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Sample records for contraception body water

  1. Contraceptives.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    This chart sets forth brief descriptions of 14 contraceptive methods: male condom, female condom, vaginal diaphragm and cap, spermicides, oral contraceptives, hormonal implants, injectables, IUD, natural family planning, fertility awareness, breast feeding, withdrawal, sterilization, and emergency contraception. After presenting a short description of each method, the chart rates its degree of protection from pregnancy, the protection provided against HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, its availability, and the method's advantages and disadvantages. PMID:12348240

  2. The `natural' body, God and contraceptive use in the southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    WOODSONG, CYNTHIA; SHEDLIN, MICHELE; KOO, HELEN

    2011-01-01

    Data collected among African-American and Caucasian women and men in the southeastern USA indicate that participants' perceptions of nature, God's will and the human body influence reproductive health and decision-making. Attitudes about the health care system, pharmaceutical companies and government programmes for fertility regulation reinforce these views and may negatively affect willingness to use contraceptive methods consistently and correctly. PMID:21972833

  3. Effect of the ethinylestradiol/norelgestromin contraceptive patch on body composition. Results of bioelectrical impedance analysis in a population of Italian women

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Antonio; Crosignani, PierGiorgio; Nappi, Carmine; Ronsini, Salvatore; Bruni, Vincenzina; Marelli, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    Background As weight gain is one of the most frequently cited reasons for not using and for discontinuing hormonal contraceptives, in an open-label, single-arm, multicentre clinical study we evaluated the effect of the ethinylestradiol/norelgestromin contraceptive patch (EVRA, Janssen-Cilag International, Belgium) on body composition using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Methods Body weight and impedance vector components (resistance (R) and reactance (Xc), at 50 kHz frequency, Akern-RJL Systems analyzer) were recorded before entry, after 1, 3 and 6 months in 182 Italian healthy women aged 29 yr (18 to 45), and with BMI 21.8 kg/m2 (16 to 31). Total body water (TBW) was estimated with a BIA regression equation. Vector BIA was performed with the RXc mean graph method and the Hotelling's T2 test for paired and unpaired data. Results After 6 months body weight increased by 0.64 kg (1.1%) and TBW increased by 0.51 L (1.7%). The pattern of impedance vector displacement indicated a small increase in soft tissue hydration (interstitial gel fluid). Body composition changes did not significantly differ among groups of previous contraceptive methods. Arterial blood pressure did not significantly change over time. Conclusion After 6 months of treatment with the ethinylestradiol/norelgestromin contraceptive patch we found a minimal, clinically not relevant, increase in body weight less than 1 kg that could be attributed to an adaptive interstitial gel hydration. This fluctuation is physiological as confirmed by the lack of any effect on blood pressure. This could be useful in increasing women's choice, acceptability and compliance of the ethinylestradiol/norelgestromin contraceptive patch. PMID:18727825

  4. About Body Water

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thoughts As Traffic Piles Up, So Does Air Pollution Heart Docs: Never Expose Kids to Cigarette Smoke ... Insulin Delivery Additional Content Medical News About Body Water By James L. Lewis, III, MD NOTE: This ...

  5. No association between body size and frequency of sexual intercourse among oral contraceptive users

    PubMed Central

    Brunner Huber, Larissa R.; Stanley, Whitney A.; Broadhurst, Leah; Dmochowski, Jacek; Vick, Tara M.; Scholes, Delia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to describe frequency of sexual intercourse and whether body size was associated with weekly sexual intercourse among a diverse group of women using oral contraceptives. Methods This longitudinal, prospective cohort study recruited participants (n=185) from several clinics in Charlotte, NC. Body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were used as measures of body size and sexual intercourse frequency was determined from self-reported information provided on daily diaries. Mean monthly frequencies of sexual intercourse were calculated and linear mixed models were used to assess if means remained constant over time. Generalized estimating equations were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Mean monthly frequency of sexual intercourse was similar for women classified as normal/underweight or obese by BMI during each month of data collection, but was highest for women classified as overweight. After adjustment, obesity-sexual intercourse associations were attenuated (BMI ≥30 vs. <25.0: OR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.43, 1.42 and WHR ≥0.85 vs. <0.85: OR=1.11; 95% CI: 0.62, 2.01). Conclusions This study found no association between BMI or WHR and weekly sexual intercourse. However, more research is warranted given the importance of this possible relationship for future studies of fertility, contraceptive effectiveness, and sexual health. PMID:25034574

  6. [Contraception news].

    PubMed

    Vincent-Rohfritsch, A; Pernin, E; Chabbert-Buffet, N

    2012-04-01

    Although contraception is widely available in France, contraceptive failure remains high. However a number of modifications in contraceptive methods have been developed and should help reduce contraceptive failure. Among those, information and improvement of access to contraception are very important. Recent advances in contraceptive practice have also contributed to improve clinical tolerance and subsequently compliance. Finally, emergency contraception has evolved as well. PMID:22079029

  7. Influence of Body Weight, Ethnicity, Oral Contraceptives, and Pregnancy on the Pharmacokinetics of Azithromycin in Women of Childbearing Age

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mitra; Kilpatrick, Sarah J.; Tuomala, Ruth E.; Shier, Janice M.; Wollett, Lori; Fischer, Patricia A.; Khorana, Kinnari S.; Rodvold, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    Women of childbearing age commonly receive azithromycin for the treatment of community-acquired infections, including during pregnancy. This study determined azithromycin pharmacokinetics in pregnant and nonpregnant women and identified covariates contributing to pharmacokinetic variability. Plasma samples were collected by using a sparse-sampling strategy from pregnant women at a gestational age of 12 to 40 weeks and from nonpregnant women of childbearing age receiving oral azithromycin for the treatment of an infection. Pharmacokinetic data from extensive sampling conducted on 12 healthy women were also included. Plasma samples were assayed for azithromycin by high-performance liquid chromatography. Population data were analyzed by nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. The population analysis included 53 pregnant and 25 nonpregnant women. A three-compartment model with first-order absorption and a lag time provided the best fit of the data. Lean body weight, pregnancy, ethnicity, and the coadministration of oral contraceptives were covariates identified as significantly influencing the oral clearance of azithromycin and, except for oral contraceptive use, intercompartmental clearance between the central and second peripheral compartments. No other covariate relationships were identified. Compared to nonpregnant women not receiving oral contraceptives, a 21% to 42% higher dose-adjusted azithromycin area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) occurred in non-African American women who were pregnant or receiving oral contraceptives. Conversely, azithromycin AUCs were similar between pregnant African American women and nonpregnant women not receiving oral contraceptives. Although higher levels of maternal and fetal azithromycin exposure suggest that lower doses be administered to non-African American women during pregnancy, the consideration of azithromycin pharmacodynamics during pregnancy should guide any dose adjustments. PMID:22106226

  8. [Topical contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Alipov, V I; Korkhov, V V

    1982-02-01

    Recently there has been little interest in topical contraceptives. The most popular are the cervical cap and the diaphragm. Other types of mechanical contraceptive devices are being investigated. Standley and Kessler have developed a device for introduction into the cervical canal with a reservoir of spermatocide, it does not block the flow of blood during menstruation. New models of vaginal rings are also being developed which are simple enough for self-insertion and also contain a reservoir of spermatocide. Work is being done on spermatocide-containing sponges in many countries. Another project being investigated is the possibility of using natural proteins, collagens, and other substances which absorb spermatozoids. The ancients used various vaginal suppositories to kill spermatozoids; in the late 19th century quinine sulfate was used for this, and a variety of substances have been used recently. These spermicidal creams also have the advantage of acting as anti-infectious agents in many cases. But they do have some negative effects. They are about 85% effective, are local irritants, and some cause discomfort during intercourse. And it is possible that some are resorbed by the body and act on the liver and other organs. Vaginal globules and suppositories are also popular. The "Kontraceptin-T" brand contains quinosol, boric acid, and tannin. There are also foaming tablets which are mixed with water and then introduced. New locally-active chemical substances are being developed in Japan, West Germany, and the USSR. Kontraceptin-E contains paranonyl-phenoxypolyethylene glycol and sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate. The "Norforks" and other preparations contain mercurial compounds which may turn out to be harmful. The future promises the development of products which will act to prevent fertilization by acting on the hyaluronidase and the acrosine of the spermatozoid, thus preventing it from penetrating the ovum. It would be best to find enzyme inhibitors which are

  9. Transdermal delivery of contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Friend, D R

    1990-01-01

    Contraceptive agents are administered to the body through a variety of routes. Research has recently been directed at examining the transdermal route for systemic delivery of contraceptive agents, including estrogens and progestins. The transdermal route has several potential advantages over the other routes of administration: (1) improved compliance, (2) once-weekly administration, (3) delivery is easily terminated, and (4) some side effects can be alleviated based on more constant delivery rates. This article reviews the permeability of skin toward contraceptive steroids and how skin permeability is evaluated. The metabolism of contraceptive steroids is also considered. Transdermal delivery systems used to deliver contraceptives are presented, followed by a detailed discussion of several delivery systems for specific contraceptive agents such as levonorgestrel and estradiol. The potential problem of skin irritation is presented as it relates to transdermal contraceptive delivery systems, all of which will be worn chronically. PMID:2272099

  10. Lunelle monthly contraceptive injection (medroxyprogesterone acetate and estradiol cypionate injectable suspension): effects of body weight and injection sites on pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Rahimy, M H; Cromie, M A; Hopkins, N K; Tong, D M

    1999-10-01

    A new contraceptive option, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and estradiol cypionate (E2C) (MPA/E2C, Lunelle Monthly Contraceptive Injection), will soon be available for women in the US. This article reports the results of a US trial that assessed the effects of body weight and injection site on the pharmacokinetics of MPA, the progestin mediating contraceptive efficacy. This assessment was part of a nonrandomized, open-label, multicenter US study in healthy women receiving a monthly injection of MPA/E2C for 60 weeks. A total of 77 women (aged 18-47 years) at four centers participated in the pharmacokinetics assessment during the sixth or the seventh injection. For determination of serum MPA concentration-time profiles, blood samples were collected before the sixth and seventh injections (day 0) and on days 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after the sixth and seventh monthly administrations. For effects of injection site, MPA pharmacokinetics were compared at injection sites of the arm, hip, and leg. The pharmacokinetics of MPA, determined at the sixth and seventh injection, were not significantly affected by injection sites. The mean area under the curve (AUC0-28), however, was different between the arm and the leg injection sites; the difference was < 20%. More important, the average MPA trough concentrations (Cmin) at the fifth and sixth monthly injections were similar (range 0.42-0.51 ng/mL) for the three injection sites and well above the threshold levels of 0.10-0.20 ng/mL required to suppress ovulation. For effects of body mass index (BMI) on pharmacokinetics, women were stratified into three groups: thin/normal (BMI 18-28, n = 48), obese (BMI 29-38, n = 23), and highly obese (BMI > 38, n = 6). There were no significant differences in the pharmacokinetics of MPA among the three BMI categories. The only significant difference (p = 0.0387) was the AUC0-28 between BMI 18-28 and BMI 29-38. Because of the small sample size in the highly obese group, a reanalysis was

  11. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    ... contraception are available: emergency contraceptive pills and the copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD). Emergency contraceptive pills include ... for emergency use, talk to your doctor. The copper-containing IUD (brand name: Paragard) is a small, ...

  12. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ114 CONTRACEPTION Emergency Contraception • What is emergency contraception (EC)? • How does EC work? • What are the different types of EC? • What is the most ...

  13. Emergency Contraception.

    PubMed

    Batur, Pelin; Kransdorf, Lisa N; Casey, Petra M

    2016-06-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) may help prevent pregnancy in various circumstances, such as contraceptive method failure, unprotected sexual intercourse, or sexual assault, yet it remains underused. There are 4 approved EC options in the United States. Although ulipristal acetate requires a provider's prescription, oral levonorgestrel (LNG) is available over the counter for women of all ages. The most effective method of EC is the copper intrauterine device, which can be left in place for up to 10 years for efficacious, cost-effective, hormone-free, and convenient long-term primary contraception. Ulipristal acetate tends to be more efficacious in pregnancy prevention than is LNG, especially when taken later than 72 hours postcoitus. The mechanism of action of oral EC is delay of ovulation, and current evidence reveals that it is ineffective postovulation. Women who weigh more than 75 kg or have a body mass index greater than 25 kg/m(2) may have a higher risk of unintended pregnancy when using oral LNG EC; therefore, ulipristal acetate or copper intrauterine devices are preferable in this setting. Providers are often unaware of the range of EC options or are unsure of how to counsel patients regarding the access and use of EC. This article critically reviews current EC literature, summarizes recommendations, and provides guidance for counseling women about EC. Useful tips for health care providers are provided, with a focus on special populations, including breast-feeding women and those transitioning to long-term contraception after EC use. When treating women of reproductive age, clinicians should be prepared to counsel them about EC options, provide EC appropriately, and, if needed, refer for EC in a timely manner. PMID:27261868

  14. Emergency contraception

    MedlinePlus

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B ... Emergency contraception most likely prevents pregnancy in the same way as regular birth control pills: By preventing or delaying ...

  15. Contraceptive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troen, Philip; And Others

    This report provides an overview of research activities and needs in the area of contraceptive development. In a review of the present state, discussions are offered on the effectiveness and drawbacks of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices, barrier methods, natural family planning, and sterilization. Methods of contraception that are in the…

  16. Changes in weight, total fat, percent body fat, and central-to-peripheral fat ratio associated with injectable and oral contraceptive use

    PubMed Central

    BERENSON, Abbey B.; RAHMAN, Mahbubur

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine changes in body weight and composition resulting from hormonal contraception. Study design Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed at baseline and every 6 months for 3 years on 703 women (200 Black, 247 White, 256 Hispanic) initiating use of oral contraception (OC, n = 245), depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA, n = 240), or nonhormonal contraception (NH, n = 218). DMPA discontinuers were followed for up to 2 years to examine the reversibility of observed changes. Results Over 36 months, DMPA users increased their weight (+5.1 kg), body fat (+4.1 kg), percent body fat (+3.4%), and central-to-peripheral fat ratio (+0.1) more than OC and NH users (P<.01). OC use did not cause weight gain. After DMPA discontinuation, NH users lost 0.42 kg/6 months while OC users gained 0.43 kg/6 months. Conclusions Body weight and fat significantly increase while using DMPA. After discontinuation, some decrease occurs when NH is used. PMID:19254592

  17. Contraceptive Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulka, Barbara S.; And Others

    The objective of research in contraceptive evaluation is to improve the ability of individuals to choose contraceptive methods best suited to their needs and circumstances and to provide information that will lead to the development of safer and more effective methods. There are usually three considerations in judging the importance of a method of…

  18. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A; Raymond, Elizabeth G

    2002-08-01

    Emergency contraception is used to prevent pregnancy after a coital act not adequately protected by a regular method of contraception. In contrast to early medical abortion, emergency contraception prevents a pregnancy from starting and does not disrupt an established pregnancy. The most commonly used approaches consist of two oral doses of contraceptive steroids. The levonorgestrel-only regimen (levonorgestrel, 0.75 mg, repeated in 12 hours) appears to be more effective and better tolerated than the Yuzpe regimen (ethinyl estradiol, 100 microg, and levonorgestrel, 0.5 mg, repeated in 12 hours). In the largest randomized, controlled trial to date, levonorgestrel prevented about 85% of pregnancies that would have occurred without its use. Hormonal emergency contraception has no known medical contraindications, although it is not indicated for suspected or confirmed pregnancy. However, if hormonal emergency contraception is inadvertently taken in early pregnancy, neither the woman nor the fetus will be harmed. Nausea and vomiting associated with the Yuzpe regimen can be reduced by prophylactic use of meclizine. A strong medical and legal case exists for making hormonal emergency contraception available over the counter, as has happened in countries other than the United States. Easier access to and wider use of emergency contraception could dramatically lower the high rates of unintended pregnancy and induced abortion in the United States. PMID:12160366

  19. Contraceptive Equity

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The Equity in Prescription Insurance and Contraceptive Coverage Act, introduced in Congress in 1997 and still unpassed, seeks to redress health insurers’ failure to pay for birth control as they pay for other prescription drugs, most paradoxically Viagra. In 1936 the International Workers Order (IWO), a fraternal society, became the first insurer to include contraception in its benefits package. A forerunner in the movement for prepaid medical care, the IWO offered its members primary care and contraceptive services for annual flat fees. Founded at a time when the legal status of contraception was in flux, the IWO’s Birth Control Center was the only such clinic to operate on an insurance system. Recent state laws and judicial actions have revived the IWO’s groundbreaking view of contraception as a basic preventive service deserving of insurance coverage. PMID:17761562

  20. Water and electrolytes. [in human bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Harrison, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    It has been found that the performance of the strongest and fittest people will deteriorate rapidly with dehydration. The present paper is concerned with the anatomy of the fluid spaces in the body, taking into account also the fluid shifts and losses during exercise and their effects on performance. Total body water is arbitrarily divided into that contained within cells (cellular) and that located outside the cells (extracellular). The anatomy of body fluid compartments is considered along with the effects of exercise on body water, fluid shifts with exercise, the consequences of sweating, dehydration and exercise, heat acclimatization and endurance training, the adverse effects of dehydration, thirst and drinking during exercise, stimuli for drinking, and water, electrolyte, and carbohydrate replacement during exercise. It is found that the deterioration of physical exercise performance due to dehydration begins when body weight decreases by about 1 percent.

  1. Contraception today.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Bastianelli, Carlo; Farris, Manuela

    2006-12-01

    Modern contraceptive methods represent more than a technical advance: they are the instrument of a true social revolution-the "first reproductive revolution" in the history of humanity, an achievement of the second part of the 20th century, when modern, effective methods became available. Today a great diversity of techniques have been made available and-thanks to them, fertility rates have decreased from 5.1 in 1950 to 3.7 in 1990. As a consequence, the growth of human population that had more than tripled, from 1.8 to more than 6 billion in just one century, is today being brought under control. At the turn of the millennium, all over the world, more than 600 million married women are using contraception, with nearly 500 million in developing countries. Among married women, contraceptive use rose in all but two developing countries surveyed more than once since 1990. Among unmarried, sexually active women, it grew in 21 of 25 countries recently surveyed. Hormonal contraception, the best known method, first made available as a daily pill, can today be administered through seven different routes: intramuscularly, intranasally, intrauterus, intravaginally, orally, subcutaneously, and transdermally. In the field of oral contraception, new strategies include further dose reduction, the synthesis of new active molecules, and new administration schedules. A new minipill (progestin-only preparation) containing desogestrel has been recently marketed in a number of countries and is capable of consistently inhibiting ovulation in most women. New contraceptive rings to be inserted in the vagina offer a novel approach by providing a sustained release of steroids and low failure rates. The transdermal route for delivering contraceptive steroids is now established via a contraceptive patch, a spray, or a gel. The intramuscular route has also seen new products with the marketing of improved monthly injectable preparations containing an estrogen and a progestin. After the first

  2. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Gold, M A

    2000-01-01

    High rates of adolescent pregnancy remain a challenge for health care providers. For most sexually active adolescents, pregnancy is unintended. Emergency contraception, also called the "morning-after-pill" or postcoital contraception, is a way to prevent pregnancy after unprotected intercourse. In the United States, three forms of emergency contraception currently are available: high-dose combination estrogen and progestin pills, high-dose progestin-only pills, and postcoital insertion of a copper intrauterine device. The postcoital intrauterine device is used infrequently. When emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) are taken within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse, they reduce the risk of pregnancy by at least 75%. However, they are most effective if taken within 24 hours of coitus. Eleven brands of pills currently are marketed in the United States that conform to the regimens approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for this indication. Recently, two prepackaged ECPs were approved by the FDA. The only medical contraindication to prescribing ECPs is pregnancy. The most common side effects are nausea and vomiting, followed by menstrual disturbances, breast tenderness, abdominal cramping, dizziness, headache, and mood changes. Because vomiting can compromise the efficacy of ECPs, routine pretreatment with an antiemetic is recommended. Primary care providers can reduce unintended adolescent pregnancy by routinely counseling adolescents at all office visits about the existence of emergency contraception and by prescribing it in advance and over the telephone. PMID:10959448

  3. Male contraception.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jing; Page, Stephanie T; Anderson, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    Clear evidence shows that many men and women would welcome new male methods of contraception, but none have become available. The hormonal approach is based on suppression of gonadotropins and thus of testicular function and spermatogenesis, and has been investigated for several decades. This approach can achieve sufficient suppression of spermatogenesis for effective contraception in most men, but not all; the basis for these men responding insufficiently is unclear. Alternatively, the non-hormonal approach is based on identifying specific processes in sperm development, maturation and function. A range of targets has been identified in animal models, and targeted effectively. This approach, however, remains in the pre-clinical domain at present. There are, therefore, grounds for considering that safe, effective and reversible methods of contraception for men can be developed. PMID:24947599

  4. Male contraception

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jing; Page, Stephanie T.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Clear evidence shows that many men and women would welcome new male methods of contraception, but none have become available. The hormonal approach is based on suppression of gonadotropins and thus of testicular function and spermatogenesis, and has been investigated for several decades. This approach can achieve sufficient suppression of spermatogenesis for effective contraception in most men, but not all; the basis for these men responding insufficiently is unclear. Alternatively, the nonhormonal approach is based on identifying specific processes in sperm development, maturation and function. A range of targets has been identified in animal models, and targeted effectively. This approach, however, remains in the pre-clinical domain at present. There are, therefore, grounds for considering that safe, effective and reversible methods of contraception for men can be developed. PMID:24947599

  5. Contraceptive revolution.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J

    1994-06-01

    Global population will increase by almost 1 billion people in the 1990s, the largest 10-year increase ever recorded. In 1994 alone, population will surpass 5.7 billion. The prospect of double-digit billions of people is worrisome, especially since these numbers may affect global warming, supplies of fresh water, destruction of rain forests, industrial pollution, and sustainable development. Yet, many indicators of quality of life show that people enjoy a better quality of life today than they did 100 years ago. Between India's independence and now, life expectancy increased by 20 years, infant mortality decreased 2-fold, literacy increased, and the food supply stabilized. Even though India's population has almost tripled since 1947, its economy increased rapidly and is 1 of the world's top 10 economies. University enrollment stands at 4.5 million. Agricultural production has exceeded demand. India represents the potential for human achievement through technological advancement and social organization. If the world's first national family planning program had been more successful when it began in 1952 in an India of 350 million people, India's population would be around 500 million instead of the expected 1 billion in 2000. All countries need to achieve a sustainable balance between human numbers and needs and natural resources. Family planning is an essential, cost-effective part of any development strategy. Family planning use has reduced fertility from 6 to 3.6 in developing countries. In 1965, only 8% used contraception, while more than 50% use it now. The most remarkable family planning/fertility reduction successes are Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Indonesia, Mexico, and Thailand. Sufficient investment in family planning is needed if significant declines in fertility are to occur. More than 90% of the developing world's people are in countries with official family planning programs. Cost-effective assistance by donors and developing countries implementing

  6. Intrauterine Contraception.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Jennifer K; Creinin, Mitchell D

    2016-05-01

    Currently, there are only two basic types of intrauterine devices (IUDs): copper and hormonal. However, other types of IUDs are under development, some of which are in clinical trials around the world. Continued development has focused on increasing efficacy, longer duration of use, and noncontraceptive benefits. This review discusses currently available intrauterine contraceptives, such as the Cu380A IUD and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems; novel intrauterine contraceptives that are available in select parts of the world including the intrauterine ball, low-dose copper products, frameless devices, and intrauterine delivery systems impregnated with noncontraceptive medication; and novel products currently in development. PMID:26947701

  7. Total body water and total body potassium in anorexia nervosa

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, D.T.; Crosby, L.O.; Lusk, E.; Oberlander, J.L.; Pertschuk, M.J.; Mullen, J.L.

    1984-08-01

    In the ill hospitalized patient with clinically relevant malnutrition, there is a measurable decrease in the ratio of the total body potassium to total body water (TBK/TBW) and a detectable increase in the ratio of total exchangeable sodium to total exchangeable potassium (Nae/Ke). To evaluate body composition analyses in anorexia nervosa patients with chronic uncomplicated semistarvation, TBK and TBW were measured by whole body K40 counting and deuterium oxide dilution in 10 females with stable anorexia nervosa and 10 age-matched female controls. The ratio of TBK/TBW was significantly (p less than 0.05) higher in anorexia nervosa patients than controls. The close inverse correlation found in published studies between TBK/TBW and Nae/Ke together with our results suggest that in anorexia nervosa, Nae/Ke may be low or normal. A decreased TBK/TBW is not a good indicator of malnutrition in the anorexia nervosa patient. The use of a decreased TBK/TBW ratio or an elevated Nae/Ke ratio as a definition of malnutrition may result in inappropriate nutritional management in the patient with severe nonstressed chronic semistarvation.

  8. [Progestational contraception].

    PubMed

    Bercovici, J P

    1987-09-21

    Synthetic progestins derived from nortestosterone provide a promising contraceptive alternative for women with contraindications for estrogens. Progesterone and synthetic progestins reduce vasodilatation and edema induced by estrogens and stop estrogen-dependent cellular multiplication in target tissue. Progestins have 2 kinds of contraceptive affect: antigonadotropic action at sufficient doses, and peripheral action at lower doses. The cervical mucus is modified in composition and volume, becoming hostile to sperm; the endometrial mucus atrophies; and tubal motility is slowed. High dose progestins are administered from the 5th or 10th to the 25th cycle day, with the earlier date preferred for women with shorter cycles. They are an ideal method for women with endometrial hyperplasia or benign breast disease or histories of breast or uterine cancer, as well as for women over 40 with dysovulatory cycles. Contraindications to high dose progestins include obesity, hypertension, lipid metabolic anomalies, and diabetes. Low dose progestin-only pills are administered at the exact same time each day including during menstruation. They are attractive for some women because they contain no estrogen, a reduced progestin dose causing fewer headaches and less somnolence, and fewer metabolic effects. Low dose progestins are indicated for lactating women, those with contraindications to estrogens such as obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes, and those with renal or cardiac insufficiency with valvulopathy. Low dose progestins are also indicated for nulliparas and other women for whom IUDS are contraindicated. Women using low dose progestins should never take drugs that act as enzymatic inductors, which speed hepatic degradation of steroids and reduce their efficiency. A resulting pregnancy is likely to be extrauterine because of slowed tubal transport. The failure rate of low dose progestins ranges from .9-3%, with higher failure rates among younger women. About 30

  9. [Contraceptive pancreopathy].

    PubMed

    Riederer, J

    1973-01-26

    In a private practice an increasing number of young women or girls are being observed with sudden onset of acute stomach pains of unknown origin. Clinically the pancreas is sensitive to pressure and there is an alpha-amylase elevation in the urine often accompanied by moderate leukocytosis. A slight elevation of the transaminase count is usual in such cases. There are no indications of alchohol abuse or pancreatic disorders in the anamnese and x-rays reveal an adequately functionning gall bladder without stones. Without exception all the women have been on oral contraceptives. With spasmolytics and a diet low in fats the symptoms disappear, often without discontinuation of the contraceptive. More data are needed on this problem, and prospective research should determine which additional factors must be present for the activation of such pancreatic disorders. PMID:4684016

  10. Emergency contraception

    PubMed Central

    Langille, Donald B.; Allen, Michael; Whelan, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the extent to which Nova Scotian FPs prescribe and provide emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) and to explore their knowledge of and attitudes toward ECPs. Design Survey of Nova Scotian FPs using a modified Dillman method. Setting All regions of Nova Scotia. Participants Family physicians registered with Dalhousie University’s Division of Continuing Medical Education. Main outcome measures Sex differences in the provision of ECPs and knowledge and attitudes about the ECP Plan B. Results Of 913 eligible FPs, 155 (17.0%) participated in the survey. Respondents resembled the sampling frame closely. Most physicians (64.0%) had prescribed ECPs in the previous year (mean number of prescriptions, 4.92); only 12.9% provided ECPs in advance of need. Knowledge about Plan B was quite good, except for knowledge of the time frame for potential effectiveness; only 29.2% of respondents answered that question correctly. Respondents generally supported nonprescription availability of ECPs, but 25.0% of FPs were concerned that this could lead to less use of more effective methods of contraception, and 39.2% believed that it would encourage repeat use. Younger FPs provided ECPs more often than their older colleagues, while female respondents had better knowledge about Plan B. In multivariate analysis being younger than 40 years was marginally associated with prescribing Plan B and with prescribing any form of ECP. Conclusion Most Nova Scotian FPs provided ECPs and had generally good knowledge about and attitudes toward providing such contraception without prescription. However, FPs were poorly informed about the length of time that Plan B can be effective, which could potentially affect use when patients consult several days after unprotected sex. There were some concerns about nonprescription availability of ECPs, which could have implications for recommending it to patients. Rarely were ECPs prescribed for advance use, which might represent a lost

  11. Contraceptive practices.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, J E; Rao, P S

    1976-08-01

    A family life education program (FLEP) providing contraceptive services within a comprehensive health care organization for low-income, inner-city adolescents is described. Each female patient attending in the July 1-September 30, 1974, period was included in a study undertaken to identify and serve the unmet needs of the teen-age population in the community of East Harlem. Of the 334 females interviewed, almost 1/2 were black, 37% were Hispanic, 12% were white, and 2% were Oriental, totals representative of the surrounding community. The questionnaire included information on demographic and social background, sexual history, reproductive history, and contraceptive experience. Comparisons are made on the answers between groups. Personal contacts and school outreach were the 2 main sources of referral to the clinic. Sexual history was found to be associated with social background rather than physiological factors. More than 1/2 the teen-agers had never used contraception prior to their 1st clinic visit and another 1/4 of the girls were using unreliable methods. The study indicated that teen-agers will use good programs which are designed to meet their needs. For teen-agers, a free-standing clinic offering comprehensive health care is the ideal situation. PMID:1066531

  12. Emergency Contraception Website

    MedlinePlus

    Text Only Full media Version Get Emergency Contraception NOW INFO about Emergency Contraception Q&A about Emergency Contraception Español | Arabic Find a Morning After Pill Provider Near You This website is ...

  13. Immaculate contraception.

    PubMed

    Smith, K

    The city of Dundee has the highest teen pregnancy and abortion rate in Scotland. In the heart of the city, The Corner is a health and information drop-in center for people aged 12-25 years which has provided a range of health promotion activities, contraception services, and general information and advice since April 1996. 8000 inquiries were posed from young people in Dundee and the surrounding areas in The Corner's first full year of operation, one-third on sexual health. A survey conducted last December found that 55% of the center's clients were aged 12-15. Young people helped to design the center, creating a cafe atmosphere in the main drop-in area with tables, chairs, and loungers. Reference literature is on display, music plays, and a series of computers is linked to health information databases. In this environment, clients can hang out, ask questions, and receive condoms or other contraceptive services without the embarrassment of attending a local family planning clinic. The examination and counseling rooms are also relaxed and warmly-appointed. The Corner has also offered emergency contraception since January, one of the few places in Scotland where nurses can provide it. While The Corner has received some local criticism, it is operating within the laws and codes of professional practices. The center is jointly funded by Tayside Health Board, Dundee City Council, and the Scottish Office. Finally, the center has a travel program which offers a package of activities based upon a different foreign country each week. PMID:9326014

  14. Intrauterine contraception.

    PubMed

    Reinprayoon, D

    1992-08-01

    Currently 85 million women use an intrauterine device (IUD), making it the most widely used, reliable, reversible contraceptive method worldwide. Although the exact mechanisms by which copper-bearing IUDs produce contraceptive action are not completely defined, recent evidence indicates that they act primarily to prevent sperm from fertilizing ova. The future of the IUD is brighter than it has been for the past 20 years. The latest generation of IUDs, such as the TCu 380A (Paragard, GynoPharma, Somerville, NJ), are safer and more effective than ever. In World Health Organization large, multicenter trials, pregnancy rates for the TCu 380A are 1.0, 1.4, 1.6, and 1.8 at 3, 5, 7, and 9 years of use, respectively. The ectopic pregnancy rates and removal for pelvic inflammatory disease are very low. The device may soon be the major IUD available in most countries. The acceptability of IUD use can be increased by good clinical management, sympathetic counseling, careful client selection, proper device selection, careful insertion, timing of insertion, and regular follow-up with quick access to medical care. PMID:1324024

  15. Robust three-body water simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tainter, C. J.; Pieniazek, P. A.; Lin, Y.-S.; Skinner, J. L.

    2011-05-01

    The most common potentials used in classical simulations of liquid water assume a pairwise additive form. Although these models have been very successful in reproducing many properties of liquid water at ambient conditions, none is able to describe accurately water throughout its complicated phase diagram. The primary reason for this is the neglect of many-body interactions. To this end, a simulation model with explicit three-body interactions was introduced recently [R. Kumar and J. L. Skinner, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 8311 (2008), 10.1021/jp8009468]. This model was parameterized to fit the experimental O-O radial distribution function and diffusion constant. Herein we reparameterize the model, fitting to a wider range of experimental properties (diffusion constant, rotational correlation time, density for the liquid, liquid/vapor surface tension, melting point, and the ice Ih density). The robustness of the model is then verified by comparing simulation to experiment for a number of other quantities (enthalpy of vaporization, dielectric constant, Debye relaxation time, temperature of maximum density, and the temperature-dependent second and third virial coefficients), with good agreement.

  16. Body Fat and Muscle Mass as Functions of Body Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, R. A.; Miller, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Hydrostatic weighing and chemical dilution are well accepted methods for measuring body composition. Recently, Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) has become the preferred method. The two compartment algorithms used by these methods assume a fixed constant for lean body tissue. This constant has long been suspect of variations due to many…

  17. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral contraceptives are available in the United States today? How could oral contraceptives influence cancer risk? How ... oral contraceptives are available in the United States today? Two types of oral contraceptives (birth control pills) ...

  18. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand. PMID:26598305

  19. Modern trends in contraception.

    PubMed

    Burkman, R T

    1990-12-01

    Substantial improvements have been made in oral contraceptives, a new injectable contraceptive (Norplant), and the intrauterine device (IUD). Major risks with oral contraceptives have declined substantially, and a number of noncontraceptive health benefits have been discovered. Norplant is probably the first new contraceptive in recent years, and offers long-term contraception with high efficacy and modest risks. The IUD, by carefully selecting users, is a safe and efficacious contraceptive method. The major risk, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), is far less common if one avoids use in the presence of risk factors for PID. PMID:2128711

  20. Changes in total body water during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Inners, L. D.; Charles, John B.

    1991-01-01

    Total body water (TBW) changes occurring in humans as a consequence of prolonged exposure to microgravity were measured in five male crewmembers of Space Shuttle missions STS-61C and STS-26. It was found that the inflight mean TBW values were significantly different from the preflight and postflight values, while the preflight TBW values were not significantly different from the postflight values. It was also found that individuals may differ in the rate at which they respond to weightlessness. Of the three crewmen who reported experiencing no symptoms of space motion sickness (SMS), two had not exhibited a decrease of TBW at the time of measurements (24 hrs after launch), while the two crewmen who reported SMS of intermediate severity showed a decrease of several kg by 24 hrs, suggesting that dehydration might be an important factor affecting the rate of TBW decrease.

  1. Young Australian women explain their contraceptive choices.

    PubMed

    Wigginton, Britta; Moran, Claire; Harris, Melissa L; Loxton, Deborah; Lucke, Jayne

    2016-07-01

    New developments in female contraceptives allow women increased options for preventing pregnancy, while men's options for reversible contraception have not advanced beyond the condom. There has been little discursive exploration of how neoliberal and postfeminist discourses shape women's accounts of choosing whether or not to use contraception. Our thematic discourse analysis of 760 free-text responses to a question about contraceptive choice considers the social and political climate that promotes the self-governed woman who freely chooses contraception. We examine the ways in which women formulated and defended their accounts of choice, focusing on the theme of free contraceptive choice that constructed women's choices as unconstrained by material, social and political forces. We identify two discursive strategies that underpinned this theme: a woman's body, a woman's choice and planning parenthood, and explore the ways in which choice was understood as a gendered entitlement and how contraceptive choices were shaped (and constrained) by women's plans for parenthood. We discuss the implications of these discursive strategies, and neoliberal and postfeminist discourses, in terms of the disallowance of any contextual, social and structural factors, including the absence of men in the 'contraceptive economy'. PMID:26670866

  2. [Emergency contraception].

    PubMed

    Bastianelli, C; Farris, M; Di Miscia, A

    2006-06-01

    A specific formulation has been approved for use in Italy for emergency contraception (EC) in 2000. As expected, marketing of this levonorgestrel (LNG) only formulation has been accompanied by an increased interest and, often, controversies leading to even strong opposition on the part of those ethically opposed to the use of any method that may act after fertilization. At present, several trials on the exact mechanism of action and safety have been conducted, giving good reason for simplifying access, providing it free or over the counter, in several European countries. EC, also known as ''the morning after pill'' or postcoital contraception, is a modality of preventing the establishment of an unwanted pregnancy after unprotected intercourse and thus, probably, of reducing the number of voluntary pregnancy terminations. Two different forms are available: the hormonal and the intrauterine. Hormonal estrogen only EC was first proposed in the 60s and in 1974 Yuzpe following his studies proposed for the first time his combined regimen, that showed better efficacy and lower side effects. More recently, a new regimen, consisting of LNG, administered alone at the dose of 1.5 mg, was introduced and found in clinical trials to be more effective than the Yuzpe regimen, if taken as early as possible, within 72 h, thereby replacing the latter in common use. Mechanism of action of both hormonal preparations used for EC is inhibiting or delaying ovulation, therefore a prefertilization action. No effect has been reported on the process of implantation nor on an ongoing pregnancy. The WHO have developed a third regimen based on the use of the selective progesterone receptor modulator (antiprogestin) Mifepristone and conducted trials with different dosages, reporting similar efficacy and safety compared to LNG. Intrauterine EC was first proposed by Lippes in 1976. It has the advantage of being effective if inserted within 5 days after unprotected intercourse and the disadvantage

  3. Clinical use of deslorelin implants for the long-term contraception in prepubertal bitches: effects on epiphyseal closure, body development, and time to puberty.

    PubMed

    Kaya, D; Schäfer-Somi, S; Kurt, B; Kuru, M; Kaya, S; Kaçar, C; Aksoy, Ö; Aslan, S

    2015-04-15

    Long-acting GnRH agonists have been used both for canine estrus induction and prevention. The objective of the study was to investigate the use of a deslorelin implant as a long-term and reversible contraceptive in prepubertal bitches with special regard to the time of epiphyseal closure. Thirteen healthy, crossbreed, medium-sized prepubertal female dogs were used in this study. An implant containing 9.4 mg (G1, n = 5) and 4.7 mg (G2, n = 4) deslorelin acetate (Suprelorin) or a placebo (sodium chloride 0.9%; G3, n = 4) was inserted subcutaneously in the interscapular region. Estrus was monitored once daily by physical and sexual behavioral changes. Body development, vaginal cytology, and serum progesterone and estradiol 17β concentration were monitored weekly for the first 5 weeks, and then every 3 weeks throughout the treatment period. Radiographic examinations were performed monthly to determine the epiphyseal closure. Half of the deslorelin-treated bitches (G1: n = 2 and G2: n = 2) came into estrus during the 83-week observation period. All animals in the control group showed estrus between the 39th and 64th weeks of observation. Time to puberty averaged 82.7 ± 8.9 and 61.9 ± 9.7 weeks in the deslorelin-treated (G1 and G2) and the control bitches, respectively (P < 0.02). Both deslorelin implants (9.4 and 4.7 mg) can be used efficiently for the long-term prevention of estrus in prepubertal bitches; however, epiphyseal closure is clearly delayed which was without any clinical effect in the present study. PMID:25619808

  4. Regulation of the synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol in water bodies in Europe, the United States, and Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Danieli Lima; da Silva, Samuel Muylaert Camargo; Bila, Daniele Maia; Oliveira, Jaime Lopes da Mota; Sarcinelli, Paula de Novaes; Larentis, Ariane Leites

    2016-03-01

    The synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol, the principal component of oral contraceptives, has been identified as one of the main compounds accounting for adverse effects on the endocrine system in various species. This study aimed to analyze the state-of-the-art in legislation and guidelines for the control of this synthetic estrogen in water bodies in Europe and the United States and to draw a parallel with the Brazilian reality. Countries have generally attempted to expand the regulation and monitoring of certain emerging micropollutants not previously covered by legislation. Europe is more advanced in terms of water quality, while in the United States this estrogen is only regulated in water for human consumption. Brazil still lacks legal provisions or standards for this estrogen, which can be explained by the relatively limited maturity of the country's system for controlling water pollutants. PMID:27027456

  5. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ott, Mary A; Sucato, Gina S

    2014-10-01

    A working knowledge of contraception will assist the pediatrician in both sexual health promotion as well as treatment of common adolescent gynecologic problems. Best practices in adolescent anticipatory guidance and screening include a sexual health history, screening for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, counseling, and if indicated, providing access to contraceptives. Pediatricians' long-term relationships with adolescents and families allow them to help promote healthy sexual decision-making, including abstinence and contraceptive use. Additionally, medical indications for contraception, such as acne, dysmenorrhea, and heavy menstrual bleeding, are frequently uncovered during adolescent visits. This technical report provides an evidence base for the accompanying policy statement and addresses key aspects of adolescent contraceptive use, including the following: (1) sexual history taking, confidentiality, and counseling; (2) adolescent data on the use and side effects of newer contraceptive methods; (3) new data on older contraceptive methods; and (4) evidence supporting the use of contraceptives in adolescent patients with complex medical conditions. PMID:25266435

  6. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Contraception is a pillar in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians develop a working knowledge of contraception to help adolescents reduce risks of and negative health consequences related to unintended pregnancy. Over the past 10 years, a number of new contraceptive methods have become available to adolescents, newer guidance has been issued on existing contraceptive methods, and the evidence base for contraception for special populations (adolescents who have disabilities, are obese, are recipients of solid organ transplants, or are HIV infected) has expanded. The Academy has addressed contraception since 1980, and this policy statement updates the 2007 statement on contraception and adolescents. It provides the pediatrician with a description and rationale for best practices in counseling and prescribing contraception for adolescents. It is supported by an accompanying technical report. PMID:25266430

  7. Permanent contraception for women.

    PubMed

    Micks, Elizabeth A; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2015-11-01

    Permanent methods of contraception are used by an estimated 220 million couples worldwide, and are often selected due to convenience, ease of use and lack of side effects. A variety of tubal occlusion techniques are available for female permanent contraception, and procedures can be performed using a transcervical or transabdominal approach. This article reviews currently available techniques for female permanent contraception and discusses considerations when helping patients choose a contraceptive method and tubal occlusion technique. PMID:26626698

  8. [Contraception in French teenage girls in 2007].

    PubMed

    Robin, G; Massart, P; Letombe, B

    2007-10-01

    The two main objectives of adolescence contraception are the eviction of involuntary pregnancies and the prevention of sexually transmitted infections. In France, in spite of our rich contraceptive arsenal and a widely spread information, the rate of voluntary termination of pregnancy keeps growing among the teenagers population--and this, probably because the gap between theoretical effectiveness and practice of contraception is particularly wide among the young people. Every contraceptive means can be used by teenagers; the best option being, it seems, the "double DUTCH", which consists of concomitant use of condoms and hormonal contraception. Most often, the consultation for contraception is the first gynaecological consultation. That is the reason why it is usually stressful for teenagers who dread undergoing a gynaecological examination. If this examination is not necessary for most of young patients, it is essential to create a trustful relationship and to make explicit the several contraceptive methods. During this consultation it is interesting to look for common teenage troubles like addiction to smoking and eating disorders. For any prescription of hormonal contraception, it is important to explain the benefits and the possible side effects, to stress the observance and to tell the teenager about the recommendations in case of forgetting. Concerning condom - the only efficient way of preventing sexually transmitted infections--, it is useful to talk about it in concrete and straightforward terms, to show its handling and to inform about risks of tearing. With this state of mind, an emergency contraception can be prescribed straightaway in order to make its use easier. Also, without any moralizing speech, the need for maturity must be emphasized as well as taking care of one's body with the aim of avoiding a premature pregnancy or any sexually transmitted infection. This consultation must be coupled with a close follow-up, availability and mutual

  9. Searching for Ideal Contraceptives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djerassi, Carl

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the problem of adolescent pregnancy and focuses on improving contraception as a practical solution. Describes the advantages and disadvantages of existing methods (the condom, the pill, and the contraceptive sponge). Predicts that the development of a fundamentally new contraceptive, such as a monthly menses-inducer pill, will not occur…

  10. Medicinal plants: conception / contraception.

    PubMed

    Chaing, H S; Merino-chavez, G; Yang, L L; Wang, F N; Hafez, E S

    1994-01-01

    Researchers have conducted considerable experiments on the effectiveness and therapeutic values of Chinese herbs and parts of plants. We should not ignore the significance of natural medicine. The Chinese have been perfecting medicinal therapy based on the raw ingredients of plants/herbs and their derivatives for thousands of years. Chinese practitioners of traditional medicine prescribe medicines based on yin and yang. Traditional medicine is communicated in a verb or written form. Natural resources used in traditional medicine to treat diseases are not limited to just medicinal plants but also include animals, shell fish, and minerals. Parts of plants used in traditional medicine are leaves, stems, flowers, bark, and root. Chinese medicine is the world's oldest continuous surviving tradition. The Chinese experimented with local plants, often resulting in mild to violent reactions. This process allowed them to become familiar with poisonous plants and those that could relieve pain or successfully treat illness. Current allopathic medicines are composed of synthetic compounds copied from natural chemical derivatives, which tend to be more potent than the original compound. Some medicinal plants used to effect conception/contraception include Striga astiatica (contraceptive); Eurycoma longifolia (male virility); and a mixture of lengkuas, mengkudu masak, black pepper seeds, ginger, salt, and 2 eggs (increase libido). Women in Malaysia take jamu to preserve their body shape and to provide nutrition during pregnancy. Praneem causes local cell-mediated immunity in the uterus. Clinical trials of Praneem with or without the hCG vaccine are planned. PMID:12287843

  11. Diatomological mapping of water bodies--a future perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajvinder; Deepa; Kaur, Ramanjeet

    2013-08-01

    Corpse floating in running or stagnant water may not keep a tail of its exact place of drowning. Disagreement between diatoms recovered from the body and those in the presumed drowning medium may possibly advocate that body has been moved from its exact site of drowning. It emphasizes on the importance of water sampling from where the body is found. Diatomological Mapping (D-Mapping) of water bodies assumes to be an important means to solve this problem even when reference water sample is not available. Information of the present attempt has been exercised to scratch the authenticity of D-maps of these four water bodies after a gap of four years (2007-2011). Current records have been found interesting and significant for the authenticity of D-maps for a prolong characterization of water bodies. PMID:23910847

  12. Contraception and Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Pieh Holder, Kelly Lynne

    2015-12-01

    Postpartum contraception is important to lengthening birth intervals and improving the health of women and children. For breastfeeding women the choice and timing of contraception may influence breastfeeding and infant growth patterns. Nonhormonal methods of contraception are the preferred choice for breastfeeding women. Progestin-only methods comprise a viable next option. Combined hormonal methods of contraception containing estrogen and progestin may be considered as a third option for birth control in breastfeeding women. The objective of this chapter is to review the current literature and recommendations for the use of hormonal and nonhormonal methods of contraception while breastfeeding. PMID:26457854

  13. Contraception and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Afsana, Faria

    2016-09-01

    Contraception for women with diabetes mellitus is an important issue mainly as the pregnancy outcome depends on glycaemic control before conception among women with diabetes. Type of diabetes as type 1 or type 2 Diabetes, women with history of gestational diabetes and breast feeding diabetic mothers may be a consideration in selecting a contraceptive .On the other hand presence of diabetic complications is a significant determinant. Different methods of contraception as oral, injectable, implant, intrauterine devices are available. Patient\\'s choice and health issues both should be considered while prescribing a contraceptive to a woman with diabetes. Emergency contraception is sometimes required in situations where there is chance of contraceptive failure. This review article highlights different contraceptive methods, their use and limitations and will guide to make a rational choice for a woman with diabetes. PMID:27582166

  14. Detection of water bodies in Saline County, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, B. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A total of 2,272 water bodies were mapped in Saline County, Kansas in 1972 using ERTS-1 imagery. A topographic map of 1955 shows 1,056 water bodies in the county. The major increase took place in farm ponds. Preliminary comparison of image and maps indicates that water bodies larger than ten acres in area proved consistently detectable. Most water areas between four and ten acres are also detectable, although occasionally image context prevents detection. Water areas less than four acres in extent are sometimes detected, but the number varies greatly depending on image context and the individual interpretor.

  15. Estrogen and Progestin (Oral Contraceptives)

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome [AIDS]) and other sexually transmitted diseases.Some brands of oral contraceptives are also used to treat ... your doctor.Oral contraceptives come in many different brands. Different brands of oral contraceptives contain slightly different ...

  16. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health PCOS: The Oral Contraceptive Pill Posted under Health Guides . ... of oral contraceptive pills for young women with PCOS? Regular and Lighter Periods: Oral contraceptive pills can ...

  17. On the representation of many-body interactions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Medders, Gregory; Gotz, Andreas; Morales, Miguel A.; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-09

    Recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interaction energy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. It is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representation of the water interactions from the gas to the condensed phase. Similarly, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water.

  18. Mathematical modeling of the human body during water replacement and dehydration: body water changes.

    PubMed

    Downey, D; Seagrave, R C

    2000-03-01

    A model of the human body that integrates the variables involved in temperature regulation and blood gas transport within the cardiovascular and respiratory systems is presented here. It expands upon previous work to describe the competition between skin and muscles when both require increased blood flows during exercise and/or heat stress. First, a detailed study of the control relations used to predict skin blood flow was undertaken. Four other control relations employed in the model were also examined and modified as indicated by empirical results found in literature. Internal responses to exercise and/or heat stress can affect both thermoregulation and the cardiorespiratory system. Dehydration was studied in addition to complete water replacement during similar environmental and exercise situations. Control relations for skin blood flow and evaporative heat loss were modified and a water balance was added to study how the loss of water through sweat can be limiting. Runoff from sweating as a function of relative humidity was introduced along with evaporation, and these results were compared to data to validate the model. PMID:10784092

  19. Unexpected sequelae of contraception.

    PubMed

    Dunn, H P

    1996-01-01

    Dissident Roman Catholic theologians who promote the use of contraception have ignored the fact that contraception separates the loving aspect of sex from its fertile nature (which does not imply fecundity). While there is no obligation for Roman Catholics to achieve pregnancy, no interference with fertility is allowed. The importance of this seeming technicality can be seen when considering that contraception offers sex without babies and in vitro fertilization allows babies to be conceived without sexual intercourse. Barrier methods of contraception make sexual intercourse impure in a way similar to masturbation, oral contraceptives generally suppress ovulation but may also act as an abortifacient, and the IUD is an abortifacient, as are other hormonal methods and menstrual extraction. Sterilization and abortion are serious moral faults. Contraception is the first step towards the prevailing antinatalism that will cause demographic collapse in rich countries because there is a progression from contraception to sterilization to abortion. Rather than leading to fewer abortions, acceptance of contraception leads to more. This distressing sequence can be extended to include masturbation at one end and homosexuality at the other. Acceptance of contraception encourages all premarital and extramarital sexual intercourse and has depreciated the value of marriage. Rejection of child-bearing has exacerbated the estrangement of teenagers from parents who chose sterile sex and money over siblings for their children. Contraception fuels fears about a population explosion when people should be regarded as important resources. Finally, contraception has contributed to the shortage of those choosing religious vocations because it has demeaned their sacrifice of celibacy. The only permitted method of family limitation, therefore, is ovulation detection. PMID:12320545

  20. On the representation of many-body interactions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Medders, Gregory R.; Gotz, Andreas W.; Morales, Miguel A.; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-09

    Our recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interactionenergy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. Moreover, it is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representation of the waterinteractions from the gas to the condensed phase. Likewise, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water.

  1. Confirming the most water-rich extrasolar rocky body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, Carl

    2014-10-01

    Most theories of exobiology require liquid water for a planet to be considered as habitable. Yet, very little is known about the prevalence of water for mature rocky objects in extrasolar planetary systems. A unique method of probing the existence, characteristics, and frequency of extrasolar water-bearing rocky bodies is through examining their bulk composition after they have been accreted by their host white dwarf star. Results to date show that water-rich extrasolar rocky bodies are rare. Evidence for oxygen in ground-based spectroscopy of SDSSJ104341.53+085558.2 suggests that it could be accreting the most water-rich extrasolar rocky object currently known. We propose COS ultraviolet spectroscopy to confirm the water-rich nature and characterize the mineralogy of the rocky body being accreted by this white dwarf star.

  2. Spatial Distribution of Small Water Body Types across Indiana Ecoregions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to their large numbers and biogeochemical activity, small water bodies (SWB), such as ponds and wetlands, can have substantial cumulative effects on hydrologic, biogeochemical, and biological processes; yet the spatial distributions of various SWB types are often unknown. Usi...

  3. Spatial Distribution of Small Water Body Types in Indiana Ecoregions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to their large numbers and biogeochemical activity, small water bodies (SWBs), such as ponds and wetlands, can have substantial cumulative effects on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes. Using updated National Wetland Inventory data, we describe the spatial distribution o...

  4. Social marketing of contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Schellstede, W P; Derr, B B

    1986-12-01

    Application of commercial marketing techniques has not only increased awareness, acceptability, and use of modern contraceptives in developing countries, but also overcome logistic problems in service delivery. The ability of contraceptive social marketing to reach large numbers and to treat contraceptives as common consumer products has helped to diminish social and religious constraints associated with family planning. Each contraceptive social marketing program is built around a theme tailored to meet specific cultural, social, and management requirements. The primary target populations are those who cannot afford regular commercial products and those who are not adequately reached by government programs. In countries such as Sri Lanka and Jamaica, profit is not a primary sales objective and retail prices are highly subsidized to make products affordable to low-income people. In contrast, the Colombian and Thai programs use contraceptive social marketing to help offset the operating costs of rural community-based programs and seek profits. The most impressive contraceptive social marketing sales performances have been recorded in Bangladesh, Colombia, Egypt, and Jamaica. The main reason contraceptive social marketing is more cost-efficient than other modes of contraceptive distribution is that the cost of product delivery is assumed by the commercial system. Although there has been some interest in making these programs self-sufficient financially, this step has tended to undermine the purpose of serving lower income groups. PMID:12341233

  5. Male Adolescent Contraceptive Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Madelon Lubin; Finkel, David J.

    1978-01-01

    The contraceptive utilization of a sample of sexually active, urban, high school males (Black, Hispanic, and White) was examined by anonymous questionnaire. Contraceptive use was haphazard, but White males tended to be more effective contraceptors than the other two groups. Reasons for nonuse were also studied. (Author/SJL)

  6. [Contraception and obesity].

    PubMed

    Lobert, M; Pigeyre, M; Gronier, H; Catteau-Jonard, S; Robin, G

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing massively over several decades in industrialized countries. Obese women are sexually active but they use fewer contraceptive methods and are at high risk of unintended pregnancy. In addition, obesity is an important risk factor for venous thromboembolism events and arterial thrombosis (myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke). All of these data are to be considered in choosing a contraceptive method for obese women. Except depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection, the progestin-only contraceptives (progestin only pills and etonogestrel subdermal implant) and the intra-uterine devices are the preferred contraceptive methods in obese women. The combined estrogen-progestin contraceptives (pill, patch and vaginal ring) may be proposed in very strict conditions (no other associated vascular risk factor). Obesity does not increase the risk of failure of most contraceptive methods. Bariatric surgery is a complex situation. It requires to program a possible pregnancy and contraception is needed for several months. Some bariatric surgical techniques such as by-pass can induce gastrointestinal malabsorption. In this situation, all oral contraceptives are not recommended because of a higher risk of failure. PMID:26527416

  7. Oral contraceptive drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Baciewicz, A M

    1985-01-01

    Approximately 50 million women use oral contraceptives (OC). Studies and case reports demonstrate that OC failure may be caused by rifampin, anticonvulsant drugs, and possibly some antibiotics. Contraceptive steroids may interfere with the metabolism of the benzodiazepines, theophylline, and the glucocorticoids. Future investigation will document the clinical significance of other OC interactions as well as give rise to new interactions. PMID:2859674

  8. Body water content of extremely preterm infants at birth

    PubMed Central

    Hartnoll, G.; Betremieux, P.; Modi, N.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Preterm birth is often associated with impaired growth. Small for gestational age status confers additional risk.
AIM—To determine the body water content of appropriately grown (AGA) and small for gestational age (SGA) preterm infants in order to provide a baseline for longitudinal studies of growth after preterm birth.
METHODS—All infants born at the Hammersmith and Queen Charlotte's Hospitals between 25 and 30 weeks gestational age were eligible for entry into the study. Informed parental consent was obtained as soon after delivery as possible, after which the extracellular fluid content was determined by bromide dilution and total body water by H218O dilution.
RESULTS—Forty two preterm infants were studied. SGA infants had a significantly higher body water content than AGA infants (906 (833-954) and 844 (637-958) ml/kg respectively; median (range); p = 0.019). There were no differences in extracellular and intracellular fluid volumes, nor in the ratio of extracellular to intracellular fluid. Estimates of relative adiposity suggest a body fat content of about 7% in AGA infants, assuming negligible fat content in SGA infants and lean body tissue hydration to be equivalent in the two groups.
CONCLUSIONS—Novel values for the body water composition of the SGA preterm infant at 25-30 weeks gestation are presented. The data do not support the view that SGA infants have extracellular dehydration, nor is their regulation of body water impaired.

 PMID:10873174

  9. Hormonal contraception and lactation.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J J

    1996-12-01

    Hormonal contraceptive measures can be used immediately postpartum if the patient so desires. Progestin-only contraceptives are preferable to estrogen-containing methods if initiated during the first six months after delivery. Progestin only contraceptives do not appear to affect milk volume, composition, or to cause deleterious effects in the infant. Ideally for women who desire a form of contraception in addition to lactation-induced amenorrhea, progestin-only methods should be started at six weeks postpartum if the woman is fully breastfeeding. Since contraception protection is provided by lactation amenorrhea, the six week delay will decrease infant exposure to exogenous hormones and decrease the incidence of irregular postpartum bleeding. Milk volume may decrease with the use of estrogen; however, no detrimental effects have been shown on infant growth or development. For women who are planning to gradually wean their infant, use of COCs may provide an easier transition to bottle-feeding. COCs should be used with caution by women who are not able to obtain supplemental milk. A decrease in milk volume can lead to earlier discontinuation of the hormonal contraceptive in an attempt to increase milk quantity. Supplementation is often needed, and then the woman ovulates again, possibly resulting in an unintended pregnancy. Many women are motivated immediately postpartum to accept contraception. For other women, lack of access to health care may provide barriers in obtaining adequate contraception later. In either case, there are adequate data to show no detriments of starting progestin-only contraceptives within days of delivery. Therefore, the best method for the patient should be employed to ensure adequate contraception while preserving optimal lactation. PMID:9025449

  10. [Community marketing of contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Urrutia, J M

    1987-09-01

    The 5-year-old community contraceptive distribution program developed by PROFAMILIA, Colombia's private family planning organization, has given excellent results, but several cost-effectiveness comparisons with social marketing programs have suggested that commercial distribution programs are superior. The community contraceptive distribution program has a high content of information and education activities, which produced significant increases in knowledge and use of contraception in the communities covered. It has been a fundamental support for the social marketing program, creating much of the demand for contraceptive products that the social marketing program has filled. The social marketing program has given good results in terms of volume of sales and in cost-effectiveness since 1976, prompting calls for replacement of the community contraceptive distribution program by the social marketing program in those sectors where knowledge and use of contraception have achieved acceptable levels. An experiment in the Department of Santander in 1984 and 1985 gave very favorable results, suggesting that community contraceptive distribution programs should be replaced by social marketing programs in all more developed markets. But economic problems in 1985 and the decision of manufacturers to decrease the profit margin for PROFAMILIA jeopardized the social marketing program. The community distribution program covered about 20% of the market. Reduced profits in the social marketing program threatened its continued expansion, at the same time that potential demand was growing because of increases in the fertile aged population and increased use of contraception. To meet the need, PROFAMILIA combined the community contraceptive distribution and social marketing programs into a new entity to be called community marketing. The strategy of the community marketing program will be to maintain PROFAMILIA's participation in the market and aid the growth of demand for

  11. A ground-water inventory of the Waialua basal-water body, Island of Oahu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dale, Robert H.

    1978-01-01

    The Waialua basal-water body underlies an area of about 18 square miles on the north shore of the island of Oahu, Hawaii. The basal-water body is a body of fresh ground water that floats on saline ground water in a highly permeable and porous basaltic aquifer. Inflow to the basal-water body is from the deep infiltration of applied irrigation water and from leakage through a low permeability ground-water dam. Outflow from the basal-water body is from basal-water pumpage and leakage through low-permeability boundaries that separate the basal-water body from the ocean. The basal-water flux, computed as either the sum of the inflow terms or the sum of the outflow terms, is about the same value. The basal-water flux is 55 million gallons per day, (206,000 cubic meters per day), based on the sum of the outflow terms. The effective porosity was computed at 0.09 by a time-series analysis of the covariations in deep infiltration, pumpage, and basal-water head. The volume of basal water in storage is estimated to be 1.4 x 1011 gallons (5.4 x 108 cubic meters). Pumpage from the basal-water body can be increased. The most efficient development method is the skimming shaft. If shafts were used, an additional 15 million gallons per day could be pumped on a sustained basis.

  12. Barrier methods of contraception.

    PubMed

    Skrine, R L

    1985-05-01

    Barrier methods of contraception make up an essential part of the present contraceptive range, and doctors need to know in detail how to choose and fit them as well as how to instruct patients in their use. This discussion reviews the mode of action of the barrier method and then focuses on the vaginal diaphragm, the cervical or vault cap, the collatex (Today) sponge, condoms, emotionl problems associated with the use of barrier methods, advantages of barrier methods, and future developments. Barrier methods of contraception are only effective if used consistently and carefully. Failure rates vary greatly between studies, but in selected populations the failure rate for the diaphragm with spermicide can be as low as 1.9/100 woman years (wy) and for the condom 3.6 per 100wy (Vessey et al., 1982). If known user failures are removed, the figure for the condom can drop to as low as 0.4 per 100wy (John, 1973), which compares favorably with that of the combined oral contraceptive. Other studies quote failure rates of 10 per 100wy or more. These methods call for considerable participation by the patient at or before each act of intercourse and there is, therefore, great scope for inefficient use, either as a result of poor instruction or because couples find that they interfere with happy, relaxed sexual activity -- or fear that they may do so. Doctors need to understand the feelings of their patients before recommending them. The aim of a barrier method is to prevent live sperm from meeting the ovum. This is accomplished by the combination of a physical barrier with a spermicide. In the case of the condom, the integrity of the physical barrier is the most important factor, although some patients feel more secure with an additional spermicide. The vaginal barriers used at present do not produce a "water-tight" fit, and the principle is that the spermicide is held over the cervix by the barrier. It is also possible that the device acts partially by holding the alkaline

  13. The 1998 Canadian Contraception Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, William A.; Boroditsky, Richard; Bridges, Martha L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the 1998 Canadian Contraception Study, a mailed survey which asked women about contraceptive practices past, present, and future (including use of oral contraceptives, condoms, and sterilization); familiarity with and opinion about different contraception methods; and general sexual and reproductive health. The paper also examines…

  14. Validation of Geoland2 small water bodies product: methodological overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaffer, S.; Kidd, R. A.; Haas, E. M.; Wagner, W.

    2012-04-01

    Remote sensing products covering the dynamics of small water bodies are important for diverse applications such as hydrology, monitoring of endangered wetlands and natural resources management. The goal of this study is to provide a scientific validation of the BioPar Water Bodies demonstration product derived from SPOT-VEGETATION data within the framework of the EU-funded project GMES-Geoland2. The demonstration product covers Africa during a time span of 1.5 years with a spatial resolution of 1 km and a temporal resolution of 10 days. A description of the product and the underlying algorithms is given in this paper. The validation effort described here is in agreement with level 1 of the validation methodology proposed by the CEOS (Committee on Earth Observation Satellites) Working Group on Calibration and Validation. In order to provide an independent dataset for validation, time series from the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard ESA's ENVISAT are processed and analysed. Radar data offer a data source which is fundamentally different from the optical data acquired by SPOT-VEGETATION. Time series acquired by ASAR in Wide Swath (WS) mode with a resolution of 150 m have been successfully used to estimate flood extent in boreal and arctic regions. Water bodies cause incoming microwave radiation to be reflected away from the sensor so that they show up as dark areas in the resulting imagery. In a first step, a synthesis map is produced showing water bodies which persisted at least during half of the validation period. The ability of the BioPar product to detect these water bodies is then tested on a number of sites scattered throughout Sub-Saharan Africa. The original approach for water bodies detection with ASAR, a simple thresholding, proved insufficient due to the sparse coverage of ASAR WS data at low latitudes and the occurrence of very dry soil surfaces in semi-arid climates which can be confused with water bodies when using such a simple

  15. Diabetes and oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Gourdy, Pierre

    2013-02-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically worldwide, resulting in more and more women of reproductive age being affected by either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Management of contraception is a major issue due to the specific risks associated with pregnancy and those potentially induced by hormonal contraceptives in diabetic women. This review emphasizes the urgent need to improve the use of contraception in women with diabetes. There is no consistent evidence that combined oral contraceptives significantly influence the risk of developing diabetes, even in women with a history of gestational diabetes. Furthermore, although data from specific studies remain sparse, no worsening effect has been reported in diabetic women, either in glycemic control or on the course of microvascular complications. Thus, the use of estroprogestive pills is now recognized as a safe and effective option for preconception care of women with uncomplicated diabetes. According to recent guidelines, these contraceptives must be avoided in case of associated cardiovascular risk factors, cardiovascular disease or severe microvascular complications such as nephropathy with proteinuria or active proliferative retinopathy. Prescription of combined hormonal contraception in type 2 diabetic women must also be considered with caution due to a frequent association with obesity and vascular risk factors which increase both thromboembolic and arterial risks. Thanks to their metabolic and vascular safety profile, progestin-only contraceptives, as well as non-hormonal methods, represent alternatives according to patient wishes. PMID:23384747

  16. Adolescent Contraception: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Pavilanis, Alan V.

    1988-01-01

    Adolescents are sexual beings who are undergoing important biological and social changes. Physicians must recognize the need for contraception in their teenage patients and realize when teenagers are asking for contraception. In order to deal effectively with the question of birth control, the physician must be comfortable with the issues of adolescent development and sexuality, as well as with his of her own sexuality. The birth-control pill remains the contraceptive prescription of choice, but other methods of birth control are discussed as well. Physicians must also be prepared to validate a teenager's decision not to engage in intercourse. PMID:21253171

  17. Ingested water equilibrates isotopically with the body water pool of a shorebird with unrivaled water fluxes.

    PubMed

    Visser, G H; Dekinga, A; Achterkamp, B; Piersma, T

    2000-11-01

    We investigated the applicability of (2)H to measure the amount of body water (TBW) and water fluxes in relation to diet type and level of food intake in a mollusk-eating shorebird, the Red Knot (Calidris canutus). Six birds were exposed to eight experimental indoor conditions. Average fractional (2)H turnover rates ranged between 0. 182 day(-1) (SD = 0.0219) for fasting birds and 7.759 day(-1) (SD = 0.4535) for birds feeding on cockles (Cerastoderma edule). Average TBW estimates obtained with the plateau method were within the narrow range of 75.9-85.4 g (or between 64.6 and 70.1% of the body mass). Those obtained with the extrapolation method showed strong day-to-day variations (range 55.7-83.7 g, or between 49.7 and 65.5%). Average difference between the two calculation methods ranged between 0.6% and 36.3%, and this difference was strongly negatively correlated with water flux rate. Average water influx rates ranged between 15.5 g/day (fasting) and 624.5 g/day (feeding on cockles). The latter value is at 26.6 times the allometrically predicted value and is the highest reported to date. Differences in (2)H concentrations between the blood and feces (i.e., biological fractionation) were small but significant (-3.4% when fed a pellet diet, and -1.1% for all the other diets), and did not relate to the rate of water flux (chi(2)(1) = 0.058, P < 0.81). We conclude that the ingested water equilibrated rapidly with the body water pool even in an avian species that shows record water flux rates when living on ingested marine bivalves. PMID:11049863

  18. Contraceptive use in acne.

    PubMed

    Lam, Charlene; Zaenglein, Andrea L

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is an inflammatory disorder of the pilosebaceous follicle. It is well established that androgen hormones play a major role in sebum production and excretion, and are vital in the pathogenesis of acne. Isotretinoin notwithstanding, hormonal therapies such as combined oral contraceptives (COCs) and spironolactone are the only treatments that can affect sebum production and the androgen component of acne. Contraceptives are also used during isotretinoin therapy for pregnancy prevention. It is important for a dermatologist to be familiar with all the available methods of contraception to provide essential counseling to patients. The aim of this paper is to review the role of hormones in acne pathogenesis, discuss the use of hormonal therapies for acne, and detail various alternative contraceptive methods in relation to isotretinoin treatment and pregnancy prevention. PMID:25017461

  19. Contraception and Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... health, age, frequency of sexual activity, number of sexual partners, desire to have children in the future, and family history of certain diseases. Individuals should consult their health care provider to ... methods of contraception include: Barrier —physically ...

