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Sample records for contrast mixture ratio

  1. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  2. High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, A.; Parsley, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Vehicle/engine analysis studies have identified the High/Dual Mixture Ratio O2/H2 Engine cycle as a leading candidate for an advanced Single Stage to Orbit (SSTO) propulsion system. This cycle is designed to allow operation at a higher than normal O/F ratio of 12 during liftoff and then transition to a more optimum O/F ratio of 6 at altitude. While operation at high mixture ratios lowers specific impulse, the resultant high propellant bulk density and high power density combine to minimize the influence of atmospheric drag and low altitude gravitational forces. Transition to a lower mixture ratio at altitude then provides improved specific impulse relative to a single mixture ratio engine that must select a mixture ratio that is balanced for both low and high altitude operation. This combination of increased altitude specific impulse and high propellant bulk density more than offsets the compromised low altitude performance and results in an overall mission benefit. Two areas of technical concern relative to the execution of this dual mixture ratio cycle concept are addressed. First, actions required to transition from high to low mixture ratio are examined, including an assessment of the main chamber environment as the main chamber mixture ratio passes through stoichiometric. Secondly, two approaches to meet a requirement for high turbine power at high mixture ratio condition are examined. One approach uses high turbine temperature to produce the power and requires cooled turbines. The other approach incorporates an oxidizer-rich preburner to increase turbine work capability via increased turbine mass flow.

  3. Statistical analyses of plume composition and deposited radionuclide mixture ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Terrence D.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Brito, Roxanne; Hunt, Brian D.; Osborn, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    A proposed method is considered to classify the regions in the close neighborhood of selected measurements according to the ratio of two radionuclides measured from either a radioactive plume or a deposited radionuclide mixture. The subsequent associated locations are then considered in the area of interest with a representative ratio class. This method allows for a more comprehensive and meaningful understanding of the data sampled following a radiological incident.

  4. Exclusion probabilities and likelihood ratios with applications to mixtures.

    PubMed

    Slooten, Klaas-Jan; Egeland, Thore

    2016-01-01

    The statistical evidence obtained from mixed DNA profiles can be summarised in several ways in forensic casework including the likelihood ratio (LR) and the Random Man Not Excluded (RMNE) probability. The literature has seen a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of likelihood ratios and exclusion probabilities, and part of our aim is to bring some clarification to this debate. In a previous paper, we proved that there is a general mathematical relationship between these statistics: RMNE can be expressed as a certain average of the LR, implying that the expected value of the LR, when applied to an actual contributor to the mixture, is at least equal to the inverse of the RMNE. While the mentioned paper presented applications for kinship problems, the current paper demonstrates the relevance for mixture cases, and for this purpose, we prove some new general properties. We also demonstrate how to use the distribution of the likelihood ratio for donors of a mixture, to obtain estimates for exceedance probabilities of the LR for non-donors, of which the RMNE is a special case corresponding to L R>0. In order to derive these results, we need to view the likelihood ratio as a random variable. In this paper, we describe how such a randomization can be achieved. The RMNE is usually invoked only for mixtures without dropout. In mixtures, artefacts like dropout and drop-in are commonly encountered and we address this situation too, illustrating our results with a basic but widely implemented model, a so-called binary model. The precise definitions, modelling and interpretation of the required concepts of dropout and drop-in are not entirely obvious, and we attempt to clarify them here in a general likelihood framework for a binary model. PMID:26160753

  5. Automatic image equalization and contrast enhancement using Gaussian mixture modeling.

    PubMed

    Celik, Turgay; Tjahjadi, Tardi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an adaptive image equalization algorithm that automatically enhances the contrast in an input image. The algorithm uses the Gaussian mixture model to model the image gray-level distribution, and the intersection points of the Gaussian components in the model are used to partition the dynamic range of the image into input gray-level intervals. The contrast equalized image is generated by transforming the pixels' gray levels in each input interval to the appropriate output gray-level interval according to the dominant Gaussian component and the cumulative distribution function of the input interval. To take account of the hypothesis that homogeneous regions in the image represent homogeneous silences (or set of Gaussian components) in the image histogram, the Gaussian components with small variances are weighted with smaller values than the Gaussian components with larger variances, and the gray-level distribution is also used to weight the components in the mapping of the input interval to the output interval. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm produces better or comparable enhanced images than several state-of-the-art algorithms. Unlike the other algorithms, the proposed algorithm is free of parameter setting for a given dynamic range of the enhanced image and can be applied to a wide range of image types. PMID:21775265

  6. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Mark Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-15

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  7. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed. PMID:26724040

  8. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  9. High variable mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, C. M.; Tu, W. H.; Weiss, A. H.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of an O2/H2 engine to operate over a range of high-propellant mixture ratios was previously shown to be advantageous in single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles. The results are presented for the analysis of high-performance engine power cycles operating over propellant mixture ratio ranges of 12 to 6 and 9 to 6. A requirement to throttle up to 60 percent of nominal thrust was superimposed as a typical throttle range to limit vehicle acceleration as propellant is expended. The object of the analysis was to determine areas of concern relative to component and engine operability or potential hazards resulting from the operating requirements and ranges of conditions that derive from the overall engine requirements. The SSTO mission necessitates a high-performance, lightweight engine. Therefore, staged combustion power cycles employing either dual fuel-rich preburners or dual mixed (fuel-rich and oxygen-rich) preburners were examined. Engine mass flow and power balances were made and major component operating ranges were defined. Component size and arrangement were determined through engine layouts for one of the configurations evaluated. Each component is being examined to determine if there are areas of concern with respect to component efficiency, operability, reliability, or hazard. The effects of reducing the maximum chamber pressure were investigated for one of the cycles.

  10. Improving the Visible and Infrared Contrast Ratio of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Li, Mary; Moseley, Harvey; Franz, Dave; Yun, Zheng; Kutyrev, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Three device improvements have been developed that dramatically enhance the contrast ratio of microshutters. The goal of a microshutter is to allow as much light through as possible when the shutters are in the open configuration, and preventing any light from passing through when they are in the closed position. The ratio of the transmitted light that is blocked is defined here as the contrast ratio. Three major components contribute to the improved performance of these microshutters: 1. The precise implementation of light shields, which protect the gap around the shutters so no light can leak through. It has been ascertained that without the light shield there would be a gap on the order of 1 percent of the shutter area, limiting the contrast to a maximum of 100. 2. The precise coating of the interior wall of each microshutter was improved with an insulator and metal using an angle deposition technique. The coating prevents any infrared light that finds an entrance on the surface of the microshutter cell from being emitted from a sidewall. Since silicon is in effect transparent to any light with a wavelength longer than .1 micrometer, these coatings are essential to blocking any stray signals when the shutters are closed. 3. A thin film of molybdenum nitride (MoN) was integrated onto the surface of the microshutter blade. This film provides the majority of light blockage over the microshutter and also ensures that the shutter can be operated over a wide temperature range by maintaining its flatness. These improvements were motivated by the requirements dictated by the James Webb Space Telescope NIRSpec instrument. The science goals of the NIRSpec require observing some of the very faintest objects in a given field of view that also may contain some very bright objects. To observe the faint objects, the light from the bright objects - which could be thousands of times brighter - must be completely blocked. If a closed microshutter is even slightly transmissive, a

  11. Quantitative analysis of contrast to noise ratio using a phase contrast x-ray imaging prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Kang, Minhua; Chen, Wei R.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) of the x-ray images taken with the phase contrast imaging mode and compare them with the CNR of the images taken under the conventional mode. For each mode, three images were taken under three exposure conditions of 100 kVp (2.8mAs), 120 kVp (1.9mAs) and 140kVp (1.42mAs). A 1.61cm thick contrast detail phantom was used as an imaging object. For phase contrast, the source to image detector distance (SID) was 182.88 cm and the source to object (SOD) distance was 73.15 cm. The SOD was the same as SID in the conventional imaging mode. A computed radiography (CR) plate was used as a detector and the output CR images were converted to linear form in relation with the incident x-ray exposure. To calculate CNR, an image processing software was used to determine the mean pixel value and the standard deviation of the pixels in the region of interest (ROI) and in the nearby background around ROI. At any given exposure condition investigated in this study, the CNR values for the phase contrast images were better as compared to the corresponding conventional mode images. The superior image quality in terms of CNR is contributed by the phase-shifts resulted contrast, as well as the reduced scatters due to the air gap between the object and the detector.

  12. Contrast to Noise Ratio and Contrast Detail Analysis in Mammography:A Monte Carlo Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, V.; Delis, H.; Kalogeropoulou, C.; Zampakis, P.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2015-09-01

    The mammographic spectrum is one of the major factors affecting image quality in mammography. In this study, a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation model was used to evaluate image quality characteristics of various mammographic spectra. The anode/filter combinations evaluated, were those traditionally used in mammography, for tube voltages between 26 and 30 kVp. The imaging performance was investigated in terms of Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) and Contrast Detail (CD) analysis, by involving human observers, utilizing a mathematical CD phantom. Soft spectra provided the best characteristics in terms of both CNR and CD scores, while tube voltage had a limited effect. W-anode spectra filtered with k-edge filters demonstrated an improved performance, that sometimes was better compared to softer x-ray spectra, produced by Mo or Rh anode. Regarding the filter material, k-edge filters showed superior performance compared to Al filters.

  13. The Oxygen Ratio: A Fuel-Independent Measure of Mixture Stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C J; Musculus, M P; Pickett, L M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2003-12-19

    The pollutant-formation characteristics and other properties of a combustion reaction typically depend strongly on the proximity of the mixture to its stoichiometric condition, i.e., the ''mixture stoichiometry.'' A quantitative, widely applicable measure of this mixture property is therefore a critical independent variable in the study of combustion systems. Such a parameter enables the clear separation of mixture stoichiometry effects from other effects (e.g., fuel molecular structure, product temperature, diluent concentration, pressure). The parameter most often used to quantify mixture stoichiometry is the equivalence ratio. Unfortunately, the equivalence ratio fails to properly account for oxygen in oxygenates, i.e., compounds that have oxygen chemically bound within the fuel molecule. This manuscript introduces the oxygen ratio, a parameter that properly characterizes mixture stoichiometry for a broader class of reactants than does the equivalence ratio, including oxygenates. A detailed definition of the oxygen ratio is provided and used to show its relationship to the equivalence ratio. The definition is also used to quantify errors involved when the equivalence ratio is used as a measure of mixture stoichiometry with oxygenates. Proper usage of the oxygen ratio is discussed and the oxygen ratio is used to interpret results in a practical example.

  14. A new hybrid double divisor ratio spectra method for the analysis of ternary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Rasha M.; Maher, Hadir M.

    2008-10-01

    A new spectrophotometric method was developed for the simultaneous determination of ternary mixtures, without prior separation steps. This method is based on convolution of the double divisor ratio spectra, obtained by dividing the absorption spectrum of the ternary mixture by a standard spectrum of two of the three compounds in the mixture, using combined trigonometric Fourier functions. The magnitude of the Fourier function coefficients, at either maximum or minimum points, is related to the concentration of each drug in the mixture. The mathematical explanation of the procedure is illustrated. The method was applied for the assay of a model mixture consisting of isoniazid (ISN), rifampicin (RIF) and pyrazinamide (PYZ) in synthetic mixtures, commercial tablets and human urine samples. The developed method was compared with the double divisor ratio spectra derivative method (DDRD) and derivative ratio spectra-zero-crossing method (DRSZ). Linearity, validation, accuracy, precision, limits of detection, limits of quantitation, and other aspects of analytical validation are included in the text.

  15. A neural network-based estimator for the mixture ratio of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, T. H.; Musgrave, J.

    1992-01-01

    In order to properly utilize the available fuel and oxidizer of a liquid propellant rocket engine, the mixture ratio is closed loop controlled during main stage (65 percent - 109 percent power) operation. However, because of the lack of flight-capable instrumentation for measuring mixture ratio, the value of mixture ratio in the control loop is estimated using available sensor measurements such as the combustion chamber pressure and the volumetric flow, and the temperature and pressure at the exit duct on the low pressure fuel pump. This estimation scheme has two limitations. First, the estimation formula is based on an empirical curve fitting which is accurate only within a narrow operating range. Second, the mixture ratio estimate relies on a few sensor measurements and loss of any of these measurements will make the estimate invalid. In this paper, we propose a neural network-based estimator for the mixture ratio of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The estimator is an extension of a previously developed neural network based sensor failure detection and recovery algorithm (sensor validation). This neural network uses an auto associative structure which utilizes the redundant information of dissimilar sensors to detect inconsistent measurements. Two approaches have been identified for synthesizing mixture ratio from measurement data using a neural network. The first approach uses an auto associative neural network for sensor validation which is modified to include the mixture ratio as an additional output. The second uses a new network for the mixture ratio estimation in addition to the sensor validation network. Although mixture ratio is not directly measured in flight, it is generally available in simulation and in test bed firing data from facility measurements of fuel and oxidizer volumetric flows. The pros and cons of these two approaches will be discussed in terms of robustness to sensor failures and accuracy of the estimate during typical transients using

  16. Novel spectrophotometric method for selective determination of compounds in ternary mixtures (dual wavelength in ratio spectra)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Ahmed S.

    2015-08-01

    A simple selective spectrophotometric method for determination of compounds in ternary mixture was developed by combining the resolution power of two well-known methods that are commonly used for binary mixtures; namely ratio difference method and dual wavelength. The new method (dual wavelength in ratio spectra) was successfully applied for the determination of a ternary mixture of betamethasone dipropionate (BM), clotrimazole (CT) and benzyl alcohol (BA) in pure powder form and in their pharmaceutical preparation. The difference in amplitudes (ΔP) in the ratio spectra at 252.0 and 258.0 nm (ΔP252.0-258.0nm) corresponds to BM, while ΔP266.8-255.4nm and ΔP254.2-243.5nm corresponds to CT and BA, respectively. The method was validated as per the USP 2005 guidelines. The developed method can be used in quality control laboratories for routine analysis of compounds in ternary mixtures.

  17. Simulation Analysis of Computer-Controlled pressurization for Mixture Ratio Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Leslie A.; Bishop-Behel, Karen; Benfield, Michael P. J.; Kelley, Anthony; Woodcock, Gordon R.

    2005-01-01

    A procedural code (C++) simulation was developed to investigate potentials for mixture ratio control of pressure-fed spacecraft rocket propulsion systems by measuring propellant flows, tank liquid quantities, or both, and using feedback from these measurements to adjust propellant tank pressures to set the correct operating mixture ratio for minimum propellant residuals. The pressurization system eliminated mechanical regulators in favor of a computer-controlled, servo- driven throttling valve. We found that a quasi-steady state simulation (pressure and flow transients in the pressurization systems resulting from changes in flow control valve position are ignored) is adequate for this purpose. Monte-Carlo methods are used to obtain simulated statistics on propellant depletion. Mixture ratio control algorithms based on proportional-integral-differential (PID) controller methods were developed. These algorithms actually set target tank pressures; the tank pressures are controlled by another PID controller. Simulation indicates this approach can provide reductions in residual propellants.

  18. RL10A-3-3B high mixture ratio qualification program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, T.; Varella, D.; Smith, C.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the high mixture ratio qualification testing of the RL10 engine for the Shuttle/Centaur program are presented. The objective of the engine qualification test was to demonstrate the suitability of the RL10A-3-3B engine for space vehicle flight by subjecting it to the testing specified in RL10A-3-3B Model Specification Number 2295 dated February 1986. The applicable section of the specification is presented. Due to payload volume advantages which can be achieved by increasing the operating mixture ratio of the RL10, a decision was made to qualify the engine to run at a higher mixture ratio. A program was created to qualify the RL10 engine for operation at 15,000 pounds thrust and a nominal 6.0 to 1 mixture ratio. This model of the engine was designated the RL10A-3-3B. The qualification program included three test series as follows: (1) hardware durability and limits test in which the engine completed 23 firings and 4605.7 seconds with 1588.7 seconds at less than 6.6 mixture ratio; (2) preliminary qualification test in which the engine completed 26 firings and 5750 seconds; and (3) qualification test in which the engine completed 26 hot firings and 5693.4 seconds with 905.9 seconds at 6.7 mixture ratio. Several changes in engine hardware were required for operation of the RL10A-3-3B engine in the Space Shuttle which include a duel pressure switch ignition, an oxidizer flow control, and helium plumbing changes.

  19. K-edge ratio method for identification of multiple nanoparticulate contrast agents by spectral CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri, H; Ay, M R; Shiran, M B; Soltanian-Zadeh, H

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recently introduced energy-sensitive X-ray CT makes it feasible to discriminate different nanoparticulate contrast materials. The purpose of this work is to present a K-edge ratio method for differentiating multiple simultaneous contrast agents using spectral CT. Methods: The ratio of two images relevant to energy bins straddling the K-edge of the materials is calculated using an analytic CT simulator. In the resulting parametric map, the selected contrast agent regions can be identified using a thresholding algorithm. The K-edge ratio algorithm is applied to spectral images of simulated phantoms to identify and differentiate up to four simultaneous and targeted CT contrast agents. Results: We show that different combinations of simultaneous CT contrast agents can be identified by the proposed K-edge ratio method when energy-sensitive CT is used. In the K-edge parametric maps, the pixel values for biological tissues and contrast agents reach a maximum of 0.95, whereas for the selected contrast agents, the pixel values are larger than 1.10. The number of contrast agents that can be discriminated is limited owing to photon starvation. For reliable material discrimination, minimum photon counts corresponding to 140 kVp, 100 mAs and 5-mm slice thickness must be used. Conclusion: The proposed K-edge ratio method is a straightforward and fast method for identification and discrimination of multiple simultaneous CT contrast agents. Advances in knowledge: A new spectral CT-based algorithm is proposed which provides a new concept of molecular CT imaging by non-iteratively identifying multiple contrast agents when they are simultaneously targeting different organs. PMID:23934964

  20. Finite mixture models for the computation of isotope ratios in mixed isotopic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffler, Daniel; Laaha, Gregor; Leisch, Friedrich; Kappel, Stefanie; Prohaska, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Finite mixture models have been used for more than 100 years, but have seen a real boost in popularity over the last two decades due to the tremendous increase in available computing power. The areas of application of mixture models range from biology and medicine to physics, economics and marketing. These models can be applied to data where observations originate from various groups and where group affiliations are not known, as is the case for multiple isotope ratios present in mixed isotopic samples. Recently, the potential of finite mixture models for the computation of 235U/238U isotope ratios from transient signals measured in individual (sub-)µm-sized particles by laser ablation - multi-collector - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS) was demonstrated by Kappel et al. [1]. The particles, which were deposited on the same substrate, were certified with respect to their isotopic compositions. Here, we focus on the statistical model and its application to isotope data in ecogeochemistry. Commonly applied evaluation approaches for mixed isotopic samples are time-consuming and are dependent on the judgement of the analyst. Thus, isotopic compositions may be overlooked due to the presence of more dominant constituents. Evaluation using finite mixture models can be accomplished unsupervised and automatically. The models try to fit several linear models (regression lines) to subgroups of data taking the respective slope as estimation for the isotope ratio. The finite mixture models are parameterised by: • The number of different ratios. • Number of points belonging to each ratio-group. • The ratios (i.e. slopes) of each group. Fitting of the parameters is done by maximising the log-likelihood function using an iterative expectation-maximisation (EM) algorithm. In each iteration step, groups of size smaller than a control parameter are dropped; thereby the number of different ratios is determined. The analyst only influences some control

  1. Synthesis and characterization of magnesium substituted biphasic mixtures of controlled hydroxyapatite/{beta}-tricalcium phosphate ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, S.; Lemos, I.A.F.; Rocha, J.H.G.; Ferreira, J.M.F. . E-mail: jmf@cv.ua.pt

    2005-10-15

    The present paper investigates the preparation of magnesium (Mg) substituted biphasic mixtures of different hydroxyapatite (HAP)/{beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) ratios through aqueous precipitation method. The concentrations of added magnesium (Mg) were varied with the calcium in order to obtain constant (Ca+Mg)/P ratios of 1.67 ranging from 1.62+0.05, 1.58+0.09 and 1.54+0.13, respectively. The as prepared powders were calcined at different temperatures to study the phase behaviour and thermal stability. The powders were characterized by the following analytical techniques: TG-DTA, X-ray diffraction and FT-IR. The results have shown that substitution of Mg in the calcium-deficient apatites resulted in the formation of biphasic mixtures of different HAP/{beta}-TCP ratios after heating above 700 deg. C. The ratios of the formation of phase mixtures were dependent on the calcium deficiency in the apatites with the higher deficiency having the strongest impact on the increased formation of {beta}-TCP and the substituted Mg was found to stabilize the {beta}-TCP phase. - Graphical abstract: Role of Mg in the behaviour of calcium-deficient apatites during calcination to form biphasic mixtures.

  2. Mean centering of double divisor ratio spectra, a novel spectrophotometric method for analysis of ternary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Said A; Elzanfaly, Eman S; Salem, Maissa Y; El-Zeany, Badr A

    2016-01-15

    A novel spectrophotometric method was developed for determination of ternary mixtures without previous separation, showing significant advantages over conventional methods. The new method is based on mean centering of double divisor ratio spectra. The mathematical explanation of the procedure is illustrated. The method was evaluated by determination of model ternary mixture and by the determination of Amlodipine (AML), Aliskiren (ALI) and Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) in laboratory prepared mixtures and in a commercial pharmaceutical preparation. For proper presentation of the advantages and applicability of the new method, a comparative study was established between the new mean centering of double divisor ratio spectra (MCDD) and two similar methods used for analysis of ternary mixtures, namely mean centering (MC) and double divisor of ratio spectra-derivative spectrophotometry (DDRS-DS). The method was also compared with a reported one for analysis of the pharmaceutical preparation. The method was validated according to the ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limits. PMID:26298680

  3. Mean centering of double divisor ratio spectra, a novel spectrophotometric method for analysis of ternary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Said A.; Elzanfaly, Eman S.; Salem, Maissa Y.; El-Zeany, Badr A.

    2016-01-01

    A novel spectrophotometric method was developed for determination of ternary mixtures without previous separation, showing significant advantages over conventional methods. The new method is based on mean centering of double divisor ratio spectra. The mathematical explanation of the procedure is illustrated. The method was evaluated by determination of model ternary mixture and by the determination of Amlodipine (AML), Aliskiren (ALI) and Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) in laboratory prepared mixtures and in a commercial pharmaceutical preparation. For proper presentation of the advantages and applicability of the new method, a comparative study was established between the new mean centering of double divisor ratio spectra (MCDD) and two similar methods used for analysis of ternary mixtures, namely mean centering (MC) and double divisor of ratio spectra-derivative spectrophotometry (DDRS-DS). The method was also compared with a reported one for analysis of the pharmaceutical preparation. The method was validated according to the ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limits.

  4. Practical method and device for enhancing pulse contrast ratio for lasers and electron accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui; Wilson, Guy

    2014-09-23

    An apparatus and method for enhancing pulse contrast ratios for drive lasers and electron accelerators. The invention comprises a mechanical dual-shutter system wherein the shutters are placed sequentially in series in a laser beam path. Each shutter of the dual shutter system has an individually operated trigger for opening and closing the shutter. As the triggers are operated individually, the delay between opening and closing first shutter and opening and closing the second shutter is variable providing for variable differential time windows and enhancement of pulse contrast ratio.

  5. NMR characterization of functional groups: 9--isomer ratios of available chloromethylstyrene mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.; Khune, G. D.; Khatri, N. A.

    1985-01-01

    From the assignments of the 1H and 13C 11.7 tesla NMR spectra of available mixtures of m- and p-chloromethylstyrene, the proportion of the meta and para compounds are easily determined. For these materials from two common commercial sources, proportions of 72 and 28% and 68 and 32% were found. These concentrations are substantially different from the often assumed 60 and 40% for the meta and para compounds, respectively. The influence of this difference on the desired properties of copolymers made from such mixtures is discussed. An alternative quantitative procedure for determining the chloromethyl group isomer ratios is also described which employs silver trifluoroacetate in acetone displacement of chloride and 19F NMR examination of the resulting ester mixture with a 2.3 tesla spectrometer.

  6. Synthetic isotope mixtures for the calibration of isotope amount ratio measurements of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russe, K.; Valkiers, S.; Taylor, P. D. P.

    2004-07-01

    Synthetic isotope mixtures for the calibration of carbon isotope amount ratio measurements have been prepared by mixing carbon tetrafluoride highly enriched in 13C with carbon tetrafluoride depleted in 13C. Mixing procedures based on volumetry and gravimetry are described. The mixtures served as primary measurement standards for the calibration of isotope amount ratio measurements of the Isotopic Reference Materials PEF1, NBS22 and USGS24. Thus SI-traceable measurements of absolute carbon isotope amount ratios have been performed for the first time without any hypothesis needed for a correction of oxygen isotope abundances, such as is the case for measurements on carbon dioxide. As a result, "absolute" carbon isotope amount ratios determined via carbon tetrafluoride have smaller uncertainties than those published for carbon dioxide. From the measurements of the Reference Materials concerned, the absolute carbon isotope amount ratio of Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite (VPDB)--the hypothetical material upon which the scale for relative carbon isotope ratio measurements is based--was calculated to be R13(VPDB) = (11 101 +/- 16) × 10-6.

  7. Resolution of five-component mixture using mean centering ratio and inverse least squares chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A comparative study of the use of mean centering of ratio spectra and inverse least squares for the resolution of paracetamol, methylparaben, propylparaben, chlorpheniramine maleate and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride has been achieved showing that the two chemometric methods provide a good example of the high resolving power of these techniques. Method (I) is the mean centering of ratio spectra which depends on using the mean centered ratio spectra in four successive steps that eliminates the derivative steps and therefore the signal to noise ratio is improved. The absorption spectra of prepared solutions were measured in the range of 220–280 nm. Method (II) is based on the inverse least squares that depend on updating developed multivariate calibration model. The absorption spectra of the prepared mixtures in the range 230–270 nm were recorded. Results The linear concentration ranges were 0–25.6, 0–15.0, 0–15.0, 0–45.0 and 0–100.0 μg mL-1 for paracetamol, methylparaben, propylparaben, chlorpheniramine maleate and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, respectively. The mean recoveries for simultaneous determination were between 99.9-101.3% for the two methods. The two developed methods have been successfully used for prediction of five-component mixture in Decamol Flu syrup with good selectivity, high sensitivity and extremely low detection limit. Conclusion No published method has been reported for simultaneous determination of the five components of this mixture so that the results of the mean centering of ratio spectra method were compared with those of the proposed inverse least squares method. Statistical comparison was performed using t-test and F-ratio at P = 0.05. There was no significant difference between the results. PMID:24028626

  8. [Measurement of Mole Ratio for Alkali Metal Mixture by Using Spectral Absorption Method].

    PubMed

    Zou, Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Yao; Chen, Xi-yuan

    2015-08-01

    The ratio of alkali metal mixture is one of the most important parameters in gauge head belonging to the ultra-sensitivity inertial measurement equipment, which is required to detect precisely. According to the feature that ratio of alkali metal is related to alkali metal vapor density, the theory of optical depth is used to detect the ratio of alkali metal in the present article. The result shows that the data got by the theory of optical depth compared with empirical formula differs at three orders of magnitude, which can't ensure the accuracy. By changing the data processing method, model between spectral absorption rate and temperature in cell is established. The temperature in alkali metal cell is calibrated by spectral absorption rate. The ratio of alkali metal atoms in the cell is analyzed by calculating the alkali density with empirical formula. The computational error is less than 10%. PMID:26672309

  9. Three different spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra for determination of binary mixture of Amlodipine and Atorvastatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Hany W.; Hassan, Said A.; Salem, Maissa Y.; El-Zeiny, Badr A.

    2011-12-01

    Three simple, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra are developed for the simultaneous determination of Amlodipine besylate (AM) and Atorvastatin calcium (AT) in tablet dosage forms. The first method is first derivative of the ratio spectra ( 1DD), the second is ratio subtraction and the third is the method of mean centering of ratio spectra. The calibration curve is linear over the concentration range of 3-40 and 8-32 μg/ml for AM and AT, respectively. These methods are tested by analyzing synthetic mixtures of the above drugs and they are applied to commercial pharmaceutical preparation of the subjected drugs. Standard deviation is <1.5 in the assay of raw materials and tablets. Methods are validated as per ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness are found to be within the acceptable limit.

  10. Cryogenic separation of oxygen-argon mixture in natural air samples for isotopic and molecular ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habeeb Rahman, Keedakkadan; Abe, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    The discovery of mass independent isotope fractionation in oxygen during the formation of ozone in the stratosphere has initiated a wide application in isotope geochemistry field. Separation of oxygen-argon mixture has become the foundation of high precision analysis of Δ17O and δ(O2/Ar) for geochemical applications. Here we present precise and simplified cryogenic separation of argon oxygen mixture from the atmospheric and dissolved air using 30/60 mesh 5A molecular sieve zeolite. A pioneer study of this method was conducted by Thiemens and Meagher in 1984. The column which is made of glass tube contains about 1.1 grams of molecular sieve zeolite and both ends of column was filled with glass wools. The experimental set up was tested for different combination of molecular sieves and slurry temperatures. We found the most efficient condition for the separation was at a column temperature of -103°C. For complete transfer of O2 and Ar mixture usually takes in 15-20 minutes time. The isotopic ratios of oxygen were analyzed using mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer Delta Plus) relative to reference oxygen-argon mixture at 3V of m/z 32 for both sample and reference side. The signals of m/z 28, 32, and 40 were measured by dynamically to determine oxygen -argon ratio and to check nitrogen contamination. Repeated measurements of atmospheric air yielded a reproducibility (SE n=80) of 0.006, 0.004 and 0.19‰ for δ17O, δ18O and δO2/Ar respectively. The isotopic and molecular fractionation of argon- oxygen mixture during gas adsorption and desorption while using molecular sieve under liquid nitrogen temperature was studied. We have established a linear relationship governing the effect of 13X and 5A molecular sieves on molecular fractionation. And suggested the use of single 1/8" pellet 13X molecular sieve provided a negligible fractionation.

  11. Phase behavior of mixtures of oppositely charged protein nanoparticles at asymmetric charge ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarten Biesheuvel, P.; Lindhoud, Saskia; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; de Vries, Renko

    2006-04-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for the phase behavior of mixtures of oppositely charged globular protein molecules in aqueous solutions containing monovalent salt. These colloidal mixtures are interesting model systems, on the one hand for electrolyte solutions (“colloidal ionic liquids”), and on the other for mixtures of oppositely charged (bio)macromolecules, colloids, micelles, etc., with the range of the electrostatic interactions (Debye length) easily tunable from much smaller to much larger than the particle size, simply by adding different amounts of monovalent salt. In this paper we investigate the phase behavior of such mixtures in the case that equally sized colloids have a large difference in charge magnitude. This is possible at any mixing ratio because small ions compensate any colloidal charge asymmetry. Our experimental system is based on lysozyme, a positively charged “hard” globular protein molecule, and succinylated lysozyme, a chemical modification of lysozyme which is negatively charged. By changing the solution pH we can adjust the ratio of charge between the two molecules. To describe phase separation into a dilute phase and a dense “complex” phase, a thermodynamic model is set up in which we combine the Carnahan-Starling-van der Waals equation of state with a heterogeneous Poisson-Boltzmann cell model and include the possibility that protein molecules adjust their charge when they move from one phase to the other (charge regulation). The theory uses the nonelectrostatic attraction strength as the only adjustable parameter and reasonably well reproduces the data in that complexation is only possible at intermediate pH , not too asymmetric mixing ratios, and low enough ionic strength and temperature.

  12. Modeling of pharmaceuticals mixtures toxicity with deviation ratio and best-fit functions models.

    PubMed

    Wieczerzak, Monika; Kudłak, Błażej; Yotova, Galina; Nedyalkova, Miroslava; Tsakovski, Stefan; Simeonov, Vasil; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-11-15

    The present study deals with assessment of ecotoxicological parameters of 9 drugs (diclofenac (sodium salt), oxytetracycline hydrochloride, fluoxetine hydrochloride, chloramphenicol, ketoprofen, progesterone, estrone, androstenedione and gemfibrozil), present in the environmental compartments at specific concentration levels, and their mutual combinations by couples against Microtox® and XenoScreen YES/YAS® bioassays. As the quantitative assessment of ecotoxicity of drug mixtures is an complex and sophisticated topic in the present study we have used two major approaches to gain specific information on the mutual impact of two separate drugs present in a mixture. The first approach is well documented in many toxicological studies and follows the procedure for assessing three types of models, namely concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and simple interaction (SI) by calculation of a model deviation ratio (MDR) for each one of the experiments carried out. The second approach used was based on the assumption that the mutual impact in each mixture of two drugs could be described by a best-fit model function with calculation of weight (regression coefficient or other model parameter) for each of the participants in the mixture or by correlation analysis. It was shown that the sign and the absolute value of the weight or the correlation coefficient could be a reliable measure for the impact of either drug A on drug B or, vice versa, of B on A. Results of studies justify the statement, that both of the approaches show similar assessment of the mode of mutual interaction of the drugs studied. It was found that most of the drug mixtures exhibit independent action and quite few of the mixtures show synergic or dependent action. PMID:27479466

  13. Measurement of the optimum surround ratio inducing the highest perceived image contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Ye Seul; Kim, Youn Jin; Kim, Hong-Suk; Park, Seung-Ok

    2010-10-01

    Much research has shown that perceived image contrast increases as the surround luminance increases, but a number of recent studies reported opposite trends under higher surround luminance levels. We measured the change in perceived image contrast under a wide range of surround luminance levels covering from dark up to 2087 cd/m2. A large-area illuminator was used to illuminate the surround. It consists of 23 dimmable fluorescent lamps and a diffuser. Its maximum luminance is 2087 cd/m2 and could be adjusted to six lower levels. A set of paired comparison experiments was conducted to compare the perception of image contrast under seven different surround luminance levels. The results showed that the perceived image contrast varies with surround luminance and the maximum perceived image contrast is found near a surround ratio (SR) of 1. As SR increases from 0 to 1, the z score is increased, which can be fully expected by the Bartleson and Breneman effect. However, it is drastically decreased in the region of SR > 1; thus, the perceived image contrast is eventually decreased.

  14. Smart manipulation of ratio spectra for resolving a pharmaceutical mixture of Methocarbamol and Paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Essam, Hebatallah M; Abd-El Rahman, Mohamed K

    2015-04-15

    Two smart, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra are developed for simultaneous determination of Methocarbamol (METH) and Paracetamol (PAR) in their combined pharmaceutical formulation without preliminary separation. Method A, is an extended ratio subtraction one (EXRSM) coupled with ratio subtraction method (RSM), which depends on subtraction of the plateau values from the ratio spectrum. Method B is a ratio difference spectrophotometric one (RDM) which measures the difference in amplitudes of ratio spectra between 278 and 286 nm for METH and 247 and 260 nm for PAR. The calibration curves are linear over the concentration range of 10-100 μg mL(-1) and 2-20 μg mL(-1) for METH and PAR, respectively. The specificity of the developed methods was investigated by analyzing different laboratory prepared mixtures of the two drugs. Both methods were applied successfully for the determination of the selected drugs in their combined dosage form. Furthermore, validation was performed according to ICH guidelines; accuracy, precision and repeatability are found to be within the acceptable limits. Statistical studies showed that both methods can be competitively applied in quality control laboratories. PMID:25659736

  15. Smart manipulation of ratio spectra for resolving a pharmaceutical mixture of Methocarbamol and Paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essam, Hebatallah M.; Abd-El Rahman, Mohamed K.

    2015-04-01

    Two smart, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra are developed for simultaneous determination of Methocarbamol (METH) and Paracetamol (PAR) in their combined pharmaceutical formulation without preliminary separation. Method A, is an extended ratio subtraction one (EXRSM) coupled with ratio subtraction method (RSM), which depends on subtraction of the plateau values from the ratio spectrum. Method B is a ratio difference spectrophotometric one (RDM) which measures the difference in amplitudes of ratio spectra between 278 and 286 nm for METH and 247 and 260 nm for PAR. The calibration curves are linear over the concentration range of 10-100 μg mL-1 and 2-20 μg mL-1 for METH and PAR, respectively. The specificity of the developed methods was investigated by analyzing different laboratory prepared mixtures of the two drugs. Both methods were applied successfully for the determination of the selected drugs in their combined dosage form. Furthermore, validation was performed according to ICH guidelines; accuracy, precision and repeatability are found to be within the acceptable limits. Statistical studies showed that both methods can be competitively applied in quality control laboratories.

  16. Display characterization by eye: contrast ratio and discrimination throughout the grayscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, Jennifer; Arend, Larry; Larimer, James O.

    2004-06-01

    We have measured the ability of observers to estimate the contrast ratio (maximum white luminance / minimum black or gray) of various displays and to assess luminous discrimination over the tonescale of the display. This was done using only the computer itself and easily-distributed devices such as neutral density filters. The ultimate goal of this work is to see how much of the characterization of a display can be performed by the ordinary user in situ, in a manner that takes advantage of the unique abilities of the human visual system and measures visually important aspects of the display. We discuss the relationship among contrast ratio, tone scale, display transfer function and room lighting. These results may contribute to the development of applications that allow optimization of displays for the situated viewer / display system without instrumentation and without indirect inferences from laboratory to workplace.

  17. High ambient contrast ratio OLED and QLED without a circular polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Guanjun; Zhu, Ruidong; Tsai, Yi-Shou; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Luo, Zhenyue; Lee, Yuh-Zheng; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2016-08-01

    A high ambient contrast ratio display device using a transparent organic light emitting diode (OLED) or transparent quantum-dot light-emitting diode (QLED) with embedded multilayered structure and absorber is proposed and its performance is simulated. With the help of multilayered structure, the device structure allows almost all ambient light to get through the display device and be absorbed by the absorber. Because the reflected ambient light is greatly reduced, the ambient contrast ratio of the display system is improved significantly. Meanwhile, the multilayered structure helps to lower the effective refractive index, which in turn improves the out-coupling efficiency of the display system. Potential applications for sunlight readable flexible and rollable displays are emphasized.

  18. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  19. Universal amplitude ratios and the interfacial tension near consolute points of binary liquid mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moldover, M. R.; Schmidt, J. W.; Chaar, H.

    1986-01-01

    The interfacial tension of the binary liquid mixtures triethylamine/heavy water, triethylamine/water, and cyclohexane/methanol near their consolute temperatures is determined experimentally by measuring the densities of the phases and the capillary lengths. The results are presented in tables and graphs and compared with published data obtained by other methods and with theoretical predictions. The findings are shown to be in good agreement with previous experiments, confirming the discrepancy between temperature-independent universal amplitude ratios calculated from such data and those predicted by renormalization-group calculations or Monte Carlo simulations of Ising models.

  20. Method and apparatus for varying the fuel ratio of an air-fuel mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardi, S.

    1981-03-24

    A method and apparatus is described for varying the fuel ratio of an air-fuel mixture supplied to the carburetor of an internal combustion engine. In a first embodiment, a valve opens and closes a port in an aluminum block between a passage coupled to the pcv and carburetor and a second passage open to the atmosphere. A spring in the second passage modulates the air flow as a function of vacuum pressure and thermally responsive means maintains the valve closed until the engine reaches its operating temperature. In a second embodiment the valve is opened as a function of the wind pressure produced during vehicle movement.

  1. Gaussian Mixture Models of Between-Source Variation for Likelihood Ratio Computation from Multivariate Data

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Pedroso, Javier; Ramos, Daniel; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    In forensic science, trace evidence found at a crime scene and on suspect has to be evaluated from the measurements performed on them, usually in the form of multivariate data (for example, several chemical compound or physical characteristics). In order to assess the strength of that evidence, the likelihood ratio framework is being increasingly adopted. Several methods have been derived in order to obtain likelihood ratios directly from univariate or multivariate data by modelling both the variation appearing between observations (or features) coming from the same source (within-source variation) and that appearing between observations coming from different sources (between-source variation). In the widely used multivariate kernel likelihood-ratio, the within-source distribution is assumed to be normally distributed and constant among different sources and the between-source variation is modelled through a kernel density function (KDF). In order to better fit the observed distribution of the between-source variation, this paper presents a different approach in which a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) is used instead of a KDF. As it will be shown, this approach provides better-calibrated likelihood ratios as measured by the log-likelihood ratio cost (Cllr) in experiments performed on freely available forensic datasets involving different trace evidences: inks, glass fragments and car paints. PMID:26901680

  2. A FLEXIBLE APPROACH FOR EVALUATING FIXED RATIO MIXTURES OF FULL AND PARTIAL AGONISTS FOR MIXTURES OF MANY CHEMICALS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detecting interaction in chemical mixtures can be complicated by differences in the shapes of the dose-response curves of the individual components (e.g. mixtures of full and partial agonists with differing response maxima). We present an analysis scheme where flexible single che...

  3. An assessment of the information content of likelihood ratios derived from complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Clare D; Rudin, Norah; Inman, Keith; Lohmueller, Kirk E

    2016-05-01

    With the increasing sensitivity of DNA typing methodologies, as well as increasing awareness by law enforcement of the perceived capabilities of DNA typing, complex mixtures consisting of DNA from two or more contributors are increasingly being encountered. However, insufficient research has been conducted to characterize the ability to distinguish a true contributor (TC) from a known non-contributor (KNC) in these complex samples, and under what specific conditions. In order to investigate this question, sets of six 15-locus Caucasian genotype profiles were simulated and used to create mixtures containing 2-5 contributors. Likelihood ratios were computed for various situations, including varying numbers of contributors and unknowns in the evidence profile, as well as comparisons of the evidence profile to TCs and KNCs. This work was intended to illustrate the best-case scenario, in which all alleles from the TC were detected in the simulated evidence samples. Therefore the possibility of drop-out was not modeled in this study. The computer program DNAMIX was then used to compute LRs comparing the evidence profile to TCs and KNCs. This resulted in 140,000 LRs for each of the two scenarios. These complex mixture simulations show that, even when all alleles are detected (i.e. no drop-out), TCs can generate LRs less than 1 across a 15-locus profile. However, this outcome was rare, 7 of 140,000 replicates (0.005%), and associated only with mixtures comprising 5 contributors in which the numerator hypothesis includes one or more unknown contributors. For KNCs, LRs were found to be greater than 1 in a small number of replicates (75 of 140,000 replicates, or 0.05%). These replicates were limited to 4 and 5 person mixtures with 1 or more unknowns in the numerator. Only 5 of these 75 replicates (0.004%) yielded an LR greater than 1,000. Thus, overall, these results imply that the weight of evidence that can be derived from complex mixtures containing up to 5 contributors

  4. IMPROVEMENTS IN ELASTOGRAPHIC CONTRAST-TO-NOISE RATIO USING SPATIAL-ANGULAR COMPOUNDING

    PubMed Central

    Techavipoo, Udomchai; Varghese, Tomy

    2005-01-01

    Spatial-angular compounding is a new technique developed for improving the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in elastography. Under this method, elastograms of a region-of-interest (ROI) are obtained from a spatially weighted average of local strain estimated along different insonification angles. In this article, we investigate the improvements in the strain contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the spatially compounded elastograms. Spatial angular compounding is also applied and evaluated in conjunction with global temporal stretching. Quantitative experimental results obtained using a single-inclusion tissue-mimicking phantom demonstrate that the strain contrast reduces slightly but the CNR improves by around 8 to 13 dB. We also present experimental spatial angular compounding results obtained from an in vitro thermal lesion in canine liver tissue embedded in a gelatin phantom that demonstrate the improved visual characteristics (due to the improved CNR) of the compound elastogram. The experimental results provide guidelines for the practical range of maximum insonification angles and estimates of the optimum angular increment. (E-mail: tvarghese@wisc.edu) PMID:15831331

  5. Epitaxial growth of quantum rods with high aspect ratio and compositional contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. H.; Patriarche, G.

