, is slightly higher than the nominal value (i.e., γ{sub el}  =  1.224 against 1.2), it attains its minimum at low H{sub 2}O content (γ{sub el} = 0.9958) and then rises again at infinite dilution (γ{sub el}   =  1.0945). The complex solution behavior is interpreted as due to the formation of energetically efficient hydrogen bonding when OH functionals are in appropriate amount and relative positioning with respect to the discrete OH{sub 2} molecules, reinforcing in this way the nominal solute-solvent inductive interaction. The interaction energy derived from the SPT-PCM calculations is then recast in terms of a sub-regular Redlich-Kister expansion of appropriate order whereas the thermodynamic properties of the H{sub 2}O component at its standard state (1-molal solution referred to infinite dilution) are calculated from partial differentiation of the solution energy over the intensive variables.

  6. Electrostatics of solvated systems in periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Marzari, Nicola

    2014-12-01

    Continuum solvation methods can provide an accurate and inexpensive embedding of quantum simulations in liquid or complex dielectric environments. Notwithstanding a long history and manifold applications to isolated systems in open boundary conditions, their extension to materials simulations, typically entailing periodic boundary conditions, is very recent, and special care is needed to address correctly the electrostatic terms. We discuss here how periodic boundary corrections developed for systems in vacuum should be modified to take into account solvent effects, using as a general framework the self-consistent continuum solvation model developed within plane-wave density-functional theory [O. Andreussi et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064102 (2012), 10.1063/1.3676407]. A comprehensive discussion of real- and reciprocal-space corrective approaches is presented, together with an assessment of their ability to remove electrostatic interactions between periodic replicas. Numerical results for zero- and two-dimensional charged systems highlight the effectiveness of the different suggestions, and underline the importance of a proper treatment of electrostatic interactions in first-principles studies of charged systems in solution.

  7. ABSINTH: A new continuum solvation model for simulations of polypeptides in aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    Vitalis, Andreas; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2009-01-01

    A new implicit solvation model for use in Monte Carlo simulations of polypeptides is introduced. The model is termed ABSINTH for self-Assembly of Biomolecules Studied by an Implicit, Novel, and Tunable Hamiltonian. It is designed primarily for simulating conformational equilibria and oligomerization reactions of intrinsically disordered proteins in aqueous solutions. The paradigm for ABSINTH is conceptually similar to the EEF1 model of Lazaridis and Karplus (Proteins: Struct. Func. Genet., 1999, 35: 133-152). In ABSINTH, the transfer of a polypeptide solute from the gas phase into a continuum solvent is the sum of a direct mean field interaction (DMFI), and a term to model the screening of polar interactions. Polypeptide solutes are decomposed into a set of distinct solvation groups. The DMFI is a sum of contributions from each of the solvation groups, which are analogs of model compounds. Continuum-mediated screening of electrostatic interactions is achieved using a framework similar to the one used for the DMFI. Promising results are shown for a set of test cases. These include the calculation of NMR coupling constants for short peptides, the assessment of the thermal stability of two small proteins, reversible folding of both an alpha-helix and a beta-hairpin forming peptide, and the polymeric properties of intrinsically disordered polyglutamine peptides of varying lengths. The tests reveal that the computational expense for simulations with the ABSINTH implicit solvation model increase by a factor that is in the range of 2.5-5.0 with respect to gas-phase calculations. PMID:18506808

  8. Undamped electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2012-09-15

    Electrostatic waves in a collision-free unmagnetized plasma of electrons with fixed ions are investigated for electron equilibrium velocity distribution functions that deviate slightly from Maxwellian. Of interest are undamped waves that are the small amplitude limit of nonlinear excitations, such as electron acoustic waves (EAWs). A deviation consisting of a small plateau, a region with zero velocity derivative over a width that is a very small fraction of the electron thermal speed, is shown to give rise to new undamped modes, which here are named corner modes. The presence of the plateau turns off Landau damping and allows oscillations with phase speeds within the plateau. These undamped waves are obtained in a wide region of the (k,{omega}{sub R}) plane ({omega}{sub R} being the real part of the wave frequency and k the wavenumber), away from the well-known 'thumb curve' for Langmuir waves and EAWs based on the Maxwellian. Results of nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations that corroborate the existence of these modes are described. It is also shown that deviations caused by fattening the tail of the distribution shift roots off of the thumb curve toward lower k-values and chopping the tail shifts them toward higher k-values. In addition, a rule of thumb is obtained for assessing how the existence of a plateau shifts roots off of the thumb curve. Suggestions are made for interpreting experimental observations of electrostatic waves, such as recent ones in nonneutral plasmas.

  9. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    The application of electric propulsion to communications satellites, however, has been limited to the use of hydrazine thrusters with electric heaters for thrust and specific impulse augmentation. These electrothermal thrusters operate at specific impulse levels of approximately 300 s with heater powers of about 500 W. Low power arcjets (1-3 kW) are currently being investigated as a way to increase specific impulse levels to approximately 500 s. Ion propulsion systems can easily produce specific impulses of 3000 s or greater, but have yet to be applied to communications satellites. The reasons most often given for not using ion propulsion systems are their high level of overall complexity, low thrust with long burn times, and the difficulty of integrating the propulsion system into existing commercial spacecraft busses. The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass.

  10. Applications of electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, G.A.; Klody, G.M.

    1995-10-01

    Most applications of electrostatic accelerators fit into two main groups, materials analysis and materials modification. Materials analysis includes routine use of Rutherford Backscattering for quality control applications in the semiconductor field. Particle induced x-ray emission (PDCE) is used in fields from art history through environmental sciences. X-ray imaging using 5 MeV DC electron beams and fast pulsed neutron analysis (PFNA) for plastic explosive and drug detection provide promise in the area of security. Accelerator based mass spectrometry (AMS) is having a profound effect in a wide variety of fields which rely on counting extremely rare isotopes in small samples. Materials modification provides a very significant economic impact in the field of semiconductors. Virtually all semiconductor devices now rely on ion implantation with ion beam energies ranging from a few kilovolts to several MeV. With some mention of electron beams, this talk will concentrate primarily on the applications of MeV ion beams from electrostatic accelerators.