  20. On the representation of many-body interactions in water

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Medders, Gregory; Gotz, Andreas; Morales, Miguel A.; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-09

    Recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interaction energy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. It is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representation ofmore » the water interactions from the gas to the condensed phase. Similarly, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water.« less

  1. Contraception in Turkey.

    PubMed

    1967-01-01

    Population control and the use of contraceptives were discusses at the biannual meeting of the Turkish Academy of Medicine in September 1966. This was of special importance because contraception and dissemination of information about it were illegal in Turkey for many years before 1965. Thus, until quite recently Turkish doctors had only limited experience of modern contraceptive methods. Oral contraceptives and IUDs were discussed at the Academy meeting, and Dr Nusret Fisek has sent the Bulletin a summary of the main points raises. Oral contraceptives: Only minor side-effects were found and were ignored or easily treated; they disappeared when the oral contraception was stopped. Serious conditions such as liver dysfunction, thromboembolic phenomena, and diabetes have not been found. Intra-uterine devices: Endometritis requiring treatment is infrequent. In 23 of 45 women who had used IUDs for six months, endometrial histology showed diffuse bleeding, endometrial oedema or lymphocyctic endometritis. Expulsion and medical removal rates for IUDs over a six-month period were 5% in one clinic and 12% in another, with a pregnancy rate of between 1.2%. There was only one perforation in 6000 insertions. The doctor's attitude had a great influence on removal and discontinuation rates. In a large maternity hospital the Medical Board accepted, as a medical reason for induced abortion, accidental pregnancies that occurred in women wearing IUDs. PMID:12304991

  2. History of oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product. PMID:21091163

  3. Water and the thermal evolution of carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimm, Robert E.; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Two hypotheses are proposed for the aqueous alteration of carbonaceous chondrites within their parent bodies, in which respectively the alteration occurs (1) throughout the parent body interior, or (2) in a postaccretional surface regolith; both models assume an initially homogeneous mixture of ice and rock that is heated through the decay of Al-26. Water is seen to exert a powerful influence on chondrite evolution through its role of thermal buffer, permitting substitution of a low temperature aqueous alteration for high temperature recrystallization. It is quantitatively demonstrated that liquid water may be introduced by either hydrothermal circulation, vapor diffusion from below, or venting due to fracture.

  4. Introducing A Global Dataset Of Open Permanent Water Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Maurizio; Lamarche, Celine; Bontemps, Sophie; Wegmuller, Urs; Kalogirou, Vasileios; Arino, Oliver; Defourny, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a 300-m global map of open permanent water bodies derived from multi-temporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. The SAR dataset consisted of images of the radar backscatter acquired by Envisat Advanced SAR(ASAR) in Wide Swath Mode (WSM, 150 m spatial resolution) between 2005 and 2010. Extended time series of WSM to 2012, Image Mode Medium resolution (IMM) and Global Monitoring Mode (GMM) data have been used to fill gaps. Using as input the temporal variability (TV) of the backscatter and the minimum backscatter (MB), a SAR- based indicator of water bodies (SAR-WBI) has been generated for all continents with a previously validated thresholding algorithm and local refinements. The accuracy of the SAR-WBI is 80%; a threshold of 50% has been used for the land/water fraction in the case of mixed pixels. Correction of inconsistencies with respect to auxiliary datasets, completion of gaps and aggregation to 300 m were applied to obtain the final global water body map referred to as Climate Change Initiative Land Cover Water Body (CCI-LC WB) Product.

  5. Contraception: Efficacy, Risks, Continuation Rates, and Use in High-Risk Women.

    PubMed

    Batur, Pelin; Bowersox, Natalie; McNamara, Megan

    2016-08-01

    The clinical update serves as a brief review of recently published, high-impact, and potentially practice-changing journal articles summarized for our readers. Topics include menopause, sexual dysfunction, breast health, contraception, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease. In this clinical update, we selected recent publications relevant to the use of contraceptive methods. We highlight articles on continuation rates of long-acting reversible contraception versus nonlong-acting methods, updated risks of intrauterine devices, use of estrogen-containing contraceptives during anticoagulation for venous thromboembolic events, and the efficacy of oral and emergency contraception in women with elevated body mass index. PMID:27438879

  6. Remote sensing of ephemeral water bodies in western Niger

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Research was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring the small ephemeral water bodies of the Sahel with the 1.1 km resolution data of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). Twenty-one lakes of western Niger with good ground observation records were selected for examination. Thematic Mapper images from 1988 were first analysed to determine surface areas and temperature differences between water and adjacent land. Six AVHRR scenes from the 1988-89 dry season were then studied. It was found that a lake can be monitored until its surface area drops below 10 ha, in most cases. Furthermore, with prior knowledge of the location and shape of a water body, its surface area can be estimated from AVHRR band 5 data to within about 10 ha. These results are explained by the sharp temperature contrast between water and land, on the order of 13?? C.

  7. Lidar point density analysis: implications for identifying water bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worstell, Bruce B.; Poppenga, Sandra; Evans, Gayla A.; Prince, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Most airborne topographic light detection and ranging (lidar) systems operate within the near-infrared spectrum. Laser pulses from these systems frequently are absorbed by water and therefore do not generate reflected returns on water bodies in the resulting void regions within the lidar point cloud. Thus, an analysis of lidar voids has implications for identifying water bodies. Data analysis techniques to detect reduced lidar return densities were evaluated for test sites in Blackhawk County, Iowa, and Beltrami County, Minnesota, to delineate contiguous areas that have few or no lidar returns. Results from this study indicated a 5-meter radius moving window with fewer than 23 returns (28 percent of the moving window) was sufficient for delineating void regions. Techniques to provide elevation values for void regions to flatten water features and to force channel flow in the downstream direction also are presented.

  8. On the representation of many-body interactions in water

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Medders, Gregory R.; Gotz, Andreas W.; Morales, Miguel A.; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-09

    Our recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interactionenergy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. Moreover, it is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representationmore » of the waterinteractions from the gas to the condensed phase. Likewise, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water.« less

  9. Statement on postcoital contraception.

    PubMed

    1981-12-01

    For the woman exposed to a single unexpected and unprotected act of sexual intercourse, postcoital contraception can be used to avoid an unwanted pregnancy. Since the mid-1960s postcoital contraception using orally administered hormones has been found to be highly effective. This should be, however, considered as a 1-time procedure rather than a routine approach to contraception. The recommended oral methods are combined oral contraceptives (OCs) containing ethinyl estradiol 50 mcg and levonorgestrel 0.25 mg. Other similar formulations may also have high efficacy. The dosage schedule is 2 tablets at once followed by 2 tablets after 12 hours. This method is indicated in women exposed to unexpected and unprotected sexual intercourse, such as in cases of rape. It is effective only if it is instituted within 72 hours of the exposure. Data suggest this regime is as effective as that using diethylstilbestrol but with fewer side effects. As with all hormonal contraceptives, the method is contraindicated where a pregnancy is already established. Possible side effects include nausea and vomiting, irregular uterine bleeding, breast tenderness, and headache. The woman should be advised to return after 1 month to reinforce the need for elective contraception or, in the case of failure, to diagnose pregnancy and initiate counseling. In the event of a pregnancy, the woman should be reassured that no evidence exists to associate this regime of OC steroid administration with teratogenesis. Recent evidence indicates that effective postcoital contraceptive can be achieved by the insertion of a copper-containing IUD within 5 days of unprotected, mid-cycle sexual intercourse. PMID:12263975

  10. Total body water and lean body mass estimated by ethanol dilution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Myhre, L. G.; Venters, M. D.; Luft, U. C.

    1977-01-01

    A method for estimating total body water (TBW) using breath analyses of blood ethanol content is described. Regression analysis of ethanol concentration curves permits determination of a theoretical concentration that would have existed if complete equilibration had taken place immediately upon ingestion of the ethanol; the water fraction of normal blood may then be used to calculate TBW. The ethanol dilution method is applied to 35 subjects, and comparison with a tritium dilution method of determining TBW indicates that the correlation between the two procedures is highly significant. Lean body mass and fat fraction were determined by hydrostatic weighing, and these data also prove compatible with results obtained from the ethanol dilution method. In contrast to the radioactive tritium dilution method, the ethanol dilution method can be repeated daily with its applicability ranging from diseased individuals to individuals subjected to thermal stress, strenuous exercise, water immersion, or the weightless conditions of space flights.

  11. Introducing new contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J; Coutinho, E

    1986-12-01

    At this time, private research efforts to discover new contraceptives are threatened. Drug companies, particularly in the US, have reduced their interest in contraceptive development due to concern over the rising cost of product liability insurance, the cost of lawsuits in defense of liability claims, and the fear of extremely high awards by juries in product liability cases. The current form of private-public collaboration, now threatened by the liability crisis, works under a few simple principles of agreement. Private industry agrees to supply its patented chemical compounds for assessment as contraceptive agents, to be willing to enter into negotiations with public sector organizations to develop the contraceptive drugs if initial tests warrant it, and to release compounds to another company if the patent-holder declines to proceed with contraceptive development. The public-sector program agrees to fund the studies, keep the industry informed, and maintain confidentiality. When the technology is discovered by the public sector and is of potential interest to private industry, the collaboration involves other issues. The public agency agrees to supply manufacturing know-how and all biological and clinical information, to license under applicable patents, and to permit cross reference to regulatory agency filings. Private industry agrees to use its best efforts to bring the product to market, to manufacture the product at reduced cost for public sector use, or to provide know-how for others to do so. It also agrees to assume product liability and to grant the public sector agency licenses to any patented improvement in its product. Contraceptive research both within and outside the US is feeling the effects of the US litigious atmosphere. Companies from abroad now wish to steer clear of contraceptive research, even though these companies would be prepared to meet the requirements of the Food and Drug Administration. Contraceptives, considered to be high risk

  12. Innate recognition of water bodies in echolocating bats

    PubMed Central

    Greif, Stefan; Siemers, Björn M.

    2010-01-01

    In the course of their lives, most animals must find different specific habitat and microhabitat types for survival and reproduction. Yet, in vertebrates, little is known about the sensory cues that mediate habitat recognition. In free flying bats the echolocation of insect-sized point targets is well understood, whereas how they recognize and classify spatially extended echo targets is currently unknown. In this study, we show how echolocating bats recognize ponds or other water bodies that are crucial for foraging, drinking and orientation. With wild bats of 15 different species (seven genera from three phylogenetically distant, large bat families), we found that bats perceived any extended, echo-acoustically smooth surface to be water, even in the presence of conflicting information from other sensory modalities. In addition, naive juvenile bats that had never before encountered a water body showed spontaneous drinking responses from smooth plates. This provides the first evidence for innate recognition of a habitat cue in a mammal. PMID:21045825

  13. Contraception in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Riphagen, F E; von Schoultz, B

    1989-06-01

    In 1987, a survey of contraceptive use, knowledge and attitudes was conducted in Sweden by the International Health Foundation (IHF) as part of a multi-country study that has so far involved six other countries in Europe. The women involved, who were aged 15-44, completed a standard questionnaire. The overall percentage use of contraceptive methods, especially the reliable ones, was found to be high (95%). Oral contraception was the most frequently used method, followed by barrier methods and the intrauterine device (IUD). Contraceptive methods were chosen or abandoned mainly because of health reasons and better reliability. Knowledge of fertility proved to be generally good. Medical methods such as oral contraceptives and IUDs were associated with health hazards. In the case of the pill, fears of cardiovascular risks, thrombosis and cancer were widespread, while infection risk and menorrhagia were the most frequently quoted perceived disadvantages of the IUD. Indeed, these two methods suffer from a very negative image among Swedish users. PMID:2752752

  14. Contraception in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Shoupe, D

    1996-06-01

    Contraceptive technology has recently provided the market place with new barrier methods, new progestin oral contraceptives, an injectable contraceptive, the female condom, new male condoms, and the contraceptive implant. During the last decade, epidemiologists have clearly defined the non-contraceptive benefits of current contraceptive methods that include decreased infections, protection from various cancers, protection from many gynecologic problems that lead to surgery, as well as symptomatic relief from many gynecologic conditions. In conjunction with medical specialists, contraceptive researchers have established the increased safety and benefits of various contraceptive choices in women with medical conditions that, until recently, were contra-indications for their use. That these advances have occurred despite multiple legal and scientific assaults gives hope that the field will continue to grow. PMID:8818532

  15. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    MedlinePlus

    Progestin-only oral contraceptives are used to prevent pregnancy. Progestin is a female hormone. It works by preventing the ... mucus and the lining of the uterus. Progestin-only oral contraceptives are a very effective method of ...

  16. [Test your knowledge: contraceptives].

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    A brief self-administered quiz on contraceptive knowledge is presented. The 7 questions ask the reader to explain the mechanism of action of combined oral contraceptives, and why estrogens are used with progestins, and to indicate the main secondary effects of Depo-Provera and implants and the dosage of the "morning-after pill." A multiple-choice question concerns absolute contraindications to combined OC use. One clinical case involves selection of OCs for a woman with a family history of breast cancer and the other requires development of a strategy for reducing high-risk pregnancies and risk of AIDS. PMID:12321847

  17. [Contraception in adolescents].

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    The proportion of women aged 15-19 in Colombia who are mothers declined from 14% in 1985 to 10% in 1990, but the actual number of cases increased due to population growth. Some 1,780,000 adolescents who have had children or are pregnant require family planning services. An additional, unknown number of adolescent pregnancies are terminated by abortion. It is estimated that 95% of adolescent pregnancies diagnosed or followed by PROFAMILIA's center for young people were unwanted. Reasons for making family planning services available to adolescents include the ever young age at initiation of sexual activity, the very low rates of contraceptive usage among sexually active adolescents, the lack of information of adolescents concerning reproduction and contraception, and their fear and guilt surrounding their sexual activity and contraceptive usage. Obstetrical services appear reluctant to furnish adolescent mothers with information on contraception, and the pharmacists and their employees who provide such information may not be aware of contraindications for this age group or whether adolescents are adequately instructed in use of the method. The rising age at marriage increases the span of time that adolescents are at risk of unwanted pregnancy. Adolescents who are well informed about sexuality and contraception and trained in decision making, self-esteem, and responsible parenthood are likely to postpone sexual activity. Information on contraception and family planning services needs to be made available to adolescents in a way that will actually motivate use. Information on sex and contraception should be made available at puberty and should include the form of use, contraindications, and advantages and disadvantages of all methods appropriate to adolescents. Orientation and assistance in selecting the best method should be individually tailored and should be provided in schools or other places accessible to young people, in a language they can understand. Rhythm and

  18. Water Transport and the Evolution of CM Parent Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, R.; Cohen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Extraterrestrial water-bearing minerals are of great importance both for understanding the formation and evolution of the solar system and for supporting future human activities in space. Asteroids are the primary source of meteorites, many of which show evidence of an early heating episode and varying degrees of aqueous alteration. The origin and characterization of hydrated minerals (minerals containing H2O or OH) among both the main-belt and near-earth asteroids is important for understanding a wide range of solar system formation and evolutionary processes, as well as for planning for human exploration. Current hypotheses postulate asteroids began as mixtures of water ice and anhydrous silicates. A heating event early in solar system history was then responsible for melting the ice and driving aqueous alteration. The link between asteroids and meteorites is forged by reflectance spectra, which show 3-µm bands indicative of bound OH or H2O on the C-class asteroids, which are believed to be the parent bodies of the carbonaceous chondrites in our collections. The conditions at which aqueous alteration occurred in the parent bodies of carbonaceous chondrites are thought to be well-constrained: at 0-25 C for less than 15 Myr after asteroid formation. In previous models, many scenarios exhibit peak temperatures of the rock and co-existing liquid water in more than 75 percent of the asteroid's volume rising to 150 C and higher, due to the exothermic hydration reactions triggering a thermal runaway effect. However, even in a high porosity, water-saturated asteroid very limited liquid water flow is predicted (distances of 100's nm at most). This contradiction has yet to be resolved. Still, it may be possible for water to become liquid even in the near-surface environment, for a long enough time to drive aqueous alteration before vaporizing or freezing then subliming. Thus, we are using physics- and chemistry-based models that include thermal and fluid transport as well

  19. Techniques for determining total body water using deuterium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Phillip A.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of total body water (TBW) is fundamental to the study of body fluid changes consequent to microgravity exposure or treatment with microgravity countermeasures. Often, the use of radioactive isotopes is prohibited for safety or other reasons. It was selected and implemented for use by some Johnson Space Center (JCS) laboratories, which permitted serial measurements over a 14 day period which was accurate enough to serve as a criterion method for validating new techniques. These requirements resulted in the selection of deuterium oxide dilution as the method of choice for TBW measurement. The development of this technique at JSC is reviewed. The recommended dosage, body fluid sampling techniques, and deuterium assay options are described.

  20. Intention to use contraceptives and subsequent contraceptive behavior in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S L; Westoff, C F

    1996-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between stated intention to use contraceptives and subsequent use during a three-year period in Morocco is examined. Longitudinal data are drawn from two Demographic and Health Surveys: the 1992 Morocco DHS and the 1995 Morocco Panel Survey. Reported contraceptive intentions in 1992 have a strong predictive effect on subsequent contraceptive use even after controlling for other characteristics of respondents, and the strength of the effect is second only to that of previous contraceptive use. Women who in 1992 said they intended to use contraceptives in the future but did not do so are the most likely to have had an unmet need for contraception in 1995. Weakly held fertility preferences reported by some of the women surveyed in 1992 appear to have been a contributing factor in the subsequent failure of these women to act upon their intention to practice contraception. PMID:8923652

  1. Modeling of highly brines transport in large water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, T. P.; Lepikhin, A. P.; Parshakova, Y. N.; Tiunov, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    The paper deals with the numerical modeling of a dilution and transport of highly brines in large water bodies taking into account the density stratification effects. This problem has an exceptional importance for the guarantee of ecological security of the Kama Reservoir in the conditions of extending exploitation of Verhnekamsk deposit of potassium and magnesium salts - one of the largest in the world. The output of million of tones of the potassium fertilizer is accompanied by the producing of the same quantity of highly brines demanding utilization. With the existing technologies the desalination of such quantity of brines is extremely energy-capacious and almost inapplicable. That is why main way for the brine utilization is the release into the surface water bodies or underground water-bearing horizons. Since the uncertainty level in the parameter setting for underground water-bearing horizons is higher than that for the surface water bodies, under the same or close conditions the release into the surface water bodies is considerably less dangerous. The main water body able to assimilate such huge amount of the removed brines is the upper part of the Kama Reservoir located within the Solikamsk-Berezniki industrial centre. The wastewater arriving from this centre make a decisive contribution to the formation of hydrochemical regime of Kama river. We suggested two-dimensional imitational hydrodynamical model allowing to determine the possible pollution zones depending on the flow rate and concentration of pollutant, flow rate and water level in the Kama river and wind characteristics in the zone of pollutant discharge. This model allows not only to calculate the distribution of pollution zones for various pollutant sources but also to estimate the consequences of emergencies. The Kama river near the Solikamsk-Berezniki industrial centre has complex morphometry. For the complete and efficient accounting for the morphometry peculiarities the non-linear orthogonal

  2. GFR Normalized to Total Body Water Allows Comparisons across Genders and Body Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Melsom, Toralf; Mathisen, Ulla D.; Jenssen, Trond G.; Solbu, Marit D.; Toft, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    The normalization of GFR to a standardized body-surface area of 1.73 m2 impedes comparison of GFR across individuals of different genders, heights, or weights. Ideally, GFR should be normalized to a parameter that best explains variation in GFR. Here, we measured true GFR by iohexol clearance in a representative sample of 1627 individuals from the general population who did not have diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or kidney disease. We also estimated total body water (TBW), extracellular fluid volume, lean body mass, liver volume, metabolic rate, and body-surface area. We compared two methods of normalizing GFR to these physiologic variables: (1) the conventional method of scaling GFR to each physiologic variable by simple division and (2) a method based on regression of the GFR on each variable. TBW explained a higher proportion of the variation in GFR than the other physiologic variables. GFR adjusted for TBW by the regression method exhibited less dependence on gender, height, and weight compared with the other physiologic variables. Thus, adjusting GFR for TBW by the regression method allows direct comparisons between individuals of different genders, weights, and heights. We propose that regression-based normalization of GFR to a standardized TBW of 40 L should replace the current practice of normalizing GFR to 1.73 m2 of body-surface area. PMID:21784894

  3. Wet tropospheric delay spatial variability over terrestrial water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, E.; Moller, D.; Andreadis, K.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    Among the sources of uncertainty in radar altimetry measurements of inland water bodies is the signal delay associated with space-time variations in water vapor in the atmosphere. Over the ocean, zenith wet tropospheric path delays (PD) can be measured by satellite microwave radiometry; however, the high brightness temperature of land prevents the use of these techniques over inland waters. SAR-based Atmospheric Phase Screens can be estimated over land, but not over water bodies. Radiosonde- and GPS-based estimates of PD over land are available, yet these measurements occur at specific, sparse locations. Atmospheric models are therefore the best source of information about space-time variations in PD, where observations (e.g., from radiosonde and GPS) are incorporated via data assimilation. The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography mission (SWOT) will use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) in Ka-band, at a high incidence angle, to measure temporal variations in water elevation, slope, and extent in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. Images will be collected over a 120-km wide swath with <100 m spatial resolution and ~1 cm height precision when averaged over a 1 km2 area, with a 21-day repeat cycle. At present, the spatial and temporal variability of PD at spatial scales relevant to the mission's inland water objectives (e.g., measurement of variations in the storage of reservoirs and lakes with spatial extent order 1 sq. km and larger) is an open question. We report the results of simulations of PD based on simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction model. We consider two domains within the continental U.S.: 1) the Pacific Northwest (at 4-km and 4/3-km spatial resolutions, via WRF results provided by the Northwest Modeling Consortium), and 2) sections of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas (at 2.33-km spatial resolution, via simulations performed for this study). We then investigate the spatial and temporal

  4. Heated Discharge Control and Management Alternatives: Small Water Bodies and Rivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLaren, James F.

    Basic concepts of waste heat management on shallow and deep small water bodies and rivers are reviewed and examples are given. This study defines a small water body as a body in which the far field hydrothermal effects of a heated discharge can be detected in a major portion or practically all of the water body. Environmental effects due to…

  5. Oral contraceptives alter circadian rhythm parameters of cortisol, melatonin, blood pressure, heart rate, skin blood flow, transepidermal water loss, and skin amino acids of healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Reinberg, A E; Touitou, Y; Soudant, E; Bernard, D; Bazin, R; Mechkouri, M

    1996-08-01

    Sixteen healthy women users and nonusers of oral contraceptives (OC) volunteered to document a set of circadian rhythms. Nine were taking OC providing ethynyl estradiol (0.03-0.05 mg/24h, 21 days/month) combined with DL- or L-norgestrel or norethisterone. There was no group difference (p > 0.05) in median age (22 years), weight (57 kg), and height (162) cm). Data were obtained at fixed hours, 5 times/24h, during a 48-h span, in November. (Day activity from approximately 08:00 to approximately 23:00 h and night rest). Environmental conditions were controlled, using air-conditioned rooms of constant temperature (26 degrees +/- 0.5) and relative humidity 45% +/- 1. Both cosinor and ANOVA were used for statistical analyses. All circadian rhythms were validated with one exception: that of salivary melatonin was not detected in OC users. The 24h mean (M) exhibited group differences for certain variables: M was greater in OC than non-OC users for systolic blood pressure (p < 0.0001), heart rate (p < 0.01), skin blood flow (p < 0.04), and transepidermal water loss (p < 0.02). M was lower in OC than non-OC users in salivary cortisol (p < 0.04) and skin amino acids (p < 0.003). No group difference was detected in any other documented rhythms: diastolic blood pressure, grip strength of both hands, oral temperature, self-rated fatigue, and the skin variables of urea, lactate, triglycerides, and acid phosphatase activity. PMID:8874983

  6. Total body water measurements using resonant cavity perturbation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Darren A.; Robinson, Martin P.

    2004-05-01

    A recent paper proposed a novel technique for determining the total body water (TBW) of patients suffering with abnormal hydration levels, using a resonant cavity perturbation method. Current techniques to measure TBW are limited by resolution and technical constraints. However, this new method involves measuring the dielectric properties of the body, by placing a subject in a large cavity resonator and measuring the subsequent change in its resonant frequency, fres and its Q-factor. Utilizing the relationship that water content correlates to these dielectric properties, it has been shown that the measured response of these parameters enables determination of TBW. Results are presented for a preliminary study using data estimated from anthropometric measurements, where volunteers were asked to lie and stand in an electromagnetic screened room, before and after drinking between 1 and 2 l of water, and in some cases, after voiding the bladder. Notable changes in the parameters were observed; fres showed a negative shift and Q was reduced. Preliminary calibration curves using estimated values of water content have been developed from these results, showing that for each subject the measured resonant frequency is a linear function of TBW. Because the gradients of these calibration curves correlate to the mass-to-height-ratio of the volunteers, it has proved that a system in which TBW can be unequivocally obtained is possible. Measured values of TBW have been determined using this new pilot-technique, and the values obtained correlate well with theoretical values of body water (r = 0.87) and resolution is very good (750 ml). The results obtained are measurable, repeatable and statistically significant. This leads to confidence in the integrity of the proposed technique.

  7. New aspects of injectable contraception.

    PubMed

    Phillips, O P

    2001-01-01

    Despite the availability of efficacious and safe contraceptive agents, not all women's contraceptive needs are being met. An injectable contraceptive method offers convenience and encourages compliance, both very important aspects for women seeking ideal contraception. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is a long-acting injectable, and is highly effective; one injection provides 3 months of contraception. Drawbacks of DMPA include irregular bleeding and a slow return to fertility. A new monthly injectable contraceptive agent is medroxyprogesterone acetate/estradiol cypionate suspension (Lunelle). It provides menstrual regulation and a rapid return to fertility. The estrogen ensures a withdrawal bleed monthly; however, women with contraindications to estrogen-containing contraception are not candidates for Lunelle. PMID:11294618

  8. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:24007251

  9. Contraceptive Beach Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Edith B.; Miller, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Abstinence-based sexuality education includes a discussion about the various types of contraception available today. This lesson addresses the knowledge and skills identified in the National Health Education Standards, and can be used with two different audiences-students and teachers. Included in the lesson are step-by-step procedures, a…

  10. On the motion of very small bodies in water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GiméNez Curto, Luis A.

    1985-01-01

    The equation of motion of a small isolated body that moves in translational motion through a fluid which is itself in unsteady and nonuniform motion is established on the assumption that actual forces acting on the body can be split up in gravity; a drag component, which accounts for viscosity and vorticity effects; and an inertial force with the same formal expression as the force that would act on the body if the flow were irrotational (this force is obtained for an unrestricted irrotational flow in the appendix). By assuming that flow acceleration is small compared with that due to gravity and that ɛ = wƒω/g ≪ 1, which defines what here is called "very small body" (wƒ being still water terminal fall velocity, ω angular frequency, and g acceleration due to gravity), some approximate equations are obtained using a perturbation scheme. Subsequently, a simple expression is derived for the leading order approximation of the velocity of very small bodies in water waves. This solution shows that, at least under certain conditions, the hypothesis of some delay time (Kennedy and Locher, 1972) is sound, although this time is not the same, in general, for the vertical velocity component as for the horizontal one. From a practical point of view, owing to the assumptions involved in this derivation, the applicability of the solution must be restricted to suspended sediment particles in low concentrations and to reasonably well-behaved wave conditions, including superposition of linear waves (particularly standing waves and irregular wave fields), slightly nonlinear waves, and weak currents superimposed on waves. The direct application of the results of this investigation to flows with a high degree of turbulence intensity must be precluded because of the existence of large flow accelerations.

  11. Veterinary Forensic Pathology: Drowning and Bodies Recovered From Water.

    PubMed

    McEwen, B J; Gerdin, J

    2016-09-01

    Determining the cause of death in animals recovered from bodies of water, swimming pools, or other water-containing vessels is challenging. Animals recovered from water may or may not have drowned. The diagnosis of drowning is usually one of exclusion, requiring information from the crime scene, recovery scene, the medical history or reliable witness accounts. While there are characteristic macroscopic and microscopic lesions of drowning, none are specific and are dependent on the volume and tonicity of the drowning medium. Beyond interpreting the postmortem findings, the court may ask pathologists to comment on the behavioral and welfare implications of drowning. This requires an understanding of the drowning process, which is a complex series of sequential, concurrent, and overlapping cardiorespiratory reflexes, electrolyte and blood gas abnormalities, aspiration, physical exhaustion, and breathlessness eventually culminating in death. This review addresses the mechanisms, lesions, and diagnostic issues associated with drowning in nonaquatic companion animals. PMID:26926081

  12. The Effect of Age, Parity and Body Mass Index on the Efficacy, Safety, Placement and User Satisfaction Associated With Two Low-Dose Levonorgestrel Intrauterine Contraceptive Systems: Subgroup Analyses of Data From a Phase III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Apter, Dan; Hauck, Brian; Schmelter, Thomas; Rybowski, Sarah; Rosen, Kimberly; Nelson, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Objective Two low-dose levonorgestrel intrauterine contraceptive systems (LNG-IUSs; total content 13.5 mg [average approx. 8 μg/24 hours over the first year; LNG-IUS 8] and total content 19.5 mg [average approx. 13 μg/24 hours over the first year; LNG-IUS 13]) have previously been shown to be highly effective (3-year Pearl Indices: 0.33 and 0.31, respectively), safe and well tolerated. The present subgroup analyses evaluated whether or not outcomes were affected by parity, age (18–25 vs 26–35 years), or body mass index (BMI, <30 vs ≥30 kg/m2). Methods Nulliparous and parous women aged 18‒35 years with regular menstrual cycles (21‒35 days) requesting contraception were randomized to 3 years of LNG-IUS 8 or LNG-IUS 13 use. Results In the LNG-IUS 8 and LNG-IUS 13 groups, 1432 and 1452 women, respectively, had a placement attempted and were included in the full analysis set; 39.2%, 39.2% and 17.1% were 18–25 years old, nulliparous and had a BMI ≥30 kg/m2, respectively. Both systems were similarly effective regardless of age, parity or BMI; the subgroup Pearl Indices had widely overlapping 95% confidence intervals. Placement of LNG-IUS 8 and LNG-IUS 13 was easier (p < 0.0001) and less painful (p < 0.0001) in women who had delivered vaginally than in women who had not. The complete/partial expulsion rate was 2.2–4.2% across all age and parity subgroups and higher in parous than in nulliparous women (p = 0.004). The incidence of pelvic inflammatory disease was 0.1–0.6% across all age and parity subgroups: nulliparous and younger women were not at higher risk than parous and older women, respectively. The ectopic pregnancy rate was 0.3–0.4% across all age and parity subgroups. Across all age and parity subgroups, the 3-year completion rate was 50.9–61.3% for LNG-IUS 8 and 57.9–61.1% for LNG-IUS 13, and was higher (p = 0.0001) among older than younger women in the LNG-IUS 8 group only. Conclusions LNG-IUS 8 and LNG-IUS 13 were highly effective

  13. Neonatal body water turnover: a putative index of perinatal morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    MacLennan, A.H.; Millington, G.; Grieve, A.; McIntosh, J.E.; Seamark, R.F.; Cox, L.W.

    1981-04-15

    The water metabolism of 46 newborn babies was determined during a 10 day period by means of an isotope dilution technique, and correlations were sought with the clinical assessment of the babies by multiple obstetric and pediatric clinical criteria. The babies, 48 to 72 hours of age, were given a single oral dose (2 ml/kg) of deuterated water (D/sub 2/O), a nonradioactive tracer, and the urinary excretion rate was followed by means of infrared spectrophotometry. After a period of equilibration of the D/sub 2/O with body water (20 hours), the rate of D2O clearance was found to be a single exponential decay process, thus allowing the fraction of total body water lost each hour (the rate constant) to be calculated for each baby. The median values of the rate constants X 10(4)(h-1) for 14 growth-retarded babies ws 104 (98% confidence limits, 97.8 to 122) compared with 76.3 (67.0 to 80.2) for 16 normal mature babies and 82.1 (73.4 to 90.6) for 16 normal premature babies. These data indicate that, compared with normal mature or normal premature babies, growth-retarded infants have a significantly (P less than 0.05) faster turnover of water during the first 10 days of postnatal life. Since there was little overlap in results between the normally grown and the retarded infants, the measurement of water turnover may provide a useful index of perinatal morbidity.

  14. [Stable Isotope Characteristics in Different Water Bodies in Changsha and Implications for the Water Cycle].

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Zhang, Xin-ping; Zhang, Li-feng; Wang, Yue-feng; Deng, Xiao-jun; Yang, Liu; Lei, Chao-gui

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of the variation characteristics of different water bodies is the basis of applying isotopic tracer technique in regional water cycle research. Based on the samples of atmospheric precipitation, surface water (river water) and groundwater (spring water and well water) in Changsha from January 2012 to December 2013, the study analyzed the variation characteristics of δD and δ(18)O in different water bodies. The results showed that the values of D and 18O in precipitation of Changsha showed obvious seasonal variation because of the seasonal difference of the water vapor source, and it showed significant negative correlation between δ(18)O in precipitation and some meteorological factors such as the temperature and the amount, the local meteoric water line revealed the climatic characteristic of humid and rainy in Changsha; the fluctuation of 8D and 80 in surface water was more moderate than those in precipitation, and the seasonal variation of stable isotope value showed lagging characteristic compared with that in precipitation, the difference of river water line (RWL) indicated that the main supply sources of surface water were changing in different seasons; the fluctuation of δD and δ(18)O in groundwater was the least, the variation ranges and mean values of δD and δ(18)O in spring water and well water were very close, it showed that there were some hydraulic connections in the two water bodies, the values of δD and δ(18)O in groundwater were constantly lower during drought months, this phenomenon might have a certain relationship with the increasing absorbency of tree roots from groundwater. The results of the study have certain guiding significance for rational utilization of water resources in the region. PMID:26387312

  15. Increase of Total Body Water with Decrease of Body Mass while Running 100 km Nonstop--Formation of Edema?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knechtle, Beat; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether ultraendurance runners in a 100-km run suffer a decrease of body mass and whether this loss consists of fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, or total body water. Male ultrarunners were measured pre- and postrace to determine body mass, fat mass, and skeletal muscle mass by using the anthropometric method. In addition,…

  16. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development

  17. [Contraception and endometriosis].

    PubMed

    Brun, G

    1993-01-01

    Choosing a contraceptive method for a woman with endometriosis is an uncommon problem because endometriosis is relatively rare and because an estimated 30-50% of women with endometriosis are infertile. Uterine or internal endometriosis or adenomyosis is characterized by a congestive and pseudoinflammatory uterus slightly increased in volume. It must be distinguished from pelvic or external or peritoneo-ovarian endometriosis. Pelvic implants may involve destruction of the ovaries by cysts or their imprisonment in adhesions. They may cause stenosis in the proximal portion of the tubes or entrap them in adhesions. 4 stages of endometriosis have been distinguished according to the significance of the lesions and a scoring system. Stage 4 patients with scores over 70 or with a score over 50 for adhesions have been unable to conceive despite treatment. No contraception is necessary in these cases. The choice of a contraceptive for other patients is conditioned by the features of endometriosis. Endometriosis refers to the abnormal localization of a normal endometrium. The implants are sensitive to estrogen. Each implant behaves like a miniature uterus; the mucus proliferates and bleeds if estrogen secretions are present, or atrophies if not. Endometriosis may be completely asymptomatic, or cause sterility, or be accompanied by pain and metrorrhagia. Several earlier treatments of endometriosis have been abandoned because of side effects. The current treatment of choice is an LHRH analog administered by parenteral injections every 4 weeks to bring about a state of pseudomenopause. The treatment produces a rapid desensitization of the pituitary LHRH receptors and a diminution of gonadotrophins, estrogens, and progesterone. The secondary effects are those of hypoestrogenism: hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and increased bone loss after 6 months of treatment. It is also an expensive medication. Contraception is provided by the treatment itself for the first 6 months

  18. [Pollution hazard for water bodies at oil production].

    PubMed

    Zholdakova, Z I; Beliaeva, N I

    2015-01-01

    In the paper there have been summarizes the concepts of the danger of the pollution ofwater bodies in oil production (the most dangerous are reagents used in the drilling, drilling waste, oil and petrochemicals, oil biodestructors. There was shown the danger of the spread of oil pollution. New indices, presenting a hazard during drilling and oil production have been substantiated The tasks aimed to the improvement of the standards and methods of the control of the water pollution by oil, as well as of the documents regulating the conditions of environmental protection during the drilling have been conceived. PMID:26031037

  19. A new device for collecting time-integrated water samples from springs and surface water bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panno, S.V.; Krapac, I.G.; Keefer, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    A new device termed the 'seepage sampler' was developed to collect representative water samples from springs, streams, and other surface-water bodies. The sampler collects composite, time-integrated water samples over short (hours) or extended (weeks) periods without causing significant changes to the chemical composition of the samples. The water sample within the sampler remains at the ambient temperature of the water body and does not need to be cooled. Seepage samplers are inexpensive to construct and easy to use. A sampling program of numerous springs and/or streams can be designed at a relatively low cost through the use of these samplers. Transient solutes migrating through such flow systems, potentially unnoticed by periodic sampling, may be detected. In addition, the mass loading of solutes (e.g., agrichemicals) may be determined when seepage samplers are used in conjunction with discharge measurements.

  20. Use of Natural Bodies of Water for IR Calibration Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.J.

    2001-04-17

    Natural bodies of water have several advantages as IR calibration targets in remote sensing. Among these are availability, homogeneity, and accurate knowledge of emissivity. A portable, low-cost, floating apparatus is described for calibration of remote IR sensors to within 0.15 C. The apparatus measures the surface and bulk water temperature as well as the wind speed, direction, temperature, and relative humidity. The apparatus collects data automatically and can be deployed for up to 24 hours. The sources of uncertainty, including the effects of skin temperature and waves are discussed. Data from several field campaigns to calibrate IR bands of DOE's Multi-Spectral Thermal Imager are described along with estimates of error.

  1. Marketing contraceptives by mail.

    PubMed

    Farley, J U; Harvey, P D

    1972-10-01

    7 ads (3" x 2") for information on nonprescription mail-order contraceptives were run in 51 college newspapters. Ads with specific product offerings, apparently directed to males and including offers of birth control literature, drew the most inquiries. Inquiries were also higher from ads placed in papers with larger circulations, and in rural areas. There were no discernible objections from the audience, and no difficulties were encountered in placing copy. About 207 of the inquiries resulted in orders. PMID:12276312

  2. Status of Contraceptive Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Rajesh K.

    2008-01-01

    Problem This is a review of antisperm contraceptive vaccines (CV), and synthesis of human scFv antibodies that can be used as immunocontraceptives. Method of study Various methods of proteomics and genomics, peptide synthesis, phage display technology, and antibody engineering were used to obtain multi-epitope vaccines and human scFv antibodies from immunoinfertile and vasectomized men. The present review primarily focuses on the effect of multi-epitope vaccines and Izumo on fertility and synthesis and characterization of sperm specific human scFv antibodies. Results The immunization with Izumo peptides causes a contraceptive effect in female mice. The efficacy is enhanced by combination vaccination, including peptides based on other sperm antigens. Using phage display technology, we were able to synthesize at least four novel scFv antibodies with unique complimentarity determining regions (CDRs) that reacted with specific fertility-related sperm antigens. These antibodies inhibited human sperm function in vitro, and their immunocontraceptive effect in vivo is currently being investigated. Conclusions The multi-epitope vaccines may provide an efficacious and viable approach to contraception. The human scFv antibodies, if they block fertility in vivo, may provide unique and novel immunocontraceptives, the first of its kind for human use. The multi-epitope CV and preformed engineered antibodies of defined specificity may obliterate the concern related to inter-individual variability of the immune response. PMID:19086987

  3. Advances in male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Antonietta; Gava, Giulia; Berra, Marta; Meriggiola Maria, Cristina

    2014-11-01

    Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials. PMID:25673544

  4. Advances in male hormonal contraception

    PubMed Central

    Antonietta, Costantino; Giulia, Gava; Marta, Berra; Cristina, Meriggiola Maria

    2014-01-01

    Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials. PMID:25673544

  5. [Initiation and monitoring of contraception].

    PubMed

    Sannisto, Tuire; Kuortti, Marjo; Kuukankorpi, Aki; Niitty, Siina

    2012-01-01

    The majority of those requiring contraception may safely use any available contraceptive method. Each method has, however, its particular contraindications, which should be screened by applying careful anamnesis and focused status, when contraception is being initiated. Gynecologic examination is not a prerequisite for the initiation of hormonal contraception, but measurement and monitoring of blood pressure is important. Testing for sexually transmitted diseases is readily worthwhile. Follow-up visits provide a chance for comprehensive support for a woman or a young person concerning sexual health. PMID:22822602

  6. [Choosing contraception for adolescents].

    PubMed

    Wemeau-jacquemont, C

    1985-02-01

    Earlier and more frequent sexual activity and the significant risk of pregnancy have increased the need for contraception among young adolescent girls. The problem for the physician is to choose a contraceptive method which will not affect future fertility or the psychological and biological maturity of adolescents. Condoms, diaphragms, and spermicides are quite effective if used correctly; they have no deleterious side effects, and they provide protection against sexually transmitted diseases. They appear to be well-adapted to the sporadic sexual activity of adolescents. The efficacy of combined oral contraceptives (OCs) is also high. Side effects depend on the synthetic estrogen component and are dose dependent. Absolute contraindications to OC use in women of any age include thromboembolic disease, cerebral vascular accidents, severe cardiac or hepatic disorders, breast or genital cancer, pregnancy, undiagnosed genital bleeding, and pituitary adenoma. Relative contraindications include hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obesity, history of hepatitis, migraines, epilepsy, asthma, renal insufficiency, cystic breast disease, and mammary fibroadenomas. Combined OCs do not seem to interfere with subsequent maturation of the hypothalamopituitary axis. The frequency of ovulatory cycles in adolescents who have discontinued pill use is the same as that in adolescents who have never used pills. However, estrogens accelerate the process of maturation in the bones, so combined OCs should never be prescribed for girls who have not terminated their growth. Minidose OCs containing 30-45 mcg of ethinyl estradiol aggravate the relative hyperestrogenism of adolescents and are associated with menstrual problems, functional ovarian cysts, and breast problems. They should only be prescribed for adolescents with regular sexual activity, no less than 3 years following menarche, with regular ovulatory menstrual cycles and no history of breast disorders. Otherwise, a standard

  7. Contraception: a social revolution.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Bastianelli, Carlo; Farris, Manuela

    2007-03-01

    Modern contraceptive technology is more than a technical advance: it has brought about a true social revolution, the 'first reproductive revolution' in the history of mankind. This latter was followed in rapid succession by other major changes in human reproductive strategies. In the human species, sexual activity began to lose its exclusive reproductive meaning at an early stage of its evolution. Human beings must have practiced non-conceptive sex from the outset and therefore must have had a need to avoid, rather than to seek conception during intercourse from time immemorial. The search for methods to control fertility went on for millennia, but a valid solution was only found during the twentieth century, when the population explosion had forever changed the shape of humanity: in only one century the total population of the planet had grown from some 1.6 billion to more than 6 billion. That increase will remain unique in the history of Homo sapiens. At the global level, contraception provided a tool to deal with overpopulation and, in only 50 years, went a long way towards its resolution. However, to solve the problem, national and international family planning initiatives were required. For individuals, contraception also meant a revolution. It allowed sexual intercourse without reproduction. Only 25 years later, in vitro fertilisation permitted childbearing without sexual intercourse. Other advances followed and now cloning, that is, reproduction without the two gametes, looms on the horizon. Such a series of rapid, major changes in human reproductive strategies has confused many. For this reason, a constructive dialogue between sociology and biology is mandatory. Contraception is a powerful tool to promote equity between sexes; it improves women's status in the family and in the community. Avoiding pregnancy during the teens increases opportunities for a young woman's education, training and employment. By controlling their fertility, women get a chance to

  8. Unmet contraceptive needs among refugees

    PubMed Central

    Aptekman, Marina; Rashid, Meb; Wright, Vanessa; Dunn, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe what women of reproductive age who received primary care at a refugee health clinic were using for contraception upon arrival to the clinic, and to quantify the unmet contraceptive needs within that population. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Crossroads Clinic in downtown Toronto, Ont. Participants Women of reproductive age (15 to 49 years) who first presented for care between December 1, 2011, and December 1, 2012. To be included, a woman had to have had 2 or more clinic visits or an annual health examination. Exclusion criteria for the contraception prevalence calculation were female sexual partner, menopause, hysterectomy, pregnancy, or trying to conceive. Main outcome measures Contraception use prevalence was measured, as was unmet contraceptive need, which was calculated using a modified version of the World Health Organization’s definition: the number of women with an unmet need was expressed as a percentage of women of reproductive age who were married or in a union, or who were sexually active. Results Overall, 52 women met the criteria for inclusion in the contraceptive prevalence calculation. Of these, 16 women (30.8%) did not use any form of contraception. Twelve women were pregnant at some point in the year and stated the pregnancy was unwanted or mistimed. An additional 14 women were not using contraception but had no intention of becoming pregnant within the next 2 years. There were no women with postpartum amenorrhea not using contraception and who had wanted to delay or prevent their previous pregnancy. In total, 97 women were married or in a union, or were sexually active. Unmet need was calculated as follows: (12 + 14 + 0)/97 = 26.8%. Conclusion There was a high unmet contraceptive need in the refugee population in our study. All women of reproductive age should be screened for contraceptive need when first seeking medical care in Canada. PMID:25642489

  9. Utilization of Landsat Data for Water Quality Observation in Small Inland Water Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pásler, M.; Komárková, J.

    2016-06-01

    Many studies deal with water quality evaluation using remotely sensed data. In the field of remote sensing, there have been proposed several procedures how to observe selected parameters of water quality and conditions. The majority of works use methods and procedures based on satellite data but they usually do not deal with suitability and practicability of the satellite data. This paper provides summary of determinants and limitations of satellite data utilization for water quality evaluation. Cloud cover and its influence on size of visible water surfaces is the most deeply evaluated determinants. Temporal resolution, spatial resolution and some other technical factors are discussed as next determinants. The case study demonstrates evaluation of the determinants for Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 data (level 1) and for area of small ponds in part of Pardubice region in the Czech Republic. It clearly demonstrates several limitations of Landsat data for evaluation of selected parameters of water quality and changes of small water bodies.

  10. Cryptosporidium and Giardia detection in water bodies of Galicia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hermida, José Antonio; García-Presedo, Ignacio; González-Warleta, Marta; Mezo, Mercedes

    2010-12-01

    animal health. These results demonstrate the wide distribution of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in the environment, the ineffectiveness of treatments in DWTPs and WWTPs in reducing/inactivating both protozoa and the need to monitor the presence, viability and infectivity of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in water bodies. In conclusion, the findings suggest the need for better monitoring of water quality and identification of sources of contamination. PMID:20673950

  11. Sculpting of a dissolvable body by flowing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinzi Mac; Moore, M. Nicholas J.; Ristroph, Leif

    2014-11-01

    Fluid flows strongly influence the dissolution of materials in geological contexts and in chemical and pharmaceutical applications. We approach flow-driven dissolution as a moving boundary problem and conduct experiments on hard candy bodies immersed within fast flowing water. We discover that different initial shapes are sculpted into a similar final form before ultimately vanishing, suggesting convergence to a stable shape-flow state. A model linking the flow and solute concentration suggests an explanation for this state and offers scaling laws for quantities such as the volume decay rate in time. As a whimsical application, we also show how this model can be used to address the long-standing question, ``How many licks does it take to get to the center of lollipop?''

  12. Statement on injectable contraception.

    PubMed

    1982-12-01

    Injectable hormonal contraception with 2 longacting steroidal preparations--norethisterone enanthate (NET-EN) and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA)--provides an effective means of fertility regulation and has become an important method of family planning. DMPA and NET-EN have several advantages which make them particularly appropriate for some women and acceptable in family planning programs. A single injection can provide highly effective contraception for 2 or more months, delivery is simple, independent of coitus, and ensures periodic contact with medical or other trained health personnel. Currently, DMPA is registered as a therapeutic agent in nearly all countries and as a contraceptive agent in over 80 developed and developing countries. NET-EN is registered as a contraceptive in 40 countries. Administered by intramuscular injection in an aqueous microcrystalline suspension, DMPA exerts its contraceptive effect primarily by suppression of ovulation, but its effects on the endometrium, the uterine tubes, and the production of cervical mucus may also play a role in reducing fertility. DMPA as a contraceptive agent is generally given at a dosage of 150 mg every 90 days. NET-EN when administered as an intramuscular injection of an oil preparation at a dose of 200 mg inhibits ovulation. It should be administered at 8 weekly intervals for the 1st 6 months of use, then at intervals of 8 or 12 weeks. Longterm animal studies with DMPA have been completed mainly on beagle bitches and rhesus monkeys, and similar studies with NET-EN are nearing completion. None of the findings in beagles is considered applicable to human populations because the beagle responds differently than humans to steroidal hormones. None of the deaths among rhesus monkeys was attributable to effects of the drug. Endometrial carcinoma was found in 2 of the replacement monkeys but the number of animals was too small for statistically significant studies, and it is not possible to conclude

  13. [Methodologic aspects of body water kinetic dynamic studies].

    PubMed

    Lobachik, V I; Chupushtanov, S A; Pishchulina, G N; Voronov, S F; Nosovskiĭ, A M

    1998-01-01

    In studying the level of hydration and liquid phases (LPs) in a space mission there use the stable and/or radioactive isotopes. The investigations are unique, the methods are adequate but not adapted in full measure to the challenges of the problem under study. The methodical approaches to the study of the dynamics of water metabolism are not available. Repeated introduction of the markers for these purposes is not acceptable. Another problem associates with taking the markers orally. In this case, a concentration of the markers will depend on the absorption and excretion processes. Prior to, during and in the readaptation period these functions will be different, making a correlation of the accumulated data difficult. There advances a possible version of solving these problems, namely, to use for the dynamic studies the residual contents of the markers in the LPs after single injection. However, this approach calls for investigating the kinetics of markers in weightlessness or during its ground-based simulation. The kinetics of tritium water has been studied in 6 volunteers under conditions of the 5-day bedrest and in 9 healthy men during free motor activity. There determined the characteristics of marker kinetics in a healthy man during his routine living activities. Under bedrest conditions there have been noted slowing-down of the rate and a decrease in the degree of marker accumulation in the body after its single injection, the shift of a period of relative stabilization of marker content in LP to the more late dates of experiment, slowing-down of the marker excretion rate from the body. PMID:9858979

  14. [Hormonal contraception in autoimmpne diseases].

    PubMed

    Matyszkiewicz, Anna; Jach, Robert; Rajtar-Ciosek, Agnieszka; Basta, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The onset and the course of autoimmune diseases is influenced among other factors by the sex hormones. Hormonal contraception might affect the course of the autoimmune disease. The paper summarises the manner of save application of hormonal contraception in patients with autoimmune disease. PMID:27526427

  15. Apparatus for removing oil and other floating contaminants from a moving body of water

    DOEpatents

    Strohecker, J.W.

    1973-12-18

    The patent describes a process in which floating contaminants such as oil and solid debris are removed from a moving body of water by employing a skimming system which uses the natural gravitational flow of the water. A boom diagonally positioned across the body of water diverts the floating contaminants over a floating weir and into a retention pond where an underflow weir is used to return contaminant-free water to the moving body of water. The floating weir is ballasted to maintain the contaminant-receiving opening therein slightly below the surface of the water during fluctuations in the water level for skimming the contaminants with minimal water removal.

  16. [Chronic illness and contraception].

    PubMed

    Saarikoski, S

    1987-01-01

    In recent years sterilization that can cause problems of the psyche and marital life has been recommended much less frequently with respect to chronic diseases. As regards heart and hypertensive diseases pregnancy is always contraindicated in case of 3rd and 4th disease categories and sterilization is recommended according to the New York Heart Association. As far as 1st and 2nd category patients are concerned if the load carrying capacity is normal pregnancy could be undertaken. Combination pills are not recommended for contraception because they can cause fluid retention or increase the risk of thrombosis. If the patient has a higher-than-normal risk of developing thrombosis or infection, for instance, those who wear pacemakers only tablets containing progesterone or subdermal capsule implants can be used. In those with blood pressure problems the additional use of the IUD is also advised. Among diseases of neurological and psychic origin the effect of hormonal contraceptives is weakened by antiepileptics, but even in such cases older combination pills of larger doses of active ingredients can be employed. Migraine is exacerbated in 1/3 of patients; here IUDs can be used. Even the contraceptive tablets themselves can induce depression. In psychosis methods requiring regular attention can be easily forgotten, therefore the IUD is the most suitable device. In diabetes progesterone and other progestogens reduce insulin response, harm carbohydrate metabolism; therefore in young people the IUD is preferred an in older women with children even sterilization can be employed. Hormonal tablets must not be used in hyperlipidemia and liver diseases. Caution must be exercised in hyperthyroidism and in endocrine disorders (e.g., Cushing's syndrome); if it is accompanied by blood pressure disorders appropriate treatment is required. In kidney diseases pregnancy is contraindicated if it is accompanied by blood pressure increase or a higher level of creatine. On the other hand

  17. [An implantable contraceptive: Norplant].

    PubMed

    Munyakazi, A

    1989-08-01

    The Norplant contraceptive system consists of 6 silastic capsules 34 mm long by 2.4 mm in diameter each containing 36 mg of levonorgestrel. Norplant provides a constant daily dose of 30 mcg of levonorgestrel beginning 24 hours after insertion and lasting for 5 years. 3 contraceptive effects are provided: the cervical mucus becomes less permeable for sperm, the endometrium atrophies, and ovulation is inhibited in about 50% of cycles. The failure rate is lower than those of pills and IUDs. It is somewhat higher for women weighing over 70 kg than for those weighing less. The safety of Norplant is due to the absence of estrogen. It has no effect on blood pressure, and the risks of ectopic pregnancies or infection at the insertion site are minor. The principal side effect is disturbance of the menstrual cycle, which usually decreases after 3-6 months of use. Other minor effects should not cause termination of the method if the user has been forewarned. Women using Norplant should be followed regularly. Norplant is particularly indicated for women desiring longterm contraception or a very effective method for spacing, postpartum women, and women with contraindications to oral contraceptives and IUDs. Contraindications include pregnancy or suspicion of pregnancy, unexplained vaginal bleeding, liver or cardiovascular disorders, jaundice or pruritus during the last pregnancy, thrombophlebitis or pulmonary embolism, falciform anemia, and breast cancer. Studies are underway to verify that Norplant does not affect lactation. Norplant should be removed immediately if the woman develops migraine headaches or visual problems, signs of thrombophlebitis or hepatic disorders, increased blood pressure, or if she becomes pregnant or must undergo a surgical procedure requiring lengthy bed rest. Norplant should be inserted under scrupulously aseptic conditions during the 1st 7 cycle days under local anesthesia. Large studies in Egypt, Indonesia, Chile and elsewhere have confirmed

  18. [Young men's contraceptive habits].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A H; Nielsen, B B; Hansen, K; Johansen, J B; Nielsen, M B

    1992-10-01

    A total of 379 men from the greater Copenhagen area were invited to fill out a questionnaire about sexual habits and use of contraception in connection with conscription for military duty. A total of 334 (88%) answered the questionnaire. In the autumn of 1988, a total of 27 men answered the test questionnaire, while in the spring of 1989, when the real study was conducted, 307 men answered it. The median age of 334 participants was 18 years (range of 17-29 years). 33% of the group stated that they had used condoms during first intercourse, while 47% had not. 1 person reported to be exclusively attracted sexually to men, 5 persons were attracted both to men and women, but 97% were exclusively attracted to women. 82% had had intercourse or other sexual experience with women. 1.8% had had intercourse or other sexual experience with men. 8% had no sexual experience, and 8% did not answer the question. Oral contraceptives were used by 60% and the condom by 56%. 10% had used coitus interruptus at one time or another; 15% had used no contraception; 5% used the IUD; and 5% used the diaphragm. Some gave several answers. 1% used spermicidal lotion. 60% thought that it was the responsibility of both men and women to be concerned about contraception, 12% opined that it was exclusively men's duty, and 2% that it was exclusively women's, while 26% did not answer. 68% wanted to use the condom in the future for protection, 24% did not know, but 8% did not want to use it more extensively. 64% did not think that the fear of AIDS would affect their sexual life, but 36% thought it would. Several of the subjects indicated that they would be more careful about choosing a partner, and every 10th suggested that they would use the condom with a new partner. One person (0.3%) was a drug addict, 89% had never injected drugs, but about 11% did not answer about drugs. 97% and 95%, respectively, indicated that the condom provided good protection against pregnancy and venereal diseases. PMID

  19. Worldwide Eutrophication of Water Bodies: Causes, Concerns, Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prepas, E. E.; Charette, T.

    2003-12-01

    Eutrophication is the nutrient enrichment of waters that stimulates an array of symptomatic changes, that can include increased phytoplankton and rooted aquatic plant (macrophyte) production, fisheries and water quality deterioration, and other undesirable changes that interfere with water uses (Bartsch, 1972). The trophic state, or degree of fertility, of water bodies ranges from oligotrophic to mesotrophic to eutrophic with increasing supply of nutrients and organic matter ( Table 1). Eutrophication is most often the result of an elevated supply of nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphorus, to surface waters that results in enhanced production of primary producers, particularly phytoplankton and aquatic plants. Table 1. Mean annual values for the trophic classification system Total phosphorus (μg L-1)Chlorophyll a (μg L-1)Secchi disk depth (m) Ultra-oligotrophic<4<1>12 Oligotrophic<10<2.5>6 Mesotrophic10-352.5-86-3 Eutrophic35-1008-253-1.5 Hypertrophic>100>25<1.5 Source: OECD (1982). Phytoplankton are unpleasant at high densities. The sight and smell of clots or masses of decaying phytoplankton decreases the recreational value of most waters and usually generates concerns among the public. Furthermore, blooms of toxin-producing phytoplankton can cause widespread illness. A bloom is a conspicuous concentration of phytoplankton, often concentrated at or near the surface. It is difficult to quantify what constitutes a "bloom," but a rough estimate places it as a chlorophyll a concentration over 30 μg L-1. Toxins produced by dinoflagellates such as Pfiesteria in marine environments of the northeastern US and red tides in tropical waters have caused massive fish kills, millions of dollars in losses to seafood-related industries, human memory loss, paralysis, and even death (Van den Hoeck et al., 1995; Silbergeld et al., 2000). Bloom-forming species of cyanobacteria can produce potent hepato-(liver) toxins termed microcystins that have been implicated in

  20. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D F

    1981-04-01

    Dermatologists often prescribe oral tetracycline for the control of acne, primarily, and to a much lesser extent, for the treatment of cutaneous infections. A number of the patients taking tetracycline are also taking birth control pills. A recent article in the British Medical Journal (1980;1:293) indicates that this combination can lead to a failure of the (OC) oral contraceptive. Such failure had been associated with ampicillin as well. It is believed that the mechanism for this was the disturbance in normal gut flora, with consequent effects on bacterial hydrolysis of steroid conjugates. This would interrupt the enterohepatic circulation of contraceptive steroids, resulting in a less than normal concentration of circulating steroids. It was recommended that women taking low-dose OCs take extra precautions against pregnancy during any cycle in which antibiotics are given. In regard to our care of and responsibilities to our patients, and in an era when malpractice suits for all types of reasons are more common, it certainly behooves dermatologists to recognize and be concerned about this potential consequence of prescribing oral antibiotics. PMID:7212735

  1. Intrauterine steroid contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Scholten, P C; Christaens, G C; Haspels, A A

    1987-11-15

    Progestagen releasing IUDs were specially developed to diminish the problems of bleeding and pain with inert and copper containing IUDs. The intrauterine release of the progestagen causes endometrial atrophy, resulting in impairment of nidation, and interferes with transport of the ovum and the spermatozoa. Two available types, Progestasert, Biograviplan (Alza Corporation, California; Grünenthal) and Levonorgestrel Nova-T (Leiras Pharmaceuticals, Finland), have been sufficiently tested in multinational trials. Compared with Progestasert, LNG Nova-T showed lower pregnancy rates (Pearl Index 0.30), less risk for ectopic pregnancy and a longer effective lifetime (7 years). With both IUDs the amount and duration of menstrual blood loss is decreased. Amenorrhea is a frequent occurring side effect of LNG Nova-T, caused by endometrial atrophy. Intermenstrual blood loss and spotting incidences are not uniformly reduced and are still a frequent reason for removal. Preinsertion counselling may improve the acceptance of these non-health-threatening side effects. With both IUDs a decrease of menstrual cramps during periods is percepted and a low incidence of PID is found. Basically, the progestagen releasing IUD can be recommended to all women who wish an IUD for contraception and to women with contraindications for oral contraceptives, especially to those with menorrhagia, anaemia or risk for anaemia. PMID:3131966

  2. Development of Global 30m Resolution Water Body Map with Permanent/Temporal Water Body Separation Using Satellite Acquired Images of Landsat GLS Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeshima, D.; Yamazaki, D.; Yoshikawa, S.; Kanae, S.

    2015-12-01

    The specification of worldwide water body distribution is important for discovering hydrological cycle. Global 3-second Water Body Map (G3WBM) is a global scale map, which indicates the distribution of water body in 90m resolutions (http://hydro.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~yamadai/G3WBM/index.html). This dataset was mainly built to identify the width of river channels, which is one of major uncertainties of continental-scale river hydrodynamics models. To survey the true width of the river channel, this water body map distinguish Permanent Water Body from Temporary Water Body, which means separating river channel and flood plain. However, rivers with narrower width, which is a major case in usual river, could not be observed in this map. To overcome this problem, updating the algorithm of G3WBM and enhancing the resolutions to 30m is the goal of this research. Although this 30m-resolution water body map uses similar algorithm as G3WBM, there are many technical issues attributed to relatively high resolutions. Those are such as lack of same high-resolution digital elevation map, or contamination problem of sub-pixel scale object on satellite acquired image, or invisibility of well-vegetated water body such as swamp. To manage those issues, this research used more than 30,000 satellite images of Landsat Global Land Survey (GLS), and lately distributed topography data of Shuttle Rader Topography Mission (SRTM) 1 arc-second (30m) digital elevation map. Also the effect of aerosol, which would scatter the sun reflectance and disturb the acquired result image, was considered. Due to these revises, the global water body distribution was established in more precise resolution.

  3. [Contraception and pregnancy in adolescence

    PubMed

    Herter, L D; Accetta, S G

    2001-11-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review and discuss different contraceptive methods currently used by adolescents, and also discuss adolescent pregnancy, including the associated risks and the importance of prenatal care. METHODS: Review of literature and clinical experience with different contraceptive methods and with adolescent pregnancy. RESULTS: The oral contraceptive pill is the most common method used by teenagers due to its low failure rate and other non-contraceptive effects. Emergency contraception is a good option in cases of rape, unplanned sexual intercourse, condom rupture, nonuse of oral contraceptives during short intervals. In this case, the pill should be taken within 72 hours after the intercourse (preferably before 24 hours for best effect). Most problems related to adolescent pregnancy have a social or economic origin; however, some medical complications such as preterm labor and anemia are frequently reported. CONCLUSIONS: The use of male and female condoms combined with other contraceptive methods should be encouraged to prevent sexually transmitted diseases. If pregnancy is confirmed, prenatal care must be implemented as soon as possible in order to minimize the risks of complication and to allow for an effective multidisciplinary approach. PMID:14676880

  4. The spectral signature analysis of inland and coastal water bodies acquired from field spectroradiometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoutsa, Christiana; Akylas, Evangelos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos

    2013-08-01

    The main goal of this research is to examine the optical properties of different water bodies such as coastal water; oligotrophic and eutrophic inland water by observing their spectral signatures. Spectral profiles of sampling points, which correspond to water bodies with different water quality characteristics, are extracted and analyzed. Field spectroscopy is a very important tool giving critical information for the comprehension of spectral signatures of different water bodies. Field spectroradiometric measurements can assist to improve or develop new algorithms and methodology enables to classify several water bodies according to their water quality characteristics using remotely sensed data. Field spectroradiometric data presented at this study were obtained for inland water in Asprokremmos Dam, Paphos District/Cyprus; in Larnaca's Salt Lake, Larnaca District/Cyprus; and in Karla Lake, Volos District/Greece and for coastal water in Zugi-Vasilikos-Old Harbour, Limassol District/Cyprus.