    2008-12-01

    The epitaxial growth of quantum rods (QRs) on GaAs was investigated. It was found that GaAs thickness in the GaAs/InAs superlattice used for QR formation plays a key role in improving the QR structural properties. Increasing the GaAs thickness results in both an increased In compositional contrast between the QRs and surrounding layer, and an increased QR length. QRs with an aspect ratio of up to 10 were obtained, representing quasiquantum wires in a GaAs matrix. Due to modified confinement and strain potential, such nanostructure is promising for controlling gain polarization.

  6. Derivative-ratio spectrophotometric method for the determination of ternary mixture of aspirin, paracetamol and salicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Yazbi, Fawzi A.; Hammud, Hassan H.; Assi, Sulaf A.

    2007-10-01

    A derivative spectrophotometric method was developed for the assay of a ternary mixture of aspirin (ASP), paracetamol (PAR) and salicylic acid (SAL). The method is based on the use of the first and second derivatives of the ratio spectra and measurement at zero-crossing wavelengths. The ratio spectra were obtained by dividing the absorption spectrum of the mixture by that of one of the components. The concentration of the other components are then determined from their respective calibration curves treated similarly. The described method was applied for the determination of these combinations in synthetic mixtures and dosage forms. The results obtained were accurate and precise.

  7. Highly photostable, reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein with high contrast ratio for live-cell superresolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Li, Dong; He, Wenting; Peng, Jianxin; Betzig, Eric; Xu, Pingyong

    2016-09-13

    Two long-standing problems for superresolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy are high illumination intensity and long acquisition time, which significantly hamper its application for live-cell imaging. Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have made it possible to dramatically lower the illumination intensities in saturated depletion-based SR techniques, such as saturated depletion nonlinear structured illumination microscopy (NL-SIM) and reversible saturable optical fluorescence transition microscopy. The characteristics of RSFPs most critical for SR live-cell imaging include, first, the integrated fluorescence signal across each switching cycle, which depends upon the absorption cross-section, effective quantum yield, and characteristic switching time from the fluorescent "on" to "off" state; second, the fluorescence contrast ratio of on/off states; and third, the photostability under excitation and depletion. Up to now, the RSFPs of the Dronpa and rsEGFP (reversibly switchable EGFP) families have been exploited for SR imaging. However, their limited number of switching cycles, relatively low fluorescence signal, and poor contrast ratio under physiological conditions ultimately restrict their utility in time-lapse live-cell imaging and their ability to reach the desired resolution at a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we present a truly monomeric RSFP, Skylan-NS, whose properties are optimized for the recently developed patterned activation NL-SIM, which enables low-intensity (∼100 W/cm(2)) live-cell SR imaging at ∼60-nm resolution at subsecond acquisition times for tens of time points over broad field of view. PMID:27562163

  8. Choosing a mixture ratio for the on-farm production of AM fungus inoculum in mixtures of compost and vermiculite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal [AM] fungi are potentially important tools in sustainable agriculture due to their roles in crop nutrient uptake, disease resistance, and water relations and in stabilizing soil aggregates. Inocula of these fungi can be effectively produced on-farm in mixtures of compost and...

  9. Mixture Analysis and Mammalian Sex Ratio Among Middle Pleistocene Mouflon of Arago Cave, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monchot, Hervé

    1999-09-01

    In archaeological studies, it is often important to be able assess sexual dimorphism and sex ratios in populations. Obtaining sex ratio is easy if each individual in the population can be accurately sexed through the use of one more objective variables. But this is often impossible, due to incompleteness of the osteological record. A modern statistical approach to handle this problem is Mixture Analysis using the method of maximum likelihood. It consists of determining how many groups are present in the sample, two in this case, in which proportions they occur, and to estimate the parameters accordingly. This paper shows the use of this method on vertebrate fossil populations in a prehistoric context with implications on prey acquisition by early humans. For instance, the analysis of mouflon bones from Arago cave (Tautavel, France) indicates that there are more females than males in the F layer. According to the ethology of the animal, this indicates that the hunting strategy could be the result of selective choice of the prey. Moreover, we may deduce the presence of Anteneandertalians on the site during spring and summer periods.

  10. D-optimal experimental designs to test for departure from additivity in a fixed-ratio mixture ray.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Todd; Gennings, Chris; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Herr, David W

    2005-12-01

    Traditional factorial designs for evaluating interactions among chemicals in a mixture may be prohibitive when the number of chemicals is large. Using a mixture of chemicals with a fixed ratio (mixture ray) results in an economical design that allows estimation of additivity or nonadditive interaction for a mixture of interest. This methodology is extended easily to a mixture with a large number of chemicals. Optimal experimental conditions can be chosen that result in increased power to detect departures from additivity. Although these designs are used widely for linear models, optimal designs for nonlinear threshold models are less well known. In the present work, the use of D-optimal designs is demonstrated for nonlinear threshold models applied to a fixed-ratio mixture ray. For a fixed sample size, this design criterion selects the experimental doses and number of subjects per dose level that result in minimum variance of the model parameters and thus increased power to detect departures from additivity. An optimal design is illustrated for a 2:1 ratio (chlorpyrifos:carbaryl) mixture experiment. For this example, and in general, the optimal designs for the nonlinear threshold model depend on prior specification of the slope and dose threshold parameters. Use of a D-optimal criterion produces experimental designs with increased power, whereas standard nonoptimal designs with equally spaced dose groups may result in low power if the active range or threshold is missed. PMID:16162847

  11. Assessing technical performance in differential gene expression experiments with external spike-in RNA control ratio mixtures.

    PubMed

    Munro, Sarah A; Lund, Steven P; Pine, P Scott; Binder, Hans; Clevert, Djork-Arné; Conesa, Ana; Dopazo, Joaquin; Fasold, Mario; Hochreiter, Sepp; Hong, Huixiao; Jafari, Nadereh; Kreil, David P; Łabaj, Paweł P; Li, Sheng; Liao, Yang; Lin, Simon M; Meehan, Joseph; Mason, Christopher E; Santoyo-Lopez, Javier; Setterquist, Robert A; Shi, Leming; Shi, Wei; Smyth, Gordon K; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Su, Zhenqiang; Tong, Weida; Wang, Charles; Wang, Jian; Xu, Joshua; Ye, Zhan; Yang, Yong; Yu, Ying; Salit, Marc

    2014-01-01

    There is a critical need for standard approaches to assess, report and compare the technical performance of genome-scale differential gene expression experiments. Here we assess technical performance with a proposed standard 'dashboard' of metrics derived from analysis of external spike-in RNA control ratio mixtures. These control ratio mixtures with defined abundance ratios enable assessment of diagnostic performance of differentially expressed transcript lists, limit of detection of ratio (LODR) estimates and expression ratio variability and measurement bias. The performance metrics suite is applicable to analysis of a typical experiment, and here we also apply these metrics to evaluate technical performance among laboratories. An interlaboratory study using identical samples shared among 12 laboratories with three different measurement processes demonstrates generally consistent diagnostic power across 11 laboratories. Ratio measurement variability and bias are also comparable among laboratories for the same measurement process. We observe different biases for measurement processes using different mRNA-enrichment protocols. PMID:25254650

  12. Different signal processing techniques of ratio spectra for spectrophotometric resolution of binary mixture of bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide; a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Elzanfaly, Eman S; Hassan, Said A; Salem, Maissa Y; El-Zeany, Badr A

    2015-04-01

    Five signal processing techniques were applied to ratio spectra for quantitative determination of bisoprolol (BIS) and hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) in their binary mixture. The proposed techniques are Numerical Differentiation of Ratio Spectra (ND-RS), Savitsky-Golay of Ratio Spectra (SG-RS), Continuous Wavelet Transform of Ratio Spectra (CWT-RS), Mean Centering of Ratio Spectra (MC-RS) and Discrete Fourier Transform of Ratio Spectra (DFT-RS). The linearity of the proposed methods was investigated in the range of 2-40 and 1-22 μg/mL for BIS and HCT, respectively. The proposed methods were applied successfully for the determination of the drugs in laboratory prepared mixtures and in commercial pharmaceutical preparations and standard deviation was less than 1.5. The five signal processing techniques were compared to each other and validated according to the ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limit. PMID:25615684

  13. Different signal processing techniques of ratio spectra for spectrophotometric resolution of binary mixture of bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide; a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzanfaly, Eman S.; Hassan, Said A.; Salem, Maissa Y.; El-Zeany, Badr A.

    2015-04-01

    Five signal processing techniques were applied to ratio spectra for quantitative determination of bisoprolol (BIS) and hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) in their binary mixture. The proposed techniques are Numerical Differentiation of Ratio Spectra (ND-RS), Savitsky-Golay of Ratio Spectra (SG-RS), Continuous Wavelet Transform of Ratio Spectra (CWT-RS), Mean Centering of Ratio Spectra (MC-RS) and Discrete Fourier Transform of Ratio Spectra (DFT-RS). The linearity of the proposed methods was investigated in the range of 2-40 and 1-22 μg/mL for BIS and HCT, respectively. The proposed methods were applied successfully for the determination of the drugs in laboratory prepared mixtures and in commercial pharmaceutical preparations and standard deviation was less than 1.5. The five signal processing techniques were compared to each other and validated according to the ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limit.

  14. Pedestal cleaning for high laser pulse contrast ratio with a 100 TW class laser system.

    PubMed

    Fourmaux, S; Payeur, S; Buffechoux, S; Lassonde, P; St-Pierre, C; Martin, F; Kieffer, J C

    2011-04-25

    Laser matter interaction at relativistic intensities using 100 TW class laser systems or higher is becoming more and more widespread. One of the critical issues of such laser systems is to let the laser pulse interact at high intensity with the solid target and avoid any pre-plasma. Thus, a high Laser Pulse Contrast Ratio (LPCR) parameter is of prime importance. We present the LPCR characterization of a high repetition 100 TW class laser system. We demonstrate that the generated Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) degrades the overall LPCR performance. We propose a simple way to clean the pulse after the first amplification stage by introducing a solid state saturable absorber which results in a LPCR improvement to better than 10(10) with only a 30% energy loss at a 10 Hz repetition rate. We finally correlated this cleaning method with experimental results. PMID:21643098

  15. Contrast ratio enhancement in a saturable absorber-based photonic analog-to-digital converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayduk, Michael J.; Bussjager, Rebecca J.; Johns, Steven T.; Gerhardstein, Cheryl M.; Wicks, Gary W.

    2002-07-01

    Optical processing techniques are expected to play a key role in the next generation of advanced high-speed analog- to-digital converters (ADCs). These techniques will alleviate the current limitations inherent in conventional electronic ADCs. We are currently developing a novel photonic ADC module that incorporates the use of semiconductor saturable absorbers to perform the data quantization at speeds in the tens of GHz regime. Results will be presented for the experimental material characterization of the semiconductor saturable absorbers used in the data conversion process. Enhancement of the contrast ratio of the saturable absorber between the 'on' state and the 'off' state can also be greatly enhanced by the use of an asymmetric Fabry-Perot etalon. Initial experimental results for a saturable absorber contained within an etalon will also be presented.

  16. Extreme Contrast Ratio Imaging of Sirius with a Charge Injection Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batcheldor, D.; Foadi, R.; Bahr, C.; Jenne, J.; Ninkov, Z.; Bhaskaran, S.; Chapman, T.

    2016-02-01

    The next fundamental steps forward in understanding our place in the universe could be a result of advances in extreme contrast ratio (ECR) imaging and point-spread function (PSF) suppression. For example, blinded by quasar light we have yet to fully understand the processes of galaxy and star formation and evolution, and there is an ongoing race to obtain a direct image of an exo-Earth lost in the glare of its host star. To fully explore the features of these systems, we must perform observations in which contrast ratios (CRs) of at least one billion can be regularly achieved with sub 0.″1 inner working angles. Here, we present the details of a latest-generation 32-bit charge injection device (CID) that could conceivably achieve CRs on the order of one billion. We also demonstrate some of its ECR imaging abilities for astronomical imaging. At a separation of two arcminutes, we report a direct CR of {{Δ }}{m}v=18.3,{log}({CR})=7.3, or 1 part in 20 million, from observations of the Sirius field. The atmospheric conditions present during the collection of this data prevented less modest results, and we expect to be able to achieve higher CRs, with improved inner working angles, simply by operating a CID at a world-class observing site. However, CIDs do not directly provide any PSF suppression. Therefore, combining CID imaging with a simple PSF suppression technique like angular differential imaging could provide a cheap and easy alternative to the complex ECR techniques currently being employed.

  17. A consideration of the signal-to-noise ratio in phase contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuri; Fujita, Naotoshi; Kodera, Yoshie

    2010-04-01

    Recently, with developments in medicine, digital systems such as computed radiography (CR) and flat-panel detector (FPD) systems are being employed for mammography instead of analog systems such as the screen-film system. Phase-contrast mammography (PCM) is a commercially available digital system that uses images with a magnification of 1.75x. To study the effect of the air gap in PCM, we measured the scatter fraction ratio (SFR) and calculated the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in PCM, and compared it to that in conventional mammography (CM). Then, to extend the SNR to the spatial frequency domain, we calculated the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) used by the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum of the pixel value (NPSΔPV), gradient of the digital characteristic curve, and number of X-ray photons. The obtained results indicated that the SFR of the PCM was as low as that of the CM with a grid. When the exposure dose was constant, the SNR of the PCM was the highest in all systems. Moreover, the NEQ and DQE for the PCM were higher than those for the CM (G-) in the spatial frequency domain over 2.5 cycles/mm. These results showed that the number of scattered X-rays was reduced sufficiently by the air gap in the PCM and the NEQ and DQE for PCM were influenced by the presampled MTF in the high-spatial-frequency domain.

  18. The mechanisms associated with the development of hypertension after exposure to lead, mercury species or their mixtures differs with the metal and the mixture ratio.

    PubMed

    Wildemann, Tanja M; Siciliano, Steven D; Weber, Lynn P

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is considered to be the most important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Beside life-style risk factors, exposure to lead and mercury species are increasingly discussed as potential risk factors. Although there are a few previous studies, the underlying mechanism by which exposure to lead and mercury disturb blood pressure regulation is not currently understood. Potential mechanisms are oxidative stress production, kidney damage and activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), all of which can interact to cause dysregulation of blood pressure. Male rats (Wistar) were exposed to lead, inorganic mercury, methylmercury or two mixtures of all three metals for four weeks through the drinking water. The two mixture ratios were based on ratios of known reference values or environmental exposure from the literature. To investigate the potential mechanism of actions, blood pressure was measured after four weeks and compared to plasma nitrotyrosine or reduced/oxidized glutathione levels in liver as markers for oxidative stress. Plasma renin and angiotensin II levels were used as markers for RAS activation. Finally, kidney function and injury were assessed via urinary and plasma creatinine levels, creatinine clearance and urinary kidney-injury molecule (KIM-1). While exposure to lead by itself increased oxidative stress and kidney damage along with blood pressure, inorganic mercury did not affect blood pressure or any end-point examined. Conversely, methylmercury instead increased RAS activation along with blood pressure. Surprisingly, when administered as mixtures, lead no longer increased oxidative stress or altered kidney function. Moreover, the mixture based on an environmental ratio no longer had an effect on blood pressure, while the reference value ratio still retained an increase in blood pressure. Based on our results, the prominent mechanism of action associated with the development of hypertension seems to be oxidative

  19. High contrast ratio and fast-switching dual polymer electrochromic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sapp, S.A.; Sotzing, G.A.; Reynolds, J.R.

    1998-08-01

    A series of dual polymer electrochromic devices (ECDs) based on 12 complementary pairs of conducting polymer films have been constructed using 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-containing conducting polymers. Poly[3,6-bis(2-(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene))-N-methylcarbazole] (PBEDOT-NCH{sub 3}Cz), poly[3,6-bis(2-(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene))-N-eicosylcarbazole] (PBEDOT-NC{sub 20}H{sub 41}Cz), and poly[4,4{prime}-bis(2-(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene))biphenyl] (PBEDOT-BP) were utilized as anodically coloring polymers that electrochemically switch between an oxidized deep blue absorptive state and a transmissive (orange or yellow) reduced state. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT) and its alkyl derivatives (PEDOT-C{sub 14}H{sub 29} and PEDOT-C{sub 16}H{sub 33}) have been used as high-contrast cathodically coloring polymers that switch between a deep blue absorptive state in the reduced form and a sky blue, highly transmissive state in the oxidized form. The dual polymer ECDs were constructed by separating complementary pairs of EC polymer films, deposited on ITO glass, with a gel electrolyte composed of a lithium salt and plasticized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Device contrast ratios, measured as {Delta}%T, ranged from 27% to 63%, and subsecond switching times for full color change were achieved. These devices were found to exhibit extremely high coloration efficiencies of up to 1400 cm{sup 2}/C over narrow (ca. 100 nm) wavelength ranges and to retain up to 60% of their optical response after 10,000 deep, double potential steps, rendering them useful for EC applications.

  20. Sedimentary Sulphur:Iron Ratio Indicates Vivianite Occurrence: A Study from Two Contrasting Freshwater Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, Matthias; Kleeberg, Andreas; Grüneberg, Björn; Friese, Kurt; Pérez-Mayo, Manuel; Hupfer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies constrain the importance of iron for the long-term retention of phosphorus (P) under anoxic conditions, i.e. the formation of reduced iron phosphate minerals such as vivianite (Fe3(PO4)2⋅8H2O). Much remains unknown about vivianite formation, the factors controlling its occurrence, and its relevance for P burial during early sediment diagenesis. To study the occurrence of vivianite and to assess its relevance for P binding, surface sediments of two hydrologically contrasting waters were analysed by heavy-liquid separation and subsequent powder X-ray diffraction. In Lake Arendsee, vivianite was present in deeper sediment horizons and not in the uppermost layers with a sharp transition between vivianite and non-vivianite bearing layers. In contrast, in lowland river Lower Havel vivianite was present in the upper sediment layers and not in deeper horizons with a gradual transition between non-vivianite and vivianite bearing layers. In both waters, vivianite occurrence was accompanied by the presence of pyrite (FeS2). Vivianite formation was favoured by an elevated iron availability through a lower degree of sulphidisation and was present at a molar ratio of total sulphur to reactive iron smaller than 1.1, only. A longer lasting burden of sediments by organic matter, i.e. due to eutrophication, favours the release of sulphides, and the formation of insoluble iron sulphides leading to a lack of available iron and to less or no vivianite formation. This weakening in sedimentary P retention, representing a negative feedback mechanism (P release) in terms of water quality, could be partly compensated by harmless Fe amendments. PMID:26599406

  1. Sedimentary Sulphur:Iron Ratio Indicates Vivianite Occurrence: A Study from Two Contrasting Freshwater Systems.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Matthias; Kleeberg, Andreas; Grüneberg, Björn; Friese, Kurt; Pérez-Mayo, Manuel; Hupfer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies constrain the importance of iron for the long-term retention of phosphorus (P) under anoxic conditions, i.e. the formation of reduced iron phosphate minerals such as vivianite (Fe3(PO4)2⋅8H2O). Much remains unknown about vivianite formation, the factors controlling its occurrence, and its relevance for P burial during early sediment diagenesis. To study the occurrence of vivianite and to assess its relevance for P binding, surface sediments of two hydrologically contrasting waters were analysed by heavy-liquid separation and subsequent powder X-ray diffraction. In Lake Arendsee, vivianite was present in deeper sediment horizons and not in the uppermost layers with a sharp transition between vivianite and non-vivianite bearing layers. In contrast, in lowland river Lower Havel vivianite was present in the upper sediment layers and not in deeper horizons with a gradual transition between non-vivianite and vivianite bearing layers. In both waters, vivianite occurrence was accompanied by the presence of pyrite (FeS2). Vivianite formation was favoured by an elevated iron availability through a lower degree of sulphidisation and was present at a molar ratio of total sulphur to reactive iron smaller than 1.1, only. A longer lasting burden of sediments by organic matter, i.e. due to eutrophication, favours the release of sulphides, and the formation of insoluble iron sulphides leading to a lack of available iron and to less or no vivianite formation. This weakening in sedimentary P retention, representing a negative feedback mechanism (P release) in terms of water quality, could be partly compensated by harmless Fe amendments. PMID:26599406

  2. Assessment of the Contrast to Noise Ratio in PET Scanners with Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, C. M.; Karpetas, G. E.; Fountos, G. P.; Valais, I. G.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of PET scanners through a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plane source. The source was simulated using a previously validated Monte Carlo model. The model was developed by using the GATE MC package and reconstructed images obtained with the STIR software for tomographic image reconstruction. The PET scanner simulated was the GE DiscoveryST. A plane source consisted of a TLC plate, was simulated by a layer of silica gel on aluminum (Al) foil substrates, immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution. Image quality was assessed in terms of the CNR. CNR was estimated from coronal reconstructed images of the plane source. Images were reconstructed by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-OSMAPOSL. OSMAPOSL reconstruction was assessed by using various subsets (3, 15 and 21) and various iterations (2 to 20). CNR values were found to decrease when both iterations and subsets increase. Two (2) iterations were found to be optimal. The simulated PET evaluation method, based on the TLC plane source, can be useful in image quality assessment of PET scanners.

  3. A novel method for contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) evaluation of digital mammography detectors.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, P; Phelan, N; Egan, G

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a new, simple method of evaluating the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) over the entire image field of a digital detector and to compare different mammography systems. Images were taken under clinical exposure conditions for a range of simulated breast thicknesses using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). At each PMMA thickness, a second image which included an additional 0.2-mm Al sheet was also acquired. Image processing software was used to calculate the CNR in multiple regions of interest (ROI) covering the entire area of the detector in order to obtain a 'CNR image'. Five detector types were evaluated, two CsI-alphaSi (GE Healthcare) flat panel systems, one alphaSe (Hologic) flat panel system and a two generations of scanning photon counting digital detectors (Sectra). Flat panel detectors exhibit better CNR uniformity compared with the first-generation scanning photon counting detector in terms of mean pixel value variation. However, significant improvement in CNR uniformity was observed for the next-generation scanning detector. The method proposed produces a map of the CNR and a measurement of uniformity throughout the entire image field of the detector. The application of this method enables quality control measurement of individual detectors and a comparison of detectors using different technologies. PMID:19424702

  4. Contrast-to-noise ratio improvement in volume-of-interest cone beam breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Youtao; Liu, Xinming; Lai, Chao-Jen; Zhong, Yuncheng; Yi, Ying; You, Zhicheng; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) improvement in breast cone beam CT (CBCT) using the volume-of-interest (VOI) scanning technique. In VOI breast CBCT, the breast is first scanned at a low exposure level. A pre-selected VOI is then scanned at a higher exposure level with collimated x-rays. The two image sets are combined together to reconstruct high quality 3-D images of the VOI. A flat panel detector based system was built to demonstrate and investigate the CNR improvement in VOI breast CBCT. The CNRs of the 8 plastic cones (Teflon, Delrin, polycarbonate, Lucite, solid water, high density polystyrene, nylon and polystyrene) in a breast phantom were measured in images obtained with the VOI CBCT technique and compared to those measured in standard full field CBCT images. CNRs in VOI CBCT images were found to be higher than those in regular CBCT images in all plastic cones. The mean glandular doses (MGDs) from the combination of a high exposure VOI scan and a low exposure full-field scan was estimated to be similar to that from regular full-field scan at standard exposure level. The VOI CBCT technique allows a VOI to be imaged with enhanced image quality with an MGD similar to that from regular CBCT technique.

  5. Surface roughness limited contrast to clutter ratios THz medical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Shijun; Bajwa, Neha; Goell, Jacob; Taylor, Zachary

    2016-03-01

    The THz electromagnetic properties of rough surface are explored and their effect on the observed contrast in THz images is quantified. Rough surface scatter is a major source of clutter in THz imaging as the rough features of skin and other tissues result in non-trivial reflection signal modulation. Traditional approaches to data collection utilize dielectric windows to flatten surfaces for THz imaging. However, there is substantial interest surrounding window free imaging as contact measurements are not ideal for a range of candidate diseases and injuries. In this work we investigate the variation in reflected signal in the specular direction from rough surfaces targets with known roughness parameters. Signal to clutter ratios are computed and compared with that predicted by Rayleigh Rough surface scattering theory. It is shown that Rayleigh rough surface scattering theory, developed for rough features larger than the interacting wavelength, holds acceptable at THz frequencies with rough features much smaller than the wavelength. Additionally, we present some biological tissue imaging examples to illustrate the impact of rough surface scattering in image quality.

  6. A simple procedure for estimating pseudo risk ratios from exposure to non-carcinogenic chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Scinicariello, Franco; Portier, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Non-cancer risk assessment traditionally assumes a threshold of effect, below which there is a negligible risk of an adverse effect. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry derives health-based guidance values known as Minimal Risk Levels (MRLs) as estimates of the toxicity threshold for non-carcinogens. Although the definition of an MRL, as well as EPA reference dose values (RfD and RfC), is a level that corresponds to "negligible risk," they represent daily exposure doses or concentrations, not risks. We present a new approach to calculate the risk at exposure to specific doses for chemical mixtures, the assumption in this approach is to assign de minimis risk at the MRL. The assigned risk enables the estimation of parameters in an exponential model, providing a complete dose-response curve for each compound from the chosen point of departure to zero. We estimated parameters for 27 chemicals. The value of k, which determines the shape of the dose-response curve, was moderately insensitive to the choice of the risk at the MRL. The approach presented here allows for the calculation of a risk from a single substance or the combined risk from multiple chemical exposures in a community. The methodology is applicable from point of departure data derived from quantal data, such as data from benchmark dose analyses or from data that can be transformed into probabilities, such as lowest-observed-adverse-effect level. The individual risks are used to calculate risk ratios that can facilitate comparison and cost-benefit analyses of environmental contamination control strategies. PMID:25667015

  7. Testing for Additivity in Chemical Mixtures Using a Fixed-Ratio Ray Design and Statistical Equivalence Testing Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fixed-ratio ray designs have been used for detecting and characterizing interactions of large numbers of chemicals in combination. Single chemical dose-response data are used to predict an “additivity curve” along an environmentally relevant ray. A “mixture curve” is estimated fr...

  8. Low-dose, phase-contrast mammography with high signal-to-noise ratio

    PubMed Central

    Gromann, Lukas B.; Bequé, Dirk; Scherer, Kai; Willer, Konstantin; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Grandl, Susanne; Hellerhoff, Karin; Sperl, Jonathan I.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Cozzini, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Differential phase-contrast X-ray imaging using a Talbot-Lau interferometer has recently shown promising results for applications in medical imaging. However, reducing the applied radiation dose remains a major challenge. In this study, we consider the realization of a Talbot-Lau interferometer in a high Talbot order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for low-dose applications. The quantitative performance of π and π/2 systems at high Talbot orders is analyzed through simulations, and the design energy and X-ray spectrum are optimized for mammography. It is found that operation even at very high Talbot orders is feasible and beneficial for image quality. As long as the X-ray spectrum is matched to the visibility spectrum, the SNR continuously increases with the Talbot order for π-systems. We find that the optimal X-ray spectra and design energies are almost independent of the Talbot order and that the overall imaging performance is robust against small variations in these parameters. Discontinuous spectra, such as that from molybdenum, are less robust because the characteristic lines may coincide with minima in the visibility spectra; however, they may offer slightly better performance. We verify this hypothesis by realizing a prototype system with a mean fringe visibility of above 40% at the seventh Talbot order. With this prototype, a proof-of-principle measurement of a freshly dissected breast at reasonable compression to 4 cm is conducted with a mean glandular dose of only 3 mGy but with a high SNR. PMID:26977347

  9. Low-dose, phase-contrast mammography with high signal-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Gromann, Lukas B; Bequé, Dirk; Scherer, Kai; Willer, Konstantin; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Grandl, Susanne; Hellerhoff, Karin; Sperl, Jonathan I; Pfeiffer, Franz; Cozzini, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Differential phase-contrast X-ray imaging using a Talbot-Lau interferometer has recently shown promising results for applications in medical imaging. However, reducing the applied radiation dose remains a major challenge. In this study, we consider the realization of a Talbot-Lau interferometer in a high Talbot order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for low-dose applications. The quantitative performance of π and π/2 systems at high Talbot orders is analyzed through simulations, and the design energy and X-ray spectrum are optimized for mammography. It is found that operation even at very high Talbot orders is feasible and beneficial for image quality. As long as the X-ray spectrum is matched to the visibility spectrum, the SNR continuously increases with the Talbot order for π-systems. We find that the optimal X-ray spectra and design energies are almost independent of the Talbot order and that the overall imaging performance is robust against small variations in these parameters. Discontinuous spectra, such as that from molybdenum, are less robust because the characteristic lines may coincide with minima in the visibility spectra; however, they may offer slightly better performance. We verify this hypothesis by realizing a prototype system with a mean fringe visibility of above 40% at the seventh Talbot order. With this prototype, a proof-of-principle measurement of a freshly dissected breast at reasonable compression to 4 cm is conducted with a mean glandular dose of only 3 mGy but with a high SNR. PMID:26977347

  10. Trabecular bone histomorphometric measurements and contrast-to-noise ratio in CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Smedby, Ö; Brismar, T B; Moreno, R

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate how imaging parameters at clinical dental CBCT affect the accuracy in quantifying trabecular bone structures, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and radiation dose. Methods: 15 radius samples were examined using CBCT (Accuitomo FPD; J. Morita Mfg., Kyoto, Japan). Nine imaging protocols were used, differing in current, voltage, rotation degree, voxel size, imaging area and rotation time. Radiation doses were measured using a kerma area product-meter. After segmentation, six bone structure parameters and CNRs were quantified. Micro-CT (μCT) images with an isotropic resolution of 20 μm were used as a gold standard. Results: Structure parameters obtained by CBCT were strongly correlated to those by μCT, with correlation coefficients >0.90 for all studied parameters. Bone volume and trabecular thickness were not affected by changes in imaging parameters. Increased tube current from 5 to 8 mA, decreased isotropic voxel size from 125 to 80 μm and decreased rotation angle from 360° to 180° affected correlations for trabecular termini negatively. Decreasing rotation degree also weakened correlations for trabecular separation and trabecular number at 80 μm voxel size. Changes in the rotation degree and tube current affected CNR significantly. The radiation dose varied between 269 and 1153 mGy cm2. Conclusions: Trabecular bone structure can be accurately quantified by clinical dental CBCT in vitro, and the obtained structure parameters are strongly related to those obtained by μCT. A fair CNR and strong correlations can be obtained with a low radiation dose, indicating the possibility for monitoring trabecular bone structure also in vivo. PMID:25168811

  11. The use of image analysis to investigate C:N ratio in the mixture of chicken manure and straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekała, W.; Dach, J.; Ludwiczak, A.; Przybylak, A.; Boniecki, P.; Koszela, K.; Zaborowicz, M.; Przybył, K.; Wojcieszak, D.; Witaszek, K.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the possibility of analysis of C:N ratio in the chicken manure and wheat straw mixture. This paper presents preliminary assumptions and parameters of extraction characteristics process. It also presents an introduction of digital image analysis of chicken manure and wheat straw mixture. This work is an introduction to the study on develop computer system that could replace chemical analysis. Good understanding the value of dependence C:N on the basis of image analysis will help in selection of optimal conditions for biological waste treatment.

  12. Effects of N2-O2 Gas Mixture Ratio on Microorganism Inactivation in Low-Pressure Surface Wave Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the effect of N2/O2 gas mixture ratio on low-pressure surface wave plasma inactivation of spore-forming bacteria was investigated. It was experimentally confirmed from the quadrupole mass spectrometry measurements that the spores were etched by atomic oxygen via converting the hydrogen atoms constituting microorganisms into H2O and the carbon into CO2. On the basis of results of plasma diagnostics by optical emission spectroscopy and the results of inactivation efficiency by colony-forming units and scanning electron microscope, we found that although there is the highest ultraviolet (UV) emission intensity in pure N2 plasma and the highest etching efficiency in 90% O2/10% N2 plasma, the inactivation rate of microorganisms was not so efficient. The best inactivation result was obtained in 30-80% O2 gas mixture ratios after 60 s plasma irradiation. The present results indicated that more efficient inactivation is achieved by the synergetic effects between atomic oxygen etching and the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV)/UV emission by combining both effects via optimizing N2/O2 gas mixture ratio.

  13. Composting of poultry manure and wheat straw in a closed reactor: optimum mixture ratio and evolution of parameters.

    PubMed

    Petric, Ivan; Selimbasić, Vahida

    2008-02-01

    The main objectives of this work were to investigate the evolution of some principal physico-chemical properties (temperature, carbon dioxide, oxygen, ammonia, pH, electrical conductivity, organic matter) and microbial population (mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria and fungi) during composting poultry manure with wheat straw in a reactor system, and to evaluate the optimum mixture ratio for organic substrate production. The experiments were carried out in four small laboratory reactors (1 l) and one large reactor (32 l) under adiabatic conditions over 14 days. During the process the highest temperature was 64.6 degrees C, pH varied between 7.40 and 8.85, electrical conductivity varied between 3.50 and 4.31 dS m(-1) and the highest value of organic matter (dry weight) degradation was 47.6%. Mesophilic bacteria and fungi predominated in the beginning, and started the degradation with generation of metabolic heat. By increasing the temperature in reactors, the number of thermophilic microorganisms also increased, which resulted in faster degradation of substrate. The application of a closed reactor showed a rapid degradation of manure/straw mixture as well as a good control of the emissions of air polluting gases into atmosphere. The results showed that the ratio of manure to straw 5.25:1 (dry weight) was better for composting process than the other mixture ratios. PMID:17387619

  14. A comparative study of different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra applied for ternary mixtures: derivative spectrophotometry versus wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Salem, Hesham; Lotfy, Hayam M; Hassan, Nagiba Y; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B; Saleh, Sarah S

    2015-01-25

    This work represents a comparative study of different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra, which are: double divisor ratio spectra derivative (DR-DD), area under curve of derivative ratio (DR-AUC) and its novel approach, namely area under the curve correction method (AUCCM) applied for overlapped spectra; successive derivative of ratio spectra (SDR) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) methods. The proposed methods represent different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra of the ternary mixture of Ofloxacin (OFX), Prednisolone acetate (PA) and Tetryzoline HCl (TZH) combined in eye drops in the presence of benzalkonium chloride as a preservative. The proposed methods were checked using laboratory-prepared mixtures and were successfully applied for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulation containing the cited drugs. The proposed methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. A comparative study was conducted between those methods regarding simplicity, limitation and sensitivity. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained from the reported HPLC method, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision. PMID:25171050

  15. A comparative study of different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra applied for ternary mixtures: Derivative spectrophotometry versus wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Hesham; Lotfy, Hayam M.; Hassan, Nagiba Y.; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B.; Saleh, Sarah S.

    2015-01-01

    This work represents a comparative study of different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra, which are: double divisor ratio spectra derivative (DR-DD), area under curve of derivative ratio (DR-AUC) and its novel approach, namely area under the curve correction method (AUCCM) applied for overlapped spectra; successive derivative of ratio spectra (SDR) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) methods. The proposed methods represent different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra of the ternary mixture of Ofloxacin (OFX), Prednisolone acetate (PA) and Tetryzoline HCl (TZH) combined in eye drops in the presence of benzalkonium chloride as a preservative. The proposed methods were checked using laboratory-prepared mixtures and were successfully applied for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulation containing the cited drugs. The proposed methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. A comparative study was conducted between those methods regarding simplicity, limitation and sensitivity. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained from the reported HPLC method, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision.

  16. Effect of hydrogen ratio on plasma parameters of N2-H2 gas mixture glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Brulsy, R. A.; Abd Al-Halim, M. A.; Abu-Hashem, A.; Rashed, U. M.; Hassouba, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    A dc plane glow discharge in a nitrogen-hydrogen (N2-H2) gas mixture has been operated at discharge currents of 10 and 20 mA. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at different hydrogen concentrations is measured. A Maxwellian EEDF is found in the positive column region, while in both cathode fall and negative glow regions, a non-Maxwellian one is observed. Langmuir electric probes are used at different axial positions, gas pressures, and hydrogen concentrations to measure the electron temperature and plasma density. The electron temperature is found to increase with increasing H2 concentration and decrease with increasing both the axial distance from the cathode and the mixture pressure. At first, with increasing distance from the cathode, the ion density decreases, while the electron density increases; then, as the anode is further approached, they remain nearly constant. At different H2 concentrations, the electron and ion densities decrease with increasing the mixture pressure. Both the electron and ion densities slightly decrease with increasing H2 concentration.

  17. Spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra for simultaneous determination of binary mixtures with sever overlapping spectra: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, H.; Fayez, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Three simple, specific and accurate spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra were developed and validated for simultaneous determination of Rabeprazole sodium (RB) and Domperidone (DP) in their binary mixture without prior separation. Method A, is constant center spectrophotometric method (CC). Method B is a ratio difference spectrophotometric one (RD), while method C is a combined ratio isoabsorptive point-ratio difference method (RIRD). Linear correlations were obtained in range of 4-44 μg/mL for both Rabeprazole sodium and Domperidone. The mean percentage recoveries of RB were 99.69 ± 0.504 for method A, 99.83 ± 0.483 for (B) and 100.31 ± 0.499 for (C), respectively, and that of DP were 99.52 ± 0.474 for method A, 100.12 ± 0.505 for (B) and 100.16 ± 0.498 for (C), respectively. Specificity was investigated by analysis of laboratory prepared mixtures containing the cited drugs and their combined tablet dosage form. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained by the reported methods, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision. The three methods were validated as per ICH guidelines and can be applied for routine analysis in quality control laboratories.

  18. Search for novel contrast materials in dual-energy x-ray breast imaging using theoretical modeling of contrast-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunamuni, R.; Maidment, A. D. A.

    2014-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) dual-energy (DE) x-ray breast imaging uses a low- and high-energy x-ray spectral pair to eliminate soft-tissue signal variation and thereby increase the detectability of exogenous imaging agents. Currently, CEDE breast imaging is performed with iodinated contrast agents. These compounds are limited by several deficiencies, including rapid clearance and poor tumor targeting ability. The purpose of this work is to identify novel contrast materials whose contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is comparable or superior to that of iodine in the mammographic energy range. A monoenergetic DE subtraction framework was developed to calculate the DE signal intensity resulting from the logarithmic subtraction of the low- and high-energy signal intensities. A weighting factor is calculated to remove the dependence of the DE signal on the glandularity of the breast tissue. Using the DE signal intensity and weighting factor, the CNR for materials with atomic numbers (Z) ranging from 1 to 79 are computed for energy pairs between 10 and 50 keV. A group of materials with atomic numbers ranging from 42 to 63 were identified to exhibit the highest levels of CNR in the mammographic energy range. Several of these materials have been formulated as nanoparticles for various applications but none, apart from iodine, have been investigated as CEDE breast imaging agents. Within this group of materials, the necessary dose fraction to the LE image decreases as the atomic number increases. By reducing the dose to the LE image, the DE subtraction technique will not provide an anatomical image of sufficient quality to accompany the contrast information. Therefore, materials with Z from 42 to 52 provide nearly optimal values of CNR with energy pairs and dose fractions that provide good anatomical images. This work is intended to inspire further research into new materials for optimized CEDE breast functional imaging.

  19. Application of the maximum cumulative ratio (MCR) as a screening tool for the evaluation of mixtures in residential indoor air.

    PubMed

    De Brouwere, Katleen; Cornelis, Christa; Arvanitis, Athanasios; Brown, Terry; Crump, Derrick; Harrison, Paul; Jantunen, Matti; Price, Paul; Torfs, Rudi

    2014-05-01

    The maximum cumulative ratio (MCR) method allows the categorisation of mixtures according to whether the mixture is of concern for toxicity and if so whether this is driven by one substance or multiple substances. The aim of the present study was to explore, by application of the MCR approach, whether health risks due to indoor air pollution are dominated by one substance or are due to concurrent exposure to various substances. Analysis was undertaken on monitoring data of four European indoor studies (giving five datasets), involving 1800 records of indoor air or personal exposure. Application of the MCR methodology requires knowledge of the concentrations of chemicals in a mixture together with health-based reference values for those chemicals. For this evaluation, single substance health-based reference values (RVs) were selected through a structured review process. The MCR analysis found high variability in the proportion of samples of concern for mixture toxicity. The fraction of samples in these groups of concern varied from 2% (Flemish schools) to 77% (EXPOLIS, Basel, indoor), the variation being due not only to the variation in indoor air contaminant levels across the studies but also to other factors such as differences in number and type of substances monitored, analytical performance, and choice of RVs. However, in 4 out of the 5 datasets, a considerable proportion of cases were found where a chemical-by-chemical approach failed to identify the need for the investigation of combined risk assessment. Although the MCR methodology applied in the current study provides no consideration of commonality of endpoints, it provides a tool for discrimination between those mixtures requiring further combined risk assessment and those for which a single-substance assessment is sufficient. PMID:24565859

  20. Comparative study of spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra: An application on pharmaceutical binary mixture of cinnarizine and dimenhydrinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamie, Nesrine T.

    2015-04-01

    Four simple, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods are developed and validated for simultaneous determination of cinnarizine (CIN) and dimenhydrinate (DIM) in a binary mixture with overlapping spectra, without preliminary separation. The first method is dual wavelength spectrophotometry (DW), the second is a ratio difference spectrophotometric one (RD) which measures the difference in amplitudes between 250 and 270 nm of ratio spectrum, the third one is novel constant center spectrophotometric method (CC) and the fourth method is mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR). The calibration curve is linear over the concentration range of 4-20 and 10-45 μg/ml for CIN and DIM, respectively. These methods are tested by analyzing synthetic mixtures of the above drugs and they are applied to commercial pharmaceutical preparation of the subjected drugs. The validity of results was assessed by applying standard addition technique. The results obtained were found to agree statistically with those obtained by a reported method, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision.