  5. [Effect of oral contraceptives on vaginal flora].

    PubMed

    Batashki, I; Markova, D; Milchev, N; Uchikova, E; Gŭrova, A

    2006-01-01

    The contraceptive and non contraceptive advantages of oral chormonal contraceptives as well as the good control on fertility, make it one of the most preffered method of contraception. The normal vaginal flora is a dynamic ecosystem and itsequilibrium and status of eubyosis amongst its inhabitants is an important mechanism against exogenous infections. The use of oral contraceptives is not associated with significant changes in the vaginal microbial flora; the normal concentration of the lactobacillli is preserved. PMID:16889189

  6. Emergency contraception: Focus on the facts.

    PubMed

    Najera, Deanna Bridge

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress on contraception, and in particular emergency contraception, has been made in the past decade. Emergency contraception was first introduced as a stand-alone prescription in 1998, and the interaction of politics and medicine meant a tumultuous course to the drug becoming available over the counter. This article reviews how emergency contraception works, the effectiveness of different methods, pros and cons, and the history of emergency contraception. PMID:26656383

  7. New contraceptive choices across reproductive life.

    PubMed

    Foran, Therese M

    2003-06-16

    The range of contraceptive options and consumer awareness of new contraceptive methods have both increased significantly over the past 10 years. New methods available in Australia include lower-dose oral contraceptive pills, new oral progestogens, progestogen implants, a progestogen-bearing intrauterine device and polyurethane female condoms. Contraceptive options which may soon be introduced in Australia include novel methods of administering combined (oestrogen-progestogen) contraception, such as dermal patches and vaginal rings. PMID:12797848

  8. [Pregnancy contraception (Current Care Guideline)].

    PubMed

    Halttunen-Nieminen, Mervi; Piltonen, Terhi; Alenius, Heidi; Apukka, Laura; Kosunen, Elise; Pietilä, Kirsi; Sihvo, Sinikka; Vuorela, Piia; Väänänen, Eija; Yli-Kivistö, Tiina

    2016-01-01

    There are no age limits for the start or use of contraception. Prior gynecological examination or cervical smear is not needed. Condom is the only method that protects from sexually transmitted diseases. An increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated only with combined contraceptives. However, the risk is remarkably higher with pregnancy, puerperium or with smoking. The most effective reversible methods are intrauterine devices (IUD) and implants, as these do not depend on daily memory. Natural family planning methods are not reliable, and effective contraception should be easily available for all at all times. PMID:27382829

  9. Sculpting of an erodible body by flowing water.

    PubMed

    Ristroph, Leif; Moore, Matthew N J; Childress, Stephen; Shelley, Michael J; Zhang, Jun

    2012-11-27

    Erosion by flowing fluids carves striking landforms on Earth and also provides important clues to the past and present environments of other worlds. In these processes, solid boundaries both influence and are shaped by the surrounding fluid, but the emergence of morphology as a result of this interaction is not well understood. We study the coevolution of shape and flow in the context of erodible bodies molded from clay and immersed in a fast, unidirectional water flow. Although commonly viewed as a smoothing process, we find that erosion sculpts pointed and cornerlike features that persist as the solid shrinks. We explain these observations using flow visualization and a fluid mechanical model in which the surface shear stress dictates the rate of material removal. Experiments and simulations show that this interaction ultimately leads to self-similarly receding boundaries and a unique front surface characterized by nearly uniform shear stress. This tendency toward conformity of stress offers a principle for understanding erosion in more complex geometries and flows, such as those present in nature. PMID:23150552

  10. Body water compartments during bed rest: Evaluation of analytical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, H. L.; Juhos, L.; Castle, B. L.; Yusken, J.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Nine healthy young men were studied to determine the reproducibility and interchangeability of the use of radio-iodinated human serum albumin and Evans Blue dye for estimating plasma volume, sodium bromide for extracellular fluid volume, and deuterium oxide for total body water volume. All subjects were tested in a semibasal condition and allowed to rest for at least 30 min. after arriving at the laboratory. The results indicate that there was uniform distribution of I131 and Evans Blue dye 10 min. after injection and of NaBr and D2O 3 hours after oral ingestion; the buildup of residual tracer did not interfere appreciably with the measurement of either or Evans Blue spaces when they are administered at equal intervals, and the buildup of background tracer after ingestion of NaBr and D2O once per week for three consecutive weeks did not affect the accuracy of the measurement. It was found that I131 and Evans Blue may be used interchangeably for estimating plasma volume; for estimating bromide and D2O spaces, one 3-hour equilibrium blood sample gives results similar to the extrapolation of multiple samples.

  11. Method of detection water-body and water-bearing formations above a coal seam -- a case history

    SciTech Connect

    Park, D.W.

    1983-03-01

    Ground water has been a problem in underground mines. (Anon., 1981; Aughenbough, 1973; Stansbury, 1981). Water migrates from water-bearing formations and surface water bodies such as lakes, ponds or creeks into the underground workings through fractures and tracks. As a result, underground workings become plagued with the necessity of having the water pumped out in large quantities. Underground workings become flooded when unexpected amounts of water flow into the openings, especially when mines use pillar extraction of longwall mining methods. It is difficult to detect water bodies above the coal mine roof before water problems take place. The resistivity method was used as a method for detecting water saturated rock layers and bodies of water above the roof of a coal mine in northern West Virginia, where the multiple seam mining method was being used.

  12. Non-Contraceptive Benefits of Oral Hormonal Contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Adolf E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract It is becoming evident that oral hormonal contraceptives-besides being well established contraceptives-seem to become important medications for many functional or organic disturbances. So far, clinical effectiveness has been shown for treatment as well as prevention of menstrual bleeding disorders and menstrual-related pain symptoms. Also this is true for premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual disphoric disorder (PMDD). Particular oral contraceptives (OCs) containing anti-androgenic progestogens were shown to be effective medications for treatment of androgenisation symptoms (seborrhea, acne, hirsutism, alopecia). Through perfect suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis OCs have proven to be effective in elimination of persistent follicular cysts. Endometriosis/adenomyosis related pain symptoms are well handled similar to other drugs like Gonadotropine Releasing Hormone agonists but are less expensive, with less side effects, and possibility to be used for longer periods of time. This is also true for myoma. Pelvic inflammatory disease, rheumatoid arthritis, menstrual migraine, and onset of multiple sclerosis are prevented or delayed. Bone density is preserved and asthma symptoms improved. Endometrial hyperplasia and benign breast disease can be controlled. There is definitely a significant impact on risk reduction regarding endometrial, ovarian, and colon cancers. In conclusion, it needs to be recognized that oral combined hormonal contraceptives (estrogen/ progestogen combination) are - besides being reliable forms of contraception - are cost-effective medications for many medical disorders in women. Therefore, these contraceptives drugs are important for female and global health and should be used in clinical practice. PMID:23853619

  13. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Atsuko; Hagopian, Laura; Linden, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Emergency post-coital contraception (EC) is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD) and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method), and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference. PMID:24453516

  14. How Effective Is Male Contraception?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications How effective is male contraception? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... health care providers to determine which method of birth control is best for them. For men, methods of ...

  15. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral contraceptives are a very effective method of birth control, but they do not prevent the spread of ... on another day, use a backup method of birth control (such as a condom and/or a spermicide) ...

  16. Detection of pathogenic organisms in food, water, and body fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, William H.; Henley, Michael V.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2002-06-01

    The construction of specific bioluminescent bacteriophage for detection of pathogenic organism can be developed to overcome interferences in complex matrices such as food, water and body fluids. Detection and identification of bacteria often require several days and frequently weeks by standard methods of isolation, growth and biochemical test. Immunoassay detection often requires the expression of the bacterial toxin, which can lead to non-detection of cells that may express the toxin under conditions different from testing protocols. Immunoassays require production of a specific antibody to the agent for detection and interference by contaminants frequently affects results. PCR based detection may be inhibited by substances in complex matrices. Modified methods of the PCR technique, such as magnetic capture-hybridization PCR (MCH-PCR), appear to improve the technique by removing the DNA products away from the inhibitors. However, the techniques required for PCR-based detection are slow and the procedures require skilled personnel working with labile reagents. Our approach is based on transferring bioluminescence (lux) genes into a selected bacteriophage. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that are widespread in nature and often are genus and species specific. This specificity eliminates or reduces false positives in a bacteriophage assay. The phage recognizes a specific receptor molecule on the surface of a susceptible bacterium, attaches and then injects the viral nucleic acid into the cell. The injected viral genome is expressed and then replicated, generating numerous exact copies of the viral genetic material including the lux genes, often resulting in an increase in bioluminescence by several hundred fold.

  17. [Oral contraceptives: knowledge and compliance].

    PubMed

    Koch, T; Marslew, U; Nielsen, M R

    1993-11-01

    One hundred and twenty (120) women, taking contraceptive pills, underwent a structured interview with a view elucidating their knowledge of the physiology of menstruation, the action and side effects of contraceptive pills and their compliance in the taking of contraceptive pills. The most important sources of information were the medical letters in magazines and the women's own doctors, while the teaching in the Folkeskole (primary and lower secondary school) had not had any major influence on the level of information. Well over one third of the interviewed women knew the most important action mechanism of the contraceptive pill, and half of the women could give a satisfactory explanation of the physiology of menstruation. Twenty-four percent (24%) thought that pregnancy could not occur until 1-2 months after the woman had ceased taking the pill. There was high compliance among the women i.e. that their behavior was correct when they had forgotten to take one or two contraceptive pills, when bleeding was irregular, and when beginning on a new package of pills. Eighty-three percent (83%) had experienced side effects that could be related to contraceptive pills. The investigation shows that there is a need for more efficient information about the effects of the Pill and about the physiology of menstruation. PMID:8236575

  18. Organic halogens in unpolluted waters and large bodies of water receiving bleach plant effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Grimvall, A.; Jonsson, S.; Karlsson, S.; Savenhed, R.; Boren, H. )

    1991-05-01

    In this paper the authors review and update recently performed studies of organic halogens in unpolluted waters and two large bodies of water receiving bleach plant effluents---Lake Vattern in Sweden and the Baltic Sea. All water samples contained measurable amounts of adsorbable organic halogens (AOX); the highest concentrations (up to 200 {mu}g Cl/L) were observed in humic lakes not exposed to any industrial discharges. Analysis of chlorophenols revealed that there is a long-distance transport ({gt} 100 km) of chloroguaiacols from bleach plants to remote parts of receiving waters. However, there was no evidence of chlorinated organics from bleach plants accumulating over several years in the water phase. One chlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and its methylated analogue, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, were also detected in surface waters considered to be unpolluted. Mass balance calculations showed that different processes in terrestrial environments make large contributions of AOX; enzyme-mediated chlorination of humic substances is a plausible explanation to the widespread occurrence of organic halogens.

  19. Beyond the Condom: Frontiers in Male Contraception.

    PubMed

    Roth, Mara Y; Amory, John K

    2016-05-01

    Nearly half of all pregnancies worldwide are unplanned, despite numerous contraceptive options available. No new contraceptive method has been developed for men since the invention of condom. Nevertheless, more than 25% of contraception worldwide relies on male methods. Therefore, novel effective methods of male contraception are of interest. Herein we review the physiologic basis for both male hormonal and nonhormonal methods of contraception. We review the history of male hormonal contraception development, current hormonal agents in development, as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contraception options for men. Nonhormonal methods reviewed will include both pharmacological and mechanical approaches in development, with specific focus on methods which inhibit the testicular retinoic acid synthesis and action. Multiple hormonal and nonhormonal methods of male contraception are in the drug development pathway, with the hope that a reversible, reliable, safe method of male contraception will be available to couples in the not too distant future. PMID:26947703

  20. Teaching in Uncharted Waters: Seeking Critical Body Literacy Scripts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Lorayne; Thomson, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Schools are places of learning, but they are also sites of struggle when fitness, obesity, and body image issues converge for students and teachers. Responding to teachers' concerns about their students on diets, a Canadian teachers' organization produced a body image program which included a training day for schools undertaking whole-school…

  1. Efficacy and safety of metformin or oral contraceptives, or both in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Young-Mo; Choi, Eun Joo

    2015-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrinopathy that affects approximately 10% of reproductive-aged women throughout their lives. Women with PCOS present with heterogeneous symptoms including ovulatory dysfunction, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries. Therefore, lifelong individualized management should be considered. Pharmacological agents commonly used to manage the symptoms are metformin and oral contraceptive pills. Although these medications have been beneficial in treating PCOS symptoms, their efficacy and safety are still not entirely elucidated. This study aimed to report the efficacy and safety of metformin, oral contraceptives, or their combination in the treatment of PCOS and to define their specific individual roles. Methods A literature search of original studies published in PubMed and Scopus was conducted to identify studies comparing metformin with oral contraceptives or evaluating the combination of both in PCOS. Results Eight clinical trials involving 313 patients were examined in the review. The intervention dosage of metformin ranged from 1,000 to 2,000 mg/d and that of oral contraceptives was ethinylestradiol 35 µg and cyproterone acetate 2 mg. Lower body mass index was observed with regimens including metformin, but increased body mass index was observed in monotherapy with oral contraceptives. Administration of metformin or oral contraceptives, especially as monotherapy, had a negative effect on lipid profiles. In addition, there are still uncertainties surrounding the effects of metformin or oral contraceptives in the management of insulin level, although they improved total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin levels. In the included studies, significant side effects due to metformin or oral contraceptives were not reported. Conclusion The clinical trials suggest that metformin or oral contraceptives are at least patient convenient, efficacious, and safe for the treatment of PCOS. However, well

  2. Television and contraception.

    PubMed

    Klein, L

    1986-01-01

    This article consists of excerpts from a speach made on October 19th at the 1986 annual meeting of the Association of Planned Parenthood Professionals by Dr. Luella Klein, President of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) between 1984-85. The speaker described the reaction of US television network to the ACOG's request that the networks air a public service announcement encouraging responsible sexual behavior among the nation's young people. In 1984 the ACOG initiated a public information program aimed at reducing the high number of unwanted births among young people. The ACOG with the help of an advertising agency developed a 27-second public service announcement stressing responsible parenthood and informing young people that they could write or call for further information. A booklet, entitled "Facts," was prepared for distribution to those who inquired. It advised young people to consider postponing sexual intercourse but to use the most effective methods of contraception if they decided to be sexually active. Oral contraceptives for females and condoms for males were recommended as the most effective methods. When the 3 major television networks, i.e., the American Broadcasting Company (ABC), the National Broadcasting Company (NBC), and the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS), were requested to carry the announcement, all 3 networks claimed the announcement was too controversial to air. These same networks do not hesitate to show blatant, irresponsible sexual behavior repeatedly during their entertainment programming, and commercials with sexual innuendos are routinely accepted for airing by the networks. In July, 1986, the ACOG called a news conference in New York City to inform the news media about the rejection of the announcement by the networks. The conference stimulated considerable interest, and the story was carried by many newspapers and by radio and television news programs. Many of the news accounts of the story contained

  3. Condoms: still the most popular contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Silverstone, T

    1997-01-01

    Condoms can be used as a barrier contraceptive and/or to protect against many sexually-transmitted diseases. They are easy to buy and use and free from medical risk. Carefully used, and used in conjunction with a spermicide, condoms have similar reliability to IUDs, progesterone-only pills and the diaphragm. The condom must be put on before the penis touches the vaginal area. The penis should not touch the vaginal area after the condom has been taken off. Oil-based products, eg baby oil, massage oil, lipstick, petroleum jelly, suntan oil, can damage the condom. If a lubricant is required, use one that is water-based. PMID:9348972

  4. Long-acting contraceptive options.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, A M

    1996-01-01

    Long-acting contraceptive methods are appropriate choices for women who prefer the convenience and high contraceptive efficacy of methods not requiring frequent compliance, and women for whom contraceptive doses of estrogen are either medically contraindicated or associated with persistent intolerable side effects. Annual pregnancy rates for the three methods described below are less than 1 per 100 woman-years. As currently formulated, levonorgestrel implants (Norplant) consist of six 34 x 2.4 mm soft plastic implants, each filled with 36 mg of crystalline levonorgestrel. Irregular and often persistent menstrual bleeding and spotting constitute the most important side effects experienced by and leading to method discontinuation in implant users. Implant removal is technically more difficult and time-consuming than insertion. Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA or Depo-Provera) is injected as an aqueous suspension of microcrystals. Intramuscular injection of 150 mg of DMPA results in more than 3 months of contraception. Irregular bleeding and spotting followed by amenorrhea, constitute the most importance side effects experienced by DMPA users. Because DMPA use can result in prolonged (but not permanent) infertility, DMPA is not an optimum contraceptive choice for women who may want to conceive in the next one or two years. The Copper T380A intrauterine device (IUD) provides reversible contraception for up to 10 years. IUDs act as contraceptives, not early abortafacients. Recent epidemiologic data indicate that long-term IUD use does not increase the occurrence of pelvic inflammatory disease. Heavier menstrual flow and cramps constitute the main side effects experienced by women using the copper IUD. Intrauterine device insertion and removal are accomplished during brief office-based procedures. PMID:8829701

  5. Fish movement and habitat use depends on water body size and shape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woolnough, D.A.; Downing, J.A.; Newton, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    Home ranges are central to understanding habitat diversity, effects of fragmentation and conservation. The distance that an organism moves yields information on life history, genetics and interactions with other organisms. Present theory suggests that home range is set by body size of individuals. Here, we analyse estimates of home ranges in lakes and rivers to show that body size of fish and water body size and shape influence home range size. Using 71 studies including 66 fish species on five continents, we show that home range estimates increased with increasing water body size across water body shapes. This contrasts with past studies concluding that body size sets home range. We show that water body size was a consistently significant predictor of home range. In conjunction, body size and water body size can provide improved estimates of home range than just body size alone. As habitat patches are decreasing in size worldwide, our findings have implications for ecology, conservation and genetics of populations in fragmented ecosystems. ?? 2008 Blackwell Munksgaard.

  6. Contraceptive research and development.

    PubMed

    Aitken, R J

    1979-05-01

    Contraceptive research and development is primarily performed at universities and research councils due to the cost and time involved for industry and philanthropic organizations to bring drugs to market. Promising fundamental research includes immunization of women against chorionic gonadotrophin in order to disrupt the embryo in early pregnancy. Post-coital drugs, such as Anordrin, are also being developed for situations involving low-coital frequency. Once-a-month formulas are being developed to 1) exert a direct luteolytic effect on the corpus luteum; 2) interfere with the luteotrophic action of the implanting blastocyst; 3) inhibit the progestational development of the endometrium during the luteal phase of the cycle; or 4) exert a specific toxic effect on the early embryo. Methods for detecting ovulation incuding urine and saliva tests as well as electronic devices to measure the blood flow or temperature associated with ovulation are also being explored. Reversible fertility control for men which suppress the pituitary function is under investigation. Applied research includes the design and assessment of alternate delivery systems such as intranasal sprays, intracervical devices, paper pills, vaginal rings, and biodegradable subdermal implants. In addition, long-acting injectable progestins, improved IUDs, and improved sterilization techniques are all being tested. With future funds, the comparative safety, efficacy, and acceptability of various fertility methods can be established. PMID:387168

  7. Oral contraceptives and exercise.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, R A; Woebkenberg, N R; Jarrett, M T

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory study was undertaken with volunteer females (aged 20-25) to determine the effect of OCs (oral contraceptives) on hematologic and metabolic variables during exercise. 5 of the women studied were naturally cycling and 7 were taking OCs. The women worked at 2 workloads on a bicycle ergometer at 50% and 90% of their maximal aerobic capacity during 3 different phases of their menstrual cycle. There was no better time of the month for doing the 50% or the 90% workload in either group. Heartrate for the OC group was significantly higher at the 50% maximal capacity. Results of the test indicate tha women on OCs have somewhat reduced cardiac efficiency and are ventilating more to carry out a given amount of work when compared to women who are naturally cycling. Possible explanations for the higher heart rate are put forward. The main limitation of the study is that the subject numbers involved are small and the number of cycles studied is also small. PMID:12278397

  8. Stable isotope composition of land snail body water and its relation to environmental waters and shell carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Goodfriend, G.A.; Magaritz, M.; Gat, J.R. )

    1989-12-01

    Day-to-day and within-day (diel) variations in {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O of the body water of the land snail, Theba pisana, were studied at a site in the southern coastal plain of Israel. Three phases of variation, which relate to isotopic changes in atmospheric water vapor, were distinguished. The isotopic variations can be explained by isotopic equilibration with atmospheric water vapor and/or uptake of dew derived therefrom. During the winter, when the snails are active, there is only very minor enrichment in {sup 18}O relative to equilibrium with water vapor or dew, apparently as a result of metabolic activity. But this enrichment becomes pronounced after long periods of inactivity. Within-day variation in body water isotopic composition is minor on non-rain days. Shell carbonate is enriched in {sup 18}O by ca. 1-2% relative to equilibrium with body water. In most regions, the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor (or dew) is a direct function of that of rain. Because the isotopic composition of snail body water is related to that of atmospheric water vapor and the isotopic composition of shell carbonate in turn is related to that of body water, land snail shell carbonate {sup 18}O should provide a reliable indication of rainfall {sup 18}O. However, local environmental conditions and the ecological properties of the snail species must be taken into account.

  9. Effects of Contraceptive Education on Adolescent Male Contraceptive Behavior and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mary E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between contraceptive education and teenage male contraceptive behavior was investigated. Findings indicated that brief or moderately in-depth contraceptive education had little effect on contraceptive behavior. The teenage pregnancy and other sex-related problems may make parents and schools more amenable to comprehensive…

  10. Contraception--the morning after.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J H

    1984-01-01

    Although no postcoital method has been developed for safe and effective regular use, postcoital contraception is being offered in Canada and Western Europe on an emergency basis to people who experience such problems as a burst condom. It is little known in the US, however. The 1st commercial version of a postcoital method recently became available to women in England. A former postcoital contraceptive was diethylstilbestrol (DES) which has been linked to cancer in the daughters of women who had taken the drug to prevent miscarriage. A new postcoital contraceptive regime was developed by Albert Yuzpe and consists of 4 ordinary contraceptive pills combining estrogen and progestin to be taken over a 12-hour period. In the US, this is the formulaion of birth control pill marketed under the trade name Ovral by Wyeth Laboratories. England and Germany are the only countries in which the Yuzpe method is officially approved for use as an emergency postocital contraceptive, but the method is used to some degree in most European countries, being well-known in France and Denmark. The most frequent side-effect reported by Yuzpe is vomiting experienced by 29% of women; another 22% felt nauseated. Other side effects, e.g. headache, were infrequent. The findings of the Pregnancy Advisory Service and the Brook Advisory Centre in Britain are reported. Overall very few side effects were found. Postcoital contraceptive treatment may cause the length of the cycle in which it occurs to be irregular. Treatment before day 15 has been found to shorten the cycle, whereas treatment after day 15 lengthens it. The majority of women who become pregnant due to treatment failure tend to seek an abortion. Ectopic pregnancy incidence may also be a result of treatment failure. In 1981, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) issued a statement endorsing the use of postcoital contraceptives. Reasons for using them include rape, problems with barrier methods, ineffective use of the

  11. Spatiotemporal dynamic of surface water bodies using Landsat time-series data from 1999 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulbure, Mirela G.; Broich, Mark

    2013-05-01

    Detailed information on the spatiotemporal dynamic in surface water bodies is important for quantifying the effects of a drying climate, increased water abstraction and rapid urbanization on wetlands. The Swan Coastal Plain (SCP) with over 1500 wetlands is a global biodiversity hotspot located in the southwest of Western Australia, where more than 70% of the wetlands have been lost since European settlement. SCP is located in an area affected by recent climate change that also experiences rapid urban development and ground water abstraction. Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery from 1999 to 2011 has been used to automatically derive a spatially and temporally explicit time-series of surface water body extent on the SCP. A mapping method based on the Landsat data and a decision tree classification algorithm is described. Two generic classifiers were derived for the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 data. Several landscape metrics were computed to summarize the intra and interannual patterns of surface water dynamic. Top of the atmosphere (TOA) reflectance of band 5 followed by TOA reflectance of bands 4 and 3 were the explanatory variables most important for mapping surface water bodies. Accuracy assessment yielded an overall classification accuracy of 96%, with 89% producer's accuracy and 93% user's accuracy of surface water bodies. The number, mean size, and total area of water bodies showed high seasonal variability with highest numbers in winter and lowest numbers in summer. The number of water bodies in winter increased until 2005 after which a decline can be noted. The lowest numbers occurred in 2010 which coincided with one of the years with the lowest rainfall in the area. Understanding the spatiotemporal dynamic of surface water bodies on the SCP constitutes the basis for understanding the effect of rainfall, water abstraction and urban development on water bodies in a spatially explicit way.

  12. Water body distributions across scales: a comparison of three Arctic wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muster, S.; Heim, B.; Abnizova, A.; Boike, J.

    2012-12-01

    Water bodies are ubiquitous features in Arctic wetlands, ranging from very small polygonal ponds to very large thermokarst lakes. Ponds, i.e. waters with a surface area smaller than 1 ha, have been recognized as hotspots of biological activity and greenhouse gas emissions. Regional and global models, however, cannot resolve ponds due to the coarse resolution. The aims of this study were to identify common characteristics of Arctic wetlands regarding (1) water body size and abundance, and (2) Landsat subpixel fraction of water cover. We mapped water bodies in three Arctic wetlands, i.e. Polar Bear Pass on Bathurst Island in the Canadian High Arctic, Samoylov Island in the Lena River Delta in Siberia, Russia, and Barrow Peninsula on the Alaska Coastal Plain. High-resolution (0.3 to 4 m) water body maps were overlain on to Landsat albedo maps to extract the proportion of open water within a Landsat mixed pixel. At all three sites ponds occupied 95% of the total number of surface waters. Surface waters smaller than 0.1 ha, which cannot be detected with Landsat data, still contributed 60% and higher to the total number. All study areas showed similar rates of decline in water body abundance with increasing water surface area (Fig. 1). Previous studies have fitted abundance-size distributions of water bodies to the Pareto distribution, which appears linear on a log-log plot. Our data, however, shows paretian behavior only in the upper tail of the distribution so that the Pareto distribution strongly overestimates small water bodies. Landsat albedo increased with decreasing proportion of open water cover per Landsat pixel. Linear regressions for albedo values with a subpixel water cover between 100% and less than 5% showed r-square values larger than 0.8, which constitutes a better performance than other more complex unmixing methods. In conclusion, all three wetlands showed similar properties regarding size-abundance data of water bodies, scaling errors, and retrieval of

  13. [Ictus, pregnancy and contraception].

    PubMed

    Pareja, A; Láinez, J M

    1995-01-01

    Ictus is a severe complication of pregnancy and the puerperium and a significant cause of maternal mortality. The risk of ictus increases by 3-13 times during pregnancy because of a tendency toward hypercoagulability, hemodynamic alterations related to increased blood volume, and severe arterial hypertension. This work outlines the incidence, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular pathology, cerebral venous thrombosis, and hemorrhagic cerebrovascular pathology occurring during pregnancy. Risk factors are indicated. The role of oral contraceptives (OCs) as a risk factor for cerebrovascular pathology is then discussed. Various prospective and retrospective studies to establish the causal or casual relationship between OC use and ictus have been published since 1962. Two important studies published in 1969 found a statistically significant increased relative risk of ischemic cerebrovascular accident in OC users. The Collaborative Group for the Study of Stroke in Young Women included hemorrhagic ictus in a retrospective study for the first time in 1973, finding that the risk of thrombotic and hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident was significantly greater in OC users. In 1975, using the same sample, the group found a positive relation between increased blood pressure and risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic events in OC users. The largest prospective study, begun by the Royal College of General Practitioners in England in 1968, found an increased risk of mortality from circulatory diseases in OC users, with mortality risks for coronary ischemia and subarachnoid hemorrhage statistically significant. The study found that the use of OCs increased the risk of fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage, especially in women over 35 who smoked. Other prospective studies found an increased incidence of nonfatal cerebrovascular accident, with relative risks for all cerebrovascular accidents ranging from 5 to 6.5. A recent continuation of the Royal College Study found that

  14. Water body mapping method with HJ-1A/B satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shanlong; Wu, Bingfang; Yan, Nana; Wang, Hao

    2011-06-01

    This paper proposes an integrated water body mapping method with HJ-1A/B satellite imagery, the CCD (charge coupled device) data of the Chinese environmental satellites that were launched on September 6th, 2008. It combines the difference between NDVI and NDWI (NDVI-NDWI) with SLOPE and near-infrared (NIR) band. The NDVI-NDWI index is used to enhance the contrast between water bodies and the surrounding surface features; the topographic SLOPE is used to eliminate the mountain shadow; and the NIR band is used to reduce the effects of artificial construction land. The objectives are evaluating the potential of the HJ-1A/B imagery on water body monitoring, and proposing ideally mapping method. The test study results indicated that the NDVI-NDWI index is superior to the single index of NDVI and NDWI to enhance the contrast between water bodies and the rest of the features. On the basis of the accurately mapped water bodies in the HJ-1A/B CCD images of the study area, we conclude that the HJ-1A/B multi-spectral satellite images is an ideal data source for high spatial and temporal resolution water bodies monitoring. And the integrated water body mapping method is suitable for the applications of HJ-1A/B multi-spectral satellite images in this field.

  15. Teen Council urges improved contraceptive accessibility.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    The Center for Population Option's (CPO) Teen Council conducted a survey of contraceptive accessibility in 45 pharmacies and 15 convenience stores in the Washington D.C. area. The survey focussed on where nonprescription contraceptives are located in the stores, whether condoms and spermicidal contraceptives are displayed on the same shelf, how clerks treat teenagers when buying contraceptives, the price of condoms, and whether signs indicate where contraceptives are located. Besides learning that finding contraceptives is difficult for teenagers, the survey revealed that teenagers often experience negative behavior from clerks, especially female teenagers when confronted with male clerks. Based on the results of the survey, the CPO Teen Council met with regional representatives of drug and convenience store chains to suggest ways to make contraceptives more accessible to teens. Since only 13% of the stores surveyed had signs clearly marking where contraceptives are, the Council recommended that all stores clearly mark the aisles where contraceptives are. Additionally, it suggested placing all contraceptives on the same shelf. According to the survey 35% of the pharmacies and 32% of the convenience stores had condoms behind the counter. Since teenagers are often reluctant to ask for them because of the fear of being judged by clerks, the Council suggested placing contraceptives where teens can buy them without having to ask for them. In addition, it recommended that clerks treat teens with the same respect as older customers when purchasing contraceptives. The Council also suggested that pamphlets and information on sexually transmitted diseases be available. PMID:12282042

  16. Urban impacts on the water quality of selected water bodies in the Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Lucas; Holbach, Andreas; Wei, Hu; Wang, Lijing; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Binghui; Norra, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Urban systems belong to the major input sources for pollutants into aquatic systems. In China, the rising urbanisation and industrialisation causes a growing pressure on rivers, lakes and estuaries. With the recent impoundment of the Yangtze River by the Three Gorges Dam, the newly formed Three Gorges Reservoir is additionally experiencing drastic changes in the flow regime [1]. In the frame of the Sino-German "Yangtze-Project" [2] samples were taken from the water bodies in proximity to the Cities of Chongqing, Kaixian and Wushan during a field campaign in April 2011. Water samples were analysed for inorganic contents in suspended solids and the dissolved phase to assess the impact of these cities on the water quality of the reservoir. Results show that input from urban sources, together with the effects from the impoundment of the Yangtze River, deteriorates the quality of water and sediments in the Three Gorges Reservoir. Water in the Wushan Lake is trapped in by the Yangtze River flowing by, which leads to longer retention times of effluent water from the city. The chemical composition of the lake water is also measurable upstream in the Daninghe itself and might be due to the backwater effect. In the Xiaojiang River near Kaixian the low flow velocity from the backwater effect of the Yangtze, together with influences from the city have led to problems with algal blooms. High metal concentrations at Chongqing indicate a strong impact of this megacity on the water quality of the Three Gorges Reservoir and the sediments of the Yangtze River. Acknowledgements: Financial support by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany (BMBF), the Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China (MOST) and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). References: [1] Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People's Republic of China, 2010: Bulletin on the Ecological and Environmental Monitoring Results of the Three Gorges Project 2010 [2

  17. Water Body Extraction from Multi Spectral Image by Spectral Pattern Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D. D.

    2012-07-01

    Water is one of the vital components of the Earth environment which needs to be frequently monitored. Satellite multispectral remote sensing image has been used over decades for water body extraction. Methodology of water body extraction can be summarized to three groups: feature extraction, supervised and unsupervised classification and data fusion. These methods, however, are of pure mathematical and statistical approach and little of them explore essential characteristics of multispectral image which is based on ground object radiance absorption behaviour in each sensing spectral bands. The spectral absorption characteristics of water body in visible and infrared bands differ very much from the other ground objects. They depend only on the used spectral bands and can be considered as invariant and sensor independent. In this paper the author proposed an application of spectral pattern analysis for water body extraction using spectral bands green, red, near infrared NIR and short wave infrared SWIR. The proposed algorithm has been used for water body extraction by Spot 5 and Landsat 5 TM images. Ground truth validation was carried out in Hanoi City. The advantage of this algorithm does not base on water body extraction only but it allows to asses also water quality. Different level of turbidity and organic matter contents could be classified by using additional index.

  18. Water-Body types identification in urban areas from radarsat-2 fully polarimetric SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lei; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Chao; Chen, Fulong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel method for supervised water-body extraction and water-body types identification from Radarsat-2 fully polarimetric (FP) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in complex urban areas. First, supervised water-body extraction using the Wishart classifier is performed, and the false alarms that are formed in built-up areas are removed using morphological processing methods and spatial contextual information. Then, the support vector machine (SVM), the classification and regression tree (CART), TreeBagger (TB), and random forest (RF) classifiers are introduced for water-body types (rivers, lakes, ponds) identification. In SAR images, certain other objects that are misclassified as water are also considered in water-body types identification. Several shape and polarimetric features of each candidate water-body are used for identification. Radarsat-2 PolSAR data that were acquired over Suzhou city and Dongguan city in China are used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, and the experimental results are evaluated at both the object and pixel levels. We compared the water-body types classification results using only shape features and the combination of shape and polarimetric features, the experimental results show that the polarimetric features can eliminate the misclassifications from certain other objects like roads to water areas, and the increasement of classification accuracy embodies at both the object and pixel levels. The experimental results show that the proposed methods can achieve satisfactory accuracies at the object level [89.4% (Suzhou), 95.53% (Dongguan)] and the pixel level [96.22% (Suzhou), 97.95% (Dongguan)] for water-body types classification, respectively.

  19. [Contraceptive pill amenorrhea--does it exist?].

    PubMed

    Fries, H; Nillius, S J

    1975-11-01

    The possibility of amenorrhea as a direct result of discontinuing oral contraceptives is discussed and its etiology is explored. In a study of 1860 women in Uppsala county in Sweden, 16% of the amenorrhea cases among these women could be temporally related to the discontinuation of oral contraceptive use. Earlier irregularities of menstruation and psychological stress are discussed as indications that "contraceptive pill amenorrhea" could occur. Loss of weight, often combined with symptoms of anorexia nervosa, is also a frequent indication of susceptibility to "contraceptive pill amenorrhea." The possibility of "contraceptive pill amenorrhea" as an iatrogenic syndrome is discussed. PMID:1186384

  20. Practice Bulletin Summary No. 152: Emergency Contraception.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Emergency contraception, also known as postcoital contraception, is therapy used to prevent pregnancy after an unprotected or inadequately protected act of sexual intercourse. Common indications for emergency contraception include contraceptive failure (eg, condom breakage or missed doses of oral contraceptives) and failure to use any form of contraception (1-3). Although oral emergency contraception was first described in the medical literature in the 1960s, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first dedicated product for emergency contraception in 1998. Since then, several new products have been introduced. Methods of emergency contraception include oral administration of combined estrogen-progestin, progestin only, or selective progesterone receptor modulators and insertion of a copper intrauterine device (IUD). Many women are unaware of the existence of emergency contraception, misunderstand its use and safety, or do not use it when a need arises (4-6). The purpose of this Practice Bulletin is to review the evidence for the efficacy and safety of available methods of emergency contraception and to increase awareness of these methods among obstetrician-gynecologists and other gynecologic providers. PMID:26287780

  1. Practice Bulletin No. 152: Emergency Contraception.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Emergency contraception, also known as postcoital contraception, is therapy used to prevent pregnancy after an unprotected or inadequately protected act of sexual intercourse. Common indications for emergency contraception include contraceptive failure (eg, condom breakage or missed doses of oral contraceptives) and failure to use any form of contraception (). Although oral emergency contraception was first described in the medical literature in the 1960s, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first dedicated product for emergency contraception in 1998. Since then, several new products have been introduced. Methods of emergency contraception include oral administration of combined estrogen-progestin, progestin only, or selective progesterone receptor modulators and insertion of a copper intrauterine device (IUD). Many women are unaware of the existence of emergency contraception, misunderstand its use and safety, or do not use it when a need arises (). The purpose of this Practice Bulletin is to review the evidence for the efficacy and safety of available methods of emergency contraception and to increase awareness of these methods among obstetrician-gynecologists and other gynecologic providers. PMID:26287787

  2. New Evidence that the Valles Marineris Interior Layered Deposits Formed in Standing Bodies of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Parker, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    Our results indicate that the best explanation for the origin and current morphology of the Valles Marineris interior layered deposits is by deposition of sediments, including chemical precipitates, in standing bodies of water.

  3. LOCATING VOLATILE ORGANIC PLUMES ENTERING WATER BODIES USING PASSIVE VAPOR DIFFUSION SAMPLERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many water bodies in New England are impacted by volatile organic contaminated groundwater intrusions. To determine the health and ecological impacts of these intrusions, it is important to locate fracture zones that transport groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compou...

  4. FastStats: Contraceptive Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Growth [PDF - 723 KB] Use of Emergency Contraception Among Women Aged 15–44: United States, 2006–2010 Related Links National Survey of Family Growth CDC Division of Reproductive Health National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Get Email Updates To receive email updates ...

  5. Contraception and the Adolescent Diabetic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennoy, Ilene

    1989-01-01

    Data from a study of 11 teenage diabetics suggests that pregnancy among adolescent diabetics is more frequent than among the general population, at a time when diabetic control is poor because of psychosocial factors associated with adolescence. Current recommendations regarding contraception for diabetic women, focusing on barrier methods, are…

  6. Water Transport and the Evolution of CM Parent Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Rob; Cohen, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Meteorites have amino acids and hydrated minerals which constrain the peak temperature ranges they have experienced. CMs in particular have a narrow range (273-325K). Bulk fluid motion during hydration constrained to small scales (less than mm). Some asteroids are known to have hydrated minerals on their surfaces. It is presumed these two facts may be related. Problem: hydration only occurs (significantly) with liquid water; melting water only occurs early on in nebula (1-10 Myrs ANC); in nebula asteroid surface temperature very cold (approximately 150K). Can indigenous alteration produce CMs and/or surface hydration?

  7. [Study on polarization spectral feature of suspended sediment in the water body].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin; Wang, Xian-Hua; Pan, Bang-Long

    2012-07-01

    Remote sensing of lake water based on water-leaving radiance is to retrieve the concentrations of suspended sediment, phytoplankton and yellow substance which have great impacts on spectrum to assess the water quality. Howerver, because of the complexity of the lake water compositons and the interference between the different components, it is of great difficulty to get accurate results with the reflectance spectrum method developed recently. In the present paper, the authors firstly discussed the reflectance and polarization spectral feature of suspended sediment water body, found out the relations of the reflectance and the degree of polarization of water-leaving radiance and the concentration of suspended sediment at the sensitive bands. The authors also compared the effectiveness of the retrieval approaches based on reflectance and polarization in laboratory water body and Chaohu water body respectively. The results show that in the lake water body where the constituents are very complex, the polarization information has greater capacity of anti-jamming, therefore it will have great potential applictions in lake water quality remote sensing. PMID:23016352

  8. Relationship between body condition of American alligators and water depth in the Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fujisaki, Ikuko; Rice, Kenneth G.; Pearlstine, Leonard G.; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    Feeding opportunities of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) in freshwater wetlands in south Florida are closely linked to hydrologic conditions. In the Everglades, seasonally and annually fluctuating surface water levels affect populations of aquatic organisms that alligators consume. Since prey becomes more concentrated when water depth decreases, we hypothesized an inverse relationship between body condition and water depth in the Everglades. On average, condition of adult alligators in the dry season was significantly higher than in the wet season, but this was not the case for juveniles/subadults. The correlation between body condition and measured water depth at capture locations was weak; however, there was a significant negative correlation between the condition and predicted water depth prior to capture for all animals except for spring juveniles/subadults which had a weak positive condition-water depth relationship. Overall, a relatively strong inverse correlation occurred at 10-49 days prior to the capture day, suggesting that current body condition of alligators may depend on feeding opportunities during that period. Fitted regression of body condition on water depth (mean depth of 10 days when condition-water depth correlation was greatest) resulted in a significantly negative slope, except for spring adult females and spring juveniles/subadults for which slopes were not significantly different from zero. Our results imply that water management practices may be critical for alligators in the Everglades since water depth can affect animal condition in a relatively short period of time.

  9. Metabolic effects of contraceptive steroids.

    PubMed

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Nath, Anita

    2011-06-01

    Estrogen and progestins have been used by millions of women as effective combined contraceptives. The safety of hormonal contraceptives has been documented by years of follow-up and serious adverse events that may be related to their use are rare in the young population exposed to these agents. The balance between the benefits and the risks of contraceptive steroids is generally positive in particular when comparing to the risks of pregnancy and especially in women with risk factors. The metabolic changes induced by the synthetic steroids used in contraception, such as lipoprotein changes, insulin response to glucose, and coagulation factors have been considered as potential markers of cardiovascular and venous risk. Observations of these effects have led to modifications of the composition of hormonal contraceptive in order to minimize these changes and hence potentially decrease the risks. The synthetic estrogen Ethinyl-Estradiol (EE) exerts a stronger effect that natural estradiol (E2) on hepatic metabolism including estrogen-dependent markers such as liver proteins. This stronger hepatic impact of EE has been related to its 17α-ethinyl group which prevents the inactivation of the molecule and results in a more pronounced hepatic effect of EE as compared to estradiol. Due to its strong activity, administering EE via a non-oral route does not prevent its impact on liver proteins. In order to circumvent the metabolic changes induced by EE, newer products using more natural compounds such as estradiol (E2) and estradiol valerate (E2V) have been introduced. The synthetic progestins used for contraception are structurally related either to testosterone (T) (estranes and gonanes) or to progesterone (pregnanes and 19-norpregnanes). Several new progestins have been designed to bind more specifically to the progesterone receptor and to minimize side-effects related to androgenic, estrogenic or glucocorticoid receptor interactions. Dienogest (DNG), and drospirenone (DRSP

  10. An elastic body impacting the water surface; inspired by diving birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghwan; Ochs, Alex; Gart, Sean

    2013-11-01

    We investigate how a soft elastic body responds to water-entry impact analogous to a bird diving into water to catch prey. Dumbbell shaped objects made of two acrylic spheres connected by an elastic rod are dropped into water. A buckling threshold was found by varying impact force and elastic rod stiffness. This threshold may have implication as to how birds are able to safely dive into water at high speeds and avoid any neck-injury.

  11. Establishing water body areal extent trends in interior Alaska from multi-temporal Landsat data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rover, Jennifer R.; Ji, Lei; Wylie, Bruce K.; Tieszen, Larry L.

    2012-01-01

    An accurate approach is needed for monitoring, quantifying and understanding surface water variability due to climate change. Separating inter- and intra-annual variances from longer-term shifts in surface water extents due to contemporary climate warming requires repeat measurements spanning a several-decade period. Here, we show that trends developed from multi-date measurements of the extents of more than 15,000 water bodies in central Alaska using Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS), Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data (1979–2009) were highly influenced by the quantity and timing of the data. Over the 30-year period from 1979 to 2009, the study area had a net decrease (p < 0.05) in the extents of 3.4% of water bodies whereas 86% of water bodies exhibited no significant change. The Landsat-derived dataset provides an opportunity for additional research assessing the drivers of lake and wetland change in this region.

  12. Contraceptive knowledge, contraceptive use, and self-esteem among Navy personnel.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, C K; Lall, R; Johnson, W B

    1997-04-01

    This study evaluated the sexual knowledge (including contraceptive and reproductive knowledge), contraceptive use, and self-esteem among a sample of 158 male and female United States Navy sailors assigned to Navy ships. In spite of the fact that men and women viewed themselves as relatively knowledgeable with respect to contraception, results showed substantial knowledge deficits. Women demonstrated significantly greater sexual knowledge than men, and contraceptive/ reproductive knowledge was highly correlated with self-reported use of contraceptives. Finally, self-esteem was highly correlated with sexual knowledge and certain contraceptive use behaviors. PMID:9110557

  13. How Close Do We Live to Water? A Global Analysis of Population Distance to Freshwater Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Kummu, Matti; de Moel, Hans; Ward, Philip J.; Varis, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, people have inhabited places with ready access to fresh water. Today, over 50% of the global population lives in urban areas, and water can be directed via tens of kilometres of pipelines. Still, however, a large part of the world's population is directly dependent on access to natural freshwater sources. So how are inhabited places related to the location of freshwater bodies today? We present a high-resolution global analysis of how close present-day populations live to surface freshwater. We aim to increase the understanding of the relationship between inhabited places, distance to surface freshwater bodies, and climatic characteristics in different climate zones and administrative regions. Our results show that over 50% of the world's population lives closer than 3 km to a surface freshwater body, and only 10% of the population lives further than 10 km away. There are, however, remarkable differences between administrative regions and climatic zones. Populations in Australia, Asia, and Europe live closest to water. Although populations in arid zones live furthest away from freshwater bodies in absolute terms, relatively speaking they live closest to water considering the limited number of freshwater bodies in those areas. Population distributions in arid zones show statistically significant relationships with a combination of climatic factors and distance to water, whilst in other zones there is no statistically significant relationship with distance to water. Global studies on development and climate adaptation can benefit from an improved understanding of these relationships between human populations and the distance to fresh water. PMID:21687675

  14. Steroidal contraceptive use is associated with lower bone mineral density in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moran, Lisa J; Thomson, R L; Buckley, J D; Noakes, M; Clifton, P M; Norman, R J; Brinkworth, G D

    2015-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition affecting reproductive-aged women with features including hyperandrogenism and menstrual irregularity frequently treated with hormonal steroidal contraceptives. Women with PCOS appear to have lower bone mineral density (BMD). While steroidal contraceptives may positively affect bone health, their effect on BMD in PCOS is not known. The aim of this study was to assess BMD in women with PCOS according to recent contraceptive use. A cross-sectional analysis of 95 pre-menopausal overweight or obese sedentary women with PCOS [age 29.4 ± 6.4 years, body mass index (BMI) 36.1 ± 5.3 kg/m(2)] who either recently took steroidal contraceptives (ceased 3 months prior) or were not taking steroidal contraceptives was conducted. Clinical outcomes included BMD, anthropometry, insulin, glucose, reproductive hormones, dietary intake and vitamin use. BMD was significantly lower for women who used contraceptives compared to those who did not (mean difference 0.06 g/cm(2) 95 % confidence interval -0.11, -0.02, p = 0.005). In regression models, lower BMD was independently associated with contraceptive use (β = -0.05, 95 % CI -0.094, -0.002, p = 0.042), higher testosterone (β = -0.03, 95 % CI -0.05, -0.0008, p = 0.043) and lower BMI (β = 0.006, 95 % CI 0.002, 0.01, p = 0.007) (r (2) = 0.22, p = 0.001 for entire model). We report for the first time that overweight and obese women with PCOS with recent steroidal contraceptive use had lower BMD in comparison to non-users independent of factors known to contribute to BMD. Whether this observation is directly related to steroidal contraceptive use or other factors requires further investigation. PMID:25957668

  15. Emergency contraception - Potential for women's health

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Suneeta

    2014-01-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) is a safe and effective method which is used to prevent unwanted pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Many of the unwanted pregnancies end in unsafe abortions. The search for an ideal contraceptive, which does not interfere with spontaneity or pleasure of the sexual act, yet effectively controls the fertility, is still continuing. Numerous contraceptive techniques are available, yet contraceptive coverage continues to be poor in India. Thus, even when not planning for a pregnancy, exposure to unprotected sex takes place often, necessitating the use of emergency contraception. This need may also arise due to failure of contraceptive method being used (condom rupture, diaphragm slippage, forgotten oral pills) or following sexual assault. Emergency contraception is an intervention that can prevent a large number of unwanted pregnancies resulting from failure of regular contraception or unplanned sexual activity, which in turn helps in reducing the maternal mortality and morbidity due to unsafe abortions. However, a concern has been expressed regarding repeated and indiscriminate usage of e-pill, currently the rational use of emergency contraception is being promoted as it is expected to make a significant dent in reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions. In fact, since the introduction of emergency contraception, the contribution of unsafe abortion towards maternal mortality has declined from 13 to 8 per cent. PMID:25673542

  16. Psychosexual issues in adolescent contraception.

    PubMed

    Greer, J G

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the psychosocial and developmental research focusing on adolescent contraception. Specific emphasis is on the interrelationship of psychosexual development and culture in preventing or exacerbating problems. Attention is directed to the following: program policy and planning; major literature reviews on adolescent sexuality; female development and early coitus; the male partner; the competent adolescent contraceptor; and directions for future research (psychological sequelae of early coitus in girls, factors affecting delay of 1st coitus in girls, and the promotion of competent contraceptive behavior). In the less developed countries, efforts to delay 1st birth and increase birth spacing must form part of the overall strategy to upgrade the survival rates and health of infants. Ancillary to such urgent public health policy concerns is the current worldwide spread of the modern feminist social movement, generating pressures to make education and work opportunities available to female adolescents in the 3rd world. Adolescent pregnancy in the developed countries is not a major world health problem; prenatal care and adequate nutrition are feasible for the pregnant teenager. Yet, no cultural supports exist for such mother-infant dyads, and such pregnancies are viewed, particularly by educated women, as reversing a developed nation's social progress. There has been a growing effort in the US to implement contraceptive programs directed at the sexually active female adolescent between menarche and age 18. Issues other than availability of abortion and contraceptive supplies are also operating. Developmental level of the public health service user and specifically psychosexual developmental level, is a factor which must be considered in program policy and planning. Developmentally, the logical course of introduction to sexuality for young females would be solitary masturbation, heterosexual mutual masturbation, and coitus. Cultures at ease with

  17. Triple oxygen isotope signatures in evaporated water bodies from the Sistan Oasis, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surma, J.; Assonov, S.; Bolourchi, M. J.; Staubwasser, M.

    2015-10-01

    Natural samples from water bodies in the arid and semiarid environment of the Sistan Oasis, Iran, demonstrate a systematic evolution of 17O-excess and δ18O as a result of nonequilibrium fractionation during extreme evaporation. Residual water samples exhibit a significant and systematic decrease of 17O-excess with progressive evaporation loss, reaching values of -160 per meg over a 35‰ range of δ18O. Waters from heavily evaporated volume-limited natural bodies with limited or no recharge fall on the theoretically predicted isotopic evolution curve in agreement with ambient relative humidity of 30 to 35%. Recharged water bodies appear to follow a different trend. These new results demonstrate the potential of 17O-excess for the estimation of evaporation loss and ambient conditions in an arid environment.

  18. Contamination of surface-water bodies after reactor accidents by the erosion of atmospherically deposited radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Helton, J C; Muller, A B; Bayer, A

    1985-06-01

    Reactor safety analyses usually do not consider the population risk which might result from the contamination of surface-water bodies after reactor accidents by the erosion of atmospherically deposited radionuclides. This paper is intended to provide perspective on the reasonableness of this omission. Data are presented which are suggestive of the rates at which atmospherically deposited radionuclides might erode into surface-water bodies. These rates are used in the calculation of potential health effects resulting from surface-water contamination due to such erosion. These health effects are compared with predicted health effects due to atmospheric and terrestrial pathways after reactor accidents. The presented results support the belief that the contamination of surface-water bodies after reactor accidents by the erosion of atmospherically deposited radionuclides is not a major contributor to the risk associated with such accidents. PMID:3997527

  19. Moving towards adaptive management of cyanotoxin-impaired water bodies.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Otten, Timothy G; Joyner, Alan R

    2016-09-01

    The cyanobacteria are a phylum of bacteria that have played a key role in shaping the Earth's biosphere due to their pioneering ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Throughout their history, cyanobacteria have experienced major biogeochemical changes accompanying Earth's geochemical evolution over the past 2.5+ billion years, including periods of extreme climatic change, hydrologic, nutrient and radiation stress. Today, they remain remarkably successful, exploiting human nutrient over-enrichment as nuisance "blooms." Cyanobacteria produce an array of unique metabolites, the functions and biotic ramifications of which are the subject of diverse ecophysiological studies. These metabolites are relevant from organismal and ecosystem function perspectives because some can be toxic and fatal to diverse biota, including zooplankton and fish consumers of algal biomass, and high-level consumers of aquatic food sources and drinking water, including humans. Given the long history of environmental extremes and selection pressures that cyanobacteria have experienced, it is likely that that these toxins serve ecophysiological functions aimed at optimizing growth and fitness during periods of environmental stress. Here, we explore the molecular and ecophysiological mechanisms underlying cyanotoxin production, with emphasis on key environmental conditions potentially controlling toxin production. Based on this information, we offer potential management strategies for reducing cyanotoxin potentials in natural waters; for cyanotoxins with no clear drivers yet elucidated, we highlight the data gaps and research questions that are still lacking. We focus on the four major classes of toxins (anatoxins, cylindrospermopsins, microcystins and saxitoxins) that have thus far been identified as relevant from environmental health perspectives, but caution there may be other harmful metabolites waiting to be elucidated. PMID:27418325

  20. 'Stratified Contraception': Emergency Contraceptive Pills and Women's Differential Experiences in Contemporary India.

    PubMed

    Sheoran, Nayantara

    2015-01-01

    Available without prescriptions in India since 2005, emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) and their advertisements have provided women with increased contraceptive options and a vocabulary to talk about their reproductive lives. I draw on long-term fieldwork with women in urban India about ECPs, demonstrating a new form of 'stratified contraception' enabled by these pills and their advertisements. I posit that there are within India spaces that replicate the luxuries and privileges of the global North. These material conditions, I suggest, are replicated when it comes to contraception as there are hubs of women consumers of contraception and contraceptive advertising that participate in an 'imagined cosmopolitanism' within the global South in close proximity to 'contraceptive ghettos.' Moving beyond simplistic binaries, I outline three major stratifications along which women experience this medical technology and outline the implications for women and their contraceptive choices when notions of northern privilege exist in the 'South.' PMID:24901232

  1. First-principles energetics of water clusters and ice: A many-body analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gillan, M. J.; Alfè, D.; Bartók, A. P.; Csányi, G.

    2013-12-28

    Standard forms of density-functional theory (DFT) have good predictive power for many materials, but are not yet fully satisfactory for cluster, solid, and liquid forms of water. Recent work has stressed the importance of DFT errors in describing dispersion, but we note that errors in other parts of the energy may also contribute. We obtain information about the nature of DFT errors by using a many-body separation of the total energy into its 1-body, 2-body, and beyond-2-body components to analyze the deficiencies of the popular PBE and BLYP approximations for the energetics of water clusters and ice structures. The errors of these approximations are computed by using accurate benchmark energies from the coupled-cluster technique of molecular quantum chemistry and from quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The systems studied are isomers of the water hexamer cluster, the crystal structures Ih, II, XV, and VIII of ice, and two clusters extracted from ice VIII. For the binding energies of these systems, we use the machine-learning technique of Gaussian Approximation Potentials to correct successively for 1-body and 2-body errors of the DFT approximations. We find that even after correction for these errors, substantial beyond-2-body errors remain. The characteristics of the 2-body and beyond-2-body errors of PBE are completely different from those of BLYP, but the errors of both approximations disfavor the close approach of non-hydrogen-bonded monomers. We note the possible relevance of our findings to the understanding of liquid water.

  2. First-principles energetics of water clusters and ice: A many-body analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillan, M. J.; Alfè, D.; Bartók, A. P.; Csányi, G.

    2013-12-01

    Standard forms of density-functional theory (DFT) have good predictive power for many materials, but are not yet fully satisfactory for cluster, solid, and liquid forms of water. Recent work has stressed the importance of DFT errors in describing dispersion, but we note that errors in other parts of the energy may also contribute. We obtain information about the nature of DFT errors by using a many-body separation of the total energy into its 1-body, 2-body, and beyond-2-body components to analyze the deficiencies of the popular PBE and BLYP approximations for the energetics of water clusters and ice structures. The errors of these approximations are computed by using accurate benchmark energies from the coupled-cluster technique of molecular quantum chemistry and from quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The systems studied are isomers of the water hexamer cluster, the crystal structures Ih, II, XV, and VIII of ice, and two clusters extracted from ice VIII. For the binding energies of these systems, we use the machine-learning technique of Gaussian Approximation Potentials to correct successively for 1-body and 2-body errors of the DFT approximations. We find that even after correction for these errors, substantial beyond-2-body errors remain. The characteristics of the 2-body and beyond-2-body errors of PBE are completely different from those of BLYP, but the errors of both approximations disfavor the close approach of non-hydrogen-bonded monomers. We note the possible relevance of our findings to the understanding of liquid water.

  3. Water entry of a body which moves in more than six degrees of freedom

    PubMed Central

    Scolan, Y.-M.; Korobkin, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The water entry of a three-dimensional smooth body into initially calm water is examined. The body can move freely in its 6 d.f. and may also change its shape over time. During the early stage of penetration, the shape of the body is approximated by a surface of double curvature and the radii of curvature may vary over time. Hydrodynamic loads are calculated by the Wagner theory. It is shown that the water entry problem with arbitrary kinematics of the body motion, can be reduced to the vertical entry problem with a modified vertical displacement of the body and an elliptic region of contact between the liquid and the body surface. Low pressure occurrence is determined; this occurrence can precede the appearance of cavitation effects. Hydrodynamic forces are analysed for a rigid ellipsoid entering the water with 3 d.f. Experimental results with an oblique impact of elliptic paraboloid confirm the theoretical findings. The theoretical developments are detailed in this paper, while an application of the model is described in electronic supplementary materials. PMID:27547102

  4. Long-acting hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Gabelnick, Henry; Brosens, Ivo

    2015-11-01

    Today, a new category of fertility-regulating agents has been created: long-acting, reversible hormonal contraceptives; they minimize compliance, while maximize effectiveness. They comprise subdermal implants and intrauterine devices. Other long-acting agents exist, such as Depo Provera and Noristerat. Use of Depo Provera and Noristerat carries great effectiveness, good clinical safety and usefulness in developing countries. They cause no significant increase in breast cancer risk, but they may carry an increased risk of HIV. Subcutaneous delivery systems have two common features: prolongation of effect is obtained by a drug reservoir and for most of their duration of action they provide a continuous, sustained release of the active hormone. Finally, the intrauterine system Mirena represents both a very effective contraceptive and a specific treatment for menorrhagia. PMID:26626534

  5. Study of norethindrone in contraception.

    PubMed

    Goldzieher, J W; Moses, L E; Ellis, L T

    1962-05-01

    The contraceptive effectiveness of 10 mg norethindrone plus .06 mg ethinyl estradiol, administered orally for 20 days of the menstrual cycle, was evaluated in 210 women over 6232 cycles at the Planned Parenthood Center of San Antonio, Texas. There were no unplanned pregnancies during the study period, and not a single patient discontinued use because of side effects. Dysmenorrhea and premenstrual tension diminshed considerably. The incidence of menstrual irregularities, was low. 99 of the women reported an increase in libido. Of 18 patients who discontinued use to become pregnant, 16 became pregnant within the first 3 cycles. The contraceptive effect of norethindrone is thought to be due to the inhibition of ovulation, reinforced by additional protective mechanisms. PMID:12305165

  6. Contraception and the adolescent diabetic.

    PubMed

    Fennoy, I

    1989-01-01

    We believe our data suggests that pregnancy among adolescent diabetics is more frequent than would be expected from the general population at a time when diabetic control is at its worse. Thus patients and their offspring are exposed to extreme morbidity. Current recommendations regarding contraception in patients with diabetes are not appropriate for the adolescent population and therefore tend to support this phenomenon rather than relieve it. Because of the peculiar physiological and developmental characteristics of this population, more medical research is necessary regarding various hormonal preparations available to determine the safest acceptable contraceptive for the adolescent diabetic. To be truly effective, these new alternatives must be presented to the patient in the context of a counseling program that (1) recognizes that this population does have an unusually high frequency of pregnancy for reasons unknown, and that (2) stresses the need for the patient to take control of the diabetes prior to becoming pregnant. PMID:2516509

  7. Simultaneous determination of 15 steroidal oral contraceptives in water using solid-phase disk extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Yong, Wei; Chu, Xiaogan; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2009-07-10

    A rapid, accurate and sensitive method for simultaneous determination of 15 steroidal hormones including four estrogens (estrone, 17beta-estradiol, 17alpha-ethynylestradiol, estriol) and eleven progestogens (17beta-estradiol-3-benzoate, 19-norethindrone, gestodene, levonorgestrel, medroxyprogesterone, cyproterone acetate, megestrol-17-acetate, progesterone, norethindrone acetate, chlormadinone-17-acetate, and hydroxy progesterone caproate) in environmental waters was developed by coupling solid-phase disk extraction (SPDE) to ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization. Among three types of extraction tested (C(8) SPDE, C(18) SPDE and C(18) SPE), the most satisfactory result was achieved using C(18) SPDE for its satisfactory recovery (75.6 to 101.4%) and short extraction time (15 min for 1L deionised water). The validity of this method was investigated and good analytical performance for all the analytes was obtained, including low limits of method detection (0.5-3.4 ng/L) and excellent linear dynamic range (1.0-50.0 ng/L). The method was applied to determine the steroidal hormones in 10 environmental waters including tap water, river water, lake water and waste water in Beijing. No progestogen was detected in all samples and estrone, estriol, 17alpha-ethynylestradiol were found in most samples at levels between 1.8 and 127.9 ng/L. PMID:19497575

  8. Relationship between contraceptive method and vaginal flora.

    PubMed

    Peddie, B A; Bishop, V; Bailey, R R; McGill, H

    1984-08-01

    This study was undertaken to assess whether the vaginal flora was affected by the method of contraception, and in particular as to whether the incidence of vaginal candidiasis increased when oral contraceptives were used. One thousand and two consecutive vaginal or cervical swabs from women attending a family planning centre were cultured. Candida albicans was isolated from 13% of women using no contraception, 16% using oral contraceptives, and from 9%, 19% and 18% of those using diaphragms, intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) and condoms respectively. These differences were not statistically significant. Women using an IUCD had significantly more Gram-positive cocci cultured than women in any other group, while those using diaphragms had significantly more Gram-negative bacilli. Our clinical impression that the use of oral contraceptives led to an increase in vaginal candidiasis, was not confirmed by this study. PMID:6596089

  9. [The acceptability of different oral contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Fritzsche, H; Hempel, E; Carol, W; Böhme, W; Scholz, B; Grass, M; Chemnitius, K H

    1975-05-01

    Results of a survey of contraceptive acceptability are reported. In formation on oral and depot hormonal contraceptives was distributed to 1064 Ovosiston or Nonovlon users, 110 women using depot contraceptives, and 609 women who had never used hormonal contraception. The women's preferences with regard to administration schedule, and their perceptions of effectiveness and safety were noted. Non-users considered daily, weekly, or monthly administration acceptable, while only 2/3 of those taking oral contraceptives thought daily administration convenient. 90.2% of Deposiston patients did not care for daily administration. Deposiston patients also had the greatest confidence in their method. The authors believe on the basis of this survey that weekly administration may be highly acceptable alternative t o conventional oral contraception. PMID:1140078

  10. Contraceptive development and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Fraser, I S

    1986-02-01

    This article provides an overview of the contraceptive development process, with particular emphasis on the importance of clinical trials. Development of a new contraceptive drug begins with chemical synthesis of a large number of substances that may have antifertility effects. Before human trials are considered, drugs must undergo a complex process of animal toxicology testing. Such studies assess acute, subacute, and chronic toxicity. Once a drug has passed the initial screening process, human testing must follow a logical sequence of clinical trials: phase I, pharmacology testing; phase II, initial assessment of efficacy, safety, acceptability, and ease of use; phase III, acurate assessment of efficacy, side effects, and reasons for discontinuation under controlled conditions; and phase IV, evaluation of effectiveness under field conditions. When these have been satisfactorily completed, a detailed marketing application must be submitted to the drug regulatory agency in each country. The process of assessment of the application often takes as long as 2 years. Once marketing approval has been received, there is still a need for postmarketing surveillance of the performance of the new contraceptive method. In many cases, a careful program of training is required. Among the research and recording strategies for postmarketing surveillance are voluntary recording of possible adverse reactions, longterm prospective cohort studies, retrospective case-control studies, and registered release. As controls on the safety and performance of new contraceptive methods are being tightened, the time scale and costs of development are increasing. The time from the 1st synthesis of a drug to marketing approval often takes 13-14 years and costs US$25-50 million. Since the patent life of a new substance is limited to 17 years in most countries, pharmaceutical companies have little time to recoup development costs, which has caused fewer new methods to be developed. PMID:3708511

  11. [The cervix and hormonal contraception].

    PubMed

    Gorins, A

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews the histological effects of hormonal contraceptives on the cervix and assesses statistical studies examining the relationship between oral contraceptive (OC) usage and cancerous lesions of the cervix. The cervix acquires a pseudopregnant appearance under the influence of combined OCs. The Malpighian epithelium acquires a richly vascularized stroma characterized by accelerated maturation and the endocervical ectropion may be swollen, frequently with epidermoid metaplasia. Such changes increase with the duration of hormonal contraception and are more pronounced with combined than with sequential OCs. Among pathological changes that may occur are active adenomatous hyperplasia and epithelial abnormalities including dysplasia involving dyscaryotic cells with regular nuclei and no mitotic abnormality. Epithelial anomalies may present various histocytological features and are sometimes difficult to interpret. Epidemiologic study of the cervix is difficult because of the number of parameters to be considered: age at 1st intercourse, frequency of intercourse, number of partners, the formulation of the OC, and the variable duration of use which may have been interrupted by use of another method such as the IUD. Statistical studies have yielded contradictory results, with the earliest reports showing a higher incidence of dysplasia among women using OCs and most later studies showing a possible increased incidence of moderate dysplasia but no increased incidence of carcinoma in situ or invasive carcinoma. The recent study by Vessey et al. which compared 6838 parous OC users with 3154 parous IUD users over 10 years revealed invasive cancer in 13 women all of whom used OCs, with carcinomas in situ and dysplasias also more frequent in women using OCs. The duration of use was found to be a significant factor. Age and dates of marriage and 1st pregnancy were similar in subjects and controls, but no data were provided on age at 1st intercourse or number of

  12. Effect of Ramadan Fasting on Body Water Status Markers after a Rugby Sevens Match

    PubMed Central

    Trabelsi, Khaled; Rebai, Haithem; el-Abed, Kais; Stannard, Stephen R.; Khannous, Hamdi; Masmoudi, Liwa; Sahnoun, Zouheir; Hakim, Ahmed; Fellman, Nicole; Tabka, Zouhair

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of Ramadan fasting on body water status markers of rugby players at basal condition and following a simulation of rugby sevens match. Methods Twelve recreational rugby sevens players played three matches: one day before Ramadan (before Ramadan), at the end of the first week of Ramadan (Beg-R) and at the end of Ramadan (End-R). Before and immediately after each match, body weight was determined and blood samples were taken for the measurement of body water status markers. Total body water was measured with an impedancemeter only before matches. Results At rest, an increase in hematocrit (+4.4%, P=0.03), hemoglobin (+3.4%, P=0.01) and plasma osmolarity (+2.8%, P<0.001) was noticed at End-R compared to before Ramadan. Total body water measured before Ramadan did not differ significantly from that of Ramadan. After the match, values of hematocrit and plasma osmolarity increased significantly at End-R (+1.4%, P=0.02; +3.1%, P<0.001 respectively) compared to before Ramadan. Although, hemoglobin measured after matches occurring during Ramadan did not differ from those of before Ramadan. In response to matches, the change of percentage of body water status markers did not differ during each period of the investigation. Conclusions The present results show that Ramadan fasting induces dehydration at basal conditions. Also, rugby sevens match played during Ramadan did not exacerbate the magnitude of responses to matches of blood and body water status markers. PMID:22375238

  13. Potential of mixed microalgae to harness biodiesel from ecological water-bodies with simultaneous treatment.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S Venkata; Devi, M Prathima; Mohanakrishna, G; Amarnath, N; Babu, M Lenin; Sarma, P N

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel as an eco-friendly fuel is gaining much acceptance in recent years. This communication provides an overview on the possibility of using mixed microalgae existing in ecological water-bodies for harnessing biodiesel. Microalgal cultures from five water-bodies are cultivated in domestic wastewater in open-ponds and the harvested algal-biomass was processed through acid-catalyzed transesterification. Experiments evidenced the potential of using mixed microalgae for harnessing biodiesel. Presence of palmitic acid (C16:0) in higher fraction and physical properties of algal oil correlated well with the biodiesel properties. Functional characteristics of water-bodies showed to influence both species diversity and lipid accumulation. Microalgae from stagnant water-bodies receiving domestic discharges documented higher lipid accumulation. Algal-oil showed to consist 33 types of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids having wide food and fuel characteristics. Simultaneous wastewater treatment was also noticed due to the syntrophic association in the water-body microenvironment. Diversity studies visualized the composition of algae species known to accumulate higher lipids. PMID:20864335

  14. Depo-provera: contraceptive risk?

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, A

    1980-04-01

    This writer agrees with Carol Levine that the issue involving depo-provera is both complex and confusing. Comment is offered on some of the conclusions reached by Levine in her article, "Depo-Provera and Contraceptive Risk: A Case Study of Values and Conflicts". In the discussion of risks and benefits, problems with administration of estrogens are rarely recommended for depo-provera users. The metabolic side-effects which are identified are also seen among oral contraceptive (OC) users and, with the exception of weight gain, appear to have a smaller impact than the combination oral steroids. Exception is taken with the description of delayed return of fertility as a "particularly serious side-effect," for delay in return appears to be a matter of months only. In regard to carcinogenicity, there is no statistically valid evidence of danger relating depo-provera to breast or cervical cancer in the human. Levine's article gives the impression that depo-provera is intended for poor women or "2nd class" citizens and this fails to accurately reflect what probably would occur were the drug available in the United States. This writer believes depo-provera to be a safer contraceptive method than the OC and to be more effective in practice. PMID:6445344

  15. American values and contraceptive acceptance.

    PubMed

    Rzepka, J R

    1979-07-01

    A number of individual personality factors and social norms may be associated with reproductive confusion and/or irresponsibility. More specifically, the values underlying common American social norms may contribute to ineffective birth planning in the following ways: 1) The traditional roles of women in our society seem to encourage parenthood. The rule has been early marriage, closely spaced children, and few alternate sources of satisfaction or self-esteem. 2) Our culture strongly encourages family life. Children are a symbol of normalcy. 3) The importance of sexual enjoyment per se often conflicts with contraceptive use. Conversely, innocence is also valued and also contributes to unprotected sexual activity. 4) Religious reasons or adherence to concepts of natural law are almost always given by people opposed to contraception. 5) Health is important to Americans, and birth control methods negatively affect health in real and imagined ways. Social norms, though changing, remain essentially congruent with former contraceptive technology and former ideologies, customs, and dreams. PMID:24318586

  16. Recently approved and experimental methods of contraception.

    PubMed

    Franklin, M

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recently approved two new contraceptive methods, and others are nearing approval. In addition, several innovative approaches to contraception are under investigation. This paper details the latest information on the following methods: Paragard Copper T 380A intrauterine device, cervical cap, NORPLANT, vaginal pouch, long-acting injectables, hormonal vaginal ring, transdermal patch, experimental male methods, inhibin, and contraceptive vaccines. PMID:2286850

  17. Letter: State clings to archaic contraceptive law.

    PubMed

    Ris, H W

    1974-10-01

    The state of Wisconsin is still clinging to an archaic contraceptive law that prohibits birth control for unmarrieds.¿The mos t tragic victims of this law are unmarried teen-agers because studies indicate that sexual intercourse is very frequent among teen-agers, yet access to contraception is hard to come by.¿It is hoped that the Legislature will see fit to repeal this outdated contraceptive law. PMID:4456832

  18. Rhodovulum aestuarii sp. nov., isolated from a brackish water body.

    PubMed

    Divyasree, B; Lakshmi, K V N S; Bharti, Dave; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2016-01-01

    A yellowish brown, phototrophic, purple non-sulfur bacterium, strain JA924T, was isolated in pure culture from a brackish water sample collected from an estuary. Single cells were oval to rod-shaped, non-motile and Gram-stain-negative and had a vesicular architecture of intracellular photosynthetic membranes. Bacteriochlorophyll-a and carotenoids of the spheroidene series were present as photosynthetic pigments. Photolithoautotrophy, chemo-organoheterotrophy and photo-organoheterotrophy were the growth modes observed. Strain JA924T had complex growth requirements. Strain JA924T was mesophilic and moderately halophilic. The DNA G+C content was 64 mol% (HPLC). The major cellular fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c, C16 : 0 and C18 : 0. The major quinone was ubiquinone-10 (Q-10). Phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, sulfolipid and an aminolipid were the main polar lipids of strain JA924T. EzTaxon-e blast searches based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of JA924T revealed highest similarity with Rhodovulum mangrovi AK41T (98.19 %) and other members of the genus Rhodovulum ( < 95.71 %). Strain JA924T was further identified to be distantly related to Rhodovulum mangrovi AK41T ( < 29 % based on DNA-DNA hybridization and ΔTm (>5 °C). Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular differences indicate that strain JA924T represents a novel species of the genus Rhodovulum, for which the name Rhodovulum aestuarii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JA924T ( = LMG 29031T = KCTC 15485T). PMID:26475698

  19. Communication about Contraception and Knowledge of Oral Contraceptives amongst Norwegian High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Thomas; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil

    2003-01-01

    Examines communication about contraception and specific knowledge of oral contraceptives (OCs) in a sample of Norwegian high school students. More females than males discussed contraception at least monthly. Discussions were predominantly held with peers and not adults. Females were far more knowledgeable about OCs than males. The most significant…

  20. New hyperspectral difference water index for the extraction of urban water bodies by the use of airborne hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huan; Luo, Xin; Xu, Xiong; Tong, Xiaohua; Jin, Yanmin; Pan, Haiyan; Zhou, Bingzhong

    2014-01-01

    Extracting surface land-cover types and analyzing changes are among the most common applications of remote sensing. One of the most basic tasks is to identify and map surface water boundaries. Spectral water indexes have been successfully used in the extraction of water bodies in multispectral images. However, directly applying a water index method to hyperspectral images disregards the abundant spectral information and involves difficulty in selecting appropriate spectral bands. It is also a challenge for a spectral water index to distinguish water from shadowed regions. The purpose of this study is therefore to develop an index that is suitable for water extraction by the use of hyperspectral images, and with the capability to mitigate the effects of shadow and low-albedo surfaces, especially in urban areas. Thus, we introduce a new hyperspectral difference water index (HDWI) to improve the water classification accuracy in areas that include shadow over water, shadow over other ground surfaces, and low-albedo ground surfaces. We tested the new method using PHI-2, HyMAP, and ROSIS hyperspectral images of Shanghai, Munich, and Pavia. The performance of the water index was compared with the normalized difference water index (NDWI) and the Mahalanobis distance classifier (MDC). With all three test images, the accuracy of HDWI was significantly higher than that of NDWI and MDC. Therefore, HDWI can be used for extracting water with a high degree of accuracy, especially in urban areas, where shadow caused by high buildings is an important source of classification error.

  1. Pavement Sealcoat, PAHs, and Water Quality of Urban Water Bodies: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, B. J.; Van Metre, P. C.; Ingersoll, C.; Kunz, J. L.; Kienzler, A.; Devaux, A.; Bony, S.

    2014-12-01

    Coal-tar-based (CT) sealcoat is used to protect and beautify the asphalt pavement of driveways and parking lots primarily in the central, southern, and northeastern U.S. and in Canada. CT sealcoat typically is 20 to 35 percent crude coal tar or coal-tar pitch and contains from 50,000 to 100,000 mg/kg PAHs, about 1,000 times more than asphalt-based (AS) sealcoat or asphalt itself. Tires and snowplows abrade the friable sealcoat surface into fine particles—PAH concentrations in fine particles (dust) from CT-sealcoated pavement are about 1,000 times higher than in dust from AS-sealcoated pavement (median total PAH concentrations 2,200 and 2.1 mg/kg, respectively). Use of CT sealcoat has several implications for urban streams and lakes. Source apportionment modeling has indicated that, in regions where CT sealcoat is prevalent, particles from sealcoated pavement are contributing the majority of the PAHs to recently deposited lake sediment, with implications for ecological health. Acute 2-d toxicity of runoff from CT-sealcoated pavement to stream biota, demonstrated for a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), continues for samples collected as long as weeks or months following sealcoat application. Using the fish-liver cell line RGL-W1, runoff collected as much as 36 days following CT-sealcoat application has been demonstrated to cause DNA damage and impair DNA repair capacity. These results demonstrate that CT runoff is a potential hazard to aquatic ecosystems for at least several weeks after sealant application, and that exposure to sunlight can enhance toxicity and genetic damage. Recent research has provided direct evidence that restricting use of CT sealcoat in a watershed can lead to a substantial reduction in PAH concentrations in receiving water bodies.

  2. Learning in social networks and contraceptive choice.

    PubMed

    Kohler, H P

    1997-08-01

    A puzzling observation in the diffusion of modern fertility control is the persistent diversity in contraceptive practices across communities or social strata. I propose a model of "learning in social networks" to explain this diversity with the random dynamics of word-of-mouth communication. Women are uncertain about the merits of modern contraception and estimate the different qualities of available method based on imprecise information from network partners. Their contraceptive choices are determined by this estimate and by private knowledge about one's personal characteristics. This process of social learning leads to path-dependent adoption of fertility control within, and diversity in contraceptive practices across villages or social strata. PMID:9275246

  3. Contraception in the Developing World: Special Considerations.

    PubMed

    Schivone, Gillian B; Blumenthal, Paul D

    2016-05-01

    The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) estimates that there are 225 million women and girls with unmet contraceptive need yearly. Unmet need for contraception is defined as women who desire a delay in childbearing and are not using a modern method of contraception. It is projected that providing contraception to these women would avert 36 million abortions, 70,000 maternal deaths, and 52 million unintended pregnancies overall. In the past 30 years, there has been an increase both in population and in contraception use in the developing world. As a result, it is estimated that in 2015 there were 500 million contraceptive users in developing countries, which is nearly double the prevalence in 2000. Unfortunately, women and girls in developing nations still face many obstacles in obtaining modern methods of contraception. Particular challenges in the developing world include lack of access due to inadequate number of trained providers, fewer method options, and "stock-outs" of contraceptive supplies. Innovative strategies for decreasing unmet need will have to address these challenges, and will necessarily involve programmatic solutions such as community-based distribution and social marketing campaigns. Additionally, increasing uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods will be essential for achieving the goal of decreasing unmet need. PMID:26956690

  4. Body water metabolism in high altitude natives during and after a stay at sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S. C.; Bardhan, Jaya; Swamy, Y. V.; Grover, A.; Nayar, H. S.

    1981-03-01

    Body fluid compartments were studied in a group of high altitude natives after a stay of two months at sea level and during 12 days at an altitude of 3,500 m. Measurements of total body water and extracellular water were made on day 3 and 12 of reinduction to altitude, while plasma volume was measured on day 12 only. The intracellular water, blood volume and red cell mass were computed from the above parameters. Total body water and intracellular water decreased by 3.3% (P<0.001) and 5.0% (P<0.001) respectively by the 3rd day at altitude and did not change thereafter. Extracellular water increased progressively at altitude, but the increase was not significant. Blood volume and red cell mass increased significantly while plasma volume decreased at altitude. These data were compared with that of low landers. This study suggested body hypohydration on high altitude induction in low landers as well as in high altitude natives on reinduction.

  5. Calculation of Water Drop Trajectories to and About Arbitrary Three-Dimensional Bodies in Potential Airflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norment, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations can be performed for any atmospheric conditions and for all water drop sizes, from the smallest cloud droplet to large raindrops. Any subsonic, external, non-lifting flow can be accommodated; flow into, but not through, inlets also can be simulated. Experimental water drop drag relations are used in the water drop equations of motion and effects of gravity settling are included. Seven codes are described: (1) a code used to debug and plot body surface description data; (2) a code that processes the body surface data to yield the potential flow field; (3) a code that computes flow velocities at arrays of points in space; (4) a code that computes water drop trajectories from an array of points in space; (5) a code that computes water drop trajectories and fluxes to arbitrary target points; (6) a code that computes water drop trajectories tangent to the body; and (7) a code that produces stereo pair plots which include both the body and trajectories. Code descriptions include operating instructions, card inputs and printouts for example problems, and listing of the FORTRAN codes. Accuracy of the calculations is discussed, and trajectory calculation results are compared with prior calculations and with experimental data.

  6. Contraceptive method-mix and family planning program in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hardjanti, K

    1995-01-01

    In Vietnam between 1989 and 1993, the modern contraceptive prevalence rate stopped at 38%. In 1984, the government implemented economic renovation (Doi Moi). This closed agricultural cooperatives which had supported commune health centers. Health workers received either low or no wages, resulting in low morale, absenteeism, and moving to the private sector or agriculture. Most women began using the IUD because it was low cost and easy to monitor, provided long-term protection against pregnancy, and there was a limited supply of oral contraceptives (OCs) and condoms. Condom use fell from 13% in 1984 to 1.4% in 1993. More than 80% of contraceptive users used the IUD. The IUD is not appropriate for many women because of health problems: 60-70% of pregnant women and 80% of parturient women have anemia, 40-60% of women have reproductive tract infections, and sexually transmitted diseases are rising. Vietnam's Prime Minister and the Communist Party are committed to expanding the range of the contraceptive method-mix and choice. Limited method choice is especially a problem in rural areas. It increases the abortion rate. About 38% of abortions supplant modern and traditional family planning methods. Improper counseling, insufficient knowledge, and low promotion of OCs account for the low use of OCs. Inferior quality, aversion by couples, and inaccessibility in most rural areas limit condom use. Women's fear and husband's objection outweigh the government's promotion of sterilization. Providers have limited comprehensive accurate and current knowledge of contraceptives. Health service facilities are concentrated in urban and semiurban areas. The quality of care in rural areas, where there is no clean water supply, is inferior. An annual target used to forecast contraceptive needs risks contraceptive stocks expiring during storage and/or disruptions in supply of users. Consecutive actions to eliminate constraints to use of other methods, developing a community level service

  7. Hormonal contraception and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Saleh, A A; Ginsburg, K A; Duchon, T A; Dorey, L G; Hirata, J; Alshameeri, R S; Dombrowski, M P; Mammen, E F

    1995-05-15

    73 healthy women (29 controls, 25 using OCs, and 19 using Norplant) were selected from the clinic population at North Oakland Medical Center for inclusion in this study after obtaining informed consent. Age, race, height, weight, blood pressure, and cigarette smoking were recorded for each subject. 12 patients were on monophasic OCs while 13 were on triphasic preparations. Both hormonal contraceptive groups had used their particular contraceptive for at least 3 months prior to blood drawing. Platelet tests were performed within 2 hours of sample collection: platelet counts (PLC) and mean platelet volume (MPV) were determined on an Automated Platelet Counter (Baker 810 Platelet Analyzer). Whole blood aggregation was performed on a platelet aggregometer (Chrono-Log, Model 550) using both ADP (ADP, 5 mM) and collagen (COLL, 2 mcg/ml) as inducing agents. Demographic differences were not significant (p 0.05) among the 3 treatment groups, whose average age was 25.3-25.8 years old. Furthermore, no significant differences (p 0.05) in platelet function were detected among controls or subjects receiving either oral contraceptives or Norplant, compared to control patients. The mean platelet counts (X 10/9/L) were 223 for OC users, 231 for Norplant users, and 232 for controls. The respective platelet aggregation (ADP, ohms) values were 12.5, 18.0, and 19.2 as well as (COLL, ohms) 35.6, 40.7, and 39.0. These results demonstrated that there is no evidence for altered platelet function, with the testing methods employed, in women using either Norplant or combination low dose oral contraceptives. To date, several studies have examined this issue, with contradictory reports about the effects of hormonal contraceptives in platelet function. After controlling for differences between various steroid preparations and other such confounding variables, some of these conflicting conclusions could be the result of a lack of uniformity among the methods used to evaluate platelet aggregation

  8. Identification of Water Bodies in a Landsat 8 OLI Image Using a J48 Decision Tree

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Tri Dev; Lee, Dong Ha; Yang, In Tae; Lee, Jae Kang

    2016-01-01

    Water bodies are essential to humans and other forms of life. Identification of water bodies can be useful in various ways, including estimation of water availability, demarcation of flooded regions, change detection, and so on. In past decades, Landsat satellite sensors have been used for land use classification and water body identification. Due to the introduction of a New Operational Land Imager (OLI) sensor on Landsat 8 with a high spectral resolution and improved signal-to-noise ratio, the quality of imagery sensed by Landsat 8 has improved, enabling better characterization of land cover and increased data size. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the most appropriate and practical water identification methods that take advantage of the improved image quality and use the fewest inputs based on the original OLI bands. The objective of the study is to explore the potential of a J48 decision tree (JDT) in identifying water bodies using reflectance bands from Landsat 8 OLI imagery. J48 is an open-source decision tree. The test site for the study is in the Northern Han River Basin, which is located in Gangwon province, Korea. Training data with individual bands were used to develop the JDT model and later applied to the whole study area. The performance of the model was statistically analysed using the kappa statistic and area under the curve (AUC). The results were compared with five other known water identification methods using a confusion matrix and related statistics. Almost all the methods showed high accuracy, and the JDT was successfully applied to the OLI image using only four bands, where the new additional deep blue band of OLI was found to have the third highest information gain. Thus, the JDT can be a good method for water body identification based on images with improved resolution and increased size. PMID:27420067

  9. Bacteriological quality of abattoir effluents discharged into water bodies in abuja, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nafarnda, W D; Ajayi, I E; Shawulu, J C; Kawe, M S; Omeiza, G K; Sani, N A; Tenuche, O Z; Dantong, D D; Tags, S Z

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriological characteristics of abattoir effluents (wastewater), abattoir water source, and water bodies receiving abattoir wastewater were investigated in Abuja, Nigeria using the multiple-tube fermentation technique. Source of water to the abattoirs and the usage of water bodies receiving abattoir effluents were determined using questionnaires. Bacterial counts ranged from 4.8 × 10(6) to 5.8 × 10(5) /100 mL of total coliform (TC), 8.2 × 10(4) to 3.2 × 10(4)/100 mL of Fecal coliform (FC), 5.2 × 10(4) to 2.0 × 10(4)/100 mL of Fecal streptococcus and 1.2 × 10(4) to 2.0 × 10(3)/100 mL of Escherichia coli for abattoir effluents 6.6 × 10(5) to 6.0 × 10(5)/100 mL of TC, 6.2 × 10(4) to 1.8 × 10(4)/100 mL of FC, 1.8 × 10(4) to 6.0 × 10(3)/100 mL of F. streptococcus, and 4.8 × 10(3) to 6.6 × 10(2)/100 mL of E. coli for water bodies receiving abattoir effluents 100 m downstream. TC bacteria counts for abattoir effluents exceeded recommended limit for discharge into surface water in Nigeria. No significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between bacterial counts of abattoir effluents and receiving water bodies 100 m downstream: an indication of contamination of receiving water bodies by abattoir effluents and possible public and environmental health hazards. PMID:23738127

  10. Identification of Water Bodies in a Landsat 8 OLI Image Using a J48 Decision Tree.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Tri Dev; Lee, Dong Ha; Yang, In Tae; Lee, Jae Kang

    2016-01-01

    Water bodies are essential to humans and other forms of life. Identification of water bodies can be useful in various ways, including estimation of water availability, demarcation of flooded regions, change detection, and so on. In past decades, Landsat satellite sensors have been used for land use classification and water body identification. Due to the introduction of a New Operational Land Imager (OLI) sensor on Landsat 8 with a high spectral resolution and improved signal-to-noise ratio, the quality of imagery sensed by Landsat 8 has improved, enabling better characterization of land cover and increased data size. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the most appropriate and practical water identification methods that take advantage of the improved image quality and use the fewest inputs based on the original OLI bands. The objective of the study is to explore the potential of a J48 decision tree (JDT) in identifying water bodies using reflectance bands from Landsat 8 OLI imagery. J48 is an open-source decision tree. The test site for the study is in the Northern Han River Basin, which is located in Gangwon province, Korea. Training data with individual bands were used to develop the JDT model and later applied to the whole study area. The performance of the model was statistically analysed using the kappa statistic and area under the curve (AUC). The results were compared with five other known water identification methods using a confusion matrix and related statistics. Almost all the methods showed high accuracy, and the JDT was successfully applied to the OLI image using only four bands, where the new additional deep blue band of OLI was found to have the third highest information gain. Thus, the JDT can be a good method for water body identification based on images with improved resolution and increased size. PMID:27420067

  11. Modeling Molecular Interactions in Water: From Pairwise to Many-Body Potential Energy Functions.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Gerardo Andrés; Wikfeldt, Kjartan Thor; Ojamäe, Lars; Lu, Jibao; Xu, Yao; Torabifard, Hedieh; Bartók, Albert P; Csányi, Gábor; Molinero, Valeria; Paesani, Francesco

    2016-07-13

    Almost 50 years have passed from the first computer simulations of water, and a large number of molecular models have been proposed since then to elucidate the unique behavior of water across different phases. In this article, we review the recent progress in the development of analytical potential energy functions that aim at correctly representing many-body effects. Starting from the many-body expansion of the interaction energy, specific focus is on different classes of potential energy functions built upon a hierarchy of approximations and on their ability to accurately reproduce reference data obtained from state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations and experimental measurements. We show that most recent potential energy functions, which include explicit short-range representations of two-body and three-body effects along with a physically correct description of many-body effects at all distances, predict the properties of water from the gas to the condensed phase with unprecedented accuracy, thus opening the door to the long-sought "universal model" capable of describing the behavior of water under different conditions and in different environments. PMID:27186804

  12. Study of information extraction method of water body based on Mapping satellite-1 imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxi; Hu, Zhuowei; Du, Hongyue

    2014-11-01

    To find a suitable water extraction method from Mapping satellite-1 imagery in urban areas, this paper compared the results of different water extraction methods and studied the effect of building shadow on water extraction. Taken parts of Xinjiang (Beitun of Irtysh river Basin) as the study area, Mapping satellite-1 imagery as data sources, single-band threshold method, Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), and spectral relationship method based on spectral area were applied respectively to extract information of water body. The results of information extraction by use of the four methods were compared to determine the optimal method for water body extraction. The results showed that, for Mapping satellite-1 imagery, single-band threshold method and spectral relationship method which based on spectral area were effective to eliminate classification errors cased by shadows from buildings, fast, easy and accurate to extract information of water body from urban areas. In addition, the spectral relationship method based on spectral area also had the character of extracting small tributary rivers.

  13. An automatic water body area monitoring algorithm for satellite images based on Markov Random Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmi, Omid; Tourian, Mohammad J.; Sneeuw, Nico

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge about spatial and temporal variation of hydrological parameters are surprisingly poor, because most of it is based on in situ stations and the number of stations have reduced dramatically during the past decades. On the other hand, remote sensing techniques have proven their ability to measure different parameters of Earth phenomena. Optical and SAR satellite imagery provide the opportunity to monitor the spatial change in coastline, which can serve as a way to determine the water extent repeatedly in an appropriate time interval. An appropriate classification technique to separate water and land is the backbone of each automatic water body monitoring. Due to changes in the water level, river and lake extent, atmosphere, sunlight radiation and onboard calibration of the satellite over time, most of the pixel-based classification techniques fail to determine accurate water masks. Beyond pixel intensity, spatial correlation between neighboring pixels is another source of information that should be used to decide the label of pixels. Water bodies have strong spatial correlation in satellite images. Therefore including contextual information as additional constraint into the procedure of water body monitoring improves the accuracy of the derived water masks significantly. In this study, we present an automatic algorithm for water body area monitoring based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of Markov Random Fields (MRF). First we collect all available images from selected case studies during the monitoring period. Then for each image separately we apply a k-means clustering to derive a primary water mask. After that we develop a MRF using pixel values and the primary water mask for each image. Then among the different realizations of the field we select the one that maximizes the posterior estimation. We solve this optimization problem using graph cut techniques. A graph with two terminals is constructed, after which the best labelling structure for

  14. Features of deformation of metal body surfaces under impact of a water jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganin, A. A.; Khismatullina, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model and computational results on dynamics of a perfect elastic-plastic body under the load arising during impact of a high-velocity liquid jet with the hemispherical end. The body is simulated by the isotropic linearly-elastic semi-space, its plastic state is described by the von Mises condition. The dependence of features of the body surface deformation on the body material is studied. The problem is considered in the axisymmetric statement. The axis of symmetry is that of the jet. The loaded domain is a circle with its radius rapidly growing from zero to the jet radius. The pressure in the loaded domain is non-uniform both in time and space. Three metal alloys (aluminium, copper-nickel and steel) are considered as the body material. The loading of the body surface in all the cases corresponds to the impact of a water jet with the radius 100 pm and the velocity 300 m/s. It has been shown that under such impact a nanometer pit arises on the body surface at the center of the domain of the jet action. The profile of the pit and its maximal depth depend on the body material.

  15. The risk of river pollution due to washout from contaminated floodplain water bodies during high floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, Tatyana; Lepikhin, Anatoly; Parshakova, Yanina; Tiunov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Today, the potential impact of extremely high floods, which in the last years have become a rather frequent weather-related disaster, is the problem of primary concern. In studies of the potential impact of floods the emphasis is placed first of all on the estimation of possible flood zones and the analysis of the flow regimes in these zones. However, in some cases the hydrochemical parameters related to changes in the chemical composition of water are more important than the hydraulic parameters. It is generally believed that the higher is the flow rate, the more intensive is the process of dissolution, i.e. the lower is the concentration of limiting contaminants in water. However, this statement is valid provided that flooding does not activate new sources of water pollution such as contaminated floodplain water bodies located in the vicinity of water supply systems. Being quite reliable and safe at small and moderate discharges, in the case of extremely high level of river waters they become intensive sources of water pollution, essentially limiting the water consumption schedule for downstream water consumers. It should be noted that compared to the well-studied mechanisms of waste discharge due to failure of hydraulic engineering structures by flood waves, the mechanisms of pollutant washout from the contaminated floodplain water bodies by the flood waves is still poorly understood. We analyze the impacts of such weather-related events on the quality of water in the water intake system, taking as an example, the section of the Vyatka River located in the Prikamskaya lowland of the Russian Federation. The risk of river pollution due to washout from the contaminated floodplain water bodies during high floods is studied by hydrodynamical modeling in the framework of combined approach using one-, two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic models are implemented and by in situ measurements. It is shown that during high floods the removal of pollutants from the

  16. Water quality observations of ice-covered, stagnant, eutrophic water bodies and analysis of influence of ice-covered period on water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    sugihara, K.; Nakatsugawa, M.

    2013-12-01

    The water quality characteristics of ice-covered, stagnant, eutrophic water bodies have not been clarified because of insufficient observations. It has been pointed out that climate change has been shortening the duration of ice-cover; however, the influence of climate change on water quality has not been clarified. This study clarifies the water quality characteristics of stagnant, eutrophic water bodies that freeze in winter, based on our surveys and simulations, and examines how climate change may influence those characteristics. We made fixed-point observation using self-registering equipment and vertical water sampling. Self-registering equipment measured water temperature and dissolved oxygen(DO).vertical water sampling analyzed biological oxygen demand(BOD), total nitrogen(T-N), nitrate nitrogen(NO3-N), nitrite nitrogen(NO2-N), ammonium nitrogen(NH4-N), total phosphorus(TP), orthophosphoric phosphorus(PO4-P) and chlorophyll-a(Chl-a). The survey found that climate-change-related increases in water temperature were suppressed by ice covering the water area, which also blocked oxygen supply. It was also clarified that the bottom sediment consumed oxygen and turned the water layers anaerobic beginning from the bottom layer, and that nutrient salts eluted from the bottom sediment. The eluted nutrient salts were stored in the water body until the ice melted. The ice-covered period of water bodies has been shortening, a finding based on the analysis of weather and water quality data from 1998 to 2008. Climate change was surveyed as having caused decreases in nutrient salts concentration because of the shortened ice-covered period. However, BOD in spring showed a tendency to increase because of the proliferation of phytoplankton that was promoted by the climate-change-related increase in water temperature. To forecast the water quality by using these findings, particularly the influence of climate change, we constructed a water quality simulation model that

  17. Flow and transport within a coastal aquifer adjacent to a stratified water body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, Imri; Yechieli, Yoseph; Eyal, Shalev; Gavrieli, Ittai; Gvirtzman, Haim

    2016-04-01

    The existence of a freshwater-saltwater interface and the circulation flow of saltwater beneath the interface is a well-known phenomenon found at coastal aquifers. This flow is a natural phenomenon that occurs due to density differences between fresh groundwater and the saltwater body. The goals of this research are to use analytical, numerical, and physical models in order to examine the configuration of the freshwater-saltwater interface and the density-driven flow patterns within a coastal aquifer adjacent to long-term stratified saltwater bodies (e.g. meromictic lake). Such hydrological systems are unique, as they consist of three different water types: the regional fresh groundwater, and low and high salinity brines forming the upper and lower water layers of the stratified water body, respectively. This research also aims to examine the influence of such stratification on hydrogeological processes within the coastal aquifer. The coastal aquifer adjacent to the Dead Sea, under its possible future meromictic conditions, serves as an ideal example to examine these processes. The results show that adjacent to a stratified saltwater body three interfaces between three different water bodies are formed, and that a complex flow system, controlled by the density differences, is created, where three circulation cells are developed. These results are significantly different from the classic circulation cell that is found adjacent to non-stratified water bodies (lakes or oceans). In order to obtain a more generalized insight into the groundwater behavior adjacent to a stratified water body, we used the numerical model to perform sensitivity analysis. The hydrological system was found be sensitive to three dimensionless parameters: dimensionless density (i.e. the relative density of the three water bodies'); dimensionless thickness (i.e. the ratio between the relative thickness of the upper layer and the whole thickness of the lake); and dimensionless flux. The results

  18. [Individualization of low-dose oral contraceptives. Pharmacological principles and practical indications for oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Cianci, A; De Leo, V

    2007-08-01

    The contraceptive pill has been a revolution of the last 40 years. In Italy, however, it is much less widely used than in other countries. Explanations for this phenomenon range from religious implications and customs to misinformation and word-of-mouth communication of negative experiences. The oral contraceptive pill is often used to correct menstrual disorders, leading to poor results and side-effects. Recent advances in oral contraception have led to a substantial reduction in doses and side-effects. Low-dose pills contain minimal doses of progesterones and estrogens and ensure good control of the menstrual cycle. Although reduction of ethinyl estradiol (EE) concentrations has reduced the incidence of negative systemic side effects such as water retention, edema and swollen breasts, the low estrogen dose may be associated with spotting and hypomenorrhea or amenorrhea in the long term, as well as dyspareunia due to reduced vaginal trophism, which may induce women to suspend use of the drug. It is also true that only one type of estrogen is used in the pill, albeit at different doses, whereas the progesterone may differ and in many cases is the cause of common side-effects. The choice of progesterone therefore involves not only its effect on the endometrium in synergy with estrogen, but also possible residual androgenic activity which may have negative metabolic repercussions. Indeed, addition of a progesterone, especially androgen-derived, attenuates the positive metabolic effects of estrogen. Two new monophasic oral contraceptives were recently released. They contain 30 microg (Yasmin) or 20 muicrog (Yasminelle) EE and a new progesterone, drospirenone, derived from spirolactone, which has antiandrogenic and antimineralcorticoid activity similar to endogenous progesterone. Like progesterone, the drospirenone molecule is an aldosterone antagonist and has a natriuretic effect that opposes the sodium retention effect of EE. It may, therefore, help to prevent the

  19. Understanding Adolescent Contraceptive Choice: An Empirical Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Nancy E.; And Others

    Research using expectancy models has shown contraceptive choice among adults to be a rational process in that intentions and behaviors reflect an individual's beliefs, values, attitudes, and perceptions of social norms. This study examined whether such an approach could accurately represent adolescents' contraceptive decision-making. It used the…

  20. Contraception in women with medical problems

    PubMed Central

    Dhanjal, Mandish K

    2008-01-01

    Women with medical disease have a higher incidence of maternal mortality compared with healthy women, with cardiac disease now being the most common cause of maternal death in the UK. A handful of medical conditions exist where pregnancy is not recommended due to mortality rates approaching 50%. It is imperative that such women have the most reliable methods of contraception available. Contraceptive agents may themselves affect medical disease, or may interact with medications used by such women. There may be a range of contraceptive agents suitable for each medical condition. The contraceptive selected should be tailored to suit the individual. The following points should be considered when deciding on the most appropriate contraceptive agent: efficacy, thrombotic risk (oestrogen containing contraceptives), arterial risks (oestrogen containing contraceptives), infective risk (e.g. insertion of intrauterine device [IUD]), vagal stimulation (e.g. insertion of IUD, ESSURE®), bleeding risks with patients on anticoagulants, interaction with concomitant drugs, effects of anaesthesia and ease of use. This review aims to cover the different contraceptive agents available and the best ones to use for certain medical illnesses. PMID:27582790

  1. La contraception de l'adolescente

    PubMed Central

    Pinsonneault, Odette

    1991-01-01

    Approximately one-half of all female adolescents are sexually active. Family physicians whose patients include female adolescents must be able to provide them with information and advice about contraception. In this article, adolescent contraception is examined in detail and a number of strategies for achieving optimum compliance are presented. PMID:21229024

  2. Advance Provision of Emergency Contraception for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamji, Jehan-Marie; Swartwout, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Emergency contraception is most effective at preventing unintended pregnancy when taken as early as possible following unprotected sexual intercourse. Advance provision of this medication supports more timely and effective use. In the midst of rising teen pregnancy rates, current policies often limit access to emergency contraception for…

  3. Adolescent Contraceptive Use: Models, Research, and Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, Bernard E., Jr.; Schofield, Janet Ward

    Both the career model and the decision model have been proposed to explain patterns of contraceptive use in teenagers. The career model views contraceptive use as a symbol of a woman's sexuality and implies a clear decision to be sexually active. The decision model is based on the subjective expected utility (SEU) theory which holds that people…

  4. Adolescent health services and contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Mudd, E H; Dickens, H O; García, C R; Rickels, K; Freeman, E; Huggins, G R; Logan, J J

    1978-07-01

    A pilot study of a health services program for never-pregnant high-school students, which stresses development of incentives for personal involvement in their own health care, reports a low incidence of unintended pregnancy among girls who requested contraceptives. The social and emotional characteristics of those who continued contraceptive use are compared with the small group who had uninteneded pregnancies. PMID:677283

  5. Use of Contraception and Attitudes towards Contraceptive Use in Swedish Women - A Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kopp Kallner, Helena; Thunell, Louise; Brynhildsen, Jan; Lindeberg, Mia; Gemzell Danielsson, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe contraceptive use and attitudes towards contraceptive use in Sweden which has the highest abortion rate in Western Europe. Secondary objectives were to investigate knowledge of contraceptive methods and outcomes of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies. Design Telephone survey. Setting National survey of women living in Sweden. Population Women between 16 and 49 years. Methods The survey contained 22 questions with free text and multi choice answers on demographics, contraceptive use, knowledge of and attitudes towards contraception, the importance of monthly bleeding and experience of unintended pregnancy. Main Outcome Measures Distribution of use of contraceptive methods and non-use of contraception among Swedish women. Prevalence and outcome of unintended pregnancies. Results A total of 1001 women participated in the survey. Of all women, 721/1001 (72.1%) currently used contraception whereas 268/1001 (26.8%) women did not. Long acting reversible contraception, (LARC; implant and intra uterine contraception) was used by 24.3% of women. The unmet need of contraception in Sweden was estimated at 8.9% (89/1001 women). A total of 781 (78%) women had never experienced an unintended pregnancy whereas 220 (22%) women had had at least one unintended pregnancy. Users and non-users alike stated that one of the most important characteristics of a contraceptive method is its effectiveness. Conclusions Sweden has a large unmet need for contraception. Furthermore, a large proportion of women have experienced at least one unintended pregnancy. Increasing contraceptive use and promotion of LARC is a possible way forward in the effort to reduce the rates of unwanted pregnancies. PMID:25992901

  6. [Detection of chlorophyll content in water body based on two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Li-Hua; Sun, Hong; Li, Min-Zan

    2014-02-01

    Twenty five samples were collected from 10 different ponds in Jiangsu Province of China. According to the different water status and surface area of each pond, different numbers of water samples were collected. The present paper aims to detect chlorophyll content in water body based on hyperspectrum. The visible and near infrared spectral transmittance of the water samples was measured by using a Shimadzu UV-2450 spectrograph. At the same time, the chlorophyll content of each sample was measured using hot-ethanol extraction method in the laboratory. Then the spectral characteristics were analyzed for the water samples and the results showed that with chlorophyll concentration increasing, spectral transmittance decreased gradually. There is an apparent transmission valley at 676 nm. And then two dimensional correlation spectrum technology was used to analyze the sensitive absorption band of chlorophyll in water body. Comprehensive observation of the spectral characteristics of water samples can be carried out much accurately by analyzing two-dimensional correlation spectra of synchronous and asynchronous spectrograms. And the effective spectral response bands of the chlorophyll content were found at 488 and 676 nm. Then the NDWCI (normalized difference water chlorophyll index) was established with the transmittance of red band and blue band. Two regression models were built to predict the chlorophyll concentration in water. One is a multiple linear regression model based on the original transmittances at 488 and 676 nm. The other is the linear regression model based on NDWCI. By comparison, the model based on NDWCI was better. The R2 of its training model reached to 0.7712, and the root mean square error of calibration was 45.5099 mg x L(-1). The R2 of prediction model reached to 0.7658, and the root mean square error of prediction was 39.5038 mg x L(-1). It reached to a practical level to predict the chlorophyll content in water body rapidly. PMID:24822407

  7. Hydrographic Surveys for Six Water Bodies in Eastern Nebraska, 2005-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Michaela R.; Andersen, Michael J.; Sebree, Sonja K.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality, completed hydrographic surveys for six water bodies in eastern Nebraska: Maskenthine Wetland, Olive Creek Lake, Standing Bear Lake, Wagon Train Lake and Wetland, Wildwood Lake, and Yankee Hill Lake and sediment basin. The bathymetric data were collected using a boat-mounted survey-grade fathometer that operated at 200 kHz, and a differentially corrected Global Positioning System with antenna mounted directly above the echo-sounder transducer. Shallow-water and terrestrial areas were surveyed using a Real-Time Kinematic Global Positioning System. The bathymetric, shallow-water, and terrestrial data were processed in a geographic information system to generate a triangulated irregular network representation of the bottom of the water body. Bathymetric contours were interpolated from the triangulated irregular network data using a 2-foot contour interval. Bathymetric contours at the conservation pool elevation for Maskenthine Wetland, Yankee Hill Lake, and Yankee Hill sediment pond also were interpolated in addition to the 2-foot contours. The surface area and storage capacity of each lake or wetland were calculated for 1-foot intervals of water surface elevation and are tabulated in the Appendix for all water bodies.

  8. [Microbial risk assessment of urban water bodies for aesthetical and recreational uses].

    PubMed

    Sun, Fu; Sha, Jing; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Liu, Yan-Hua

    2013-03-01

    With the increasing public access to urban water bodies for aesthetical and recreational purposes, it is of critical importance for densely populated urban areas to conduct microbial risk assessment and accordingly implement effective risk management. Based on the methodology of quantitative microbial risk assessment, a case study was conducted on three typical urban water bodies for aesthetical and recreational uses in a southern city in China. Exposure assessment was carried out through water quality monitoring, field survey and literature review, and accordingly human health risk was assessed with different dose-response equations based on fecal coliforms (FC), Escherichia coli (EC) and Enterococci (ENT). Microbial risk estimated by different dose-response equations was found consistent with and comparable to each other. Stream B located in a residential area was not suitable for primary- or secondary-contact recreational uses, and its microbial risk to the public mainly came from water abstraction for household miscellaneous uses. Stream C and Lake E, located in a public open space and a scenic area respectively, could meet the current recreational requirements, and their microbial risk to the public was generally attributed to various recreational activities. It was necessary to address the public health risk associated with the unauthorized or inappropriate water uses (e.g. abstraction for household miscellaneous uses) of urban aesthetical and recreational water bodies. PMID:23745397

  9. Water ages of 20 groundwater bodies and its relevance for the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralik, Martin; Brielmann, Heike; Humer, Franko; Grath, Johannes; Sültenfuß, Jürgen; Philippitsch, Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    The 'Mean Residence Time' (MRT) of groundwater is required to develop reliable hydrogeological concepts of groundwater bodies as a prerequisite for a qualified monitoring and risk assessment. MRTs from monitoring wells help to assess if groundwater bodies are 'at risk' or 'not at risk' failing to meet good groundwater quantitative and chemical status according to the Water Framework Directive and therefore not being able to use the groundwater as drinking water or industrial water resource. A combination of 18O/2H, 3H, 3H/3He and in some cases additional CFC, SF6, 85Kr and 35S measurements allow to calculate reliable MRTs in 20 groundwater bodies covering 13% (approx.10719 km2) of the Austrian territory. Altogether 401 groundwater wells and springs from the existing groundwater monitoring network were analysed for δ18O (n=1500), 3H (n=800) and 3He (n=327) since 2006. Considering both the fact that monitoring wells may have multiple or long well screens and the inherent uncertainties of groundwater age dating techniques, age estimations were classified into 5 categories of short ( 50years) mean residence times for each monitoring site. Subsequently, median values of the MRT categories were assigned to each investigated groundwater body. These are valuable information to fix extraction rates, to set measures to improve the land use and groundwater protection and to validate hydrogeological concepts. Generally, MRTs of groundwater bodies increase from shallow Alpine groundwater bodies over deeper Alpine valley-aquifers to longer MRTs in the Pannonian climate range in the east of Austria.

  10. The effect of water temperature and synoptic winds on the development of surface flows over narrow, elongated water bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, M.; Pielke, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Simulations of the thermally induced breeze involved with a relatively narrow, elongated water body is presented in conjunction with evaluations of sensible heat fluxes in a stable marine atmospheric surface layer. The effect of the water surface temperature and of the large-scale synoptic winds on the development of surface flows over the water is examined. As implied by the sensible heat flux patterns, the simulation results reveal the following trends: (1) when the synoptic flow is absent or light, the induced surface breeze is not affected noticeably by a reduction of the water surface temperature; and (2) for stronger synoptic flow, the resultant surface flow may be significantly affected by the water surface temperature.

  11. [The value of irreversible contraception].

    PubMed

    Havemann, O; Seidenschnur, G; Meyer, K

    1979-01-01

    8 years after sterilization was in force in GDR it is stated, that this way of female healthy protection was different performed in the varions countries of GDR. The portion of the country Rostock amount to 56,6%. --85,3% of the women were elder than 30 years. 60% of the applicants have had legal abortions. 66,8% of the propositions were based by medical indication. --The rate of complications and failures amount to 0,3%. --By reason of the results it is recommended to regard the sterilization as the adequate method of contraception, if reproduction is finished. PMID:433491

  12. International standardization of mechanical contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Mellstam, S

    1983-06-01

    At least 12 countries have regulations for condoms, and because of the complicated regulations relating to condoms the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) was asked to create a committee for contraceptives. Its objective is to promote the development of standards throughout the world to help the international exchange of goods and services. Following discussions between the World Health Organization (WHO) and ISO it was decided in 1974 to establish a technical ISO committee that would deal with international standards for mechanical contraceptives, comprising condoms, diaphragms, and IUDs. It was also decided that spermicides and oral contraceptives (OCs) should be excluded from the ISO effort, but that they should fall within the responsibility of WHO. The committee, entitled ISO/TC 157 Mechanical Contraceptives, was represented by 35 member countries in 1982. The object of standardizing condoms is to obtain a satisfactory quality that can be accepted throughout the world. To achieve that purpose, acceptable test methods and associated limit requirements and values must be determined, along with rules for storage, packaging, and labeling. The most important factors in determining condom quality are the need to reach agreement on an acceptable number of holes in the condom and the ability to establish limit values for the mechanical properties of the condom. Specific requirements regarding dimensions, resistance to storage, packaging, labeling, and appropriate storage are also important. Up to 1982 the work of ISO for condoms resulted in 8 published international standards, of which 6 deal with test methods, 1 with packaging and labeling, and 1 with storage. Agreement has also been reached within the ISO committee on an additional 3 draft standards. Due to the comparatively small use of diaphragms, standardization efforts in this area do not have the highest priority. ISO/TC 157 has formulated 10 drafts which are being prepared for distribution to

  13. Gene expression in caged fish as indicators of contaminants exposure in tropical karstic water bodies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gabriela; Luna-Ramírez, Karen S; Soto, Mélina; Richardson, Kristine L

    2012-04-01

    Karstic areas in Yucatan are very permeable, which allows contaminants to move rapidly into the aquifer. In the present study, we evaluated gene expression of vitellogenin (VTG) and cytochrome P-450 1A (CYP1A) in caged juvenile zebrafish deployed for 15 days in 13 different water bodies, cenotes and aguadas, throughout karstic region of the Yucatan peninsula. Gene expression was evaluated using qRT-PCR. Results indicated induction of VTG in 7 water bodies with respect to reference cage. The highest relative VTG expression, about 3000 times higher than reference cage, was found in an aguada close to a cattle farm. CYP1A induction with respect to reference cage was observed in 3 water bodies, all of them located near villages or used for tourist activities. Pollutants and biomarkers of effect should be monitored in these water bodies in order to have a better understanding of the actual levels of pollutants that are present at Yucatan's aquifer and the potential risk to human and environmental health. PMID:22014761

  14. EUTROPHICATION OF COASTAL WATER BODIES: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN NUTRIENT LOADINGS AND ECOLOGICAL RESPONSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This newly initiated research is intended to provide environmental managers with an empirical method to develop regional nutrient input limits for East Coast estuaries and other coastal water bodies. Our goal is to create an improved model of nutrient load-response relationships....

  15. TOXIWASP: A DYNAMIC MODEL FOR SIMULATING THE TRANSPORT AND FATE OF TOXIC CHEMICALS IN WATER BODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    TOXIWASP is a dynamic model for simulating the transport and fate of toxic chemicals in water bodies. Two state variables are simulated: organic chemical and total sediment. The generalized chemical model can be used for problems requiring dynamic transport and loading capabiliti...

  16. EUTROPHICATION OF COASTAL WATER BODIES: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN NUTRIENT LOADING AND ECOLOGICAL RESPONSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This newly initiated research will provide environmental managers with an empirical method to develop regional nutrient input limits for East Coast estuaries/coastal water bodies. The goal will be to reduce the current uncertainty associated with nutrient load-response relationsh...

  17. Water-triacylglycerol interactions affect oil body structure and seed viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are investigating interactions between water and triacylglycerols (TAG) that appear to affect oil body stability and viability of seeds. Dried seeds are usually stored at freezer temperatures (-20oC) for long-term conservation of genetic resources. This globally accepted genebanking practice is...

  18. Sterilization and contraceptive services in Catholic hospitals.

    PubMed

    O'Lane, J M

    1979-02-15

    Sterilization and contraceptive practices in United States Catholic hospitals were surveyed by anonymous mail questionnaires, obtaining a 57% response rate (340 of 598). Twenty per cent of the hospitals permitted medically indicated sterilization operations. Forty-seven per cent of those hospitals not allowing sterilization procedures reported that their medical staffs were interested in performing medically indicated sterilizations. The types of contraceptive services offered varied widely. The rhythm method was most frequently available, with oral contraceptives in second place; many hospitals did not provide any family-planning services; 13% utilized all types of contraception. The thesis is advanced that improvement in availability of sterilization and contraceptive services is a duty of hospital medical staffs. PMID:433994

  19. [Contraception and abortion: an update in 2015].

    PubMed

    Chung, D; Ferro Luzzi, E; Bettoli Musy, L; Narring, F

    2015-09-23

    Family doctors can play an important role in preventing unplanned pregnancies. This article addresses the different contraceptives methods available in Switzerland, which are classified in 2 groups and recommends using the GATHER approach (Greet, Ask, Tell, Help, Explain, Return) to promote compliance. LARC (long acting reversible contraceptives) can be recommended to any woman who needs a reliable birth control method. These contraceptives require minimum effort for high efficiency. Further explanation regarding the use of an emergency contraception must be provided when short action contraceptives are chosen. Switzerland's abortion rate is one of the lowest in the world. Medical abortion tends to be more and more prominent. Under certain circumstances, it can be self-administered at home. PMID:26591787

  20. a Probability-Based Statistical Method to Extract Water Body of TM Images with Missing Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Shizhong; Chen, Jiangping; Luo, Minghai

    2016-06-01

    Water information cannot be accurately extracted using TM images because true information is lost in some images because of blocking clouds and missing data stripes, thereby water information cannot be accurately extracted. Water is continuously distributed in natural conditions; thus, this paper proposed a new method of water body extraction based on probability statistics to improve the accuracy of water information extraction of TM images with missing information. Different disturbing information of clouds and missing data stripes are simulated. Water information is extracted using global histogram matching, local histogram matching, and the probability-based statistical method in the simulated images. Experiments show that smaller Areal Error and higher Boundary Recall can be obtained using this method compared with the conventional methods.

  1. Mechanism for generating power from wave motion on a body of water

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, G.A.; Sachs, H.K.

    1982-09-28

    A mechanism for generating power from wave motion on a body of water is described. The mechanism includes a buoyant body which is adapted to float on a body of water and to roll and pitch in response to the wave motion of the water. A gyro-wave energy transducer is mounted on the buoyant body for translating the pendulum-like motions of the buoyant body into rotational motion. The gyro-wave energy transducer includes a gimbal comprised of first and second frames, with the first frame being pivotally mounted to the second frame and the second frame being pivotally mounted to the buoyant body. A gyroscope is mounted to the first frame for rotation about an axis perpendicular to the axes of rotation of the first and second frames. A motor/generator is coupled to the gyroscope for maintaining a controlled rotational velocity for the gyroscope. Transferring members are associated with one of the first and second frames for transferring torque of one of the first and second frames to the gyroscope about an axis that is perpendicular to that of the gyroscope which results in rotation of the other of the first and second frames. An electrical generator is responsive to the relative rotational movement of the first and second frames for generating electrical energy. A storage battery is mounted on the buoyant body for storing and releasing electrical energy and is operatively coupled to the motor/generator and the electrical generator. A control circuit is associated with the generator and the motor/generator unit of the gyroscope and is responsive to the time rate of change of current produced by the generator for controlling the rotational velocity of the gyroscope in order to maintain maximum power output from the electrical generator.

  2. In vitro uptake of oral contraceptive steroids by magnesium trisilicate.

    PubMed

    Khalil, S A; Iwuagwu, M

    1978-02-01

    Some steroids used in oral contraceptives were adsorbed significantly by magnesium trisilicate. The adsorption affinity followed the sequence: ethindrone greater than mestranol greater than norethindrone greater than ethinyl estradiol. Adsorption data obtained at relatively low initial concentrations fitted a Langmuir plot; the values for monolayer adsorption ranged between 0.24 and 0.32 mg/g. At higher concentrations of the steroids, multilayer adsorption occurred. The results of desorption experiments made at 37 degrees in water and 0.05 N HCl suggested that desorption was incomplete and depended on the amount of steroid adsorbed. During the dissolution testing of a brand of contraceptive tablets containing norethindrone acetate, the presence of 0.5% (w/v) magnesium trisilicate in the medium resulted in almost complete reduction in the amount of the steroid remaining in solution after 1 hr. PMID:202691

  3. Sprectroradiometric characteristics of inland water bodies infestated by Oscillatoria rubescens algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciraolo, Giuseppe; La Loggia, Goffredo; Maltese, Antonino

    2010-10-01

    In December 2006 blooms of Oscillatoria rubescens were found in the reservoir Prizzi in Sicily. Oscillatoria is a genus of filamentous alga comprising approximately 6 species, between these the O. rubescens is sadly famous since this organism produces microcystins which are powerful hepatotoxins. Firstly found in Europe in 1825 on Geneva lake, recently (2006) those algae has been find out in Pozzillo, Nicoletti e Ancipa reservoirs (Enna Province), as well as in Prizzi (Palermo Province) and Garcia reservoirs (Trapani Province). Toxins produced by those bacteria (usually called microcystine LR-1 and LR-2) are highly toxic since they can activate oncogenes cells causing cancer pathologies on liver and gastrointestinal tract. Even if water treatment plants should ensure the provision of safe drinking water from surface waters contaminated with those toxic algae blooms, the contamination of reservoirs used for civil and agricultural supply highlights human health risks. International literature suggests a threshold value of 0.01 μgl-1 to avoid liver cancer using water coming from contaminated water bodies for a long period. Since O. rubescens activities is strongly related to phosphate and nitrogen compounds as well as to temperature and light transmission within water, the paper presents the comparison between optical properties of the water of an infested reservoir and those of a reservoir characterized by clear water. Field campaigns were carried out in February-March 2008 in order to quantify the spectral transparencies of two water bodies through the calculation of the diffuse attenuation coefficient, measuring underwater downwelling irradiance at different depths as well as water spectral reflectance. Results show that diffuse attenuation coefficient is reduced by approximately 15% reducing light penetration in the water column; coherently reflectance spectral signature generally decreases, exhibiting a characteristic peak around 703 nm not present in

  4. The historical distribution of main malaria foci in Spain as related to water bodies.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Arturo; García-Barrón, Leoncio; Vetter, Mark; Morales, Julia

    2014-08-01

    The possible connectivity between the spatial distribution of water bodies suitable for vectors of malaria and endemic malaria foci in Southern Europe is still not well known. Spain was one of the last countries in Western Europe to be declared free of malaria by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1964. This study combines, by means of a spatial-temporal analysis, the historical data of patients and deceased with the distribution of water bodies where the disease-transmitting mosquitos proliferate. Therefore, data from historical archives with a Geographic Information System (GIS), using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation method, was analyzed with the aim of identifying regional differences in the distribution of malaria in Spain. The reasons, why the risk of transmission is concentrated in specific regions, are related to worse socioeconomic conditions (Extremadura), the presence of another vector (Anopheles labranchiae) besides A. atroparvus (Levante) or large areas of water bodies in conditions to reproduce theses vectors (La Mancha and Western Andalusia). In the particular case of Western Andalusia, in 1913, the relatively high percentage of 4.73% of the surface, equal to 202362 ha, corresponds to wetlands and other unhealthy water bodies. These wetlands have been reduced as a result of desiccation policies and climate change such as the Little Ice Age and Global Climate Change. The comprehension of the main factors of these wetland changes in the past can help us interpret accurately the future risk of malaria re-emergence in temperate latitudes, since it reveals the crucial role of unhealthy water bodies on the distribution, endemicity and eradication of malaria in southern Europe. PMID:25101771

  5. The Historical Distribution of Main Malaria Foci in Spain as Related to Water Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Arturo; García-Barrón, Leoncio; Vetter, Mark; Morales, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The possible connectivity between the spatial distribution of water bodies suitable for vectors of malaria and endemic malaria foci in Southern Europe is still not well known. Spain was one of the last countries in Western Europe to be declared free of malaria by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1964. This study combines, by means of a spatial-temporal analysis, the historical data of patients and deceased with the distribution of water bodies where the disease-transmitting mosquitos proliferate. Therefore, data from historical archives with a Geographic Information System (GIS), using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation method, was analyzed with the aim of identifying regional differences in the distribution of malaria in Spain. The reasons, why the risk of transmission is concentrated in specific regions, are related to worse socioeconomic conditions (Extremadura), the presence of another vector (Anopheles labranchiae) besides A. atroparvus (Levante) or large areas of water bodies in conditions to reproduce theses vectors (La Mancha and Western Andalusia). In the particular case of Western Andalusia, in 1913, the relatively high percentage of 4.73% of the surface, equal to 202362 ha, corresponds to wetlands and other unhealthy water bodies. These wetlands have been reduced as a result of desiccation policies and climate change such as the Little Ice Age and Global Climate Change. The comprehension of the main factors of these wetland changes in the past can help us interpret accurately the future risk of malaria re-emergence in temperate latitudes, since it reveals the crucial role of unhealthy water bodies on the distribution, endemicity and eradication of malaria in southern Europe. PMID:25101771

  6. Hydrologic, water-quality, and biological data for three water bodies, Texas Gulf Coastal Plain, 2000-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Jeffery W.; Hogan, Jennifer L.

    2003-01-01

    During July 2000?September 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed site-specific hydrologic, water-quality, and biological data in Dickinson Bayou, Armand Bayou, and the San Bernard River in the Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas. Segments of the three water bodies are on the State 303(d) list. Continuous monitoring showed that seasonal variations in water temperature, specific conductance, pH, and dissolved oxygen in all three water bodies were similar to those observed at U.S. Geological Survey stations along the Texas Gulf Coast. In particular, water temperature and dissolved oxygen are inversely related. Periods of smallest dissolved oxygen concentrations generally occurred in the summer months when water temperatures were highest. Water-quality monitors were deployed at three depths in Dickinson Bayou. For periodically collected nutrients, the median concentration of ammonia nitrogen was largest in Dickinson Bayou and smallest in the San Bernard River. Median concentrations of ammonia plus organic nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, and orthophosphorus were largest in Armand Bayou. The median concentration of each of the four nutrients was larger for high-flow samples than for low-flow samples. The largest individual nutrient concentrations occurred during spring and summer. Both median and individual concentrations of chlorophyll-a were largest for Armand Bayou; median concentrations of pheophyton were similar for all three water bodies, and individual concentrations were largest for Armand Bayou. Median densities of fecal coliform bacteria and E. coli bacteria were similar for all three water bodies. Flow conditions had minimal effect on concentrations of chlorophyll-a and pheophytin, but the largest bacteria densities were in samples collected during high flow. Yields of most nutrients tended to increase with distance downstream. Yields in the San Bernard River and tributaries were less than yields in Dickinson and Armand Bayous. For Dickinson

  7. Rapid extraction of water bodies from SAR imagery assisted by InSAR DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Ming; Zmuda, Andy

    1998-08-01

    In China, detailed flood maps are produced in near real time using an airborne SAR and data transmission system. Water bodies are extracted and the information is integrated with other thematic data to facilitate the rapid response to economic and humanitarian relief. One problem has been that terrain shadow on SAR images is classified as water and this proves difficult to eliminate without detailed elevation data. However interferometric processing of ERS Tandem Mission data has been used to produce a digital elevation model for a test area in China. This has been used to mask areas of terrain shadow on SAR images therefore improving the automatic classification of water bodies. The result is promising compared with the previously used method that relied on manual elimination of shadow areas.

  8. Adolescent women's contraceptive decision making.

    PubMed

    Weisman, C S; Plichta, S; Nathanson, C A; Chase, G A; Ensminger, M E; Robinson, J C

    1991-06-01

    A modified rational decision model incorporating salient events and social influences (particularly from sexual partners) is used to analyze adolescent women's consistent use of oral contraceptives (OCs) over a six-month period. Data are taken from a panel study of 308 clients of an inner-city family planning clinic. Expected OC use was computed for each subject on the basis of subjective expected utility (SEU) theory, and is found in multivariate analyses to be a significant predictor of actual OC use. In addition, variables representing baseline and follow-up partner influences, the salience of pregnancy for the subject, and positive side effects of OCs during the first months of use are found to predict OC use. Partner's support of OC use during follow-up and positive side effects of OCs are found to predict OC use among subjects for whom OC use was not the expected decision according to baseline SEU. Implications of the findings for models of adolescents' contraceptive behavior and for clinicians are discussed. PMID:1861049

  9. Australian scientists develop male contraceptive.

    PubMed

    1974-05-20

    The Australian Information Service in Canberra reports that Australian scientists have formulated a contraceptive pill to temporarily stop spermatogenesis in man, thus producing infertility. The research was done by a team consisting of Dr. Henry Burger, director of the Medical Reserach Center at Prince Henry's Hospital in Melbourne, Dr. Bryan Hudson, Principal Research Fellow at the Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Medicine at the Univeristy of Melbourne, and Dr. David de Kretser, senior lecturer in Monash University's Department of Medicine at Prince Henry's Hospital. The contraceptive pill consists of progestagen (d-norgestrel) with androgen (methyltestosterone), a combination that suppresses the production of the sperm but conserves libido and potency. The testing program has yet to be undertaken in human volunteers. There will be three phases to the drug trial: pretreatment, during which the health of the volunteers and the safety of the drug will be established; the treatment phase, lasting six months, during which the volunteers will be given daily oral dose of the drugs; and the recovery phase, lasting at least three months, during which the restoration of normal spermatogenesis will be observed. PMID:12333267

  10. [Post-abortion contraception: effects of contraception services and reproductive intention].

    PubMed

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela

    2016-02-01

    Contraceptive counseling and the supply of contraceptive methods are part of post-abortion care and positively influence the subsequent use of contraceptive methods. Studies showing such evidence have been conducted predominantly in countries with no legal restrictions on abortion and with adequate care for women that terminate a pregnancy. However, little is known about contraceptive practices in contexts where abortion is illegal, as in Brazil, in which post-abortion contraceptive care is inadequate. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of contraceptive care on male condom use and oral and injectable contraceptives in the six months post-abortion, considering reproductive intention. The results showed that contraceptive care only has a positive effect on the use of oral contraceptives in the first six months post-abortion, as long as the woman had a medical consultation in the same month in which she received information on contraception. One or the other intervention alone had no significant impact. PMID:26910252

  11. Assessment of molecular methods as a tool for detecting pathogenic protozoa isolated from water bodies.

    PubMed

    Adamska, M; Sawczuk, M; Kolodziejczyk, L; Skotarczak, B

    2015-12-01

    Several species belong to the Cryptosporidium and Giardia genus, the main parasitic protozoa occurring in water, but only some of them are infectious to humans. We investigated the occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and identified their species in the water samples collected from natural water bodies in north-western Poland. A total of 600 samples from water bodies used for bathing, sewage discharge, as drinking water sources and watering places for animals were screened. The samples were collected during a 3-year period in each of the four seasons and filtered using Filta-Max (IDEXX Laboratories, USA). Genomic DNA was extracted from all samples and used as a target sequence for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and TaqMan real-time PCR, as well as for reverse line blotting (RLB) methods. PCR methods seem to be more sensitive to detect Giardia and Cryptosporidium DNA in water samples than RLB methods. All PCR products were sequenced and three were identified as C. parvum and four as G. intestinalis. The overall prevalence of C. parvum (0.5%) and G. intestinalis (0.6%) in the samples suggests that the risk of Cryptosporidium and Giardia infections in north-western Poland is minimal. PMID:26608757

  12. Integrated Evaluation of Urban Water Bodies for Pollution Abatement Based on Fuzzy Multicriteria Decision Approach.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Sarfraz; Yuebo, Xie; Saifullah, Muhammad; Nabi Jan, Ramila; Muhetaer, Adila

    2015-01-01

    Today's ecology is erected with miscellaneous framework. However, numerous sources deteriorate it, such as urban rivers that directly cause the environmental pollution. For chemical pollution abatement from urban water bodies, many techniques were introduced to rehabilitate the water quality of these water bodies. In this research, Bacterial Technology (BT) was applied to urban rivers escalating the necessity to control the water pollution in different places (Xuxi River (XXU); Gankeng River (GKS); Xia Zhang River (XZY); Fenghu and Song Yang Rivers (FSR); Jiu Haogang River (JHH)) in China. For data analysis, the physiochemical parameters such as temperature, chemical oxygen demand (COD), dissolved oxygen (DO), total phosphorus (TP), and ammonia nitrogen (NH3N) were determined before and after the treatment. Multicriteria Decision Making (MCDM) method was used for relative significance of different water quality on each station, based on fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP). The overall results revealed that the pollution is exceeding at "JHH" due to the limit of "COD" as critical water quality parameter and after treatment, an abrupt recovery of the rivers compared with the average improved efficiency of nutrients was 79%, 74%, 68%, and 70% of COD, DO, TP, and NH3N, respectively. The color of the river's water changed to its original form and aquatic living organism appeared with clear effluents from them. PMID:26516623

  13. Integrated Evaluation of Urban Water Bodies for Pollution Abatement Based on Fuzzy Multicriteria Decision Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Sarfraz; Yuebo, Xie; Saifullah, Muhammad; Nabi Jan, Ramila; Muhetaer, Adila

    2015-01-01

    Today's ecology is erected with miscellaneous framework. However, numerous sources deteriorate it, such as urban rivers that directly cause the environmental pollution. For chemical pollution abatement from urban water bodies, many techniques were introduced to rehabilitate the water quality of these water bodies. In this research, Bacterial Technology (BT) was applied to urban rivers escalating the necessity to control the water pollution in different places (Xuxi River (XXU); Gankeng River (GKS); Xia Zhang River (XZY); Fenghu and Song Yang Rivers (FSR); Jiu Haogang River (JHH)) in China. For data analysis, the physiochemical parameters such as temperature, chemical oxygen demand (COD), dissolved oxygen (DO), total phosphorus (TP), and ammonia nitrogen (NH3N) were determined before and after the treatment. Multicriteria Decision Making (MCDM) method was used for relative significance of different water quality on each station, based on fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP). The overall results revealed that the pollution is exceeding at “JHH” due to the limit of “COD” as critical water quality parameter and after treatment, an abrupt recovery of the rivers compared with the average improved efficiency of nutrients was 79%, 74%, 68%, and 70% of COD, DO, TP, and NH3N, respectively. The color of the river's water changed to its original form and aquatic living organism appeared with clear effluents from them. PMID:26516623

  14. Aster Global dem Version 3, and New Aster Water Body Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, M.

    2016-06-01

    In 2016, the US/Japan ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) project released Version 3 of the Global DEM (GDEM). This 30 m DEM covers the earth's surface from 82N to 82S, and improves on two earlier versions by correcting some artefacts and filling in areas of missing DEMs by the acquisition of additional data. The GDEM was produced by stereocorrelation of 2 million ASTER scenes and operation on a pixel-by-pixel basis: cloud screening; stacking data from overlapping scenes; removing outlier values, and averaging elevation values. As previously, the GDEM is packaged in ~ 23,000 1 x 1 degree tiles. Each tile has a DEM file, and a NUM file reporting the number of scenes used for each pixel, and identifying the source for fill-in data (where persistent clouds prevented computation of an elevation value). An additional data set was concurrently produced and released: the ASTER Water Body Dataset (AWBD). This is a 30 m raster product, which encodes every pixel as either lake, river, or ocean; thus providing a global inland and shore-line water body mask. Water was identified through spectral analysis algorithms and manual editing. This product was evaluated against the Shuttle Water Body Dataset (SWBD), and the Landsat-based Global Inland Water (GIW) product. The SWBD only covers the earth between about 60 degrees north and south, so it is not a global product. The GIW only delineates inland water bodies, and does not deal with ocean coastlines. All products are at 30 m postings.