  1. Fiber Optic Raman Sensor to Monitor Concentration Ratio of Nitrogen and Oxygen in a Cryogenic Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Kalluru, Rajamohan R.; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, Jagdish P.; SaintCyr, William

    2007-01-01

    A spontaneous Raman scattering optical fiber sensor is developed for a specific need of NASA/SSC for long-term detection and monitoring of the quality of liquid oxygen (LOX) in the delivery line during ground testing of rocket engines. The sensor performance was tested in the laboratory and with different excitation light sources. To evaluate the sensor performance with different excitation light sources for the LOX quality application, we have used the various mixtures of liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen as samples. The study of the sensor performance shows that this sensor offers a great deal of flexibility and provides a cost effective solution for the application. However, an improved system response time is needed for the real-time, quantitative monitoring of the quality of cryogenic fluids in harsh environment.

  2. On-board Optical Spectrometry for Detection of Mixture Ratio and Eroded Materials in Rocket Engine Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis; Kittinger, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Optical spectrometry can provide means to characterize rocket engine exhaust plume impurities due to eroded materials, as well as combustion mixture ratio without any interference with plume. Fiberoptic probes and cables were designed, fabricated and installed on Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), allowing monitoring of the plume spectra in real time with a Commercial of the Shelf (COTS) fiberoptic spectrometer, located in a test-stand control room. The probes and the cables survived the harsh engine environments for numerous hot-fire tests. When the plume was seeded with a nickel alloy powder, the spectrometer was able to successfully detect all the metallic and OH radical spectra from 300 to 800 nanometers.

  3. Optimization of contrast-to-tissue ratio through pulse windowing in dual-frequency “acoustic angiography” imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Shelton, Sarah E.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Early-stage tumors in many cancers are characterized by vascular remodeling, indicative of transformations in cell function. We have previously presented a high-resolution ultrasound imaging approach for detecting these changes which is based on microbubble contrast agents. In this technique, images are formed from only the higher harmonics of microbubble contrast agents, producing images of vasculature alone with 100–200 μm resolution. In this article, shaped transmit pulses are applied to imaging the higher broadband harmonic echoes of microbubble contrast agents, and the effects of varying pulse window and phasing on microbubble and tissue harmonic echoes are evaluated using a dual-frequency transducer in vitro and in vivo. An increase in contrast-to-tissue ratio of 6.8 ± 2.3 dB was observed in vitro by using an inverted pulse with a cosine window relative to a non-inverted pulse with a rectangular window. The increase in mean image intensity due to contrast enhancement in vivo in five rodents was 13.9 ± 3.0 dB greater for an inverted cosine-windowed pulse and 17.8 ± 3.6 dB greater for a non-inverted Gaussian-windowed relative to a non-inverted pulse with a rectangular window. Implications for pre-clinical and diagnostic imaging are also discussed. PMID:25819467

  4. Larger phylogenetic distances in litter mixtures: lower microbial biomass and higher C/N ratios but equal mass loss.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xu; Berg, Matty P; Butenschoen, Olaf; Murray, Phil J; Bartish, Igor V; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Dong, Ming; Prinzing, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Phylogenetic distances of coexisting species differ greatly within plant communities, but their consequences for decomposers and decomposition remain unknown. We hypothesized that large phylogenetic distance of leaf litter mixtures increases differences of their litter traits, which may, in turn, result in increased resource complementarity or decreased resource concentration for decomposers and hence increased or decreased chemical transformation and reduction of litter. We conducted a litter mixture experiment including 12 common temperate tree species (evolutionarily separated by up to 106 Myr), and sampled after seven months, at which average mass loss was more than 50%. We found no effect of increased phylogenetic distance on litter mass loss or on abundance and diversity of invertebrate decomposers. However, phylogenetic distance decreased microbial biomass and increased carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios of litter mixtures. Consistently, four litter traits showed (marginally) significant phylogenetic signal and in three of these traits increasing trait difference decreased microbial biomass and increased C/N. We suggest that phylogenetic proximity of litter favours microbial decomposers and chemical transformation of litter owing to a resource concentration effect. This leads to a new hypothesis: closely related plant species occurring in the same niche should promote and profit from increased nutrient availability. PMID:25876845

  5. Larger phylogenetic distances in litter mixtures: lower microbial biomass and higher C/N ratios but equal mass loss

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xu; Berg, Matty P.; Butenschoen, Olaf; Murray, Phil J.; Bartish, Igor V.; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.; Dong, Ming; Prinzing, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic distances of coexisting species differ greatly within plant communities, but their consequences for decomposers and decomposition remain unknown. We hypothesized that large phylogenetic distance of leaf litter mixtures increases differences of their litter traits, which may, in turn, result in increased resource complementarity or decreased resource concentration for decomposers and hence increased or decreased chemical transformation and reduction of litter. We conducted a litter mixture experiment including 12 common temperate tree species (evolutionarily separated by up to 106 Myr), and sampled after seven months, at which average mass loss was more than 50%. We found no effect of increased phylogenetic distance on litter mass loss or on abundance and diversity of invertebrate decomposers. However, phylogenetic distance decreased microbial biomass and increased carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios of litter mixtures. Consistently, four litter traits showed (marginally) significant phylogenetic signal and in three of these traits increasing trait difference decreased microbial biomass and increased C/N. We suggest that phylogenetic proximity of litter favours microbial decomposers and chemical transformation of litter owing to a resource concentration effect. This leads to a new hypothesis: closely related plant species occurring in the same niche should promote and profit from increased nutrient availability. PMID:25876845

  6. Digital breast tomosynthesis: studies of the effects of acquisition geometry on contrast-to-noise ratio and observer preference of low-contrast objects in breast phantom images.

    PubMed

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Chan, Heang-Ping; Schmitz, Andrea; Zelakiewicz, Scott; Telang, Santosh; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Watcharotone, Kuanwong; Helvie, Mark A; Paramagul, Chintana; Neal, Colleen; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Larson, Sandra C; Carson, Paul L

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acquisition geometry in digital breast tomosynthesis was evaluated with studies of contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) and observer preference. Contrast-detail (CD) test objects in 5 cm thick phantoms with breast-like backgrounds were imaged. Twelve different angular acquisitions (average glandular dose for each ~1.1 mGy) were performed ranging from narrow angle 16° with 17 projection views (16d17p) to wide angle 64d17p. Focal slices of SART-reconstructed images of the CD arrays were selected for CNR computations and the reader preference study. For the latter, pairs of images obtained with different acquisition geometries were randomized and scored by 7 trained readers. The total scores for all images and readings for each acquisition geometry were compared as were the CNRs. In general, readers preferred images acquired with wide angle as opposed to narrow angle geometries. The mean percent preferred was highly correlated with tomosynthesis angle (R = 0.91). The highest scoring geometries were 60d21p (95%), 64d17p (80%), and 48d17p (72%); the lowest scoring were 16d17p (4%), 24d9p (17%) and 24d13p (33%). The measured CNRs for the various acquisitions showed much overlap but were overall highest for wide-angle acquisitions. Finally, the mean reader scores were well correlated with the mean CNRs (R = 0.83). PMID:25211509

  7. Increasing the darkfield contrast-to-noise ratio using a deconvolution-based information retrieval algorithm in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Pelzer, Georg; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Zang, Andrea; Durst, Jürgen; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

    2013-07-29

    A novel information retrieval algorithm for X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging based on the deconvolution of the object and the reference phase stepping curve (PSC) as proposed by Modregger et al. was investigated in this paper. We applied the method for the first time on data obtained with a polychromatic spectrum and compared the results to those, received by applying the commonly used method, based on a Fourier analysis. We confirmed the expectation, that both methods deliver the same results for the absorption and the differential phase image. For the darkfield image, a mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) increase by a factor of 1.17 using the new method was found. Furthermore, the dose saving potential was estimated for the deconvolution method experimentally. It is found, that for the conventional method a dose which is higher by a factor of 1.66 is needed to obtain a similar CNR value compared to the novel method. A further analysis of the data revealed, that the improvement in CNR and dose efficiency is due to the superior background noise properties of the deconvolution method, but at the cost of comparability between measurements at different applied dose values, as the mean value becomes dependent on the photon statistics used. PMID:23938672

  8. Digital breast tomosynthesis: studies of the effects of acquisition geometry on contrast-to-noise ratio and observer preference of low-contrast objects in breast phantom images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Schmitz, Andrea; Zelakiewicz, Scott; Telang, Santosh; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Watcharotone, Kuanwong; Helvie, Mark A.; Paramagul, Chintana; Neal, Colleen; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Larson, Sandra C.; Carson, Paul L.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acquisition geometry in digital breast tomosynthesis was evaluated with studies of contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) and observer preference. Contrast-detail (CD) test objects in 5 cm thick phantoms with breast-like backgrounds were imaged. Twelve different angular acquisitions (average glandular dose for each ~1.1 mGy) were performed ranging from narrow angle 16° with 17 projection views (16d17p) to wide angle 64d17p. Focal slices of SART-reconstructed images of the CD arrays were selected for CNR computations and the reader preference study. For the latter, pairs of images obtained with different acquisition geometries were randomized and scored by 7 trained readers. The total scores for all images and readings for each acquisition geometry were compared as were the CNRs. In general, readers preferred images acquired with wide angle as opposed to narrow angle geometries. The mean percent preferred was highly correlated with tomosynthesis angle (R = 0.91). The highest scoring geometries were 60d21p (95%), 64d17p (80%), and 48d17p (72%); the lowest scoring were 16d17p (4%), 24d9p (17%) and 24d13p (33%). The measured CNRs for the various acquisitions showed much overlap but were overall highest for wide-angle acquisitions. Finally, the mean reader scores were well correlated with the mean CNRs (R = 0.83).

  9. Digital breast tomosynthesis: Studies of the effects of acquisition geometry on contrast-to-noise ratio and observer preference of low-contrast objects in breast phantom images

    PubMed Central

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Schmitz, Andrea; Zelakiewicz, Scott; Telang, Santosh; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Watcharotone, Kuanwong; Helvie, Mark A.; Paramagul, Chintana; Neal, Colleen; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Larson, Sandra C.; Carson, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acquisition geometry in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) was evaluated with studies of contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) and observer preference. Contrast-detail (CD) test objects in 5 cm thick phantoms with breast-like backgrounds were imaged. Twelve different angular acquisitions (average glandular dose for each ~1.1 mGy) were performed ranging from narrow angle 16° with 17 projection views (16d17p) to wide angle 64d17p. Focal slices of SART-reconstructed images of the CD arrays were selected for CNR computations and the reader preference study. For the latter, pairs of images obtained with different acquisition geometries were randomized and scored by 7 trained readers. The total scores for all images and readings for each acquisition geometry were compared as were the CNRs. In general, readers preferred images acquired with wide angle as opposed to narrow angle geometries. The mean percent preferred was highly correlated with tomosynthesis angle (R=0.91). The highest scoring geometries were 60d21p (95%), 64d17p (80%), and 48d17p (72%); the lowest scoring were 16d17p (4%), 24d9p (17%) and 24d13p (33%). The measured CNRs for the various acquisitions showed much overlap but were overall highest for wide-angle acquisitions. Finally, the mean reader scores were well correlated with the mean CNRs (R=0.83). PMID:25211509

  10. Manipulating Ratio Spectra for the Spectrophotometric Analysis of Diclofenac Sodium and Pantoprazole Sodium in Laboratory Mixtures and Tablet Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Nejal M.; Chavada, Vijay D.; Sanyal, Mallika; Shrivastav, Pranav S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Three sensitive, selective, and precise spectrophotometric methods based on manipulation of ratio spectra, have been developed and validated for the determination of diclofenac sodium and pantoprazole sodium. Materials and Methods. The first method is based on ratio spectra peak to peak measurement using the amplitudes at 251 and 318 nm; the second method involves the first derivative of the ratio spectra (Δλ = 4 nm) using the peak amplitudes at 326.0 nm for diclofenac sodium and 337.0 nm for pantoprazole sodium. The third is the method of mean centering of ratio spectra using the values at 318.0 nm for both the analytes. Results. All the three methods were linear over the concentration range of 2.0–24.0 μg/mL for diclofenac sodium and 2.0–20.0 μg/mL for pantoprazole sodium. The methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability, and robustness are found to be within the acceptable limit. The results of single factor ANOVA analysis indicated that there is no significant difference among the developed methods. Conclusions. The developed methods provided simple resolution of this binary combination from laboratory mixtures and pharmaceutical preparations and can be conveniently adopted for routine quality control analysis. PMID:24701171

  11. High ambient-contrast-ratio display using tandem reflective liquid crystal display and organic light-emitting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jiun-Haw; Zhu, Xinyu; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Kit Choi, Wing; Lin, Tien-Chun; Hsu, Sheng-Chih; Lin, Hoang-Yan; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2005-11-01

    A high ambient-contrast-ratio (A-CR) and large aperture-ratio display is conceptually demonstrated and experimentally validated by stacking a normally black reflective liquid crystal display (NB-RLCD) and an organic light-emitting device (OLED). Such a tandem device can be switched between the NB-RLCD mode and the OLED mode under bright and dark ambient light, respectively. The normally black characteristic of the RLCD also helps to boost the A-CR under OLED-mode operation. To obtain a better image quality in the RLCD mode, a bumpy and transmissive structure is used to eliminate the specular reflection and to increase the viewing angle performance that results in CR>2:1 over 55° viewing cone. Besides, such a structure can also increase the external quantum efficiency of the OLED by 49.4%. In our experiments, regardless of the ambient intensity the A-CR is kept higher than 100:1.

  12. [Comparison of Contrast to Noise Ratio and Signal Difference to Noise Ratio Based on QA and QC Guidelines in CR Mammography].

    PubMed

    Nagami, Akiko; Ishii, Mie; Ishii, Rie; Kodama, Sayaka; Sanada, Taizo; Yoshida, Akira

    2016-06-01

    The measurement methods of contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) in digital mammography are different among several quality assurance (QA) guidelines, that is, the type of pixel value (PV), phantom shape, location of aluminum plate, and the size of region of interest (ROI) principally differ in data acquisition. We compared CNR (SDNR) obtained from three QA guidelines. They are the European Reference Organisation for Quality Assured Breast Screening and Diagnostic Services (EUREF), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In EUREF and IEC, CNR was calculated using linearized pixel value (LPV). In IAEA, because the type of pixel value to use in SDNR was not specified, SDNR was calculated using PV and LPV, and CNR was calculated using LPV. Target/filter combinations are molybdenum/molybdenum (Mo/Mo) and molybdenum/rhodium (Mo/Rh). Applied various tube voltages are 25, 30, and 35 kV, and various phantom thicknesses are 20, 45, and 70 mm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The PV-SDNR of IAEA showed the largest value among the three methods, following LPV-CNR of IEC, LPV-CNR of EUREF at 20 mm PMMA thickness. In IAEA, SDNR changed by the kind of pixel value (PV or LPV). When CNR is calculated, every researcher should describe the type of guidelines, the kind of pixel value, and formula for calculation. PMID:27320154

  13. Improvement of contrast ratio in quadriphase-shift-keying optical label recognition with passive optical waveguide circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishikawa, Hiroki; Makimoto, Yoshihiro; Inoshita, Kensuke; Igarashi, Sanae; Goto, Nobuo; Yanagiya, Shin-ichiro

    2016-05-01

    In photonic label routing networks, recognition of optical labels is one of the key functions. We have proposed waveguide-type optical circuits for recognition of optical labels encoded in quadriphase-shift-keying (QPSK) form. A basic device for the circuits consists of a 3-dB directional coupler, two Y-branches, and an asymmetric X-junction coupler. We employed a scheme of complete interference of optical waves between each coded pulse and a reference pulse in our previously reported paper. The contrast ratio of the output at the destination output port to the outputs at the other ports was reported to decrease to 1.6, 1.28, and 1.13 for two-, three-, and four-stage circuits for recognition of 16, 64, and 256 QPSK labels, respectively. We find optimum circuits with improved contrast ratio of 1.8, 1.6, and 1.47 for 16, 64, and 256 labels, respectively. The recognition operation with the improved circuits is numerically confirmed using the beam propagation method. Noise tolerance of the proposed circuits is also clarified by numerical simulation. The improved circuits are optimum from the viewpoint of efficient use of optical power and noise tolerance.

  14. Correction of aspect ratio dependency in deep silicon etch using SF6/C4F8/Ar gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Robert Lee

    The etch rate of deep features in silicon, such as trenches and vias, can vary significantly with the changing Aspect Ratio (AR) of the feature. Developing a better understanding of the complex volumetric and surface chemistry as well as the etching mechanisms controlling the Aspect Ratio Dependent Etch-rate (ARDE) continues to present research opportunities. Recall that ARDE is generally characterized by small AR features etching at faster rates than large AR features. The main causes of ARDE include Knudsen transport of neutrals into and out of the features as well as ion and neutral loss to the walls due to angular spread in the velocity distribution function and differential charging of insulating microstructures. This work focuses on using a continuous plasma process utilizing a gas mixture of SF6/C4F8/Ar to produce trenches of varying widths and depths. The experimental results were obtained using a Plasma-Therm Versaline processing system. Experiments were performed to show that the etch rate of low AR features can be reduced through the deposition of a passivation layer and thereby allow larger AR features to catch up. It is also possible to invert the ARDE in certain circumstances. We will present the insights we have gained into the ARDE process and the solutions we have tested.

  15. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO MIXTURE RAY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed to mixtures of environmental compounds. A regulatory assumption is that the mixtures of chemicals act in an additive manner. However, this assumption requires experimental validation. Traditional experimental designs (full factorial) require a large number of e...

  16. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO RAY MIXTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessors are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of assessing interactions between chemicals in a mixture. Most traditional designs for evaluating interactions are prohibitive when the number of chemicals in the mixture is large. However, evaluation of interacti...

  17. High ambient-contrast-ratio display using tandem reflective liquid crystal display and organic light-emitting device.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiun-Haw; Zhu, Xinyu; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Choi, Wing; Lin, Tien-Chun; Hsu, Sheng-Chih; Lin, Hoang-Yan; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2005-11-14

    A high ambient-contrast-ratio (A-CR) and large aperture-ratio display is conceptually demonstrated and experimentally validated by stacking a normally black reflective liquid crystal display (NB-RLCD) and an organic light-emitting device (OLED). Such a tandem device can be switched between the NB-RLCD mode and the OLED mode under bright and dark ambient light, respectively. The normally black characteristic of the RLCD also helps to boost the A-CR under OLED-mode operation. To obtain a better image quality in the RLCD mode, a bumpy and transmissive structure is used to eliminate the specular reflection and to increase the viewing angle performance that results in CR>2:1 over 55 degrees viewing cone. Besides, such a structure can also increase the external quantum efficiency of the OLED by 49.4%. In our experiments, regardless of the ambient intensity the A-CR is kept higher than 100:1. PMID:19503145

  18. Determining the Maximum Cumulative Ratios for Mixtures Observed in Ground Water Wells Used as Drinking Water Supplies in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xianglu; Price, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    The maximum cumulative ratio (MCR) developed in previous work is a tool to evaluate the need to perform cumulative risk assessments. MCR is the ratio of the cumulative exposures to multiple chemicals to the maximum exposure from one of the chemicals when exposures are described using a common metric. This tool is used to evaluate mixtures of chemicals measured in samples of untreated ground water as source for drinking water systems in the United States. The mixtures of chemicals in this dataset differ from those examined in our previous work both in terms of the predicted toxicity and compounds measured. Despite these differences, MCR values in this study follow patterns similar to those seen earlier. MCR values for the mixtures have a mean (range) of 2.2 (1.03–5.4) that is much smaller than the mean (range) of 16 (5–34) in the mixtures in previous study. The MCR values of the mixtures decline as Hazard Index (HI) values increase. MCR values for mixtures with larger HI values are not affected by possible contributions from chemicals that may occur at levels below the detection limits. This work provides a second example of use of the MCR tool in the evaluation of mixtures that occur in the environment. PMID:22408599

  19. Estimate of the optimum weight ratio in zero-valent iron/pumice granular mixtures used in permeable reactive barriers for the remediation of nickel contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, P S; Moraci, N; Suraci, P

    2012-03-15

    This paper presents the results of laboratory column tests aimed at defining the optimum weight ratio of zero-valent iron (ZVI)/pumice granular mixtures to be used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for the removal of nickel from contaminated groundwater. The tests were carried out feeding the columns with aqueous solutions of nickel nitrate at concentrations of 5 and 50 mg/l using three ZVI/pumice granular mixtures at various weight ratios (10/90, 30/70 and 50/50), for a total of six column tests; two additional tests were carried out using ZVI alone. The most successful compromise between reactivity (higher ZVI content) and long-term hydraulic performance (higher Pumice content) seems to be given by the ZVI/pumice granular mixture with a 30/70 weight ratio. PMID:21885195

  20. Soil surface colonization by phototrophic indigenous organisms, in two contrasted soils treated by formulated maize herbicide mixtures.

    PubMed

    Joly, Pierre; Misson, Benjamin; Perrière, Fanny; Bonnemoy, Frédérique; Joly, Muriel; Donnadieu-Bernard, Florence; Aguer, Jean-Pierre; Bohatier, Jacques; Mallet, Clarisse

    2014-11-01

    Soil phototrophic microorganisms, contributors to soil health and food webs, share their particular metabolism with plants. Current agricultural practices employ mixtures of pesticides to ensure the crops yields and can potentially impair these non-target organisms. However despite this environmental reality, studies dealing the susceptibility of phototrophic microorganisms to pesticide mixtures are scarce. We designed a 3 months microcosm study to assess the ecotoxicity of realistic herbicide mixtures of formulated S-metolachlor (Dual Gold Safeneur(®)), mesotrione (Callisto(®)) and nicosulfuron (Milagro(®)) on phototrophic communities of two soils (Limagne vertisol and Versailles luvisol). The soils presented different colonizing communities, with diatoms and chlorophyceae dominating communities in Limagne soil and cyanobacteria and bryophyta communities in Versailles soil. The results highlighted the strong impairment of Dual Gold Safeneur(®) treated microcosms on the biomass and the composition of both soil phototrophic communities, with no resilience after a delay of 3 months. This study also excluded any significant mixture effect on these organisms for Callisto(®) and Milagro(®) herbicides. We strongly recommend carrying on extensive soil studies on S-metolachlor and its commercial formulations, in order to reconsider its use from an ecotoxicological point of view. PMID:25129149

  1. Quality assurance in MRI breast screening: comparing signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging protocols.

    PubMed

    Kousi, Evanthia; Borri, Marco; Dean, Jamie; Panek, Rafal; Scurr, Erica; Leach, Martin O; Schmidt, Maria A

    2016-01-01

    MRI has been extensively used in breast cancer staging, management and high risk screening. Detection sensitivity is paramount in breast screening, but variations of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of position are often overlooked. We propose and demonstrate practical methods to assess spatial SNR variations in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast examinations and apply those methods to different protocols and systems. Four different protocols in three different MRI systems (1.5 and 3.0 T) with receiver coils of different design were employed on oil-filled test objects with and without uniformity filters. Twenty 3D datasets were acquired with each protocol; each dataset was acquired in under 60 s, thus complying with current breast DCE guidelines. In addition to the standard SNR calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis, we propose other regional indices considering the mean and standard deviation of the signal over a small sub-region centred on each pixel. These regional indices include effects of the spatial variation of coil sensitivity and other structured artefacts. The proposed regional SNR indices demonstrate spatial variations in SNR as well as the presence of artefacts and sensitivity variations, which are otherwise difficult to quantify and might be overlooked in a clinical setting. Spatial variations in SNR depend on protocol choice and hardware characteristics. The use of uniformity filters was shown to lead to a rise of SNR values, altering the noise distribution. Correlation between noise in adjacent pixels was associated with data truncation along the phase encoding direction. Methods to characterise spatial SNR variations using regional information were demonstrated, with implications for quality assurance in breast screening and multi-centre trials. PMID:26605957

  2. Quality assurance in MRI breast screening: comparing signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kousi, Evanthia; Borri, Marco; Dean, Jamie; Panek, Rafal; Scurr, Erica; Leach, Martin O.; Schmidt, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has been extensively used in breast cancer staging, management and high risk screening. Detection sensitivity is paramount in breast screening, but variations of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of position are often overlooked. We propose and demonstrate practical methods to assess spatial SNR variations in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast examinations and apply those methods to different protocols and systems. Four different protocols in three different MRI systems (1.5 and 3.0 T) with receiver coils of different design were employed on oil-filled test objects with and without uniformity filters. Twenty 3D datasets were acquired with each protocol; each dataset was acquired in under 60 s, thus complying with current breast DCE guidelines. In addition to the standard SNR calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis, we propose other regional indices considering the mean and standard deviation of the signal over a small sub-region centred on each pixel. These regional indices include effects of the spatial variation of coil sensitivity and other structured artefacts. The proposed regional SNR indices demonstrate spatial variations in SNR as well as the presence of artefacts and sensitivity variations, which are otherwise difficult to quantify and might be overlooked in a clinical setting. Spatial variations in SNR depend on protocol choice and hardware characteristics. The use of uniformity filters was shown to lead to a rise of SNR values, altering the noise distribution. Correlation between noise in adjacent pixels was associated with data truncation along the phase encoding direction. Methods to characterise spatial SNR variations using regional information were demonstrated, with implications for quality assurance in breast screening and multi-centre trials.

  3. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO MIXTURE RAY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional factorial designs for evaluating interactions among chemicals in a mixture are prohibitive when the number of chemicals is large. However, recent advances in statistically-based experimental design have made it easier to evaluate interactions involving many chemicals...

  4. POWER AND SAMPLE SIZE CALCULATIONS FOR LINEAR HYPOTHESES ASSOCIATED WITH MIXTURES OF MANY COMPONENTS USING FIXED-RATIO RAY DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Response surface methodology, often supported by factorial designs, is the classical experimental approach that is widely accepted for detecting and characterizing interactions among chemicals in a mixture. In an effort to reduce the experimental effort as the number of compound...

  5. DETECTING INTERACTIONS(S) AND ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF COMPONENT SUBSETS IN A CHEMICAL MIXTURE USING FIXED-RATIO MIXTURE RAY DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An important environmental and regulatory issue is the protection of human health from potential adverse effects of cumulative exposure to multiple chemicals. Gennings et al. (2002) and Meadows et al. (2002) suggest restricting inference to specific fixed-ratio rays of interest....

  6. Monte Carlo evaluation of the relationship between absorbed dose and contrast-to-noise ratio in coherent scatter breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghammraoui, B.; Popescu, L. M.; Badal, A.

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the advantages and shortcomings associated with Coherent Scatter Computed Tomography (CSCT) systems for breast imaging and study possible alternative configurations. The relationship between dose in a breast phantom and a simple surrogate of image quality in pencil-beam and fan-beam CSCT geometries was evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation, and an improved pencil-beam setup was proposed for faster CSCT data acquisition. CSCT projection datasets of a simple breast phantom have been simulated using a new version of the MC-GPU code that includes an improved model of x-ray coherent scattering using experimentally measured molecular interference functions. The breast phantom was composed of an 8 cm diameter cylinder of 50/50 glandular/adipose material and nine rods with different diameters of cancerous, adipose and glandular tissues. The system performance has been assessed in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in multiple regions of interest within the reconstructed images, for a range of exposure levels. The enhanced pencil-beam setup consisted of multiplexed pencil beams and specific post-processing of the projection data to calculate the scatter intensity coming from each beam separately. At reconstruction spatial resolution of 1×1×1 mm3 and from 1 to 10 mGy of received breast dose, fan-beam geometry showed higher statistical noise and lower CNR than pencil-beam geometry. Conventional CT acquisition had the highest CNR per dose. However, the CNR figure of merit did not combine yet all the information available at different scattering angles in the CSCT, which has potential for increased discrimination of materials with similar attenuation properties. Preliminary evaluation of the multiplexed pencil-beam geometry showed that the scattering profiles simulated with the new approach are similar to those of the single pencil-beam geometry. Conclusion: It has been shown that the GPU-accelerated MC-GPU code is a practical

  7. Enhancing the Efficiency and Contrast Ratio of White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Using Energy-Recyclable Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Meiso; Wu, Chung-Ming; Su, Shui-Hsiang

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate that power recycling is feasible by using a semitransparent strip of Al electrode as an interconnecting layer to merge a white organic light-emitting device (WOLED) and an organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell. The device is called a photovoltaic organic light-emitting device (PVOLED). It has a glass/indium tin oxide (ITO)/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/4,4,4-tris(3-methyl-phenylphenylamino) triphenylamine (m-MTDATA):V2O5/2-N',N-bis(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPB)/4,4'-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP):bis[3,5-difluoro-2-(2-pyridyl) phenyl-(2-carboxypyridyl)] iridium(II) (FIrpic):4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6 (1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB)/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen)/LiF/Al/poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):[6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)/V2O5/Al structure. A power recycling efficiency of 10.133% is achieved using the WOLED of the PVOLED operated at 9 V and a brightness of 2110 cd/m2 when the conversion efficiency of the OPV cell is 2.3%. We found that the power recycling efficiency decreases at a high brightness and a high applied voltage owing to an increase in the input power of the WOLED. A high efficiency (18.3 cd/A) and a high contrast ratio (9.3) are obtained in the device operated at 2500 cd/m2 under an ambient illumination of 24000 lx. Reasonable white light emission with Commission Internationale De L'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.32, 0.44) at 20 mA/cm2 and a slight color shift occur in spite of the high current density of 50 mA/cm2.

  8. Evaluation of the equivalence ratio of the reacting mixture using intensity ratio of chemiluminescence in laminar partially premixed CH{sub 4}-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Yong Ki; Jeon, Chung Hwan; Chang, Young June

    2006-07-15

    An experimental study was performed to investigate the effects of partially premixing, varying the equivalence ratios from 0.79 to 9.52, on OH*, CH* and C{sub 2}* in laminar partially premixed flames. The signals from the electronically excited states of OH*, CH* and C{sub 2}* were detected through interference filters using a photo multiplier tube, which were processed to the intensity ratios (C{sub 2}*/CH*, C{sub 2}*/OH* and CH*/OH*) to determine a correlation with the local equivalence ratios. Furthermore, the consistency between the results of the tomographic reconstruction; Abel inversion technique, image with CCD (Couple Charged Detector) camera and the local radical intensity with PMT was investigated. The results demonstrated that (1) the flames at F=<1.36 exhibited classical double flame structure, at F>=4.76, the flames exhibited non-premixed-like flame structure and the intermediate flames at 1.36ratio of CH*/OH* was nearly proportional to 1/F for the 1 dimensional results with PMT, with a correlation coefficient of 0.99 at the equivalence ratios of 0.79-9.52. These results are in good agreement with those obtained from the two dimensional results with ICCD. However, it is difficult to predict the relationships between the equivalence ratios and intensity ratios of C{sub 2}*/CH* and C{sub 2}*/OH*. (author)

  9. Two-photon Laurdan studies of the ternary lipid mixture DOPC:SM:cholesterol reveal a single liquid phase at sphingomyelin:cholesterol ratios lower than 1.

    PubMed

    Carravilla, Pablo; Nieva, José L; Goñi, Félix M; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Huarte, Nerea

    2015-03-10

    The ternary lipid mixture DOPC:eggSM:cholesterol in excess water has been studied in the form of giant unilamellar vesicles using two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Previous publications based on single-photon fluorescence microscopy had reported heterogeneous phase behavior (phase coexistence) in the region of the triangular phase diagram corresponding to SM:cholesterol molar ratios <1. We have examined this region by two-photon microscopy of Laurdan-labeled mixtures and have found that, under our conditions, only a single liquid phase exists. We have shown that macroscopic phase separation in the above region can be artifactually induced by one-photon excitation of the fluorescent probes and ensuing photooxidation and is prevented using two-photon excitation. The main effect of increasing the concentration of cholesterol in mixtures containing 30 mol % SM was to increase the rigidity of the disordered domains. Increasing the concentration of SM in mixtures containing 20 mol % cholesterol gradually augmented the rigidity of the ordered domains, while the disordered domains reached minimal order at a SM:cholesterol 2.25:1 molar ratio, which then increased again. Moreover, the detailed measurement of Laurdan generalized polarization across the whole phase diagram allowed the representation, for both the single- and two-phase regions, of the gradual variation of membrane lateral packing along the diagram, which we found to be governed largely by SM:cholesterol interactions. PMID:25658036

  10. Evaluating the efficiency of spectral resolution of univariate methods manipulating ratio spectra and comparing to multivariate methods: An application to ternary mixture in common cold preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Azza Aziz; Salem, Hesham; Hegazy, Maha; Ali, Omnia

    2015-02-01

    Simple, accurate, and selective methods have been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of a ternary mixture of Chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM), Pseudoephedrine HCl (PSE) and Ibuprofen (IBF), in tablet dosage form. Four univariate methods manipulating ratio spectra were applied, method A is the double divisor-ratio difference spectrophotometric method (DD-RD). Method B is double divisor-derivative ratio spectrophotometric method (DD-RD). Method C is derivative ratio spectrum-zero crossing method (DRZC), while method D is mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR). Two multivariate methods were also developed and validated, methods E and F are Principal Component Regression (PCR) and Partial Least Squares (PLSs). The proposed methods have the advantage of simultaneous determination of the mentioned drugs without prior separation steps. They were successfully applied to laboratory-prepared mixtures and to commercial pharmaceutical preparation without any interference from additives. The proposed methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. The obtained results were statistically compared with the official methods where no significant difference was observed regarding both accuracy and precision.

  11. Evaluating the efficiency of spectral resolution of univariate methods manipulating ratio spectra and comparing to multivariate methods: an application to ternary mixture in common cold preparation.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Azza Aziz; Salem, Hesham; Hegazy, Maha; Ali, Omnia

    2015-02-25

    Simple, accurate, and selective methods have been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of a ternary mixture of Chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM), Pseudoephedrine HCl (PSE) and Ibuprofen (IBF), in tablet dosage form. Four univariate methods manipulating ratio spectra were applied, method A is the double divisor-ratio difference spectrophotometric method (DD-RD). Method B is double divisor-derivative ratio spectrophotometric method (DD-RD). Method C is derivative ratio spectrum-zero crossing method (DRZC), while method D is mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR). Two multivariate methods were also developed and validated, methods E and F are Principal Component Regression (PCR) and Partial Least Squares (PLSs). The proposed methods have the advantage of simultaneous determination of the mentioned drugs without prior separation steps. They were successfully applied to laboratory-prepared mixtures and to commercial pharmaceutical preparation without any interference from additives. The proposed methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. The obtained results were statistically compared with the official methods where no significant difference was observed regarding both accuracy and precision. PMID:25306132

  12. Influence of Seeding Ratio, Planting Date, and Termination Date on Rye-Hairy Vetch Cover Crop Mixture Performance under Organic Management

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Andrew; Cogger, Craig; Bary, Andy; Fortuna, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Cover crop benefits include nitrogen accumulation and retention, weed suppression, organic matter maintenance, and reduced erosion. Organic farmers need region-specific information on winter cover crop performance to effectively integrate cover crops into their crop rotations. Our research objective was to compare cover crop seeding mixtures, planting dates, and termination dates on performance of rye (Secale cereale L.) and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) monocultures and mixtures in the maritime Pacific Northwest USA. The study included four seed mixtures (100% hairy vetch, 25% rye-75% hairy vetch, 50% rye-50% hairy vetch, and 100% rye by seed weight), two planting dates, and two termination dates, using a split-split plot design with four replications over six years. Measurements included winter ground cover; stand composition; cover crop biomass, N concentration, and N uptake; and June soil NO3--N. Rye planted in mid-September and terminated in late April averaged 5.1 Mg ha-1 biomass, whereas mixtures averaged 4.1 Mg ha-1 and hairy vetch 2.3 Mg ha-1. Delaying planting by 2.5 weeks reduced average winter ground cover by 65%, biomass by 50%, and cover crop N accumulation by 40%. Similar reductions in biomass and N accumulation occurred for late March termination, compared with late April termination. Mixtures had less annual biomass variability than rye. Mixtures accumulated 103 kg ha-1 N and had mean C:N ratio <17:1 when planted in mid-September and terminated in late April. June soil NO3--N (0 to 30 cm depth) averaged 62 kg ha-1 for rye, 97 kg ha-1 for the mixtures, and 119 kg ha-1 for hairy vetch. Weeds comprised less of the mixtures biomass (20% weeds by weight at termination) compared with the monocultures (29%). Cover crop mixtures provided a balance between biomass accumulation and N concentration, more consistent biomass over the six-year study, and were more effective at reducing winter weeds compared with monocultures. PMID:26080008

  13. Influence of Seeding Ratio, Planting Date, and Termination Date on Rye-Hairy Vetch Cover Crop Mixture Performance under Organic Management.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Andrew; Cogger, Craig; Bary, Andy; Fortuna, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Cover crop benefits include nitrogen accumulation and retention, weed suppression, organic matter maintenance, and reduced erosion. Organic farmers need region-specific information on winter cover crop performance to effectively integrate cover crops into their crop rotations. Our research objective was to compare cover crop seeding mixtures, planting dates, and termination dates on performance of rye (Secale cereale L.) and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) monocultures and mixtures in the maritime Pacific Northwest USA. The study included four seed mixtures (100% hairy vetch, 25% rye-75% hairy vetch, 50% rye-50% hairy vetch, and 100% rye by seed weight), two planting dates, and two termination dates, using a split-split plot design with four replications over six years. Measurements included winter ground cover; stand composition; cover crop biomass, N concentration, and N uptake; and June soil NO3(-)-N. Rye planted in mid-September and terminated in late April averaged 5.1 Mg ha(-1) biomass, whereas mixtures averaged 4.1 Mg ha(-1) and hairy vetch 2.3 Mg ha(-1). Delaying planting by 2.5 weeks reduced average winter ground cover by 65%, biomass by 50%, and cover crop N accumulation by 40%. Similar reductions in biomass and N accumulation occurred for late March termination, compared with late April termination. Mixtures had less annual biomass variability than rye. Mixtures accumulated 103 kg ha(-1) N and had mean C:N ratio <17:1 when planted in mid-September and terminated in late April. June soil NO3(-)-N (0 to 30 cm depth) averaged 62 kg ha(-1) for rye, 97 kg ha(-1) for the mixtures, and 119 kg ha(-1) for hairy vetch. Weeds comprised less of the mixtures biomass (20% weeds by weight at termination) compared with the monocultures (29%). Cover crop mixtures provided a balance between biomass accumulation and N concentration, more consistent biomass over the six-year study, and were more effective at reducing winter weeds compared with monocultures. PMID:26080008

  14. Effect of hydrogen ratio on plasma parameters of N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} gas mixture glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    El-Brulsy, R. A.; Abd Al-Halim, M. A.; Abu-Hashem, A.; Rashed, U. M.; Hassouba, M. A.

    2012-05-15

    A dc plane glow discharge in a nitrogen-hydrogen (N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}) gas mixture has been operated at discharge currents of 10 and 20 mA. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at different hydrogen concentrations is measured. A Maxwellian EEDF is found in the positive column region, while in both cathode fall and negative glow regions, a non-Maxwellian one is observed. Langmuir electric probes are used at different axial positions, gas pressures, and hydrogen concentrations to measure the electron temperature and plasma density. The electron temperature is found to increase with increasing H{sub 2} concentration and decrease with increasing both the axial distance from the cathode and the mixture pressure. At first, with increasing distance from the cathode, the ion density decreases, while the electron density increases; then, as the anode is further approached, they remain nearly constant. At different H{sub 2} concentrations, the electron and ion densities decrease with increasing the mixture pressure. Both the electron and ion densities slightly decrease with increasing H{sub 2} concentration.

  15. Comparing CO2 flux data from eddy covariance methods with bowen ratio energy balance methods from contrasting soil management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring CO2 fluxes from contrasting soil management practices is important for understanding the role of agriculture in source-sink relationship with CO2 flux. There are several micrometeorological methods for measuring CO2 emissions, however all are expensive and thus do not easily lend themselve...

  16. ZnO nanocrystals synthesized by evaporation of Zn in microwave plasma torch in terms of mixture ratio of N{sub 2} to O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Kim, Jong Hun; Cho, Soon Cheon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-06-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals synthesized by an atmospheric microwave plasma torch are characterized in terms of the mixture ratio of N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} in the torch gas. Zinc (Zn) granules as a source material placed on the plasma reactor were evaporated and oxidized to ZnO immediately as soon as Zn granules were in contact with the plasma torch flame. The samples obtained from the different gas mixtures were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and photoluminescence (PL). As the N{sub 2} content in the gas mixture increased to 93.6%, the aggregates or clusters of ZnO crystals were synthesized without nanorod-like and multipod-like structures. Especially, ZnO crystals synthesized in the N{sub 2} content of 55.6% mainly revealed the tripod and tetrapod. Also, the visible to ultraviolet (UV) intensity ratio in the PL analysis was increased with increasing of the N{sub 2} content, revealing that the aggregated ZnO crystals have the high concentration of oxygen vacancies.

  17. How does pea architecture influence light sharing in virtual wheat–pea mixtures? A simulation study based on pea genotypes with contrasting architectures

    PubMed Central

    Barillot, Romain; Combes, Didier; Chevalier, Valérie; Fournier, Christian; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Abraham J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Light interception is a key factor driving the functioning of wheat–pea intercrops. The sharing of light is related to the canopy structure, which results from the architectural parameters of the mixed species. In the present study, we characterized six contrasting pea genotypes and identified architectural parameters whose range of variability leads to various levels of light sharing within virtual wheat–pea mixtures. Methodology Virtual plants were derived from magnetic digitizations performed during the growing cycle in a greenhouse experiment. Plant mock-ups were used as inputs of a radiative transfer model in order to estimate light interception in virtual wheat–pea mixtures. The turbid medium approach, extended to well-mixed canopies, was used as a framework for assessing the effects of leaf area index (LAI) and mean leaf inclination on light sharing. Principal results Three groups of pea genotypes were distinguished: (i) early and leafy cultivars, (ii) late semi-leafless cultivars and (iii) low-development semi-leafless cultivars. Within open canopies, light sharing was well described by the turbid medium approach and was therefore determined by the architectural parameters that composed LAI and foliage inclination. When canopy closure started, the turbid medium approach was unable to properly infer light partitioning because of the vertical structure of the canopy. This was related to the architectural parameters that determine the height of pea genotypes. Light capture was therefore affected by the development of leaflets, number of branches and phytomers, as well as internode length. Conclusions This study provides information on pea architecture and identifies parameters whose variability can be used to drive light sharing within wheat–pea mixtures. These results could be used to build up the architecture of pea ideotypes adapted to multi-specific stands towards light competition. PMID:23240074

  18. Simultaneous determination of chloramphenicol, dexamethasone and naphazoline in ternary and quaternary mixtures by RP-HPLC, derivative and wavelet transforms of UV ratio spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Vu Dang; Hue, Nguyen Thu; Tho, Nguyen Huu; Nguyen, Hue Minh Thi

    2015-03-01

    The application of chemometrics-assisted UV spectrophotometry and RP-HPLC to the simultaneous determination of chloramphenicol, dexamethasone and naphazoline in ternary and quaternary mixtures is presented. The spectrophotometric procedure is based on the first-order derivative and wavelet transforms of ratio spectra using single, double and successive divisors. The ratio spectra were differentiated and smoothed using Savitzky-Golay filter; whereas wavelet transform realized with wavelet functions (i.e. db6, gaus5 and coif3) to obtain highest spectral recoveries. For the RP-HPLC procedure, the separation was achieved on a ZORBAX SB-C18 (150 × 4.6 mm; 5 μm) column at ambient temperature and the total run time was less than 7 min. A mixture of acetonitrile - 25 mM phosphate buffer pH 3 (27:73, v/v) was used as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and the effluent monitored by measuring absorbance at 220 nm. Calibration graphs were established in the range 20-70 mg/L for chloramphenicol, 6-14 mg/L for dexamethasone and 3-8 mg/L for naphazoline (R2 > 0.990). The RP-HPLC and ratio spectra transformed by a combination of derivative-wavelet algorithms proved to be able to successfully determine all analytes in commercial eye drop formulations without sample matrix interference (mean percent recoveries, 97.4-104.3%).

  19. Simultaneous determination of chloramphenicol, dexamethasone and naphazoline in ternary and quaternary mixtures by RP-HPLC, derivative and wavelet transforms of UV ratio spectra.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Vu Dang; Hue, Nguyen Thu; Tho, Nguyen Huu; Nguyen, Hue Minh Thi

    2015-03-15

    The application of chemometrics-assisted UV spectrophotometry and RP-HPLC to the simultaneous determination of chloramphenicol, dexamethasone and naphazoline in ternary and quaternary mixtures is presented. The spectrophotometric procedure is based on the first-order derivative and wavelet transforms of ratio spectra using single, double and successive divisors. The ratio spectra were differentiated and smoothed using Savitzky-Golay filter; whereas wavelet transform realized with wavelet functions (i.e. db6, gaus5 and coif3) to obtain highest spectral recoveries. For the RP-HPLC procedure, the separation was achieved on a ZORBAX SB-C18 (150×4.6 mm; 5 μm) column at ambient temperature and the total run time was less than 7 min. A mixture of acetonitrile - 25 mM phosphate buffer pH 3 (27:73, v/v) was used as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and the effluent monitored by measuring absorbance at 220 nm. Calibration graphs were established in the range 20-70 mg/L for chloramphenicol, 6-14 mg/L for dexamethasone and 3-8 mg/L for naphazoline (R(2)>0.990). The RP-HPLC and ratio spectra transformed by a combination of derivative-wavelet algorithms proved to be able to successfully determine all analytes in commercial eye drop formulations without sample matrix interference (mean percent recoveries, 97.4-104.3%). PMID:25546493

  20. Comparative Study of Novel Ratio Spectra and Isoabsorptive Point Based Spectrophotometric Methods: Application on a Binary Mixture of Ascorbic Acid and Rutin

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Hany W.; Bakheit, Ahmed H.; Naguib, Ibrahim A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents novel methods for spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid (AA) in presence of rutin (RU) (coformulated drug) in their combined pharmaceutical formulation. The seven methods are ratio difference (RD), isoabsorptive_RD (Iso_RD), amplitude summation (A_Sum), isoabsorptive point, first derivative of the ratio spectra (1DD), mean centering (MCN), and ratio subtraction (RS). On the other hand, RU was determined directly by measuring the absorbance at 358 nm in addition to the two novel Iso_RD and A_Sum methods. The work introduced in this paper aims to compare these different methods, showing the advantages for each and making a comparison of analysis results. The calibration curve is linear over the concentration range of 4–50 μg/mL for AA and RU. The results show the high performance of proposed methods for the analysis of the binary mixture. The optimum assay conditions were established and the proposed methods were successfully applied for the assay of the two drugs in laboratory prepared mixtures and combined pharmaceutical tablets with excellent recoveries. No interference was observed from common pharmaceutical additives. PMID:26885440

  1. Fiber optic Raman sensor to monitor the concentration ratio of nitrogen and oxygen in a cryogenic mixture.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vidhu S; Kalluru, Rajamohan R; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P; Cyr, William St; Khijwania, Sunil K

    2007-06-01

    A spontaneous Raman scattering optical fiber sensor was developed for a specific need of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for long-term detection and monitoring of the purity of liquid oxygen (LO(2)) in the oxidizer feed line during ground testing of rocket engines. The Raman peak intensity ratios for liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) and LO(2) with varied weight ratios (LN(2)/LO(2)) were analyzed for their applicability to impurity sensing. The study of the sensor performance with different excitation light sources has helped to design a miniaturized, cost-effective system for this application. The optimal system response time of this miniaturized sensor for LN(2)/LO(2) measurement was found to be in the range of a few seconds. It will need to be further reduced to the millisecond range for real-time, quantitative monitoring of the quality of cryogenic fluids in a harsh environment. PMID:17514292

  2. Parametric mixture models to evaluate and summarize hazard ratios in the presence of competing risks with time-dependent hazards and delayed entry

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Bryan; Cole, Stephen R.; Gange, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    In the analysis of survival data, there are often competing events that preclude an event of interest from occurring. Regression analysis with competing risks is typically undertaken using a cause-specific proportional hazards model. However, modern alternative methods exist for the analysis of the subdistribution hazard with a corresponding subdistribution proportional hazards model. In this paper, we introduce a flexible parametric mixture model as a unifying method to obtain estimates of the cause-specific and subdistribution hazards and hazard ratio functions. We describe how these estimates can be summarized over time to give a single number that is comparable to the hazard ratio that is obtained from a corresponding cause-specific or subdistribution proportional hazards model. An application to the Women’s Interagency HIV Study is provided to investigate injection drug use and the time to either the initiation of effective antiretroviral therapy, or clinical disease progression as a competing event. PMID:21337360

  3. [Quantitative Measurement of Equivalence Ratios of Methane/Air Mixture by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: the Effects of Detector Gated Mode and Laser Wavelength].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Peng; Li, Bo; Yan, Bei-bei; Li, Zhong-shan; Yao, Ming-fa

    2015-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been increasingly used in combustion diagnostics as a novel spectral analysis method in recent years. The quantitative local equivalence ratio of methane/air mixture is determined by LIBS using different emission intensity ratios of H/O and H/N. The comparison between calibration curves of H₆₅₆/O₇₇₇ and H₆₅₆/N₇₄₆ is performed in gated mode, which shows that H₆₅₆/O₇₇₇ can achieve better prediction accuracy and higher sensitivity. More spectral intensity ratios (H₆₅₆/O₇₇₇, H₆₅₆/N₅₀₀⁺, H₆₅₆/N₅₆₇ and H₆₅₆/N₇₄₆) can be used to make calibration measurements in ungated mode and H₆₅₆/O₇₇₇ is also tested best among them. The comparison between gated and ungated detection modes shows that gated mode offers better accuracy and precision. In addition, the effects of different laser wavelengths (1064, 532 and 355 nm) on LIBS spectra and calibration curves are investigated with laser focal point size and laser fluence kept constant. The results show that with longer laser wavelength, the peak intensity and SNR of H, O and N lines increase, as well as the slope of calibration curve of H₆₅₆/O₇₇₇. Among these three wavelengths, 1064 nm laser is best suited to measure the equivalence ratio of CH₄/air mixture by LIBS. The experimental results are explained in terms of plasma electron density and temperature, which have a significant impact on the emission intensity and the partition function of hydrogen and oxygen, respectively. PMID:26978894

  4. Processes affecting oxygen isotope ratios of atmospheric and ecosystem sulfate in two contrasting forest catchments in Central Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Novak; Myron J. Mitchell; Iva Jackova; Frantisek Buzek; Jana Schweigstillova; Lucie Erbanova; Richard Prikryl; Daniela Fottova

    2007-02-15

    Sulfate aerosols are harmful as respirable particles. They also play a role as cloud condensation nuclei and have radiative effects on global climate. A combination of {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} data with catchment sulfur mass balances was used to constrain processes affecting S cycling in the atmosphere and spruce forests of the Czech Republic. Extremely high S fluxes via spruce throughfall and runoff were measured at Jezeri (49 and 80 kg S ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, respectively). The second catchment, Na Lizu, was 10 times less polluted. In both catchments, {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} decreased in the following order: open-area precipitation {gt} throughfall {gt} runoff. The 180-SO{sub 4} values of throughfall exhibited a seasonal pattern at both sites, with maxima in summer and minima in winter. This seasonal pattern paralleled {delta}{sup 18}O-H{sub 2}O values, which were offset by -18{per_thousand}. Sulfate in throughfall was predominantly formed by heterogeneous (aqueous) oxidation of SO{sub 2}. Wet-deposited sulfate in an open area did not show systematic {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} trends, suggesting formation by homogeneous (gaseous) oxidation and/or transport from large distances. The percentage of incoming S that is organically cycled in soil was similar under the high and the low pollution. High-temperature {sup 18}O-rich sulfate was not detected, which contrasts with North American industrial sites. 29 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. High-performance liquid chromatographic and first derivative of the ratio spectrophotometric determination of amlodipine and valsartan in their binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kul, Dilek; Dogan-Topal, Burcu; Kutucu, Tugba; Uslu, Bengi; Ozkan, Sibel A

    2010-01-01

    Amlodipine besylate (AML) is a long-acting calcium channel blocker used as an antihypertensive agent. Valsartan (VAL) is also used to treat hypertension, either alone or in combination with other agents. Two-component mixtures of AML and VAL were analyzed by HPLC and the ratio spectra of the first derivative spectrophotometric technique. The spectrophotometric method depends on the first derivative of the ratio-spectra by measurements of the amplitudes at 234.0 nm for VAL and 351.0 nm for AML. Calibration graphs were established for 0.5-20 microg/mL AML and 1-32 microg/mL VAL using the ratio spectra of the first derivative spectrophotometric method. In the HPLC method, an ACE 5 C18 (4.6 x 150 mm, 5 microm) RP column at 30 degrees C with the mobile phase methanol-acetonitrile-NaH2PO4.H2O buffer, including 5 mL/L triethylamine and adjusted to pH 3.0 (42 + 18 + 40, v/v/v) at 2.0 mL/min flow rate was used to separate both compounds with detection at 254.0 nm. Linearity was obtained in the concentration range of 0.5-500 microg/mL for AML and 5.0-900 microg/mL for VAL. The proposed methods have been extensively validated. These methods allow a number of cost- and time-saving benefits. They were successfully applied to the determination of AML and VAL in synthetic mixtures and in a pharmaceutical dosage form. There was no significant difference between the performance of the proposed methods regarding the mean and SD values. The proposed methods are simple, rapid, and suitable for QC applications. PMID:20629391

  6. Effect of Polycalcium, a mixture of Polycan and calcium lactate-gluconate in a 1:9 weight ratio, on rats with surgery-induced osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, JAE-SUK; SHIN, HYUN-SOO; KIM, KI YOUNG; KU, SAE KWANG; CHOI, IN SOON; KIM, JOO WAN

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the beneficial and synergistic effects of Polycalcium, a mixture of Polycan and calcium (Ca) lactate-gluconate in a 1:9 weight ratio, on a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA) were explored. Polycalcium (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) was administered orally once per day for 28 days from 1 week after the OA-modeling surgery. Diclofenac sodium (2 mg/kg) was administered as a reference drug. Following the OA surgery, increases in the maximum extension angles, edematous changes in knee and capsule thickness, reductions in chondrocyte proliferation and cartilage glycosaminoglycan (GAG) levels, as well as changes in cartilage degeneration were observed. However, these OA-related symptoms were inhibited after 28 days of continuous oral treatment with Polycalcium. Anti-OA effects, including the induction of chondrocyte proliferation, were detected in the Polycalcium-treated rats and were more favorable compared with those in rats treated with Polycan or Ca lactate-gluconate alone (100 mg). Therefore, a mixture of Polycan and Ca lactate-gluconate was demonstrated to have beneficial synergistic effects on OA. PMID:26136893

  7. How Grain Size Ratio and Fine Sediment Feed Concentration Influence Channel Slope Evolution Due to Grain Size Sorting in Bimodal Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudill, A. R.; Frey, P.; Church, M. A.; Hassan, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    It is essential that understanding of grain size sorting and its influence upon sediment transport in gravel-bed rivers is deepened due to implications for channel stability, ecology and stratigraphy. Previous work has shown how the addition of finer material to a coarse channel bed can enhance the mobility of the coarser sediment due to a reduced entrainment threshold. This enhanced mobility has been indexed using the change in equilibrium slope within the channel. However, it is not yet known how variations in the grain size ratio (diameter of coarse/diameter of fine), along with the concentration of fine material, influences this behavior. New experiments undertaken with bimodal mixtures of spherical glass particles in a relatively narrow sediment-feed flume permit observation of the individual and bulk particle motion. These experiments demonstrate that degradation can occur when fine sediment is added to a coarse bed (Figure 1), and show the grain size ratios and fine sediment feed concentrations at which this arises. The research also shows that under certain conditions, aggradation can also occur due to the addition of finer sediment to a coarse channel bed. The amount of degradation and aggradation under varying conditions is quantified using the change in equilibrium bed slope. Figure 1: Channel degradation (flow from right to left)

  8. Differential Tuning of the Electron Transfer Parameters in 1,3,5-Triarylpyrazolines: A Rational Design Approach for Optimizing the Contrast Ratio of Fluorescent Probes

    PubMed Central

    Cody, John; Mandal, Subrata; Yang, Liuchun; Fahrni, Christoph J.

    2010-01-01

    A large class of cation-responsive fluorescent sensors utilizes a donor-spacer-acceptor (D-A) molecular framework that can modulate the fluorescence emission intensity through a fast photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer (PET) process. The emission enhancement upon binding of the analyte defines the contrast ratio of the probe, a key property that is particularly relevant in fluorescence microscopy imaging applications. Due to their unusual electronic structure, 1,3,5-triaryl-pyrazoline fluorophores allow for the differential tuning of the excited state energy ΔE00 and the fluorophore acceptor potential E(A/A−), both of which are critical parameters that define the ET thermodynamics and thus the contrast ratio. By systematically varying the number and attachment positions of fluoro-substituents on the fluorophore π-system, ΔE00 can be adjusted over a broad range (0.4 eV) without significantly altering the acceptor potential E(A/A−). Experimentally measured D-A coupling and reorganization energies were used to draw a potential map for identifying the optimal ET driving force that is expected to give a maximum fluorescence enhancement for a given change in donor potential upon binding of the analyte. The rational design strategy was tested by optimizing the fluorescence response of a pH sensitive probe, thus yielding a maximum emission enhancement factor of 400 upon acidification. Furthermore, quantum chemical calculations were used to reproduce the experimental trends of reduction potentials, excited state energies, and ET driving forces within the framework of linear free energy relationships (LFER). Such LFERs should be suitable to semi-empirically predict ET driving forces with an average unsigned error of 0.03 eV, consequently allowing for the computational prescreening of substituent combinations to best match the donor potential of a given cation receptor. Within the scaffold of the triarylpyrazoline platform, the outlined differential tuning of

  9. Laser-based K α X-ray emission characterization using a high contrast ratio and high-power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmaux, S.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    We characterized a laser-based K_α X-ray source produced onto a Mo solid target. We used a laser system with a high laser pulse contrast ratio (LPCR) and an instantaneous power ˜30 TW. We investigated simultaneously the K_α X-ray conversion efficiency, the X-ray source size, and the proton front surface emission. We found a high K_α X-ray conversion efficiency up to 2× 10^{-4} associated with an X-ray source size only ˜1.8 times larger than the laser focal spot for the highest intensities. We found that using a high LPCR laser pulse with 245 mJ per pulse is of interest to develop a laser-based X-ray imaging system as it can combine a high conversion efficiency with a small increase in the X-ray source size compared to the laser focal spot.

  10. Successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication spectrophotometric method for determination of hydroquinone in complex mixture with its degradation products, tretinoin and methyl paraben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elghobashy, Mohamed R.; Bebawy, Lories I.; Shokry, Rafeek F.; Abbas, Samah S.

    2016-03-01

    A sensitive and selective stability-indicating successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication (SRS-CM) spectrophotometric method was studied and developed for the spectrum resolution of five component mixture without prior separation. The components were hydroquinone in combination with tretinoin, the polymer formed from hydroquinone alkali degradation, 1,4 benzoquinone and the preservative methyl paraben. The proposed method was used for their determination in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The zero order absorption spectra of hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben were determined at 293, 357.5, 245 and 255.2 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 4.00-46.00, 1.00-7.00, 0.60-5.20, and 1.00-7.00 μg mL- 1 for hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben, respectively. The pharmaceutical formulation was subjected to mild alkali condition and measured by this method resulting in the polymerization of hydroquinone and the formation of toxic 1,4 benzoquinone. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the reported method.

  11. Successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication spectrophotometric method for determination of hydroquinone in complex mixture with its degradation products, tretinoin and methyl paraben.

    PubMed

    Elghobashy, Mohamed R; Bebawy, Lories I; Shokry, Rafeek F; Abbas, Samah S

    2016-03-15

    A sensitive and selective stability-indicating successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication (SRS-CM) spectrophotometric method was studied and developed for the spectrum resolution of five component mixture without prior separation. The components were hydroquinone in combination with tretinoin, the polymer formed from hydroquinone alkali degradation, 1,4 benzoquinone and the preservative methyl paraben. The proposed method was used for their determination in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The zero order absorption spectra of hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben were determined at 293, 357.5, 245 and 255.2nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 4.00-46.00, 1.00-7.00, 0.60-5.20, and 1.00-7.00μgmL(-1) for hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben, respectively. The pharmaceutical formulation was subjected to mild alkali condition and measured by this method resulting in the polymerization of hydroquinone and the formation of toxic 1,4 benzoquinone. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the reported method. PMID:26745510

  12. Effect of the Si/Al ratio and of the zeolite structure on the performance of dealuminated zeolites for the reforming of hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Smirniotis, P.G.; Zhang, W.

    1996-09-01

    Various 12-membered ring pore zeolites were employed for the reforming of synthetic hydrocarbon mixtures which simulate industrial naphthas. All the zeolites were dealuminated to various extents. It was found that, under the present conditions over the samples which are slightly dealuminated, bimolecular-condensation reactions followed by recracking are responsible for the relatively large selectivities of C{sub 4} paraffins. The monomolecular cracking (via pentacoordinated carbonium ions) of the latter hydrocarbons is responsible for the large generation of CH{sub 4} from the cracking of C{sub 4} paraffins. When the Si/Al ratio increases, the selectivity of methane passes through a steep minimum, while those of C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, and C{sub 5} pass through a maximum. It was also found that the zeolite pore structure is a very important factor for the time on stream activity of zeolite-based catalysts. Zeolites with reduced aluminum content and pore structures, which do not favor the formation of coke precursors in their cavities, can lead to very promising catalysts for acid-catalyzed reactions. From this study a 12-membered ring pore zeolite, which demonstrates minimal coke deactivation, was identified.

  13. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) in High Definition (HD) Mode for Improved Contrast-to-Noise Ratio and Resolution in Fluoroscopy and Roadmapping

    PubMed Central

    Panse, Ashish; Ionita, C. N.; Wang, W.; Natarajan, S. K.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2011-01-01

    During image guided interventional procedures, superior resolution and image quality is critically important. Operating the MAF in the new High Definition (HD) fluoroscopy mode provides high resolution and increased contrast-to-noise ratio. The MAF has a CCD camera and a 300 micron cesium iodide x-ray convertor phosphor coupled to a light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. The MAF captures 1024 × 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35 microns, and is capable of real-time imaging at 30 fps. The HD mode uses the advantages of higher exposure along with a small focal spot effectively improving the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the spatial resolution. The Control Acquisition Processing and Image Display System (CAPIDS) software for the MAF controls the LII gain. The interventionalist can select either fluoroscopic or angiographic modes using the two standard foot pedals. When improved image quality is needed and the angiography footpedal is used for HD mode, the x-ray machine will operate at a preset higher exposure rate using a small focal spot, while the CAPIDS will automatically adjust the LII gain to achieve proper image brightness. HD mode fluoroscopy and roadmapping are thus achieved conveniently during the interventional procedure. For CNR and resolution evaluation we used a bar phantom with images taken in HD mode with both the MAF and a Flat Panel Detector (FPD). It was seen that the FPD could not resolve more than 2.8 lp/mm whereas the MAF could resolve more than 5 lp/mm. The CNR of the MAF was better than that of the FPD by 60% at lower frequencies and by 600% at the Nyquist frequency of the FPD. The HD mode has become the preferred mode during animal model interventions because it enables detailed features of endovascular devices such as stent struts to be visualized clearly for the first time. Clinical testing of the MAF in HD mode is imminent. PMID:21766062

  14. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) in High Definition (HD) Mode for Improved Contrast-to-Noise Ratio and Resolution in Fluoroscopy and Roadmapping.

    PubMed

    Panse, Ashish; Ionita, C N; Wang, W; Natarajan, S K; Jain, A; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2010-10-30

    During image guided interventional procedures, superior resolution and image quality is critically important. Operating the MAF in the new High Definition (HD) fluoroscopy mode provides high resolution and increased contrast-to-noise ratio. The MAF has a CCD camera and a 300 micron cesium iodide x-ray convertor phosphor coupled to a light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. The MAF captures 1024 × 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35 microns, and is capable of real-time imaging at 30 fps. The HD mode uses the advantages of higher exposure along with a small focal spot effectively improving the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the spatial resolution. The Control Acquisition Processing and Image Display System (CAPIDS) software for the MAF controls the LII gain. The interventionalist can select either fluoroscopic or angiographic modes using the two standard foot pedals. When improved image quality is needed and the angiography footpedal is used for HD mode, the x-ray machine will operate at a preset higher exposure rate using a small focal spot, while the CAPIDS will automatically adjust the LII gain to achieve proper image brightness. HD mode fluoroscopy and roadmapping are thus achieved conveniently during the interventional procedure. For CNR and resolution evaluation we used a bar phantom with images taken in HD mode with both the MAF and a Flat Panel Detector (FPD). It was seen that the FPD could not resolve more than 2.8 lp/mm whereas the MAF could resolve more than 5 lp/mm. The CNR of the MAF was better than that of the FPD by 60% at lower frequencies and by 600% at the Nyquist frequency of the FPD. The HD mode has become the preferred mode during animal model interventions because it enables detailed features of endovascular devices such as stent struts to be visualized clearly for the first time. Clinical testing of the MAF in HD mode is imminent. PMID:21766062

  15. Contrasted enzymatic cocktails reveal the importance of cellulases and hemicellulases activity ratios for the hydrolysis of cellulose in presence of xylans.

    PubMed

    Dondelinger, Eve; Aubry, Nathalie; Ben Chaabane, Fadhel; Cohen, Céline; Tayeb, Jean; Rémond, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Various enzymatic cocktails were produced from two Trichoderma reesei strains, a cellulase hyperproducer strain and a strain with β-glucosidase activity overexpression. By using various carbon sources (lactose, glucose, xylose, hemicellulosic hydrolysate) for strains growth, contrasted enzymatic activities were obtained. The enzymatic cocktails presented various levels of efficiency for the hydrolysis of cellulose Avicel into glucose, in presence of xylans, or not. These latter were also hydrolyzed with different extents according to cocktails. The most efficient cocktails (TR1 and TR3) on Avicel were richer in filter paper activity (FPU) and presented a low ratio FPU/β-glucosidase activity. Cocktails TR2 and TR5 which were produced on the higher amount of hemicellulosic hydrolysate, possess both high xylanase and β-xylosidase activities, and were the most efficient for xylans hydrolysis. When hydrolysis of Avicel was conducted in presence of xylans, a decrease of glucose release occurred for all cocktails compared to hydrolysis of Avicel alone. Mixing TR1 and TR5 cocktails with two different ratios of proteins (1/1 and 1/4) resulted in a gain of efficiency for glucose release during hydrolysis of Avicel in presence of xylans compared to TR5 alone. Our results demonstrate the importance of combining hemicellulase and cellulase activities to improve the yields of glucose release from Avicel in presence of xylans. In this context, strategies involving enzymes production with carbon sources comprising mixed C5 and C6 sugars or combining different cocktails produced on C5 or on C6 sugars are of interest for processes developed in the context of lignocellulosic biorefinery. PMID:27001439

  16. Application of contrast-to-noise ratio in optimizing beam quality for digital chest radiography: comparison of experimental measurements and theoretical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, P.; Martin, C. J.; Gentle, D.

    2006-06-01

    The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) has been employed in optimizing beam quality for imaging a chest phantom using digital radiography. The relationship between CNR and tube potential has been studied for regions of different attenuations representing the lung, heart and abdomen, and a figure of merit (FOM) incorporating effective dose has been calculated to enable dose performance to be included. Direct measurements of imaging performance have been compared with simulations based on a model representing object attenuations. The study has shown reasonable agreement between measurements of CNR and calculated values. The CNR values in the lung and heart regions are higher at 60-80 kV, while those for the abdomen are higher at 90-110 kV. Incorporating a 0.2 mm copper filter has minimal effect on image quality and the FOM is higher because of the reduction in dose. For imaging the heart and abdomen, performance was improved through use of a technique to remove scatter, with an air-gap technique giving a higher FOM because of the lower dose. The CNR and FOM can provide useful quantities for evaluating imaging performance to optimize beam quality for different imaging tasks.

  17. Single-Step 3-D Image Reconstruction in Magnetic Induction Tomography: Theoretical Limits of Spatial Resolution and Contrast to Noise Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Hollaus, Karl; Rosell-Ferrer, Javier; Merwa, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a low-resolution imaging modality for reconstructing the changes of the complex conductivity in an object. MIT is based on determining the perturbation of an alternating magnetic field, which is coupled from several excitation coils to the object. The conductivity distribution is reconstructed from the corresponding voltage changes induced in several receiver coils. Potential medical applications comprise the continuous, non-invasive monitoring of tissue alterations which are reflected in the change of the conductivity, e.g. edema, ventilation disorders, wound healing and ischemic processes. MIT requires the solution of an ill-posed inverse eddy current problem. A linearized version of this problem was solved for 16 excitation coils and 32 receiver coils with a model of two spherical perturbations within a cylindrical phantom. The method was tested with simulated measurement data. Images were reconstructed with a regularized single-step Gauss–Newton approach. Theoretical limits for spatial resolution and contrast/noise ratio were calculated and compared with the empirical results from a Monte-Carlo study. The conductivity perturbations inside a homogeneous cylinder were localized for a SNR between 44 and 64 dB. The results prove the feasibility of difference imaging with MIT and give some quantitative data on the limitations of the method. PMID:17031597

  18. Contrasting effects of age on the plasma/whole blood lead ratio in men and women with a history of lead exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Fernando; Curtius, Adilson J.; Buzalaf, Marilia R.; Tanus-Santos, Jose E.

    2006-09-15

    We examined the effect of age and sex on the relationship between the concentrations of Pb in blood (Pb-B) and in plasma (Pb-P) in an adult population with a history of lead exposure. Pb-P was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Pb-B by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS). We studied 154 adults (56 men and 98 women) from 18 to 60-year old. Pb-B levels varied from 10.0 to 428.0 {mu}g/L, with a mean of 76 {mu}g/L. Blood lead levels varied from 10.0 to 428.0 {mu}g/L in men (mean, 98.3 {mu}g/L) and from 10.0 to 263.0 {mu}g/L (mean, 62.8 {mu}g/L) in women. Corresponding Pb-Ps were 0.02-2.9 {mu}g/L (mean, 0.66 {mu}g/L) and 0.02-1.5 {mu}g/L (mean, 0.42 {mu}g/L) in men and women, respectively. The relationship between Pb-B and Pb-P was found to be curvilinear (r=0.757, P<0.001 Spearman's correlation). The two quantities are related by the line y=0.0006x {sup 1492} (y=Pb-P, and x=Pb-B). The %Pb-P/Pb-B ratio ranged from 0.03% to 1.85%. A positive association was found between %Pb-P/Pb-B ratio and Pb-B levels. When data were separated by sex, this association was also relevant for men (y=0.0184x {sup 0.702}) and women (y=0.0534x {sup 0.5209}) (y=%Pb-P/Pb-B and x=Pb-B). Moreover, we found an interesting positive correlation between Log (Pb-P/Pb-B) and age for women (r=0.31, P<0.0001) and a negative correlation for men (r=-0.164, P=0.07). Taken together, these results suggest contrasting effects of age on the plasma/whole blood lead ratio in men and women with a history of lead exposure. Moreover, sex might play an important role in the metabolism of lead, implying further consideration on the kinetic models constructed of lead toxicity.

  19. Maximizing Iodine Contrast-to-Noise Ratios in Abdominal CT Imaging through Use of Energy Domain Noise Reduction and Virtual Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT1

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the iodine contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for abdominal computed tomography (CT) when using energy domain noise reduction and virtual monoenergetic dual-energy (DE) CT images and to compare the CNR to that attained with single-energy CT at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board with waiver of informed consent. A syringe filled with diluted iodine contrast material was placed into 30-, 35-, and 45-cm-wide water phantoms and scanned with a dual-source CT scanner in both DE and single-energy modes with matched scanner output. Virtual monoenergetic images were generated, with energies ranging from 40 to 110 keV in 10-keV steps. A previously developed energy domain noise reduction algorithm was applied to reduce image noise by exploiting information redundancies in the energy domain. Image noise and iodine CNR were calculated. To show the potential clinical benefit of this technique, it was retrospectively applied to a clinical DE CT study of the liver in a 59-year-old male patient by using conventional and iterative reconstruction techniques. Image noise and CNR were compared for virtual monoenergetic images with and without energy domain noise reduction at each virtual monoenergetic energy (in kiloelectron volts) and phantom size by using a paired t test. CNR of virtual monoenergetic images was also compared with that of single-energy images acquired with 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Results Noise reduction of up to 59% (28.7/65.7) was achieved for DE virtual monoenergetic images by using an energy domain noise reduction technique. For the commercial virtual monoenergetic images, the maximum iodine CNR was achieved at 70 keV and was 18.6, 16.6, and 10.8 for the 30-, 35-, and 45-cm phantoms. After energy domain noise reduction, maximum iodine CNR was achieved at 40 keV and increased to 30.6, 25.4, and 16.5. These CNRs represented improvement of up to 64% (12.0/18.6) with

  20. Comparative study between recent methods manipulating ratio spectra and classical methods based on two-wavelength selection for the determination of binary mixture of antazoline hydrochloride and tetryzoline hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Halim, Lamia M.; Abd-El Rahman, Mohamed K.; Ramadan, Nesrin K.; EL Sanabary, Hoda F. A.; Salem, Maissa Y.

    2016-04-01

    A comparative study was developed between two classical spectrophotometric methods (dual wavelength method and Vierordt's method) and two recent methods manipulating ratio spectra (ratio difference method and first derivative of ratio spectra method) for simultaneous determination of Antazoline hydrochloride (AN) and Tetryzoline hydrochloride (TZ) in their combined pharmaceutical formulation and in the presence of benzalkonium chloride as a preservative without preliminary separation. The dual wavelength method depends on choosing two wavelengths for each drug in a way so that the difference in absorbance at those two wavelengths is zero for the other drug. While Vierordt's method, is based upon measuring the absorbance and the absorptivity values of the two drugs at their λmax (248.0 and 219.0 nm for AN and TZ, respectively), followed by substitution in the corresponding Vierordt's equation. Recent methods manipulating ratio spectra depend on either measuring the difference in amplitudes of ratio spectra between 255.5 and 269.5 nm for AN and 220.0 and 273.0 nm for TZ in case of ratio difference method or computing first derivative of the ratio spectra for each drug then measuring the peak amplitude at 250.0 nm for AN and at 224.0 nm for TZ in case of first derivative of ratio spectrophotometry. The specificity of the developed methods was investigated by analyzing different laboratory prepared mixtures of the two drugs. All methods were applied successfully for the determination of the selected drugs in their combined dosage form proving that the classical spectrophotometric methods can still be used successfully in analysis of binary mixture using minimal data manipulation rather than recent methods which require relatively more steps. Furthermore, validation of the proposed methods was performed according to ICH guidelines; accuracy, precision and repeatability are found to be within the acceptable limits. Statistical studies showed that the methods can be

  1. Comparative study between recent methods manipulating ratio spectra and classical methods based on two-wavelength selection for the determination of binary mixture of antazoline hydrochloride and tetryzoline hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, Lamia M; Abd-El Rahman, Mohamed K; Ramadan, Nesrin K; El Sanabary, Hoda F A; Salem, Maissa Y

    2016-04-15

    A comparative study was developed between two classical spectrophotometric methods (dual wavelength method and Vierordt's method) and two recent methods manipulating ratio spectra (ratio difference method and first derivative of ratio spectra method) for simultaneous determination of Antazoline hydrochloride (AN) and Tetryzoline hydrochloride (TZ) in their combined pharmaceutical formulation and in the presence of benzalkonium chloride as a preservative without preliminary separation. The dual wavelength method depends on choosing two wavelengths for each drug in a way so that the difference in absorbance at those two wavelengths is zero for the other drug. While Vierordt's method, is based upon measuring the absorbance and the absorptivity values of the two drugs at their λ(max) (248.0 and 219.0 nm for AN and TZ, respectively), followed by substitution in the corresponding Vierordt's equation. Recent methods manipulating ratio spectra depend on either measuring the difference in amplitudes of ratio spectra between 255.5 and 269.5 nm for AN and 220.0 and 273.0 nm for TZ in case of ratio difference method or computing first derivative of the ratio spectra for each drug then measuring the peak amplitude at 250.0 nm for AN and at 224.0 nm for TZ in case of first derivative of ratio spectrophotometry. The specificity of the developed methods was investigated by analyzing different laboratory prepared mixtures of the two drugs. All methods were applied successfully for the determination of the selected drugs in their combined dosage form proving that the classical spectrophotometric methods can still be used successfully in analysis of binary mixture using minimal data manipulation rather than recent methods which require relatively more steps. Furthermore, validation of the proposed methods was performed according to ICH guidelines; accuracy, precision and repeatability are found to be within the acceptable limits. Statistical studies showed that the methods can be

  2. Thermal-solutal capillary-buoyancy flow of a low Prandtl number binary mixture with a -1 capillary ratio in an annular pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia-Jia; Wu, Chun-Mei; Li, You-Rong; Chen, Jie-Chao

    2016-08-01

    A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations on thermal-solutal capillary-buoyancy flow in an annular pool were carried out. The pool was filled with silicon-germanium melt with an initial silicon mass fraction of 1.99%. The Prandtl number and the Lewis number of the working fluid are 6.37 × 10-3 and 2197.8, respectively. Both the radial temperature gradient and the solute concentration gradient were applied to the annular pool. The capillary ratio was assumed to be -1, which means that the solutal and thermal capillary effects were equal and opposite. Results show that the thermal-solutal capillary-buoyancy flow always occurs at this special case with the capillary ratio of -1, and even in a shallow annular pool with an aspect ratio of 0.05. With the increase of the thermal Marangoni number, four kinds of flow patterns appear orderly, including concentric rolls, petal-like, spoke, and rosebud-like patterns. These flow patterns are strongly influenced by the local interaction between the solutal and thermal capillary effects and the vertical solute concentration gradient near the outer cylinder. A small vortex driven by the dominant solutal capillary effect emerges near the inner cylinder, which is different from the flow pattern in a pure fluid. In addition, the critical thermal Marangoni number of the initial three-dimensional flow decreases with the increase of the aspect ratio of the annular pool.

  3. Airborne ultraviolet imaging system for oil slick surveillance: oil-seawater contrast, imaging concept, signal-to-noise ratio, optical design, and optomechanical model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Lei; Cao, Diansheng; Wu, Qingwen; Yu, Xiangyang; Lin, Guanyu

    2015-09-01

    The airborne ultraviolet imaging system, which assesses oil slick areas better than visible and infrared optical systems, was designed to monitor and track oil slicks in coastal regions. A model was built to achieve the upwelling radiance distribution of oil-covered sea and clean seawater, based on the radiance transfer software. With this model, the oil-seawater contrast, which affects the detection of oil-covered coastal areas, was obtained. The oil-seawater contrast, fundamental imaging concept, analog calculation of SNR, optical design, and optomechanical configuration of the airborne ultraviolet imaging system are illustrated in this paper. The study of an airborne ultraviolet imaging system with F-number 3.4 and a 40° field of view (FOV) in near ultraviolet channel (0.32-0.38 μm) was illustrated and better imaging quality was achieved. The ground sample distance (GSD) is from 0.35 to 0.7 m with flight height ranges from 0.5 to 1 km. Comparisons of detailed characteristics of the airborne ultraviolet imaging system with the corresponding characteristics of previous ultraviolet systems were tabulated, and these comparisons showed that this system can achieve a wide FOV and a relative high SNR. A virtual mechanical prototype and tolerances analysis are illustrated in this paper to verify the performance of fabrication and assembly of the ultraviolet system. PMID:26368888

  4. A single diamagnetic catalyCEST MRI contrast agent that detects cathepsin B enzyme activity by using a ratio of two CEST signals

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Dina V.; Montano, Luis A.; Randtke, Edward A.; Lee, Yeon Sun; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    CatalyCEST MRI can detect enzyme activity by monitoring the change in chemical exchange with water after a contrast agent is cleaved by an enzyme. Often these molecules use paramagnetic metals and are delivered with an additional non-responsive reference molecule. To improve this approach for molecular imaging, a single diamagnetic agent with enzyme-responsive and enzyme-unresponsive CEST signals was synthesized and characterized. The CEST signal from the aryl amide disappeared after cleavage of a dipeptidyl ligand with cathepsin B, while a salicylic acid moiety was largely unresponsive to enzyme activity. The ratiometric comparison of the two CEST signals from the same agent allowed for concentration independent measurements of enzyme activity. The chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was unchanged after enzyme catalysis, which further validated that this moiety was enzyme-unresponsive. The temperature dependence of the chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was non-Arrhenius, suggesting a two-step chemical exchange mechanism for salicylic acid. The good detection sensitivity at low saturation power facilitates clinical translation, along with the potentially low toxicity of a non-metallic MRI contrast agent. The modular design of the agent constitutes a platform technology that expands the variety of agents that may be employed by catalyCEST MRI for molecular imaging. PMID:26633584

  5. Contrasting winter and summer VOC mixing ratios at a forest site in the Western Mediterranean Basin: the effect of local biogenic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, R.; Peñuelas, J.; Filella, I.; Llusià, J.; Molowny-Horas, R.; Schallhart, S.; Metzger, A.; Müller, M.; Hansel, A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are involved in ozone and aerosol generation, thus having implications for air quality and climate. VOCs and their emissions by vegetation also have important ecological roles as they can protect plants from stresses and act as communication cues between plants and between plants and animals. In spite of these key environmental and biological roles, the reports on seasonal and daily VOC mixing ratios in the literature for Mediterranean natural environments are scarce. We conducted seasonal (winter and summer) measurements of VOC mixing ratios in an elevated (720 m a.s.l.) holm oak Mediterranean forest site near the metropolitan area of Barcelona (NE Iberian Peninsula). Methanol was the most abundant compound among all the VOCs measured in both seasons. While aromatic VOCs showed almost no seasonal variability, short-chain oxygenated VOCs presented higher mixing ratios in summer, presumably due to greater emission by vegetation and increased photochemistry, both enhanced by the high temperatures and solar radiation in summer. Isoprenoid VOCs showed the biggest seasonal change in mixing ratios: they increased by one order of magnitude in summer, as a result of the vegetation's greater physiological activity and emission rates. The maximum diurnal concentrations of ozone increased in summer too, most likely due to more intense photochemical activity and the higher levels of VOCs in the air. The daily variation of VOC mixing ratios was mainly governed by the wind regime of the mountain, as the majority of the VOC species analyzed followed a very similar diel cycle. Mountain and sea breezes that develop after sunrise advect polluted air masses to the mountain. These polluted air masses had previously passed over the urban and industrial areas surrounding the Barcelona metropolitan area, where they were enriched in NOx and in VOCs of biotic and abiotic origin. Moreover, these polluted air masses receive additional biogenic

  6. Contrasting winter and summer VOC mixing ratios at a forest site in the Western Mediterranean Basin: the effect of local biogenic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, R.; Peñuelas, J.; Filella, I.; Llusià, J.; Molowny-Horas, R.; Schallhart, S.; Metzger, A.; Müller, M.; Hansel, A.

    2011-07-01

    Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are involved in ozone and aerosol generation, thus having implications for air quality and climate. VOCs and their emissions by vegetation also have important ecological roles as they can protect plants from stresses and act as communication cues between plants and between plants and animals. In spite of these key environmental and biological roles, the reports on seasonal and daily VOC mixing ratios in the literature for Mediterranean natural environments are scarce. We conducted seasonal (winter and summer) measurements of VOC mixing ratios in an elevated (720 m a.s.l.) holm oak Mediterranean forest site near the metropolitan area of Barcelona (NE Iberian peninsula). Methanol was the most abundant compound among all the VOCs measured in both seasons. While aromatic VOCs showed almost no seasonal variability, short-chain oxygenated VOCs presented higher mixing ratios in summer, presumably due to greater emission by vegetation and increased photochemistry, both enhanced by the high temperatures and solar radiation in summer. Isoprenoid VOCs showed the biggest seasonal change in mixing ratios: they increased by one order of magnitude in summer, as a result of the vegetation's greater physiological activity and emission rates. The maximum diurnal concentrations of ozone increased in summer too, most likely due to more intense photochemical activity and the higher levels of VOCs in the air. The daily variation of VOC mixing ratios was mainly governed by the wind regime of the mountain, as the majority of the VOC species analyzed followed a very similar diel cycle. Mountain and sea breezes that develop after sunrise advect polluted air masses to the mountain. These polluted air masses had previously passed over the urban and industrial areas surrounding the Barcelona metropolitan area, where they were enriched in NOx and in VOCs of biotic and abiotic origin. Moreover, these polluted air masses receive additional biogenic

  7. Carbon xerogel microspheres and monoliths from resorcinol-formaldehyde mixtures with varying dilution ratios: preparation, surface characteristics, and electrochemical double-layer capacitances.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Benabithe, Zulamita; Carrasco-Marín, Francisco; de Vicente, Juan; Moreno-Castilla, Carlos

    2013-05-21

    Carbon xerogels in the form of microspheres and monoliths were obtained from the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde in the presence of potassium carbonate as catalyst, using water as solvent and two different molar dilution ratios. The objectives of this study were as follows: to investigate the effect of the dilution ratio, polymerization reaction time, and temperature on the rheological properties of the sols used to prepare the carbon xerogel microspheres and monoliths; and to determine the influence of their preparation methods and shapes on their surface characteristics and electrochemical double-layer (EDL) capacitance. An increase in the molar dilution ratio produced a decrease in the apparent activation energy of the sol-gel transition. Carbon xerogel microspheres were steam-activated at different burnoff percentages. The morphology, surface area, porosity, and surface chemistry of samples were determined. The main difference between the carbon xerogel microspheres and monoliths was that the latter are largely mesoporous. Better electrochemical behavior was shown by carbon xerogels in monolith than in microsphere form, but higher gravimetric and volumetric capacitances were found in activated carbon xerogel microspheres than in carbon xerogel monoliths. PMID:23617279

  8. Determination of Phase Ratio in Polymorphic Materials by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: The Case of Anatase and Rutile Phase Mixture in TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. F.; Klysubun, W.; Kityakarn, S.; Worayingyong, A.; Zhang, S. B.; Wei, S. H.; Onkaw, D.; Songsiriritthigul, P.; Rujirawat, S.; Limpijumnong, S.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can be used as an unconventional characterization technique to determine the proportions of different crystal phases in polymorphic samples. As an example, we show that ratios of anatase and rutile phases contained in the TiO{sub 2} samples obtained by XAS are in agreement with conventional x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements to within a few percent. We suggest that XAS measurement is a useful and reliable technique that can be applied to study the phase composition of highly disordered or nanoparticle polymorphic materials, where traditional XRD technique might be difficult.