  15. Biotic variation in coastal water bodies in Sussex, England: Implications for saline lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Chris B.; Vina-Herbon, Cristina; Metcalfe, Daniel J.

    2005-12-01

    Coastal water bodies are a heterogeneous resource typified by high spatial and temporal variability and threatened by anthropogenic impacts. This includes saline lagoons, which support a specialist biota and are a priority habitat for nature conservation. This paper describes the biotic variation in coastal water bodies in Sussex, England, in order to characterise the distinctiveness of the saline lagoon community and elucidate environmental factors that determine its distribution. Twenty-eight coastal water bodies were surveyed for their aquatic flora and invertebrate fauna and a suite of exploratory environmental variables compiled. Ordination and cluster analyses were used to examine patterns in community composition and relate these to environmental parameters. Biotic variation in the coastal water body resource was high. Salinity was the main environmental parameter explaining the regional distribution of taxa; freshwater and saline assemblages were evident and related to sea water ingress. Freshwater sites were indicated by the plant Myriophyllum spicatum and gastropod mollusc Lymnaea peregra, while more saline communities supported marine and brackish water taxa, notably a range of chlorophytic algae and the bivalve mollusc Cerastoderma glaucum. Site community differences were also related to bank slope and parameters describing habitat heterogeneity. A saline lagoon community was discerned within the matrix of biotic variation consisting of specialist lagoonal species with associated typically euryhaline taxa. For fauna, the latter were the molluscs Abra tenuis and Hydrobia ulvae, and the crustaceans Corophium volutator and Palaemonetes varians, and for flora they were the algae Ulva lactuca, Chaetomorpha mediterranea, Cladophora spp. and Enteromorpha intestinalis. One non-native polychaete species, Ficopomatus enigmaticus, also strongly influenced community structure within the lagoonal resource. The community was not well defined as specialist and

  16. Using Landsat image time series to study a small water body in Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Chao Rodríguez, Y; el Anjoumi, A; Domínguez Gómez, J A; Rodríguez Pérez, D; Rico, E

    2014-06-01

    Ramsar Convention and EU Water Framework Directive are two international agreements focused on the conservation and achievement of good ecological and chemical status of wetlands. Wetlands are important ecosystems holding many plant and animal communities. Their environmental status can be characterised by the quality of their water bodies. Water quality can be assessed from biophysical parameters (such as Chlorophyll-a concentration ([Chla]), water surface temperature and transparency) in the deeper or lacustrine zone, or from bioindicators (as submerged aquatic vegetation) in the shallow or palustrine zone. This paper proves the use of Landsat time series to measure the evolution of water quality parameters and the environmental dynamics of a small water body (6.57 ha) in a Ramsar wetland (Arreo Lake in the North of Spain). Our results show that Landsat TM images can be used to describe periodic behaviours such as the water surface temperature or the phenologic state of the submerged vegetation (through normalized difference vegetation index, NDVI) and thus detect anomalous events. We also show how [Chla] and transparency can be measured in the lacustrine zone using Landsat TM images and an algorithm adjusted for mesotrophic Spanish lakes, and the resulting values vary in time in accordance with field measurements (although these were not synchronous with the images). The availability of this algorithm also highlights anomalies in the field data series that are found to be related with the concentration of suspended matter. All this potential of Landsat imagery to monitor small water bodies in wetlands can be used for hindcasting of past evolution of these wetlands (dating back to 1970s) and will be also useful in the future thanks to the Landsat continuity mission and the Operational Land Imager. PMID:24452860

  17. Males and Morals: Teenage Contraceptive Behavior Amid the Double Standard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Peter

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews literature on teenage contraceptive behavior and teenage contraceptive decision making. The paper describes the persistence of a sexual double standard in terms of moral motivation to use contraception and in terms of the relative lack of communication about contraception among young partners. (Author)

  18. The Male Role in Contraception: Implications for Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chng, Chwee Lye

    1983-01-01

    Many males still perceive contraception as a woman's responsibility. This paper describes male contraceptives and their effectiveness and draws implications for school and community health education professionals. More equitable sharing of the responsibility for contraception might result in more effective contraception. (PP)

  19. Name that Contraceptive! A Game for the Human Sexuality Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Martha S.

    2010-01-01

    There are many contraceptive choices available to people today. Learning about them can be dry, but the game "Name that Contraceptive!" can be a fun and interactive way to review, remember, and retain the details about contraceptive options. Name that Contraceptive is a card game in which students "bid" on the number of clues it will take them to…

  20. The Contraceptive Needs for STD Protection among Women in Jail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswalt, Krista; Hale, Galen J.; Cropsey, Karen L.; Villalobos, Gabriella C.; Ivey, Sara E.; Matthews, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the contraceptive needs of women in jails and their sexually transmitted disease (STD) history and risk to determine effective contraceptive methods for this population. A survey of demographics, sexual health, contraceptive use, and preferred method of contraception was completed by participants recruited at jails in a medium-sized…

  1. Effects of Intense Physical Activity with Free Water Replacement on Bioimpedance Parameters and Body Fluid Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, E. B.; Ulbricht, L.; Krueger, E.; Romaneli, E. F. R.; Souza, M. N.

    2012-12-01

    Authors have emphasized the need for previous care in order to perform reliable bioimpedance acquisition. Despite of this need some authors have reported that intense physical training has little effect on Bioimpedance Analysis (BIA), while other ones have observed significant effects on bioimpedance parameters in the same condition, leading to body composition estimates considered incompatible with human physiology. The aim of this work was to quantify the changes in bioimpedance parameters, as well as in body fluids estimates by BIA, after four hours of intense physical activity with free water replacement in young males. Xitron Hydra 4200 equipment was used to acquire bioimpedance data before and immediately after the physical training. After data acquisition body fluids were estimates from bioimpedance parameters. Height and weight of all subjects were also acquired to the nearest 0.1 cm and 0.1 kg, respectively. Results point that among the bioimpedance parameter, extracellular resistance presented the most coherent behavior, leading to reliable estimates of the extracellular fluid and part of the total body water. Results also show decreases in height and weight of the participants, which were associated to the decrease in body hydration and in intervertebral discs.

  2. Distribution and Ecology of Cyanobacteria in the Rocky Littoral of an English Lake District Water Body, Devoke Water

    PubMed Central

    Pentecost, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria were sampled along two vertical and two horizontal transects in the littoral of Devoke Water, English Lake District. Profiles of cyanobacterium diversity and abundance showed that both attained a maximum close to the water line, but declined rapidly 20–40 cm above it. The distribution of individual species with height together with species and site ordinations showed that several taxa occurred in well-defined zones. A narrow “black zone” in the supralittoral was colonised mainly by species of Calothrix, Dichothrix and Gloeocapsa with pigmented sheaths. There was no evidence of lateral variation of species around the lake, but the height of the black zone correlated positively with wind exposure. The flora of Devoke Water is that of a base-poor mountain lake with some elements of a lowland, more alkaline water-body. PMID:25522253

  3. Fluctuating water depths affect American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) body condition in the Everglades, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brandt, Laura A.; Beauchamp, Jeffrey S.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Successful restoration of wetland ecosystems requires knowledge of wetland hydrologic patterns and an understanding of how those patterns affect wetland plant and animal populations.Within the Everglades, Florida, USA restoration, an applied science strategy including conceptual ecological models linking drivers to indicators is being used to organize current scientific understanding to support restoration efforts. A key driver of the ecosystem affecting the distribution and abundance of organisms is the timing, distribution, and volume of water flows that result in water depth patterns across the landscape. American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) are one of the ecological indicators being used to assess Everglades restoration because they are a keystone species and integrate biological impacts of hydrological operations through all life stages. Alligator body condition (the relative fatness of an animal) is one of the metrics being used and targets have been set to allow us to track progress. We examined trends in alligator body condition using Fulton’s K over a 15 year period (2000–2014) at seven different wetland areas within the Everglades ecosystem, assessed patterns and trends relative to restoration targets, and related those trends to hydrologic variables. We developed a series of 17 a priori hypotheses that we tested with an information theoretic approach to identify which hydrologic factors affect alligator body condition. Alligator body condition was highest throughout the Everglades during the early 2000s and is approximately 5–10% lower now (2014). Values have varied by year, area, and hydrology. Body condition was positively correlated with range in water depth and fall water depth. Our top model was the “Current” model and included variables that describe current year hydrology (spring depth, fall depth, hydroperiod, range, interaction of range and fall depth, interaction of range and hydroperiod). Across all models, interaction

  4. Water-Rock Reactions on Non-Planetary Bodies in the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.

    2005-12-01

    Reactions of aqueous fluids with rocks shortly after formation of the solar system affected the oxidation states, mineralogy, organic speciation, ice composition, and surface/atmospheric chemistry of asteroids, icy satellites of giant plants, and possibly Kuiper belt objects. Water condensed as ice in the solar nebula, was incorporated into the composition of these bodies together with rocky components represented by extremely reduced and anhydrous nebular condensates (e.g., Fe-rich metal, forsterite, low-Ca pyroxene, troilite, Ca-Mg-Al oxides, phosphides), presolar grains (SiC, graphite, diamond, Al-, Mg-, Ti-oxides) and organic compounds and polymers. Radioactive decay of short-lived radionuclides on small bodies, and accretionary heat and decay of long-lived radionuclides on large bodies provided energy to melt ice. On smaller bodies, low gravity precluded separation of water from rocks and restricted fluid dynamics. On larger bodies, water was separated from descending rocks, limiting the duration of water-rock reactions. Competitive oxidation and hydration by water affected both inorganic and organic compounds in rocks. Oxidation of minerals led to formation of ferrous silicates, magnetite, pyrrhotite, Ni sulfides, Ni-rich metal alloys, chromite, phosphates, carbonates and sulfates. Hydration caused formation of phyllosilicates (serpentine, chlorites, smectite clays, amphiboles, and micas), hydroxides, and hydrated sulfides and salts. High water/rock ratios, elevated temperatures and low pressures favored oxidation. Low temperatures supported hydration. In some icy satellites (Europa, Ganymede) high water content and hydrothermal processes during differentiation may have caused profound oxidation leading to carbonates and even sulfates. Since water was the only early oxidizing agent, the elevated oxidation state of Io implies its early aqueous history. Hydrogen was produced in all oxidation reactions and preferentially separated into the gas phase. Escape of H

  5. Improving SNMR data sensitivity to infiltrating water in the presence of large bodies of surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, S.; Keating, K.; Grunewald, E. D.; Walsh, D. O.

    2014-12-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) is a geophysical method used to image water content with depth. Recently SNMR has been used to monitor infiltration events in the vadose zone; however, this application can be complicated by the presence of large signals associated with the ponded surface water. In this study, we develop algorithms to reduce this surface water signal for improved sensitivity to the infiltrated groundwater. Using synthetic models, we examine the accuracy of these algorithms. We then assess our approach using a field dataset collected from a five-week SNMR survey conducted during an infiltration event at the South Aura Valley Storage and Recovery Project (SAVSARP) site in Tucson, AZ. Three different algorithms were developed to remove the surface water from the SNMR data: (1) late time mono-exponential subtraction, in which signal from late in the measurement is used to model surface water signal; (2) model subtraction, in which the Earth's magnetic field subsurface conductive structure, and water layer thickness are used to model the surface water signal; and (3) late time inversion correction, in which model parameters in the relaxation time distributions corresponding to slower relaxation times are zeroed. We used two readily available SNMR inversion codes to verify the three approaches: the GMR Inversion software and the MRS Matlab toolkit. Synthetic models were recovered using both inversion codes by applying the late time mono-exponential subtraction and the model subtraction algorithms, while the late time inversion correction algorithm produced poorly resolved relaxation time distribution models. The corrected dataset from the start of the SAVSARP survey contained features in the relaxation time distribution and water content versus depth models that were consistent with observed features present in other datasets from the survey. We conclude that either the late time mono-exponential subtraction or the model subtraction algorithm are

  6. A global, 30-m resolution land-surface water body dataset for 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, M.; Sexton, J. O.; Huang, C.; Song, D. X.; Song, X. P.; Channan, S.; Townshend, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Inland surface water is essential to terrestrial ecosystems and human civilization. The distribution of surface water in space and its change over time are related to many agricultural, environmental and ecological issues, and are important factors that must be considered in human socioeconomic development. Accurate mapping of surface water is essential for both scientific research and policy-driven applications. Satellite-based remote sensing provides snapshots of Earth's surface and can be used as the main input for water mapping, especially in large areas. Global water areas have been mapped with coarse resolution remotely sensed data (e.g., the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)). However, most inland rivers and water bodies, as well as their changes, are too small to map at such coarse resolutions. Landsat TM (Thematic Mapper) and ETM+ (Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus) imagery has a 30m spatial resolution and provides decades of records (~40 years). Since 2008, the opening of the Landsat archive, coupled with relatively lower costs associated with computing and data storage, has made comprehensive study of the dynamic changes of surface water over large even global areas more feasible. Although Landsat images have been used for regional and even global water mapping, the method can hardly be automated due to the difficulties on distinguishing inland surface water with variant degrees of impurities and mixing of soil background with only Landsat data. The spectral similarities to other land cover types, e.g., shadow and glacier remnants, also cause misidentification. We have developed a probabilistic based automatic approach for mapping inland surface water bodies. Landsat surface reflectance in multiple bands, derived water indices, and data from other sources are integrated to maximize the ability of identifying water without human interference. The approach has been implemented with open-source libraries to facilitate processing large

  7. The current state of male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jing H; Page, Stephanie T

    2016-07-01

    World population continues to grow at an unprecedented rate, doubling in a mere 50years to surpass the 7-billion milestone in 2011. This steep population growth exerts enormous pressure on the global environment. Despite the availability of numerous contraceptive choices for women, approximately half of all pregnancies are unintended and at least half of those are unwanted. Such statistics suggest that there is still a gap in contraceptive options for couples, particularly effective reversible contraceptives for men, who have few contraceptive choices. Male hormonal contraception has been an active area of research for almost 50years. The fundamental concept involves the use of exogenous hormones to suppress endogenous production of gonadotropins, testosterone, and downstream spermatogenesis. Testosterone-alone regimens are effective in many men but high dosing requirements and sub-optimal gonadotropin suppression in 10-30% of men limit their use. A number of novel combinations of testosterone and progestins have been shown to be more efficacious but still require further refinement in delivery systems and a clearer understanding of the potential short- and long-term side effects. Recently, synthetic androgens with both androgenic and progestogenic activity have been developed. These agents have the potential to be single-agent male hormonal contraceptives. Early studies of these compounds are encouraging and there is reason for optimism that these may provide safe, reversible, and reliable contraception for men in the near future. PMID:27016468

  8. Controversies in contraception for women with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2015-01-01

    Contraception is an important choice that offers autonomy to women with regard to prevention of unintended pregnancies. There is wide variation in the contraceptive practices between continents, countries, and societies. The medical eligibility for contraception for sexually active women with epilepsy (WWE) is determined by the type of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) that they use. Enzyme inducing AEDs such as phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine increase the metabolism of orally administered estrogen (and progesterone to a lesser extent). Estrogen can increase the metabolism of certain AEDs, such as lamotrigine, leading to cyclical variation in its blood level with resultant adverse effect profile or seizure dyscontrol. AEDs and sex hormones can increase the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in WWE. The potential interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraception need to be discussed with all women in reproductive age-group. The alternate options of oral contraception such as intrauterine copper device, intrauterine levonorgestrel release system, and supplementary protection with barriers need to be presented to them. World Health Organization has recommended to avoid combination contraceptive pills containing estrogen and progesteron in women who desire contraception and in breastfeeding mothers. Care providers need to consider the option of non-enzyme-inducing AEDs while initiating long-term treatment in adolescent and young WWE. PMID:26425002

  9. Combination oral contraceptives and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Gast, K; Snyder, T

    1990-07-01

    Substantial evidence exists to suggest that the use of oral contraceptives alters the risk for some types of cancer. Use of oral contraceptives for one year or more will reduce the risk of endometrial cancer and epithelial ovarian cancer by 50%, with the protective effect lasting for at least 10 years. The risk for developing cervical cancer in women who have used oral contraceptives appears to be slightly increased, although two independent studies actually found a protective effect associated with oral contraceptive use. The protective effect was probably related to the increased screening frequency found in oral contraceptive users and not related to a biologically protective effect. Therefore, women should be encouraged to undergo regular Pap tests. Data regarding breast cancer, in general, show no increased risk associated with oral contraceptive use. The latency associated with the development of breast cancer does not allow a definitive conclusion, and further study will be required. Oral contraceptives appear to increase the risk for developing benign hepatocellular adenoma, but not hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:2202849

  10. Controversies in contraception for women with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2015-01-01

    Contraception is an important choice that offers autonomy to women with regard to prevention of unintended pregnancies. There is wide variation in the contraceptive practices between continents, countries, and societies. The medical eligibility for contraception for sexually active women with epilepsy (WWE) is determined by the type of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) that they use. Enzyme inducing AEDs such as phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine increase the metabolism of orally administered estrogen (and progesterone to a lesser extent). Estrogen can increase the metabolism of certain AEDs, such as lamotrigine, leading to cyclical variation in its blood level with resultant adverse effect profile or seizure dyscontrol. AEDs and sex hormones can increase the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in WWE. The potential interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraception need to be discussed with all women in reproductive age-group. The alternate options of oral contraception such as intrauterine copper device, intrauterine levonorgestrel release system, and supplementary protection with barriers need to be presented to them. World Health Organization has recommended to avoid combination contraceptive pills containing estrogen and progesteron in women who desire contraception and in breastfeeding mothers. Care providers need to consider the option of non-enzyme-inducing AEDs while initiating long-term treatment in adolescent and young WWE. PMID:26425002

  11. Body mass, energy intake, and water consumption of rats and humans during space flight.

    PubMed

    Wade, C E; Miller, M M; Baer, L A; Moran, M M; Steele, M K; Stein, T P

    2002-10-01

    Alteration of metabolism has been suggested as a major limiting factor to long-term space flight. In humans and primates, a negative energy balance has been reported. The metabolic response of rats to space flight has been suggested to result in a negative energy balance. We hypothesized that rats flown in space would maintain energy balance as indicated by maintenance of caloric intake and body mass gain. Further, the metabolism of the rat would be similar to that of laboratory-reared animals. We studied the results from 15 space flights lasting 4 to 19 d. There was no difference in average body weight (206 +/- 13.9 versus 206 +/- 14.8 g), body weight gain (5.8 +/- 0.48 versus 5.9 +/- 0.56 g/d), caloric intake (309 +/- 21.0 versus 309 +/- 20.1 kcal/kg of body mass per day), or water intake (200 +/- 8.6 versus 199 +/- 9.3 mL/kg of body mass per day) between flight and ground control animals. Compared with standard laboratory animals of similar body mass, no differences were noted. The observations suggested that the negative balance observed in humans and non-human primates may be due to other factors in the space-flight environment. PMID:12361774

  12. Body mass, energy intake, and water consumption of rats and humans during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, C. E.; Miller, M. M.; Baer, L. A.; Moran, M. M.; Steele, M. K.; Stein, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Alteration of metabolism has been suggested as a major limiting factor to long-term space flight. In humans and primates, a negative energy balance has been reported. The metabolic response of rats to space flight has been suggested to result in a negative energy balance. We hypothesized that rats flown in space would maintain energy balance as indicated by maintenance of caloric intake and body mass gain. Further, the metabolism of the rat would be similar to that of laboratory-reared animals. We studied the results from 15 space flights lasting 4 to 19 d. There was no difference in average body weight (206 +/- 13.9 versus 206 +/- 14.8 g), body weight gain (5.8 +/- 0.48 versus 5.9 +/- 0.56 g/d), caloric intake (309 +/- 21.0 versus 309 +/- 20.1 kcal/kg of body mass per day), or water intake (200 +/- 8.6 versus 199 +/- 9.3 mL/kg of body mass per day) between flight and ground control animals. Compared with standard laboratory animals of similar body mass, no differences were noted. The observations suggested that the negative balance observed in humans and non-human primates may be due to other factors in the space-flight environment.

  13. Perceptions of contraceptive effectiveness and health effects of oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Tessler, S L; Peipert, J F

    1997-01-01

    The hypothesis that misperceptions about the effectiveness of contraceptive methods and the risks and benefits of oral contraceptive (OC) use are widespread in the US, even among the most educated population groups, was investigated in 147 women presenting to the Brown University (Providence, Rhode Island) health service and 189 students solicited by female volunteers on the campus. 90% of respondents correctly estimated the effectiveness of OCs in preventing pregnancy, but 32-34% inflated the pregnancy rates associated with subdermal implants and Depo-Provera. 60% overestimated the failure rate of the IUD. On the other hand, a majority underestimated the failure rates of barrier methods and spermicides. 41% believed OCs increase the risk of breast cancer and 33% thought the pill increases cervical cancer risk. 66% knew that OCs reduce dysmenorrhea and 50% were aware the pill decreases menstrual bleeding. However, the majority were unaware OCs reduce the risk of benign breast disease (95%), ectopic pregnancy (91%), pelvic inflammatory disease (90%), and anemia (89%). 81% were unaware of the protective effects of OCs against uterine cancer and 77% did not know they have a protective effect against ovarian cancer. In general, OC users were more aware of the health benefits of OCs than condom users. Finally, respondents were asked to rate their satisfaction with their current birth control method on a scale of 1-12. Mean satisfaction scores were significantly higher among OC users (10.3) than condom users (7.1). These findings indicate that, even among highly educated US women, misperceptions persist about the reliability of birth control, the risks of pregnancy, and the health effects of OCs. PMID:9439201

  14. Weight loss in full-term negroid infants: relationship to body water compartments at birth?

    PubMed

    Offringa, P J; Boersma, E R; Brunsting, J R; Meeuwsen, W P; Velvis, H

    1990-02-01

    The possible influence of the body fluid compartments at birth on postnatal weight loss was studied in normal term negroid infants when on a standardized oral fluid, sodium and energy regimen during the first three days of life. Measurements of plasma volume (PV), total body water (TBW), and extracellular water (ECW) were performed simultaneously on vaginally-born infants on the first day of life, by using a triple indicator (Evans blue, deuterium oxide and sucrose) single injection dilution technique. PV was 54 +/- 7 ml/kg (N = 9), TBW was 751 +/- 50 ml/kg (N = 13) and ECW was 311 +/- 61 ml/kg (N = 13) (mean +/- S.D.). Postnatal weight loss (3.7% of birth weight) occurred during the first two days. The postnatal weight loss was not related to any of the body water compartments. However, there was a highly significant correlation with the (cumulative) urine water excretion (r = 0.833, P less than 0.001 on day 1, with similar values for days 1 and 2). PMID:2318126

  15. Prevalence of enteropathogenic bacteria in treated effluents and receiving water bodies and their potential health risks.

    PubMed

    Teklehaimanot, Giorgis Z; Genthe, B; Kamika, I; Momba, M N B

    2015-06-15

    The failure of wastewater treatment plants to produce effluents of a high microbiological quality is a matter of great concern in terms of water resource pollution. A more serious concern is that this water source is used by communities in developing countries for multiple purposes, which include drinking, recreation and agriculture. The current study investigated the prevalence and potential health risks of enteropathogenic bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella dysenteriae and Vibrio cholerae) in the treated effluents of three selected South African Wastewater Treatment Works as well as their receiving water bodies. Culture-based and polymerase chain reaction techniques were used to detect and identify the pathogenic bacteria. The conventional methods revealed that of the 272 water samples collected, 236 samples (86.8%) tested presumptively positive for Salmonella spp., 220 samples (80.9%) for Shigella spp. and 253 samples (93.0%) for V. cholerae. Molecular test results indicated that out of the randomly selected presumptive positive samples (145), zero to 60% of samples were positive for S. typhimurium and S. dysenteriae and 20% to 60% for V. cholerae. For the health risk assessment, the daily combined risk of S. typhimurium, S. dysenteriae and V. cholerae infection was above the lowest acceptable risk limit of 10(-4) as estimated by the World Health Organization for drinking water. This study showed that the target treated wastewater effluents and their receiving water bodies could pose a potential health risk to the surrounding communities. PMID:25777950

  16. Case study on rehabilitation of a polluted urban water body in Yangtze River Basin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Cheng, Shuiping; Li, Zhu; Guo, Weijie; Zhong, Fei; Yin, Daqiang

    2013-10-01

    In the past three decades, the fast development of economy and urbanization has caused increasingly severe pollutions of urban water bodies in China. Consequently, eutrophication and deterioration of aquatic ecosystem, which is especially significant for aquatic vegetation, inevitably became a pervasive problem across the Yangtze River Basin. To rehabilitate the degraded urban water bodies, vegetation replanting is an important issue to improve water quality and to rehabilitate ecosystem. As a case study, a representative polluted urban river, Nanfeihe River, in Hefei City, Anhui Province, was chosen to be a rehabilitation target. In October 2009 and May 2010, 13 species of indigenous and prevalent macrophytes, including seven species emergent, one species floating leaved, and five species submersed macrophytes, were planted along the bank slopes and in the river. Through 1.5 years' replanting practice, the water quality and biodiversity of the river had been improved. The concentrations of total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and ammonia nitrogen (NH4 (+)-N) declined by 46.0, 39.5, and 60.4 %, respectively. The species of macrophytes increased from 14 to 60, and the biodiversity of phytoplankton rose significantly in the river (p<0.05). The biomasses of zooplankton and benthos were also improved after the vegetation replanting. The study confirmed that vegetation replanting could alleviate the increasing water pollution and rehabilitate the degraded aquatic ecosystem. The case study would be an example for polluted urban waters restoration in the middle-downstream area of Yangtze River Base. PMID:23247519

  17. Analysis of aerial multispectral imagery to assess water quality parameters of Mississippi water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvin, Shane Adison

    The goal of this study was to demonstrate the application of aerial imagery as a tool in detecting water quality indicators in a three mile segment of Tibbee Creek in, Clay County, Mississippi. Water samples from 10 transects were collected per sampling date over two periods in 2010 and 2011. Temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) were measured at each point, and water samples were tested for turbidity and total suspended solids (TSS). Relative reflectance was extracted from high resolution (0.5 meter) multispectral aerial images. A regression model was developed for turbidity and TSS as a function of values for specific sampling dates. The best model was used to predict turbidity and TSS using datasets outside the original model date. The development of an appropriate predictive model for water quality assessment based on the relative reflectance of aerial imagery is affected by the quality of imagery and time of sampling.

  18. TFA from HFO-1234yf: accumulation and aquatic risk in terminal water bodies.

    PubMed

    Russell, Mark H; Hoogeweg, Gerco; Webster, Eva M; Ellis, David A; Waterland, Robert L; Hoke, Robert A

    2012-09-01

    A next-generation mobile automobile air-conditioning (MAC) refrigerant, HFO-1234yf (CF(3) CF = CH(2)), is being developed with improved environmental characteristics. In the atmosphere, it ultimately forms trifluoroacetic acid (TFA(A); CF(3)COOH), which is subsequently scavenged by precipitation and deposited on land and water as trifluoroacetate (TFA; CF(3)COO(-)). Trifluoroacetate is environmentally stable and has the potential to accumulate in terminal water bodies, that is, aquatic systems receiving inflow but with little or no outflow and with high rates of evaporation. Previous studies have estimated the emission rates of HFO-1234yf and have modeled the deposition concentrations and rates of TFA across North America. The present study uses multimedia modeling and geographic information system (GIS)-based modeling to assess the potential concentrations of TFA in terminal water bodies over extended periods. After 10 years of emissions, predicted concentrations of TFA in terminal water bodies across North America are estimated to range between current background levels (i.e., 0.01-0.22 µg/L) and 1 to 6 µg/L. After 50 years of continuous emissions, aquatic concentrations of 1 to 15 µg/L are predicted, with extreme concentrations of up to 50 to 200 µg/L in settings such as the Sonoran Desert along the California/Arizona (USA) border. Based on the relative insensitivity of aquatic organisms to TFA, predicted concentrations of TFA in terminal water bodies are not expected to impair aquatic systems, even considering potential emissions over extended periods. PMID:22730026

  19. Male hormonal contraception: looking back and moving forward.

    PubMed

    Roth, M Y; Page, S T; Bremner, W J

    2016-01-01

    Despite numerous contraceptive options available to women, approximately half of all pregnancies in the United States and worldwide are unplanned. Women and men support the development of reversible male contraception strategies, but none have been brought to market. Herein we review the physiologic basis for male hormonal contraception, the history of male hormonal contraception development, currents agents in development as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contraception for men. PMID:26453296

  20. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Back, D J; Orme, M L

    1990-06-01

    Oral contraceptive steroids are used by an estimated 60 to 70 million women world-wide. Over the past 20 years there have been both case reports and clinical studies on the topic of drug interactions with these agents. Some of the interactions are of definite therapeutic relevance, whereas others can be discounted as being of no clinical significance. Pharmacological interactions between oral contraceptive steroids and other compounds may be of 2 kinds: (a) drugs may impair the efficacy of oral contraceptive steroids, leading to breakthrough bleeding and pregnancy (in a few cases, the activity of the contraceptive is enhanced); (b) oral contraceptive steroids may interfere with the metabolism of other drugs. A number of anticonvulsants (phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine) are enzyme-inducing agents and thereby increase the clearance of the oral contraceptive steroids. Valproic acid has no enzyme-inducing properties, and thus women on this anticonvulsant can rely on their low dose oral contraceptive steroids for contraceptive protection. Researchers are now beginning to unravel the molecular basis of this interaction, with evidence of specific forms of cytochrome P450 (P450IIC and IIIA gene families) being induced by phenobarbital. Rifampicin, the antituberculous drug, also induces a cytochrome P450 which is a product of the P450IIIA gene subfamily. This isozyme is one of the major forms involved in 2-hydroxylation of ethinylestradiol. Broad spectrum antibiotics have been implicated in causing pill failure; case reports document the interaction, and general practitioners are convinced that it is real. The problem remains that there is still no firm clinical pharmacokinetic evidence which indicates that blood concentrations of oral contraceptive steroids are altered by antibiotics. However, perhaps this should not be a surprise, given that the incidence of the interaction may be very low. It is suggested that an individual at risk will have a low bioavailability

  1. Political and economic factors influencing contraceptive uptake.

    PubMed

    Sai, F T

    1993-01-01

    International, national and local level politics influence the uptake of contraception through consensuses, laws, financial and moral support or the creation of an enabling atmosphere. Opposition to contraception generally comes from some churches and groups opposed to particular technologies. Socio-economic factors, particularly education, the health care system and the perceived or actual cost of fertility regulation as compared to benefits expected from children also powerfully influence contraceptive use. For many poor women in developing countries their powerlessness in relation to their male partners is an important obstacle. PMID:8324609

  2. Choosing a combined oral contraceptive pill

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mary; Black, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Summary The combined oral contraceptive pill is an effective contraceptive method which can also offer other benefits. However, other contraceptive options should be discussed. If the pill is the chosen method, prescribe a pill with the lowest effective dose of oestrogen and progestogen. Pills containing levonorgestrel or norethisterone in combination with ethinyloestradiol 35 microgram or less are considered first-line. They are effective if taken correctly, have a relatively low risk of venous thromboembolism, and are listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. The pill is usually taken in a monthly cycle. Some women may prefer an extended pill regimen with fewer or no inactive pills. PMID:26648603

  3. CONTRACEPTION TECHNOLOGY: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Nath, Anita; Mishell, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Steady progress in contraception research has been achieved over the past 50 years. Hormonal and non-hormonal modern contraceptives have improved women’s lives by reducing different health conditions that contributed to considerable morbidity. However the contraceptives available today are not suitable to all users and the need to expand contraceptive choices still exists. Novel products such as new implants, contraceptive vaginal rings, transdermal patches and newer combinations of oral contraceptives have recently been introduced in family planning programs and hormonal contraception is widely used for spacing and limiting births. Concerns over the adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives have led to research and development of new combinations with improved metabolic profile. Recent developments include use of natural compounds such as estradiol (E2) and estradiol valerate (E2V) with the hope to decrease thrombotic risk, in combination with newer progestins derived from the progesterone structure or from spirolactone, in order to avoid the androgenic effects. Progesterone antagonists and progesterone receptor modulators are highly effective in blocking ovulation and preventing follicular rupture and are undergoing investigations in the form of oral pills and in semi long-acting delivery systems. Future developments also include the combination of a contraceptive with an antiretroviral agent for dual contraception and protection against sexually transmitted diseases, to be used before intercourse or on demand, as well as for continuous use in dual-protection rings. Alhough clinical trials of male contraception have reflected promising results, limited involvement of industry in that area of research has decreased the likelihood of having a male method available in the current decade. Development of non-hormonal methods are still at an early stage of research, with the identification of specific targets within the reproductive system in ovaries and testes, as

  4. Contraceptive failure in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Trussell, James

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update of previous estimates of first-year probabilities of contraceptive failure for all methods of contraception available in the United States. Estimates are provided of probabilities of failure during typical use (which includes both incorrect and inconsistent use) and during perfect use (correct and consistent use). The difference between these two probabilities reveals the consequences of imperfect use; it depends both on how unforgiving of imperfect use a method is and on how hard it is to use that method perfectly. These revisions reflect new research on contraceptive failure both during perfect use and during typical use. PMID:21477680

  5. Postpartum Care and Contraception in Obese Women.

    PubMed

    Maclean, Courtney C; Thompson, Ivana S

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum obese women have an increased risk of breastfeeding difficulties and depression. Retaining the pregnancy weight at 6 months postpartum predicts long-term obesity. Risks for weight retention include excessive gestational weight gain, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, diet, exercise, depression, and duration of breastfeeding. Exercise and reducing total caloric intake promote postpartum weight loss. Intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants are the most effective contraceptives for obese women. Contraceptive pills, patches, and vaginal rings are effective options; however, obese women should be made aware of a potential increased risk of venous thromboembolism. Vasectomy and hysteroscopic sterilization carry the least surgical risk for obese women. PMID:26694498

  6. Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception.

    PubMed

    Espey, Eve

    2015-08-01

    This commentary is adapted from the Irvin M. Cushner Memorial Lecture, "Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception," given at 2014 Annual Clinical Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in Chicago. It provides a brief and simplified historical review of the feminist movement, primarily in the United States, focusing on feminism's association with contraception. This commentary reflects the perspective and opinions of the author. Contraception is fundamental to a woman's ability to achieve equality and realize her full social, economic, and intellectual potential. PMID:26241431

  7. Constraints for Using Radon-in-Water Concentrations as an Indicator for Groundwater Discharge into Surface Water Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petermann, Eric; Schubert, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The radon (222-Rn) activity concentration of surface water is a favourable indicator for the detection of groundwater discharge into surface water bodies since radon is highly enriched in groundwater relative to surface waters. Hence, positive radon-in-water anomalies are interpreted as groundwater discharge locations. For this approach, usually, radon time-series are recorded along transects in near-surface waters. Time-series of radon-in-water concentration are commonly measured by permanent radon extraction from a water pump stream and continuous monitoring of the resulting radon-in-air concentration by means of a suitable radon detector. Radon-in-water concentrations are derived from the recorded radon-in-air signal by making allowances for water/air partitioning of radon. However, several constraints arise for this approach since undesirable factors are influencing the radon-in-water concentration. Consequently, corrections are required to remove the effect of these undesirable factors from the radon signal. First, an instrument inherent response delay between actual changes in the radon-in-water concentration and the related radon-in-air signal was observed during laboratory experiments. The response delay is due to (i) the water/air transfer kinetics of radon and (ii) the delayed decay equilibrium between radon and its progeny polonium (218-Po), which is actually being measured by most radon-in-air monitors. We developed a physical model, which considers all parameters that are responsible for the response delay. This model allows the reconstruction of radon-in-water time-series based on radon-in-air records. Second, on a time-scale of several hours the tidal stage is known as a major driver for groundwater discharge fluctuations due to varying hydraulic gradients between groundwater and surface water during a tidal cycle. Consequently, radon-in-water time-series that are detected on tidal coasts are not comparable among each other without normalization

  8. Transdermal contraception and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Odutayo, Ayodele; Cherney, David; Miller, Judith; Ahmed, Sofia B; Lai, Vesta; Dunn, Sheila; Pun, Nicole; Moineddin, Rahim; Hladunewich, Michelle A

    2015-03-15

    The oral contraceptive pill (OCP) activates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) through first-pass hepatic metabolism. Although usually benign, RAAS activation may have detrimental effects on renal and hemodynamic function in some women. Since combined hormonal contraception with the transdermal patch (EVRA) does not undergo first-pass hepatic metabolism, we hypothesized that the RAAS response would be different from that of OCP subjects. Thirty-five nonsmoking, premenopausal women (15 control subjects, 10 OCP subjects, and 10 contraceptive patch subjects) without evidence of cardiovascular disease, renal disease, or diabetes were studied. Baseline angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and plasma renin activity were assessed along with hormonal and hemodynamic responses to simulated orthostatic stress using incremental lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -15, -25, and -40 mmHg). Baseline levels of angiotensinogen, angiotensin II, and plasma renin activity were significantly higher in OCP subjects compared with normotensive control and contraceptive patch subjects (P < 0.05), whereas aldosterone was significantly higher in OCP versus control subjects only (P < 0.05). Plasma renin levels were significantly lower at baseline in contraceptive patch subjects compared with normotensive control and OCP subjects (P < 0.05). In response to LBNP, increases in renin, angiotensin II, and aldosterone were attenuated in contraceptive patch subjects in conjunction with an exaggerated decline in mean arterial pressure (P < 0.05 vs. control and OCP subjects). The contraceptive patch in healthy premenopausal women is associated with an impaired ability to maintain blood pressure in response to LBNP, possibly due to insensitivity of the endogenous RAAS. Further evaluation may be beneficial in women with kidney disease. PMID:25587124

  9. Changes in body core and body surface temperatures during prolonged swimming in water of 10°C—a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This case report describes an experienced open-water ultra-endurance athlete swimming in water of 9.9°C for 6 h and 2 min. Methods Before the swim, anthropometric characteristics such as body mass, body height, skinfold thicknesses, and body fat were determined. During and after the swim, body core (rectum) and body surface (forearm and calf) temperatures were continuously recorded. Results The swimmer (53 years old, 110.5 kg body mass, 1.76 m body height, 34.9% body fat, and a body mass index of 35.7 kg/m2) achieved a total distance of 15 km while swimming at a mean speed of 2.48 km/h, equal to 0.69 m/s, in water of 9.9°C. Body core temperature was at 37.8°C before the swim, increased to a maximum of 38.1°C after approximately 20 min of swimming, and then decreased continuously to 36.3°C upon finishing the swim. The lowest body core temperature was 36.0°C between 35 and 60 min after finishing the swim. Sixty minutes after the swim, the body core temperature continuously rose to 36.5°C where it remained. At the forearm, the temperature dropped to 19.6°C after approximately 36 min of swimming and decreased to 19.4°C by the end of the swim. The lowest temperature at the forearm was 17.6°C measured at approximately 47 min before the athlete stopped swimming. At the calf, the temperature dropped to 13.0°C after approximately 24 min of swimming and decreased to 11.9°C at the end of the swim. The lowest temperature measured at the calf was 11.1°C approximately 108 min after the start. In both the forearm and the calf, the skin temperature continuously increased after the swim. Conclusions This case report shows that (1) it is possible to swim for 6 h in water of 9.9°C and that (2) the athlete did not suffer from hypothermia under these circumstances. The high body mass index, high body fat, previous experience, and specific preparation of the swimmer are the most probable explanations for these findings. PMID:23849461

  10. Determination of water body structures for small rivers using remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrasch, Pierre; Henzen, Daniel; Hunger, Sebastian; Hörold, Max

    2015-10-01

    The diversity of habitats in water bodies like rivers is characterised by the status of morphological and hydrological conditions. The good ecological status of water bodies is claimed in the European Water Framework Directive. For the assessment of this status the hydro-morphology is one of the most important supporting components for the classification of the ecological status of water bodies. Therefore the periodical monitoring is a mandatory measure in the scope of the European Water Framework Directive. Regarding the so called overview-method of the LAWA (German Working Group on water issues of the Federal States and the Federal Government represented by the Federal Environment Ministry) the use of remote sensing data and remote sensing methodologies becomes more important. Therefore remote sensing data on different scales (satellite, aerial photographs) as well as other topographic information (ATKIS) and a high resolution DTM are merged into an integrative process of analysis using remote sensing and GIS methodology. The analyses are focused on two parameters. First, a detailed land use classification based on LANDSAT satellite data is performed for whole catchment of a small river. The results show significant increase of urban areas close to the river. The second analyses deals with the determination of river curvature and introduces the use of a quasi-continuously representation of the river. An additional challenge is the chosen study area of a low mountain range river. While large rivers are clear visible in remote sensing data, the usability and transformation of the well-established algorithms and work flows to small rivers need a further substantial research.

  11. Contraceptive use among young women in Estonia: Association with contraceptive services.

    PubMed

    Part, Kai; Ringmets, Inge; Laanpere, Made; Rahu, Mati; Karro, Helle

    2016-04-01

    Objectives Our study aimed to explore the association between the use of effective contraceptive methods and access to different contraceptive services, as well as to describe accessibility-related obstacles when using contraceptive services and satisfaction with those services. Methods From a population-based cross-sectional study carried out in 2004 (response rate 53.8%), the data of 16- to 24-year-old women requiring contraception (N = 868) were analysed. Factors associated with the use of effective contraceptive methods and, specifically, hormonal methods, were explored using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Effective contraception was used by 75.1% of the respondents. The use of effective contraceptive methods was associated with school-based sexuality education (adjusted prevalence odds ratio 2.69; 95% confidence interval 1.32 - 5.50), visiting a youth-friendly clinic (YFC) (1.82; 1.03-3.23) or a private gynaecologist (2.08; 1.11-3.92). The use of hormonal methods was additionally associated with being a native Estonian speaker and visiting a family doctor. More than half of the respondents reported some obstacle in accessing contraceptive services. The highest satisfaction ratings were given to YFCs. Conclusions Steps to promote the use of services that are youth-friendly and associated with better uptake of effective contraceptive methods are needed among all 16- to 24-year-old women. PMID:26098563

  12. Contraceptive Counseling: Best Practices to Ensure Quality Communication and Enable Effective Contraceptive Use

    PubMed Central

    Dehlendorf, Christine; Krajewski, Colleen; Borrero, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    Improving the quality of contraceptive counseling is one strategy to prevent unintended pregnancy. We identify aspects of relational and task-oriented communication in family planning care that can assist providers in meeting their patients’ needs. Approaches to optimizing women's experiences of contraceptive counseling include working to develop a close, trusting relationship with patients and using a shared decision-making approach that focuses on eliciting and responding to patient preferences. Providing counseling about side effects and using strategies to promote contraceptive continuation and adherence can also help optimize women's use of contraception. PMID:25264697

  13. Influence of open water bodies on the generation of summertime convection over the Canadian Prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, D.; Bélair, S.; Carrera, M. L.; Leroyer, S.

    2014-12-01

    There are still numerous water features on the Canadian landscape that are not monitored. Specifically, there are landscape features (e.g. the prairies and Canadian shield regions of North America) that are ephemeral in nature and have a significant influence on convective storm generation and local weather patterns through turbulent exchanges of sensible and latent heat between land and the atmosphere. In this study we perform a series of numerical experiments with the GEM (Global Environmental Multiscale model) model at 2.5 km resolution to examine the sensitivity of the atmospheric boundary layer to the presence of open water bodies. At present the land-water fraction in the GEM model is specified by means of static geophysical databases which do not change annually. Uncertainty is introduced into this land-water fraction and the sensitivity of the resulting soil moisture and precipitation is quantified for a series of convective precipitation events over Alberta for the summer 2014 period.

  14. The Languages Spoken in the Water Body (or the Biological Role of Cyanobacterial Toxins)

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Aaron; Harel, Moshe; Kaplan-Levy, Ruth N.; Hadas, Ora; Sukenik, Assaf; Dittmann, Elke

    2012-01-01

    Although intensification of toxic cyanobacterial blooms over the last decade is a matter of growing concern due to bloom impact on water quality, the biological role of most of the toxins produced is not known. In this critical review we focus primarily on the biological role of two toxins, microcystins and cylindrospermopsin, in inter- and intra-species communication and in nutrient acquisition. We examine the experimental evidence supporting some of the dogmas in the field and raise several open questions to be dealt with in future research. We do not discuss the health and environmental implications of toxin presence in the water body. PMID:22529842

  15. Aqueous alteration of meteorite parent bodies: Possible role of unfrozen water and the Antarctic meteorite analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Based on oxygen isotrophy the alteration of CM2 chondrites could occur at or near O C (273 K). Such a scenario can be understood if C chondrite parent bodies evolved as rock/ice mixtures that contained unfrozen (mobile or quasi-liquid below 273K) pure water, a well known phenomenon in cold soils on Earth. The importance of unfrozen water diagenesis in C chondrite history can be tested by a combined program of experimental simulations and petrologic study of analogous features developed by weathering of meteorites in or an Antarctic ice.

  16. Satellite monitoring at high spatial resolution of water bodies used for irrigation purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baup, F.; Flanquart, S.; Marais-Sicre, C.; Fieuzal, R.

    2012-04-01

    In a changing climate context, with an increase of the need for food, it becomes increasingly important to improve our knowledge for monitoring agricultural surfaces by satellite for a better food management and to reduce the waste of natural resources (water storages and shortages, irrigation management, increase of soil and water salinity, soil erosion, threats on biodiversity). The main objective of this study is to evaluate the potentialities of multi-spectral and multi-resolution satellites for monitoring the temporal evolution of water bodies surfaces (mainly used for irrigation purposes). This analysis is based on the use of a series of images acquired between the years 2003 and 2011. The year 2010 is considered as a reference, with 110 acquisitions performed during the MCM'10 campaign (Multispectral Crop Monitoring 2010, http://www.cesbio.ups-tlse.fr/us/mcm.html). Those images are provided by 8 satellites (optical, thermal and RADAR) such as ALOS, TERRASAR-X, RADARSAT-2, FORMOSAT-2, SPOT-2, SPOT-4, SPOT-5, LANDSAT-5. The studied area is situated in the South-West of Toulouse in France; in a region governed by a temperate climate. The irrigated cultures represent almost 12% of the cultivated surface in 2009. The method consists in estimating the water bodies surfaces by using a generic approach suitable for all images, whatever the wavelength (optical, infrared, RADAR). The supervised parallelepiped classification allows discriminating four types of surfaces coverage: forests, water expanses, crops and bare soils. All RADAR images are filtered (Gamma) to reduce speckle effects and false detections of water bodies. In the context if the "South-West" project of the CESBIO laboratory, two spatial coverages are analyzed: SPOT 4 (4800km2) and FORMOSAT 2 (576km2). At these scales, 154 and 38 water bodies are identify. They respectively represent 4.85 km2 (0.10% of the image cover) and 2.06 km2 (0.36% of the image cover). Statistical analyses show that 8% of lakes

  17. An airborne robotic platform for mapping thermal structure in surface water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. E.; Chung, M.; Detweiler, C.; Ore, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The significance of thermal heterogeneities in small surface water bodies as drivers of mixing and for habitat provision is increasingly recognized, yet obtaining three-dimensionally resolved observations of the thermal structure of lakes and rivers remains challenging. For relatively shallow water bodies, observations of water temperature from aerial platforms are attractive: they do not require shoreline access, they can be quickly and easily deployed and redeployed, facilitating repeated sampling, and they can rapidly move between measurement locations, allowing multiple measurements to be made during single flights. However, they are also subject to well-known limitations including payload, flight duration and operability, and their effectiveness as a mobile platform for thermal sensing is still poorly characterized. In this talk, I will introduce an aerial thermal sensing platform that enables water temperature measurements to be made and spatially located throughout a water column, and present preliminary results from initial field experiments comparing in-situ temperature observations to those made from the UAS platform. The results highlight the potential scalability of the platform to provide high-resolution 3D thermal mapping of a ~1 ha lake in 2-3 flights (circa 1 hour), sufficient to resolve diurnal variations. Operability constraints and key needs for further development are also identified.

  18. When neuroscience gets wet and hardcore: neurocognitive markers obtained during whole body water immersion.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan; Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Frick, Hosea; Krehan, Sebastian; Micke, Florian; Sauer, Marc; Dalecki, Marc; Dern, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    Neutral buoyancy facilities are used to prepare astronauts and cosmonauts for extra vehicular activities e.g. on-board of the International Space Station. While previous studies indicated a decrease in cognitive performance in an under water setting, they have only provided behavioural data. This study aimed to review whether recording of electro cortical activity by the use of electroencephalography (EEG) is possible in an under water setting and if so, to identify the influence of water immersion at a depth of 4 m on neurocognitive markers. Ten male subjects performed a cognitive choice-reaction times (RT) task that progressed through five levels of increasing difficulty on land and when submerged 4 m under water. N200 latency and amplitude in the occipital and frontal areas were measured, and baseline cortical activity was measured during rest in both conditions. Neither RT nor amplitude or latency of the N200 showed any significant changes between the land and the under water conditions. Also theta, alpha and beta frequencies showed no differences between the two conditions. The data provided in this study demonstrate the possibility of recording EEG even under the extreme conditions of full body water immersion. The lack of cognitive impairment in RT and N200 in the under water condition may be explained by the fact that only experienced divers participated in the study. As a proof of principle, this study generates many new experimental possibilities that will improve our understanding of cognitive processes under water. PMID:24980790

  19. Changes in water and sugar-containing beverage consumption and body weight outcomes in children.

    PubMed

    Muckelbauer, Rebecca; Gortmaker, Steven L; Libuda, Lars; Kersting, Mathilde; Clausen, Kerstin; Adelberger, Bettina; Müller-Nordhorn, Jacqueline

    2016-06-01

    An intervention study showed that promoting water consumption in schoolchildren prevented overweight, but a mechanism linking water consumption to overweight was not substantiated. We investigated whether increased water consumption replaced sugar-containing beverages and whether changes in water or sugar-containing beverages influenced body weight outcomes. In a secondary analysis of the intervention study in Germany, we analysed combined longitudinal data from the intervention and control groups. Body weight and height were measured and beverage consumption was self-reported by a 24-h recall questionnaire at the beginning and end of the school year 2006/2007. The effect of a change in water consumption on change in sugar-containing beverage (soft drinks and juices) consumption, change in BMI (kg/m2) and prevalence of overweight and obesity at follow-up was analysed using regression analyses. Of 3220 enroled children, 1987 children (mean age 8·3 (sd 0·7) years) from thirty-two schools were analysed. Increased water consumption by 1 glass/d was associated with a reduced consumption of sugar-containing beverages by 0·12 glasses/d (95 % CI -0·16, -0·08) but was not associated with changes in BMI (P=0·63). Increased consumption of sugar-containing beverages by 1 glass/d was associated with an increased BMI by 0·02 (95 % CI 0·00, 0·03) kg/m2 and increased prevalence of obesity (OR 1·22; 95 % CI 1·04, 1·44) but not with overweight (P=0·83). In conclusion, an increase in water consumption can replace sugar-containing beverages. As sugar-containing beverages were associated with weight gain, this replacement might explain the prevention of obesity through the promotion of water consumption. PMID:27040694

  20. Modeling the Shape Evolution of Enclosed Water Bodies: Pattern Formation from Emergent Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A. B.; Littlewood, R.; Ashton, A. D.

    2006-12-01

    Elongated water bodies tend to exhibit interesting shoreline shapes, including cuspate capes and flying spits. In some natural cases, these features appear to have merged, leading to segmentation of the water body. We explore how such shapes might evolve, starting with a coastline-evolution model originally developed to examine the results of a previously unappreciated instability in the large-scale, plan-view shape of sedimentary shorelines (Ashton et al., 2001; Murray and Ashton, 2004). Breaking waves drive an alongshore sediment flux, and when the waves approach from highly oblique angles, divergence of this flux along a perturbation on an otherwise straight shoreline cause perturbation growth. When local wave climates are dominated by these 'high-angle' waves, shorelines tend to become progressively bumpier over time. Numerical modeling has illuminated various modes of emergent interactions between shoreline features as they attain finite amplitude (Ashton and Murray, 2003; Murray and Ashton, 2003). These interactions stem largely from a wave shadowing effect; features such as emergent spits that protrude from the shoreline tend to shelter other parts of the shoreline from approaching waves. The resulting non-local interactions lead to the self-organization of rhythmic capes, spits, and alongshore sandwaves. The previous work involves an initially straight, infinite-length shoreline (periodic lateral boundary conditions) affected by alongshore-uniform deep-water wave forcing - i.e. waves approaching from a distant source. Here we highlight an increased level of complexity that arises in an enclosed water body, where the characteristics of waves approaching one section of shoreline depend on the length over which the local wind is blowing - the 'fetch'. Starting with an initially rectangular basin, local fetches affecting shoreline sections depend on the location within the domain, and the direction the wind is blowing from. With an isotropic distribution of

  1. Potential of a novel airborne hydrographic laser scanner for capturing shallow water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandlburger, G.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Steinbacher, F.; Pfeifer, N.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we present the general design of a hydrographic laser scanner (prototype instrument) manufactured by the company Riegl Laser Measurement Systems in cooperation with the University of Innsbruck, Unit of Hydraulic Engineering. The instrument utilizes very short laser pulses (1 ns) in the green wavelength domain (λ=532 nm) capable of penetrating the water column. The backscattered signal is digitized in a waveform recorder at high frequency enabling sophisticated waveform processing, both, online during the flight and in post processing. In combination with a traditional topographic airborne laser scanner (λ=1500 nm) mounted on the same platform a complete hydrographic and topographic survey of the riparian foreland, the water surface and river bed can be carried out in a single campaign. In contrast to existing bathymetric LiDAR systems, the presented system uses only medium pulse energy but a high pulse repetition rate of up to 250 kHz and, thus, focuses on a detailed description of shallow water bodies under clear water conditions. Different potential fields of applications of the instrument (hydraulic modelling, hydro-morphology, hydro-biology, ecology, river restoration and monitoring) are discussed and the results of first real-world test flights in Austria and Germany are presented. It is shown that: (i) the high pulse repetition rate enables a point density on the ground of the water body of 10-20 pts/m2, (ii) the short laser pulses together with waveform processing enable a discrimination between water and ground reflections at a water depth of less than 25 cm, (iii) the combination of a topographic and hydrographic laser scanner enable the acquisition of the geometry data for hydraulic modeling in a single survey, thus, providing a much more homogeneous data basis compared to traditional techniques, and (iv) the high point density and the ranging accuracy of less than 10 cm enable a detailed and precise description of the river bed

  2. The use of biomarkers as integrative tools for transitional water bodies monitoring in the Water Framework Directive context - A holistic approach in Minho river transitional waters.

    PubMed

    Capela, R; Raimundo, J; Santos, M M; Caetano, M; Micaelo, C; Vale, C; Guimarães, L; Reis-Henriques, M A

    2016-01-01

    The Water Framework Directive (WFD) provides an important legislative opportunity to promote and implement an integrated approach for the protection of inland surface waters, transitional waters, coastal waters and groundwaters. The transitional waters constitute a central piece as they are usually under high environmental pressure and by their inherent characteristics present monitoring challenges. Integrating water quality monitoring with biological monitoring can increase the cost-effectiveness of monitoring efforts. One way of doing this is with biomarkers, which effectively integrate physical-chemical status and biological quality elements, dealing holistically with adverse consequences on the health of water bodies. The new Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) already incorporates the biomarker approach. Given the recent activities of OSPAR and HELCOM to harmonize existing monitoring guidelines between MSFD and WFD the use of similar methodologies should be fostered. To illustrate the potential of the biomarker approach, juveniles of flounder (Platichthys flesus) were used to evaluate the quality of the Minho river-estuary water bodies. The use of juveniles instead of adults eliminates several confounding factors such changes on the biological responses associated with reproduction. Here, a panel of well-established biomarkers, EROD, AChE, SOD, CAT, GST, LPO, ENA and FACs (1-Hydroxyrene) were selected and measured along with a gradient of different physical conditions, and integrated with trace elements characterization on both biota and sediments. In general, a clear profile along the water bodies was found, with low seasonal and spatial variation, consistent with a low impacted area. Overall, the results support the use of both the battery of biomarkers and the use of juvenile flounders in the monitoring of the water quality status within the WFD. PMID:26356181

  3. Flume experiments on wind induced flow in static water bodies in the presence of protruding vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tirtha; Muste, Marian; Katul, Gabriel

    2015-02-01

    The problem of wind-induced flow in inland waters is drawing significant research attention given its relevance to a plethora of applications in wetlands including treatment designs, pollution reduction, and biogeochemical cycling. The present work addresses the role of wind induced turbulence and waves within an otherwise static water body in the presence of rigid and flexible emergent vegetation through flume experimentation and time series analysis. Because no prior example of Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) experiments involving air-water and flexible oscillating components have been found in the literature, a spectral analysis framework is needed and proposed here to guide the analysis involving noise, wave and turbulence separation. The experiments reveal that wave and turbulence effects are simultaneously produced at the air-water interface and the nature of their coexistence is found to vary with different flow parameters including water level, mean wind speed, vegetation density and its flexibility. For deep water levels, signature of fine-scaled inertial turbulence is found at deeper layers of the water system. The wave action appears stronger close to the air-water interface and damped by the turbulence deeper inside the water system. As expected, wave action is found to be dominated in a certain frequency range driven by the wind forcing, while it is also diffused to lower frequencies by means of (wind-induced) oscillations in vegetation. Regarding the mean water velocity, existence of a counter-current flow and its switching to fully forward flow in the direction of the wind under certain combinations of flow parameters were studied. The relative importance of wave and turbulence to the overall energy, degree of anisotropy in the turbulent energy components, and turbulent momentum transport at different depths from the air-water interface and flow combinations were then quantified. The flume experiments reported here differ from previous laboratory

  4. [Interactions between oral contraceptives and other drugs].

    PubMed

    Hansen, T H; Jensen, S B

    1991-10-28

    Failures of oral contraceptives are possible when combined with rifampicin or antiepileptics, especially phenobarbitone and phenytoin. The mode of action is shown by clinical trials to be due to induction of hepatic enzymes thus increasing the steroid metabolism. Failure or oral contraceptives has occurred with the concomitant use of antibiotics, i.e. ampicillin and sulfonamides. Clinical trials have focused upon the changes in the intestinal flora induced by antibiotics. This might influence the enterohepatic circulation of estrogen and thereby decrease reabsorption of estrogen, but this has not been definitely proved. The failures may be caused by individual pharmacokinetics of oral contraceptives. Oral contraceptives are able to influence the pharmacodynamics of various other drugs metabolized by oxidation or conjugation but besides an increased pharmacological effect of prednisolone and increased toxicity of imipramine the clinical importance is uncertain. PMID:1949335

  5. New frontiers in nonhormonal male contraception

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, C. Yan; Mruk, Dolores D.

    2015-01-01

    The world’s population is nearing 6.8 billion, and we are in need of a male contraceptive that is safe, effective, reversible and affordable. Hormonal approaches, which employ different formulations of testosterone administered in combination with other hormones, have shown considerable promise in clinical trials, and they are currently at the forefront of research and development. However, the long-term effects of using hormones throughout a male’s reproductive life for contraception are unknown, and it may take decades before this information becomes available. Because of this, many investigators are aiming to bring a nonhormonal male contraceptive to the consumer market. Indeed, there are several distinct but feasible avenues in which fertility can be regulated without affecting the hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis. In this review, we discuss several approaches for fertility control involving the testis that one day may lead to the development of a nonhormonal male contraceptive. PMID:20933122

  6. The natural way. A tropical contraceptive.

    PubMed

    1994-05-18

    It's not news for the women of the Indian subcontinent. For generations, they've been well aware that papaya and pregnancy don't mix. But now researchers at Britain's University of Sussex have proven the contraceptive qualities of the tropical fruit. "Women in Sri Lanka use papaya fruit as contraceptives because they are cheap and natural," says Tharmalingam Senthilomohan. "If they want to become pregnant, they simply avoid eating them." His findings: abortion can be induced by eating unripe papaya for three consecutive days. And daily consumption of ripe fruit can be an effective contraceptive. Senthilomohan has two theories on what gives papaya its contraceptive qualities. The tropical fruit contains an enzyme called papain which suppresses progesterone, a sex hormone needed to prepare the uterus for conception and to maintain the pregnancy. Another possibility is that papain, which can be used to tenderize meat, may break down a membrane vital to the development of the fetus. PMID:12288101

  7. What Are the Different Types of Contraception?

    MedlinePlus

    ... single use. Female condoms. These are thin, flexible plastic pouches. A portion of the condom is inserted ... blood clots. Contraceptive patch. This is a thin, plastic patch that sticks to the skin and releases ...

  8. An Investigation of Summertime Inland Water Body Temperatures in California and Nevada (USA): Recent Trends and Future Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, Nathan; Hook, Simon; Piccolroaz, Sebastiano; Toffolon, Marco; Radocinski, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Inland water body temperature has been identified as an ideal indicator of potential climate change. Understanding inland water body temperature trends is important for forecasting impacts to limnological, biological, and hydrological resources. Many inland water bodies are situated in remote locations with incomplete data records of in-situ monitoring or lack in-situ observations altogether. Thus, the utilization of satellite data is essential for understanding the behavior of global inland water body temperatures. Part of this research provides an analysis of summertime (July-September) temperature trends in the largest California/Nevada (USA) inland water bodies between 1991 and 2015. We examine satellite temperature retrievals from ATSR (ATSR-1, ATSR-2, AATSR), MODIS (Terra and Aqua), and VIIRS sensors. Our findings indicate that inland water body temperatures in the western United States were rapidly warming between 1991 and 2009, but since then trends have been decreasing. This research also includes implementation of a model called air2water to predict future inland water body surface temperature through the sole input of air temperature. Using projections from CMIP5-CCSM4 output, our model indicates that Lake Tahoe (USA) is expected to experience an increase of roughly 3 °C by 2100.

  9. The quest for a herbal contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, R R

    1993-01-01

    An oral herbal contraceptive would allow couples control their fertility without consulting a health worker, which in turn would likely markedly increase the number of couples practicing family planning. Other advantages of such a contraceptive would include the familiarity rural people have with herbal medicines, the fewer side effects associated with herbal preparations, their ready availability from local sources, and protection of privacy. There are many references to plants in India with antifertility properties. Since 1966, the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) has been conducting research to identify a herbal contraceptive, as have other organizations. Plants that have exhibited antifertility activity in clinical trials include Hibiscus rosasinensis (benzene extract of the flower petals suppresses implantation); Rudrapushpaka (extract of the flower petals prevents pregnancy); Embelia ribes (pregnancy prevention); Davcus carota, Butea monosperma, and Sapindus trifoliatis (seeds have an anti-implantation effect); and Mentha arvensis (leaves have anti-implantation effect). The Central Drug Research Institute in Lucknow, India, in collaboration with the US National Institutes of Health, the World Health Organization, and the ICMR confirm anti-implantation activity in Ferula jaeschkeana, Bupleurum marginatum, Lepidium capitatum, Caesalpinia sepiaria, Lonicera japonica, Juniperus communis, Lotus corniculatus, Lamium allum, and Acacia farnesiana. In China, scientists have evaluated the cotton-seed extract gossypol as a male contraceptive. They are now studying the possible antifertility effect on men of the plant Tripterygium wilfordii. From all the aforementioned plants as well as others under investigation, three possible types of contraceptives could be developed: an anti-ovulatory contraceptive; a postcoital contraceptive; and a male contraceptive. Some obstacles to their development include difficulties in obtaining adequate quantities of the herbs, a

  10. Family planning availability and contraceptive practice.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, G

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of World Fertility Survey data from five countries--Colombia, Costa Rica, Korea, Malaysia and Nepal--shows that the availability of contraceptive services and supplies is a major determinant of use. In Nepal, where few women know where to obtain supplies, only two percent are contracepting. In Costa Rica, where almost all married women know an outlet nearby, 53 percent use effective methods. PMID:421882

  11. Relationship between Weight and Bone Mineral Density in Adolescents on Hormonal Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Andrea E.; Secic, Michelle; Cromer, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objective Since bone loss has been observed among adolescents on depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), a clinical population that commonly experiences weight gain, we were interested in examining the direct relationship between body weight and bone mineral density (BMD) in adolescents on DMPA as compared to those on oral contraceptive pills (OC) or on no hormonal contraception (control). Design Prospective, Longitudinal study. Setting Four urban adolescent health clinics in a large metropolitan area. Participants Post-menarcheal girls, age 12 – 18 years, selecting DMPA, OC or no hormonal contraception. Interventions At baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, all study participants underwent measurement of weight and BMD of the hip and spine. Main Outcome Measures The correlation between weight and BMD, and the correlation between change in weight and change in BMD were assessed at each time point. Results Body weight was significantly (p < .05) positively correlated with femoral neck BMD and spine BMD at each time point regardless of contraceptive method. Change in body weight at 12 and 24 months was highly correlated with change in femoral neck BMD (p < .0001) for all treatment groups. No statistically significant correlation between change in weight and change in spine BMD was seen in the DMPA, OC or control subjects at 12 or 24 months. Conclusion Weight gain on DMPA may mitigate loss of BMD among adolescent users. PMID:20709582

  12. On the variability of the Priestley-Taylor coefficient over water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, Shmuel; Li, Dan; Tyler, Scott; Tanny, Josef; Cohen, Shabtai; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Parlange, Marc; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2016-01-01

    Deviations in the Priestley-Taylor (PT) coefficient αPT from its accepted 1.26 value are analyzed over large lakes, reservoirs, and wetlands where stomatal or soil controls are minimal or absent. The data sets feature wide variations in water body sizes and climatic conditions. Neither surface temperature nor sensible heat flux variations alone, which proved successful in characterizing αPT variations over some crops, explain measured deviations in αPT over water. It is shown that the relative transport efficiency of turbulent heat and water vapor is key to explaining variations in αPT over water surfaces, thereby offering a new perspective over the concept of minimal advection or entrainment introduced by PT. Methods that allow the determination of αPT based on low-frequency sampling (i.e., 0.1 Hz) are then developed and tested, which are usable with standard meteorological sensors that filter some but not all turbulent fluctuations. Using approximations to the Gram determinant inequality, the relative transport efficiency is derived as a function of the correlation coefficient between temperature and water vapor concentration fluctuations (RTq). The proposed approach reasonably explains the measured deviations from the conventional αPT = 1.26 value even when RTq is determined from air temperature and water vapor concentration time series that are Gaussian-filtered and subsampled to a cutoff frequency of 0.1 Hz. Because over water bodies, RTq deviations from unity are often associated with advection and/or entrainment, linkages between αPT and RTq offer both a diagnostic approach to assess their significance and a prognostic approach to correct the 1.26 value when using routine meteorological measurements of temperature and humidity.