  9. The contrast study of anammox-denitrifying system in two non-woven fixed-bed bioreactors (NFBR) treating different low C/N ratio sewage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fan; Zhang, Hanmin; Yang, Fenglin; Qiang, Hong; Zhang, Guangyi

    2012-06-01

    Two non-woven fixed-bed bioreactors (NFBR) based on different substrates (nitrite and nitrate) were constructed to study the environmental adaptability for temperature and organic matter of anammox-denitrifying system and nitrogen removal performance. The two reactors were successfully operated for 200 days. The average removal rates of nitrogen and COD of R2 were 81% and 93%, respectively. Besides, the nitrogen removal rate of R1 was 95% under not more than 105 mg/l of COD. The experimental results indicated that the R2 based on nitrate had a good nitrogen removal performance at room temperature (25 °C). Additionally, the analysis results of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that the percentage compositions of anammox in R1 and R2 were 84% and 65% on day 189. Finally, the possible nitrogen removal model of anammox-denitrifying system was constructed. According to nitrogen balance and C/N ratios of denitrification, the nitrogen removal approaches of R1 and R2 were obtained. PMID:22446054

  10. A numerical study of the effect of various reactions, pressure and gas mixture ratio on the density distribution of etchant species (H, Br, Br+, and HBr+) in HBr/He plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, Banat; Aman-ur-Rehman

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a fluid model has been used to study the effect of gas mixing ratio and pressure on the density distribution of important etchant species, i.e., hydrogen (H), bromine (Br), Br+, and HBr+ in HBr/He plasma. Our simulation results show that the densities of active etchant species H, Br, and HBr+ increase with the increase in pressure as well as the HBr fraction in HBr/He mixture. On the contrary, the density of Br+ decreases with the increase in He percentage in HBr/He mixture and with the increase in the pressure. Time averaged reaction rates (of the reactions involved in the production and consumption of these species) have been calculated to study the effect of these reactions on the density distribution of these species. The spatial distribution of these species is explained with the help of the time averaged reaction rates. Important reactions have been identified that contribute considerably to the production and consumption of these active species. The code has been optimized by identifying 26 reactions (out of 40 reactions which contribute in the production and consumption of these species) that have insignificant effect on the densities of H, Br, Br+, and HBr+. This shows that out of 40 reactions, only 14 reactions can be used to calculate the density and distribution of the important species in HBr/He plasma discharge.

  11. Contrast studies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Susan M

    2006-01-01

    Contrast media plays an important role in imaging soft tissues and organs. Though contrast imaging is considered safe, radiologic technologists can improve the safety of contrast examinations by reviewing institutional safety procedures, safe practices for different methods of contrast administration and possible complications. The need for efficient communication and attention to detail during contrast procedures is essential for patient safety. PMID:16998193

  12. Versatile inlet system for on-line compound-specific deltaD and delta13C gas chromatography-oxidation/reduction-isotope ratio mass spectrometry analysis of gaseous mixtures.

    PubMed

    Henning, Mark; Strapoć, Dariusz; Lis, Grzegorz P; Sauer, Peter; Fong, Jon; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Pratt, Lisa M

    2007-01-01

    Compound-specific deltaD and delta13C analyses of gas mixtures are useful indicators of geochemical and environmental factors. However, the relative concentrations of individual components in gas mixtures (e.g., H2, CO2, methane, ethane, propane, i-butane, n-butane) may vary over several orders of magnitude. The determination of hydrogen and carbon compound-specific stable isotope ratios requires that the hydrogen and carbon dioxide produced from each separated component has a concentration adjusted to match the dynamic range of the stable isotope mass spectrometer. We present a custom-built gas sampling and injection system (GASIS) linked with a Delta Plus XP mass spectrometer that provides flexibility, ease of operation, and economical use of small gas samples with wide ranges of analyte concentrations. The overall on-line GC-ox/red-IRMS (Gas Chromatography - oxidation/reduction - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) system consists of (i) a customized GASIS inlet system and (ii) two alternative reactors, namely an oxidative Cu-Ni-Pt reactor at 950 degrees C for production of CO2 and a reductive graphitized Al2O3 reactor at 1420 degrees C for production of H2. In addition, the system is equipped with (iii) a liquid nitrogen spray-cooling unit for cryo-GC-focusing at -20 degrees C, and (iv) a Nafion dryer for removal of water vapor from product CO2. The three injection loops of the GASIS inlet allow flexibility in the volume of injected analyte gas (e.g., from 0.06 to 500 microL) in order to measure reproducible deltaD and delta13C values for gases at concentrations ranging from 100% down to 10 ppm. We calibrate our GC-ox/red-IRMS system with two isotopically distinct methane references gases that are combusted off-line and characterized using dual-inlet IRMS. PMID:17577874

  13. Total Electron Yield Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the C K Region of the Mixtures of Graphitic Carbons and Diamond for Quantitative Analysis of the sp2/sp3-Hybridized Carbon Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Shimomura, Kenta; Katayama, Tetsuya; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2009-06-01

    To elucidate the possibility of quantitatively analyzing sp2-hybridized carbon (sp2-C) and sp3-C in carbon materials using total-electron-yield (TEY) X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) in the C K region, we measured the TEY-XAS of mixtures of multi-walled carbon nanotubes or carbon black as sp2-C sources and diamond as an sp3-C source. The measured relationship between the π*/σ* peak intensity ratio in the C K TEY-XAS and the weight (atomic)% of sp2-C can be successfully explained by the summed TEY of the sp2-C and sp3-C components and considering the TEY efficiency of sp3-C relative to sp2-C, k. However, the experimentally determined k values show that TEY of the sp3-C is much smaller than that of sp2-C by about one order of magnitude, even depending on the chemical form and/or electronic properties of individual carbon components. This suggests that further evaluation of the TEY efficiency is necessary prior to the quantitative sp2/sp3 analysis of carbon materials using the TEY-XAS.

  14. Thermobaric investigation of coal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kosinskii, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    An examination of the dynamics of gas emission during the heating in vacuo of different grades of Donbass coal included a study of binary and ternary mixtures of these coals. Discrete gas emission was established at temperatures depending principally on the ratio of coals within the mixtures. The data obtained could be used as a basis for commercial processes.

  15. Newborn Rabbit Perception of 6-Odorant Mixtures Depends on Configural Processing and Number of Familiar Elements

    PubMed Central

    Romagny, Sébastien; Thomas-Danguin, Thierry; Coureaud, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Perception of odors, i.e. usually of mixtures of odorants, is elemental (the odorants' odor qualities are perceived in the mixture) or configural (the odor quality of the mixture differs from the one of each odorant). In human adults, the Red Cordial (RC) mixture is a configurally-processed, 6-odorant mixture. It evokes a red cordial odor quality while none of the elements carries that odor. Interestingly, in newborn rabbits, the same RC mixture is weak configurally perceived: the newborns behaviorally respond to all the elements after conditioning to the whole mixture, but not to the mixture after conditioning to a single element. Thus, they perceive in the RC mixture both the odor quality of the RC configuration and the quality of each element. Here, we aimed to determine whether this perception is modulated by quantitative (number of elements) and/or qualitative bits of information (nature of elements) previously learned by the animals. Newborns were conditioned to RC sub-mixtures of different complexity and composition before behavioral testing to RC. Pups generalized their sucking-related response to RC after learning at least 4 odorants. In contrast, after conditioning to sub-mixtures of another 6-odorant mixture, the elementally perceived MV mixture, pups responded to MV after learning one or two odorants. The different generalization to RC and MV mixtures after learning some of their elements is discussed according to three hypotheses: i) the configural perception of RC sub-mixtures, ii) the ratio of familiar/unfamiliar individual information elementally and configurally perceived, iii) the perception of RC becoming purely elemental. The results allow the first hypothesis to be dismissed, while further experiments are required to distinguish between the remaining two. PMID:25248149

  16. Contrastive Lexicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, R. R. K.

    This paper deals with the relation between etymologically related words in different languages. A survey is made of seven stages in the development of contrastive lexicology. These are: prelinguistic word studies, semantics, lexicography, translation, foreign language learning, bilingualism, and finally contrastive analysis. Concerning contrastive…

  17. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other reactions to contrast materials are rare, radiology departments are well-equipped to deal with them. ... is given. However, both the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the European Society of Urogenital Radiology ...

  18. Effects of a temperature-dependent viscosity on thermal convection in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilt, Markus; Glässl, Martin; Zimmermann, Walter

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the effect of a temperature-dependent viscosity on the onset of thermal convection in a horizontal layer of a binary fluid mixture that is heated from below. For an exponential temperature dependence of the viscosity, we find, in binary mixtures as a function of a positive separation ratio ψ and beyond a certain viscosity contrast, a discontinuous transition between two stationary convection modes having different wavelengths. In the range of negative values of the separation ratio ψ, a (continuous or discontinuous) transition from an oscillatory to a stationary onset of convection occurs beyond a certain viscosity contrast, and for large values of the viscosity ratio, the oscillatory onset of convection is suppressed.

  19. Effects of a temperature-dependent viscosity on thermal convection in binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hilt, Markus; Glässl, Martin; Zimmermann, Walter

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the effect of a temperature-dependent viscosity on the onset of thermal convection in a horizontal layer of a binary fluid mixture that is heated from below. For an exponential temperature dependence of the viscosity, we find, in binary mixtures as a function of a positive separation ratio ψ and beyond a certain viscosity contrast, a discontinuous transition between two stationary convection modes having different wavelengths. In the range of negative values of the separation ratio ψ, a (continuous or discontinuous) transition from an oscillatory to a stationary onset of convection occurs beyond a certain viscosity contrast, and for large values of the viscosity ratio, the oscillatory onset of convection is suppressed. PMID:25353805

  20. Contrast lipocryolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Hernán; Melamed, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Alternative crystal structures are possible for all lipids and each different crystal structure is called a polymorphic form. Inter-conversion between polymorphisms would imply the possibility of leaning crystal formation toward the most effective polymorphism for adipocyte destruction. Food industry has been tempering lipids for decades. Tempering technology applied to lipocryolysis gave birth to “contrast lipocryolysis”, which involves pre- and post-lipocryolysis fat layer heating as part of a specific tempering protocol. In this study, we evaluated the skinfold thickness of 10 subjects after a single contrast lipocryolysis session and witnessed important and fast reductions. PMID:25068088

  1. Thermobaric investigations of coal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kosinskii, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamics of the evolution of gas when coals of various types from the Donbass and binary and ternary mixtures of them are heated have been studied. The discrete nature of the evolution of gas has been established, the temperature intervals of which depend primarily on the ratio of the coals in the mixtures. The possibility of using the results obtained in determining rational schemes for the industrial processing of coals is suggested.

  2. Concentration Addition, Independent Action and Generalized Concentration Addition Models for Mixture Effect Prediction of Sex Hormone Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Humans are concomitantly exposed to numerous chemicals. An infinite number of combinations and doses thereof can be imagined. For toxicological risk assessment the mathematical prediction of mixture effects, using knowledge on single chemicals, is therefore desirable. We investigated pros and cons of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast, antagonism was observed for effects of Mixture 2 on this hormone. The mixtures contained chemicals exerting only limited maximal effects. This hampered prediction by the CA and IA models, whereas the GCA model could be used to predict a full dose response curve. Regarding effects on progesterone and estradiol, some chemicals were having stimulatory effects whereas others had inhibitory effects. The three models were not applicable in this situation and no predictions could be performed. Finally, the expected contributions of single chemicals to the mixture effects were calculated. Prochloraz was the predominant but not sole driver of the mixtures, suggesting that one chemical alone was not responsible for the mixture effects. In conclusion, the GCA model seemed to be superior to the CA and IA models for the prediction of testosterone effects. A situation with chemicals exerting opposing effects, for which the models could not be applied, was identified. In addition, the data indicate that in non-potency adjusted mixtures the effects cannot always be

  3. Psychophysical contrast calibration

    PubMed Central

    To, Long; Woods, Russell L; Goldstein, Robert B; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Electronic displays and computer systems offer numerous advantages for clinical vision testing. Laboratory and clinical measurements of various functions and in particular of (letter) contrast sensitivity require accurately calibrated display contrast. In the laboratory this is achieved using expensive light meters. We developed and evaluated a novel method that uses only psychophysical responses of a person with normal vision to calibrate the luminance contrast of displays for experimental and clinical applications. Our method combines psychophysical techniques (1) for detection (and thus elimination or reduction) of display saturating nonlinearities; (2) for luminance (gamma function) estimation and linearization without use of a photometer; and (3) to measure without a photometer the luminance ratios of the display’s three color channels that are used in a bit-stealing procedure to expand the luminance resolution of the display. Using a photometer we verified that the calibration achieved with this procedure is accurate for both LCD and CRT displays enabling testing of letter contrast sensitivity to 0.5%. Our visual calibration procedure enables clinical, internet and home implementation and calibration verification of electronic contrast testing. PMID:23643843

  4. 10-7 contrast ratio at 4.5λ/D: New results obtained in laboratory experiments using nano-fabricated coronagraph and multi-Gaussian shaped pupil masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Thompson, Laird A.; Rogosky, Michael

    2005-04-01

    We present here new experimental results on high contrast imaging of 10-7 at 4.λ/D (λ=0.820 microns) by combining a circular focal plane mask (coronagraph) of 2.5λ/D diameter and a multi-Gaussian pupil plane mask. Both the masks were fabricated on very high surface quality (λ/30) BK7 optical substrates using nano-fabrication techniques of photolithography and metal lift-off. This process ensured that the shaped masks have a useable edge roughness better than λ/4 (rms error better than 0.2 microns), a specification that is necessary to realize the predicted theoretical limits of any mask design. Though a theoretical model predicts a contrast level of 10-12, the background noise of the observed images was speckle dominated which reduced the contrast level to 4x10-7 at 4.5λ/D. The optical setup was built on the University of Illinois Seeing Improvement System (UnISIS) optics table which is at the Coude focus of the 2.5-m telescope of the Mt. Wilson Observatory. We used a 0.820 micron laser source coupled with a 5 micron single-mode fiber to simulate an artificial star on the optical test bench of UnISIS.

  5. 10(-7) contrast ratio at 4.5lambda/D: New results obtained in laboratory experiments using nano-fabricated coronagraph and multi-Gaussian shaped pupil masks.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Thompson, Laird; Rogosky, Michael

    2005-04-01

    We present here new experimental results on high contrast imaging of 10-7 at 4.lambda/D (lambda=0.820 microns) by combining a circular focal plane mask (coronagraph) of 2.5lambda/D diameter and a multi-Gaussian pupil plane mask. Both the masks were fabricated on very high surface quality (lambda/30) BK7 optical substrates using nano-fabrication techniques of photolithography and metal lift-off. This process ensured that the shaped masks have a useable edge roughness better than lambda/4 (rms error better than 0.2 microns), a specification that is necessary to realize the predicted theoretical limits of any mask design. Though a theoretical model predicts a contrast level of 10-12, the background noise of the observed images was speckle dominated which reduced the contrast level to 4x10-7 at 4.5lambda/D. The optical setup was built on the University of Illinois Seeing Improvement System (UnISIS) optics table which is at the Coude focus of the 2.5-m telescope of the Mt. Wilson Observatory. We used a 0.820 micron laser source coupled with a 5 micron single-mode fiber to simulate an artificial star on the optical test bench of UnISIS. PMID:19495130

  6. Effects of saturation contrast on color recognition in night vision goggles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havig, Paul R.; Marasco, Peter L.; Post, David L.; Ellwanger, Harold L.; Reis, George A.

    2004-09-01

    In the past we have examined the luminance contrast ratios required to maintain color recognition in helmet-mounted displays (HMDs). Using typical daytime viewing conditions as simulated backgrounds we were able to determine 95% correct color recognition thresholds resulting in luminance contrast ratios averaging 1.17:1. Last year we adapted this research to determine the best colors to maintain color recognition of symbology that is on a night vision goggle (NVG) image. We simulated NVG P43 green phosphor and determined 95% correct color recognition thresholds. Results indicated that, on average, a luminance contrast ratio of nearly 1.5:1 was required to maintain color recognition. Review of the studies indicated that our simulated P43 phosphor was a much more saturated background, so saturation contrast may play as important a role as luminance contrast. A P45 white phosphor NVG may therefore be less problematic. Here we investigate the effects of both luminance and saturation contrast by manipulating color mixtures of green, yellow, and red symbology against two different backgrounds, P43 green and P45 white. We discuss our results in terms of both luminance and saturation contrast required for the maintenance of color recognition in NVGs.

  7. Air/fuel ratio controller

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1980-12-23

    An internal combustion engine has a fuel injection pump and an air/fuel ratio controller. The controller has a lever that is connected to the pump lever. An aneroid moves the controller lever as a function of changes in intake manifold vacuum to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio to the mixture charge. A fuel enrichment linkage is provided that modifies the movement of the fuel flow control lever by the aneroid in response to changes in manifold gas temperature levels and exhaust gas recirculation to maintain the constant air/fuel ratio. A manual override is provided to obtain a richer air/fuel ratio for maximum acceleration.

  8. Development Characteristics of PMMA in alternative alcohol:water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocola, Leonidas E.

    2015-03-01

    The most widely used resist in electron beam lithography is polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The standard developers used are solution mixtures of isopropanol (IPA) and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in a ratio of 3:1 and mixtures of IPA and water (H2O) in a ratio of 7:3. The Globally Harmonized System (GHS) classification entry for IPA includes: Specific target organ toxicity - single exposure (Category 3). MIBK is much more hazardous than IPA. The only GHS classification entry for Ethanol is: Flammable liquids (Category 2), i.e. more environmentally safe. Using Ethanol/H2O as a developer will therefore enable lower hazardous waste disposal costs to cleanrooms. We find Ethanol/H2O at 85% volume (2:1 molar) exhibits excellent lithography results as good as with IPA/H2O, and better contrast and sensitivity than IPA/H2O and MIBK/IPA developers. Lithographic data shows trends similar to published cosolvency data, but differ too much to be explained by it. In addition, unusual development at 50% volume concentrations for both IPA and Ethanol in H2O show dramatic pothole formation instead of uniform thickness loss found in standard contrast curve exposures. We believe local pockets of concentrated alcohol water molar mixtures are responsible for such behavior. This work was supported by the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. Use of the Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. The electro-optical characteristics of liquid crystal device in multi-component liquid crystal mixture system with non-contact photo-induced vertical alignment mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fa-Hsin; Ho, Czung-Yu; Lee, Jiunn-Yih

    2012-05-01

    In previous studies, we mixed photo-curable acrylic pre-polymer into negative dielectric anisotropy nematic type liquid crystal (N-type LC, NLC) to obtain a NLC/photo-curable acrylic pre-polymer mixture solution (NLC mixture system). After irradiation with UV light of fixed intensity, we successfully fabricated copolymer films with vertical alignment effect among the LC molecules. In this study, we propose a new type of multi-component LC mixture system by mixing chiral smectic type (SmA*) LC with homeotropic texture into NLC/photo-curable acrylic pre-polymer mixture system (NSLC mixture system). Our experimental results revealed that this SmA* LC exhibited the vertical alignment effect associated with LC molecules in the auxiliary LC mixture system. Moreover, we also discovered that altering the main chain type biphenol acrylic pre-polymer had drastic impact on the contrast ratio (CR) of the LC mixture system, with an increase of as much as 73%. More importantly, adding the SmA* LC can evidently increase the anchoring energy of the alignment film surface. We also further performed measurements, analyses, and discussions of electro-optical properties of devices fabricated from the new LC mixture systems.

  10. Multi-step contrast sensitivity gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, Enrico C; Thompson, Kyle R; Moore, David G; Heister, Jack D; Poland, Richard W; Ellegood, John P; Hodges, George K; Prindville, James E

    2014-10-14

    An X-ray contrast sensitivity gauge is described herein. The contrast sensitivity gauge comprises a plurality of steps of varying thicknesses. Each step in the gauge includes a plurality of recesses of differing depths, wherein the depths are a function of the thickness of their respective step. An X-ray image of the gauge is analyzed to determine a contrast-to-noise ratio of a detector employed to generate the image.

  11. Homogeneous cooling of mixtures of particle shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, R. C.; Serero, D.; Pöschel, T.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we examine theoretically the cooling dynamics of binary mixtures of spheres and rods. To this end, we introduce a generalized mean field analytical theory, which describes the free cooling behavior of the mixture. The relevant characteristic time scale for the cooling process is derived, depending on the mixture composition and the aspect ratio of the rods. We simulate mixtures of spherocylinders and spheres using a molecular dynamics algorithm implemented on graphics processing unit (GPU) architecture. We systematically study mixtures composed of spheres and rods with several aspect ratios and varying the mixture composition. A homogeneous cooling state, where the time dependence of the system's intensive variables occurs only through a global granular temperature, is identified. We find cooling dynamics in excellent agreement with Haff's law, when using an adequate time scale. Using the scaling properties of the homogeneous cooling dynamics, we estimated numerically the efficiency of the energy interchange between rotational and translational degrees of freedom for collisions between spheres and rods.

  12. System for controlling air-fuel ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Morozumi, T.

    1982-09-14

    A system for controlling the air-fuel ratio for an internal combustion engine having an induction passage, an exhaust passage , a choke valve in the induction passage, an automatic choke device comprising a positive temperature coefficient (Ptc) heater and a bimetal element connected to the choke valve, a detector for detecting the concentration of a constituent of exhaust gases passing through the exhaust passage, an electronic control circuit, an on-off type electromagnetic valve actuated by the output signal from the electronic control circuit for correcting the air-fuel ratio of the air-fuel mixture supplied by an airfuel mixture supplier, and means for actuating the on-off type electromagnetic valve at a fixed duty ratio during cold engine operation. The electronic control circuit comprises a vacuum sensor for converting the amount of the induced air to an electric quantity, an engine temperature detector for converting the engine temperature to an electric quantity, a first calculating circuit for producing a proper desired air-fuel mixture ratio signal from the output signals of the vacuum sensor and of the engine temperature detector, and a second calculation circuit for producing an actual air-fuel ratio signal from output signals of the vacuum sensor and of the ptc heater. A summing circuit for summing the proper air-fuel ratio signal and the actual air-fuel ratio signal produces a pulse duty ratio correcting signal which is applied to the electronic control circuit for correcting the fixed duty ratio.

  13. Combined photobacterium toxicity of herbicide mixtures containing one insecticide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Shen; Song, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Hai-Ling; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Zhang, Jing

    2009-04-01

    To test whether the dose-addition (DA) model can predict the combined toxicity of the mixtures of herbicides that coexisted with insecticide(s), we selected five herbicides (simetryn, prometon, bromacil, velpar, and diquat) and one organophosphorus insecticide (dichlorvos) as the test components. The inhibition toxicities of the six pesticides as well as those of their mixtures to Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 were determined by using the microplate toxicity test procedure. The dose-response curves (DRCs) between the observed inhibition toxicities and the doses of the pesticides or the mixtures were modeled by using the nonlinear least square fitting. It was shown that all dose-response relationships were effectively described by the Weibull function. To fully explore the combined toxicities of mixtures including various concentration compositions, we designed three equivalent-effect concentration ratio (EECR) mixtures and six uniform design concentration ratio (UDCR) mixtures. The combined toxicity of a mixture is identified by inspecting whether the DRC predicted by the dose addition (DA) or independent action (IA) locates in the 95% confidence interval of the DRC of the mixture. Furthermore, the possible reason for the three mixtures to depart from the DA action was the very high concentration ratio of diquat in the mixtures. PMID:19215957

  14. Near azeotropic mixture substitute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention comprises a refrigerant mixture consisting of a first mole fraction of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124), CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b) and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a).

  15. [Contrast sensitivity in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Bartos, D

    1989-05-01

    Author reports on results of the contrast sensitivity examinations using the Cambridge low-contrast lattice test supplied by Clement Clarke International LTD, in patients with open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. In glaucoma patients there was observed statistically significant decrease of the contrast sensitivity. In patients with ocular hypertension decrease of the contrast sensitivity was in patients affected by corresponding changes of the visual field and of the optical disc. The main advantages of the Cambridge low-contrast lattice test were simplicity, rapidity and precision of its performance. PMID:2743444

  16. Gelation in mixtures of polymers and bidisperse colloids.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Rahul; Conrad, Jacinta C

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of varying the volume fraction of large particles (r) on the linear rheology and microstructure of mixtures of polymers and bidisperse colloids, in which the ratio of the small and large particle diameters was α=0.31 or α=0.45. Suspensions formulated at a total volume fraction of ϕ_{T}=0.15 and a constant concentration of polymer in the free volume c/c^{*}≈0.7 contained solid-like gels for small r and fluids or fluids of clusters at large r. The solid-like rheology and microstructure of these suspensions changed little with r when r was small, and fluidized only when r>0.8. By contrast, dense suspensions with ϕ_{T}=0.40 and α=0.31 contained solid-like gels at all concentrations of large particles and exhibited only modest rheological and microstructural changes upon varying the volume fraction of large particles. These results suggest that the effect of particle-size dispersity on the properties of colloid-polymer mixtures are asymmetric in particle size and are most pronounced near a gelation boundary. PMID:26871125

  17. Particle segregation during explosive dispersal of binary particle mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, David; Loiseau, Jason; Marr, Bradley; Goroshin, Sam

    2015-06-01

    The explosive dispersal of a layer of solid particles surrounding a spherical high explosive charge generates a turbulent, multiphase flow. The shock-compacted particle layer typically fractures into discrete fragments which shed particles in their wakes forming jet-like structures. The tendency to form jets depends on the particle to explosive mass ratio and type of particles, with brittle particles (e.g., glass) as well as ductile metallic particles particularly susceptible to jet formation. In contrast, tough, dense (e.g., steel) particles are much less prone to forming jets. Experiments have been carried out to determine the degree of particle segregation that occurs during the explosive dispersal of a uniform binary mixture containing both ``jetting'' (silicon carbide) and ``non-jetting'' (steel) particles with various mass fractions of each particle type. During the dispersal of mixtures that contain predominantly non-jetting (steel) particles, the steel particles form a stable layer whereas the jetting (silicon carbide) particles rapidly segregate and form jets which lag behind the steel particles. As the fraction of silicon carbide particles increases, the jet structures dominate the particle motion and the steel particles are entrained into the jets.

  18. SEPARATION OF FLUID MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Lipscomb, R.; Craig, A.; Labrow, S.; Dunn, J.F.

    1958-10-28

    An apparatus is presented for separating gaseous mixtures by selectively freezing a constituent of the mixture and subsequently separating the frozen gas. The gas mixture is passed through a cylinder fltted with a cooling jacket, causing one gas to freeze on the walls of the cylinder. A set of scraper blades are provided in the interior of the cyllnder, and as the blades oscillate, the frozen gas is scraped to the bottom of the cylinder. Means are provided for the frozen material to pass into a heating chamber where it is vaporized and the product gas collected.

  19. Monte Carlo cluster algorithm for fluid phase transitions in highly size-asymmetrical binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Douglas J.; Liu, Jiwen; Luijten, Erik; Wilding, Nigel B.

    2010-11-01

    Highly size-asymmetrical fluid mixtures arise in a variety of physical contexts, notably in suspensions of colloidal particles to which much smaller particles have been added in the form of polymers or nanoparticles. Conventional schemes for simulating models of such systems are hamstrung by the difficulty of relaxing the large species in the presence of the small one. Here we describe how the rejection-free geometrical cluster algorithm of Liu and Luijten [J. Liu and E. Luijten, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 035504 (2004)] can be embedded within a restricted Gibbs ensemble to facilitate efficient and accurate studies of fluid phase behavior of highly size-asymmetrical mixtures. After providing a detailed description of the algorithm, we summarize the bespoke analysis techniques of [Ashton et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074111 (2010)] that permit accurate estimates of coexisting densities and critical-point parameters. We apply our methods to study the liquid-vapor phase diagram of a particular mixture of Lennard-Jones particles having a 10:1 size ratio. As the reservoir volume fraction of small particles is increased in the range of 0%-5%, the critical temperature decreases by approximately 50%, while the critical density drops by some 30%. These trends imply that in our system, adding small particles decreases the net attraction between large particles, a situation that contrasts with hard-sphere mixtures where an attractive depletion force occurs.

  20. Arcjet Nozzle Area Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  1. Arcjet nozzle area ratio effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  2. Kinematic separation of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldshtik, M.; Husain, H.S.; Hussain, F. )

    1992-06-15

    A phenomenon of spontaneous separation of components in an initially uniform fluid mixture is found experimentally. A qualitative explanation of the effect is proposed in terms of nonparallel streamlines in the medium.

  3. Tracking three-phase coexistences in binary mixtures of hard plates and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliabadi, Roohollah; Moradi, Mahmood; Varga, Szabolcs

    2016-02-01

    The stability of demixing phase transition in binary mixtures of hard plates (with thickness L and diameter D) and hard spheres (with diameter σ) is studied by means of Parsons-Lee theory. The isotropic-isotropic demixing, which is found in mixtures of large spheres and small plates, is very likely to be pre-empted by crystallization. In contrast, the nematic-nematic demixing, which is obtained in mixtures of large plates and small spheres, can be stabilized at low diameter ratios (σ/D) and aspect ratios (L/D). At intermediate values of σ/D, where the sizes of the components are similar, neither the isotropic-isotropic nor the nematic-nematic demixing can be stabilized, but a very strong fractionation takes place between a plate rich nematic and a sphere rich isotropic phases. Our results show that the excluded volume interactions are capable alone to explain the experimental observation of the nematic-nematic demixing, but they fail in the description of isotropic-isotropic one [M. Chen et al., Soft Matter 11, 5775 (2015)].

  4. Contrast Intravasation During Hysterosalpingography

    PubMed Central

    Bhoil, Rohit; Sood, Dinesh; Sharma, Tanupriya; Sood, Shilpa; Sharma, Jiten; Kumar, Nitesh; Ahluwalia, Ajay; Parekh, Dipen; Mistry, Kewal A.; Sood, Saurav

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hysterosalpingography is an imaging method to evaluate the endometrial and uterine morphology and fallopian tube patency. Contrast intravasation implies backflow of injected contrast into the adjoining vessels mostly the veins and may be related to factors altering endometrial vascularity and permeability. Radiologists and gynaecologists should be well acquainted with the technique of hysterosalpingography, its interpretation, and intravasation of contrast agents for safer procedure and to minimize the associated complications. PMID:27279925

  5. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  6. Testing for Additivity at Select Mixture Groups of Interest Based on Statistical Equivalence Testing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, LeAnna M.; Gennings, Chris; Carchman, Richard; Carter, Jr., Walter H.; Pounds, Joel G.; Mumtaz, Moiz

    2006-12-01

    Several assumptions, defined and undefined, are used in the toxicity assessment of chemical mixtures. In scientific practice mixture components in the low-dose region, particularly subthreshold doses, are often assumed to behave additively (i.e., zero interaction) based on heuristic arguments. This assumption has important implications in the practice of risk assessment, but has not been experimentally tested. We have developed methodology to test for additivity in the sense of Berenbaum (Advances in Cancer Research, 1981), based on the statistical equivalence testing literature where the null hypothesis of interaction is rejected for the alternative hypothesis of additivity when data support the claim. The implication of this approach is that conclusions of additivity are made with a false positive rate controlled by the experimenter. The claim of additivity is based on prespecified additivity margins, which are chosen using expert biological judgment such that small deviations from additivity, which are not considered to be biologically important, are not statistically significant. This approach is in contrast to the usual hypothesis-testing framework that assumes additivity in the null hypothesis and rejects when there is significant evidence of interaction. In this scenario, failure to reject may be due to lack of statistical power making the claim of additivity problematic. The proposed method is illustrated in a mixture of five organophosphorus pesticides that were experimentally evaluated alone and at relevant mixing ratios. Motor activity was assessed in adult male rats following acute exposure. Four low-dose mixture groups were evaluated. Evidence of additivity is found in three of the four low-dose mixture groups.The proposed method tests for additivity of the whole mixture and does not take into account subset interactions (e.g., synergistic, antagonistic) that may have occurred and cancelled each other out.

  7. Investigations of reversible thermochromic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, Douglas C.

    Three-component organic thermochromic systems have potential applications in reversible, rewritable thermal printing. In principle, such mixtures could maintain a coloured or non-coloured state at ambient temperature depending on their thermal treatment. These systems generally consist of a functional dye (1--3 mol%), a weakly acidic colour developer (5--25 mol%), and a high-melting organic solvent (75--90 mol%). Colour development occurs at the fusion temperature of the mixture, which triggers the interaction of the dye and developer. Slow cooling of the melt results in an equilibrium state with low colour density, whereas rapid cooling of the melt results in a metastable state with high colour density. The metastable state can be decoloured by heating to an intermediate decolourisation temperature at which the coloured state becomes unstable. Barriers to the widespread use of reversible, rewritable thermochromic materials include problems with colour contrast, colour stability, and decolourisation rates. Development is hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the interactions between components in these systems. In this study the developer-dye and developer-solvent interactions were examined for an archetypal dye/developer/solvent thermochromic system. Vibrational spectroscopy, NMR, and thermal analysis were used to examine compounds formed in developer/dye and developer/solvent binary mixtures. Rewritable thermochromic properties such as metastable colour density, equilibrium colour density, and decolourisation rates were examined and discussed in terms of the thermodynamics of the developer/dye and developer/solvent interactions. Observed thermochromic properties are shown to be strongly correlated to a competition between the dye and the solvent for interaction with the developer. Increasing the attractive interaction between the solvent and developer results in enhanced rewritable thermochromic properties.

  8. Isotopic Ratio, Isotonic Ratio, Isobaric Ratio and Shannon Information Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2014-11-01

    The isoscaling and the isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) probes, both of which are constructed by yield ratio of fragment, provide cancelation of parameters. The information entropy theory is introduced to explain the physical meaning of the isoscaling and IBD probes. The similarity between the isoscaling and IBD results is found, i.e., the information uncertainty determined by the IBD method equals to β - α determined by the isoscaling (α (β) is the parameter fitted from the isotopic (isotonic) yield ratio).

  9. Potential of high-Z contrast agents in clinical contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Tristan; Hupfer, Martin; Brauweiler, Robert; Eisa, Fabian; Kalender, Willi A.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Currently, only iodine- and barium-based contrast media (CM) are used in clinical contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT). High-Z metals would produce a higher contrast at equal mass density for the x-ray spectra used in clinical CT. Using such materials might allow for significant dose reductions in CE-CT. The purpose of this study was to quantify the potential for dose reduction when using CM based on heavy metals. Methods: The contrast-to-noise ratio weighted by dose (CNRD) was determined as a function of scan protocol by means of measurements and simulations on a clinical CT scanner. For simulations, water cylinders with diameters 160, 320, 480, and 640 mm were used to cover a broad range of patient sizes. Measurements were conducted with 160 and 320 mm water-equivalent plastic cylinders. A central bore of 13 mm diameter was present in all phantoms. The tube voltage was varied from 80 to 140 kV for measurements and from 60 to 180 kV for simulations. Additional tin filtration of thicknesses 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 mm was applied in the simulation to evaluate a range of spectral hardness. The bore was filled with a mixture of water and 10 mg/ml of pure iodine, holmium, gadolinium, ytterbium, osmium, tungsten, gold, and bismuth for the simulations and with aqueous solutions of ytterbium, tungsten, gold, and bismuth salts as well as Iopromid containing 10 mg/ml of the pure materials for the measurements. CNRDs were compared to iodine at phantom size-dependent reference voltages for all high-Z materials and the resulting dose reduction was calculated for equal contrast-to-noise ratio. Results: Dose reduction potentials strongly depended on phantom size, spectral hardness, and tube voltage. Depending on the added filtration, a dose reduction of 19%-60% could be reached at 80 kV with gadolinium for the 160 mm phantom, 52%-69% at 100 kV with holmium for the 320 mm phantom, 62%-78% with 120 kV for hafnium and the 480 mm phantom and 74%-86% with 140 kV for gold

  10. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu((R)) (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith; Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  11. Paternity testing that involves a DNA mixture.

    PubMed

    Mortera, Julia; Vecchiotti, Carla; Zoppis, Silvia; Merigioli, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Here we analyse a complex disputed paternity case, where the DNA of the putative father was extracted from his corpse that had been inhumed for over 20 years. This DNA was contaminated and appears to be a mixture of at least two individuals. Furthermore, the mother's DNA was not available. The DNA mixture was analysed so as to predict the most probable genotypes of each contributor. The major contributor's profile was then used to compute the likelihood ratio for paternity. We also show how to take into account a dropout allele and the possibility of mutation in paternity testing. PMID:27017109

  12. Toward Critical Contrastive Rhetoric

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubota, Ryuko; Lehner, Al

    2004-01-01

    A traditional approach to contrastive rhetoric has emphasized cultural difference in rhetorical patterns among various languages. Despite its laudable pedagogical intentions to raise teachers' and students' cultural and rhetorical awareness in second language writing, traditional contrastive rhetoric has perpetuated static binaries between English…

  13. A numerical study of laminar flames propagating in stratified mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiacheng

    Numerical simulations are carried out to study the structure and speed of laminar flames propagating in compositionally and thermally stratified fuel-air mixtures. The study is motivated by the need to understand the physics of flame propagation in stratified-charge engines and model it. The specific question of interest in this work is: how does the structure and speed of the flame in the stratified mixture differ from that of the flame in a corresponding homogeneous mixture at the same equivalence ratio, temperature, and pressure? The studies are carried out in hydrogen-air, methane-air, and n-heptane-air mixtures. A 30-species 184-step skeletal mechanism is employed for methane oxidation, a 9-species 21-step mechanism for hydrogen oxidation, and a 37-species 56-step skeletal mechanism for n-heptane oxidation. Flame speed and structure are compared with corresponding values for homogeneous mixtures. For compositionally stratified mixtures, as shown in prior experimental work, the numerical results suggest that when the flame propagates from a richer mixture to a leaner mixture, the flame speed is faster than the corresponding speed in the homogeneous mixture. This is caused by enhanced diffusion of heat and species from the richer mixture to the leaner mixture. In fact, the effects become more pronounced in leaner mixtures. Not surprisingly, the stratification gradient influences the results with shallower gradients showing less effect. The controlling role that diffusion plays is further assessed and confirmed by studying the effect of a unity Lewis number assumption in the hydrogen/air mixtures. Furthermore, the effect of stratification becomes less important when using methane or n-heptane as fuel. The laminar flame speed in a thermally stratified mixture is similar to the laminar flame speed in homogeneous mixture at corresponding unburned temperature. Theoretical analysis is performed and the ratio of extra thermal diffusion rate to flame heat release rate

  14. Realistic environmental mixtures of micropollutants in surface, drinking, and recycled water: herbicides dominate the mixture toxicity toward algae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2014-06-01

    Mixture toxicity studies with herbicides have focused on a few priority components that are most likely to cause environmental impacts, and experimental mixtures were often designed as equipotent mixtures; however, real-world mixtures are made up of chemicals with different modes of toxic action at arbitrary concentration ratios. The toxicological significance of environmentally realistic mixtures has only been scarcely studied. Few studies have simultaneously compared the mixture effect of water samples with designed reference mixtures comprised of the ratios of analytically detected concentrations in toxicity tests. In the present study, the authors address the effect of herbicides and other chemicals on inhibition of photosynthesis and algal growth rate. The authors tested water samples including secondary treated wastewater effluent, recycled water, drinking water, and storm water in the combined algae assay. The detected chemicals were mixed in the concentration ratios detected, and the biological effects of the water samples were compared with the designed mixtures of individual detected chemicals to quantify the fraction of effect caused by unknown chemicals. The results showed that herbicides dominated the algal toxicity in these environmentally realistic mixtures, and the contribution by the non-herbicides was negligible. A 2-stage model, which used concentration addition within the groups of herbicides and non-herbicides followed by the model of independent action to predict the mixture effect of the two groups, could predict the experimental mixture toxicity effectively, but the concentration addition model for herbicides was robust and sufficient for complex mixtures. Therefore, the authors used the bioanalytical equivalency concept to derive effect-based trigger values for algal toxicity for monitoring water quality in recycled and surface water. All water samples tested would be compliant with the proposed trigger values associated with the

  15. Processing of odor mixtures in the zebrafish olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Rico; Yaksi, Emre; Weislogel, Jan-Marek; Friedrich, Rainer W

    2004-07-21

    Components of odor mixtures often are not perceived individually, suggesting that neural representations of mixtures are not simple combinations of the representations of the components. We studied odor responses to binary mixtures of amino acids and food extracts at different processing stages in the olfactory bulb (OB) of zebrafish. Odor-evoked input to the OB was measured by imaging Ca2+ signals in afferents to olfactory glomeruli. Activity patterns evoked by mixtures were predictable within narrow limits from the component patterns, indicating that mixture interactions in the peripheral olfactory system are weak. OB output neurons, the mitral cells (MCs), were recorded extra- and intracellularly and responded to odors with stimulus-dependent temporal firing rate modulations. Responses to mixtures of amino acids often were dominated by one of the component responses. Responses to mixtures of food extracts, in contrast, were more distinct from both component responses. These results show that mixture interactions can result from processing in the OB. Moreover, our data indicate that mixture interactions in the OB become more pronounced with increasing overlap of input activity patterns evoked by the components. Emerging from these results are rules of mixture interactions that may explain behavioral data and provide a basis for understanding the processing of natural odor stimuli in the OB. PMID:15269273

  16. Compressive phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, F.; MacDowell, A.; Marchesini, S.; Padmore, H. A.; Parkinson, D. Y.; Pien, J.; Schirotzek, A.; Yang, C.

    2010-08-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  17. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  18. The preparation and calibration of calcium synthetic isotope mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, M.; Hennessy, C.; Richter, S.; Fortunato, G.; Wunderli, S.

    2010-12-01

    Calcium is one of the most-abundant elements but still there is no calibrated measurement of its isotopic composition. In this work a set of six mixtures were gravimetrically prepared from highly enriched calcium isotopes. The purification of the enriched calcium material was done by vacuum distillation. Solutions of the now highly enriched metallic 40Ca, 42Ca, 44Ca and 48Ca where prepared in an inert atmosphere. Mixtures were then made gravimetrically with the isotope ratios in Table 1. The measurements of the mixtures were done by a total evaporation method for isotopic analysis by multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). This work describes the preparation, measurement and the calibrated results of the mixtures and mother solutions.Table 1: Isotope ratios of calcium isotope mixtures

  19. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas R.; Flicker, Dawn G.