  13. Thermal regime of shallow water bodies in the coastal tundra zone of the Hudson Bay Lowlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguay, C. R.; Soliman, A. S.; Macrae, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Many shallow lakes and ponds of the Arctic/sub-Arctic contain thick, organic-rich sediments, which have the potential to release significant amounts of CO2 or CH4 to the atmosphere if sediment decomposition rates increase in response to warmer temperatures caused by global warming. This may be exacerbated by a deepening of the seasonal sediment thaw depth in small water bodies that are underlain by permafrost. An important step in linking climatic conditions to rates of organic matter decomposition and gas production from shallow water bodies is an improved understanding of the thermal properties of lake sediments and how sediment temperatures fluctuate in response to changing air temperatures. This knowledge is also important if the ratio of terrestrial to aquatic landscape units in cold regions changes under a warmer climate. One approach that has been used in terrestrial permafrost environments is the examination of how mean annual permafrost surface temperature deviates from mean annual 2-m screen height air temperature (MAAT). The offset between MAAT and the mean annual sediment surface temperature (MASST) has been found to be much larger in deep aquatic systems (greater than 10 m) than in terrestrial permafrost systems due to the presence of the water column that can efficiently transfer heat through mixing. However, the efficiency of heat transfer in shallow water bodies is expected to larger in summer (thawed) than in winter (frozen) conditions, when thermal energy must move by conduction alone. The present study examined the efficiency of sediment heat transfer in shallow water bodies (less than 3 m) during summer and winter periods. Air, sediment and water temperatures of three shallow water bodies in the coastal tundra zone of the Hudson Bay Lowlands near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada were monitored (December 2009-August 2011). Arrays of thermistors and heat pulse probes were placed at 10 cm increments between 20 cm above the water/sediment interface and

  14. Barriers to contraceptive use in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kamau, R K; Karanja, J; Sekadde-Kigondu, C; Ruminjo, J K; Nichols, D; Liku, J

    1996-10-01

    This study was designed to identify and to better understand the barriers to contraceptive use among Kenyan-couples. Data were collected through structured interviews and focus group discussions among couples not planning for pregnancy and not using any effective contraceptive method. The study was conducted in the Baba Dogo urban slum area of Nairobi, and Chwele, a rural sub-location in Bungoma, western Kenya. Some important barriers to contraceptive use were identified in couples wishing to space or limit further births. Those barriers included lack of agreement on contraceptive use and on reproductive intentions; husband's attitude on his role as a decision maker; perceived undesirable side effects, distribution and infant mortality; negative traditional practices and desires such as naming relatives, and preference for sons as security in old age. There were also gaps in knowledge on contraceptive methods, fears, rumours and misconceptions about specific methods and unavailability or poor quality of services in the areas studied. This paper recommends that information and educational programmes should be instituted to increase contraceptive knowledge, to emphasise the value of quality of life over traditional reproductive practices and desires, and to improve availability and quality of services. PMID:8997845

  15. Erotophobia and contraception among Zimbabwean students.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D; Marindo, R

    1989-10-01

    Unplanned pregnancies are of great concern to the government of Zimbabwe. In Zimbabwe, at least 1/3rd of the women (15-19 years) had been pregnant at least once; and only 27% of married Zimbabwe women use some form of contraception. Various North American researchers believe that erotophobia (negative feelings about sex) is in some way responsible for increase sexual relations and lack of concern over contraception. A study was conducted on 178 Zimbabwean students (104 males, 74 females), with a mean age of 22.03 to discover attitudes about sex. The alpha coefficient reliability of the Sexual Opinion Survey was .40. The results of the findings are as follows: extremely religious (r = .18, p .05); frequency of reading erotica; (r = .41, p .01); occurrence of sexual dreams (r = .39, p .01); and disapproval of premarital sex (r = .38, p .02). Signs of erotophobia could also be found in reporting the chance of sex in the future (r = -.41, p .01); the belief that contraception leads to sexual promiscuity (r = -.17, p .05); the belief that the use of contraception leads to feelings of guilt (r = -13, p .05); reported likelihood of engaging in public actions to obtain contraceptives (r = .29, p .01); and the reported continued use of contraception (r = .14, p .05). The reliability of the Sexual Opinion Survey was moderate; however, it would be best if a survey, taking into account the Zimbabwean culture and attitudes towards sex, is developed. PMID:2811326

  16. Comparison of two methods of assessing total body water at sea level and increasing high altitude.

    PubMed

    Boos, C J; Holdsworth, D A; Hall, D P; Mellor, A; O'Hara, J; Woods, D R

    2014-11-01

    Fluid retention is a recognized feature of acute mountain sickness. However, accurate assessment of hydration, including the quantification of body water, has traditionally relied on expensive and non-portable equipment limiting its utility in the field setting. We compared the assessment of total body water (TBW) and their relationship to total body weight using two non-invasive methods using the NICas single-frequency bioimpedance analysis (SF-BIA) system and the BodyStat QuadScan 4000 multifrequency BIA system (MF-BIA). TBW measurements were performed at rest at sea level and at high altitude (HA) at 3833 m postexercise and at rest and thereafter at rest at 4450 m and 5129 m on 47 subjects. The average age was 34.5 ± 9.3 years with an age range of 21-54 years (70.2% male). There were strong correlations between TBW assessment with both methods at sea level (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.78-0.95: P<0.0001) and at HA (r = 0.92; 0.89-0.94: P<0.0001), however, TBW readings were 0.2 l and 1.91 l lower, respectively, with the NICaS. There was a stronger correlation between TBW and body weight with the QuadScan (r = 0.91; P<0.0001) than with the NICaS (r = 0.83; P<0.0001). The overall agreement between the two TBW methods was good, but the 95% confidence intervals around these agreements were relatively wide. We conclude that there was reasonable agreement between the two methods of BIA for TBW, but this agreement was lower at HA. PMID:24797153

  17. An Experimental Method for Measuring Water Droplet Impingement Efficiency on Two- and Three-dimensional Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, M.; Zumwalt, G. W.; Elangonan, R.; Freund, G. A., Jr.; Breer, M.; Whitmer, L.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental method was developed to determine the droplet impingement characteristics on 2-D and 3-D bodies. The experimental results provide the essential droplet impingement data required to validate water droplet trajectory codes, which are used in the analysis of aircraft icing. A body, whose water droplet impingement characteristics are required, is covered at strategic locations by thin strips of moisture absorbing (blotter) paper, and is exposed to an air stream containing a water dye solution spray cloud. Water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter strips by measuring the optical reflectance of the dye deposit on the strips, using an automated reflectometer. Models tested include a 4-inch diameter cylinder, a NACA 652015 airfoil section, a MS(1)-0317 supercritical airfoil section, three simulated ice shapes, an axisymmetric inlet and a Boeing 737-300 inlet model. Detailed descriptions of the dye tracer technique, instrumentation, data reduction method and the results obtained are presented. Analytical predictions of collection efficiency characteristics for most test configurations are included for comparison.

  18. Sediments, porewaters and diagenesis in an urban water body, Salford, UK: impacts of remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Kevin G.; Boyd, Nathan A.; Boult, Stephen

    2003-07-01

    Contaminated sediments deposited within urban water bodies commonly exert a significant negative effect on overlying water quality. However, our understanding of the processes operating within such anthropogenic sediments is currently poor. This paper describes the nature of the sediment and early diagenetic reactions in a highly polluted major urban water body (the Salford Quays of the Manchester Ship Canal) that has undergone remediation focused on the water column.The style of sedimentation within Salford Quays has been significantly changed as a result of remediation of the water column. Pre-remediation sediments are composed of a range of natural detrital grains, predominantly quartz and clay, and anthropogenic detrital material dominated by industrial furnace-derived metal-rich slag grains. Post-remediation sediments are composed of predominantly autochthonous material, including siliceous algal remains and clays. At the top of the pre-remediation sediments and immediately beneath the post-remediation sediments is a layer significantly enriched in furnace-derived slag grains, input into the basin as a result of site clearance prior to water-column remediation. These grains contain a high level of metals, resulting in a significantly enhanced metal concentration in the sediments at this depth.Porewater analysis reveals the importance of both bacterial organic matter oxidation reactions and the dissolution of industrial grains upon the mobility of nutrient and chemical species within Salford Quays. Minor release of iron and manganese at shallow depths is likely to be taking place as a result of bacterial Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction. Petrographic analysis reveals that the abundant authigenic mineral within the sediment is manganese-rich vivianite, and thus Fe(II) and Mn(II) released by bacterial reactions may be being taken up through the precipitation of this mineral. Significant porewater peaks in iron, manganese and silicon deeper in the sediment column are

  19. Distribution and significance of small, artificial water bodies across the United States landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S.V.; Renwick, W.H.; Bartley, J.D.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    At least 2.6 million small, artificial water bodies dot the landscape of the conterminous United States; most are in the eastern half of the country. These features account for approximately 20% of the standing water area across the United States, and their impact on hydrology, sedimentology, geochemistry, and ecology is apparently large in proportion to their area. These features locally elevate evaporation, divert and delay downstream water flow, and modify groundwater interactions. They apparently intercept about as much eroded soil as larger, better-documented reservoirs. Estimated vertical accretion rates are much higher, hence, inferred sedimentary chemical reactions must be different in the small features than in larger ones. Finally, these features substantially alter the characteristics of aquatic habitats across the landscape. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Water quality parameters associated with prevalence of Legionella in hot spring facility water bodies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Wu, Shu-Fen; Fan, Cheng-Wei; Shih, Feng-Cheng; Lin, Yung-Chang; Ji, Dar-Der

    2010-09-01

    Some species of Legionella are recognized as opportunistic potential human pathogens, such as Legionella pneumophila, which causes legionnaires disease. Indeed, outbreaks of legionellosis are frequently reported in areas in which the organism has been spread via aerosols from contaminated institutional water systems. Contamination in hot tubs, spas and public baths are also possible. As a result, in this study, we investigated the distribution of Legionella at six hot spring recreation areas throughout Taiwan. Legionella were detected in all six hot spring recreation areas, as well as in 20 of the 72 samples that were collected (27.8%). Seven species of Legionella identified from samples by the direct DNA extraction method were unidentified Legionella spp., Legionella anisa, L. pneumophila, Legionella erythra, Legionella lytica, Legionella gresilensis and Legionella rubrilucen. Three species of Legionella identified in the samples using the culture method were L. pneumophila, unidentified Legionella spp. and L. erythra. Legionella species were found in water with temperatures ranging from 22.7 °C to 48.6 °C. The optimal pH appeared to range from 5.0 to 8.0. Taken together, the results of this survey confirmed the ubiquity of Legionella in Taiwan spring recreational areas. Therefore, a long-term investigation of the health of workers at hot spring recreational areas and the occurrence of Legionella in hot spring recreational areas throughout Taiwan are needed. PMID:20727568

  1. Factors associated with contraceptive use and intention to use contraceptives among married women in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tiruneh, Fentanesh Nibret; Chuang, Kun-Yang; Ntenda, Peter A M; Chuang, Ying-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Family planning has improved the well-being of families by preventing high-risk pregnancies and abortions and reducing unplanned pregnancies. However, the effectiveness of family planning efforts has not been consistent across countries. This study examined factors associated with contraceptive use among married women in Ethiopia. Data were from the 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey. The sample comprised 10,204 married women (aged 15-49 years). Logistic regression models were used to analyze the data. Among married women in Ethiopia, 29.2% used contraceptive methods. About 44.1% of women who were not current users of contraceptives reported that they intended to use contraceptives in the future. Age at first marriage, being educated, number of living children, exposure to mass media, being employed, having educated partners, and having been informed about contraceptive use at health facilities were positively associated with current contraceptive use. By contrast, older age, a rural resident, or Muslim; belonging to the Afar or Somali ethnic groups; desiring numerous children; having husbands who desired additional children; and abortion experience were negatively associated with current contraceptive use. Our findings indicated that improving education, providing employment opportunities for women, and providing training to family planning providers are essential to increasing contraceptive use. PMID:26212154

  2. Knowledge, Perceptions, and Motivations for Contraception: Influence on Teens' Contraceptive Consistency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Suzanne; Franzetta, Kerry; Manlove, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the authors examine the association between contraceptive use patterns in teens' first sexual relationships and their knowledge of, perceptions of, and motivations for contraception and pregnancy prevention. Results from logistic regression analyses show that knowledge,…

  3. The Contraceptive CHOICE Project: Reducing Barriers to Long-Acting Reversible Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Secura, Gina M.; Allsworth, Jenifer E.; Madden, Tessa; Mullersman, Jennifer L.; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To introduce and promote the use of long-acting reversible methods of contraception (LARC; intrauterine contraceptives and subdermal implant) by removing financial and knowledge barriers. STUDY DESIGN The Contraceptive CHOICE Project is a prospective cohort study of 10,000 women 14-45 years who want to avoid pregnancy for at least one year and are initiating a new form of reversible contraception. Women screened for this study are read a script regarding LARC to increase awareness of these options. Participants choose their contraceptive method that is provided at no cost. We report the contraceptive choice and baseline characteristics of the first 2,500 women enrolled August 2007 through December 2008. RESULTS Sixty-seven percent of women enrolled (95% confidence interval: 65.3, 69.0) chose long-acting methods. Fifty-six percent selected intrauterine contraception and 11% selected the subdermal implant. CONCLUSION Once financial barriers were removed and LARC methods were introduced to all potential participants as a first-line contraceptive option, two-thirds chose LARC. PMID:20541171

  4. Emergency Contraception: Do Your Patients Have a Plan B?

    PubMed

    Bullock, Holly; Salcedo, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Emergency contraception is used after unprotected sex, inadequately protected sex, or sexual assault to reduce the risk of pregnancy. Of emergency contraceptive methods available in the United States, the copper intrauterine device has the highest efficacy, followed by ulipristal acetate, levonorgestrel-containing emergency contraceptive pills, and the Yuzpe method. However, access to the most effective methods is limited. Although advanced prescription of emergency contraceptive pills and counseling on emergency contraception to all reproductive-aged women is recommended, women should be advised to contact their health care providers after taking emergency contraceptive pills to discuss possible copper intrauterine device placement and other follow-up. PMID:26598310

  5. Ecotoxicological endpoints, are they useful tools to support ecological status assessment in strongly modified water bodies?

    PubMed

    Palma, P; Ledo, L; Alvarenga, P

    2016-01-15

    Although man-made reservoirs represent an important water supply source in countries where water scarcity has become a problem, little work has been done on the evaluation of their ecological status. Taking this in account, the general aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of ecotoxicological endpoints in the potential ecological status characterization of water reservoirs, with the purpose of their possible integration in evaluation programs developed under the Water Framework Directive (WFD). To achieve this purpose, a group of bioassays were selected to evaluate both water and sediment compartments at the Alqueva reservoir (the biggest from the Iberian Peninsula), with representative species from different taxonomic and functional groups: Vibrio fischeri, Thamnocephalus platyurus, Daphnia magna and Heterocypris incongruens. The ecotoxicological assessment showed that sublethal endpoints (e.g., luminescence, growth or reproduction), would be more useful and sensitive to identify toxicity patterns in this type of water body. In general, the results from this ecotoxicological toolbox agreed with the potential ecological status established according to the WFD, which indicates that the bioassays complement the ecological assessment. Furthermore, the use of an ecotoxicological approach can be extremely useful, especially in cases where the biotic indices are difficult to establish, such as in man-made reservoirs. However, when pollutant concentrations are very low, and/or when nutrients and organic matter concentrations are high, the two approaches do not fit, requiring further research to determine which organisms are more sensitive and the best biotic indices to use under those conditions. PMID:26402482

  6. [Pouring water over the body--hydrotherapy prescriptions in the late Middle Ages].

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    Once identified, an illness is met or fought against by an appropriate therapy. The diverse use of water holds a significant place among the therapeutic means which had been developed in Western medicine ever since antiquity. The essay deals with one particular form of application, namely, the gush of water. Focus is laid on the period around 1500. As the relevant medical treatises are based directly on Greek or Roman authors (Hippocrate, Galen, Celsus) or are even commentaries of Arabic handbooks in their Latin translations (Avicenna, Rhazes), antique medicine inevitably had also to be taken into account. The pouring of water, alone or in combination with other prescriptions, was applicable in a variety of illnesses as fevers, pains of the joints, psychic diseases, or even headaches. To counteract the causes (or symptoms) of a disease the water quality could be adjusted by changing its temperature, by adding certain substances (oils, herb extracts or decoctions) or by varying the way of application. The gush of water could serve many purposes and was prescribed to soothe, to refrigerate, to stop a swelling, to widen pores, to shock the patient and even, given the underlying humoural conception of men's nature, to draw away humours from one part of the body to another. The water gush, hence, was not restricted to be used in the case of one particular illness only but was considered an almost general therapeutic means. PMID:12168234

  7. Time-resolved Tomographic PIV Measurements of Water Flea Hopping: Body Size Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipper, A. N.; Murphy, D. W.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2014-11-01

    The flow field of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna is quantified with time-resolved tomographic PIV. In the current work, we compare body kinematics and flow disturbance between organisms of small (body length = 1.8 mm) versus medium (2.3 mm) versus large (2.65 mm) size. These plankters are equipped with a pair of antennae that are biramous such that the protopodite splits or branches into an exopodite and an endopodite. They beat the antennae pair synchronously to impulsively propel themselves, or `hop,' through the water. The stroke cycle of Daphnia magna is roughly 80 ms in duration and this period is evenly split between the power and recovery strokes. A typical hop carries the daphniid one body length forward and is followed by a period of sinking. Unlike copepod escape motion, no body vortex is observed in front of the animal. Rather, the flow induced by each antennae consists of a viscous vortex ring that demonstrates a slow decay. The time-record of velocity (peak of 40 mm/s for the medium specimen) and hop acceleration (1.8 m/s2 for the medium specimen) are compared, as well as the strength, size, and decay of the induced viscous vortex rings. The viscous vortex ring analysis will be presented in the context of a double Stokeslet model consisting of two impulsively applied point forces separated by the animal width.

  8. [Drug interactions with contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Simon, P; Hakkou, F; Warot, D

    1984-03-01

    3 possible types of drug interactions with contraceptives involve oral contraceptives (OCs), IUDs, and spermicides. The interaction of combined OCs with various drugs is frequently discussed in the literature, but the reported facts are sometimes contradictory. Case studies have indicated failure of OCs in patients taking ampicillin, but comparative studies using ampicillin and placebos have shown no difference in rates of estrogen, progestogens, follicle stimulating hormone, or luteinizing hormone in the 2 groups. Individual differences and predispositions among some women appear to play a role in drug interactions. The clinician should be wary of modifying accepted prescription practices too readily in the face of findings that may be explained by other as yet undisclosed factors. Interactions are difficult to establish, as are their mechanisms. They may perhaps be explained by the estrogen or progestogen components of the pills, the timing of the antibiotic dose, the duration of treatment and the dosage used, resistance of the intestinal flora, self-medication, or other factors. The drug troleandomycin is a special case; it appears to favor the already existing tendency of OCs to provoke cholestatic jaundice. A table of drug interactions with OCs can be divided into 2 parts, those that have been confirmed and whose mechanisms of action are known, including antiepileptics such as phenobarbital, butobarbital, phenytoin, and primidone, and the drug rifampicin, which are enzyme inductors; and those that are suspected but as yet unconfirmed and whose mechanism of action is not established. The unconfirmed interactions involve a variety of effects in addition to pregnancy. It is not yet established whether enzyme inductors are a greater problem for users of low-dose pills, but the probable existence of individual variations in sensitivity causes problems in setting recommendations applicable to all patients. Interactions between progestogen-only OCs and other drugs

  9. [Contraception in immigrant women: influence of sociocultural aspects on the choice of contraceptive method].

    PubMed

    Paraíso Torras, B; Maldonado Del Valle, M D; López Muñoz, A; Cañete Palomo, M L

    2013-01-01

    There are currently 6 million immigrants living in Spain. Half of them are women, the majority of whom are of childbearing age. These women, who suffer high rates of induced abortion, form a special group who require a special approach to their reproductive health. In order to study the use of contraceptive methods in this population, a review was made of 1100 clinical histories from our Sexual Health and Reproduction Clinic. Latin American women were the most prevalent group who came to seek information about contraception, followed by Eastern Europeans and Moroccans. Fewer Asian and Sub-Saharan women sought these services. The contraceptives most frequently used were the intrauterine device (used mostly by Latin American and Eastern European women), and combined oral contraception, most used by Moroccan women. It is important to advise the immigrant women about contraceptive methods, taking into account their preferences, in order to improve adherence to the method. PMID:23583187

  10. Reasons for contraceptive nonuse among women having unmet need for contraception in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sedgh, Gilda; Hussain, Rubina

    2014-06-01

    The level of unmet need for contraception-an important motivator of international family planning programs and policies-has declined only slightly in recent decades. This study draws upon data from 51 surveys conducted between 2006 and 2013 in Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean to provide an updated review of the reasons why many married women having unmet need are not practicing contraception. We examine the reasons for contraceptive nonuse and how these reasons vary across countries and according to national levels of unmet need and contraceptive use. We present specific findings regarding the most widespread reasons for nonuse, particularly infrequent sex and concerns regarding side effects or health risks. Our findings suggest that access to services that provide a range of methods from which to choose, and information and counseling to help women select and effectively use an appropriate method, can be critical in helping women having unmet need overcome obstacles to contraceptive use. PMID:24931073

  11. Non-hormonal male contraception: A review and development of an Eppin based contraceptive.

    PubMed

    O'Rand, Michael G; Silva, Erick J R; Hamil, Katherine G

    2016-01-01

    Developing a non-hormonal male contraceptive requires identifying and characterizing an appropriate target and demonstrating its essential role in reproduction. Here we review the development of male contraceptive targets and the current therapeutic agents under consideration. In addition, the development of EPPIN as a target for contraception is reviewed. EPPIN is a well characterized surface protein on human spermatozoa that has an essential function in primate reproduction. EPPIN is discussed as an example of target development, testing in non-human primates, and the search for small organic compounds that mimic contraceptive antibodies; binding EPPIN and blocking sperm motility. Although many hurdles remain before the success of a non-hormonal male contraceptive, continued persistence should yield a marketable product. PMID:26593445

  12. Reversible Contraception Update: The Importance of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Mestad, Renee E.; Kenerson, Jessica; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2011-01-01

    The past several years have seen an expansion in contraception options. Emerging data support the use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) such as the intrauterine device and subdermal implant as the most effective methods of contraception with the highest continuation rates and very high levels of patient satisfaction. In addition, the appropriate target population for the use of the intrauterine device now includes nulliparous women and adolescents. When a patient considers initiating a new contraceptive method, it is important to consider the characteristics of each method, including the side effects, effectiveness, and patient acceptability. Additionally, medical comorbidities must also be evaluated prior to choosing a method. In this article, we provide a brief overview of available reversible contraceptive methods, with an emphasis on LARC. PMID:19641264

  13. POSSIBLE SIGNS OF WATER AND DIFFERENTIATION IN A ROCKY EXOPLANETARY BODY

    SciTech Connect

    Farihi, J.; Brinkworth, C. S.; Girven, J.; Hoard, D. W.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Marsh, T. R.; Klein, B.; Koester, D.

    2011-02-10

    Spitzer observations reveal the presence of warm debris from a tidally destroyed rocky and possibly icy planetary body orbiting the white dwarf GD 61. Ultraviolet and optical spectroscopy of the metal-contaminated stellar photosphere reveal traces of hydrogen, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, iron, and calcium. The nominal ratios of these elements indicate an excess of oxygen relative to that expected from rock-forming metal oxides, and thus it is possible that water was accreted together with the terrestrial-like debris. Iron is found to be deficient relative to magnesium and silicon, suggesting the material may have originated as the outer layers of a differentiated parent body, as is widely accepted for the Moon.

  14. Characterizing Water and Hydroxyl on Airless Bodies from Vacuum UV and IR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbitts, Charles A.

    2015-11-01

    Water exists in the surfaces of airless bodies as ice and potentially as adsorbed species [1], either as molecular water or dissociated into hydroxyl when bulk water (ice) is not stable [2]. All physical states of water have a strong spectral signatures in the infrared from 2.7 to 3-um because of a fundamental OH-cation or H-O-H stretch vibration. But the IR is not always definitive of physical state. Although a band at 3.07 um is associated with water ice, an almost identical band exists in some hydrated minerals. Brucite, an alteration product of olivine, possesses this band [6] as does goethite, another alteration mineral of basalts [7]. In fact, the 3.05-um band on Ceres, which was initially attributed to water ice, has more recently been attributed to brucite [6]. Spectral observations in the UV can potentially resolve this degeneracy. In the UV, water ice possesses a very strong band near 180 nm [8], but adsorbed molecular water does not induce a band. Because of this, a combination of UV measurements at wavelengths from ~ 150 nm to ~200 nm and IR measurements near 3 um can discriminate ice from adsorbed water. The UV region, however, is also sensitive to silicate composition, with iron bearing minerals having a strong OMCT absorption feature near 300 nm and again shortward of 200 nm, that can potentially be a source of confusion between the identification of iron-poor minerals and water ice. In conclusion, the IR can sense all three forms of water (ice, adsorbed molecular water, and hydroxyl) and the UV, being sensitive to ice, may potentially be used either alone or with the IR to identify water ice separately from other phases of hydration.References: [1] Hibbitts et al., Icarus, 213, 64-72, 2011. [2] Schorghofer, N and G.J. Taylor, JGR, 112, E02010,doi:10.1029, 2007; [3] Poston et al., JGR, 118, 105-115, 2013; [4] Dyar et al., Icarus, 208,425-437, 2010; [5] Zeller et al., JGR, 71, 4855-4860, 1966;[6] Milliken, R.E. and A.S. Rivkin, Nature Geosci, DOI: 10

  15. [Optical properties and remote sensing retrieval model of diffuse attenuation coefficient of Taihu Lake water body].

    PubMed

    Le, Cheng-Feng; Li, Yun-Mei; Zha, Yong; Sun, De-Yong; Wang, Li-Zhen

    2009-02-01

    The spectral and chemical analytical data of Taihu Lake water quality in Nov. 8-22, 2007 were used to analyze the spectral characteristics of diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) of the water body in autumn and related affecting factors. On the basis of this analysis, the Kd at band 490 nm, Kd (490), was used as a variable to build the relationship between Kd and remote sensing reflectance. The results indicated that within the scope of visible band, the Kd of the water body at most locations of Taihu Lake presented an exponent decreasing trend with the increase of wave length. Due to the higher concentration of phytoplankton in some locations, a peak value of Kd was presented at band 675 nm. Non-organic suspended particles, because of their higher content in suspended sediment, had larger effects on Kd than organic suspended ones. There was a good correlation between Kd and remote sensing reflectance. Taking Rrs (550), Rrs (675) and Rrs (731) as independent variables and doing regression analysis with Kd (490), a good linear relationship was found between Kd (490) and Rrs (731), and multi-variate linear regression analysis using variables Rrs (550), Rrs (675) and Rrs (731) could get better effect (R2 > 0.96) than the regression analysis using variable Rrs (731). PMID:19459373

  16. Simultaneous occurrence of nitrates and sulfonamide antibiotics in two ground water bodies of Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Galán, M. a. Jesús; Garrido, Teresa; Fraile, Josep; Ginebreda, Antoni; Díaz-Cruz, M. Silvia; Barceló, Damià

    2010-03-01

    SummaryIn the present work the occurrence of 19 selected sulfonamides, including one acetylated metabolite, was investigated in ground water samples taken from two ground water bodies in Catalonia (Plana de Vic and La Selva). Both include areas designated as nitrate vulnerable zones, according to Directive 91/676/EEC. A fully automated analytical methodology based on on-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS) was developed for this purpose. The high selectivity and sensitivity achieved (limits of detection between 0.005 and 0.8 ng/L) permitted to demonstrate the ubiquity of these antibiotics in both ground water bodies. Results showed a wide range of concentrations, from 0.01 ng/L up to 3460.57 ng/L. Since sulfonamides are related to livestock veterinary practices, they can be used as a specific indicator of manure contamination. However, the presence of sulfonamides appeared not to be directly related to the concentration of nitrates, as it is reflected on the low correlation coefficients found.

  17. A new model for estimating total body water from bioelectrical resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siconolfi, S. F.; Kear, K. T.

    1992-01-01

    Estimation of total body water (T) from bioelectrical resistance (R) is commonly done by stepwise regression models with height squared over R, H(exp 2)/R, age, sex, and weight (W). Polynomials of H(exp 2)/R have not been included in these models. We examined the validity of a model with third order polynomials and W. Methods: T was measured with oxygen-18 labled water in 27 subjects. R at 50 kHz was obtained from electrodes placed on the hand and foot while subjects were in the supine position. A stepwise regression equation was developed with 13 subjects (age 31.5 plus or minus 6.2 years, T 38.2 plus or minus 6.6 L, W 65.2 plus or minus 12.0 kg). Correlations, standard error of estimates and mean differences were computed between T and estimated T's from the new (N) model and other models. Evaluations were completed with the remaining 14 subjects (age 32.4 plus or minus 6.3 years, T 40.3 plus or minus 8 L, W 70.2 plus or minus 12.3 kg) and two of its subgroups (high and low) Results: A regression equation was developed from the model. The only significant mean difference was between T and one of the earlier models. Conclusion: Third order polynomials in regression models may increase the accuracy of estimating total body water. Evaluating the model with a larger population is needed.

  18. Calculation of water drop trajectories to and about arbitrary three-dimensional lifting and nonlifting bodies in potential airflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norment, H. G.

    1985-01-01

    Subsonic, external flow about nonlifting bodies, lifting bodies or combinations of lifting and nonlifting bodies is calculated by a modified version of the Hess lifting code. Trajectory calculations can be performed for any atmospheric conditions and for all water drop sizes, from the smallest cloud droplet to large raindrops. Experimental water drop drag relations are used in the water drop equations of motion and effects of gravity settling are included. Inlet flow can be accommodated, and high Mach number compressibility effects are corrected for approximately. Seven codes are described: (1) a code used to debug and plot body surface description data; (2) a code that processes the body surface data to yield the potential flow field; (3) a code that computes flow velocities at arrays of points in space; (4) a code that computes water drop trajectories from an array of points in space; (5) a code that computes water drop trajectories and fluxes to arbitrary target points; (6) a code that computes water drop trajectories tangent to the body; and (7) a code that produces stereo pair plots which include both the body and trajectories. Accuracy of the calculations is discussed, and trajectory calculation results are compared with prior calculations and with experimental data.

  19. Out from behind the contraceptive Iron Curtain.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J L

    1990-01-01

    In the early 1950s, the Soviet Union and several of its Eastern European satellites completed their transition from high to low fertility before the US and Western Europe. They did this even though there were not enough modern contraceptives available to meet the needs of its citizens. As late as 1990, the Soviet Union had no factories manufacturing modern contraceptives. A gynecologist in Poland described domestically produced oral contraceptives (OCs) as being good for horses, but not for humans. The Romanian government under Ceaucescu banned all contraceptives and safe abortion services. Therefore, women relied on abortion as their principal means of birth control, even in Catholic Poland. The legal abortion rates in the Soviet Union and Romania stood at 100/1000 (1985) and 91/1000 (1987) as compared to 18/1000 in Denmark and 13/1000 in France. All too often these abortion were prohibited and occurred under unsafe conditions giving rise to complications and death. Further, the lack of contraceptives in the region precipitated and increase in AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. On the other hand, abortion rates were minimalized in Czechoslovakia, East Germany, and Hungary due to the availability of modern contraceptives and reproductive health services. Hungary and East Germany even manufactured OCs. OC use in these 2 nations rated as among the world's highest. East Germany also treated infertility and sexually transmitted diseases. The region experienced a political opening in latecomer 1989. In 1989, IPPF gave approximately 15 million condoms and 3000 monthly OC packets to the Soviet Union to ease the transition. More international assistance for contraceptive supplies and equipment and training to modernize abortion practices is necessary. PMID:12283401

  20. Origin and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance: The Common Mechanisms of Emergence and Spread in Water Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Agnese; Coyne, Sébastien; Berendonk, Thomas Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The environment, and especially freshwater, constitutes a reactor where the evolution and the rise of new resistances occur. In water bodies such as waste water effluents, lakes, and rivers or streams, bacteria from different sources, e.g., urban, industrial, and agricultural waste, probably selected by intensive antibiotic usage, are collected and mixed with environmental species. This may cause two effects on the development of antibiotic resistances: first, the contamination of water by antibiotics or other pollutants lead to the rise of resistances due to selection processes, for instance, of strains over-expressing broad range defensive mechanisms, such as efflux pumps. Second, since environmental species are provided with intrinsic antibiotic resistance mechanisms, the mixture with allochthonous species is likely to cause genetic exchange. In this context, the role of phages and integrons for the spread of resistance mechanisms appears significant. Allochthonous species could acquire new resistances from environmental donors and introduce the newly acquired resistance mechanisms into the clinics. This is illustrated by clinically relevant resistance mechanisms, such as the fluoroquinolones resistance genes qnr. Freshwater appears to play an important role in the emergence and in the spread of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the necessity for strategies of water quality improvement. We assume that further knowledge is needed to better understand the role of the environment as reservoir of antibiotic resistances and to elucidate the link between environmental pollution by anthropogenic pressures and emergence of antibiotic resistances. Only an integrated vision of these two aspects can provide elements to assess the risk of spread of antibiotic resistances via water bodies and suggest, in this context, solutions for this urgent health issue. PMID:22303296

  1. Economic Estimation of the Losses Caused by Surface Water Pollution Accidents in China From the Perspective of Water Bodies' Functions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; You, Zhen; Liu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    The number of surface water pollution accidents (abbreviated as SWPAs) has increased substantially in China in recent years. Estimation of economic losses due to SWPAs has been one of the focuses in China and is mentioned many times in the Environmental Protection Law of China promulgated in 2014. From the perspective of water bodies' functions, pollution accident damages can be divided into eight types: damage to human health, water supply suspension, fishery, recreational functions, biological diversity, environmental property loss, the accident's origin and other indirect losses. In the valuation of damage to people's life, the procedure for compensation of traffic accidents in China was used. The functional replacement cost method was used in economic estimation of the losses due to water supply suspension and loss of water's recreational functions. Damage to biological diversity was estimated by recovery cost analysis and damage to environmental property losses were calculated using pollutant removal costs. As a case study, using the proposed calculation procedure the economic losses caused by the major Songhuajiang River pollution accident that happened in China in 2005 have been estimated at 2263 billion CNY. The estimated economic losses for real accidents can sometimes be influenced by social and political factors, such as data authenticity and accuracy. Besides, one or more aspects in the method might be overestimated, underrated or even ignored. The proposed procedure may be used by decision makers for the economic estimation of losses in SWPAs. Estimates of the economic losses of pollution accidents could help quantify potential costs associated with increased risk sources along lakes/rivers but more importantly, highlight the value of clean water to society as a whole. PMID:26805869

  2. Action against contraceptive implant threatened.

    PubMed

    Dyer, C

    1995-08-19

    Norplant provides contraception over a five-year period through the gradual subcutaneous release of the progestogen levonorgestrel. It has been on the US market since 1991 and available in Great Britain since 1993. Already the subject of group legal actions in several US states, Norplant may soon be the target of lawyers in Britain for litigation. The lawyers allege that insertion of the implant under the skin of the upper arm by untrained doctors has led to painful and difficult removals and left women with scarred arms. Moreover, insufficient warning has been given about possible side effects such as mood swings and continuous vaginal bleeding. Hoechst Roussel, marketer of the implant in Britain, however, argues that only doctors trained in Norplant insertion and removal should attempt either procedure. Removal will be problematic only if preceded by a problem insertion. Hoechst Roussel recently advised gynecologists, in writing, not to attempt to extract the implant unless they are trained in the removal technique. By British law, the application of a drug product once approved for general release to general practitioners and family planning doctors cannot be restricted by a pharmaceutical company. PMID:7647639

  3. Oral contraceptives and birth defects.

    PubMed

    Smithells, R W

    1981-06-01

    Although OCs (oral contraceptives) are not designed to be taken during pregnancy, in Europe and the U.S. they are taken by 2-5% of women in early pregnancy and by 1/4-1/3 of women 3-4 months prior to conception. The effects of OCs on folic acid and other vitamin metabolism are well known and provide a theoretical basis for possible teratogenicity, even when stopped prior to conception. Both hormone support therapy for threatened abortions and hormonal pregnancy tests have been abandoned in recent years, the first because it proved inefficacious, the second because there are better alternatives available. In neither of these cases were sex hormones shown to be teratogenic. Most cohort (prospective) and many case-control (retrospective) studies have shown no association between OC use and birth defects. Case-control methodology can be criticized because of recall bias and because of the difficulty of choosing entirely matched controls. Several studies have shown OC users to have characteristics slightly different from the general population, e.g., they are younger, more often unmarried, and are more likely to smoke during pregnancy. Any of these characteristics might influence the occurrence of teratogenicity. It is impossible to prove that OCs constitute a low-level teratogen. The author considers them nonteratogenic. PMID:7250546

  4. Oral contraceptives and liver cancer.

    PubMed

    1997-11-01

    To date, nine case-control studies conducted in developed countries have identified an association between oral contraceptives (OCs) and liver cancer. The most recent population-based data from both developed and developing countries failed to confirm such an association, however. A study conducted by the World Health Organization in eight developing countries (Chile, China, Colombia, Israel, Kenya, Nigeria, Philippines, and Thailand), in which 122 women with liver cancer were matched with 802 controls, found no elevated risk for OC users compared with never-users (relative risk, 0.7; 95% confidence interval, 0.4-1.2). This study is particularly significant since it was conducted in countries where hepatitis B virus infection, an important risk factor for primary liver cancer, is widespread. In addition, population mortality data from the US, UK, Japan, and Sweden have failed to document increases in liver cancer cases coincident with increases in OC use. Given that population statistics can detect changes on the magnitude of a 40-50% decrease in the risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer related to OC use, they should be able to detect increases of two to 20 times the risk of liver cancer. The increased risk of liver cancer found in the case-control studies may reflect bias resulting from the small size of these studies. PMID:12348250

  5. No effect of upper body compression garments in elite flat-water kayakers.

    PubMed

    Dascombe, Ben; Laursen, Paul; Nosaka, Kazunori; Polglaze, Ted

    2013-01-01

    While the effect of lower body compression garments on performance and physiological responses are well documented, no studies have examined the effect of upper body compression garments (UBCG) on upper-body dominant exercise. This study examined the effects of wearing UBCG on performance and physiological responses during simulated flat-water kayaking. Five male (mean values±s: 21.8±2.8 years; 83.5±9.2 kg; 63.0±5.5 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and two female (mean values±s: 25.0±4.2 years; 71.4±2.7 kg; 51.0±4.8 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) elite flat-water kayakers completed a six-step incremental test followed by a four-minute maximal performance test (4minPT) in both UBCG and control (no shirt or sports training bra) conditions in a randomized counter-balanced order. Heart rate and oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]O2) as well as performance measures (power, distance covered, stroke rate) were recorded during the tests, and blood lactate was measured immediately after each incremental step and three minutes following the 4minPT. Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived measures of blood flow and oxygenation of the flexor carpi radialis were monitored continuously for all tests. No significant differences between the UBCG and control conditions were evident for any performance, cardiorespiratory or oxygenation measure across the incremental step test and 4minPT. It was concluded that wearing UBCG did not provide any significant physiological or performance benefits during simulated flat-water kayaking. PMID:23834538

  6. Ancient Martian Deltas: Evidence for Shallow and Deep Standing Bodies of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jew, C. L.; Kim, W.; Lim, Y.; Piliouras, A.

    2015-12-01

    Ancient deltas on Mars are indicative of a geologic history composed of complex fluvio-deltaic deposits. We focus on two morphologically different deltas preserved on Mars, one located in the Jezero crater and the other in the Shalbatana Valles canyon. The Jezero delta, formed during the Noachian age, is a large fluvial delta with strong channelization and a rigid shoreline resembling a terrestrial delta. In contrast, the Shalbatana Delta is a smaller scaled more briefly lived delta system, developed during the Hesperian, that is characterized by its smooth and simple planform. Evidence from previous studies on these Martian deltas such as the base level, mechanism to build sediment cohesion, estimated discharge, and time of formation offer support to ultimately discover why one delta drastically differs from the other. Based upon the observations from these two locations, we investigate through our physical experiments the conditions required to create these prograding deltas. We use carbonate precipitation in our experiments as a mechanism to increase bank stability, an alternative for any chemically driven precipitated deposits that potentially improve cohesion as vegetation does for terrestrial deltas. We found that there are differences in floodplain thickness, channelization, shoreline rugosity, and delta shape in the carbonate verse non-carbonate runs. Additionally, we conducted runs for isolating the influence that shallow and deep standing bodies of water have on prograding deltas. The experimental results suggested that the highly channelized delta (e.g., Jezero delta) rapidly prograded into a shallow body of water, covering a broader surface area and is dependent on a cohesive force for channel organization. On the contrary, Gilbert-type delta (e.g., Shalbatana delta) was best replicated when prograding into a deep standing body of water. Investigation using the experimental carbonate deltas suggests that cohesion results in better channelization (more

  7. Mapping water bodies over tropical bassins from SMOS L-band brightness temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrens, Marie; Al-Bitar, Ahmad; Kerr, Yann; Cote, Rémi; Richaume, Philippe; Crétaux, Jean-François; Cherchali, Selma; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Wetlands and land surface waters play a crucial role in the global water and biogeochimal cycles. Since the 80's, remote sensing techniques provide quantitative estimates of open water surfaces over land. They appear to be a valuable tool to monitor natural and anthropogenic evolution of this variable over the globe. A large array of frequencies has been used to retrieve surface water over land: visible, infrared, radar and passive microwave. In this work, the passive microwave L-band acquisitions from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are used to retrieve the water fraction. At this frequency, the signal is highly sensitive to surface waters. At L-band, the signal is expected to penetrate deeper in vegetation than signal in other frequency, such as visible and infrared and to some extent C-Band microwave. This asset permits to L-band signal to be more sensitive to open water under dense vegetation. In this study, authors focus on the Amazon and Congo basins. It is shown from a preliminary analysis of multi-angular, full polarized brightness temperature data that the dynamics observed over these study areas are related to the changing water bodies than the change in physical temperature. Based on this conclusion, a simple model had been built to obtain open water maps over the Amazon and Congo basin from SMOS brightness temperature at a coarse spatial resolution (25 km x 25 km) and high temporal frequency (2-days). These maps reveal the potential of L-band to monitor the evolution of open water and inundation over land. This new SMOS product is validated with visible data LandSAT. It is also compared to altimeter data (Jason-2) over the Rio Negro river. It was found that the water fraction estimated by SMOS was highly correlated with water levels measured by Jason-2 (R > 0.98). These maps exhibit also a phase shift of three months in the precipitation regime between the South and the North of the Amazon basin.

  8. Adaptive hydrological flow field modeling based on water body extraction and surface information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttinaovarat, Supattra; Horkaew, Paramate; Khaimook, Kanit; Polnigongit, Weerapong

    2015-01-01

    Hydrological flow characteristic is one of the prime indicators for assessing flood. It plays a major part in determining drainage capability of the affected basin and also in the subsequent simulation and rainfall-runoff prediction. Thus far, flow directions were typically derived from terrain data which for flat landscapes are obscured by other man-made structures, hence undermining the practical potential. In the absence (or diminutive) of terrain slopes, water passages have a more pronounced effect on flow directions than elevations. This paper, therefore, presents detailed analyses and implementation of hydrological flow modeling from satellite and topographic images. Herein, gradual assignment based on support vector machine was applied to modified normalized difference water index and a digital surface model, in order to ensure reliable water labeling while suppressing modality-inherited artifacts and noise. Gradient vector flow was subsequently employed to reconstruct the flow field. Experiments comparing the proposed scheme with conventional water boundary delineation and flow reconstruction were presented. Respective assessments revealed its advantage over the generic stream burning. Specifically, it could extract water body from studied areas with 98.70% precision, 99.83% recall, 98.76% accuracy, and 99.26% F-measure. The correlations between resultant flows and those obtained from the stream burning were as high as 0.80±0.04 (p≤0.01 in all resolutions).

  9. Dynamic monitoring of compliant bodies impacting the water surface through local strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panciroli, Riccardo; Biscarini, Chiara; Jannelli, Elio; Ubertini, Filippo; Ubertini, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The understanding and the experimental characterization of the evolution of impulsive loading is crucial in several fields in structural, mechanical and ocean engineering, naval architecture and aerospace. In this regards, we developed an experimental methodology to reconstruct the deformed shape of compliant bodies subjected to impulsive loadings, as those encountered in water entry events, starting from a finite number of local strain measurements performed through Fiber Bragg Gratings. The paper discusses the potential applications of the proposed methodology for: i) real-time damage detection and structural health monitoring, ii) fatigue assessment and iii) impulsive load estimation.

  10. Modeling the movement and equilibrium of water in the body of ruminants in relation to estimating body composition by deuterium oxide dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    Deuterium oxide (D/sub 2/O) dilution was evaluated for use in estimating body composition of ruminants. Empty body composition of cattle could not be accurately estimated by two- or three-compartment models when solved on the basis of clearance of D/sub 2/O from blood. A 29-compartment blood-flow model was developed from measured blood flow rates and water volumes of tissues of sheep. The rates of equilibration of water in tissues that were simulated by the blood-flow model were much faster than actual rates measured in sheep and cattle. The incorporation of diffusion hindrances for movement of water into tissues enabled the blood flow model to simulate the measured equilibration rates in tissues, but the values of the diffusion coefficients were different for each tissue. The D/sub 2/O-disappearance curve for blood simulated by the blood-flow model with diffusion limitations was comprised for four exponential components. The tissues and gastrointestinal tract contents were placed into five groups based upon the rate of equilibration. Water in the organs of the body equilibrated with water in blood within 3 min. Water in visceral fat, head, and some of the gastrointestinal tract tissues equilibrated within 8 to 16 min. Water in skeletal muscle, fat, and bone and the contents of some segments of the gastrointestinal tract equilibrated within 30 to 36 min. Water in the tissues and contents of the cecum and upper-large intestine equilibrated within 160 to 200 min. Water in ruminal tissue and contents equilibrated within 480 min.

  11. Pharmacologic considerations for patients taking oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Hassan, T

    1987-03-01

    This is a brief review of the theoretical and known drug reactions with oral contraceptives. There are at least 6 possible types of drug reactions that may affect the action of oral contraceptives, not including malabsorption related to changes in intestinal motility or flora. Ampicillin is an example of an antibiotic that may cause diarrhea, thereby reducing absorption of pill steroids. The steroids in orals are subject to enterohepatic circulation, which is in turn affected by the gut flora. Antibiotics known to suppress gut flora include: penicillins, cephalosporins, tetracyclines, sulfas, neomycin and erythromycin. Although controlled clinical trials of antibiotic intake with oral contraception have not shown significant interactions, anecdotal reports of pill failures have been published. The other important drug interaction affecting contraception by orals is enhanced hepatic degradation, as seen with rifampicin. Other drugs such as cimetidine, MAO-inhibitor antidepressants, chloramphenicol, influenza or BCG vaccine, isoniazid, warfarin, metronidazole and disulfiram may delay steroid metabolism and possibly increase side effects. When prescribing drugs it is important to realize that certain drugs decrease oral contraceptive concentrations: antibiotics anticonvulsants, griseofulvin, purgatives and rifampicin. PMID:3155374

  12. Zoely: a new combined oral contraceptive.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    ▼Zoely is the second estradiol-containing oral contraceptive formulated as an 'extended regimen' (pill-free interval <7 days) to be licensed in the UK. However, unlike the quadraphasic estradiol-containing contraceptive Qlaira, it is a monophasic preparation.1,2 It is postulated that combined oral contraceptives (COCs) containing synthetic estradiol, which is structurally identical to endogenous oestrogen,3 are potentially safer and better tolerated than those containing ethinylestradiol, the synthetic oestrogen most commonly used in COCs.4 The progestogen in Zoely is nomegestrol acetate, which is structurally related to progesterone,5 in contrast to the majority of progestogens in COCs that are derived from 19-nortestosterone6 and associated with androgenic effects.7 It is suggested that nomegestrol acetate, with its greater specificity for progesterone receptors, may minimise the potential for androgenic, oestrogenic and glucocorticoid effects.7 The company considers Zoely an option for women "who want a contraceptive with hormones similar to her own", and claims that it has a high level of contraceptive efficacy, produces shorter, lighter periods compared with a 21-day regimen of drospirenone 3mg/ethinylestradiol 30µg (Yasmin) and that most women report no negative impact on weight and skin.8 Here we review the effectiveness and place of Zoely. PMID:25104773

  13. Cervical cytology associated with levonorgestrel contraception.

    PubMed

    Misra, J S; Engineer, A D; Tandon, P

    1995-01-01

    Cytologic monitoring of cervical smears was carried out in 686 women receiving two modes of levonorgestrel contraception, one in the form of a subdermal implant and the other as an intrauterine device. The period of contraception with both delivery systems ranged from six months to five years. No case of malignant neoplasia was seen in any of the 44 subjects even after five years of continued levonorgestrel contraception. Preinsertion cytology revealed eight dysplastic smears (seven mild and one moderate); the lesions reverted to normal six months later and remained normal after one to four years of hormone use. A total of 19 dysplastic smears (18 mild and 1 moderate) were detected in the postinsertion smears collected after one to five years of contraception, giving an incidence of 2.8%, which was nonsignificant when compared with the control figure of 1.3%. Regression of the lesion to normal was observed in all 19 dysplasias on follow-up and in none did the dysplasia progress to a higher grade or frank malignancy. The incidence of dysplasia was more than twice as high with the intrauterine device as with the implant (4.9% vs. 2.1%). Hence, the implant appeared to be safe during five years of contraceptive use in terms of cervical pathology. However, longer follow-up of a large number of women is needed to reach a definitive conclusion. PMID:7847008

  14. Oral contraceptive marketing in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bamgboye, E A; Ladipo, O A

    1992-10-01

    The demographic transition in Nigeria is gradually moving towards the second stage. There is clear evidence of a declining mortality but the fertility rate remains exceptionally high. A realistic approach towards reducing fertility rate is the use of oral contraceptive. This study assesses the distribution system of oral contraceptive in Ibadan, the second largest city in Nigeria. The findings revealed that the people are aware of modern oral contraceptives as they purchase them freely at chemist shops. But effective distribution is hampered by existing channels and high costs. A local source recommended is the proprietary medicine stores, often at convenient locations to the potential users of contraceptives. The current cost which is between $1.3 and $19.5 per couple-years of protection is exorbitant, consuming 0.5-7.8% of the gross annual income of the average individual. Therefore, the government should subsidize the prices of oral contraceptives, to facilitate freedom from the tyranny of excessive fertility. PMID:1411690

  15. Relation between biological testing and standardization and toxicological control of pollution of water bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Filenko, O.F.

    1986-03-01

    In aquatic toxicology, biotesting means an evaluation of the toxic properties of substances present in water on the basis of the reactions or aquatic organisms. Toxicological biotesting is the basis for two important elements of limiting environmental pollution -- toxicological standardization and toxicological control. The development of toxicological control does not eliminate the need for conducting systematic chronic investigations for purposes of standardization but uses them as its basis. It is necessary to develop toxicological control methods for a multitude of substances or wastewaters capable of polluting water bodies. A table illustrates the allowable concentrations of triethyltin chloride (TETC), tripropyltin chloride (TPTC), triphenyltin chloride (T PhTC), and trihexyltin chloride (THTC) for aquatic organisms.

  16. [Aquaporins--a new element in the regulation of body water homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Krzyształowska, Maja; Bińcjczak-Kuleta, Agnieszka

    2009-08-01

    Aquaporins represent an ubiquitous class of integral membrane proteins that are serving in the passage of water across cell membrane. A subset of aquaporins may additionally facilitate transmembrane permeation of small neutral solutes such as glicerol (aquaglyceroporins). The widespread occurrence and an unique function of aquaporins give rise to the high degree of their intra- and interspecies homology, especially in their regions forming the internal wall of channel. The review presents current knowledge about the role of water channels in regulation of body homeostasis basing on results of experiments with mice lacking various aquaporins genes and studies on humans with inherited or acquired abnormalities in their function as well as about potential perspectives of pharmacological regulation of aquaporin activity. PMID:19856883

  17. Evidence from peninsular Malaysia of breastfeeding as a contraceptive method.

    PubMed

    Rao, S R

    1992-01-01

    This report examines Malaysian women's perceptions of the contraceptive effect of breastfeeding, the determinants of their perceptions, and any effect these perceptions might have on nursing duration and contraceptive use. The report also considers whether women are consciously replacing breastfeeding with modern contraceptive methods. Data from the 1976 Malaysian Family Life Survey are analyzed, and the author concludes that Malaysian women do perceive that breastfeeding has a contraceptive effect, but that this perception is not universal. Ethnicity and desire for a particular family size are the most significant determinants of this perception. Finally, Malaysian women's recognition of the contraceptive effect of nursing does not influence either the duration of their breastfeeding or their adoption of contraception. Malaysian women may not be abandoning breastfeeding to adopt contraception. More probably, breastfeeding declines and contraceptive prevalence increases with modernization. PMID:1293861

  18. Search for an Emergency Contraception Provider in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contraception Website - Your website for the "Morning After" Search for an Emergency Contraception (Plan B) Provider in ... use ella (a prescription-only product) you can search our directory for health care providers (including pharmacists ...

  19. Reassessment of the metabolic effects of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Franklin, M

    1990-01-01

    During the 30 years of experience with oral contraceptives, dramatic changes have occurred in their formulations and in prescribing practices. This article analyzes the latest information on the metabolic effects of oral contraceptives and makes recommendations for practice. PMID:2286849

  20. Legal and regulatory aspects of prescribing and marketing emergency contraception in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adekunle, A O; Babarinsa, I A; Akinyemi, Z; Okediran, A Y

    2001-01-01

    Emergency contraception remains so little used or understood and the lack of its awareness can be traced to a myriad of factors including legal and regulatory obstacles. The aim of this study was to determine the legal and regulatory aspects of dispensing or marketing a contraceptive method for reasons (especially emergency purposes) other than stated by the manufacturers. The existing drugs' and devices' regulatory systems in Nigeria, especially those governing family planning methods, were reviewed. A questionnaire was administered to 363 health workers, comprising of physicians, pharmacists, nurses and midwives, to determine the implications of dispensing some currently available oral contraceptives (OCs) for emergency purposes despite the fact that there is no explicit description of emergency use in the labelling of such drugs. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with regulatory bodies. It was observed that, with the exception of Postinor, the drug manufacturers' leaflets did not indicate that they could be used for emergency contraceptive purposes. Although 64.5% of the healthcare providers were aware that OCs and intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCDs) can be used for emergency purposes, 42.1% actually prescribed or recommended them. Many health workers (62.3%) were unaware of any legal implication with regards to prescribing unregistered drugs in Nigeria. The existing guidelines stipulate that a manufacturer or marketer should 're-register' a product if a new indication or use not contained in the initial application was found later. To satisfy legal requirements, it does appear that the currently available OCs and IUCDs in Nigeria must be labelled and registered for emergency contraceptive purposes. PMID:14510172

  1. Coliform and Metal Contamination in Lago de Colina, a Recreational Water Body in Chihuahua State, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Arias, Hector; Rey, Nora I.; Quintana, Rey M.; Nevarez, G. Virginia; Palacios, Oskar

    2011-01-01

    Lago de Colina (Colina Lake) is located about 180 km south of the city of Chihuahua (Mexico), and during the Semana Santa (Holy Week) vacation period its recreational use is high. The objective of this study was to quantify coliform and heavy metal levels in this water body before and after the Holy Week vacation period in 2010. Twenty sampling points were randomly selected and two water samples were collected at each point near the surface (0.30 m) and at 1 m depth. After the Holy Week vacation the same twenty points were sampled at the same depths. Therefore, a total 80 water samples were analyzed for fecal and total coliforms and levels of the following metals: Al, As, B, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Se, Si and Zn. It was hypothesized that domestic tourism contaminated this water body, and as a consequence, could have a negative impact on visitor health. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) study was performed for each element and its interactions considering a factorial design where factor A was sample date and factor B was sample depth. Fecal coliforms were only detected at eight sampling points in the first week, but after Holy Week, both fecal and total coliforms were detected at most sampling points. The concentrations of Al, B, Na, Ni and Se were only statistically different for factor A. The levels of Cr, Cu, K and Mg was different for both date and depth, but the dual factor interaction was not significant. The amount of Ca and Zn was statistically different due to date, depth and their interaction. No significant differences were found for any factor or the interaction for the elements As, Fe and Mn. Because of the consistent results, it is concluded that local tourism is contaminating the recreational area of Colina Lake, Chihuahua, Mexico. PMID:21776236

  2. Water- versus land-based exercise in elderly subjects: effects on physical performance and body composition

    PubMed Central

    Bergamin, Marco; Ermolao, Andrea; Tolomio, Silvia; Berton, Linda; Sergi, Giuseppe; Zaccaria, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 24-week exercise protocol carried out in geothermal spring water to improve overall physical function and muscle mass in a group of healthy elderly subjects. A further aim was to compare this water-based protocol with a land-based protocol and a control group. For this purpose, 59 subjects were recruited and randomly allocated to three groups: aquatic group (AG), land group (LG), and control group (CG). AG and LG followed a 6-month, twice-weekly, multimodality exercise intervention. AG underwent the protocol in hot-spring water (36°C) while LG did it in a land-based environment. After the intervention, knee-extension strength was maintained in AG and LG. The 8-foot up-and-go test showed a reduction in both exercise groups (AG −19.3%, P < 0.05; LG −12.6%, P < 0.05), with a significantly greater decrease in AG. The back-scratch test revealed an improvement only in AG (25.8%; P < 0.05), while the sit-and-reach test improved in all groups. Finally, AG reduced fat mass by 4% (P < 0.05), and dominant forearm fat decreased by 9.2% (P < 0.05). In addition, calf muscle density increased by 1.8% (P < 0.05). In summary, both water- and land-based activities were beneficial in maintaining strength and in improving lower-body flexibility. Aquatic exercise appeared a better activity to improve dynamic balance. Thermal swimming pools and the use of rating of perceived exertion as a method of exercise monitoring should be considered potentially useful tools to enhance physical performance and body composition in healthy elderly. PMID:24009416

  3. Vulnerability of surface water bodies to potential contamination by ammunition residues from military training ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranquille Temgoua, André Guy; Martel, Richard; Gabriel, Uta; Furlan, Adriana; Jouveau, Marie-Juliette

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decade, a major effort has been made by Canadian Forces to understand the hydrodynamic of groundwater flow on range training areas (RTA). However, there is also a need to study surface water bodies and especially its vulnerability to potential contamination by ammunition residues. Nearly half of the surface (42%) of the studied RTA is located on bedrock prone to high rate of surface runoff. Rugged terrain is located to the north of the RTA, whereas to the south; the surface is on deltaic sediment made of sand that is favorable to high infiltration rate. Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of topography were used in Geographic Information System (GIS) Software (ArcGis) to derive hydrologic processes. The GIS grid cells encompass basic terrain flow data that can be used to represent the flow processes at the free surface. They can also be used to derive a wide variety of information useful for the study of hydrologic processes such as topographic slope, water flow direction, contributing and drainage areas, catchments, watersheds and channel networks. The free surface flow was defined everywhere in the RTA but more specifically around targets locations, firing positions, and in impact areas. The developed methodology allows determining the hydrologic network with potential accumulation areas. The main objective is to identify areas where surficial geology and hydrological properties are favorable to rainfall-runoff and to establish if the quality of surface water may be altered by training ranges activities and subsequently if potential contaminants may migrate to receptors such as lakes and rivers. Vulnerable sectors that have high, medium or low rainfall-runoff index and surface water flow accumulation were shown on a regional map. Many other local maps were produced to define in more details surface water vulnerability in specific ranges. The possible relationship between the detection of ammunition residues in surface water bodies, the vulnerability

  4. Contraceptive use among women admitted with abortion in Nairobi.

    PubMed

    Ojwang', S B; Omuga, B

    1991-03-01

    In this study, a total of 519 patients were interviewed. 82.5% had incomplete abortion. The implication of abortion especially when induced is emphasised. Economic implications that are contributed by the youth are stressed. 83.6% of the patients had not used any contraception. The role of contraception in preventing unwanted pregnancy and therefore induced abortion is stressed. The role of the physician in providing contraception and appropriate contraceptive knowledge is discussed. PMID:2070755

  5. Validation of Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy to Measure Total Body Water in Resistance-Trained Males.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ava; Slater, Gary; Byrne, Nuala; Chaseling, Janet

    2015-10-01

    The three-compartment (3-C) model of physique assessment (fat mass, fat-free mass, water) incorporates total body water (TBW) whereas the two-compartment model (2-C) assumes a TBW of 73.72%. Deuterium dilution (D2O) is the reference method for measuring TBW but is expensive and time consuming. Multifrequency bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS SFB7) estimates TBW instantaneously and claims high precision. Our aim was to compare SFB7 with D2O for estimating TBW in resistance trained males (BMI >25kg/m2). We included TBWBIS estimates in a 3-C model and contrasted this and the 2-C model against the reference 3-C model using TBWD2O. TBW of 29 males (32.4 ± 8.5 years; 183.4 ± 7.2 cm; 92.5 ± 9.9 kg; 27.5 ± 2.6 kg/m2) was measured using SFB7 and D2O. Body density was measured by BODPOD, with body composition calculated using the Siri equation. TBWBIS values were consistent with TBWD2O (SEE = 2.65L; TE = 2.6L) as were %BF values from the 3-C model (BODPOD + TBWBIS) with the 3-C reference model (SEE = 2.20%; TE = 2.20%). For subjects with TBW more than 1% from the assumed 73.72% (n = 16), %BF from the 2-C model differed significantly from the reference 3-C model (Slope 0.6888; Intercept 5.093). The BIS SFB7 measured TBW accurately compared with D2O. The 2C model with an assumed TBW of 73.72% introduces error in the estimation of body composition. We recommend TBW should be measured, either via the traditional D2O method or when resources are limited, with BIS, so that body composition estimates are enhanced. The BIS can be accurately used in 3C equations to better predict TBW and BF% in resistance trained males compared with a 2C model. PMID:26011918

  6. [N and P removal characters of eutrophic water body under planted float].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoping; Wang, Jianguo; Xue, Lihong; Xu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Linzhang

    2005-11-01

    The study on the N and P removal and N2O release of eutrophic water body under planted float Ipomoea aquatica and Oenanthe javanica showed that planted float had a good effect on the removal of N and P from eutrophic water body. The bioaccumulation of N and P by the plants accounted for 40.32% approximately 63.87% of the N and P removal, respectively, suggesting that plant uptake was the main removal process. Within the treating period, there was a rapid and sufficient nitrification but a slow and insufficient denitrification in the planted float system, and thereby, planted float system had a high NH4+-N removal rate and NO3(-)-N accumulation. The presence of planted float reduced the release flux of N2O, which was 17.14 microg N x m(-2) x h(-1) for Ipomoea aquatica, 37.38 microg N x m(-2) x h(-1) for Oenanthe javanica, and 85.08 microg N x m(-2) x h(-1) for the control. PMID:16471367

  7. Dynamic monitoring of Poyang Lake water body area using MODIS images between 2000 and 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yayong; Huang, Shifeng; Li, Jiren; Li, Xiaotao; Ma, Jianwei; Li, Shanyang; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake of China, is well known for its ecological and economic importance as a dynamic wetland system. But, influenced by the climate change and human activity, Poyang Lake wetland has changed a lot. The long time series of Terra/MODIS data between 2000 and 2014 were utilized to investigate the variation of Poyang Lake and to analyze Poyang lake response to variation of local precipitation with the meteorological data. The results showed: (1) Poyang Lake water body area showed a significant seasonal variation, minimum value was about 690 km2 and maximum value reached 3500 km2, and inter-annual fluctuation; (2)For the past 15 year , local precipitation directly affected the inundation changes. In particular, the impact of rainfall during the first half of the year is more significant (the relation coefficient with R2 of 0.61); (3) Taking into account humid activities, the impoundment of the Three Gorges dam (TGD) had a certain impact on Poyang Lake water body area, especially the persistent reduction of Poyang lake surface area in November was deteriorated by the impounding of TGD in October after 2006. Finally, the study provides a theoretical basis and data for changes in Poyang Lake wetland research and protection.

  8. Hydraulic resistance of a plant root to water-uptake: A slender-body theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang Ping

    2016-05-01

    A slender-body theory for calculating the hydraulic resistance of a single plant root is developed. The work provides an in-depth discussion on the procedure and the assumptions involved in calculating a root׳s internal hydraulic resistance as well as the physical and the mathematical aspects of the external three-dimensional flow around the tip of a root in a saturated soil and how this flow pattern enhances uptake and reduces hydraulic resistance. Analytical solutions for the flux density distribution on the stele-cortex interface, local water-uptake profile inside the stele core, the overall water-uptake at the base of the stele, and the total hydraulic resistance of a root are obtained in the slender-body limit. It is shown that a key parameter controlling a root's hydraulic resistance is the dimensionless axial conductivity in the stele, which depends on the permeabilities of the stele and the cortex as well as the root's radial and axial dimensions. Three-dimensional tip effect reduces a root's hydraulic resistance by as much as 36% when compared to the radial flow theory of Landsberg and Fowkes. In addition, the total hydraulic resistance cannot be generally decomposed into the direct sum of a radial resistance and an axial resistance. PMID:26920247

  9. Removal of Emulsified Oil from Water by Fruiting Bodies of Macro-Fungus (Auricularia polytricha)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xunan; Guo, Mengting; Wu, Yinghai; Wu, Qunhe; Zhang, Renduo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of utilizing the fruiting bodies of a jelly macro-fungus Auricularia polytricha as adsorbents to remove emulsified oil from water. The effects of several factors, including temperature, initial pH, agitation speed, and adsorbent dosage, were taken into account. Results showed that the optimized conditions for adsorption of A. polytricha were a temperature of 35°C, pH of 7.5, and agitation speed of 100 rpm. The adsorption kinetics were characterized by the pseudo-first order model, which showed the adsorption to be a fast physical process. The Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm described the adsorption very well and predicted the maximum adsorption capacity of 398 mg g−1, under optimized conditions. As illustrated by scanning electron micrographs, the oil particles were adsorbed onto the hairs covering the bottom surface and could be desorbed by normal temperature volatilization. The material could be used as an emulsified oil adsorbent at least three times, retaining more than 95% of the maximum adsorption capacity. The results demonstrated that the fruiting bodies of A. polytricha can be a useful adsorbent to remove emulsified oil from water. PMID:24743498

  10. Induced abortion and contraception use

    PubMed Central

    du Prey, Beatrice; Talavlikar, Rachel; Mangat, Rupinder; Freiheit, Elizabeth A.; Drummond, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine what proportion of women seeking induced abortion in the Calgary census metropolitan area were immigrants. Design For 2 months, eligible women were asked to complete a questionnaire. Women who refused were asked to provide their country of birth (COB) to assess for selection bias. Setting Two abortion clinics in Calgary, Alta. Participants Women presenting at or less than 15 weeks’ gestational age for induced abortion for maternal indications. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the proportion of women seeking induced abortion services who were immigrants. Secondary outcomes compared socioeconomic characteristics and contraception use between immigrant and Canadian-born women. Results A total of 752 women either completed a questionnaire (78.6%) or provided their COB (21.4%). Overall, 28.9% of women living in the Calgary census metropolitan area who completed the questionnaire were immigrants, less than the 31.2% background proportion of immigrant women of childbearing age. However, 46.0% of women who provided only COB were immigrants. When these data were combined, 34.2% of women presenting for induced abortion identified as immigrant, a proportion not significantly different from the background proportion (P = .127). Immigrant women presenting for induced abortion tended to be older, more educated, married with children, and have increased parity. They were similar to Canadian-born women in number of previous abortions, income status, and employment status. Conclusion This study suggests that immigrant women in Calgary are not presenting for induced abortion in disproportionately higher numbers, which differs from existing European literature. This is likely owing to differing socioeconomic characteristics among the immigrant women in our study from what have been previously described in the literature (typically lower socioeconomic status). Much still needs to be explored with regard to factors influencing the use of

  11. New progestagens for contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2006-01-01

    The progestins have different pharmacologic properties depending upon the parent molecule, usually testosterone or progesterone (P), from which they are derived. Very small structural changes in the parent molecule may induce considerable differences in the activity of the derivative. In hormonal contraceptives, progestins represent the major agent designed for suppressing ovulation and are used in combination with estrogen (E) usually ethinyl-estradiol (EE). The development of new generations of progestins with improved selectivity profiles has been a great challenge. Steroidal and nonsteroidal progesterone receptor (PR) agonists have been synthesized as well, although the latter are still in a very early stage of development. Several new progestins, have been synthesized in the last two decades. These include dienogest (DNG), drospirenone (DRSP), Nestorone (NES), nomegestrol acetate (NOMAc) and trimegestone (TMG). These new progestins have been designed to have no androgenic or estrogenic actions and to be closer in activity to the physiological hormone P. DRSP differs from the classic progestins as it is derived from spirolactone. It is essentially an antimineralocorticoid steroid with no androgenic effect but a partial antiandrogenic effect. The antiovulatory potency of the different progestins varies. TMG and NES are the most potent progestins synthesized to date, followed by two of the older progestins, keto-desogestrel (keto-DSG) and levonorgestrel (LNG). The new molecules TMG, DRSP and DNG also have antiandrogenic activity. Striking differences exist regarding the side effects among the progestins and the combination with EE leads to other reactions related to the E itself and whether the associated progestin counterbalances, more or less, the estrogenic action. The 19-norprogesterone molecules and the new molecules DRSP and DNG are not androgenic and, therefore, have no negative effect on the lipid profile. Given their pharmacological properties, it is

  12. Companies commit to emergency contraception -- have you?

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    Despite the efforts of the medical community, as well as promotional efforts by pharmaceutical companies, relatively few women in the US have heard of emergency contraceptives (ECs). Gynetics, marketer of Preven, plans to file a new drug application for a levonorgestrel EC by the end of 1999, with an anticipated approval in the second half of 2000. Women's Capital Corp., marketer of Plan B, is also aiming for a national commercial launch of its product. According to a recently published acceptability study, women will use ECs when they are made available. A survey among 235 women at 13 Kaiser Permanente medical offices in San Diego, California, regarding their experiences with ECs showed that 91% were satisfied with ECs, and 97% said they would use ECs for emergencies only--dispelling fears that women would forego use of ongoing contraception. About 70% of the women who participated in the study were using a contraceptive method when they requested ECs. PMID:12295558

  13. The use of contraception among abortion applicants.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoni, D; Jain, S C

    1985-01-01

    Applicants for therapeutic abortion at an outpatient unit of a general hospital in the capital city of Newfoundland were interviewed, and the contraception related findings are presented. The total number of therapeutic abortions performed in 1977 in the province was 493, of which 416 (84%) were performed in Grace General Hospital, where the study was conducted. The 416 women ranged in age from 14-45 years. 72% were under age 24. 41% had achieved only elementary school education. 65% came from the capital city and from the surrounding areas, within a radius of 100 miles. The rest of the women had traveled up to 700 miles or more to procure the service. Of the total of 416, 10, or 2%, claimed that they had no knowledge that there are ways to prevent conception. The 2nd group of 170 women (41%) knew that contraceptive methods did exist but for various reasons had never used any method at any time in their lives. The 3rd group of 236 (57%) consisted of those who had used some form of contraception. This group was further divided: 181 women (44%) had used birth control methods within the last 6 months or earlier but not at the time of conception; the rest had been consistent contraceptors but the method had failed. Of the 10 women who claimed they had absolutely no knowledge of contraception, 6 were below age 17, 7 were unmarried, and 5 were Roman Catholics. Approximately 1/3 of the 170 women who knew of contraceptive methods but did not use them were under age 16 and would have required parental consent to receive contraceptive counseling and/or prescriptions. For approximately 2/3 of this group, birth control methods were available and accessible since they were above the age of 17 and could have sought contraceptive counseling. The reasons this group of women gave for not using contraceptives fell under 3 main headings. 1/3 attributed it to ignorance and/or carelessness. Another 1/3 consisted of those who had not planned on having sexual intercourse. The rest

  14. Should dermatologists prescribe hormonal contraceptives for acne?

    PubMed

    Harper, Julie C

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the primary factors contributing to the development of acne vulgaris is excess sebum. Sebaceous glands and sebum excretion are regulated, at least in part, by androgen hormones. Acne treatments that block this androgen effect include spironolactone and combination oral contraceptives (COC). Three COC are now FDA approved to treat moderate acne. Dermatologists must become experts at prescribing these hormonal contraceptives. Likewise, it is vital to be aware of contraindications to hormonal contraceptive therapy. Proper patient selection relies on an appropriate medical history and an assessment of blood pressure. A pelvic exam and/or Papanicolaou smear are not required prior to initiating therapy with a COC. It is important to counsel patients about potential adverse effects of COC pills and to establish appropriate expectations concerning acne improvement. PMID:19845722

  15. Internet opens access to contraceptive methods.

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    US women are able to import contraceptive agents not available in the US from two Canadian companies who advertise their products on the World Wide Web. US regulations permit importation of small quantities of drugs for personal use even if the drugs have not received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. Most US women order the Protectaid contraceptive sponge, which is sold over-the-counter in Canada, because contraceptive sponges are no longer available in the US. One of the companies also exports the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD, but, in this case, the company only ships the product to physicians. The legal liabilities of inserting an IUD that has not received FDA approval are the same as for any sanctioned product. While manufacturers of a product not distributed in the US may have protection from liability, the distributor may be liable. PMID:12348705

  16. The state of the contraceptive art.

    PubMed

    Tyrer, L B; Duarte, J

    1983-01-01

    The high failure rates of available contraceptive methods attest to the fact that the present technology is inadequate to meet the needs of many women, and new, safer, and highly effective contraceptive methods must be developed for both the female and the male. Previously, industry was largely responsible for the research and development of many of the currently available contraceptives, but at this time it is less than enthusiastic about carrying out further research because of the time and cost associated with the approval of new drugs. Additionally, because of the medico legal climate that exists today, particularly concerning present contraceptive drugs and devices, pharmaceutical companies are concentrating on developing drugs for the treatent of disease conditions, a less risky area. The US federal government, which currently is the single largest funder in the world of contraceptive and related research, is directing little attention to this particular area. The most obvious obstacles to enhanced federal support is the debate over the federal budget priorities. Other deterring factors include the controversy over abortion which has discouraged efforts to call attention to contraceptive research because of concern that it might result in funding cuts instead of increases. Another factor is the traditional allocation of 40% of National Institute of Health funds to population research and 60% to maternal and child health. An overview of currently available contraceptive methods covers oral contraception (OC), long lasting injectable contraception, IUDs, the condom, vaginal contraceptive sponge, the diagphragm, and fertility awareness techniques. Determining the actual benefits versus the risks of OC has proved difficult. OC has changed considerably since it came into use. The most serious side effects attributed to the OCs involve the cardiovascular system, specifically thromboembolism, stroke, and heart attack. The risk of developing these diseases has

  17. Taking the Initiative: A Green Light for Contraceptive Responsibility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillis, Diane E.; Allgeier, Elizabeth Rice

    One explanation for the lack of contraception use among adolescents is that young women may feel embarrassment or rejection by their partners if they initiate the use of contraception. To explore young adults' reactions to contraceptive use, 160 college students evaluated a description of an unmarried young couple which varied the length of time…

  18. The Effects of Pregnancy Experience on Contraceptive Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orcutt, Holly K.; Cooper, M. Lynne

    1997-01-01

    Retrospective reports of contraceptive use on two occasions of intercourse were used to examine change in contraceptive practice as a function of intervening pregnancy in a sample of 466 black adolescent females and white adolescent females. Improvements in contraceptive use and the effects of the passage of time are discussed for both racial…

  19. Unintentional drowning mortality, by age and body of water: an analysis of 60 countries

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Yih; Wang, Yi-Fong; Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Kawach, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Background To examine unintentional drowning mortality by age and body of water across 60 countries, to provide a starting point for further in-depth investigations within individual countries. Methods The latest available three years of mortality data for each country were extracted from WHO Health Statistics and Information Services (updated at 13 November 2013). We calculated mortality rate of unintentional drowning by age group for each country. For countries using International Classification of Disease 10 (ICD-10) detailed 3 or 4 Character List, we further examined the body of water involved. Results A huge variation in age-standardised mortality rate (deaths per 100 000 population) was noted, from 0.12 in Turkey to 9.19 in Guyana. Of the ten countries with the highest age-standardised mortality rate, six (Belarus, Lithuania, Latvia, Russia, Ukraine and Moldova) were in Eastern Europe and two (Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan) were in Central Asia. Some countries (Japan, Finland and Greece) had a relatively low rank in mortality rate among children aged 0–4 years, but had a high rank in mortality rate among older adults. On the contrary, South Africa and Colombia had a relatively high rank among children aged 0–4 years, but had a relatively low rank in mortality rate among older adults. With regard to body of water involved, the proportion involving a bathtub was extremely high in Japan (65%) followed by Canada (11%) and the USA (11%). Of the 13 634 drowning deaths involving bathtubs in Japan between 2009 and 2011, 12 038 (88%) were older adults aged 65 years or above. The percentage involving a swimming pool was high in the USA (18%), Australia (13%), and New Zealand (7%). The proportion involving natural water was high in Finland (93%), Panama (87%), and Lithuania (85%). Conclusions After considering the completeness of reporting and quality of classifying drowning deaths across countries, we conclude that drowning is a high-priority public health

  20. Exposure of small water bodies to pesticides and their transformation products in a lowland catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Uta; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Based on the European Directive 2009/128/EC (2009), all member states were obliged to set up National Action Plans for the sustainable use of pesticides. In the German National Action Plan (GNAP), the status of small water bodies (swb) defined as water bodies with a catchment <10km² was stressed among other issues. Since the GNAP stated that knowledge and data base of pesticide contamination of swbs is insufficient, a monitoring of 10 swbs in the catchment of the lowland river Kielstau was carried out in summer and autumn 2015 for selected herbicides and their transformation products (TP). METHODS Grab samples of the water phase were collected once at the end of the spring/summer application period and a screening was carried out for 102 pesticides and 6 TPs. During autumn application, the rape herbicide metazachlor and the winter grain herbicide flufenacet as well as their TPs oxalic acid (OA) and sulfonic acid (ESA) were in the focus of the study. The sampling was carried out event based after the first and second relevant rainfall events after application. The third sample was collected four weeks after the second sampling to observe the occurrence of the TPs. The target compounds were quantified by LC-MSMSMS. RESULTS For all swbs, the pesticide screening after the spring application showed pesticide/TP concentrations below the quantification limits (0.01-0.05 μg L-1) except of the corn herbicdes metolachlor, terbuthylazine and its TP desethylterbuthylazine. These findings were independent from the time elapsed since the last application of these compounds took place which was partly 4 years ago. After autumn application, the samples were analyzed for the herbicides metazachlor, flufenacet and their TPs which were sprayed on the fields where the swb are located in. These results showed that TPs of both herbicides remained from the year before and reached concentrations up to 1.9 μg L-1 for metazachlor ESA, 0.55 μg L-1 for metazachlor OA, 0.16

  1. Maintained total body water content and serum sodium concentrations despite body mass loss in female ultra-runners drinking ad libitum during a 100 km race.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Senn, Oliver; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Joleska, Irena; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We investigated in 11 female ultra-runners during a 100 km ultra-run, the association between fluid intake and prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in a cross-sectional study. Athletes drank ad libitum and recorded their fluid intake. They competed at 8.0 (1.0) km/h and finished within 762 (91) min. Fluid intake was 4.1 (1.3) L during the race, equal to 0.3 (0.1) L/h. Body mass decreased by 1.5 kg (p< 0.01); pre race body mass was related to speed in the race (r = -0.78, p< 0.05); and change (Delta) in body mass was not associated with speed in the race. Change in body mass was positively (r = 0.70; p< 0.05), and Delta urinary specific gravity negatively (r = -0.67; p< 0.05), correlated to Delta percent total body water. Changes in body mass were not related to fluid intake during the race. Fluid intake was not correlated to running speed and showed no association with either Delta percent total body water nor Delta [Na] in plasma. Fluid intake showed no relationship with both Delta haematocrit and Delta plasma volume. No exercise-associated hyponatremia occurred. Female ultra- runners consuming fluids ad libitum during the race experienced no fluid overload, and ad libitum drinking protects against exercise-associated hyponatremia. The reported higher incidence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in women is not really a gender effect but due to women being more prone to overdrink. PMID:20199991

  2. A special obligation -- access to contraception.

    PubMed

    Akhter, H

    1993-03-01

    In rural Bangladesh, health workers go door to door to offer women injectable contraceptives. At small shops, villagers can obtain oral contraceptives without a prescription. In poor urban areas and in remote villages, trained workers insert IUDs at satellite clinics and in homes. These resourceful ways of making contraceptives available are not the norm, however. Many obstacles to accessible contraceptives exist, including physicians with little exposure to public health issues and perspectives. The executive director of the Bangladesh Institute of Research for Promotion of Essential and Reproductive Health believes that properly trained paramedics can sufficiently provide family planning services given adequate conditions and supplies, e.g., nurse practitioners and midwives often insert IUDs more conscientiously than do physicians. In Egypt, physicians are disinclined to delegate some services to paramedics, even in remote areas where few physicians practice. On the other hand, physicians in Bangladesh realize that if they do not relinquish these services to paramedical, they must go to remote areas to provide these services themselves. Another considerable obstacle to improved access to contraceptives is the lack of a clear, specific guideline. The executive director suggests that 2 groups of step-by-step guidelines translatable at the clinic level are needed, one for senior program managers and one for providers in the field. It is important for the guidelines to minimize the musts and shoulds because they too become barriers. For example, requiring IUD users to return to the clinic after 1, 2, 3 and 6 months discourages potential users who cannot leave their homes regularly for the inconvenience of so many physical exams. Too many tests as a means to screen potential contraceptive users also deters potential users. In Bangladesh as well as some other countries, a husband's signature is required for the wife to use a new method or to undergo sterilization. This

  3. Male contraception: a clinically-oriented review.

    PubMed

    Kanakis, George A; Goulis, Dimitrios G

    2015-01-01

    Despite the variety of available female contraceptive methods, many pregnancies (~50%) are still undesired. Many men (>60%) want to participate equally with their partner in family planning; however, male contraceptive methods (MCMs) account for only 14% of those used worldwide and no pharmaceutical MCM is available so far. The only two MCMs currently available are condoms, which despite protecting against sexually transmitted diseases have high failure rates (~19%), and vasectomy, which though very efficient (99%) is poorly reversible (<50%). Among MCMs under investigation, male hormonal contraceptives (MHCs) are those that have come closest to commercialization. The action of MHCs relies on the disruption of spermatogenesis that exogenous androgen administration evokes by suppressing the hypophyseal-gonadal axis. Various regimens of androgens as monotherapy or in combination with progestins have been tested in clinical trials achieving a Pearl Index <1.0 (equal to that of the female oral contraceptive pill); however, concerns regarding the variable response rates observed (non-responders: 5-20%), the impracticality of parenteral administration and long-term prostate-associated or cardiovascular morbidity have deflected the interest of the pharmaceutical industry from further research. Non-hormonal contraception methods may be, at least theoretically, more specific by selectively disrupting spermatogenesis and sperm transport or fertilizing ability. Nevertheless, only a few have been tested in clinical trials (Reversible Inhibition of Sperm Under Guidance, RISUG, and Intra Vas Plugs); most of them are still in pre-clinical development or have been abandoned due to toxicity (gossypol). Consequently, until a reliable, safe and practical MCM is developed, women will continue to bear most of the contraception burden. PMID:26732151

  4. Contraceptive methods use -- the gender difference.

    PubMed

    1995-04-01

    Male involvement in family planning programs has been recognized as an important strategy towards shared responsibility between men and women in reproductive decisions as well as in the prevention of STDs and AIDS. Bolstering male involvement is among the objectives of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) Program of Action. One of the achievements of Cairo was the recognition of the need to increase men's responsibility for their sexuality and child rearing roles. The contraceptive prevalence rate and the difference in use of male and female contraceptive methods in selected Asian and Pacific countries are presented. Data on Pacific Islands was not available by contraceptive methods used except for Fiji (1974). There is above 70% contraceptive use in Hong Kong, Republic of Korea, Australia, Taiwan, Singapore, and China, with low use in Pakistan and Nepal. The data show that the type of contraceptive used is very much gender biased, indicating that the burden of contraceptive use is on women. The male methods of vasectomy, condom, and withdrawal are used by fewer couples than the female methods of female sterilization, pills, injectables, IUDs, and vaginal barriers for most countries except Japan. In Japan 44% of couples rely on male methods, mainly condoms; however, the use of pills constitutes less than 1%. Hong Kong and Singapore also have higher use of condoms than other countries (about 1/4 of married couples). Male sterilization is relatively lower than female sterilization for all countries. The highest use is in Korea, with 11% of the couples having undergone male sterilization, however, female sterilization is also the highest for Korea with 37% of the couples using this method. No matter what the level of the socioeconomic development of the country, the responsibility of regulating reproduction seems to lie with the women. PMID:12346435

  5. Contraception, punishment and women who use drugs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In light of the recent debate on the use of financial incentives to promote long-acting contraception and sterilisation among women who use illicit drugs we discuss attitudes to contraception, pregnancy and parenting among Australian women who inject drugs. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 90 women of reproductive age about contraceptive use, preferences, reproductive histories, attitudes to and experiences of parenting. All women were either currently, or had previously injected drugs. The in-depth, semi-structured interviews were compared and contrasted for themes relating to drug use, contraception, pregnancy and parenting. Results Participants aspired to control their fertility, expressed individual contraceptive preferences and concerns for their children (both born and unborn). Most had tried a number of contraceptive methods interspersed by periods of non-use related to experiences of side-effects, being single or abstinent, believing that they were infertile and trying to conceive. Attitudes varied from woman to woman and in the same individual over their life course. Some believed that they were not likely to be capable, but most aspired to be successful mothers. Conclusions Women’s drug use should not automatically be associated with an inability to make informed health care choices or to care for children. Evidence suggests that women who use drugs do not need to be paid to limit or end their fertility. Rather, programs that aim to reduce barriers to obtaining free, non-discriminating reproductive advice and parenting assistance would better utilise women’s agency to improve their own reproductive health. PMID:24405890

  6. Factors affecting contraceptive use in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, N; Ringheim, K

    1996-01-01

    This study postulates that contraceptive use in Pakistan is affected by the usual demographic factors as well as husband-wife communication, female autonomy, son preference, religious beliefs, and family planning service supply. Analysis is based on data obtained from the Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey of 1990-91. Findings indicate that 74% of women never talked in the past year with their husbands about family planning. Almost 60% believed that family size was "up to God." About 47% knew where to obtain contraception; only 20.4% had easy access to a source of supplies. Current use was 14% and ever use was 22.4%. Analysis is based on three basic models. Model 1 includes the control variables and son preference. Model 2 includes husband-wife communication, religious attitudes, and female autonomy. Model 3 includes the addition of family planning to model 2 variables. Urban residence increases the odds of contraceptive use considerably only in Model 1. The influence of urban residence in the other models is reduced. Husband's education is significant only in Models 1 and 2 and insignificant in Model 3 when the family planning variable is included. Increased women's age is also insignificant in Model 3. Of the supply factors in Model 3, knowledge of a source and easy access to a source were highly significant, while mass media exposure was not important. Knowledge of a source was the most important predictor. Model 3 explained 90% of use. Among urban women, lack of husband-wife communication and fatalistic beliefs reduce the log-odds of contraceptive use. For rural women, age and women's secondary education were key predictors. Findings confirm that demographic and socio-cultural factors affect contraceptive use in Pakistan. All the theorized variables exerted a strong influence on contraceptive use, which can be counteracted by improved supply and service strategies. PMID:12292564

  7. Contraceptive problems unique to the United States.

    PubMed

    Tyrer, L B; Salas, J E

    1989-06-01

    An overview of the distinctive milieu regarding contraceptive methods available in the U.S. considers declining method options, future prospects, reasons for the poor current climate, factors affecting future options, global ramifications, and proposed reforms that may improve the U.S. situation. In the last 3 years, the U.S. lost 3 safe IUDs, and lawsuits now threaten the existence of both spermicides and their associated barrier methods. Meanwhile 2 new IUDs and the cervical cap have been introduced. Future possible methods include Norplant, transdermal patches and a disposable spermicide-releasing diaphragm. The chief reason for loss of contraceptives is the legal system in the U.S. which permits peer juries to evaluate a method's side effects relative to the claimant's former health, rather than actual risk- benefit ratios or medical data. Adverse legal decisions have escalated or eliminated liability insurance. The public is ignorant of the benefits of contraceptives, but misinformed by prominent coverage in the media of preliminary adverse findings. Even the F.D.A., for unstated political reasons, has failed on 2 occasions to approve Depo-Provera, used safely in over 80 countries and approved by the drug agencies of most western nations. Other political factors have cut government funding for contraceptive development steadily for 15 years. Apathy for contraceptive research extends from congress to donor support to numbers of new Ph.D.s entering the field. Ramifications include the highest unplanned pregnancy rate, abortion rate and adolescent pregnancy rate in the developed world in the U.S., and a suspicious stance on the part of developed countries toward U.S. contraceptives, especially those not approved here. Proposed ways of reversing the legal and insurance blocks include reform of tort law and no-fault compensation decided by arbitration. PMID:2743644

  8. Postcoital contraception. Has its day come?

    PubMed

    Narrigan, D

    1994-01-01

    Although postcoital contraception might aid in reducing the occurrence of some unintended pregnancies, it is seldom used. This review summarizes the development of postcoital methods, focusing on the Yuzpe regimen, the most widely used emergency contraceptive in the United States. The article discusses its mechanism of action, safety, side effects, and effectiveness. Reasons for its limited use are discussed, as are recent findings that RU 486 may be a superior postcoital agent. Finally, a protocol for integrating the Yuzpe method into nurse-midwifery practice is presented. PMID:7830144

  9. Oral contraceptives in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Helvaci, N; Yildiz, B O

    2014-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder of women of reproductive age and combined oral contraceptives (OCs) are often the first-line treatment of the syndrome by improving hyperandrogenism and regulating menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives have some cardiovascular and metabolic effects that varies among different formulations depending upon the dose and type of the both estrogen and progestin components. These cardiometabolic effects of OCs raise some concerns about their long-term use in PCOS, but available data suggest that the benefits outweigh the risks. More studies are needed to clarify the safety of long-term use of OCs in PCOS. PMID:25003228

  10. Hormonal contraceptives and travel to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Linda E

    2015-03-01

    Women frequently ask about the safety and efficacy of using hormonal contraception (HC), either oral contraceptive pills (OC) or other forms, when traveling to high altitude locales. What are the risks and benefits of using HC at high altitude? Does HC affect acclimatization, exercise performance, or occurrence of acute mountain sickness? This article reviews current data regarding the risks and benefits of HC at high altitude, both demonstrated and theoretical, with the aim of helping health care providers to advise women traveling above 2500 meters. Most healthy women can safely use HC when traveling to high altitude, but should be aware of the potential risks and inconveniences. PMID:25759908

  11. European perspectives on regional estimates of standing water bodies and the relevance of man-made ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasmaa, Jaanus; Bartout, Pascal; Marzecova, Agata; Touchart, Laurent; Koff, Tiiu; Choffel, Quentin; Kapanen, Galina; Maleval, Véronique; Millot, Camille; Qsair, Zoubida; Vandel, Egert

    2015-04-01

    Until recently, the small water bodies have been disregarded in the environmental management and protection policies. For example, the European Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC proposes the threshold surface area of water bodies for typology and reporting as 50 ha. The inventories on state level or scientific studies took into account smaller water bodies (e.g. <10 ha for Meybeck, 1995, <1 ha for Rjanžin, 2005, or <0.05 ha for Kuusisto and Raatikainen, 1988) but these methods of estimations has been region-specific and not suitable for global estimates. The increasing awareness about the important roles that terrestrial standing water bodies play in the biodiversity or hydrological and biogeochemical cycles has facilitated new global and regional inventories of lakes and water bodies. Although with differences in the total counts and in the statistical estimates of abundance-size relationship, these recent global estimates reveal the quantitative importance of the terrestrial standing water bodies in the global hydrology (Downing et al., 2006; Verpoorter et al., 2014). Yet, our analysis of the abundance and distribution EU water bodies suggest that these global counts underrepresents the hydrologically complex terrain of the European territory. One of the main limits is the high cutoff limit that excludes small water bodies below ~0.2 ha. For example, in France, Bartout and Touchart (2013) report that including water bodies below 0.01 ha in the estimates resulted in 16 times higher number of water bodies with the surface area one-third higher than officially registered inventories. Also, in Estonia, the water bodies with a surface area below 1 ha are almost 50 times more abundant than those above 1 ha and 92% of all standing water bodies are smaller than 0.2 ha. Using the OpenStreetMap database we will discuss the differences between global inventories and EU-level analysis. We will show the alternative regional estimates of water bodies with the surface size

  12. Honduran women received no written information on contraceptive pill.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    In the period 1989-1994, Honduran women participating in the Project Health Sector 2 have been exposed to a contraceptive mini-pill, Ovrette. The Institute of Honduran Social Security (IHSS) approved the program (in which Ovrette distribution is included) in May 1990. The program is partly funded by the Population Council, which is funded by USAID Registry with the Department of Health was not required under the Health Code since Ovrette had entered the country as a donation. In June 1993, a Commission of the Honduran Medical Association reported that the women were not given any written information on the drug. Ovrette is an oral contraceptive manufactured by Wyeth. Its active ingredient is a progestagen, Norgestrel. Contraindications for Ovrette include: non-lactating women who exhibit side-effects such as dizziness, water retention, migraine, etc.; non-lactating women with contraindications for estrogen; lactating women who reject other contraceptive drugs. The US Pharmacopeia and the US Food and Drug Administration do not authorize the drug for use by lactating women. As with other progestagens, Norgestrel passes through to the mother's milk. In 1993, the US Pharmacopeia reported that these hormones can cause harmful effects to the child, and recommended switching medications or discontinuation of lactation. In 1983, the WHO expressed concern about the possibility of injury caused by the progestagens. The possibilities included alterations to personality, behavior, anatomy of sexual organs, reproductive capacity, immunological function and development of neoplasia. Possible damages in puberty or during the reproductive age are not known since there is no study of exposed children that are older than 12 years of age. PMID:12318716

  13. Effects of menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptives on alertness, cognitive performance, and circadian rhythms during sleep deprivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. P. Jr; Badia, P.; Czeisler, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The influence of menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptive use on neurobehavioral function and circadian rhythms were studied in healthy young women (n = 25) using a modified constant routine procedure during 24 h of sleep deprivation. Alertness and performance worsened across sleep deprivation and also varied with circadian phase. Entrained circadian rhythms of melatonin and body temperature were evident in women regardless of menstrual phase or oral contraceptive use. No significant difference in melatonin levels, duration, or phase was observed between women in the luteal and follicular phases, whereas oral contraceptives appeared to increase melatonin levels. Temperature levels were higher in the luteal phase and in oral contraceptive users compared to women in the follicular phase. Alertness on the maintenance of wakefulness test and some tests of cognitive performance were poorest for women in the follicular phase especially near the circadian trough of body temperature. These observations suggest that hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle and the use of oral contraceptives contribute to changes in nighttime waking neurobehavioral function and temperature level whereas these factors do not appear to affect circadian phase.

  14. A cheaper, faster, better way to detect water of hydration on Solar System bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilas, Faith

    1994-01-01

    The 3.0-micrometers water of hydration absorption feature observed in the IR photometry of many low-albedo and some medium-albedo asteroids strongly correlates with the 0.7-micrometers Fe(+2) to Fe(+3) oxidized iron absorption feature observed in narrowband spectrophotometry of these asteroids. Using this relationship, an empirical algorithm for predicting the presence of water of hydration in the surface material of a Solar System body using photometry obtained through the Eight-Color Asteroid Survey nu (0.550 micrometers), w (0.701 micrometers), and x (0.853 micrometers) filters was developed and applied to the ECAS photometry of asteroids and outer planet satellites. The percentage of objects in low-albedo, outer main-belt asteroid classes that test positively for water of hydration increases from P to B to C to G class and correlates linearly with the increasing mean albedos of those objects testing positively. The medium-albedo M-class asteroids do not test positively in large number using this algorithm. Aqueously altered asteroids dominate the Solar System population between heliocentric distances of 2.6 to 3.5 AU, bracketing the Solar System region where the aqueous alteration mechanism operated most strongly. One jovian satellite, J VI Himalia, and one saturnian satellite. Phoebe, tested positively for water of hydration, supporting the hypothesis that these may be captured C-class asteroids from a postaccretional dispersion. The proposed testing technique could be applied to an Earth-based survey of asteroids or a space-probe study of an asteroid's surface characteristic in order to identify a potential water source.

  15. Retting of jute grown in arsenic contaminated area and consequent arsenic pollution in surface water bodies.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Aparajita; Bairagya, M D; Basu, B; Gupta, P C; Sarkar, S

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity of ground water in Bengal delta is a major environmental catastrophe. Cultivation of jute, a non edible crop after summer rice usually reduces arsenic load of the soil. However, during retting of jute As is present in the crop and thus increase its amount in surface water bodies. To test this hypothesis, a study was carried out in ten farmers' field located in As affected areas of West Bengal, India. As content of soil and variou the jute plant were recorded on 35 and 70 days after sowing (DAS) as well as on harvest date (110 DAS). During the study period, due to the influence of rainfall, As content of surface (0-150 mm) soil fluctuates in a narrow range. As content of jute root was in the range of 1.13 to 9.36 mg kg(-1). As content of both root and leaf attained highest concentration on 35 DAS and continuously decreased with the increase in crop age. However, in case of shoot, the As content initially decreased by 16 to 50% during 35 to 70 DAS and on 110 DAS the value slightly increased over 70 DAS. Retting of jute in pond water increased the water As content by 0.2 to 2.0 mg L(-1). The increment was 1.1 to 4 times higher over the WHO safe limit (0.05 mg L(-1)) for India and Bangladesh. Microbiological assessment in this study reveals the total bacterial population of pre and post retting pond water. Bacterial strains capable in transforming more toxic As-III to less toxic AS-V were screened and six of them were selected based on their As tolerance capacity. Importantly, identified bacterial strain Bacterium C-TJ19 (HQ834294) has As transforming ability as well as pectinolytic activity, which improves fibre quality of jute. PMID:23178784

  16. Probing Microbial Activity in a Perched Water Body Located in a Deep Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Y.; Taylor, J. L.; Henriksen, J. R.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Hubbard, S. S.; Spycher, N.; Weathers, T. S.; Ginn, T. R.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Smith, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    Waste releases to the vadose zone are a legacy of past activities at a number of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), 90Sr has been detected in perched water bodies underlying the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) facility. Microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) using urea-hydrolyzing microbes is one proposed approach for immobilization of 90Sr in the subsurface. The sequestration mechanism is co-precipitation in calcite, promoted by the production of carbonate alkalinity from ureolysis. In order to assess the potential efficacy of MICP at INTEC a field study was conducted at the INL Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP). The VZRP is located approximately 3 km from INTEC and shares many of the same hydrologic and lithologic features but in a non-contaminated setting. We conducted experiments over two field seasons in a perched water body located approximately 15 meters below land surface, using a 5-spot wellfield design. During the first season amendments (molasses and urea) were injected into the central well and water was extracted from two wells on either side, located along a diagonal. Water samples were characterized for microbial abundance, ureolytic activity and ureC gene numbers, along with solution composition. Before, during and after the injections cross-borehole geophysical imaging was performed, using various combinations of the available wells. During the second field season in situ static experiments were conducted to specifically characterize attached and unattached microbial communities, using surrogate substrates colonized during a 12 week incubation. Based on the field data a first order in situ urea hydrolysis rate constant of 0.034 d-1 was estimated. This was more than an order of magnitude higher than rate constants estimated above-ground using water samples, suggesting that attached microorganisms were responsible for >90% of the observed urea hydrolysis activity. The

  17. Aqueous Alteration on Ordinary Chondrite Parent Bodies- The Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Water.O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L.; Franchi, I. A.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    2003-04-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that aqueous alteration has been a major process on meteorite parent bodies. Understanding the details of such processes can be greatly improved by a knowledge of the isotopic composition of water taking part in aqueous alteration. Studies of the unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (1, 2) have identified the presence of phyllosilicates which necessarily require reaction with water in some form. Using the technique of (3) we have measured the oxygen isotopic composition of water extracted from Semarkona and Bishunpur from room temp to 900^oC. Water release profiles generally define large low temperature peaks that tail off to about 800^oC, with smaller releases superimposed. This is consistent with the main hydrated mineral present being a smectite but with contributions from other hydrated phases. Isotopic compositions at different temperatures allow identification of water originating from distinct reservoirs within the samples, including both terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources. That at low temperatures is dominated by terrestrial water while that released at high temperatures contains a large proportion indigenous to the meteorite. In Semarkona the highest temperature releases originating from O-H structural groups within hydrated minerals possesses a positive Δ17O of ˜+2.4 ppm, in excess of twice that measured in the silicate phases of these meteorites and greater than that measured in any carbonaceous chondrites. These results suggest that during reaction with solid phases water, originally with a Δ17O value equal to or in excess that measured in magnetites ˜+6 ppm (4), must have evolved to lower values after magnetite formation. However, the final water composition, represented by the structural O-H groups, did not achieve isotopic equilibrium with the surrounding phases. Refs: [1] Hutchison R. et al. (1987) GCA 51, 1875-1882. [2] Alexander C. M. O'D. et al. (1989) EPSL 95, 187-207. [3] Baker L. et al. (2002) Anal

  18. Design of a decision tool for hydromorphological restoration of water bodies in Walloon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambot, Francis; de Le Court, Bernard; Petit, François; Hallot, Eric; Peeters, Alexandre; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Verniers, Gisèle; Latli, Adrien

    2010-05-01

    The pilot project WALPHY (LIFE + Environment LIFE07 ENV/B/000038, UE-funded) develops a structured approach aiming at improving hydromorphological quality of the upstream Meuse basin in order to achieve the "good ecological status" required by the Water Framework Directive (WFD 2000/60). It began in January 2009 for a period of 5 years. River's biological recovery needs the recovery of river's structure and physical dynamics. Returning to "good ecological status" inevitably involves physical restoration of affected rivers. Physical component of aquatic environment acts as a limiting factor for their functioning. Three types of modification are key obstacles for river good ecological status: (i) fluxes alteration (discharge, sedimentation…), (ii) forms alteration (uniform facies…) and (iii) biotopes access alteration (lateral connections breaks, modification of the continuity upstream/downstream…). Therefore hydromorphology is needed to implement the WFD. To respond to this legal necessity, we develop a unique, useful and suitable methodology in Walloon Region to determine and schedule river physical quality restoration works. This methodology has been applied on 3 "risk water bodies". The works are based on two axes : longitudinal continuity and transversal continuity. The two first selected water bodies (Bocq river, eastern tributary of the Meuse) seem to be convenient for the restoration works which concern the longitudinal continuity due to the presence of dams and other obstacles usually between 1 and 3 m high. These works consist in dam management (weir removal or fish passage) taking into account hydromorphological (bedload transport) and biological (invertebrate or fish species free movement) impacts. The third water bodies (Eau Blanche river, western tributary of the Meuse) presents straightened rivers with artificial banks, witch consequently own bad connections between the stream and its floodplain. This water bodies should therefore be appropriated

  19. Novel isolation of water-soluble polysaccharides from the fruiting bodies of Pleurotus ostreatus mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Irene; García-Lafuente, Ana; Guillamón, Eva; Villares, Ana

    2012-09-01

    Novel water-soluble polysaccharides have been isolated from the fruiting bodies of the edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus. Three polysaccharide fractions were obtained by ethanol precipitation from cold water, hot water and hot aqueous NaOH extracts. The fractions were purified by size exclusion chromatography showing a unique carbohydrate occurring in each fraction: PC from the cold fraction, PH from the hot fraction and PB from the hot aqueous NaOH fraction. The analysis of the methylated alditol acetates and the NMR studies revealed that all the polysaccharides displayed a linear backbone. PC was formed by α-(1→3),(1→6)-linked galactopyranosyl residues whereas PH and PB consisted of glucose-linked units. PH was exclusively composed of glucopyranosyl units bound by α-(1→4) linkages whereas PB was a β-linked glucan showing (1→3) and (1→6) glycosidic bonds. The analysis of molecular arrangement by complexation with Congo red showed that only the β-linked polysaccharide (PB) displayed a triple helix conformation. PMID:22824506

  20. Body water handling in response to hypertonic-saline induced diuresis in fasting northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wade, Charles E.; Ortiz, C. Leo

    2003-01-01

    During natural fasting conditions in postweaned northern elephant seal (NES) (Mirounga angustirostris) pups, urinary water loss is minimized and percent total body water (TBW) is maintained constant. However, following infusion of hypertonic saline, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine output increased in fasting pups. Therefore, we quantified the magnitude of the hypernatremia-induced diuresis relative to the animal's total body water (TBW) pool and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed. Following a 24 h control period, naturally fasting NES pups (n=7) were infused (4 ml min(-1)) with hypertonic saline (16.7%) at a dose of 3 mmol NaCl kg(-1) body mass. Total body water was estimated prior to infusion by tritium dilution, GFR was estimated by standard creatinine clearance, and urine output (V) was measured for 24 h during the control and post infusion periods. Percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was calculated as (1-(V/GFR))x100. Twenty-four hours following the infusion, GFR (control: 69+/-12 ml min(-1) and post-infusion: 118+/-19 ml min(-1); mean+/-S.E.) increased 77+/-28% above control and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was decreased 0.4+/-0.1%. The increase in urine output (control: 218+/-47 ml d(-1) and post-infusion: 883+/-92 ml d(-1)) accounted for 1.7+/-0.2% of the pups' TBW. The hypernatremia-induced diuresis was accompanied by the loss of body water indicating the lack of water retention. Although the 77% increase in GFR was only associated with a 0.4% decrease in the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed, this decrease was significant enough to result in a 4-fold increase in urine output. Despite the observed diuresis, fasting NES pups appear to possess an efficient water recycling mechanism requiring only a small percentage of body water to excrete an excess salt load. This water recycling mechanism may allow pups to avoid negative perturbations in body water as they initiate feeding in a marine environment following the

  1. Effect of a School-Based Water Intervention on Child Body Mass Index and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Leardo, Michele; Aneja, Siddhartha; Elbel, Brian

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Decreasing the amount of caloric beverages consumed and simultaneously increasing water consumption is important to promoting child health and decreasing the prevalence of childhood obesity. OBJECTIVE To estimate the impact of water jets (electrically cooled, large clear jugs with a push lever for fast dispensing) on standardized body mass index, overweight, and obesity in elementary school and middle school students. Milk purchases were explored as a potential mechanism for weight outcomes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This quasi-experimental study used a school-level database of cafeteria equipment deliveries between the 2008-2009 and 2012-2013 and included a sample of 1227 New York, New York, public elementary schools and middle schools and the 1 065 562 students within those schools. INTERVENTION Installation of water jets in schools. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Individual body mass index (BMI) was calculated for all students in the sample using annual student-level height and weight measurements collected as part of New York’s FITNESSGRAM initiative. Age- and sex-specific growth charts produced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used to categorize students as overweight and obese. The hypothesis that water jets would be associated with decreased standardized BMI, overweight, and obesity was tested using a difference-in-difference strategy, comparing outcomes for treated and nontreated students before and after the introduction of a water jet. RESULTS This study included 1 065 562 students within New York City public elementary schools and middle schools. There was a significant effect of water jets on standardized BMI, such that the adoption of water jets was associated with a 0.025 (95% CI, −0.038 to −0.011) reduction of standardized BMI for boys and a 0.022 (95% CI, −0.035 to −0.008) reduction of standardized BMI for girls (P < .01). There was also a significant effect on being overweight. Water jets were

  2. Weight reduction, fertility and contraception.

    PubMed

    Van Der Spuy, Z M; Jacobs, H S

    1983-10-01

    The significance of weight and body composition with regard to the fertile menstrual cycle has excited much interest. There is global imbalance of resources and problems of widespread chronic malnutrition in many 3rd world countries. This emphasizes the great importance of the possible effects of diet, body weight, and body composition on fecundity (ability to reproduce), fertility (reproductive performance), and pregnancy outcome. Frisch and Revelle suggested that a critical body weight is required for a girl to progress through puberty, menstruate, and finally develop ovulatory cycles. They postulated a direct relationship between weight and menarche and suggested that before menarche will occur at least 17% of the body weight needs to be made up of fat. The Frisch hypothesis is not universally accepted, and it seems highly unlikely that a single age unrelated body weight is always the trigger for menarche. Many of the data used in Frische's original studies were derived rather than directly observed. It seems likely that both body weight and composition are important and that the peripheral conversion of androgens to estrogens in fat plays a role in pubertal development, but the actual signal whcih triggers the hypothalamic events leading eventually through puberty to menstruation and ovulation remains unkown. Acute malnutrition, as seen during famine, is assoicated with a dramatic decrease in fertility. It is usually secondary to amenorrhea and annovulation. In developing countries weight related amenorrhea and delayed menarche are largely the result of nutritonal deprivation and the demands of lactation on women of boderline body weight, but a different pattern is seen in Western countries. The outstanding example of weight reduction resulting in infertility is seen in patients with anorexia nervosa. These women have extreme self imposed weight loss, a distorted perception of their body image, and disturbance in their attitude towards their feelings of hunger

  3. Tectonics of icy satellites driven by melting and crystallization of water bodies inside their ice shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Stephanie Ann

    Enceladus and Europa are icy satellites that currently support bodies of liquid water in the outer solar system Additionally, they show signs of being geologically active. Developing numerical models informed by observations of these icy satellites allows for the development of additional constraints and an improved understanding of the tectonics and evolution of icy satellites. The formation mechanisms for both chaos and ridges on Europa are thought to involve water as albedo changes observed in association with them imply the deposition of salt-rich water near these features. Ridges are the most ubiquitous feature on Europa and are described as central troughs flanked by two raised edifices, range in height from tens to hundreds of meters. Europan ridges can extend hundreds of km continuously along strike but are only about 2 km across. A model of a crystallizing dike--like water intrusion is able to match the overall morphology of ridges, and is consistent the long continuous strike. However, the intrusion of a large volume of water is required to match the most common heights of the ridges. Chaos on Europa is defined as a large area of disrupted ice that contain blocks of pre-existing material separated by a hummocky matrix. A proposed mechanism for the formation of Chaos is that a region of heterogeneous ice within the shell is melted and then recrystallizes. Comparing the model results with the geology of Thera Macula, a region where it has been proposed that Chaos is currently forming, suggests that additional processes may be needed to fully understand the development of Chaos. Water-rich plumes erupt from the south pole of Enceladus, suggesting the presence of a pressurized water reservoir. If a pressurized sea is located beneath the south polar terrain, its geometry and size in the ice shell would contribute to the stress state in the ice shell. The geometry and location of such an ocean, as well as the boundary conditions and thickness of an ice shell

  4. Increasing the effectiveness of contraceptive usage in university students.

    PubMed

    ní Riain, A

    1998-09-01

    Prevention of pregnancy requires correct and consistent use of an effective method of contraception and knowledge alone is not sufficient to ensure such use, as many complex social and behavioral factors influence contraceptive behavior. Women are particularly likely to change their contraceptive method after a contraceptive 'shock'. In this study, the change in contraceptive behavior of a group of university students who presented for emergency contraception is studied. Each student participated in a single individualized educational session. A total of 465 women requested emergency contraception in a 3.5-year period at a large student health center. Of these, 24% had not previously used contraception, 50% had previously used condoms and 25% had taken the pill (COC). Of those who usually used condoms, 79% had had a condom accident and 21% had not used them at the last intercourse. Only 30% of COC users had had a problem with the pill and the remaining 70% were not taking it at the time of last intercourse, for social rather than medical reasons. Follow-up is available for 309 (66.5%). Paired-sample analysis of these women shows a decrease in the number using no contraception (22% to 8%), and an increase in the number using COCs (33% to 66%). These changes reached statistical significance (p < 0.0001). University students, despite their intelligence, exhibit a high degree of risk-taking behavior but become more effective contraceptive users after an interactive counselling session following a contraceptive scare. PMID:9853203

  5. Hybrid Wing Body Model Identification Using Forced-Oscillation Water Tunnel Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Vicroy, Dan D.; Kramer, Brian; Kerho, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Static and dynamic testing of the NASA 0.7 percent scale Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) configuration was conducted in the Rolling Hills Research Corporation water tunnel to investigate aerodynamic behavior over a large range of angle-of-attack and to develop models that can predict aircraft response in nonlinear unsteady flight regimes. This paper reports primarily on the longitudinal axis results. Flow visualization tests were also performed. These tests provide additional static data and new dynamic data that complement tests conducted at NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. HWB was developed to support the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project goals of lower noise, emissions, and fuel burn. This study also supports the NASA Aviation Safety Program efforts to model and control advanced transport configurations in loss-of-control conditions.

  6. Investigating the Thermal Effects of Water on the Differentiation of Large Proto-planetary Bodies in the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskovitz, N. A.; Gaidos, E.

    2008-12-01

    Arguments regarding the origin of iron meteorite parent bodies suggest that they accreted and differentiated in the inner Solar System amongst the material that would ultimately become the terrestrial planets (Bottke et al. 2006). Results from high-precision W isotopic measurements (Markowski et al. 2006) suggest that these parent bodies experienced metal-silicate segregation no later that 1 Myr after CAI formation, making them some of the earliest solid bodies to have formed. However, there is considerable uncertainty regarding the water content of proto-planetary material that originated in the terrestrial planet region of the Solar System. Planetesimal formation in an optically thick dust disk may have resulted in bodies with water contents as high as 50% by mass (Machida & Abe 2006), whereas trends in the water contents of carbonaceous, ordinary and enstatite chondrites as a function of heliocentric distance suggest that the terrestrial planets formed from anhydrous material with water mass fractions of ~ 0.001% (Raymond et al. 2004). A possible range of four orders of magnitude in the initial water content of planetesimals in the inner Solar System would clearly influence the thermal evolution of these bodies: water acts as a thermal buffer due to its high heat capacity and could cause significant exo- and endothermic water-rock reactions (Cohen & Coker 2000). We will present thermal evolution calculations to investigate the effect of water on the timescales of differentiation for large (~100-1000 km size) proto-planetary bodies. The initial temperatures of these bodies will be set to that of the ambient solar nebula (~180 K) and their initial compositions will be assumed to be a mixture of water ice and silicates. The temperature evolution will primarily be dictated by the decay of short-lived radioactive isotopes like 26Al (Grimm & McSween 1993), which will be the dominant heat source for time scales of several half-lives (~3 Myr). Particular attention will

  7. Antioxidant properties in some selected cyanobacteria isolated from fresh water bodies of Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Fuad; Ratnayake, R R; Meerajini, Kirisnashamy; Wasantha Kumara, K L

    2016-09-01

    Phytonutrients and pigments present in cyanobacteria act as antioxidants, which facilitate the formation of body's defense mechanism against free radical damage to cells. The aim of this investigation was to study the total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), antioxidant activity, phycobiliproteins (PBPs), and active compounds in four cyanobacterial species, that is, Oscillatoria sp., Lyngbya sp., Microcystis sp., and Spirulina sp. isolated from fresh water bodies of Sri Lanka. In this study, Lyngbya sp., showed highest TPC (5.02 ± 0.20 mg/g), TFC (664.07 ± 19.76 mg/g), and total PBPs (127.01 mg/g) value. The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) was recorded highest in Oscillatoria sp. (39.63 ± 7.02), whereas the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity was also reported the highest in Oscillatoria sp. (465.31 ± 25.76) followed by Lyngbya sp. (248.39 ± 11.97). In FTIR spectroscopy, Lyngbya sp. does not show any N-H stretching band which is ultimately responsible for the inhibition of antioxidant activity. The study revealed that Lyngbya sp. and Oscillatoria sp. can be an excellent source for food, pharmaceutical, and other industrial uses. PMID:27625779

  8. The Current Status of Oral Contraceptives: Progress and Recent Innovations.

    PubMed

    Golobof, Alexandra; Kiley, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    Millions of women in the United States and abroad use oral contraceptive pills. These popular contraceptives are the most common reversible birth control method in the United States, and a wide variety of pills are available for prescription. Oral contraceptives provide safe and effective protection against pregnancy and offer several noncontraceptive benefits. Over the years, advances in the laboratory and knowledge gained through epidemiologic data promoted the development of new contraceptive preparations. Generations of oral contraceptives emerged over time, containing lower doses of estrogens and new and novel progestins. The current review discusses the clinical characteristics of oral contraceptives, with emphasis on basic pharmacology and the evolution of various contraceptive formulations and regimens. PMID:26960906

  9. Emergency contraception: a second chance at preventing adolescent unintended pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gold, M A

    1997-08-01

    Adolescent pregnancy challenges the United States and Europe. For most sexually active adolescents, pregnancy is unintended. Emergency contraception, also called the "morning-after treatment" or postcoital contraception is a way to prevent pregnancy after unprotected intercourse. In February 1997, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of certain oral contraceptive pills for emergency contraception. There are currently six brands of pills marketed in the United States that can be prescribed to, conform to the FDA-approved regimen. When emergency contraceptive pills are initiated within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse, they reduce the risk of pregnancy by 75%. Contraindications are the same as those used for ongoing contraceptive pills. The most common side effects are nausea, vomiting, menstrual disturbances, breast tenderness, abdominal cramping, dizziness, headache, and mood changes. Routinely counseling all adolescents about emergency contraceptive pills and increasing access to them can give adolescents a second chance at preventing pregnancy. PMID:9300185

  10. Contraceptive choice and patient compliance. The health care provider's challenge.

    PubMed

    Branden, P S

    1998-01-01

    Contraceptive compliance is a multifaceted issue that is influenced by many factors. These factors can directly affect the level of patient compliance, thereby affecting contraceptive method efficacy rates. A review of the literature reveals many studies about contraceptive compliance but a dearth of studies addressing how to change noncompliant behaviors. This article describes the contraceptive methods currently available and their efficacy rates. Patient characteristics and the components of compliance are described as they affect contraceptive efficacy and patient care. Suggestions are made for the use of alternative terminology to include adherence to or continuance of a contraceptive method. Health care providers should realize the impact they can have on a patient's education, decision-making process, and ultimate compliance with a contraceptive method. It is the patient, however, who ultimately makes the decision, either actively or passively, to comply or not and whether to have an unplanned pregnancy. PMID:9871380

  11. Physiologic and psychologic symptoms associated with use of injectable contraception and 20 µg oral contraceptive pills

    PubMed Central

    Berenson, Abbey B.; Odom, Susan D.; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen; Rahman, Mahbubur

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare menstrual, physiologic, and psychologic symptoms over 2 years among women initiating use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate or an oral contraceptive pill with a reduced pill-free interval, and those not using hormonal contraception. Methods A total of 608 women reported their experience regarding 17 symptoms prior to initiating contraception and every 6 months thereafter for 24 months. Longitudinal relationships between symptoms and contraceptives were assessed after adjusting for age, visits, and baseline status of symptoms. Results Oral contraceptive pills were protective against mastalgia (OR = 0.7), cramping (OR = 0.5), hair loss (OR = 0.6), acne (OR = 0.4), nervousness (OR = 0.5), and mood swings (OR = 0.7). DMPA was protective against bloating (OR = 0.5) and mood swings (OR = 0.7), but caused weight gain (OR = 2.3), bleeding episodes >20 days (OR = 13.4), and missed periods (OR = 96.9). Both methods caused intermenstrual bleeding. Conclusion Evidence-based data regarding beneficial and adverse symptoms associated with these methods may help clinicians counsel patients appropriately prior to contraceptive initiation. PMID:18599013

  12. The strategic approach to contraceptive introduction.

    PubMed

    Simmons, R; Hall, P; Díaz, J; Díaz, M; Fajans, P; Satia, J

    1997-06-01

    The introduction of new contraceptive technologies has great potential for expanding contraceptive choice, but in practice, benefits have not always materialized as new methods have been added to public-sector programs. In response to lessons from the past, the UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction (HRP) has taken major steps to develop a new approach and to support governments interested in its implementation. After reviewing previous experience with contraceptive introduction, the article outlines the strategic approach and discusses lessons from eight countries. This new approach shifts attention from promotion of a particular technology to an emphasis on the method mix, the capacity to provide services with quality of care, reproductive choice, and users' perspectives and needs. It also suggests that technology choice should be undertaken through a participatory process that begins with an assessment of the need for contraceptive introduction and is followed by research and policy and program development. Initial results from Bolivia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Chile, Myanmar, South Africa, Vietnam, and Zambia confirm the value of the new approach. PMID:9216029

  13. Emergency contraception pill--controversies and use.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, C; Sivalingam, N

    2007-03-01

    Emergency contraceptive pills (ECP) are effective, safe and cheap, with profound global health and economic benefits. Patient education and easy access to ECP will contribute immensely to avoiding unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions. Issues related to morality, its perceived status as an abortifacient and harmful behaviour should it be easily available, has limited the widespread use of ECP in many countries. PMID:17682587

  14. Feminine Stereotype and the Use of Contraceptives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Myra L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A sex-role stereotype questionnaire was administered to 67 females who were either (a) consistent users of contraceptives, (b) inconsistent users, (c) nonusers, or (d) virgins. No differences were found between the four groups for the feminine items; however, significant differences were obtained for the masculine items. (Author)

  15. [Abortifacient effect of hormonal contraceptives: a review].

    PubMed

    Agulles Simó, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Most of the scientific community, as well as in a sector of international Law, when referring to the unborn embryo, pregnancy must be defined as the period extending from implantation to natural birth. This implies some novelty, such as the redefinition of abortion as the elimination of the embryo only within this period, and the extension of contraception to any means that impedes the union of the gametes as a consequence of a sexual intercourse, or also that which eliminates the product of conception prior to its implantation. Therefore, the pharmaceutical industry markets, under the name of contraceptives, products that act also by means of an anti-implantation mechanism. This fact has great ethical implications regarding the respect for the embryo which require a reflection on the moral valuation of the prescription, dispensation and use of these means. One may ask: which of the contraceptive means actually present in the market include an anti-implantation effect? What mechanisms contribute to their pharmacological action and in what measure do they do this? This is what we have studied in this article, based on the available scientific bibliography. We have basically fulfilled a double objective: updating and completing the studies -few, partial or distant in time- that had this same subject matter; and offering a moral valuation on the use of hormonal contraceptives that may have an anti-implantation effect, from the point of view of the respect due to the embryonic life. PMID:26030015

  16. [Male contraception - the current state of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmynt; Kasperska, Karolina; Lewandowska, Marta

    2016-08-01

    Contraception is important from a health, psychological and socioeconomic point of view. Due to the fact that male-based contraceptive methods are mostly represented by condoms and vasectomy, researchers are working on the new solutions, which could let the men be more involved in a conscious family planning. In this review we will present the current state of knowledge on this subject. There is a lot going on in the field of hormonal contraception. Studies including testosterone, progestins, synthetic androgens and other derivatives are on a different stages of clinical trials and mostly demonstrate high efficacy rates. Recent discovers of Izumo and Juno proteins, essential for the fertilization process, give hope for an easily reversible, non-hormonal method. Researchers are also trying to interfere with the process of spermatogenesis using BRDT inhibitor - JQ1, or neutralize the sperm by injecting styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) into the lumen of the vas deferens. The other studies explore processes involved in proper sperm motility. A vaccine which induces an immune response to the reproductive system is also an interesting method. The latest research use ultrasound waves and mechanical device which blocks the patency of vas deferens. The aim of the study current state of knowledge male contraception. PMID:27591451

  17. [Male contraception - the current state of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmynt; Kasperska, Karolina; Lewandowska, Marta

    2016-07-01

    Contraception is important from a health, psychological and socioeconomic point of view. Due to the fact that male-based contraceptive methods are mostly represented by condoms and vasectomy, researchers are working on the new solutions, which could let the men be more involved in a conscious family planning. In this review we will present the current state of knowledge on this subject. There is a lot going on in the field of hormonal contraception. Studies including testosterone, progestins, synthetic androgens and other derivatives are on a different stages of clinical trials and mostly demonstrate high efficacy rates. Recent discovers of Izumo and Juno proteins, essential for the fertilization process, give hope for an easily reversible, non-hormonal method. Researchers are also trying to interfere with the process of spermatogenesis using BRDT inhibitor - JQ1, or neutralize the sperm by injecting styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) into the lumen of the vas deferens. The other studies explore processes involved in proper sperm motility. A vaccine which induces an immune response to the reproductive system is also an interesting method. The latest research use ultrasound waves and mechanical device which blocks the patency of vas deferens. The aim of the study current state of knowledge male contraception. PMID:27590656

  18. Parental Involvement and Young Women's Contraceptive Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisco, Michelle L.

    2005-01-01

    Young adult women in the United States tend to delay family formation, pursue higher education and professional jobs, and become sexually active before marriage. Using effective contraception is the best way to ensure that nonmarital parenthood does not disrupt educational and career plans. Because parental involvement in education shapes…

  19. Contraception and Women with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Background: Contraception is widely prescribed to women with intellectual disabilities, yet little is known about what the women think and feel about this. One of the aims of the study was to explore what women understood and to what extent they were able to exercise choice and control. Method: Twenty-three women with mild and moderate…

  20. Benefits and risks of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Sherif, K

    1999-06-01

    The major benefits of modern low-dose oral contraceptives include relative safety and a high degree of efficacy, decreasing the need for abortion or surgical sterilization; reduced risks of bacterial (but not viral) pelvic inflammatory disease and of endometrial and ovarian cancer; improved menstrual regularity, with less dysmenorrhea and blood flow; and, when low-dose combination (not progestogen-only) oral contraceptives are used, reduced acne and hirsutism. Major risks are cardiovascular. Preliminary data from nonrandomized studies suggest that oral contraceptives containing third-generation progestogens are associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism, particularly in carriers of the coagulation factor V Leiden mutation. The risk of arterial thrombosis, such as myocardial infarction or stroke, may be directly related to estrogen dose, particularly in women who have hypertension, smoke, or are >35 years old. Considering that only users aged >/=30 years who smoke >/=25 cigarettes/d have a higher estimated mortality rate than that of pregnant women, the benefits of oral contraceptives appear to outweigh their risks. PMID:10368519

  1. [Emergency oral contraception policy: the Peruvian experience].

    PubMed

    Pretell-Zárate, Eduardo A

    2013-07-01

    Emergency oral contraception is part of the sexual and reproductive rights of women. In 2001, this health policy was incorporated into the Rules of the National Family Planning Program of the Ministry of Health, primarily to prevent unwanted pregnancy and its serious consequences, induced abortion and the high associated maternal mortality rate, which are major public health problems. Scientific research has confirmed that the main mechanism of action of levonorgestrel, component of emergency oral contraception (EOC) is to inhibit or delay ovulation, preventing fertilization of the egg; additionally, it increases the thickening of the cervical mucus, making the sperm migration more difficult. No study has found endometrial abnormalities that may interfere with the implantation of the fertilized egg or embryo development of an implanted egg. However, despite the support of medical science and legal backing, the EOC is available only to users with economic resources, but its use has not been fully implemented in public sector services, due to obstacles created by groups opposed to contraception under claim of an alleged abortive effect that has already been ruled out scientifically. This article describes the administrative experience and legal confrontations between groups of power that prevent the proper implementation of an emergency contraception policy in Peru. PMID:24100827

  2. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  3. Identifying factors linked to the occurrence of alien gastropods in isolated woodland water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyra, Aneta; Strzelec, Małgorzata

    2014-03-01

    Biological invasions are a significant component of human-caused global change and is widely regarded as one of the main threats to natural biodiversity. Isolated anthropogenic water bodies created in the areas that are deprived of natural freshwater habitats allow the survival and reproduction of alien species on newly settled sites. They are often small with water level fluctuations causing frequent environmental disturbances. The colonisation success may be the result of the rate of their degradation. The aims of the study were to determine the environmental conditions that affect the existence of alien species of gastropods in this type of aquatic environment and to examine whether the occurrence of non-native species affects the community structure of the native species. This study made it possible to group woodland ponds according to the occurrence of the three invasive species in snail communities and discuss the environmental conditions present in these pond types. Analysis of water properties emphasised the distinctiveness of the selected pond types. In ponds of the Potamopyrgus antipodarum type, we found the highest values of some parameters mainly hardness, conductivity, and content of calcium and chlorides, in contrast with the Physella acuta type, which were characterised by the lowest values except for phosphates and nitrites. In the Ferrissia fragilis type, we found the highest nitrate content. Data on the occurrence of alien species in different water environments play an important role in actions which are taken to prevent new invasions and spread of non-native species as well as to reduce future impacts of invaders.

  4. Identifying factors linked to the occurrence of alien gastropods in isolated woodland water bodies.

    PubMed

    Spyra, Aneta; Strzelec, Małgorzata

    2014-03-01

    Biological invasions are a significant component of human-caused global change and is widely regarded as one of the main threats to natural biodiversity. Isolated anthropogenic water bodies created in the areas that are deprived of natural freshwater habitats allow the survival and reproduction of alien species on newly settled sites. They are often small with water level fluctuations causing frequent environmental disturbances. The colonisation success may be the result of the rate of their degradation. The aims of the study were to determine the environmental conditions that affect the existence of alien species of gastropods in this type of aquatic environment and to examine whether the occurrence of non-native species affects the community structure of the native species. This study made it possible to group woodland ponds according to the occurrence of the three invasive species in snail communities and discuss the environmental conditions present in these pond types. Analysis of water properties emphasised the distinctiveness of the selected pond types. In ponds of the Potamopyrgus antipodarum type, we found the highest values of some parameters mainly hardness, conductivity, and content of calcium and chlorides, in contrast with the Physella acuta type, which were characterised by the lowest values except for phosphates and nitrites. In the Ferrissia fragilis type, we found the highest nitrate content. Data on the occurrence of alien species in different water environments play an important role in actions which are taken to prevent new invasions and spread of non-native species as well as to reduce future impacts of invaders. PMID:24504533

  5. Controlling the release of wood extractives into water bodies by selecting suitable eucalyptus species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilulya, K. F.; Msagati, T. A. M.; Mamba, B. B.; Ngila, J. C.; Bush, T.