    2015-04-01

    Mixtures of light elements with heavy elements are important in inertial confinement fusion. We explore the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated temperature and pressure is used to obtain the thermodynamic state properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate these simulations, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with the completion of dissociation in ethane. The DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental data along the principal Hugoniots and are used to provide insight into the dissociation and temperature along the Hugoniots as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for several compositions suggesting a limiting compression for C-C bonded systems.

  20. Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography and Angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado-Mendez, I.; Palma, B. A.; Villasenor, Y.; Benitez-Bribiesca, L.; Brandan, M. E.

    2007-11-26

    Angiogenesis could be a means for pouring contrast media around tumors. In this work, optimization of radiological parameters for contrast-enhanced subtraction techniques in mammography has been performed. A modification of Lemacks' analytical formalism was implemented to model the X-ray absorption in the breast with contrast medium and detection by a digital image receptor. Preliminary results of signal-to-noise ratio analysis show the advantage of subtracting two images taken at different energies, one prior and one posterior to the injection of contrast medium. Preliminary experimental results using a custom-made phantom have shown good agreement with calculations. A proposal is presented for the clinical application of the optimized technique, which aims at finding correlations between angiogenesis indicators and dynamic variables of contrast medium uptake.

  1. MIXTURES FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have been conducted to address questions concerning the toxicity of "real world" mixtures of DBPs. These studies, which used either concentrates of drinking water or humic acid preparations treated with various disinfectants, were largely negative and had a nu...

  2. Mixtures with relatives and linked markers.

    PubMed

    Dørum, Guro; Kling, Daniel; Tillmar, Andreas; Vigeland, Magnus Dehli; Egeland, Thore

    2016-05-01

    Mixture DNA profiles commonly appear in forensic genetics, and a large number of statistical methods and software are available for such cases. However, most of the literature concerns mixtures where the contributors are assumed unrelated and the genetic markers are unlinked. In this paper, we consider mixtures of linked markers and related contributors. If no relationships are involved, linkage can be ignored. While unlinked markers can be treated independently, linkage introduces dependencies. The use of linked markers presents statistical and computational challenges, but may also lead to a considerable increase in power since the number of markers available is much larger if we do not require the markers to be unlinked. In addition, some cases that cannot be solved with an unlimited number of unlinked autosomal markers can be solved with linked markers. We focus on two special cases of linked markers: pairs of linked autosomal markers and X-chromosomal markers. A framework is presented for calculation of likelihood ratios for mixtures with general relationships and with linkage between any number of markers. Finally, we explore the effect of linkage disequilibrium, also called allelic association, on the likelihood ratio. PMID:26614310

  3. Effect of contrast on human speed perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Thompson, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This study is part of an ongoing collaborative research effort between the Life Science and Human Factors Divisions at NASA ARC to measure the accuracy of human motion perception in order to predict potential errors in human perception/performance and to facilitate the design of display systems that minimize the effects of such deficits. The study describes how contrast manipulations can produce significant errors in human speed perception. Specifically, when two simultaneously presented parallel gratings are moving at the same speed within stationary windows, the lower-contrast grating appears to move more slowly. This contrast-induced misperception of relative speed is evident across a wide range of contrasts (2.5-50 percent) and does not appear to saturate (e.g., a 50 percent contrast grating appears slower than a 70 percent contrast grating moving at the same speed). The misperception is large: a 70 percent contrast grating must, on average, be slowed by 35 percent to match a 10 percent contrast grating moving at 2 deg/sec (N = 6). Furthermore, it is largely independent of the absolute contrast level and is a quasilinear function of log contrast ratio. A preliminary parametric study shows that, although spatial frequency has little effect, the relative orientation of the two gratings is important. Finally, the effect depends on the temporal presentation of the stimuli: the effects of contrast on perceived speed appears lessened when the stimuli to be matched are presented sequentially. These data constrain both physiological models of visual cortex and models of human performance. We conclude that viewing conditions that effect contrast, such as fog, may cause significant errors in speed judgments.

  4. Viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, R.; Gottlieb, M.; Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures by adopting the Thomas relations for spheres and Milliken`s for randomly oriented rods with aspect ratio of 20. The relative viscosity of a mixed suspension may now be calculated for any combination of rods (of aspect ratio 20) and spheres.

  5. Aspiration of Barium Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes Santos, Cristina; Steen, Bárbara

    2014-01-01

    The aspiration of barium contrast is a rare complication that may occur during studies of the digestive tract. Barium is an inert material that can cause anywhere from an asymptomatic mechanical obstruction to serious symptoms of respiratory distress that can result in patient death. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient in whom we observed the presence of contrast medium residue in the lung parenchyma as an incidental finding during hospitalization. When the patient's medical file was reviewed, images were found of a barium swallow study that the patient had undergone months earlier, and we were able to observe the exact moment of the aspiration of the contrast material. The patient had been asymptomatic since the test. PMID:25309769

  6. Gadofullerene MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bolskar, Robert D

    2008-04-01

    A promising new class of MRI contrast-enhancing agents with high relaxivities is based on gadolinium-containing metallofullerenes, which are also termed gadofullerenes. Detailed study of the water-proton relaxivity properties and intermolecular nanoclustering behavior of gadofullerene derivatives has revealed valuable information about their relaxivity mechanisms and given a deeper understanding of this new class of paramagnetic contrast agent. Here, the latest findings on water-solubilized gadofullerene materials and how these findings relate to their future applications in MRI are reviewed and discussed. PMID:18373426

  7. Combustion of Gaseous Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duchene, R

    1932-01-01

    This report not only presents matters of practical importance in the classification of engine fuels, for which other means have proved inadequate, but also makes a few suggestions. It confirms the results of Withrow and Boyd which localize the explosive wave in the last portions of the mixture burned. This being the case, it may be assumed that the greater the normal combustion, the less the energy developed in the explosive form. In order to combat the detonation, it is therefore necessary to try to render the normal combustion swift and complete, as produced in carbureted mixtures containing benzene (benzol), in which the flame propagation, beginning at the spark, yields a progressive and pronounced darkening on the photographic film.

  8. Supersonic combustion of a silane/methane mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.; Mclain, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the ignition and combustion characteristics of a 20 volume percent silane/methane mixture using a model scramjet combustor with Mach 2 combustor entrance conditions. The test gas total temperature was varied from 1200 to 3900 R. The mixture autoignited at a total temperature of 1650 R. This autoignition temperature can be contrasted with 2330 R for hydrogen and 1350 R for a 20 percent silane/hydrogen mixture in similar hardware. Methane without the silane additive did not autoignite in this configuration at temperatures as high as 3900 R.

  9. BCS to BEC evolution for mixtures of fermions with unequal masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, Carlos A. R. Sa

    2009-03-01

    I discuss the zero and finite temperature phase diagrams of a mixture of fermions with unequal masses with and without population imbalance, which may correspond for example to mixtures of ^6Li and ^40K, ^6Li and ^87Sr, or ^40K and ^87Sr in the context of ultracold atoms. At zero temperature and when excess fermions are present, at least three phases may occur as the interaction parameter is changed from the BCS to the BEC regime. These phases correspond to normal, phase separation, or superfluid with coexistence between paired and excess fermions. The zero temperature phase diagram of population imbalance versus interaction parameter presents a remarkable asymmetry between the cases involving excess lighter or heavier fermions [1, 2], in sharp contrast with the symmetric phase diagram corresponding to the case of equal masses. At finite temperatures, the phase separation region of the phase diagram competes with superfluid regions possessing gapless elementary excitations [3] for certain ranges of the interaction parameter depending on the mass ratio. Furthermore, a phase transition may take place between two superfluid phases which are topologically distinct. The precise location of such transition is sensitive to the mass ratio between the two species of fermions. Signatures of this possible topological transition are present in the momentum distribution or structure factor, which may be measured experimentally in time-of-flight or through Bragg scattering, respectively. Lastly, throughout the evolution from BCS to BEC, I discuss the critical current and sound velocity for unequal mass systems as a function of interaction parameter and mass ratio. These quantities may also be measured via the same techniques already used in mixtures of fermions with equal masses. [1] M. Iskin, and C. A. R. Sa de Melo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 100404 (2006). [2] M. Iskin and C. A. R. Sa de Melo, Phys. Rev. A 76, 013601 (2007). [3] Li Han, and C. A. R. Sa de Melo, arXiv:0812.xxxx

  10. Shock Compression of Cryogenic Noble Gas Mixtures: Xenon - Krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, Seth; Magyar, Rudolph; Lemke, Raymond; Mattsson, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    In past work, we have examined the multi-Mbar response of cryogenically cooled liquid xenon and liquid krypton measuring their Hugoniots to 8 Mbar. These results were utilized in the development of new EOS models for Xe and Kr to use in high energy density physics applications. The previous work demonstrated the usefulness of integrating high accuracy shock compression experiments with DFT to generate the basis for equation of state (EOS) models. In many physics applications, such as Z-pinch experiments, gas mixtures are used instead. However, we do not have reliable experimental data on these mixtures to provide informed decisions about the EOS models or mixture rules. To improve our understanding of mixtures at extreme conditions, we performed dynamic compression experiments using Sandia's Z - facility on a 70/30 molar ratio Kr/Xe cryogenically cooled liquid mixture. We measured the Hugoniot state and reshock state of the liquid mixture to several Mbar. The experimental data validated the DFT simulations for identical molar ratio mixtures. The combined experimental and DFT results are used to assess the EOS models and test the mixture rules. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Hydrodynamic gas mixture separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarov, A.A.

    1982-02-10

    The separation of gas mixtures is the basis of many chemical, petrochemical, and gas processes. Classical separation methods (absorption, adsorption, condensation, and freezing) require cumbersome and complex equipment. No adequate solution is provided by the cheapening and simplification of gas-processing apparatus and separation methods by hydration and diffusion. For example, an apparatus for extracting helium from natural gas by diffusion has a throughput of gas containing 0.45% helium of 117,000 m/sup 3//h and in the first stage has teflon membranes working at a pressure difference of 63.3x10/sup 5/ Pa of area 79,000 m/sup 2/, and the specific cost of the apparatus was 8500 dollars per m/sup 3//h of helium. Therefore, vigorous studies are being conducted on new ways of efficient separation of gas mixtures that are cheaper and simpler. Here we consider a novel method of physically essentially reversible separation of gas mixtures, which involves some features of single-phase supersonic flows.

  12. Development characteristics of polymethyl methacrylate in alcohol/water mixtures: a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ocola, Leonidas E; Costales, Maya; Gosztola, David J

    2016-01-22

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the most widely used resist in electron beam lithography. This paper reports on a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study of development characteristics of PMMA in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol mixtures with water as developers. We have found that ethanol/water mixtures at a 4:1 volume ratio are an excellent, high resolution, non-toxic developer for exposed PMMA. We have also found that the proper methodology to use so that contrast data can be compared to techniques used in polymer science is not to rinse the developed resist but to immediately dry with nitrogen. Our results show how powerful simple lithographic techniques can be used to study ternary polymer solvent solutions when compared to other techniques used in the literature. Raman data show that both tightly bonded -OH groups and non-hydrogen bonded -OH groups play a role in the development of PMMA. Tightly hydrogen bonded -OH groups show pure Lorentzian Raman absorption only in the concentration ranges where ethanol/water and IPA/water mixtures are effective developers of PMMA, pointing to possible ordering or reduced amorphization due to the liquid state. The impact of understanding these interactions may open doors to a new developers of other electron beam resists that can reduce the toxicity of the waste stream. PMID:26656030

  13. Development characteristics of polymethyl methacrylate in alcohol/water mixtures: a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocola, Leonidas E.; Costales, Maya; Gosztola, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the most widely used resist in electron beam lithography. This paper reports on a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study of development characteristics of PMMA in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol mixtures with water as developers. We have found that ethanol/water mixtures at a 4:1 volume ratio are an excellent, high resolution, non-toxic developer for exposed PMMA. We have also found that the proper methodology to use so that contrast data can be compared to techniques used in polymer science is not to rinse the developed resist but to immediately dry with nitrogen. Our results show how powerful simple lithographic techniques can be used to study ternary polymer solvent solutions when compared to other techniques used in the literature. Raman data show that both tightly bonded -OH groups and non-hydrogen bonded -OH groups play a role in the development of PMMA. Tightly hydrogen bonded -OH groups show pure Lorentzian Raman absorption only in the concentration ranges where ethanol/water and IPA/water mixtures are effective developers of PMMA, pointing to possible ordering or reduced amorphization due to the liquid state. The impact of understanding these interactions may open doors to a new developers of other electron beam resists that can reduce the toxicity of the waste stream.

  14. Development characteristics of polymethyl methacrylate in alcohol/water mixtures. A lithography and Raman spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Ocola, Leonidas E.; Costales, Maya; Gosztola, David J.

    2015-12-10

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the most widely used resist in electron beam lithography. This paper reports on a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study of development characteristics of PMMA in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol mixtures with water as developers. We have found that ethanol/water mixtures at a 4:1 volume ratio are an excellent, high resolution, non-toxic, developer for exposed PMMA. We also have found that the proper methodology to use so that contrast data can be compared to techniques used in polymer science is not to rinse the developed resist but to immediately dry with nitrogen. Our results show how powerful simple lithographic techniques can be used to study ternary polymer solvent solutions when compared to other techniques used in the literature. Raman data shows that there both tightly bonded –OH groups and non-hydrogen bonded –OH groups play a role in the development of PMMA. Tightly hydrogen bonded –OH groups show pure Lorentzian Raman absorption only in the concentration ranges where ethanol/water and IPA/water mixtures are effective developers of PMMA. The impact of the understanding these interactions may open doors to a new developers of other electron beam resists that can reduce the toxicity of the waste stream.

  15. Hadamard speckle contrast reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisnadi, Jahja I.

    2004-01-01

    The condition for a diffuser to produce the maximum speckle contrast reduction with the minimum number of distinct phase patterns is derived. A binary realization of this optimum diffuser is obtained by mapping the rows or columns of a Hadamard matrix to the phase patterns. The method is experimentally verified in the Grating Light Valve laser projection display.

  16. Phonation in Tonal Contrasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Jianjing

    2013-01-01

    Phonation is used in many tonal languages, but how it should be incorporated into tonal systems is not well understood. The purpose of this dissertation thus is to examine the role of phonation in tonal contrasts, and to investigate how phonation and pitch interact in the tonal space. This dissertation presents close studies of tonal contrasts…

  17. Flashing anomalous color contrast.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S

    2004-01-01

    A new visual phenomenon that we call flashing anomalous color contrast is described. This phenomenon arises from the interaction between a gray central disk and a chromatic annulus surrounded by black radial lines. In an array of such figures, the central gray disk no longer appears gray, but assumes a color complementary to that of the surrounding annulus. The induced color appears: (1) vivid and saturated; (2) self-luminous, not a surface property; (3) flashing with eye or stimulus movement; (4) floating out of its confines; and (5) stronger in extrafoveal than in foveal vision. The strength of the effect depends on the number, length, width, and luminance contrast of the radial lines. The results suggest that the chromatic ring bounding the inner tips of the black radial lines induces simultaneous color contrast, whereas the radial lines elicit, in conjunction with the gray disk and the ring, the flashing, vividness, and high saturation of the effect. The stimulus properties inducing the illusion suggest that flashing anomalous color contrast may be based on asynchronous interactions among multiple visual pathways. PMID:15518215

  18. Acute toxicity to goldfish of mixtures of chloramines, copper, and linear alkylate sulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.F.; McKee, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity to goldfish (Carassius auratus) of mixtures of chloramines, copper, and linear alkylate sulfonate (LAS) was studied by continuous-flow toxicity tests during an exposure period of 96 hours. The individual toxicities of these three chemicals are either additive or synergistic in mixtures, depending on the rate of toxic action of the individual chemical, the toxicity ratio of the chemicals in the mixtures, and the concentration of the mixtures.

  19. Measuring contrast sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pelli, Denis G.; Bex, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Contrast sensitivity defines the threshold between the visible and invisible, which has obvious significance for basic and clinical vision science. Fechner's 1860 review reported that threshold contrast is 1% for a remarkably wide range of targets and conditions. While printed charts are still in use, computer testing is becoming more popular because it offers efficient adaptive measurement of threshold for a wide range of stimuli. Both basic and clinical studies usually want to know fundamental visual capability, regardless of the observer's subjective criterion. Criterion effects are minimized by the use of an objective task: multiple-alternative forced-choice detection or identification. Having many alternatives reduces the guessing rate, which makes each trial more informative, so fewer trials are needed. Finally, populations who may experience crowding or target confusion should be tested with one target at a time. PMID:23643905

  20. Chromatography: concepts and contrasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    As the author states in the Preface, this text attempts to provide a unified approach to chromatography (hence the title) by way of contrasting similarities and differences between gas chromatography (GC), column liquid chromatography (LC), and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). This book is also said to be pitched at an elementary level, suitable for most newcomers to the field (e.g., advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in the academic world, as well as bench-level chemists in industry).

  1. Stereopsis from contrast envelopes.

    PubMed

    Langley, K; Fleet, D J; Hibbard, P B

    1999-07-01

    We report two experiments concerning the site of the principal nonlinearity in second-order stereopsis. The first exploits the asymmetry in perceiving transparency with second-order stimuli found by Langley et al. (1998) (Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 265, 1837-1845) i.e. the product of a positive-valued contrast envelope and a mean-zero carrier grating can be seen transparently only when the disparities are consistent with the envelope appearing in front of the carrier. We measured the energy at the envelope frequencies that must be added in order to negate this asymmetry. We report that this amplitude can be predicted from the envelope sidebands and not from the magnitude of compressive pre-cortical nonlinearities measured by other researchers. In the second experiment, contrast threshold elevations were measured for the discrimination of envelope disparities following adaptation to sinusoidal gratings. It is reported that perception of the envelope's depth was affected most when the adapting grating was similar (in orientation and frequency) to the carrier, rather than to the contrast envelope. These results suggest that the principal nonlinearity in second-order stereopsis is cortical, occurring after orientation- and frequency-selective linear filtering. PMID:10367053

  2. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  3. Prediction for the mixture toxicity of six organophosphorus pesticides to the luminescent bacterium Q67.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Hui; Liu, Shu-Shen; Song, Xiao-Qing; Ge, Hui-Lin

    2008-11-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are ubiquitous in the surface water as mixtures. To examine the mixture toxicity in the multi-component space, the uniform design (UD) which can explore the concentration changes with few experimental efforts was employed to design the mixtures. On the other hand, the fixed concentration ratio ray was applied into six UD mixtures and two equivalent-effect concentration mixtures to build the whole concentration-response curves to overcome the demerit of the classical "point-to-point" method. The experimental toxicities of six pesticides and their mixtures to the luminescent bacterium Q67 were determined. The mixture toxicities were predicted by two models, concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA). The results showed that all the mixture toxicities observed had no significant differences from the ones predicted by CA. However, the mixture toxicities were also well predicted by IA especially at the low-concentration section. PMID:18308393

  4. Separating Dust Mixtures and Other External Aerosol Mixtures Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Vaughan, M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Rogers, R. R.; Hair, J. W.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of aerosol type is important for source attribution and for determining the magnitude and assessing the consequences of aerosol radiative forcing. The NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) has acquired considerable datasets of both aerosol extensive parameters (e.g. aerosol optical depth) and intensive parameters (e.g. aerosol depolarization ratio, lidar ratio) that can be used to infer aerosol type. An aerosol classification methodology has been used extensively to classify HSRL-1 aerosol measurements of different aerosol types including dust, smoke, urban pollution, and marine aerosol. However, atmospheric aerosol is frequently not a single pure type, but instead occurs as a mixture of types, and this mixing affects the optical and radiative properties of the aerosol. Here we present a comprehensive and unified set of rules for characterizing external mixtures using several key aerosol intensive parameters: extinction-to-backscatter ratio (i.e. lidar ratio), backscatter color ratio, and depolarization ratio. Our mixing rules apply not just to the scalar values of aerosol intensive parameters, but to multi-dimensional normal distributions with variance in each measurement dimension. We illustrate the applicability of the mixing rules using examples of HSRL-1 data where mixing occurred between different aerosol types, including advected Saharan dust mixed with the marine boundary layer in the Caribbean Sea and locally generated dust mixed with urban pollution in the Mexico City surroundings. For each of these cases we infer a time-height cross section of mixing ratio along the flight track and we partition aerosol extinction into portions attributed to the two pure types. Since multiple aerosol intensive parameters are measured and included in these calculations, the techniques can also be used for cases without significant depolarization (unlike similar work by earlier researchers), and so a third example of a

  5. Competition-Based Model of Pheromone Component Ratio Detection in the Moth

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Andrei; Buckley, Christopher L.; Martinez, Dominique; Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Nowotny, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    For some moth species, especially those closely interrelated and sympatric, recognizing a specific pheromone component concentration ratio is essential for males to successfully locate conspecific females. We propose and determine the properties of a minimalist competition-based feed-forward neuronal model capable of detecting a certain ratio of pheromone components independently of overall concentration. This model represents an elementary recognition unit for the ratio of binary mixtures which we propose is entirely contained in the macroglomerular complex (MGC) of the male moth. A set of such units, along with projection neurons (PNs), can provide the input to higher brain centres. We found that (1) accuracy is mainly achieved by maintaining a certain ratio of connection strengths between olfactory receptor neurons (ORN) and local neurons (LN), much less by properties of the interconnections between the competing LNs proper. An exception to this rule is that it is beneficial if connections between generalist LNs (i.e. excited by either pheromone component) and specialist LNs (i.e. excited by one component only) have the same strength as the reciprocal specialist to generalist connections. (2) successful ratio recognition is achieved using latency-to-first-spike in the LN populations which, in contrast to expectations with a population rate code, leads to a broadening of responses for higher overall concentrations consistent with experimental observations. (3) when longer durations of the competition between LNs were observed it did not lead to higher recognition accuracy. PMID:21373177

  6. Measuring additive interaction using odds ratios

    PubMed Central

    Kalilani, Linda; Atashili, Julius

    2006-01-01

    Interaction measured on the additive scale has been argued to be better correlated with biologic interaction than when measured on the multiplicative scale. Measures of interaction on the additive scale have been developed using risk ratios. However, in studies that use odds ratios as the sole measure of effect, the calculation of these measures of additive interaction is usually performed by directly substituting odds ratios for risk ratios. Yet assessing additive interaction based on replacing risk ratios by odds ratios in formulas that were derived using the former may be erroneous. In this paper, we evaluate the extent to which three measures of additive interaction – the interaction contrast ratio (ICR), the attributable proportion due to interaction (AP), and the synergy index (S), estimated using odds ratios versus using risk ratios differ as the incidence of the outcome of interest increases in the source population and/or as the magnitude of interaction increases. Our analysis shows that the difference between the two depends on the measure of interaction used, the type of interaction present, and the baseline incidence of the outcome. Substituting odds ratios for risk ratios, when calculating measures of additive interaction, may result in misleading conclusions. Of the three measures, AP appears to be the most robust to this direct substitution. Formulas that use stratum specific odds and odds ratios to accurately calculate measures of additive interaction are presented. PMID:16620385

  7. Safety Testing of Ammonium Nitrate Based Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jason; Lappo, Karmen; Phelan, James; Peterson, Nathan; Gilbert, Don

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN)/ammonium nitrate based explosives have a lengthy documented history of use by adversaries in acts of terror. While historical research has been conducted on AN-based explosive mixtures, it has primarily focused on detonation performance while varying the oxygen balance between the oxidizer and fuel components. Similarly, historical safety data on these materials is often lacking in pertinent details such as specific fuel type, particle size parameters, oxidizer form, etc. A variety of AN-based fuel-oxidizer mixtures were tested for small-scale sensitivity in preparation for large-scale testing. Current efforts focus on maintaining a zero oxygen-balance (a stoichiometric ratio for active chemical participants) while varying factors such as charge geometry, oxidizer form, particle size, and inert diluent ratios. Small-scale safety testing was conducted on various mixtures and fuels. It was found that ESD sensitivity is significantly affected by particle size, while this is less so for impact and friction. Thermal testing is in progress to evaluate hazards that may be experienced during large-scale testing.

  8. The Golden Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2004-01-01

    The Golden Ratio is sometimes called the "Golden Section" or the "Divine Proportion", in which three points: A, B, and C, divide a line in this proportion if AC/AB = AB/BC. "Donald in Mathmagicland" includes a section about the Golden Ratio and the ratios within a five-pointed star or pentagram. This article presents two computing exercises that…

  9. Evaluating Whole Chemical Mixtures and Sufficient Similarity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation supports apresentation describing dose-response assessment for complex chemical mixtures including deriving reference doses for mixtures evaluating sufficient similarity among chemical mixtures.

  10. Reactivity of anthracene in liquid SbCl/sub 3/-AlCl/sub 3/-N-(1-BUTYL)pyridinium chloride mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zingg, S.P.; Buchanan, A.C.; Chapman, D.M.; Dworkin, A.S.; Smith, G.P.; Sorlie, M.

    1983-05-01

    Mixtures of SbCl/sub 3/ and N-(1-butyl)pyridinium chloride (BPCl) containing 75-87 mol % SbCl/sub 3/ and SbCl/sub 3/-AlCl/sub 3/-BPCl mixtures containing 60 mol % SbCl/sub 3/ and 17-24 mol % BPCl were found to be liquid at 25/sup 0/C. Dilute solutions of anthracene were stable in ternary mixtures containing 18 mol % AlCl/sub 3/, but in mixtures containing 22-24 mol % AlCl/sub 3/, anthracene reacted under the influence of the solvent, which behaved as both oxidant and H-transfer catalyst. The oxidized product was protonated anthracene, which was stable in this melt. The source of protons was provided by hydrogen-liberating Scholl condensations combined with the reduction of Sb(III). A part of the hydrogen from Scholl reactions reacted with anthracene to form 9,10-dihydroanthracene. By contrast, a liquid mixture without SbCl/sub 3/, AlCl/sub 3/-BPCl (2:1 mole ratio), proved to be a much less active H-transfer catalyst than the SbCl/sub 3/-rich liquids even though it is a stronger Lewis acid, and it did not induce protonation beyond a trace attributable to protic impurities.

  11. Reactivity of anthracene in liquid SbCl/sub 3/-AlCl/sub 3/-N-(1-butyl)pyridinium chloride mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zingg, S.P.; Dworkin, A.S.; Sorlie, M.; Chapman, D.M.; Buchanan, A.C. III; Smith, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    Mixtures of SbCl/sub 3/ and N-(1-butyl)pyridinium chloride (BPCl) containing 75 to 87 mol % SbCl/sub 3/ and SbCl/sub 3/-AlCl/sub 3/-BPCl mixtures containing 60 mol % SbCl/sub 3/ and 17 to 24 mol % BPCl were found to be liquid at 25/sup 0/C. Dilute solutions of anthracene were stable in ternary mixtures containing 18 mol % AlCl/sub 3/, but in mixtures containing 22 to 24 mol % AlCl/sub 3/, anthracene reacted under the influence of the solvent, which behaved as both oxidant and H-transfer catalyst. The oxidized product was protonated anthracene, which was stable in this melt. The source of protons was provided by hydrogen-liberating Scholl condensations combined with the reduction of Sb(III). A part of the hydrogen from Scholl reactions reacted with anthracene to form 9,10-dihydroanthracene. By contrast, a liquid mixture without SbCl/sub 3/, AlCl/sub 3/-BPCl (2:1 mole ratio), proved to be a much less active H-transfer catalyst than the SbCl/sub 3/-rich liquids even though it is a stronger Lewis acid, and it did not induce protonation beyond a trace attributable to protic impurities.

  12. Experience with coal-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1983-06-01

    A demonstration of coal-water mixture at Florida Power and Light's Sanford plant was a technological success, but not without some difficulty. Extensive accumulation of melted ash, and atomizer wear, made the demonstration only marginal economically. Falling oil prices in 1981-82 made the conversion to COM even less attractive. Combustion tests on the suitability of several candidate coal mixtures concluded that the quantity and characteristics of the ash in the coal is the most important variable in predicting fuel performance. An examination of the characteristics of CWM with various coal-water ratios shows that the ''water penalty'' is not as severe as believed. Yet it is NOT a foregone conclusion that CWM fuels will be economical in the future.

  13. Polydispersity effects in colloid-polymer mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liddle, S M; Narayanan, T; Poon, W C K

    2011-05-18

    We study phase separation and transient gelation experimentally in a mixture consisting of polydisperse colloids (polydispersity: ≈ 6%) and non-adsorbing polymers, where the ratio of the average size of the polymer to that of the colloid is ≈ 0.062. Unlike what has been reported previously for mixtures with somewhat lower colloid polydispersity (≈ 5%), the addition of polymers does not expand the fluid-solid coexistence region. Instead, we find a region of fluid-solid coexistence which has an approximately constant width but an unexpected re-entrant shape. We detect the presence of a metastable gas-liquid binodal, which gives rise to two-stepped crystallization kinetics that can be rationalized as the effect of fractionation. Finally, we find that the separation into multiple coexisting solid phases at high colloid volume fractions predicted by equilibrium statistical mechanics is kinetically suppressed before the system reaches dynamical arrest. PMID:21525554

  14. Noise and crossover exponents in conductor-insulator mixtures and superconductor-conductor mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, R.R. ); Albinet, G. ); Tremblay, A.S. )

    1992-01-01

    The resistance noise of random conductor-insulator mixtures is studied in the case where the insulators have a small but finite conductance. The conductance noise of superconductor-conductor mixtures is similarly studied when the superconductors have a small but finite resistance. The Migdal-Kadanoff renormalization-group calculations that lead to the appropriate linear and nonlinear scaling fields for these problems are discussed in detail. The corresponding homogeneity relations for the total noise are valid near the unstable percolation fixed point whatever the relative size of the microscopic noises. The exponents of the superconductor-conductor mixture appear naturally in the scaling form of the noise coming from the imperfect insulators. Analogously, the exponents of the conductor-insulator mixture enter in the scaling form of the noise coming from the imperfect superconductors in the superconductor-conductor problem. Monte Carlo simulations in two and three dimensions confirm that the scaling predictions are valid well beyond the domain of applicability of the Migdal-Kadanoff approach. For all multifractal moments and both types of mixtures, there is a single crossover exponent and a single correlation length associated with the ratio of the microscopic conductances.

  15. Toxicological evaluation of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Feron, V J; Groten, J P

    2002-06-01

    This paper addresses major developments in the safety evaluation of chemical mixtures during the past 15 years, reviews today's state of the art of mixture toxicology, and discusses challenges ahead. Well-thought-out tailor-made mechanistic and empirical designs for studying the toxicity of mixtures have gradually substituted trial-and-error approaches, improving the insight into the testability of joint action and interaction of constituents of mixtures. The acquired knowledge has successfully been used to evaluate the safety of combined exposures and complex mixtures such as, for example, the atmosphere at hazardous waste sites, drinking water disinfection by-products, natural flavouring complexes, and the combined intake of food additives. To consolidate the scientific foundation of mixture toxicology, studies are in progress to revisit the biological concepts and mathematics underlying formulas for low-dose extrapolation and risk assessment of chemical mixtures. Conspicuous developments include the production of new computer programs applicable to mixture research (CombiTool, BioMol, Reaction Network Modelling), the application of functional genomics and proteomics to mixture studies, the use of nano-optochemical sensors for in vivo imaging of physiological processes in cells, and the application of optical sensor micro- and nano-arrays for complex sample analysis. Clearly, the input of theoretical biologists, biomathematicians and bioengineers in mixture toxicology is essential for the development of this challenging branch of toxicology into a scientific subdiscipline of full value. PMID:11983277

  16. Toxicological approaches to complex mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of toxicological studies in understanding the health effects of environmental exposures to mixtures. The approach taken is to review mixtures that have received the greatest emphasis from toxicology; major mixtures research programs; the toxicologist's view of mixtures and approaches to their study; and the complementary roles of toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Studies of tobacco smoke, engine exhaust, combustion products, and air pollutants comprise most of the past research on mixtures. Because of their great experimental control over subjects, exposures, and endpoints, toxicologists tend to consider a wider range of toxic interactions among mixture components and sequential exposures than is practical for human studies. The three fundamental experimental approaches used by toxicologists are integrative (studying the mixture as a whole), dissective (dissecting a mixture to determine causative constituents), and synthetic (studying interactions between agents in simple combinations). Toxicology provides information on potential hazards, mechanisms by which mixture constituents interact to cause effects, and exposure dose-effect relationships; but extrapolation from laboratory data to quantitative human health risks is problematic. Toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological approaches are complementary but are seldom coordinated. Fostering synergistic interactions among the disciplines in studying the risks from mixtures could be advantageous. PMID:7515806

  17. On Establishing Underlying Tonal Contrast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Phonological field work is largely about establishing contrast in comparable environments. The notion of phonological contrast, however, can be confusing, particularly in its application to tone analysis. Does it mean phonemic contrast in the structuralist sense, or does it mean underlying contrast in the generative sense? Many linguists, in…

  18. Stabilizer for fuel mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Moriyama, N.; Yamamura, M.

    1981-02-24

    A stabilizer for fuel mixtures of finely divided coal and fuel oil is composed of an active ingredient, a non-ionic surface active agent consisting of a block copolymer represented by the following general formula (I): R/sub 1/O-(C/sub 2/H/sup 4/O)l-(C/sub 3/H/sup 6/O)m-(C/sub 2/H/sup 4/O)n-R/sub 2/ (I) wherein r/sub 1/ and r/sub 2/ stand for a hydrogen atom or an alklyl group having 1 to 6 carbon atoms, the mole number (L+n) of added ethylene oxide is in the range of from 30 to 300, the mole number (M) of added propylene oxide is in the range of from 15 to 80, and the content of ethylene oxide in the whole molecule is 40 to 85% by weight.

  19. Differential interference contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Vishnyakov, Gennady; Levin, Gennady; Minaev, Vladimir; Latushko, Mikhail; Nekrasov, Nikolay; Pickalov, Valery

    2016-07-01

    We present a new approach to optical tomography of phase objects that is referred to as differential interference contrast tomography (DICT). The main feature of DICT is that the result of tomographic reconstruction is a 3D DIC image. This image is described by partial derivative of 3D refractive index distribution in one direction. The DICT setup consists of a lateral shearing phase-shifting interference microscope with low-coherent LED illumination. To create projections of the sample at various illumination angles, an angular scanning beam was used. 3D DIC tomograms of a white blood cell are presented. The comparison between the reconstructed DIC tomogram slices and the conventional DIC images of the same sample at the same depths are also represented. PMID:27367095

  20. Polarization contrast vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, Edward N.

    1990-05-01

    An attempt is made to establish the possibility that the geometry of certain classes of vertebrate photoreceptors results in a birefringence that allows the animals to utilize the state of polarization of light striking their retinas as a meaningful stimulus parameter. Simulate the photoreceptors as dielectric waveguides using a simple physical model, and augment this theoretical work with empirical measurements of the light guiding properties of photoreceptors in isolated pieces of retina from a green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus). With a classical conditioning paradigm, this fish's sensitivity to light is modulated by the orientation of the plane of polarization of linearly polarized light. This functional dependence was predicted by a hypothetical antagonistic mechanism between twin cones of two orientations in the animal's retinal mosaic. Further study is planned for the nature of the stimulus to which the fish is sensitive by creating a camera that will generate images based purely upon the contrast between orthogonal polarizations at each point in space.

  1. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T.M.; Kay, A.R.; Tank, D.W. )

    1990-12-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity.

  2. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Contrast Dependent on Blood Oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T. M.; Kay, A. R.; Tank, D. W.

    1990-12-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high fields, we demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complements other techniques that are attempting to provide positron emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity.

  3. Pycnonuclear reaction rates for binary ionic mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichimaru, S.; Ogata, S.; Van Horn, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Through a combination of compositional scaling arguments and examinations of Monte Carlo simulation results for the interparticle separations in binary-ionic mixture (BIM) solids, we have derived parameterized expressions for the BIM pycnonuclear rates as generalizations of those in one-component solids obtained previously by Salpeter and Van Horn and by Ogata et al. We have thereby discovered a catalyzing effect of the heavier elements, which enhances the rates of reactions among the lighter elements when the charge ratio exceeds a critical value of approximately 2.3.

  4. Reactivity of anthracene in liquid SbCl/sub 3/-AlCl/sub 3/-N-(1-butyl)pyridinium chloride mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zingg, S.P.; Buchanan, A.C.; Chapman, D.M.; Dworkin, A.S.; Smith, G.P.; Sorlie, M.

    1984-07-01

    Mixtures of SbCl/sub 3/ and N-(l-butyl)pyridinium chloride (BPCl) containing 75-87 m/o (mole percent) SbCl/sub 3/ and SbCl/sub 3/AlCl/sub 3/-BPCl mixtures containing 60 m/o SbCl/sub 3/ and 16-23 m/o AlCl/sub 3/ were found to be liquid at 25/sup 0/C. Dilute solutions of anthracene were stable in ternary mixtures containing 18 m/o AlCl/sub 3/, but in mixtures containing 22-24 m/o AlCl/sub 3/, anthracene reacted under the influence of the solvent, which behaved as both oxidant and H-transfer catalyst. The oxidized product was protonated anthracene, which was stable in this melt. The source of protons was provided by hydrogen liberating Scholl condensations combined with the reduction of Sb(III). A part of the hydrogen from Scholl reactions reacted with anthracene to form 9,10-dihydroanthracene. By contrast, a liquid mixture without SbCl/sub 3/, AlCl/sub 3/-BPCl (2:1 mole ratio) proved to be a much less active H-transfer catalyst than the SbCl/sub 3/-rich liquids even though it is a stronger Lewis acid, and it did not induce protonation beyond a trace attributable to protic impurities. The role of impurities in these mixtures was investigated with results that are relevant to earlier investigations of liquid AlCl/sub 3/-BPCl mixtures. An improved procedure for purifying BPCl is described.

  5. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Contrast echocardiography 1996. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Villarraga, H R; Foley, D A; Mulvagh, S L

    1996-01-01

    Remarkable advances in the field of contrast echocardiography have been made during the last decade. Interest in ultrasound contrast agents that strengthen the backscattered ultrasound signal and improve image display has stimulated further research. Echocardiographic contrast agents providing left ventricular cavity image enhancement after intravenous injection are now available. A role for contrast echocardiography in the assessment of myocardial perfusion has been established within the invasive clinical setting. With the development of newer contrast agents and new ultrasound technology, myocardial perfusion imaging using contrast echocardiography after venous injection is no longer the unattainable "holy grail," but is fast approaching clinical applicability. Images PMID:8792539

  7. Mixture design and multivariate analysis in mixture research.

    PubMed Central

    Eide, I; Johnsen, H G

    1998-01-01

    Mixture design has been used to identify possible interactions between mutagens in a mixture. In this paper the use of mixture design in multidimensional isobolographic studies is introduced. Mutagenicity of individual nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was evaluated is an organic extract of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). The particles were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM). After replacing DCM with dimethyl sulfoxide, the extract was spiked with three individual nitro-PAH: 1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 1,8-dinitropyrene. The nitro-PAH were added separately and in various combinations to the extract to determine the effects of each variable and to identify possible interactions between the individual nitro-PAH and between the nitro-PAH and the extract. The composition of the mixtures was determined by mixture design (linear axial normal) with four variables (the DEP extract and the three nitro-PAH, giving 8 different mixtures plus a triplicate centerpoint, i.e., a total of 11. The design supports a model with linear and interaction (product) terms. Two different approaches were used: traditional mixture design within a well-defined range on the linear part of the dose-response curves and an isobolographic mixture design with equipotent doses of each variable. The mixtures were tested for mutagenicity in the Ames assay using the TA98 strain of Salmonella typhimurium. The data were analyzed with projections to latent structures (PLS). The three individual nitro-PAH and the DEP extract acted additively in the Ames test. The use of mixture design either within a well-defined range of the linear part on the dose-response curve or with equipotent doses saves experiments and reduces the possibility of false interaction terms in situations with dose additivity or response additivity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9860895

  8. Mixture design and multivariate analysis in mixture research.

    PubMed

    Eide, I; Johnsen, H G

    1998-12-01

    Mixture design has been used to identify possible interactions between mutagens in a mixture. In this paper the use of mixture design in multidimensional isobolographic studies is introduced. Mutagenicity of individual nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was evaluated is an organic extract of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). The particles were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM). After replacing DCM with dimethyl sulfoxide, the extract was spiked with three individual nitro-PAH: 1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 1,8-dinitropyrene. The nitro-PAH were added separately and in various combinations to the extract to determine the effects of each variable and to identify possible interactions between the individual nitro-PAH and between the nitro-PAH and the extract. The composition of the mixtures was determined by mixture design (linear axial normal) with four variables (the DEP extract and the three nitro-PAH, giving 8 different mixtures plus a triplicate centerpoint, i.e., a total of 11. The design supports a model with linear and interaction (product) terms. Two different approaches were used: traditional mixture design within a well-defined range on the linear part of the dose-response curves and an isobolographic mixture design with equipotent doses of each variable. The mixtures were tested for mutagenicity in the Ames assay using the TA98 strain of Salmonella typhimurium. The data were analyzed with projections to latent structures (PLS). The three individual nitro-PAH and the DEP extract acted additively in the Ames test. The use of mixture design either within a well-defined range of the linear part on the dose-response curve or with equipotent doses saves experiments and reduces the possibility of false interaction terms in situations with dose additivity or response additivity. PMID:9860895

  9. Brute force absorption contrast microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Graham R.; Mills, David

    2014-09-01

    In laboratory X-ray microtomography (XMT) systems, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is typically determined by the X-ray exposure due to the low flux associated with microfocus X-ray tubes. As the exposure time is increased, the SNR improves up to a point where other sources of variability dominate, such as differences in the sensitivities of adjacent X-ray detector elements. Linear time-delay integration (TDI) readout averages out detector sensitivities on the critical horizontal direction and equiangular TDI also averages out the X-ray field. This allows the SNR to be increased further with increasing exposure. This has been used in dentistry to great effect, allowing subtle variations in dentine mineralisation to be visualised in 3 dimensions. It has also been used to detect ink in ancient parchments that are too damaged to physically unroll. If sufficient contrast between the ink and parchment exists, it is possible to virtually unroll the tomographic image of the scroll in order that the text can be read. Following on from this work, a feasibility test was carried out to determine if it might be possible to recover images from decaying film reels. A successful attempt was made to re-create a short film sequence from a rolled length of 16mm film using XMT. However, the "brute force" method of scaling this up to allow an entire film reel to be imaged presents a significant challenge.

  10. A fluidic device for measuring constituent masses of a flowing binary gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.