    Pulping industries are increasing worldwide as a result of the increase in the demand for pulp for cellulose derivatives and paper manufacturing. Due to the activities involved in pulping processes, different chemicals from raw materials (wood) and bleaching agents are released in pulp-mill effluent streams discharged into the environment and find their way into water bodies. Large quantities of water and chemicals used in pulping result in large amounts of wastewater with high concentrations of extractives such as unsaturated fatty acids, which are known to be toxic, and plant sterols which affect the development, growth and reproduction of aquatic organisms. This study was aimed at assessing the composition of extractives in two eucalyptus species used for pulp production in South Africa, in order to identify the suitable species with regard to extractive content. Samples from two eucalyptus plant species (Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus dunnii) were collected from three sites and analysed for extractives by first extracting with water, followed by Soxhlet extraction using acetone. Compounds were identified and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Major classes of extractives identified were fatty acids (mainly hexadecanoic acid, 9,12-octadecadienoic, 9-octadecenoic and octadecanoic acids) and sterols (mainly β-sitosterol and stigmastanol). E. dunnii was found to contain higher amounts of the compounds compared to those found in E. grandis in all sampled sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed and explained 92.9% of the total variation using three principal components. It was revealed that the percentage of fatty acids, which has a negative influence on both principal components 2 and 3, was responsible for the difference between the species. E. grandis, which was found to contain low amounts of extractives, was therefore found suitable for pulping with regard to minimal water usage and environment pollution.

  6. Toward Chemical Accuracy in the Description of Ion-Water Interactions through Many-Body Representations. I. Halide-Water Dimer Potential Energy Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Pushp; Götz, Andreas W; Paesani, Francesco

    2016-06-14

    Despite recent progress, a unified understanding of how ions affect the structure and dynamics of water across different phases remains elusive. Here, we report the development of full-dimensional many-body potential energy functions, called MB-nrg (Many-Body-energy), for molecular simulations of halide ion-water systems from the gas phase to the condensed phase. The MB-nrg potentials are derived entirely from "first-principles" calculations carried out at the F12 explicitly correlated coupled-cluster level including single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, CCSD(T)-F12, in the complete basis set limit. Building upon the functional form of the MB-pol water potential, the MB-nrg potentials are expressed through the many-body expansion of the total energy in terms of explicit contributions representing one-body, two-body, and three-body interactions, with all higher-order contributions being described by classical induction. The specific focus of this study is on the MB-nrg two-body terms representing the full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the corresponding H2O-X(-) dimers, with X(-)= F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-). The accuracy of the MB-nrg PESs is systematically assessed through extensive comparisons with results obtained using both ab initio models and polarizable force fields for energies, structures, and harmonic frequencies of the H2O-X(-) dimers. PMID:27145081

  7. Africa-Wide Monitoring of Small Surface Water Bodies Using Multisource Satellite Data: A Monitoring System for FEWS NET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velpuri, N. M.; Senay, G. B.; Rowland, J.; Budde, M. E.; Verdin, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Continental Africa has the largest volume of water stored in wetlands, large lakes, reservoirs and rivers, yet it suffers with problems such as water availability and access. Furthermore, African countries are amongst the most vulnerable to the impact of natural hazards such as droughts and floods. With climate change intensifying the hydrologic cycle and altering the distribution and frequency of rainfall, the problem of water availability and access is bound to increase. The U.S Geological Survey Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET), funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, has initiated a large-scale project to monitor small to medium surface water bodies in Africa. Under this project, multi-source satellite data and hydrologic modeling techniques are integrated to monitor these water bodies in Africa. First, small water bodies are mapped using satellite data such as Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Landsat, and high resolution Google Earth imagery. Stream networks and watersheds for each water body are identified using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation data. Finally, a hydrologic modeling approach that uses satellite-derived precipitation estimates and evapotranspiration data calculated from global data assimilation system climate parameters is applied to model water levels. This approach has been implemented to monitor nearly 300 small water bodies located in 10 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Validation of modeled scaled depths with field-installed gauge data in East Africa demonstrated the ability of the model to capture both the spatial patterns and seasonal variations. Modeled scaled estimates captured up to 60% of the observed gauge variability with an average RMSE of 22%. Current and historic data (since 2001) on relative water level, precipitation, and evapotranspiration for each water body is made available in near real time. The water point monitoring network

  8. Contraception by the end of the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Spira, A

    1994-03-01

    Despite worldwide fertility declines, global population continues to grow. Most of the decline in fertility is due to contraceptive use, accounting for 80% of the variance in the total fertility rate between countries. Yet, some countries have much higher or lower fertility levels than countries with the same contraceptive prevalence levels, indicating that other factors also influence fertility rates. These factors are generally cultural. Africa is the only area where contraceptive prevalence is still low in most countries (e.g., 13% for Sub-Saharan Africa vs. 57% for Latin America). Use of individual contraceptive methods varies from country to country. For example, most contraceptive users in Japan use the condom, while those in India depend on female sterilization (about 75% and 75%, respectively). Between the late 1970s and the late 1980s, contraceptive prevalence increased 1 percentage point annually in 64% of all countries. In those developing countries where contraceptive prevalence rates have approached those of developed countries (e.g., Columbia and Thailand), the growth in contraceptive use is slowing. Important determinants of contraceptive use include rural/urban residence, education level, and income per capita. The difference in use rates between rural and urban areas are largely due to availability of family planning services in urban areas. Since contraceptive use plays such a significant role in fertility reduction and the slowing of population growth, improved contraception is needed worldwide, regardless of socioeconomic class. Desires of the population and not those of the scientists should be considered when developing new contraceptives. An analysis of users' needs should be done before developing new contraceptives. Such an analysis would require social and behavioral research. The approach of listening to the needs and beliefs of users should result in an increase of contraceptive use, which will benefit everyone. PMID:8006132

  9. CFTR genotype-related body water and electrolyte balance during a marathon.

    PubMed

    Del Coso, J; Lara, B; Salinero, J J; Areces, F; Ruiz-Vicente, D; Gallo-Salazar, C; Abián-Vicén, J; Cacabelos, R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of CFTR genotype on body water and electrolyte balance during a marathon. Fifty-one experienced runners completed a marathon race. Before and after the race, body mass and a sample of venous blood were obtained. During the race, sweat samples were collected using sweat patches, and fluid and electrolyte intake were obtained using self-reported questionnaires. Thirty-eight participants (74.5% of the total) were 7T/7T homozygotes, 11 (21.6%) were 7T/9T heterozygotes, and one participant presented the rare genotype 5T/7T. Another participant with 9T/9T presented the mutation p.L206W. Participants with 7T/7T showed higher sweat sodium concentrations (42.2 ± 21.6 mmol/L) than 7T/9T (29.0 ± 24.7 mmol/L; P = 0.04). The runner with the 5T/7T genotype (10.2 mmol/L) and the participant with the p.L206W mutation (20.5 mmol/L) exhibited low-range sweat sodium concentrations. However, post-race serum sodium concentration was similar in 7T/7T and 7T/9T (142.1 ± 1.3 and 142.4 ± 1.6 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.27) and did not show abnormalities in participants with the 5T/7T genotype (140.0 mmol/L) and the p.L206W mutation (143.0 mmol/L). Runners with the CFTR-7T/7T genotype exhibited increased sweat sodium concentrations during a marathon. However, this phenotype was not related with increased likelihood of suffering body water and electrolyte imbalances during real competitions. PMID:26282188

  10. Letter: Contraceptive choice and cervical cytology.

    PubMed

    Leppaluoto, P

    1974-02-15

    In the evaluation of biological potentials of contraceptives in the genesis of cervical cancer, cytology seems to have been given due attention while information on the clinical condition and specific treatment of the target organ, the cervix, is repeatedly neglected. "Cancer does not develop in a healthy cervix" is an old dogma derived from impressions gained by clinical examination of the organ. This concept is supported by epidemiologic studies indicating that cancer is extremely rare in cervices restored to a normal condition by cauterization. It may be postulated that this type of treatment destroys the permissive target cells of the cervix, thus indirectly rendering possible coitus-associated and contraceptive-associated(?) mutagen(s) invalid. Also, in comparative studies, an evaluation should be made of the significance of a higher incidence of cervical ectopy reported in women receiving oral hormonal contraceptives. The importance of ectopy in the genesis of cervical malignancy has been derived from the presumption that permissive cervical cells are thus created and exposed to vaginal contents which may harbor the mutagens(s). Therefore, it would seem not only desirable but imperative to include the neglected parameters of clinical condition and of specific treatment (both past and present) of the uterine cervix in the structure of studies like the recent one in this Journal on "Contraceptive choice and cervical cytology", by Drs. Shulman and Merritt. Still another parameter which might prove to be of significance is the predominant type of vaginal flora, which can be assessed readily in the routine examination of Papanicolaou smears. It may be that vaginal contents, which would seem to be somewhat different in wearers of the intrauterine contraceptive device as compared to "pill" users, might play a part in the advent of cervical malignancy as a medium of or for coitus-associated mutagens(s). PMID:4855868

  11. Contraceptive Hormone Use and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shufelt, Chrisandra L.; Noel Bairey Merz, C.

    2009-01-01

    Contraceptive hormones, most commonly prescribed as oral contraceptives (OC), are a widely utilized method to prevent ovulation, implantation and therefore pregnancy. The Women’s Health Initiative demonstrated cardiovascular risk linked to menopausal hormone therapy among women without pre-existing cardiovascular disease, prompting review of the safety, efficacy and side effects of other forms of hormone therapy. A variety of basic science, animal and human data suggest that contraceptive hormones have anti-atheromatous effects, however relatively less is known regarding the impact on atherosclerosis, thrombosis, vasomotion and arrhythmogenesis. Newer generation OC formulations currently in use indicate no increased myocardial infarction (MI) risk for current users, but a persistent increased risk of venous thrombo-embolism (VTE). There are no cardiovascular data available for the newest generation contraceptive hormone formulations, including those that contain newer progestins that lower blood pressure, as well as the non-oral routes (topical and vaginal). Current guidelines indicate that, as with all medication, contraceptive hormones should be selected and initiated by weighing risks and benefits for the individual patient. Women 35 years and older should be assessed for cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, smoking, diabetes, nephropathy and other vascular diseases including migraines, prior to use. Existing data are mixed with regard to possible protection from OC for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events; longer-term cardiovascular follow-up of menopausal women with regard to prior OC use, including subgroup information regarding adequacy of ovulatory cycling, the presence of hyperandrogenic conditions, and the presence of prothrombotic genetic disorders is needed to address this important issue. PMID:19147038

  12. Modeling the time-varying interaction between surface water and groundwater bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliege, Steffen; Steidl, Jörg; Lischeid, Gunnar; Merz, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The countless kettle holes (small lakes) in the Late Pleistocene landscapes of Northern Europe have important ecological and hydrological functions. On the one hand they act as depressions in which water and solutes of mainly agriculturally used catchments accumulate. On the other hand they operate as biochemical reactors with respect to greenhouse gas emissions, carbon sequestration, and as major sinks for nutrients and contaminants. Even small kettle holes often are hydraulically connected to the uppermost groundwater system: Groundwater discharges into the kettle hole on one side, and the aquifer is recharged from the kettle hole water body on the other side. Thus kettle hole biogeochemical processes are both affected by groundwater and vice versa. Groundwater flow direction and velocity into and out of the kettle hole often is not stable over time. Groundwater flow direction might reverse at the downstream part, resulting in repeated recycling of groundwater and corresponding solute turnover within the kettle holes. A sound understanding of this intricate interplay is a necessary prerequisite for better understanding of the biogeochemistry of this terrestrial-aquatic interface. A numerical experiment was used to quantify the lateral solute exchange between a kettle hole and the surrounding groundwater. A vertical cross section through the real existing catchment of a kettle hole was chosen. Glacial till represents the lower boundary. The heterogeneity of the subsurface was reproduced by various parameterizations of the soil hydraulic properties as well as varying the thickness of the unconfined aquifer or the lateral boundary conditions. In total 24 different parameterizations were implemented in the modeling software HydroGeoSphere (HGS). HGS is suitable to calculate the fluid exchange between surface and subsurface simultaneously and in a physically based way. The simulation runs were done for the period from November 1994 to October 2014. All results were

  13. Red and blue shift of liquid water's excited states: A many body perturbation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    In the present paper, accurate optical absorption spectrum of liquid H2O is calculated in the energy range of 5-20 eV to probe the nature of water's excited states by means of many body perturbation approach. Main features of recent inelastic X-ray measurements are well reproduced, such as a bound excitonic peak at 7.9 eV with a shoulder at 9.4 eV as well as the absorption maximum at 13.9 eV, followed by a broad shoulder at 18.4 eV. The spectrum is dominated by excitonic effects impacting the structures of the spectrum at low and higher energy regimes mixed by single particle effects at high energies. The exciton distribution of the low-energy states, in particular of S1, is highly anisotropic and localized mostly on one water molecule. The S1 state is essentially a HOCO-LUCO (highest occupied crystal orbital - lowest unoccupied crystal orbital) transition and of intra-molecular type, showing a localized valence character. Once the excitation energy is increased, a significant change in the character of the electronically excited states occurs, characterized through emergence of multiple quasi-particle peaks at 7.9 eV in the quasi-particle (QP) transition profile and in the occurring delocalized exciton density distribution, spread over many more water molecules. The exciton delocalization following a change of the character of excited states at around 7.9 eV causes the blue shift of the first absorption band with respect to water monomer S1. However, due to reduction of the electronic band gap from gas to liquid phase, following enhanced screening upon condensation, the localized S1 state of liquid water is red-shifted with respect to S1 state of water monomer. For higher excitations, near vertical ionization energy (11 eV), quasi-free electrons emerge, in agreement with the conduction band electron picture. Furthermore, the occurring red and blue shift of the excited states are independent of the coupling of resonant and anti-resonant contributions to the

  14. Injectable polymer microspheres enhance immunogenicity of a contraceptive peptide vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chengji; Stevens, Vernon C; Schwendeman, Steven P

    2007-01-01

    Advanced contraceptive peptide vaccines suffer from the unavailability of adjuvants capable of enhancing the antibody response with acceptable safety. We sought to overcome this limitation by employing two novel poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microsphere formulations to deliver a synthetic human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) peptide antigen co-synthesized with a T-cell epitope from tetanus toxoid (TT), C-TT2-CTP35: surface-conjugated immunogen to induce phagocytosis; and encapsulated peptide to provide a depot effect, with MgCO(3) co-encapsulated in the polymer to neutralize acidity from the biodegrading PLGA polyester. A single immunization of encapsulated peptide in rabbits elicited a stronger antibody response with equivalent duration relative to a positive control--three injections of the peptide administered in a squalene-based water-in-oil emulsion. Surface-conjugated peptide was less effective but enhanced antibody levels at 1/5 the dose, relative to soluble antigen. Most remarkable and unexpected was the finding that co-encapsulation of base was essential to attain the powerful adjuvant effect of the PLGA-MgCO(3) system, as the MgCO(3)-free microspheres were completely ineffective. A promising contraceptive hCG peptide vaccine with acceptable side effects (i.e., local tissue reactions) was achieved by minimizing PLGA and MgCO(3) doses, without significantly affecting antibody response. PMID:16996662

  15. Sugar cane vinasse in water bodies: impact assessed by liver histopathology in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Júlia Fernanda Urbano; Correia, Jorge Evangelista; Marcato, Ana Claudia de Castro; Pedro-Escher, Janaína; Fontanetti, Carmem Silvia

    2014-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are the main receptors of toxic substances from human activities. With the increase in sugar cane production, vinasse - the main residue of ethanol production - is a potential contaminant of water resources, due to its high organic matter content. This study was aimed at evaluating the toxicity of vinasse by examining the liver of the fish Oreochromis niloticus exposed to different dilutions of sugar cane vinasse (1%, 2%, 5%, 5% and 10%) in laboratory bioassays. Portions of liver were collected and fixed for histological and histochemical techniques to detect total proteins, polysaccharides and lipids. In the histological analysis, the groups treated with vinasse exhibited significant alterations, such as loss of cytoplasmic integrity, loss of cell limit and tissue disorganization. Protein and lipid profiles were not altered. Higher accumulation of polysaccharides was detected in fish exposed to lower concentrations of vinasse, with a gradual decrease in animals treated with vinasse in higher concentrations. We concluded that vinasse has a dose-dependent toxic and cytotoxic potential in water bodies and that the liver is strongly affected when acutely exposed to this contaminant. PMID:25265025

  16. [Changes of algal communities in water body with different proportions of nitrogen and phosphorus].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ling; Jin, Xiangcan; Zhong, Yuan; Zhang, Dongmei; Zhu, Lin; Dai, Shugui; Zhuang, Yuanyi

    2006-07-01

    A simulation test was conducted in aquaria to study the responses of algal communities to different N/P ratios in urban water body. The water sample was taken from a small artificial lake in Tianjin, and its initial N/P ratio was adjusted to 0. 5:1,7.2:1, 25:1 and 50:1, respectively. The results showed that in high N/P ratio groups, the numbers of Chlorophyta species decreased, while those of Cyanophyta species didn' t change very much. The numbers of these two species were both decreased in low N/P ratio group. Algal biomass, cell density and chlorophyll a content in medium and high N groups were higher than those in control and high P groups. The mean value of chlorophyll a reached the highest (69.7 microg x L(-1)) in high N group, and was 54.3, 30.3 and 29.7 microg x L(-1) in medium N, control, and high P groups, respectively. At the mid-late stages of culture, green algae Dictyosphaerium pulchellum was dominant in high P group, while blue algae Phormidium tenue, P. corium, Lyngbya limnetica and Microcystis aeruginosa were dominated in high N/P ratio groups. Control group had the highest species richness, while medium and high N groups had the highest and lowest ecological species dominance, respectively. PMID:17044495

  17. Using hedonic property models to value public water bodies: An analysis of specification issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Nicholas Z.

    2009-01-01

    The hedonic literature has established that public water bodies provide external benefits that are reflected in the value of nearby residential real estate. The literature has employed several approaches to quantify these nonmarket services. With a residential hedonic model, this paper tests whether model specification affects resource valuation using an actively managed reservoir in Indiana and a passively managed lake in Connecticut. The results indicate that valuation is quite sensitive to model specification and that omitting either the waterview or waterfront variables from the hedonic function likely results in a misspecified model. The findings from this study are important for researchers and public agencies charged with managing water resources to bear in mind as the external benefits from existing or proposed man-made lakes and reservoirs are estimated. Therefore, while it requires considerably more effort to determine which properties are in waterfront locations and which properties have a view, the potential mispecification of "distance-only" models likely justifies these extra research costs. Further, the findings in this analysis call into question results from distance-only models in the literature.

  18. Operator decision support system for integrated wastewater management including wastewater treatment plants and receiving water bodies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsoo; Kim, Yejin; Kim, Hyosoo; Piao, Wenhua; Kim, Changwon

    2016-06-01

    An operator decision support system (ODSS) is proposed to support operators of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in making appropriate decisions. This system accounts for water quality (WQ) variations in WWTP influent and effluent and in the receiving water body (RWB). The proposed system is comprised of two diagnosis modules, three prediction modules, and a scenario-based supporting module (SSM). In the diagnosis modules, the WQs of the influent and effluent WWTP and of the RWB are assessed via multivariate analysis. Three prediction modules based on the k-nearest neighbors (k-NN) method, activated sludge model no. 2d (ASM2d) model, and QUAL2E model are used to forecast WQs for 3 days in advance. To compare various operating alternatives, SSM is applied to test various predetermined operating conditions in terms of overall oxygen transfer coefficient (Kla), waste sludge flow rate (Qw), return sludge flow rate (Qr), and internal recycle flow rate (Qir). In the case of unacceptable total phosphorus (TP), SSM provides appropriate information for the chemical treatment. The constructed ODSS was tested using data collected from Geumho River, which was the RWB, and S WWTP in Daegu City, South Korea. The results demonstrate the capability of the proposed ODSS to provide WWTP operators with more objective qualitative and quantitative assessments of WWTP and RWB WQs. Moreover, the current study shows that ODSS, using data collected from the study area, can be used to identify operational alternatives through SSM at an integrated urban wastewater management level. PMID:26893178

  19. Structural investigation of water-soluble polysaccharides extracted from the fruit bodies of Coprinus comatus.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Gerwig, Gerrit J; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Kamerling, Johannis P

    2013-01-01

    Water-soluble polysaccharide material, extracted from the stipes of the fruit bodies of Coprinus comatus by hot water, was fractionated by sequential weak anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The relevant fractions were subjected to structural analysis, including (d/l) monosaccharide/methylation analysis and 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy. Besides the disaccharide α,α-trehalose [α-D-Glcp-(1↔1)-α-D-Glcp], high-molecular-mass α-D-glucans (the most abundant component) consisting of [→4)-α-D-Glcp-(1→](n) backbones with ~10% branching at C-6 by terminal α-D-Glcp-(1→6)- or α-D-Glcp-(1→6)-α-D-Glcp-(1→6)- units, lower-molecular-mass linear β-D-glucans consisting of [→6)-β-D-Glcp-(1→](m) sequences, and a lower-molecular-mass pentasaccharide-repeating α-L-fuco-α-D-galactan, {→6)-α-D-Galp-(1→6)-[α-L-Fucp-(1→2)-]α-D-Galp-(1→6)-α-D-Galp-(1→6)-α-D-Galp-(1→}(p), were found to be present. PMID:23044138

  20. Development and Implementation of Flood Risk Mapping, Water Bodies Monitoring and Climate Information for Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccato, P.; McDonald, K. C.; Jensen, K.; Podest, E.; De La Torre Juarez, M.

    2013-12-01

    Public health professionals are increasingly concerned about the potential impact that climate variability and change can have on infectious disease. The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), City College of New York (CCNY) and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are developing new products to increase the public health community's capacity to understand, use, and demand the appropriate climate data and climate information to mitigate the public health impacts of climate on vector-borne diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, rift valley fever. In this poster we present the new and improved products that have been developed for monitoring water bodies for monitoring and forecasting risks of vector-borne disease epidemics. The products include seasonal inundation patterns in the East African region based on the global mappings of inundated water fraction derived at the 25-km scale from both active and passive microwave instruments QuikSCAT, AMSR-E, SSM/I, ERS, ASCAT, and MODIS and LANDSAT data. We also present how the products are integrated into a knowledge system (IRI Data Library Map room, SERVIR) to support the use of climate and environmental information in climate-sensitive health decision-making.

  1. Water

    MedlinePlus

    ... Shopping Tips Food Safety Common Questions Learn More Water Printer-friendly It’s important for your body to have plenty of fluids each day. Water helps you digest food, absorb nutrients from food, ...

  2. [Historical survey of modern reversible contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Mbabajende, V

    1986-04-01

    Because of contraception, pregnancy need not be viewed by women as punishment for sexual activity but as a planned and desired event. Most of the contraceptive methods used in developing countries at present were introduced during the 1960s, but use of contraception has a long history and some methods date back to antiquity. Contraceptive pills were already used around 2000 BC in the form of mercury and arsenic tablets. Their effectiveness was questionable. The role of hormones in human reproduction began to be understood only in the early 1900s. The discovery of progesterone in a Mexican iguana in the 1940s permitted production of progesterone on a large scale. Estrogens had been identified around 1930. Human trials of a contraceptive pill beginning in 1956 in Puerto Rico demonstrated that progestins could prevent pregnancy by suppressing ovulation. Later on, estrogen was added to reduce menstrual irregularities. The 1st generation of combined oral contraceptives contained very high levels of hormones associated with high rates of side effects. Numerous formulations with lower hormonal contents became available beginning around 1970 and constitute the principal formulations in use today. A number of long acting hormonal methods based on progestins have been developed, including injectables, some IUDs and vaginal rings, and implants. The 1st commercially available injectable, norethisterone enanthate, did not acquire the wide distribution of medroxyprogesterone acetate, sold as Depo Provera and used to treat various pathological conditions as well as for contraception. The 1st true IUDs were small stones placed within the uteri of camels by nomads to prevent pregnancy during long caravans. An IUD was developed in 1909 by Richter, and the 2 most widely used models before 1960 were the Grafenberg and Ota silver rings. Use of the 2 rings became rare for medical reasons after 1935 despite their efficacy. Safe plastic IUDs which appeared beginning in the early 1960s

  3. [Contraception in adolescence: knowing is not enough].

    PubMed

    Aman, M

    1985-10-01

    Sexuality is the source of the biological, psychic, and social changes of adolescence. Contraception, by modifying some aspects of sexuality, can change the usual course of adolescence. Sexuality is a new experience for adolescents and is submerged in the same confusion and uncertainty as other areas of their lives. The experience of health personnel in contraception over the years has been gained in prescription for adults, who unlike adolescents are members of stable couples who have found their places in society. Women seeking contraception have usually experienced pregnancy and verified their fecundity, thereby consolidating their identities, unlike the adolescent who is still unsure of her femininity. Contraception for adolescents, by blocking 2 stages in the life of a woman (proving fecundity and experiencing maternity) is an obstacle to the total achievement of adulthood. The connection between sex and pregnancy is recognized by a 13-year-old in a theoretical way, but is not always integrated as a practical reality. Many adults have difficulty accepting the contraception requests of adolescents because they do not feel it is morally right for adolescents to have direct sexual experiences rather than daydreams. The reality of adolescent sexual lives is quite different from what most adults adults imagine it to be. Mental integration of contraception for an adolescent requires acceptance of the link between sex and pregnancy and a mental representation of oneself and one's behavior in which sexuality is considered a possibility. Many adolescents believe that they are too young to become pregnant, or are unable to make the link between sex today and pregnancy in the future, or do not perceive a possible pregnancy in negative terms. After they perceive the need for contraception and develop a desire to meet the need, adolescents must gain knowledge of the different methods available. Choice of a method will be influenced by the degree of efficacy of the method

  4. Body water measurement in growth disorders: a comparison of bioelectrical impedance and skinfold thickness techniques with isotope dilution.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, J W; Greene, S A; Scrimgeour, C M; Rennie, M J

    1991-01-01

    Total body water was estimated as part of the assessment of body composition in children with growth disorders, using the newly commercially available method of bioelectrical impedance. This was undertaken to compare the precision and accuracy of the results with those derived from skinfold thickness against measurement of stable isotopically labelled water (H2(18)O) dilution as a standard. The comparisons were carried out to see to what extent the impedance method could be applied with confidence to assessment of children with growth disorders. Total body water was derived from impedance (I) using an association with height (Ht2/I). Impedance and skinfold thickness estimates of total body water were equally precise when compared with values obtained from H2(18)O dilution (limits of agreement -1.9 to +1.3 and -1.7 to +2.0 kg respectively). The mean intraobserver coefficient of variation for repeat measurements of impedance was 0.9% compared with 4.6% for skinfold thickness with an interobserver coefficient of variation for impedance of 2.8%. Bioelectrical impedance estimation of body composition is likely to be of value in the growth clinic when expertise in measurement of skinfold thickness is limited or repeated measurements are to be undertaken by different observers. PMID:2001107

  5. Urea, creatinine, uric acid, and phosphate spaces and their relationship to total body water during chronic hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ericsson, F.; Odar-Cederloef, I.E.; Eriksson, C.G.; Lindgren, S.; Kjellstrand, C.M.

    1988-07-01

    The authors determined total body water (TBW) with tritium in 11 patients on chronic hemodialysis and compared this space to that estimated by 60% of body weight, and removal spaces of urea, creatinine, uric acid, and phosphate (PO4). The latter spaces were determined by dividing the total amount of substance (measured in total dialysate) by pre- minus post-dialysis concentrations. Body water X 0.6 was more than 10% less than the tritium space, and showed a maximal variation of 10 liters, or 24%. The removal space of urea was 80% of the tritium space, but correlated closely with it. The difference between total body water and urea removal space was variable and dependent on fluid excess (edema) in the patients. Creatinine, uric acid, and phosphate removal spaces were highly variable and not correlated to total body water. The authors suggest that actual measured TBW should be used, rather than estimations using BW X 0.6, for V in K X T/V, where K = clearance, T = duration of dialysis, and V = the removal space of urea. Furthermore, one may need to introduce a correction factor for urea removal space over TBW in the equation to allow better quantification of dialysis in edematous patients and during very fast dialyses.

  6. Knowledge and Beliefs about Reproductive Anatomy and Physiology among Mexican-Origin Women in the U.S.A: Implications for Effective Oral Contraceptive Use

    PubMed Central

    Amastae, Jon; Potter, Joseph E.; Hopkins, Kristine; Grossman, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Inherent in many reproductive health and family planning programmes is the problematic assumption that the body, its processes, and modifications to it are universally experienced in the same way. This paper addresses contraceptive knowledge and beliefs among Mexican-origin women, based upon data gathered by the qualitative component of the Border Contraceptive Access Study. Open-ended interviews explored the perceived mechanism of action of the pill, side effects, non-contraceptive benefits, and general knowledge of contraception. Findings revealed complex connections between traditional and scientific information. Use of medical terms (“hormone”) illustrated attempts to integrate new information with existing knowledge and belief systems. Conclusions address concerns that existing information and services may not be sufficient if population-specific knowledge and beliefs are not assessed and addressed. Findings can contribute to the development of effective education, screening, and reproductive health services. PMID:23464742

  7. Reversible contraception for the woman over 35 years of age.

    PubMed

    Archer, D F

    1992-12-01

    Methods of reversible contraception, oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices, and Norplant (systemic progestin-only contraceptive; Wyeth-Ayerst, Radnor, PA), can be used for women over 35 years of age. Oral contraceptive formulations are safe and effective for healthy women up to the age of menopause. Oral contraceptives in women who do not smoke cigarettes do not result in a significant increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The incidence of breast cancer is not increased in women who have used oral contraceptives. A slight increase was found in younger women who had been on oral contraceptives based on a reanalysis of the contraceptive and steroid hormone study of the Centers for Disease Control. A reduction in the incidence of ovarian epithelial neoplasia by 40% was found in three European case-control studies. Two intrauterine devices are currently available on the US market: Paragard (GynoPharma, Somerville, NJ) and Progestasert (Alza Corp., Palo Alto, CA). Both of these provide highly effective contraception. A World Health Organization prospective randomized study found that there was an increase in pelvic inflammatory disease rates in the first 20 days after intrauterine device insertion. The intrauterine device itself did not increase the pelvic inflammatory disease incidence rates. The Norplant system exerts its contraceptive action through ovulation inhibition and alteration of cervical mucus. The major consumer complaint is irregular or prolonged uterine bleeding, which can be controlled by oral estrogen. PMID:1450355

  8. Linking the management of urban watersheds with the impacts on the receiving water bodies: the use of flow duration curves.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Guido; Rodriguez, Fabrice; Deroubaix, José-Frédéric; Tassin, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that changes in the current hydrological behaviour of urbanising catchments are a major source of impacts on the downstream water bodies. However, current flow-rates are rarely considered in studies on urban stormwater management, usually focused on extreme flow-rates. We argue that taking into account receiving water bodies is possible with relatively small modifications in current practices of urban stormwater modelling, through the use of Flow duration curves (FDCs). In this paper, we discuss advantages and requirements of the use of FDCs. Then, we present an example of application comparing source control regulations over an urbanised catchment (178 ha) in Nantes, France. PMID:25026590

  9. Numerical Modeling of Thermal Pollution of Large Water Bodies from Thermal and Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, Tatyana; Lepikhin, Anatoly; Lyakhin, Yury; Parshakova, Yanina; Tiunov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Currently, the major manufacturers of electrical energy are the thermal and nuclear power plants including the cooling ponds in the processing chains. For a wide range of both environmental and technological problems, the evaluation of the temperature fields in the cooling ponds at certain critical values of hydrological and meteorological parameters is important. The present paper deals with the evaluation of the thermal effect of one of the largest thermal power plant in Europe - Perm GRES - to its cooling pond which is the Kama Reservoir. Since the area of the possible impact is rather large and the reservoir itself is characterized by a very complex morphometry, numerical modeling of thermal spot propagation in the Kama River due to the discharge of warm water by Perm GRES for the entire area in the 3D-formulation with the desired detail setting morphometric characteristics of the water body meets very serious difficulties. Because of that, to solve the problem, a combined scheme of calculations based on the combination of hydrodynamic models in 2D and 3D formulations was used. At the first stage of the combined scheme implementation, 2D hydrodynamical model was developed for all possible area, using software SMS v.11.1. The boundary and initial conditions for this model were formulated on the basis of calculations made using 1D hydrodynamical model developed and applied for the entire Kama Reservoir. Application of 2D hydrodynamical model for solving the problem under consideration was needed to obtain the necessary information for setting the boundary conditions for the 3D model. Software package ANSYS Fluent v.6.3 was used for the realization of 3D model. 3D modeling was performed for different wind speeds and directions and quantitative characteristics of the discharge of warm water. To verify the models, the data of the detailed field measurements in the zones of thermal pollution of the Kama reservoir due to impact of the Perm GRES were used. A

  10. Extended regimen combined oral contraception: A review of evolving concepts and acceptance by women and clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Nappi, Rossella E.; Kaunitz, Andrew M.; Bitzer, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The clinical utility of extended regimen combined oral contraceptives (COCs) is increasingly being recognised. Our objective was to understand the attitudes of women and clinicians about the use of these regimens. We present the rationale for extended regimen COCs from a historical perspective, and trace their evolution and growing popularity in light of their clinical benefits. We conclude by offering potential strategies for counselling women about extended regimen COC options. Methods: We conducted a MEDLINE search to identify and summarise studies of extended regimen COCs, focusing on attitudes of women and clinicians regarding efficacy, safety/tolerability and fewer scheduled bleeding episodes and other potential benefits. Results: The body of contemporary literature on extended regimen COCs suggests that their contraceptive efficacy is comparable to that of conventional 28-day (i.e., 21/7) regimens. For women seeking contraception that allows infrequent scheduled bleeding episodes, particularly those who suffer from hormone withdrawal symptoms and cyclical symptoms (e.g., headache, mood changes, dysmenorrhoea, heavy menstrual bleeding), extended regimen COCs are an effective and safe option. Although satisfaction with extended regimen COCs in clinical trials is high, misperceptions about continuous hormone use may still limit the widespread acceptance of this approach. Conclusions: Despite the widespread acceptance among clinicians of extended regimen COCs as an effective and safe contraceptive option, these regimens are underused, likely due to a lack of awareness about their availability and utility among women. Improved patient education and counselling regarding the safety and benefits of extended regimen COCs may help women make more informed contraceptive choices. PMID:26572318

  11. The risk of river pollution due to washout from contaminated floodplain water bodies during periods of high magnitude floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, T.; Lepikhin, A.; Parshakova, Ya.; Tiunov, A.

    2016-03-01

    The risk of river pollution due to washout (removal of pollutants) from contaminated floodplain water bodies (floodplain lakes and quarries whose origin is related to the large-scale mining of nonmetallic building materials in the floodplain zone) during high magnitude flood periods is analyzed using a combination of one-, two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling and in situ measurements. The modeling performed for the floodplain water bodies contaminated by N compounds shows that during large magnitude floods washout occurs. The washout process consists of two stages: an initial rapid stage lasting about two hours during which the upper (3-4 m thick) layer is washed out, followed by a second stage when the concentration of NH4-N in the floodplain water body remains nearly constant. The maximum contaminant concentration in the river in the vicinity of a water intake for drinking water located 21 km downstream is attained about 9 h from the beginning of the flood; concentration of NH4-N can reach values several times larger than acceptable concentration guidelines. The initial primary peak in contaminant concentration at the water intake is followed by a slight decrease in contaminant concentration; a second peak related to the contaminant transport through the inundated floodplain subsequently occurs, after which the concentration slowly decreases, reaching acceptable values after 30-40 h. Contaminated floodplain water bodies located near drinking water supply systems are not significant sources of contamination during small and moderate floods, but during high magnitude floods, they can become sources of water pollution. Operational measures that can decrease potential health risks are discussed.

  12. Short-term in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity testing systems for some water bodies of Northern India.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Athar Habib; Tabrez, Shams; Ahmad, Masood

    2011-09-01

    The genotoxicity of certain water bodies was evaluated employing the DNA repair defective mutants of Escherichia coli, induction of prophage lamda in the lysogen and the plasmid nicking assay. All the test DNA repair defective mutants invariably exhibited more sensitivity than their isogenic wild-type strains but distinctive patterns against the three water samples viz. industrial waste water and the groundwater samples obtained from industrial estate of Aligarh as well as river water of Yamuna at Agra. A significant level of phage induction was also recorded in the test system exhibiting maximum induction in case of industrial waste water followed by that in river and groundwater samples, respectively. The single- and double-strand breaks were also observed in the plasmid DNA treated with industrial waste water and the river water samples. These findings are suggestive of the DNA damage induced by the test samples with the probable role of SOS repair in E. coli. PMID:21116844

  13. Hydrothermal Systems in Europa and Possibility of Water on Similar Bodies as a Biological Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, Rohan M.; Radhakrishnan, Arun

    One of the most important precursors to extraterrestrial life is the presence of water in a planet and as such most of the inter-solar remote sensing data centers around testing conditions for water on other planets and natural bodies. In this paper, we examine means for driving hydrothermal activity in extraterrestrial oceans on planets and on satellites that have less than one Earth mass, with implications for sustaining a low level of biological activity over geological timescales. Assuming ocean planets have olivine-dominated lithospheres, a model for cooling-induced thermal cracking shows how variation in planet size and internal thermal energy may drive variation in the dominant type of hydrothermal system for example, high or low temperature system or chemically driven system. As radiogenic heating diminishes over time, progressive exposure of new rock continues to the current epoch. Where fluid-rock interactions propagate slowly into a deep brittle layer, thermal energy from serpentinization may be the primary cause of hydrothermal activity in small ocean planets. We show that the time-varying hydro-static head of a tidally forced ice shell may drive hydrothermal fluid flow through the sea floor, which can generate moderate but potentially important heat through viscous interaction with the matrix of porous sea floor rock. Considering all presently known potential ocean planets|Mars, a number of icy satellites, Pluto, and other trans-neptunian object and applying Earth-like material properties and cooling rates, we nd depths of circulation are more than an order of magnitude greater than in Earth. In Europa and Enceladus, tidal flexing may drive hydrothermal circulation and, in Europa, it may generate heat on the same order as present-day radiogenic heat flux at Earth's surface. In all objects, progressive serpentinization generates heat on a globally averaged basis at a fraction of a percent of present-day radiogenic heating and hydrogen is produced at

  14. Contraception for the HIV-Positive Woman: A Review of Interactions between Hormonal Contraception and Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer A.; Jamshidi, Roxanne; Burke, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Preventing unintended pregnancy in HIV-positive women can significantly reduce maternal-to-child HIV transmission as well as improve the woman's overall health. Hormonal contraceptives are safe and effective means to avoid unintended pregnancy, but there is concern that coadministration of antiretroviral drugs may alter contraceptive efficacy. Materials and Methods. We performed a literature search of PubMed and Ovid databases of articles published between January 1980 and February 2012 to identify English-language reports of drug-drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives (HCs) and antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). We also reviewed the FDA prescribing information of contraceptive hormone preparations and antiretrovirals for additional data and recommendations. Results. Twenty peer-reviewed publications and 42 pharmaceutical package labels were reviewed. Several studies of combined oral contraceptive pills (COCs) identified decreased serum estrogen and progestin levels when coadministered with certain ARVs. The contraceptive efficacy of injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) were largely unaffected by ARVs, while data on the contraceptive patch, ring, and implant were lacking. Conclusions. HIV-positive women should be offered a full range of hormonal contraceptive options, with conscientious counseling about possible reduced efficacy of COCs and the contraceptive implant when taken with ARVs. DMPA and the LNG-IUS maintain their contraceptive efficacy when taken with ARVs. PMID:22927715

  15. Comparison of contraceptive use between the Contraceptive CHOICE Project and state and national data

    PubMed Central

    Kittur, Nupur D.; Secura, Gina M.; Peipert, Jeffrey F.; Madden, Tessa; Finer, Lawrence B.; Allsworth, Jenifer E.

    2010-01-01

    Background We compared contraceptive prevalence reported in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project (CHOICE) at time of enrollment, with estimates from representative surveys, the 2006–2008 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) and 2006 Missouri Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Study design We calculated survey weights for CHOICE participants and compared selected demographic characteristics and prevalence estimates of current contraceptive methods being used at the time of enrollment. Results Compared to the NSFG, CHOICE participants at time of enrollment were less likely to be pill users (16.1% vs. 24.0%) and more likely to use condoms (23.8% vs. 13.8%). Compared to the BRFSS, CHOICE participants were more likely to use condoms (20.4% vs. 12.9%) and withdrawal (6.6% vs. 0.4%). Conclusion Despite differences in sampling strategies between CHOICE and state and national surveys, the contraceptive prevalence estimates were largely similar. This information combined with the high rates of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) use after enrollment by CHOICE particiants that have been previously reported by study participants, may imply that cost and restricted access to LARC could be essential factors in the low rates of LARC use in the US. PMID:21477693

  16. Contraception for Adolescents: Focusing on Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARC) to Improve Reproductive Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy rates in the U.S. have reached an all-time low from their peak in the 1980s and 1990s. However, the U.S. maintains the highest rate of teenage pregnancy among developed nations. Adolescents experience higher typical use failure rates for user-dependent contraceptives compared to their adult counterparts. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), IUDs and implants, have failure rates that are both very low and independent of user age. In settings where the most effective methods are prioritized and access barriers are removed, the majority of adolescents initiate LARC. Use of LARC by adolescents significantly reduces rates of overall and repeat teen pregnancy. All methods of contraception are safe for use in teens, including IUDs and DMPA. Dual use of LARC and barrier methods to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection, is the optimal contraceptive strategy for most adolescents. Adolescent access to evidence-based and confidential contraceptive services, provided in a manner that respects autonomy, is a vital public health goal.

  17. Escherichia coli bacteriuria and contraceptive method.

    PubMed

    Hooton, T M; Hillier, S; Johnson, C; Roberts, P L; Stamm, W E

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of contraceptive method on the occurrence of bacteriuria and vaginal colonization with Escherichia coli in 104 women who were evaluated prior to having sexual intercourse, the morning after intercourse, and 24 hours later. After intercourse, the prevalence of E coli bacteriuria increased slightly in oral contraceptive users but dramatically in both foam and condom users and diaphragm-spermicide users. Twenty-four hours later, the prevalence of bacteriuria remained significantly elevated only in the latter two groups. Similarly, vaginal colonization with E coli was more dramatic and persistent in users of diaphragm-spermicide and foam and condoms. Vaginal colonization with Candida species, enterococci, and staphylococci also increased significantly in diaphragm-spermicide users after intercourse. We conclude that use of the diaphragm with spermicidal jelly or use of a spermicidal foam with a condom markedly alters normal vaginal flora and strongly predisposes users to the development of vaginal colonization and bacteriuria with E coli. PMID:1859519

  18. Emergency contraception among refugees and the displaced.

    PubMed

    Goodyear, L; McGinn, T

    1998-01-01

    In 1994, the international relief community began to recognize and address the reproductive health needs of refugees and displaced populations. A minimum initial service package of reproductive health services for refugees and the displaced, which includes emergency contraception (EC), was developed and recommended for use in refugee settings. This paper describes the experience of one international relief organization, the International Rescue Committee (IRC), in introducing EC into its worldwide reproductive health program. A recent IRC survey found that EC is available in 4 out of 14 settings where it provides reproductive health services. A case study from Tanzania demonstrates the modes of delivery, the demand for EC by women who have experienced sexual violence, and the community responses to this method of contraception. More information, education, and communication directed at refugee communities; more donor support for supplies; and institutional commitment to train staff are needed to expand refugee access to EC. PMID:9859638

  19. Contraceptive decision-making in military women.

    PubMed

    Chung-Park, Min S

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of women in the military related to the prevention of pregnancy. Ten single women, ages 19 to 24, volunteered to be participants. They were interviewed over a 12-week period in a private setting at a military clinic. The results of the study were that their decision to use contraception was influenced by their personal goals, family values, perceived support system, and effectiveness of the birth control. These women used contraceptive methods that they felt were right for them. The conclusion of the study was that women in active military duty are in need of reproductive health education, career counseling, and support. Nurses are in a good position to provide these needed services. PMID:17595410

  20. Emergency Contraception for Adolescents: A Political Battle.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    The political debate for adolescents to have access to emergency contraception that is available over the counter has been going on for years. Since 1999, Levonorgestrel, Plan B One Step(®), has been used in the United States as an emergency contraception but with a prescription at the time. The FDA has done years of research and testing with Barr Laboratories, the manufacture of Plan B One Step(®), to make it safe for females of all ages. In 2003, the FDA recommended the over the counter use of Plan B One Step(®) for all ages, yet this did not occur. In pharmacies across our nation young women find it impossible to purchase this product whether they be of age or not. Politics is making the choices for our young females, not medical evidence. How long are we going to let this continue? PMID:26897510

  1. Intracranial venous thrombosis complicating oral contraception

    PubMed Central

    Dindar, F.; Platts, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    Four days after the onset of a severe headache a 22-year-old woman who had been taking oral contraceptives for less than three weeks had a convulsion, followed by right hemiparesis. Other focal neurologic signs and evidence of raised intracranial pressure appeared, and she became comatose on the seventh day. A left craniotomy revealed extensive cerebral venous thrombosis. She died the next day. On postmortem examination extensive thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus and draining cerebral veins, and multiple areas of cerebral hemorrhage and hemorrhagic infarction were seen. Some of the superficial cerebral veins showed focal necrosis of their walls, and the lateral lacunae of the superior sagittal sinus contained proliferating endothelial cells. The adrenal veins were also thrombosed. The significance of these findings is discussed. The literature on cerebrovascular complications of oral contraception, particularly cerebral venous thrombosis, is reviewed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4413961

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis, the contraceptive pill, and androgens.

    PubMed

    James, W H

    1993-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating that low androgen concentrations are a cause of rheumatoid arthritis. This would explain a number of established features of the epidemiology of the disease. These include: (a) the variation of disease activity with pregnancy; (b) the variation of age at onset by sex; (c) the variation by sex with HLA-B15; (d) the association with bone mineral density; and (e) the differing time trends in incidence rates by sex. It is argued, moreover, that if one makes a plausible assumption--namely, that women who choose oral contraceptives have high androgen concentrations at the time they first make this choice--then an explanation becomes available for the confusion about the relation between rheumatoid arthritis and oral contraception. Grounds are adduced for that assumption. If this line of reasoning is substantially correct it also has implications for the relations between rheumatoid arthritis and smoking and consumption of alcohol. PMID:8323402

  3. New Advantage 24 contraceptive gel claims 24-hour effectiveness. But proposed FDA rule could put N-9 products to the test.

    PubMed

    1995-04-01

    Advantage 24 is a new contraceptive gel that makes use of bioadhesive technology to offer 24 hours of protection relying on the spermicide nonoxynol-9 (N-9) in lower concentrations. If a proposed US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rule is enforced N-9 may be examined closely. The manufacturer, Whitehall-Robins Healthcare in New Jersey, stopped production of the Today contraceptive sponge because of the costs of complying with FDA standards. The Advantage 24 gel costs twice as much as the sponge. It is made in Switzerland and distributed by an Illinois company. Any vaginal contraceptive containing N-9 would be approved by the FDA as long as it complied with guidelines laid down in an FDA monograph. However, the registration of the gel could not be confirmed. The product uses a bioadhesive technology concept that natural substances adhere to epithelial and mucosal tissues in the body. Polycarbofil is mixed with water, N-9, and mineral oil to create an emulsion that allows for a time-release mechanism, but at any given time only 2 mg of N-9 is available to kill sperm. The final formula for Advantage 24 is 52.5 mg per dose. Too much N-9 can be toxic, as demonstrated by the Today sponge, which contained 1000 mg of N-9. In Kenya prostitutes using it frequently experienced 3 times as many genital lesions as those using a placebo. A study of Advantage 24 by a Miami laboratory involved 250 women, 22-45 years old, who had had prior tubal ligations. When the gel was applied 15-30 minutes before intercourse the efficacy rate was 98%; it was 91% for those applying it 12 hours before; and it was 86% when the gel was applied 24 hours ahead of time. FDA compliance officers are intrigued about the claim that the gel lasts 24 hours. However, if the claim is held up by research data, women will have an easily available, portable, efficient, aesthetic, and highly effective contraceptive. PMID:12347026

  4. Awareness regarding contraception and population control among school going adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jahnavi, G; Patra, S R

    2009-12-01

    Growing sexuality among adolescents increases their risk of getting reproductive tract infections and pregnancy. This Cross sectional survey was done to assess the knowledge and attitude of higher secondary school children regarding contraception and population control. Majority of students (94.4%) were aware of contraceptives and their easy availability on chemist shop. However very few were aware of name and how to use them and 60% of them considered that condom is an emergency contraceptive. Lack of employment facilities as a consequence of uncontrolled population growth was the main concern of both boys and girls. The two children norm was acceptable to most, with one son and one daughter. All perceived that there is need to be informed about contraceptives. Most of the adolescents are misinformed about contraceptives and their attitude is not favorable as far as responsibility is concerned. There is an unmet need of contraceptive & population control knowledge and attitude among school adolescents and require urgent intervention. PMID:20803909

  5. Long-acting injectable hormonal dosage forms for contraception.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linfeng; Janagam, Dileep R; Mandrell, Timothy D; Johnson, James R; Lowe, Tao L

    2015-07-01

    Although great efforts have been made to develop long-acting injectable hormonal contraceptives for more than four decades, few long-acting injectable contraceptives have reached the pharmaceutical market or even entered clinical trials. On the other hand, in clinical practice there is an urgent need for injectable long-acting reversible contraceptives which can provide contraceptive protection for more than 3 months after one single injection. Availability of such products will offer great flexibility to women and resolve certain continuation issues currently occurring in clinics. Herein, we reviewed the strategies exploited in the past to develop injectable hormonal contraceptive dosages including drug microcrystal suspensions, drug-loaded microsphere suspensions and in situ forming depot systems for long-term contraception and discussed the potential solutions for remaining issues met in the previous development. PMID:25899076

  6. Calculation of Water Entry Problem for Free-falling Bodies Using a Developed Cartesian Cut Cell Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenhua, Wang; Yanying, Wang

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the development of free surface capturing method on Cartesian cut cell mesh to water entry problem for free-falling bodies with body-fluid interaction. The incompressible Euler equations for a variable density fluid system are presented as governing equations and the free surface is treated as a contact discontinuity by using free surface capturing method. In order to be convenient for dealing with the problem with moving body boundary, the Cartesian cut cell technique is adopted for generating the boundary-fitted mesh around body edge by cutting solid regions out of a background Cartesian mesh. Based on this mesh system, governing equations are discretized by finite volume method, and at each cell edge inviscid flux is evaluated by means of Roe's approximate Riemann solver. Furthermore, for unsteady calculation in time domain, a time accurate solution is achieved by a dual time-stepping technique with artificial compressibility method. For the body-fluid interaction, the projection method of momentum equations and exact Riemann solution are applied in the calculation of fluid pressure on the solid boundary. Finally, the method is validated by test case of water entry for free-falling bodies.

  7. Total Hg and methyl Hg distribution in sediments of selected Louisiana water bodies.

    PubMed

    Delaune, Ronald D; Gambrell, Robert P; Devai, Istvan; Jugsujinda, Aroon; Kongchum, Manoch

    2009-05-01

    Sediment samples (543) collected from selected Louisiana streams and lakes were analyzed for total Hg and methyl Hg content. The average total Hg content among 543 samples was 92.3 +/- 95.1 microg kg(-1). The average methyl Hg content in the samples was 0.68 +/- 0.80 microg kg(-1). Methyl Hg accounted for an average of 0.73% of the total Hg in sediment. Linear regression analysis of total Hg versus methyl Hg content of the sediment showed methyl Hg content was significantly correlated to total Hg content of sediment (P > 0.01, n = 537) and sediment organic matter content. (P > 0.01, n = 536) Methyl Hg was also positively correlated to clay (P > 0.01, n = 537) and inversely correlated to sand content of sediment (P > 0.01, n = 537). Total Hg and methyl Hg content in these sediments was within the normal range reported elsewhere indicating no significant industrial or municipal Hg contamination. A comparison of selected water bodies with fishing advisories showed no relationship to total Hg and methyl Hg in sediment. PMID:19337918

  8. Is body size of the water frog Rana esculenta complex responding to climate change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryjanowski, Piotr; Sparks, Tim; Rybacki, Mariusz; Berger, Leszek

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies on climate responses in ectothermic (cold-blooded) vertebrates have been few in number and focussed on phenology rather than morphology. According to Bergmann’s rule, endothermic (warm-blooded) vertebrates from cooler climates tend to be larger than congeners from warmer regions. Although amphibians are ectothermic vertebrates, weather and climatic conditions may also impact on their morphology, and thereby affect their survival rates and population dynamics. In this paper, we show, in a unique long-term study during the period 1963-2003 in an agricultural landscape in western Poland, that the body length of two water frog parental species (males of both Rana ridibunda and R. lessonae) increased significantly. However, their hybridogenetic hybrid R. esculenta did not show similar changes. A significant relationship with a large-scale climatic factor, the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index, was found positive for R. ridibunda males and R. lessonae females, and negative for R. esculenta females. Our findings, the first for amphibians, are consistent with other studies reporting that recent climate change has affected the morphology of animals. However, we also show that changes in amphibian phenotype linked to climate may vary independently between (even very similar) species.

  9. Comparison of total body water estimates from O-18 and bioelectrical response prediction equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Linda H.; Inners, L. Daniel; Stricklin, Marcella D.; Klein, Peter D.; Wong, William W.; Siconolfi, Steven F.

    1993-01-01

    Identification of an indirect, rapid means to measure total body water (TBW) during space flight may aid in quantifying hydration status and assist in countermeasure development. Bioelectrical response testing and hydrostatic weighing were performed on 27 subjects who ingested O-18, a naturally occurring isotope of oxygen, to measure true TBW. TBW estimates from three bioelectrical response prediction equations and fat-free mass (FFM) were compared to TBW measured from O-18. A repeated measures MANOVA with post-hoc Dunnett's Test indicated a significant (p less than 0.05) difference between TBW estimates from two of the three bioelectrical response prediction equations and O-18. TBW estimates from FFM and the Kushner & Schoeller (1986) equation yielded results that were similar to those given by O-18. Strong correlations existed between each prediction method and O-18; however, standard errors, identified through regression analyses, were higher for the bioelectrical response prediction equations compared to those derived from FFM. These findings suggest (1) the Kushner & Schoeller (1986) equation may provide a valid measure of TBW, (2) other TBW prediction equations need to be identified that have variability similar to that of FFM, and (3) bioelectrical estimates of TBW may prove valuable in quantifying hydration status during space flight.

  10. [Effects of selective extraction on microorganisms on biomembrane in natural water body].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Chen, Jiejiang; Haiyan, Ma; Hua, Xiuyi; Dong, Deming; Guo, Shuhai

    2006-02-01

    By the methods of direct viable count and plate count, this paper studied the effects of different selective extractants on the bacteria, algae and protozoan on the biomembrane in natural water body. The results indicated that the stronger the extraction ability of selective extractant, the fewer the living microorganisms on the biomembrane after extraction. Compared with the control, the percentages of living microorganisms on the biomembrane were 27.6, 14.1 and 0.01, respectively, after extracted by hydroxylamine hydrochloride (0.01 mol x L(-1) NH2OH.HCl + 0.01 mol x L(-1) HNO3), sodium dithionite (0.4 mol x L(-1) Na2S2O4, pH 6.0), and acidified ammonium oxalate. Very few bacteria was left after extracted by nitric acid (15% HNO3), and no microorgariisms could be detected after extracted by H2O2/HNO3, suggesting that the use of selective extractants affected the activity of biomembrane. With the decreasing amount of microorganisms on the biomembrane after treated with selective extractants, the adsorption of heavy metals by the biomembrane was gradually depressed. PMID:16706056

  11. Effects of body mass and water temperature on routine metabolism of American paddlefish Polyodon spathula.

    PubMed

    Patterson, J T; Mims, S D; Wright, R A

    2013-04-01

    This study quantified the effects of temperature and fish mass on routine metabolism of the American paddlefish Polyodon spathula. Thermal sensitivity, as measured by Q(10) value, was low in P. spathula. Mean Q(10) was 1·78 while poikilotherms are generally expected to have Q(10) values in the 2·00-2·50 range. Mass-specific metabolism did not decrease with increased fish size to the extent that this phenomenon is observed in teleosts, as evidenced by a mass exponent (β) value of 0·92 for P. spathula compared with 0·79 in a review of teleost species. Other Acipenseriformes have exhibited relatively high β values for mass-specific respiration. Overall P. spathula metabolism appears to be more dependent on body mass and less dependent on temperature than for many other fishes. An equation utilizing temperature and fish mass to estimate gross respiration for P. spathula was derived and this equation was applied to respiratory data from other Acipenseriformes to assess inter-species variation. Polyodon spathula respiration rates across water temperature and fish mass appear most similar to those of Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser naccarii and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus. PMID:23557305

  12. Debromination of PBDEs in Arkansas Water Bodies Analyzed by Positive Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yonghong; Aziz-Schwanbeck, Azivy Che; Wei, Hua; Christensen, Erik R; Rockne, Karl J; Li, An

    2016-02-01

    A previously generated data set for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in dated sediment cores of West Lake of El Dorado (AED), Calion Lake (ACL), and the lagoon of Magnolia Wastewater Treatment Facility (AMW) from Southern Arkansas is examined by a weighted chemical mass balance (CMB) model and positive matrix factorization (PMF) in order to quantify PBDE sources and debromination. DNA extraction and pyrosequencing were done on several core sections in order to investigate microbial debromination. CMB and PMF analyses indicate that deca technical mixtures are the dominant PBDE input (>99% in mole fraction in AED and ACL, and 94.7% in AMW). Minor contributions of penta and octa technical mixtures were found in all three water bodies (<1% in AED and ACL; and 1.1% and 4.1% in AMW, respectively). Results suggest that debromination takes place in all three lakes, but is more intense in AMW. In-situ microbial debromination was supported by the microorganism analysis. The PMF results are validated by PBDE manufacturing records, and the operating history of AMW. Despite the high PBDE concentrations in these sediments near former manufacturing facilities, the extent of debromination is limited, possibly due to sorption to natural organic matter of the sediment. PMID:26741167

  13. Vertebral artery occlusion and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed Central

    Ask-Upmark, E; Bickerstaff, E R

    1976-01-01

    If vertebral artery occlusion occurs in degenerative arterial disease it is almost invariably left-sided, but in vertebral artery deficiency syndromes associated with oral contraceptives a striking preponderance of right-sided involvement has been shown. This observation adds support to the view that causes other than changes in the wall of the vessel at the site of occlusion must be sought as an explanation of the occlusion. PMID:1252812

  14. Nomegestrol acetate/estradiol: in oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lily P H; Plosker, Greg L

    2012-10-01

    Nomegestrol acetate/estradiol is a combined oral contraceptive with approval in many countries. This fixed-dose combination tablet contains nomegestrol acetate, a highly selective progestogen, and estradiol, a natural estrogen. It is the first monophasic combined oral contraceptive to contain estradiol, and is taken in 28-day cycles, consisting of 24 active therapy days with 4 placebo days (i.e. 24/4-day cycles). In two large, 1-year, randomized, open-label, multicentre, phase III trials in healthy adult women (aged 18-50 years), nomegestrol acetate/estradiol was at least as effective as drospirenone/ethinylestradiol as contraceptive therapy, as the pregnancy rates in women aged 18-35 years (primary efficacy population) in terms of the Pearl Index (primary endpoint) were numerically lower with nomegestrol acetate/estradiol, although the between-group difference was not statistically significant. In both trials, nomegestrol acetate/estradiol was given in a 24/4-day cycle, and drospirenone/ethinylestradiol was given in a 21/7-day cycle. The criteria for using condoms in case of forgotten doses were less stringent in the nomegestrol acetate/estradiol group than in the drospirenone/ethinylestradiol group. Nomegestrol acetate/estradiol therapy for up to 1 year was generally well tolerated in healthy adult women, with an acceptable tolerability profile in line with that expected for a combined oral contraceptive. The most commonly reported adverse events were acne and abnormal withdrawal bleeding (most often shorter, lighter or absent periods). Overall, compared with drospirenone/ethinylestradiol, nomegestrol acetate/estradiol appeared to be associated with less favourable acne-related outcomes, and shorter, lighter or absent periods. PMID:22950535

  15. Impact of Contraceptive Counseling in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Lauren B.; Tregear, Stephen J.; Curtis, Kathryn M.; Tiller, Marie; Pazol, Karen; Mautone-Smith, Nancy; Gavin, Loretta E.

    2015-01-01

    Context This systematic review evaluated the evidence on the impact of contraceptive counseling provided in clinical settings on reproductive health outcomes to provide information to guide national recommendations on quality family planning services. Evidence acquisition Multiple databases were searched during 2010–2011 for peer-reviewed articles published in English from January 1985 through February 2011 describing studies that evaluated contraceptive counseling interventions in clinical settings. Studies were excluded if they focused primarily on prevention of HIV or sexually transmitted infections, focused solely on men, or were conducted outside the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, or New Zealand. Evidence synthesis The initial search identified 12,327 articles, of which 22 studies (from 23 articles) met the inclusion criteria. Six studies examined the impact of contraceptive counseling among adolescents, with four finding a significant positive impact on at least one outcome of interest. Sixteen studies examined the impact of counseling among adults or mixed populations (adults and adolescents), with 11 finding a significant positive impact on at least one outcome of interest. Conclusions Promising components of contraceptive counseling were identified despite the diversity of interventions and inability to compare the relative effectiveness of one approach versus another. The evidence base would be strengthened by improved documentation of counseling procedures; assessment of intervention implementation and fidelity to put study findings into context; and development and inclusion of more RCTs, studies conducted among general samples of women, and studies with sample sizes sufficient to detect important behavioral outcomes at least 12 months post-intervention. PMID:26190845

  16. Mechanism of action of levonorgestrel emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Kahlenborn, Chris; Peck, Rebecca; Severs, Walter B

    2015-02-01

    There has been much debate regarding levonorgestrel emergency contraception's (LNG-EC's) method of action since 1999 when the Food and Drug Administration first approved its use. Proponents of LNG-EC have argued that they have moral certitude that LNG-EC works via a non-abortifacient mechanism of action, and claim that all the major scientific and medical data consistently support this hypothesis. However, newer medical data serve to undermine the consistency of the non-abortifacient hypothesis and instead support the hypothesis that preovulatory administration of LNG-EC has significant potential to work via abortion. The implications of the newer data have important ramifications for medical personnel, patients, and both Catholic and non-Catholic emergency room protocols. In the future, technology such as the use of early pregnancy factor may have the potential to quantify how frequently preovulatory LNG-EC works via abortion. Lay Summary: How Plan B (levonorgestrel emergency contraception) works has been vigorously debated ever since the Food and Drug Administration approved it in 1999. Many doctors and researchers claim that it has either no-or at most-an extremely small chance of working via abortion. However, the latest scientific and medical evidence now demonstrates that levonorgestrel emergency contraception theoretically works via abortion quite often. The implications of the newer data have important ramifications for medical personnel, patients, and both Catholic and non-Catholic emergency room rape protocols. PMID:25698840

  17. The social marketing of contraceptives in Mexico.

    PubMed

    De La Macorra, L

    1980-07-01

    The success in social marketing of the PROFAM brand of subsidized contraceptives, by a nonprofit private institution that supports the Mexican government program, is related here. PROFAM began in 1978, when half of contraceptives were purchased commercially from drugstores: they were neither economical, consistently distributed, nor advertised. Comprehensive market research revealed that a great demand existed. It generated information for choice of items to market, package design, and instructions. In 1979, pills, condoms, foam, cream and vaginal suppositories, all locally produced were distributed. A serious problem initially was the impropriety of using the word "contraceptive" in the media. The first phase of advertising targeted newspapers. After 3 months, 40% of Mexico's drugstores carried PROFAM. The second phase of advertising, in radio, magazines and newspapers, approached consumers with information tailored to the specific socioeconomic group involved. The third phase, geared to rural areas and general stores, concentrates on advantages of each method. Other aggressive aspects of the campaign include house to house sampling and a mail-in question and answer service. Evidence of success in broadcasting the PROFAM message is the frequent reference to PROFAM in jokes in the media and even in graffiti. The government's goal is to reduce the growth rate form 2.9 percent annually to 1 percent by 2000. PMID:12315136

  18. Mechanism of action of levonorgestrel emergency contraception

    PubMed Central

    Kahlenborn, Chris; Peck, Rebecca; Severs, Walter B.

    2015-01-01

    There has been much debate regarding levonorgestrel emergency contraception's (LNG-EC's) method of action since 1999 when the Food and Drug Administration first approved its use. Proponents of LNG-EC have argued that they have moral certitude that LNG-EC works via a non-abortifacient mechanism of action, and claim that all the major scientific and medical data consistently support this hypothesis. However, newer medical data serve to undermine the consistency of the non-abortifacient hypothesis and instead support the hypothesis that preovulatory administration of LNG-EC has significant potential to work via abortion. The implications of the newer data have important ramifications for medical personnel, patients, and both Catholic and non-Catholic emergency room protocols. In the future, technology such as the use of early pregnancy factor may have the potential to quantify how frequently preovulatory LNG-EC works via abortion. Lay Summary: How Plan B (levonorgestrel emergency contraception) works has been vigorously debated ever since the Food and Drug Administration approved it in 1999. Many doctors and researchers claim that it has either no—or at most—an extremely small chance of working via abortion. However, the latest scientific and medical evidence now demonstrates that levonorgestrel emergency contraception theoretically works via abortion quite often. The implications of the newer data have important ramifications for medical personnel, patients, and both Catholic and non-Catholic emergency room rape protocols. PMID:25698840

  19. Oral contraceptives in the immediate postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Hume, A L; Hijab, J C

    1991-04-01

    Although there is a critical need for effective contraception in the immediate postpartum period for women who are not breastfeeding, this need must be balanced against the inherent risks. The most effective form of contraceptive protection--oral contraceptives (OCs)--can present an increased risk of thromboembolism in the period after delivery. The thrombotic changes associated with pregnancy, and the statistics and vascular damage following a delivery, can combine to create greater potential for thromboembolism after delivery than during pregnancy. Reported here is the case of a 21-year-old woman who, 4 weeks postpartum, developed pain and swelling in the right lower calf and mottled discoloration extending from the proximal thigh to the toes. A diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis was made and heparin was administered. In the hospital, the patient experienced pleuritic chest pain and diaphoresis. A ventilation-perfusion scan indicated a pulmonary embolism. 1 week after delivery, the patient had initiated use of Triphasil. Although this woman had other risk factors (obesity, light cigarette smoking, and a sedentary life-style), OC use in the immediate postpartum period may have been the final factor precipitating the thromboembolic event. It is recommended that OC use should be delayed until at least 2 weeks postpartum in women without other risk factors for thromboembolism and until 4-6 weeks postpartum in those with such factors. PMID:2010744

  20. INFLUENCE OF DIET AND BODY LIPIDS ON THE BIOCONCENTRATION OF ENDRIN FROM WATER IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW ('PIMEPHALES PROMELAS')

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the importance of the fathead minnow's (Pimephales promelas) body lipid content and its composition in the bioconcentration of a lipophilic chemical (endrin) from water. For three months prior to exposure, six groups of fish were fed refe...