    1973-01-01

    A continuous reading mass flow device was developed to measure the component flow of a binary gas mixture. The basic components of the device are a fluidic humidity sensor and a specially designed flow calorimeter. These components provide readings of gas mixture ratio, mixture heat capacity, heat dissipated by the calorimeter and the gas temperature rise across the calorimeter. These parameter values, applied in the general definitions of specific heat capacity and the heat capacity of a gas mixture, produce calculated component flow rates of the mixture being metered. A test program was conducted to evaluate both the steady state and dynamic performance of the device.

  11. Scavenging ratios based on inflow air concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Dana, M.T.; Lee, R.N.; Slinn, W.G.N.; Thorp, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Scavenging ratios were calculated from field measurements made during April 1985. Event precipitation samples were collected at the surface, but air chemistry measurements in the air mass feeding the precipitation were made from an aircraft. In contrast, ratios calculated in previous studies have used air concentration and precipitation chemistry data from only surface measurements. Average scavenging ratios were calculated for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, total sulfate, total nitrate, and total ammonium for 5 events; the geometric mean of these scavenging ratios were 8.5 {times} 10{sup 5}, 5.6 {times} 10{sup 6}, 4.3 {times} 10{sup 5}, 3.4 {times} 10{sup 5}, 2.4 {times} 10{sup 6}, and 9.7 {times} 10{sup 4}, respectively. These means are similar to but less variable than previous ratios formed using only surface data.

  12. Compression ratio effect on methane HCCI combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S. M.; Pitz, W.; Smith, J. R.; Westbrook, C.

    1998-09-29

    We have used the HCT (Hydrodynamics, Chemistry and Transport) chemical kinetics code to simulate HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) combustion of methane-air mixtures. HCT is applied to explore the ignition timing, bum duration, NOx production, gross indicated efficiency and gross IMEP of a supercharged engine (3 atm. Intake pressure) with 14:1, 16:l and 18:1 compression ratios at 1200 rpm. HCT has been modified to incorporate the effect of heat transfer and to calculate the temperature that results from mixing the recycled exhaust with the fresh mixture. This study uses a single control volume reaction zone that varies as a function of crank angle. The ignition process is controlled by adjusting the intake equivalence ratio and the residual gas trapping (RGT). RGT is internal exhaust gas recirculation which recycles both thermal energy and combustion product species. Adjustment of equivalence ratio and RGT is accomplished by varying the timing of the exhaust valve closure in either 2-stroke or 4-stroke engines. Inlet manifold temperature is held constant at 300 K. Results show that, for each compression ratio, there is a range of operational conditions that show promise of achieving the control necessary to vary power output while keeping indicated efficiency above 50% and NOx levels below 100 ppm. HCT results are also compared with a set of recent experimental data for natural gas.

  13. Inviscid behaviour of fines-rich pyroclastic flows inferred from experiments on gas-particle mixtures [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, O.; Gilbertson, M. A.; Phillips, J. C.; Sparks, R. S. J.

    2005-12-01

    Experiments were carried out on granular flows generated by instantaneous release of gas-fluidised, bidisperse mixtures and propagating into a horizontal channel. The mixture consists of fine (< 100 μm) and coarse (> 100 μm) particles of same density, with corresponding grain size ratios of ˜ 2 to 9. Initial fluidisation of the mixture destroys the interparticle frictional contacts, and the flow behaviour then depends on the initial bed packing and on the timescale required to re-establish strong frictional contacts. At a fines mass fraction ( α) below that of optimal packing (˜ 40%), the initial mixtures consist of a continuous network of coarse particles with fines in interstitial voids. Strong frictional contacts between the coarse particles are probably rapidly re-established and the flows steadily decelerate. Some internal friction reduction appears to occur as α and the grain size ratio increases, possibly due to particle rolling and the lower roughness of internal shear surfaces. Segregation only occurs at large grain size ratio due to dynamical sieving with fines concentrated at the flow base. In contrast, at α above that for optimal packing, the initial mixtures consist of coarse particles embedded in a matrix of fines. Flow velocities and run-outs are similar to that of the monodisperse fine end-member, thus showing that the coarse particles are transported passively within the matrix whatever their amount and grain size are. These flows propagate at constant height and velocity as inviscid fluid gravity currents, thus suggesting negligible interparticle friction. We have determined a Froude number of 2.61 ± 0.08 consistent with the dam-break model for fluid flows, and with no significant variation as a function of α, the grain size ratio, and the initial bed expansion. Very little segregation occurs, which suggests low intensity particle interactions during flow propagation and that active fluidisation is not taking place. Strong frictional

  14. Improvement in device performance from a mixture of a liquid crystal and photosensitive acrylic prepolymer with the photoinduced vertical alignment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Czung-Yu; Lin, Fa-Hsin; Tao, Yu-Tai; Lee, Jiunn-Yih

    2011-12-01

    In a multicomponent nematic liquid crystal (NLC) mixture of a liquid crystal (negative-type NLC) and a photosensitive acrylic prepolymer, photopolymerization upon UV irradiation induces the separation of the LC and photosensitive acrylic prepolymer layers, thereby leading to a vertical arrangement of LC molecules. In this study, we propose a simple vertical alignment method for LC molecules, by adding a chiral smectic A (SmA*) liquid crystal having homeotropic texture characteristics to an NLC mixture solution. Measurements of electro-optical properties revealed that the addition of the SmA* LC not only strengthened the anchoring force of the copolymer alignment film surface, but also significantly enhanced the contrast ratio (~73%), response time and grayscale switching performance of the device.

  15. Sex ratios in bumble bees

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, A. F. G.

    1997-01-01

    The median proportion of investment in females among 11 populations of seven bumble bee (Bombus) species was 0.32 (range 0.07 to 0.64). By contrast, two species of workerless social parasites in the related genus Psithyrus had female-biased sex allocation, the reasons for which remain unclear. Male-biased sex allocation in Bombus contradicts the predictions of Trivers and Hare's sex ratio model for the social Hymenoptera, which are that the population sex investment ratio should be 0.5 (1:1) under queen control and 0.75 (3:1 females:males) under worker control (assuming single, once-mated, outbred queens and non-reproductive workers). Male bias in Bombus does not appear to be either an artefact, or purely the result of symbiotic sex ratio distorters. According to modifications of the Trivers–Hare model, the level of worker male-production in Bombus is insufficient to account for observed levels of male bias. There is also no evidence that male bias arises from either local resource competition (related females compete for resources) or local mate enhancement (related males cooperate in securing mates). Bulmer presented models predicting sexual selection for protandry (males are produced before females) in annual social Hymenoptera and, as a consequence (given some parameter values), male-biased sex allocation. Bumble bees fit the assumptions of Bulmer's models and are protandrous. These models therefore represent the best current explanation for the bees' male-biased sex investment ratios. This conclusion suggests that the relative timing of the production of the sexes strongly influences sex allocation in the social Hymenoptera.

  16. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  17. Contrast agent choice for intravenous coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, H.D.; Siddons, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-rays and an iodine containing contrast agent at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an adequately intense monochromatic x-ray source. Because of the size and cost of synchrotron radiation facilities it would be desirable to make the most efficient use of the intensity available, while reducing as much as possible the radiation dose experienced by the patient. By choosing contrast agents containing elements with a higher atomic number than iodine, it is possible to both improve the image quality and reduce the patient radiation dose, while using the same synchrotron source. By using Si monochromator crystals with a small mosaic spread, it is possible to increase the x-ray flux available for imaging by over an order of magnitude, without any changes in the storage ring or wiggler magnet. The most critical imaging task for intravenous coronary angiography utilizing synchrotron radiation x-rays is visualizing a coronary artery through the left ventricle or aorta which also contains a contrast agent. Calculations have been made of the signal to noise ratio expected for this imaging task for various contrast agents with atomic numbers between that of iodine and bismuth.

  18. Familial searching on DNA mixtures with dropout.

    PubMed

    Slooten, K

    2016-05-01

    Familial searching, the act of searching a database for a relative of an unknown individual whose DNA profile has been obtained, is usually restricted to cases where the DNA profile of that person has been unambiguously determined. Therefore, it is normally applied only with a good quality single source profile as starting point. In this article we investigate the performance of the method if applied to mixtures with and without allelic dropout, when likelihood ratios are computed with a semi-continuous (binary) model. We show that mixtures with dropout do not necessarily perform worse than mixtures without, especially if some separation between the donors is possible due to their different dropout probabilities. The familial searching true and false positive rates of mixed profiles on 15 loci are in some cases better than those of single source profiles on 10 loci. Thus, the information loss due to the fact that the person of interest's DNA has been mixed with that of other, and is affected by dropout, can be less than the loss of information corresponding to having 5 fewer loci available for a single source trace. Profiles typed on 10 autosomal loci are often involved in familial searching casework since many databases, including the Dutch one, in part consist of such profiles. Therefore, from this point of view, there seems to be no objection to extend familial searching to mixed or degraded profiles. PMID:26905597

  19. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Thomas; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Flicker, Dawn G.

    2015-04-22

    Mixtures of light elements with heavy elements are important in inertial confinement fusion. We explore the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated temperature and pressure is used to obtain the thermodynamic state properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. In order to validate these simulations, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with the completion of dissociation in ethane. Furthermore, the DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental data along the principal Hugoniots and are used to provide insight into the dissociation and temperature along the Hugoniots as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for several compositions suggesting a limiting compression for C-C bonded systems.

  20. Tandem mass spectrometry: analysis of complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    Applications of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the analysis of complex mixtures results in increased specificity and selectivity by using a variety of reagent gases in both negative and positive ion modes. Natural isotopic abundance ratios were examined in both simple and complex mixtures using parent, daughter and neutral loss scans. MS/MS was also used to discover new compounds. Daughter scans were used to identify seven new alkaloids in a cactus species. Three of these alkaloids were novel compounds, and included the first simple, fully aromatic isoquinoline alkaloids reported in Cactaceae. MS/MS was used to characterize the chemical reaction products of coal in studies designed to probe its macromolecular structure. Negative ion chemical ionization was utilized to study reaction products resulting from the oxidation of coal. Possible structural units in the precursor coal were predicted based on the reaction products identified, aliphatic and aromatic acids and their anhydrides. The MS/MS method was also used to characterize reaction products resulting from coal liquefaction and/or extraction. These studies illustrate the types of problems for which MS/MS is useful. Emphasis has been placed on characterization of complex mixtures by selecting experimental parameters which enhance the information obtained. The value of using MS/MS in conjunction with other analytical techniques as well as the chemical pretreatment is demonstrated.

  1. Statistical mechanical theory of fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yueqiang; Wu, Zhengming; Liu, Weiwei

    2014-01-01

    A general statistical mechanical theory of fluid mixtures (liquid mixtures and gas mixtures) is developed based on the statistical mechanical expression of chemical potential of components in the grand canonical ensemble, which gives some new relationships between thermodynamic quantities (equilibrium ratio Ki, separation factor α and activity coefficient γi) and ensemble average potential energy u for one molecule. The statistical mechanical expressions of separation factor α and activity coefficient γi derived in this work make the fluid phase equilibrium calculations can be performed by molecular simulation simply and efficiently, or by the statistical thermodynamic approach (based on the saturated-vapor pressure of pure substance) that does not need microscopic intermolecular pair potential functions. The physical meaning of activity coefficient γi in the liquid phase is discussed in detail from a viewpoint of molecular thermodynamics. The calculated Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) properties of argon-methane, methanol-water and n-hexane-benzene systems by this model fit well with experimental data in references, which indicates that this model is accurate and reliable in the prediction of VLE properties for small, large and strongly associating molecules; furthermore the statistical mechanical expressions of separation factor α and activity coefficient γi have good compatibility with classical thermodynamic equations and quantum mechanical COSMO-SAC approach.

  2. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flicker, Dawn; Magyar, Rudolph; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Mixtures of light and heavy elements arise in inertial confinement fusion and planetary science. We present results on the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT/QMD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to obtain the properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate the QMD simulations, we performed high-precision shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis of the simulations correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with completion of dissociation in ethane. DFT-based simulation results compare well with experimental data and are used to provide insight into the dissociation as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for ethane, Xe-ethane, polymethyl-pentene, and polystyrene, suggesting that a limiting compression exists for C-C bonded systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Thomas; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Flicker, Dawn G.

    2015-04-22

    Mixtures of light elements with heavy elements are important in inertial confinement fusion. We explore the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated temperature and pressure is used to obtain the thermodynamic state properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. In order to validate these simulations, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with the completion of dissociation in ethane. Furthermore, themore » DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental data along the principal Hugoniots and are used to provide insight into the dissociation and temperature along the Hugoniots as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for several compositions suggesting a limiting compression for C-C bonded systems.« less

  4. Pedagogical Implications of Contrastive Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marton, Waldemar

    1972-01-01

    Pessimism regarding pedagogical applications of contrastive studies, and reasons therefore, are described. Several misunderstandings believed to contribute to this pessimism, and several areas of controversy concerning uses of contrastive studies, are discussed. See FL 508 197 for availability. (RM)

  5. Latent classiness and other mixtures.

    PubMed

    Neale, Michael C

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this article is to laud Lindon Eaves' role in the development of mixture modeling in genetic studies. The specification of models for mixture distributions was very much in its infancy when Professor Eaves implemented it in his own FORTRAN programs, and extended it to data collected from relatives such as twins. It was his collaboration with the author of this article which led to the first implementation of mixture distribution modeling in a general-purpose structural equation modeling program, Mx, resulting in a 1996 article on linkage analysis in Behavior Genetics. Today, the popularity of these methods continues to grow, encompassing methods for genetic association, latent class analysis, growth curve mixture modeling, factor mixture modeling, regime switching, marginal maximum likelihood, genotype by environment interaction, variance component twin modeling in the absence of zygosity information, and many others. This primarily historical article concludes with some consideration of some possible future developments. PMID:24477932

  6. Latent Classiness and Other Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to laud Lindon Eaves’ role in the development of mixture modeling in genetic studies. The specification of models for mixture distributions was very much in its infancy when Professor Eaves implemented it in his own FORTRAN programs, and extended it to data collected from relatives such as twins. It was his collaboration with the author of this article which led to the first implementation of mixture distribution modeling in a general-purpose structural equation modeling program, Mx, resulting in a 1996 article on linkage analysis in Behavior Genetics. Today, the popularity of these methods continues to grow, encompassing methods for genetic association, latent class analysis, growth curve mixture modeling, factor mixture modeling, regime switching, marginal maximum likelihood, genotype by environment interaction, variance component twin modeling in the absence of zygosity information, and many others. This primarily historical article concludes with some consideration of some possible future developments. PMID:24477932

  7. Deterrence and arrest ratios.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Stephanie E; Piquero, Alex R

    2006-02-01

    In the limited research on the origins of sanction threat perceptions, researchers have focused on either the effects of actively engaging in crime or the effects of formal sanctioning but rarely on both (i.e., the arrest ratio or the number of arrests relative to the number of crimes committed). This article extends this line of research by using a sample of Colorado inmates and measures arrest ratios and sanction perceptions for eight different crime types. Analyses reveal that the offenders report both significant experiential and arrest ratio effects. Theoretical and policy implications, limitations, and directions for future research are outlined. PMID:16397123

  8. Explosive compaction of WC+Co mixture by axisymmetric scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzyurkin, A. E.; Kraus, E. I.; Lukyanov, Ya L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of development and optimization of schemes for explosive compaction of mixtures of solid powder materials with metal bond. For this purpose, experiments were conducted on explosive compaction of mixtures of tungsten carbide (WC) and cobalt (Co) using a simple cylindrical compaction system. In addition, a numerical simulation of shock waves propagation in two-phase porous medium WC+Co was carried out. Based on experimental and numerical studies of shock wave propagation, the optimal modes of explosive compaction of two-phase powder media, representing mixtures of solid powder materials with metal bond, were found. It is shown that the most preferable compaction mode for obtaining a uniform durable compact of a mixture of powders WC+Co with ratio 9:1 by volume in axially symmetric scheme with central mandrel corresponds to the detonation velocity of 4.6 km/s followed by sintering.

  9. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  10. Recognition memory reveals just how CONTRASTIVE contrastive accenting really is

    PubMed Central

    Fraundorf, Scott H.; Watson, Duane G.; Benjamin, Aaron S.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of pitch accenting on memory were investigated in three experiments. Participants listened to short recorded discourses that contained contrast sets with two items (e.g. British scientists and French scientists); a continuation specified one item from the set. Pitch accenting on the critical word in the continuation was manipulated between non-contrastive (H* in the ToBI system) and contrastive (L+H*). On subsequent recognition memory tests, the L+H* accent increased hits to correct statements and correct rejections of the contrast item (Experiments 1–3), but did not impair memory for other parts of the discourse (Experiment 2). L+H* also did not facilitate correct rejections of lures not in the contrast set (Experiment 3), indicating that contrastive accents do not simply strengthen the representation of the target item. These results suggest comprehenders use pitch accenting to encode and update information about multiple elements in a contrast set. PMID:20835405

  11. Identification and evaluation of pyrethroid insecticide mixtures in urban sediments.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Andrew J; Weston, Donald P; Belden, Jason B; Lydy, Michael J

    2009-08-01

    Organochlorine, organophosphorous, and pyrethroid insecticides frequently have been detected together as mixtures in stream sediments. To simplify mixture analyses, additive toxic responses usually are assumed but rarely are confirmed, especially for compounds with similar modes of action. The first objective of the present study was to screen a database of 24 different pesticides and 94 urban-stream sediment samples collected throughout central and northern California (USA) to identify compounds and partial mixtures that dominated sample toxicity to Hyalella azteca. Pyrethroids and chlorpyrifos were the most toxicologically relevant compounds in terms of detection frequency, contribution to overall sample toxicity, and co-occurrence in the most common mixture patterns. Organochlorine insecticides were the least toxicologically relevant compounds, with only a small percentage of samples exceeding predefined screening values. The second objective was to confirm that mixtures of type I and type II pyrethroids display additive responses. Ten-day sediment toxicity tests of binary pesticide mixtures were conducted using H. azteca as the test organism. Observed dose-response curves were compared to those predicted from concentration-addition and independent-action models. Model deviation ratios (MDRs) were calculated at the median effect level to quantify the magnitudes of deviation between observed and predicted curves. Whereas the concentration-addition model adequately predicted toxicity for all the pyrethroid mixtures (MDRs within a factor of two), dose-response values deviated from additivity enough to warrant further investigation. PMID:19245272

  12. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  13. Transport properties of highly asymmetric hard-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bannerman, Marcus N; Lue, Leo

    2009-04-28

    The static and dynamic properties of binary mixtures of hard spheres with a diameter ratio of sigma(B)/sigma(A)=0.1 and a mass ratio of m(B)/m(A)=0.001 are investigated using event driven molecular dynamics. The contact values of the pair correlation functions are found to compare favorably with recently proposed theoretical expressions. The transport coefficients of the mixture, determined from simulation, are compared to the predictions of the revised Enskog theory using both a third-order Sonine expansion and direct simulation Monte Carlo. Overall, the Enskog theory provides a fairly good description of the simulation data, with the exception of systems at the smallest mole fraction of larger spheres (x(A)=0.01) examined. A "fines effect" was observed at higher packing fractions, where adding smaller spheres to a system of large spheres decreases the viscosity of the mixture; this effect is not captured by the Enskog theory. PMID:19405594

  14. Transport properties of highly asymmetric hard-sphere mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannerman, Marcus N.; Lue, Leo

    2009-04-01

    The static and dynamic properties of binary mixtures of hard spheres with a diameter ratio of σB/σA=0.1 and a mass ratio of mB/mA=0.001 are investigated using event driven molecular dynamics. The contact values of the pair correlation functions are found to compare favorably with recently proposed theoretical expressions. The transport coefficients of the mixture, determined from simulation, are compared to the predictions of the revised Enskog theory using both a third-order Sonine expansion and direct simulation Monte Carlo. Overall, the Enskog theory provides a fairly good description of the simulation data, with the exception of systems at the smallest mole fraction of larger spheres (xA=0.01) examined. A "fines effect" was observed at higher packing fractions, where adding smaller spheres to a system of large spheres decreases the viscosity of the mixture; this effect is not captured by the Enskog theory.

  15. Contrast agent choice for intravenous coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, H. D.; Siddons, D. P.

    1990-05-01

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with monochromatic synchrotron radiation X-rays and an iodine-containing contrast agent at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an adequately intense monochromatic X-ray source. Because of the size and cost of synchrotron radiation facilities it would be desirable to make the most efficient use of the intensity available, while reducing as much as possible the radiation dose experienced by the patient. By choosing contrast agents containing elements with a higher atomic number than iodine, it is possible to both improve the image quality and reduce the patient radiation dose, while using the same synchrotron radiation source. By using Si monochromator crystals with a small mosaic spread, it is possible to increase the X-ray flux available for imaging by over an order of magnitude, without any changes in the storage ring or wiggler magnet. The most critical imaging task for intravenous coronary angiography utilizing synchrotron radiation X-rays is visualizing a coronary artery through the left ventricle or aorta which also contain contrast agent. Calculations have been made of the signal to noise ratio expected for this imaging task for various contrast agents with atomic numbers between that of iodine and bismuth. The X-ray energy spectrum of the X-17 superconduction wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been used for these calculations. Both perfect Si crystals and Si crystals with a small mosaic spread are considered as monochromators. Contrast agents containing Gd or Yb seem to have about the optimal calculated signal to noise ratio. Gd-DTPA is already approved for use as a contrast agent for

  16. Simplifying Likelihood Ratios

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Likelihood ratios are one of the best measures of diagnostic accuracy, although they are seldom used, because interpreting them requires a calculator to convert back and forth between “probability” and “odds” of disease. This article describes a simpler method of interpreting likelihood ratios, one that avoids calculators, nomograms, and conversions to “odds” of disease. Several examples illustrate how the clinician can use this method to refine diagnostic decisions at the bedside.

  17. Maximum Likelihood and Minimum Distance Applied to Univariate Mixture Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yuh-Yin Wu; Schafer, William D.

    This Monte-Carlo study compared modified Newton (NW), expectation-maximization algorithm (EM), and minimum Cramer-von Mises distance (MD), used to estimate parameters of univariate mixtures of two components. Data sets were fixed at size 160 and manipulated by mean separation, variance ratio, component proportion, and non-normality. Results…

  18. High Aspect Ratio Wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Crosby, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Buckling-induced surface undulations are widely found in living creatures, for instance, gut villi and the surface of flower petal cells. These undulations provide unique functionalities with their extremely high aspect ratios. For the synthetic systems, sinusoidal wrinkles that are induced by buckling a thin film attached on a soft substrate have been proposed to many applications. However, the impact of the synthetic wrinkles have been restricted by limited aspect ratios, ranging from 0 to 0.35. Within this range, wrinkle aspect ratio is known to increase with increasing compressive strain until a critical strain is reached, at which point wrinkles transition to localizations, such as folds or period doublings. Inspired by the living creatures, we propose that wrinkles can be stabilized in high aspect ratio by manipulating the strain energy in the substrate. We experimentally demonstrate this idea by forming a secondary crosslinking network in the wrinkled surface and successfully achieve aspect ratio as large as 0.8. This work not only provides insights for the mechanism of high aspect ratio structures seen in living creatures, but also demonstrates significant promise for future wrinkle-based applications.

  19. Mutual diffusion in a binary isotopic mixture.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raman; Tankeshwar, K

    2010-11-17

    The mass dependence of the mutual diffusion coefficient, in a binary equimolar mixture of Lennard-Jones fluids, is studied within Mori's memory function formalism. A phenomenological form of the memory function is used to study the time evolution of the self- and relative velocity correlation functions. The diffusion coefficients are calculated from the relevant velocity correlation functions using the Green-Kubo integral formula. Like the self-diffusion coefficient, the mutual diffusion coefficient is also found to be weakly dependent on the mass ratio. The present study shows that the minimum value that the mutual diffusion coefficient in an equimolar mixture of isotopic fluids can have is √(1/2) times the self-diffusion coefficient of any of the species when in isolation. Further, the contribution of the dynamic/distinct cross correlations to the mutual diffusion coefficient is found to be small and positive for the whole range of the mass ratio which is consistent with earlier molecular dynamics results. PMID:21339621

  20. Prechamber initiation of detonation in gaseous mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivol, G. Yu; Golovastov, S. V.; Golub, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    A process of deflagration-to-detonation transition in propane-butane-oxygen and acetylene-oxygen mixtures, in an open channel with a circular cross section with a diameter of 3 mm, was investigated experimentally. Detonation initiation was carried out by burning the mixture in the prechamber connected to the channel. The prechamber was considered as an extended source for the initiation of the detonation of a finite volume. To measure the velocity of a flame front, photodiodes, installed along the axis of the channel, were used. To determine the boundary conditions at the entrance to the channel, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used. The influence of the dimensions of the prechamber, equivalence ratio and fuel on the pressure profile, and evolution of the flame front along the axis of the channel are presented. It was shown that, the dynamics of the flame front and shock waves in the channel can occur in different scenarios depending on the geometry of the prechamber and equivalence ratio. Two limit effects of the prechamber detonation initiation in the channel have been analyzed. The pre-detonation distances and the minimal energy of direct initiation of the detonation were determined.

  1. The optimal polarizations for achieving maximum contrast in radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, A. A.; Yueh, H. A.; Kong, J. A.; Novak, L. M.; Shin, R. T.

    1988-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining the optimal polarizations that maximize contrast between two scattering classes in polarimetric radar images. A systematic approach is presented for obtaining the optimal polarimetric matched filter, i.e., that filter which produces maximum contrast between two scattering classes. The maximization procedure involves solving an eigenvalue problem where the eigenvector corresponding to the maximum contrast ratio is an optimal polarimetric matched filter. To exhibit the physical significance of this filter, it is transformed into its associated transmitting and receiving polarization states, written in terms of horizontal and vertical vector components. For the special case where the transmitting polarization is fixed, the receiving polarization which maximizes the contrast ratio is also obtained. Polarimetric filtering is then applies to synthetic aperture radar images obtained from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It is shown, both numerically and through the use of radar imagery, that maximum image contrast can be realized when data is processed with the optimal polarimeter matched filter.

  2. Responses of protocerebral neurons in Manduca sexta to sex-pheromone mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hong; Chiu, Hong-Yan; Hildebrand, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Male Manduca sexta moths are attracted to a mixture of two components of the female's sex pheromone at the natural concentration ratio. Deviation from this ratio results in reduced attraction. Projection neurons innervating prominent male-specific glomeruli in the male's antennal lobe produce maximal synchronized spiking activity in response to synthetic mixtures of the two components centering around the natural ratio, suggesting that behaviorally effective mixture ratios are encoded by synchronous neuronal activity. We investigated the physiological activity and morphology of downstream protocerebral neurons that responded to antennal stimulation with single pheromone components and their mixtures at various concentration ratios. Among the tested neurons, only a few gave stronger responses to the mixture at the natural ratio whereas most did not distinguish among the mixtures that were tested. We also found that the population response distinguished among the two pheromone components and their mixtures, prior to the peak population response. This observation is consistent with our previous finding that synchronous firing of antennal-lobe projection neurons reaches its maximum before the firing rate reaches its peak. Moreover, the response patterns of protocerebral neurons are diverse, suggesting that the representation of olfactory stimuli at the level of protocerebrum is complex. PMID:23974854

  3. Gaussian mixture model-based gradient field reconstruction for infrared image detail enhancement and denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fan; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Wenda; Qu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Infrared images are characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio and low contrast. Therefore, the edge details are easily immerged in the background and noise, making it much difficult to achieve infrared image edge detail enhancement and denoising. This article proposes a novel method of Gaussian mixture model-based gradient field reconstruction, which enhances image edge details while suppressing noise. First, by analyzing the gradient histogram of noisy infrared image, Gaussian mixture model is adopted to simulate the distribution of the gradient histogram, and divides the image information into three parts corresponding to faint details, noise and the edges of clear targets, respectively. Then, the piecewise function is constructed based on the characteristics of the image to increase gradients of faint details and suppress gradients of noise. Finally, anisotropic diffusion constraint is added while visualizing enhanced image from the transformed gradient field to further suppress noise. The experimental results show that the method possesses unique advantage of effectively enhancing infrared image edge details and suppressing noise as well, compared with the existing methods. In addition, it can be used to effectively enhance other types of images such as the visible and medical images.

  4. Simultaneous de-noising in phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Thomas; Roessl, Ewald

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we investigate methods for de-noising of tomographic differential phase contrast and absorption contrast images. We exploit the fact that in grating-based differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI), first, several images are acquired simultaneously in exactly the same geometry, and second, these different images can show very different contrast-to-noise-ratios. These features of grating-based DPCI are used to generalize the conventional bilateral filter. Experiments using simulations show a superior de-noising performance of the generalized algorithm compared with the conventional one.

  5. Perceived contrast in complex images

    PubMed Central

    Haun, Andrew M.; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    To understand how different spatial frequencies contribute to the overall perceived contrast of complex, broadband photographic images, we adapted the classification image paradigm. Using natural images as stimuli, we randomly varied relative contrast amplitude at different spatial frequencies and had human subjects determine which images had higher contrast. Then, we determined how the random variations corresponded with the human judgments. We found that the overall contrast of an image is disproportionately determined by how much contrast is between 1 and 6 c/°, around the peak of the contrast sensitivity function (CSF). We then employed the basic components of contrast psychophysics modeling to show that the CSF alone is not enough to account for our results and that an increase in gain control strength toward low spatial frequencies is necessary. One important consequence of this is that contrast constancy, the apparent independence of suprathreshold perceived contrast and spatial frequency, will not hold during viewing of natural images. We also found that images with darker low-luminance regions tended to be judged as having higher overall contrast, which we interpret as the consequence of darker local backgrounds resulting in higher band-limited contrast response in the visual system. PMID:24190908

  6. X-ray microanalysis of aldehyde-fixed glycogen contrast-stained by OsVI . FeII and OsVI . RuIV complexes.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, W C; van Buitenen, J M

    1980-11-01

    The composition of the contrast-donating complex of rat liver glycogen, nucleoplasm, erythrocytes, and mitochondria was established by X-ray microanalysis. In these compartments the presence of osmium and iron was shown qualitatively in tissue after glutaraldehyde fixation, treated with OsVIIIO4 plus K4FeII(CN)6 and in similar tissue treated with a combination of K2OsVIO4 plus K4FeII(CN)6. Osmium and ruthenium were detected in these compartments, in aldehyde-fixed tissue treated with mixtures containing K2RuIVL(CN)6 rather than K4FeII(CN)6. The iron detected in the glycogen, nucleoplasm, erythrocytes, and mitochondria of tissue treated with K2RuIV(CN)6 mixtures proved to derive from sources inside the electron microscope, and had to be considered an artifact. Quantitatively, the mean atomic ratios of osmium-to-iron and osmium-to-ruthenium were determined from spectra obtained by point analyses of the same compartments (glycogen, nucleoplasm, mitochondria, lipid droplets, and erythrocytes). After correction of the spectra for the instrumental iron contribution, the osmium-to-iron and osmium-to-ruthenium ratios in the glycogen were about 1:3 for tissue treated with those combinations including K2OsVIO4. In the other compartments, the osmium-to-iron and osmium-to-ruthenium ratios were virtually 1:0. For Os-VIIIO4 in combination with potassium ferrouscyanide however the osmium-to-iron ratio was 1:7 in the glycogen and 1:5 in all other compartments. OsVIIIO4 was combined with potassium ruthenium-cyanide, the osmium-to-ruthenium ratio was 1:2 in the glycogen and 2:1 in the other compartments. These results support our view that the selective glycogen contrast is obtained by complex formation. PMID:6159393

  7. Plutonium isotope ratio variations in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E; La Mont, Stephen P; Eisele, William F; Fresquez, Philip R; Mc Naughton, Michael; Whicker, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-14

    Historically, approximately 12,000 TBq of plutonium was distributed throughout the global biosphere by thermo nuclear weapons testing. The resultant global plutonium fallout is a complex mixture whose {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio is a function of the design and yield of the devices tested. The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in global fallout is 0.176 + 014. However, the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio at any location may differ significantly from 0.176. Plutonium has also been released by discharges and accidents associated with the commercial and weapons related nuclear industries. At many locations contributions from this plutonium significantly alters the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios from those observed in global fallout. We have measured the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in environmental samples collected from many locations in North America. This presentation will summarize the analytical results from these measurements. Special emphasis will be placed on interpretation of the significance of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios measured in environmental samples collected in the Arctic and in the western portions of the United States.

  8. The contrasting effect of the Ta/Nb ratio in (111)-layered B-site deficient hexagonal perovskite Ba5Nb4-xTaxO15 crystals on visible-light-induced photocatalytic water oxidation activity of their oxynitride derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Bekheet, Maged F; Zahedi, Ehsan; Wagata, Hajime; Vequizo, Junie Jhon M; Yamakata, Akira; Yubuta, Kunio; Gurlo, Aleksander; Domen, Kazunari; Teshima, Katsuya

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the Ta/Nb ratio in the (111)-layered B-site deficient hexagonal perovskite Ba5Nb4-xTaxO15 (0 ≤ x ≤ 4) crystals grown by a KCl flux method on visible-light-induced photocatalytic water oxidation activity of their oxynitride derivatives BaNb1-xTaxO2N (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) was investigated. The Rietveld refinement of X-ray data revealed that all Ba5Nb4-xTaxO15 samples were well crystallized in the space group P3[combining macron]m1 (no. 164). Phase-pure BaNb1-xTaxO2N (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) porous structures were obtained by nitridation of the flux-grown oxide crystals at 950 °C for 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 h, respectively. The absorption edge of BaNb1-xTaxO2N (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) was slightly shifted from 720 to 690 nm with the increasing Ta/Nb ratio. The O2 evolution rate gradually progressed and reached the highest value (127.24 μmol in the first 2 h) with the Ta content up to 50 mol% but decreased at 75 and 100 mol% presumably due to the reduced specific surface area and high density of structural defects, such as grain boundaries acting as recombination centers, originated from high-temperature nitridation for prolonged periods. Transient absorption spectroscopy provided evidence for the effect of the Ta/Nb ratio on the behavior and energy states of photogenerated charge carriers, indicating a direct correlation with photocatalytic water oxidation activity of BaNb1-xTaxO2N. PMID:27437784

  9. Refining clinical diagnosis with likelihood ratios.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A; Schulz, Kenneth F

    Likelihood ratios can refine clinical diagnosis on the basis of signs and symptoms; however, they are underused for patients' care. A likelihood ratio is the percentage of ill people with a given test result divided by the percentage of well individuals with the same result. Ideally, abnormal test results should be much more typical in ill individuals than in those who are well (high likelihood ratio) and normal test results should be most frequent in well people than in sick people (low likelihood ratio). Likelihood ratios near unity have little effect on decision-making; by contrast, high or low ratios can greatly shift the clinician's estimate of the probability of disease. Likelihood ratios can be calculated not only for dichotomous (positive or negative) tests but also for tests with multiple levels of results, such as creatine kinase or ventilation-perfusion scans. When combined with an accurate clinical diagnosis, likelihood ratios from ancillary tests improve diagnostic accuracy in a synergistic manner. PMID:15850636

  10. Screening level mixture risk assessment of pharmaceuticals in STP effluents.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, Thomas; Karlsson, Maja

    2014-02-01

    We modeled the ecotoxicological risks of the pharmaceutical mixtures emitted from STP effluents into the environment. The classic mixture toxicity concept of Concentration Addition was used to calculate the total expected risk of the analytically determined mixtures, compare the expected impact of seven effluent streams and pinpoint the most sensitive group of species. The risk quotient of a single, randomly selected pharmaceutical is often more than a factor of 1000 lower than the mixture risk, clearly indicating the need to systematically analyse the overall risk of all pharmaceuticals present. The MCR, which is the ratio between the most risky compound and the total mixture risk, varies between 1.2 and 4.2, depending on the actual scenario and species group under consideration. The mixture risk quotients, based on acute data and an assessment factor of 1000, regularly exceed 1, indicating a potential risk for the environment, depending on the dilution in the recipient stream. The top 10 mixture components explain more than 95% of the mixture risk in all cases. A mixture toxicity assessment cannot go beyond the underlying single substance data. The lack of data on the chronic toxicity of most pharmaceuticals as well as the very few data available for in vivo fish toxicity has to be regarded as a major knowledge gap in this context. On the other hand, ignoring Independent Action or even using the sum of individual risk quotients as a rough approximation of Concentration Addition does not have a major impact on the final risk estimate. PMID:24321250

  11. Triphilic Ionic-Liquid Mixtures: Fluorinated and Non-fluorinated Aprotic Ionic-Liquid Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Hollóczki, Oldamur; Macchiagodena, Marina; Weber, Henry; Thomas, Martin; Brehm, Martin; Stark, Annegret; Russina, Olga; Triolo, Alessandro; Kirchner, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    We present here the possibility of forming triphilic mixtures from alkyl- and fluoroalkylimidazolium ionic liquids, thus, macroscopically homogeneous mixtures for which instead of the often observed two domains—polar and nonpolar—three stable microphases are present: polar, lipophilic, and fluorous ones. The fluorinated side chains of the cations indeed self-associate and form domains that are segregated from those of the polar and alkyl domains. To enable miscibility, despite the generally preferred macroscopic separation between fluorous and alkyl moieties, the importance of strong hydrogen bonding is shown. As the long-range structure in the alkyl and fluoroalkyl domains is dependent on the composition of the liquid, we propose that the heterogeneous, triphilic structure can be easily tuned by the molar ratio of the components. We believe that further development may allow the design of switchable, smart liquids that change their properties in a predictable way according to their composition or even their environment. PMID:26305804

  12. Triphilic Ionic-Liquid Mixtures: Fluorinated and Non-fluorinated Aprotic Ionic-Liquid Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hollóczki, Oldamur; Macchiagodena, Marina; Weber, Henry; Thomas, Martin; Brehm, Martin; Stark, Annegret; Russina, Olga; Triolo, Alessandro; Kirchner, Barbara

    2015-10-26

    We present here the possibility of forming triphilic mixtures from alkyl- and fluoroalkylimidazolium ionic liquids, thus, macroscopically homogeneous mixtures for which instead of the often observed two domains-polar and nonpolar-three stable microphases are present: polar, lipophilic, and fluorous ones. The fluorinated side chains of the cations indeed self-associate and form domains that are segregated from those of the polar and alkyl domains. To enable miscibility, despite the generally preferred macroscopic separation between fluorous and alkyl moieties, the importance of strong hydrogen bonding is shown. As the long-range structure in the alkyl and fluoroalkyl domains is dependent on the composition of the liquid, we propose that the heterogeneous, triphilic structure can be easily tuned by the molar ratio of the components. We believe that further development may allow the design of switchable, smart liquids that change their properties in a predictable way according to their composition or even their environment. PMID:26305804

  13. Testing Mixture Models of Transitive Preference: Comment on Regenwetter, Dana, and Davis-Stober (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    This article contrasts 2 approaches to analyzing transitivity of preference and other behavioral properties in choice data. The approach of Regenwetter, Dana, and Davis-Stober (2011) assumes that on each choice, a decision maker samples randomly from a mixture of preference orders to determine whether "A" is preferred to "B." In contrast, Birnbaum…

  14. Dual-energy approach to contrast-enhanced mammography using the balanced filter method: Spectral optimization and preliminary phantom measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2007-11-15

    Dual-energy contrast agent-enhanced mammography is a technique of demonstrating breast cancers obscured by a cluttered background resulting from the contrast between soft tissues in the breast. The technique has usually been implemented by exploiting two exposures to different x-ray tube voltages. In this article, another dual-energy approach using the balanced filter method without switching the tube voltages is described. For the spectral optimization of dual-energy mammography using the balanced filters, we applied a theoretical framework reported by Lemacks et al. [Med. Phys. 29, 1739-1751 (2002)] to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in an iodinated contrast agent subtraction image. This permits the selection of beam parameters such as tube voltage and balanced filter material, and the optimization of the latter's thickness with respect to some critical quantity--in this case, mean glandular dose. For an imaging system with a 0.1 mm thick CsI:Tl scintillator, we predict that the optimal tube voltage would be 45 kVp for a tungsten anode using zirconium, iodine, and neodymium balanced filters. A mean glandular dose of 1.0 mGy is required to obtain an SNR of 5 in order to detect 1.0 mg/cm{sup 2} iodine in the resulting clutter-free image of a 5 cm thick breast composed of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissue. In addition to spectral optimization, we carried out phantom measurements to demonstrate the present dual-energy approach for obtaining a clutter-free image, which preferentially shows iodine, of a breast phantom comprising three major components - acrylic spheres, olive oil, and an iodinated contrast agent. The detection of iodine details on the cluttered background originating from the contrast between acrylic spheres and olive oil is analogous to the task of distinguishing contrast agents in a mixture of glandular and adipose tissues.

  15. Biodiesel from Canola Oil using a 1:1 Molar Mixture of Methanol and Ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canola oil was transesterified using an equimolar mixture of ethanol and methanol with potassium hydroxide (KOH) catalyst. Effect of catalyst concentration (0.5 to 1.5% wt/wt), molar ratio of equimolar mixture of ethanol and methanol (EMEM) to canola oil (3:1 to 12:1) and reaction temperature (25 t...

  16. Preparation and Fuel Properties of Mixtures of Soybean Oil Methyl and Ethyl Esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil was transesterified using methanol, ethanol, and various mixtures of methanol and ethanol at a constant mole ratio of alcohol to oil of 12:1 in the presence of 1 wt % potassium hydroxide (KOH) catalyst at 30 deg C for 60 minutes. The effect of mixtures of methanol and ethanol on percent...

  17. Preparation and Fuel Properties of Mixtures of Soybean Oil Methyl and Ethyl Esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil was transesterified using various mixtures of methanol and ethanol at a constant molar ratio of alcohol to oil of 12:1 in the presence of 1 wt% potassium hydroxide catalyst at 30 degrees C for 60 min. The effect of mixtures of methanol and ethanol on percentage yields and fuel propertie...

  18. Ionization coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marić, D.; Šašić, O.; Jovanović, J.; Radmilović-Rađenović, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2007-03-01

    We have tested the application of the common E/N ( E—electric field, N—gas number density) or Wieland approximation [Van Brunt, R.J., 1987. Common parametrizations of electron transport, collision cross section, and dielectric strength data for binary gas mixtures. J. Appl. Phys. 61 (5), 1773-1787.] and the common mean energy (CME) combination of the data for pure gases to obtain ionization coefficients for mixtures. Test calculations were made for Ar-CH4, Ar-N2, He-Xe and CH4-N2 mixtures. Standard combination procedure gives poor results in general, due to the fact that the electron energy distribution is considerably different in mixtures and in individual gases at the same values of E/N. The CME method may be used for mixtures of gases with ionization coefficients that do not differ by more than two orders of magnitude which is better than any other technique that was proposed [Marić, D., Radmilović-Rađenović, M., Petrović, Z.Lj., 2005. On parametrization and mixture laws for electron ionization coefficients. Eur. Phys. J. D 35, 313-321.].

  19. A statistical approach to optimizing concrete mixture design.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shamsad; Alghamdi, Saeid A

    2014-01-01

    A step-by-step statistical approach is proposed to obtain optimum proportioning of concrete mixtures using the data obtained through a statistically planned experimental program. The utility of the proposed approach for optimizing the design of concrete mixture is illustrated considering a typical case in which trial mixtures were considered according to a full factorial experiment design involving three factors and their three levels (3(3)). A total of 27 concrete mixtures with three replicates (81 specimens) were considered by varying the levels of key factors affecting compressive strength of concrete, namely, water/cementitious materials ratio (0.38, 0.43, and 0.48), cementitious materials content (350, 375, and 400 kg/m(3)), and fine/total aggregate ratio (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45). The experimental data were utilized to carry out analysis of variance (ANOVA) and to develop a polynomial regression model for compressive strength in terms of the three design factors considered in this study. The developed statistical model was used to show how optimization of concrete mixtures can be carried out with different possible options. PMID:24688405

  20. A Statistical Approach to Optimizing Concrete Mixture Design

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Saeid A.

    2014-01-01

    A step-by-step statistical approach is proposed to obtain optimum proportioning of concrete mixtures using the data obtained through a statistically planned experimental program. The utility of the proposed approach for optimizing the design of concrete mixture is illustrated considering a typical case in which trial mixtures were considered according to a full factorial experiment design involving three factors and their three levels (33). A total of 27 concrete mixtures with three replicates (81 specimens) were considered by varying the levels of key factors affecting compressive strength of concrete, namely, water/cementitious materials ratio (0.38, 0.43, and 0.48), cementitious materials content (350, 375, and 400 kg/m3), and fine/total aggregate ratio (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45). The experimental data were utilized to carry out analysis of variance (ANOVA) and to develop a polynomial regression model for compressive strength in terms of the three design factors considered in this study. The developed statistical model was used to show how optimization of concrete mixtures can be carried out with different possible options. PMID:24688405

  1. Increased Efficiency in SI Engine with Air Replaced by Oxygen in Argon Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N J; Rapp, V H; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-01-13

    Basic engine thermodynamics predicts that spark ignited engine efficiency is a function of both the compression ratio of the engine and the specific heat ratio of the working fluid. In practice the compression ratio of the engine is often limited due to knock. Both higher specific heat ratio and higher compression ratio lead to higher end gas temperatures and increase the likelihood of knock. In actual engine cycles, heat transfer losses increase at higher compression ratios and limit efficiency even when the knock limit is not reached. In this paper we investigate the role of both the compression ratio and the specific heat ratio on engine efficiency by conducting experiments comparing operation of a single-cylinder variable-compression-ratio engine with both hydrogen-air and hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures. For low load operation it is found that the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures result in higher indicated thermal efficiencies. Peak efficiency for the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures is found at compression ratio 5.5 whereas for the hydrogen-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.24 the peak efficiency is found at compression ratio 13. We apply a three-zone model to help explain the effects of specific heat ratio and compression ratio on efficiency. Operation with hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures at low loads is more efficient because the lower compression ratio results in a substantially larger portion of the gas to reside in the adiabatic core rather than in the boundary layer and in the crevices, leading to less heat transfer and more complete combustion.

  2. Pattern specificity of contrast adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Anstis, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Contrast adaptation is specific to precisely localised edges, so that adapting to a flickering photograph makes one less sensitive to that same photograph, but not to similar photographs. When two low-contrast photos, A and B, are transparently superimposed, then adapting to a flickering high-contrast B leaves no net afterimage, but it makes B disappear from the A+B picture, which now simply looks like A. PMID:25165518

  3. A color-ratio map of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, B.; Christman, C.; Rava, B.; Mosher, J.

    1980-01-01

    Orange and UV frames are used to construct a color-ratio map of the portion of Mercury imaged by Mariner 10, with at least two independent color-ratio images being used for each region in order to prevent spurious, blemish-induced color. Color differences appear to be smaller than those of the moon, and many apparently fresh craters and their ray systems tend to be bluer than their surroundings. Regions of interesting color contrast are noted, and it is concluded that there is little evident correlation of color with either geology or topography.

  4. Mixture Model For Overdispersion of Precipitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Richardw.; Zheng, Xiaogu

    1999-08-01

    Stochastic models fit to time series of daily precipitation amount generally ignore any year-to-year (i.e., low frequency) source of random variation, and such models are known to underestimate the interannual variance of monthly or seasonal total precipitation. To explicitly account for this `overdispersion' phenomenon, a mixture model is proposed. A hidden index, taking on one of two possible states, is assumed to exist (perhaps representing different modes of atmospheric circulation). To represent the intermittency of precipitation and the tendency of wet or dry spells to persist, a stochastic model known as a chain-dependent process is applied. The parameters of this stochastic model are permitted to vary conditionally on the hidden index.Data for one location in California (whose previous study motivated the present approach), as well as for another location in New Zealand, are analyzed. To estimate the parameters of a mixture of two conditional chain-dependent processes by maximum likelihood, the `expectation-maximization algorithm' is employed. It is demonstrated that this approach can either eliminate or greatly reduce the extent of the overdispersion phenomenon. Moreover, an attempt is made to relate the hidden indexes to observed features of atmospheric circulation. This approach to dealing with overdispersion is contrasted with the more prevalent alternative of fitting more complex stochastic models for high-frequency variations to time series of daily precipitation.

  5. A Recipe for Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Many learners still struggled to appreciate, and understand the difference between, the concepts of fractions and ratio. This is not just a UK phenomenon, which is demonstrated here by the use of a resource developed by the Wisconsin Centre for Education, in association with the Freudenthal Institute of the University of Utrecht, with a group of…

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  8. Detonation cell widths in hydrogen-air-diluent mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Stamps, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper I report on the influence of steam and carbon dioxide on the detonability of hydrogen-air mixtures. Data were obtained on the detonation cell width in a heated detonation tube that is 0.43 m in diameter and 13.1 m long. The detonation cell widths were correlated using a characteristic length calculated from a chemical kinetic model. The addition of either diluent to a hydrogen-air mixture increased the cell width for all equivalence ratios. For equal diluent concentrations, however, carbon dioxide not only yielded larger increases in the cell width than steam, but its efficacy relative to steam was predicted to increase with increasing concentration. The range of detonable hydrogen concentrations in a hydrogen-air mixture initially at 1 atm pressure was found to be between 11.6 percent and 74.9 percent for mixtures at 20{degree}C and 9.4 percent and 76.9 percent for mixtures at 100{degree}C. The detonation limit was between 38.8 percent and 40.5 percent steam for a stoichiometric hydrogen-air-steam mixture initially at 100{degree}C and 1 atm. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Wavelength and energy dependent absorption of unconventional fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N.; Saleem, Z.; Mirza, A. A.

    2005-11-01

    Economic considerations of laser induced ignition over the normal electrical ignition of direct injected Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) engines has motivated automobile industry to go for extensive research on basic characteristics of leaner unconventional fuel mixtures to evaluate practical possibility of switching over to the emerging technologies. This paper briefly reviews the ongoing research activities on minimum ignition energy and power requirements of natural gas fuels and reports results of present laser air/CNG mixture absorption coefficient study. This study was arranged to determine the thermo-optical characteristics of high air/fuel ratio mixtures using laser techniques. We measured the absorption coefficient using four lasers of multiple wavelengths over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. The absorption coefficient of mixture was found to vary significantly over change of mixture temperature and probe laser wavelengths. The absorption coefficients of air/CNG mixtures were measured using 20 watts CW/pulsed CO2 laser at 10.6μm, Pulsed Nd:Yag laser at 1.06μm, 532 nm (2nd harmonic) and 4 mW CW HeNe laser at 645 nm and 580 nm for temperatures varying from 290 to 1000K using optical transmission loss technique.

  10. Surface tensions of solutions containing dicarboxylic acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Young; Hildemann, Lynn M.

    2014-06-01

    Organic solutes tend to lower the surface tension of cloud condensation nuclei, allowing them to more readily activate. The surface tension of various dicarboxylic acid aerosol mixtures was measured at 20 °C using the Wilhelmy plate method. At lower concentrations, the surface tension of a solution with equi-molar mixtures of dicarboxylic acids closely followed that of a solution with the most surface-active organic component alone. Measurements of surface tension for these mixtures were lower than predictions using Henning's model and the modified Szyszkowski equation, by ˜1-2%. The calculated maximum surface excess (Γmax) and inverse Langmuir adsorption coefficient (β) from the modified Szyszkowski equation were both larger than measured values for 6 of the 7 mixtures tested. Accounting for the reduction in surface tension in the Köhler equation reduced the critical saturation ratio for these multi-component mixtures - changes were negligible for dry diameters of 0.1 and 0.5 μm, but a reduction from 1.0068 to 1.0063 was seen for the 4-dicarboxylic acid mixture with a dry diameter of 0.05 μm.

  11. Vessel contrast enhancement in hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorgan, Asgeir; Denstedt, Martin; Milanič, Matija; Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2015-03-01

    Imaging of vessel structures can be useful for investigation of endothelial function, angiogenesis and hyper-vascularization. This can be challenging for hyperspectral tissue imaging due to photon scattering and absorption in other parts of the tissue. Real-time processing techniques for enhancement of vessel contrast in hyperspectral tissue images were investigated. Wavelet processing and an inverse diffusion model were employed, and compared to band ratio metrics and statistical methods. A multiscale vesselness filter was applied for further enhancement. The results show that vessel structures in hyperspectral images can be enhanced and characterized using a combination of statistical, numerical and more physics informed models.

  12. ``sex Ratio'' Meiotic Drive in Drosophila Testacea

    PubMed Central

    James, A. C.; Jaenike, J.

    1990-01-01

    We document the occurrence of ``sex ratio'' meiotic drive in natural populations of Drosophila testacea. ``Sex ratio'' males sire >95% female offspring. Genetic analysis reveals that this effect is due to a meiotically driven X chromosome, as in other species of Drosophila in which ``sex ratio'' has been found. In contrast to other drosophilids, the ``sex ratio'' and standard chromosomes of D. testacea do not differ in gene arrangement, implying that the effect may be due to a single genetic factor in this species. In all likelihood, the ``sex ratio'' condition has evolved independently in D. testacea and in the Drosophila obscura species group, as the loci responsible for the effect occur on different chromosomal elements. An important ecological consequence of ``sex ratio'' is that natural populations of D. testacea exhibit a strong female bias. Because D. testacea mates, oviposits, and feeds as adults and larvae on mushrooms, this species provides an excellent opportunity to study the selective factors in nature that prevent ``sex ratio'' chromosomes from increasing to fixation and causing the extinction of the species. PMID:2249763

  13. Near Infrared Spectra of Mixtures Relevant to Icy Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastrapa, Rachel M. E.; Bernstein, Max P.; Sanford, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    We will present near IR spectra of ice mixtures and review the differences between spectra of mixtures and those of pure solids: the creation of new features, weakening and shifting of bands, dependence on concentration, and changes with temperature. The forbidden CO2 (2nu3) overtone at 2.134 microns (4685/cm) is absent from the spectrum of pure CO2, but present in all of the following mixtures: H2O/CO2 = 5 and = 25, H2O:CH3OH:CO2 = 100:2.5:1, and CH3OH:CO2 = 5. Also, in mixtures of H2O and any other material, we see a feature at 1.89 microns (5290/cm) that is possibly related to the "dangling OH" feature at 2.73 microns (3360/cm). The features of a material in H2O are generally weaker and shifted to longer wavelength in comparison to the pure substance. For example, the largest near-IR absorption of pure solid CH4 is located at 2.324 microns (4303/cm) but is broader and at slightly longer wavelength in samples mixed with H2O. The degree of shifting and weakening depends on the ratio of the mixture. The mixture mentioned above was at a ratio of H2O/ CH4 = 3. When the ratio rises to H2O/ CH4 = 87, the CH4 feature at 2.324 microns is shifted to shorter wavelength and is much broader and weaker. In CH4/ H2O mixtures the peaks shift to higher frequency and become increasingly broad, but this trend is reversible on re-cooling, even though the phase transitions of H2O are irreversible. In short, mixtures created in the lab produce spectra that are very different from modeled combinations of end member species. Recent Cassini VIMS observations show the CO2 fundamental at 4.255 microns (2350/cm) on Iapetus [l] and at 4.26 microns (2347/cm) on Phoebe [2], while Galileo NIMS observed it at 4.25 microns (2353/cm) on Ganymede [3]. Since pure CO2 is located at 4.266 (2344/cm), the CO2 must be mixed with something else to produce the shift. A mixture of CH3OH:CO2 = 5 at 90 K shifts the fundamental to 4.262 microns (2346/cm). The shifts in the feature between satellites could

  14. Detonation of cryogenic gaseous hydrogen-oxygen mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaster, M.; Mcclenagan, R. D.; Benz, F. J.; Shepherd, J. E.; Lee, J. H. S.

    1991-01-01

    The accidental mixing and detonation of oxygen-hydrogen mixtures is a serious aerospace industry hazard. The detonation characteristics of cryogenic mixtures of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen have accordingly been studied at various initial pressures and equivalence ratios at 100 K, and the results compared with numerical computations of idealized, steady-state, one-dimensional Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doering detonation structure with detailed chemical reaction kinetics. The predictions thus obtained for critical tube diameter, on the basis of calculated reaction-zone thickness, are found to agree reasonably well with experimental data.

  15. Depletion effects in smectic phases of hard-rod-hard-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ratón, Y; Cinacchi, G; Velasco, E; Mederos, L

    2006-10-01

    It is known that when hard spheres are added to a pure system of hard rods the stability of the smectic phase may be greatly enhanced, and that this effect can be rationalised in terms of depletion forces. In the present paper we first study the effect of orientational order on depletion forces in this particular binary system, comparing our results with those obtained adopting the usual approximation of considering the rods parallel and their orientations frozen. We consider mixtures with rods of different aspect ratios and spheres of different diameters, and we treat them within Onsager theory. Our results indicate that depletion effects, and consequently smectic stability, decrease significantly as a result of orientational disorder in the smectic phase when compared with corresponding data based on the frozen-orientation approximation. These results are discussed in terms of the tau parameter, which has been proposed as a convenient measure of depletion strength. We present closed expressions for tau, and show that it is intimately connected with the depletion potential. We then analyse the effect of particle geometry by comparing results pertaining to systems of parallel rods of different shapes (spherocylinders, cylinders and parallelepipeds). We finally provide results based on the Zwanzig approximation of a fundamental-measure density-functional theory applied to mixtures of parallelepipeds and cubes of different sizes. In this case, we show that the tau parameter exhibits a linear asymptotic behaviour in the limit of large values of the hard-rod aspect ratio, in conformity with Onsager theory, as well as in the limit of large values of the ratio of rod breadth to cube side length, d, in contrast to Onsager approximation, which predicts tau approximately d (3). Based on both this result and the Percus-Yevick approximation for the direct correlation function for a hard-sphere binary mixture in the same limit of infinite asymmetry, we speculate that, for

  16. Targeting cancer chemotherapeutic agents by use of lipiodol contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, T. )

    1990-11-01

    Arterially administered Lipiodol Ultrafluid contrast medium selectively remained in various malignant solid tumors because of the difference in time required for the removal of Lipiodol contrast medium from normal capillaries and tumor neovasculature. Although blood flow was maintained in the tumor, even immediately after injection Lipiodol contrast medium remained in the neovasculature of the tumor. To target anti-cancer agents to tumors by using Lipiodol contrast medium as a carrier, the characteristics of the agents were examined. Anti-cancer agents had to be soluble in Lipiodol, be stable in it, and separate gradually from it so that the anti-cancer agents would selectively remain in the tumor. These conditions were found to be necessary on the basis of the measurement of radioactivity in VX2 tumors implanted in the liver of 16 rabbits that received arterial injections of 14C-labeled doxorubicin. Antitumor activities and side effects of arterial injections of two types of anti-cancer agents were compared in 76 rabbits with VX2 tumors. Oily anti-cancer agents that had characteristics essential for targeting were compared with simple mixtures of anti-cancer agents with Lipiodol contrast medium that did not have these essential characteristics. Groups of rabbits that received oily anti-cancer agents responded significantly better than groups that received simple mixtures, and side effects were observed more frequently in the groups that received the simple mixtures. These results suggest that targeting of the anti-cancer agent to the tumor is important for treatment of solid malignant tumors.

  17. Multi-contrast photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Sohn, R.; Lu, Z.-H.; Soetikno, B.; Zhong, Q.; Yao, J.; Maslov, K.; Arbeit, J. M.; Wang, L. V.

    2012-02-01

    We developed multi-contrast photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) for in vivo anatomical, functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. This technical innovation enables comprehensive understanding of the tumor microenvironment. With multi-contrast PAM, we longitudinally determined tumor vascular anatomy, blood flow, oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, and oxygen extraction fraction.

  18. Faithful Contrastive Features in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesar, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    This article pursues the idea of inferring aspects of phonological underlying forms directly from surface contrasts by looking at optimality theoretic linguistic systems (Prince & Smolensky, 1993/2004). The main result proves that linguistic systems satisfying certain conditions have the faithful contrastive feature property: Whenever 2 distinct…

  19. Image Contrast in Holographic Reconstructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, B. R.

    1969-01-01

    The fundamental concepts of holography are explained using elementary wave ideas. Discusses wavefront reconstruction and contrast in hemigraphic images. The consequence of recording only the intensity at a given surface and using an oblique reference wave is shown to be an incomplete reconstruction resulting in image of low contrast. (LC)

  20. Measurement of visual contrast sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vongierke, H. E.; Marko, A. R.

    1985-04-01

    This invention involves measurement of the visual contrast sensitivity (modulation transfer) function of a human subject by means of linear or circular spatial frequency pattern on a cathode ray tube whose contrast is automatically decreasing or increasing depending on the subject pressing or releasing a hand-switch button. The threshold of detection of the pattern modulation is found by the subject by adjusting the contrast to values which vary about the subject's threshold thereby determining the threshold and also providing by the magnitude of the contrast fluctuations between reversals some estimate of the variability of the subject's absolute threshold. The invention also involves the slow automatic sweeping of the spatial frequency of the pattern over the spatial frequencies after preset time intervals or after threshold has been defined at each frequency by a selected number of subject-determined threshold crossings; i.e., contrast reversals.

  1. Drag Coefficient of a Spherical Droplet Immersed in a Near-Critical Binary Fluid Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Youhei

    2014-02-01

    We consider a spherical liquid droplet immersed in a near-critical binary fluid mixture. A weak preferential attraction is assumed between the droplet and one of the two mixture components, and the difference in the viscosity is neglected between the mixture components. Using the Gaussian free-energy functional, we calculate the drag coefficient of a droplet. Whether it is increased or decreased by the preferential attraction turns out to depend on the bulk correlation length and the ratio of the viscosity of the surrounding mixture to that of the droplet.

  2. Effect of alkyl chain asymmetry on catanionic mixtures of hydrogenated and fluorinated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Elena; Rodriguez-Abreu, Carlos; Schulz, Pablo; Ruso, Juan M

    2010-01-15

    In this work we studied and compared the physicochemical properties of the catanionic mixtures cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide-sodium dodecanoate, cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide-sodium perfluorodacanoate, octyltrimethylammonium bromide-sodium perfluorodacanoate and cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide-sodium octanoate by a combination of rheological, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and polarized optical microscopy measurements. The binary mixtures of the surfactants have been analyzed at different mixed ratios and total concentration of the mixture. Mixtures containing a perfluorinated surfactant are able to form lamellar liquid crystals and stable spontaneous vesicles. Meanwhile, system containing just hydrogenated surfactants form hexagonal phases or they are arranged in elongated aggregates. PMID:19853859

  3. Predicting the toxicity of metal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Balistrieri, Laurie S; Mebane, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of single and multiple metal (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) solutions to trout is predicted using an approach that combines calculations of: (1) solution speciation; (2) competition and accumulation of cations (H, Ca, Mg, Na, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) on low abundance, high affinity and high abundance, low affinity biotic ligand sites; (3) a toxicity function that accounts for accumulation and potency of individual toxicants; and (4) biological response. The approach is evaluated by examining water composition from single metal toxicity tests of trout at 50% mortality, results of theoretical calculations of metal accumulation on fish gills and associated mortality for single, binary, ternary, and quaternary metal solutions, and predictions for a field site impacted by acid rock drainage. These evaluations indicate that toxicity of metal mixtures depends on the relative affinity and potency of toxicants for a given aquatic organism, suites of metals in the mixture, dissolved metal concentrations and ratios, and background solution composition (temperature, pH, and concentrations of major ions and dissolved organic carbon). A composite function that incorporates solution composition, affinity and competition of cations for two types of biotic ligand sites, and potencies of hydrogen and individual metals is proposed as a tool to evaluate potential toxicity of environmental solutions to trout. PMID:23973545

  4. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts

    PubMed Central

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:22523437

  5. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts.

    PubMed

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B

    2011-12-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:22523437

  6. Autoignition of adiabatically compressed combustible gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.; Keck, J.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of explosion limits for fuel/air/diluent mixtures compressed by an expanding laminar flame have been made in a constant volume spherical bomb. The fuels studied to date range from butane to octane at fuel/air equivalence ratios from 0.8 to 1.3. The explosion pressures and temperatures range from 10 to 100 atm and 650 to 850 K. The pressure versus time curves show the behavior typical of the two-stage ignition process observed in rapid compression machines. A branched chain kinetic model has been developed to correlate the data. The model has been used to predict both the explosion limits measured in the current bomb experiments and ignition delays measured in prior rapid compression machine experiments. Good agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved with minor adjustment in published rate constants.

  7. Coarsening in binary solid-liquid mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhees, P. W.

    1990-01-01

    A theory of Ostwald ripening has been developed for a solid-liquid mixture cosisting of a low volume fraction array of spherical solid particles in a liquid wherein the coarsening process proceeds via the transport of both heat and mass. It is found that the simultaneous transport of heat and mass during ripening does not alter the exponents of the temporal power laws governing the ripening process from their classical values but does alter the amplitudes of these power laws. The growth rate of the cube of the average particle radius, the rate constant, is found to depend both on the alloy solute concentration and the ratio of the thermal to solutal diffusivities. In most metallic systems, a large decrease in the rate constant can be expected with small additions of solute to a pure metal. Possible extensions of this theory to the analogous problem of ripening in isothermal ternary alloys are also discussed.

  8. Contrasting Rhetorics/Contrasting Cultures: Why Contrastive Rhetoric Needs a Better Conceptualization of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Dwight

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with an underdeveloped notion in the EAP sub-discipline of contrastive rhetoric: culture. It argues that a better conceptualization of contrastive rhetoric needs to include a better conceptualization of culture. After engaging with the complex question "What is culture?" the paper moves on to consider four sets of current issues…

  9. Unrestricted Mixture Models for Class Identification in Growth Mixture Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Min; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    Growth mixture modeling has gained much attention in applied and methodological social science research recently, but the selection of the number of latent classes for such models remains a challenging issue, especially when the assumption of proper model specification is violated. The current simulation study compared the performance of a linear…

  10. Landfilling ash/sludge mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, J.; Eighmy, T.T.; Crannell, B.S.

    1999-10-01

    The geotechnical properties of a mixture of municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge was investigated for a proposed ash/sludge secure landfill. The components as well as mixtures ranging from 10:1 to 5:1 (ash:sludge, by volume) were evaluated, where appropriate, for a number of geotechnical index and mechanical properties including particle size, water content, specific gravity, density-moisture relationships, shear strength, and compressibility. The results from a compactibility study and stability analysis of the proposed landfill were used to help approve a landfill codisposal concept; a full-scale facility was constructed and is currently operating successfully.

  11. Estimating proportions of materials using mixture models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heydorn, R. P.; Basu, R.

    1983-01-01

    An approach to proportion estimation based on the notion of a mixture model, appropriate parametric forms for a mixture model that appears to fit observed remotely sensed data, methods for estimating the parameters in these models, methods for labelling proportion determination from the mixture model, and methods which use the mixture model estimates as auxiliary variable values in some proportion estimation schemes are addressed.

  12. Simplex-centroid mixture formulation for optimised composting of kitchen waste.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, N; Chin, N L

    2010-11-01

    Composting is a good recycling method to fully utilise all the organic wastes present in kitchen waste due to its high nutritious matter within the waste. In this present study, the optimised mixture proportions of kitchen waste containing vegetable scraps (V), fish processing waste (F) and newspaper (N) or onion peels (O) were determined by applying the simplex-centroid mixture design method to achieve the desired initial moisture content and carbon-to-nitrogen (CN) ratio for effective composting process. The best mixture was at 48.5% V, 17.7% F and 33.7% N for blends with newspaper while for blends with onion peels, the mixture proportion was 44.0% V, 19.7% F and 36.2% O. The predicted responses from these mixture proportions fall in the acceptable limits of moisture content of 50% to 65% and CN ratio of 20-40 and were also validated experimentally. PMID:20624604

  13. Ultrasound Despeckling for Contrast Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Peter C.; Garson, Christopher D.; Acton, Scott T.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Images produced by ultrasound systems are adversely hampered by a stochastic process known as speckle. A despeckling method based upon removing outlier is proposed. The method is developed to contrast enhance B-mode ultrasound images. The contrast enhancement is with respect to decreasing pixel variations in homogeneous regions while maintaining or improving differences in mean values of distinct regions. A comparison of the proposed despeckling filter is compared with the other well known despeckling filters. The evaluations of despeckling performance are based upon improvements to contrast enhancement, structural similarity, and segmentation results on a Field II simulated image and actual B-mode cardiac ultrasound images captured in vivo. PMID:20227984

  14. Ultrasound despeckling for contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Tay, Peter C; Garson, Christopher D; Acton, Scott T; Hossack, John A

    2010-07-01

    Images produced by ultrasound systems are adversely hampered by a stochastic process known as speckle. A despeckling method based upon removing outlier is proposed. The method is developed to contrast enhance B-mode ultrasound images. The contrast enhancement is with respect to decreasing pixel variations in homogeneous regions while maintaining or improving differences in mean values of distinct regions. A comparison of the proposed despeckling filter is compared with the other well known despeckling filters. The evaluations of despeckling performance are based upon improvements to contrast enhancement, structural similarity, and segmentation results on a Field II simulated image and actual B-mode cardiac ultrasound images captured in vivo. PMID:20227984

  15. The Effect of Formal Representation on the Learning of Ratio Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesher, Pearla; Sukenik, Michal

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the effect of formal representation of blue and yellow color mixtures as rational numbers on students' ability to solve ratio problems comparing the mixtures. Sixty subjects participated, 20 from each of grades 7, 8, and 9 from a Haifa (Israel) junior high school. Introducing the formal representation improved performance for…

  16. The mixability of angiographic contrast with arterial blood

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Baruch B.; Sadasivan, Chander; Hao, Qing; Seong, Jaehoon; Cesar, Liliana

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Angiographic contrast that is routinely injected into arteries is used not only to evaluate arterial geometry but also in many cases to assess perfusion. The authors conducted two experiments to examine the dispersion of angiographic contrast injected antegradely into an artery under conditions similar to those found in selective (carotid artery) or superselective (circle of Willis) angiography in order to determine the distance from the catheter tip at which the contrast can be considered fully mixed with the blood. A third experiment investigated whether the contrast once mixed with blood will separate from the mixture under the gravitational field due to a density mismatch. Methods: Experiment I—Under high-speed angiographic acquisition, a bolus of contrast was injected through a catheter along the flow direction of a blood analog fluid flowing through a straight, long, cylindrical tube. The variation in grayscale intensity along the length of the tube was acquired and modeled as the step response to a second-order system. The distance from the catheter tip at which the contrast mixes with the working fluid, the mixing length, was determined as the length along the tube after which the step response settles to within 3% of the steady state value. Experiment II—A bolus of angiographic contrast was injected at rates varying from 0.1 to 1 cc∕s through three different catheter sizes in the left common carotid artery of three rabbits. The average cross-sectional grayscale intensity over one cardiac cycle was calculated at four locations along the artery: Immediately distal to the catheter tip, at location of maximum grayscale intensity, and at 10 and 20 arterial diameters from the catheter tip. The status of mixing within 10 arterial diameters was assessed by differences between the grayscale value at this location and that at the maximum and 20 arterial diameter location. Experiment III—Angiographic contrast was premixed by agitation in three

  17. Photophysical study of Zn phthalocyanine in binary solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staicu, A.; Pascu, A.; Boni, M.; Pascu, M. L.; Enescu, M.

    2013-07-01

    Photophysical properties of phthalocyanines are important in photodynamic therapy, where these compounds are proposed as photosensitizing agents. We report here some significant solvent effects on the photophysical properties of Zn phthalocyanine (ZnPc) observed in binary solvent mixture dimethyl sulfoxide/water at several ratios of cosolvents. The absorbance of ZnPc at the maximum of Q band has a sharp drop in intensity for a water mass percent in the solvent mixture larger than 40%. The same characteristic shows also the quantum yield of fluorescence. A particular result is the increase of singlet oxygen lifetime for water percentage raise up to 20% in the solvent mixture. The effects are discussed in connection with the particular solvent microenvironment, involving DMSO/water clusters formation and the strong interaction between the solute and the solvent.

  18. Premixed flame propagation in combustible particle cloud mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.; Yang, B.

    1993-01-01

    The structures of premixed flames propagating in combustible systems, containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel particles, in an oxidizing gas mixtures is analyzed. The experimental results show that steady flame propagation occurs even if the initial equivalence ratio of the combustible mixture based on the gaseous fuel available in the particles, phi(u) is substantially larger than unity. A model is developed to explain these experimental observations. In the model it is presumed that the fuel particles vaporize first to yield a gaseous fuel of known chemical composition which then reacts with oxygen in a one-step overall process. It is shown that the interplay of vaporization kinetics and oxidation process, can result in steady flame propagation in combustible mixtures where the value of phi(u) is substantially larger than unity. This prediction is in agreement with experimental observations.

  19. Preparation of reminiscent aroma mixture of Japanese soy sauce.

    PubMed

    Bonkohara, Kaori; Fuji, Maiko; Nakao, Akito; Igura, Noriyuki; Shimoda, Mitsuya

    2016-01-01

    To prepare an aroma mixture of Japanese soy sauce by fewest components, the aroma concentrate of good sensory attributes was prepared by polyethylene membrane extraction, which could extract only the volatiles with diethyl ether. GC-MS-Olfactometry was done with the aroma concentrate, and 28 odor-active compounds were detected. Application of aroma extract dilution analysis to the separated fraction revealed high flavor dilution factors with respect to acetic acid, 4-hydroxy-2(or5)-ethyl-5(or2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HEMF), 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol), and 3-(methylsulfanyl)propanal (methional). A model aroma mixture containing above four odorants showed a good similarity with the aroma of the soy sauce itself. Consequently, the reminiscent aroma mixture of soy sauce was prepared in water. The ratio of acetic acid, HEMF, isoamyl alcohol, and methional was 2500:300:100:1. PMID:26494283

  20. Two-stage prediction of the effects of imidazolium and pyridinium ionic liquid mixtures on luciferase.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui-Lin; Liu, Shu-Shen; Su, Bing-Xia; Zhu, Xiang-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The predicted toxicity of mixtures of imidazolium and pyridinium ionic liquids (ILs) in the ratios of their EC50, EC10, and NOEC (no observed effect concentration) were compared to the observed toxicity of these mixtures on luciferase. The toxicities of EC50 ratio mixture can be effectively predicted by two-stage prediction (TSP) method, but were overestimated by the concentration addition (CA) model and underestimated by the independent action (IA) model. The toxicities of EC10 ratio mixtures can be basically predicted by TSP and CA, but were underestimated by IA. The toxicities of NOEC ratio mixtures can be predicted by TSP and CA in a certain concentration range, but were underestimated by IA. Our results support the use of TSP as a default approach for predicting the combined effect of different types of ILs at the molecular level. In addition, mixtures of ILs mixed at NOEC and EC10 could cause significant effects of 64.1% and 97.7%, respectively. Therefore, we should pay high attention to the combined effects in mixture risk assessment. PMID:24858273

  1. Image contrast enhancement using Chebyshev wavelet moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchaev, Dm. V.; Uchaev, D. V.; Malinnikov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    A new algorithm for image contrast enhancement in the Chebyshev moment transform (CMT) domain is introduced. This algorithm is based on a contrast measure that is defined as the ratio of high-frequency to zero-frequency content in the bands of CMT matrix. Our algorithm enables to enhance a large number of high-spatial-frequency coefficients, that are responsible for image details, without severely degrading low-frequency contributions. To enhance high-frequency Chebyshev coefficients we use a multifractal spectrum of scaling exponents (SEs) for Chebyshev wavelet moment (CWM) magnitudes, where CWMs are multiscale realization of Chebyshev moments (CMs). This multifractal spectrum is very well suited to extract meaningful structures on images of natural scenes, because these images have a multifractal character. Experiments with test images show some advantages of the proposed algorithm as compared to other widely used image enhancement algorithms. The main advantage of our algorithm is the following: the algorithm very well highlights image details during image contrast enhancement.

  2. Microvascular contrast enhancement in optical coherence tomography using microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, Homa; Demidov, Valentin; Karshafian, Raffi; Douplik, Alexandre; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2016-07-01

    Gas microbubbles (MBs) are investigated as intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) contrast agents. Agar + intralipid scattering tissue phantoms with two embedded microtubes were fabricated to model vascular blood flow. One was filled with human blood, and the other with a mixture of human blood + MB. Swept-source structural and speckle variance (sv) OCT images, as well as speckle decorrelation times, were evaluated under both no-flow and varying flow conditions. Faster decorrelation times and higher structural and svOCT image contrasts were detected in the presence of MB in all experiments. The effects were largest in the svOCT imaging mode, and uniformly diminished with increasing flow velocity. These findings suggest the feasibility of utilizing MB for tissue hemodynamic investigations and for microvasculature contrast enhancement in OCT angiography.

  3. Directional gear ratio transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafever, A. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Epicyclic gear transmissions which transmit output at a gear ratio dependent only upon the input's direction are considered. A transmission housing envelops two epicyclic gear assemblies, and has shafts extending from it. One shaft is attached to a sun gear within the first epicyclic gear assembly. Planet gears are held symmetrically about the sun gear by a planet gear carrier and are in mesh with both the sun gear and a ring gear. Two unidirectional clutches restrict rotation of the first planet gear carrier and ring gear to one direction. A connecting shaft drives a second sun gear at the same speed and direction as the first planet gear carrier while a connecting portion drives a second planet gear carrier at the same speed and direction as the first ring gear. The transmission's output is then transmitted by the second ring gear to the second shaft. Input is transmitted at a higher gear ratio and lower speed for all inputs in the first direction than in the opposite direction.

  4. MRI contrast agent concentration and tumor interstitial fluid pressure.

    PubMed

    Liu, L J; Schlesinger, M

    2016-10-01

    The present work describes the relationship between tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) and the concentration of contrast agent for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). We predict the spatial distribution of TIFP based on that of contrast agent concentration. We also discuss the cases for estimating tumor interstitial volume fraction (void fraction or porosity of porous medium), ve, and contrast volume transfer constant, K(trans), by measuring the ratio of contrast agent concentration in tissue to that in plasma. A linear fluid velocity distribution may reflect a quadratic function of TIFP distribution and lead to a practical method for TIFP estimation. To calculate TIFP, the parameters or variables should preferably be measured along the direction of the linear fluid velocity (this is in the same direction as the gray value distribution of the image, which is also linear). This method may simplify the calculation for estimating TIFP. PMID:27343032

  5. Contrast-enhanced imaging of cerebral vasculature with laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, K.; Li, N.; Rege, A.; Jia, X.; All, A.; Thakor, N.

    2007-08-01

    High-resolution cerebral vasculature imaging has applications ranging from intraoperative procedures to basic neuroscience research. Laser speckle, with spatial contrast processing, has recently been used to map cerebral blood flow. We present an application of the technique using temporal contrast processing to image cerebral vascular structures with a field of view a few millimeters across and approximately 20 μm resolution through a thinned skull. We validate the images using fluorescent imaging and demonstrate a factor of 2-4 enhancement in contrast-to-noise ratios over reflectance imaging using white or spectrally filtered green light. The contrast enhancement enables the perception of approximately 10%-30% more vascular structures without the introduction of any contrast agent.

  6. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  7. [Allergy to radiographic contrast media].

    PubMed

    Vionnet, Julien; Petitpierre, Stéphanie; Fumeaux, Alexandre; Meuli, Reto; Spertini, Francois; Comte, Denis

    2013-04-17

    Allergy to radiographic contrast media Hypersensitivity reactions to radio-contrast media are common in the daily practice. These products are responsible for immediate (< or = 1 hour after administration) and non immediate (> 1 hour after administration) hypersensitivity reactions. A diagnostic work-up by an allergologist with skin tests and in some cases provocation tests is of value in reducing the risk of recurrent hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media. A careful selection of the patients is required because the incidence of breakthrough reactions is still concerning, even with proper premedication. Practical recommendations are presented in this article. For gadolinium-based contrast agents, data in the literature is not sufficient for suggesting guidelines. PMID:23667970

  8. Environmentally responsive MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Gemma-Louise; Kramberger, Iris; Davis, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical imaging techniques can provide a vast amount of anatomical information, enabling diagnosis and the monitoring of disease and treatment profile. MRI uniquely offers convenient, non-invasive, high resolution tomographic imaging. A considerable amount of effort has been invested, across several decades, in the design of non toxic paramagnetic contrast agents capable of enhancing positive MRI signal contrast. Recently, focus has shifted towards the development of agents capable of specifically reporting on their local biochemical environment, where a switch in image contrast is triggered by a specific stimulus/biochemical variable. Such an ability would not only strengthen diagnosis but also provide unique disease-specific biochemical insight. This feature article focuses on recent progress in the development of MRI contrast switching with molecular, macromolecular and nanoparticle-based agents. PMID:24040650

  9. Contrast-controlled retinal response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Nachieketa K.

    2015-06-01

    A beam of light stimulates the retina weakly when its entry to the pupil is gradually shifted from the centre toward the edge. For single pupil entrance point the light, irrespective of its coherence would still show the Stiles-Crawford effect with diminished visibility toward the edge of the pupil. Only when coherent light is incident from opposing points in the pupil can the effect be cancelled. This paper has attempted a theoretical computation of how the contrast in an interference pattern formed on the retina controls the retina's response in three ways; first, by completely disregarding the Stiles Crawford diminution of effective brightness for unit contrast; next, taking the traditional SCE route for zero contrast, and finally enhancing the diminution in the effective brightness by giving an opposing boost to the visibility in commensurate with a contrast intermediate between the two extremes of unity and zero.

  10. Formation of hydrotalcite in mixtures of aluminum hydroxycarbonate and magnesium hydroxide gels.

    PubMed

    Vanderlaan, R K; White, J L; Hem, S L

    1982-07-01

    IR and X-ray analysis demonstrate that hydrotalcite forms during the aging of aluminum hydroxycarbonate gel and magnesium hydroxide gel mixtures. The formation of hydrotalcite produces a change in the pH-stat titrigram and a sharp increase in the pH of the mixture. Hydrotalcite was noted earlier in mixtures having a high molar ratio of magnesium to aluminum, a high total gel concentration, a high initial pH, or in mixtures stored at elevated temperatures. The addition of sorbitol to the mixtures substantially delayed the appearance of hydrotalcite. Nonacid-reactive hydrotalcite formed when mixtures of chloride-containing aluminum hydroxide gel and magnesium hydroxide gel were aged. PMID:7120062

  11. Contrast-Enhanced Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Sharma, M.; Hocke, M.

    2012-01-01

    The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) introduced guidelines on the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in 2004. This EFSUMB-document focused mainly on liver applications. However, new applications extending beyond the liver were developed thereafter. Increased interest in recent years in CEUS technique and in the application of CEUS in novel fields like endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has revolutionized indications and applications. As a result, the EFSUMB initiated a new update of the guidelines in 2011 to include this additional knowledge. Some of the contrast-enhanced EUS (CE-EUS) indications are established, whereas others are preliminary; these latter indications are categorized as emergent CEUS applications since the available evidence is insufficient for general recommendation. This article focuses on the use of CE-EUS in various clinical settings. The reader will get an overview of current indications and possible applications of CE-EUS. This involves the introduction of different contrast studies including color Doppler techniques (known as contrast-enhanced high mechanical index endosonography or CEHMI-EUS) as well as more modern high-resolution contrast-enhanced techniques (known as contrast-enhanced low mechanical index endosonography or CELMI EUS). PMID:24949350

  12. A theory of behavioral contrast.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Peter R

    2014-11-01

    The reinforcers that maintain target instrumental responses also reinforce other responses that compete with them for expression. This competition, and its imbalance at points of transition between different schedules of reinforcement, causes behavioral contrast. The imbalance is caused by differences in the rates at which different responses come under the control of component stimuli. A model for this theory of behavioral contrast is constructed by expanding the coupling coefficient of MPR (Killeen, 1994). The coupling coefficient gives the degree of association of a reinforcer with the target response (as opposed to other competing responses). Competing responses, often identified as interim or adjunctive or superstitious behavior, are intrinsic to reinforcement schedules, especially interval schedules. In addition to that base-rate of competition, additional competing responses may spill over from the prior component, causing initial contrast; and they may be modulated by conditioned reinforcement or punishment from stimuli associated with subsequent component change, causing terminal contrast. A formalization of these hypotheses employed (a) a hysteresis model of off-target responses giving rise to initial contrast, and (b) a competing traces model of the suppression or enhancement of ongoing competitive responses by signals of following-schedule transition. The theory was applied to transient contrast, the following schedule effect, and the component duration effect. PMID:25244535

  13. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations. PMID:25761383

  14. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  15. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  16. Induced smectic phases of stoichiometric liquid crystal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sugisawa, Shin-Ya; Tabe, Yuka

    2016-03-16

    We revealed the detailed structures of induced smectic liquid crystal (LC) phases composed of a binary mixture of charge-transfer (CT) LC substances. Although neither of the constituents had highly ordered smectic phases, the mixture exhibited smectic-E (SmE) or smectic-B (SmB) phases when mixed at ratios of 1 : 1 and 2 : 3, respectively. The results of polarized optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy indicated that the induced smectic phases were stabilized by an exquisite balance between the CT interactions, dipolar interactions, and excluded volume effects. We proposed a possible model for the molecular arrangements in the SmE and SmB phases, which consistently explained the experimental results including the stoichiometric ratios. PMID:26898174

  17. Medium-term bioassays for carcinogenicity of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, N; Imaida, K; Hirose, M; Shirai, T

    1998-01-01

    Carcinogenic effects of chemical mixtures were examined with a medium-term liver bioassay for carcinogens or a multiorgan medium-term bioassay using male F344 rats. In the medium-term liver bioassay, rats were initially treated with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) at 200 mg/kg body weight, i.p.; after 2 weeks they received chemical mixtures such as 10 different heterocyclic amines at one-tenth or one-hundredth the dose levels used in carcinogenicity studies and the mixtures of 20 different pesticides, each at acceptable daily intake (ADI) levels or a mixture of 100 times ADI levels. All animals were subjected to two-thirds partial hepatectomy at week 3 and were sacrificed at week 8. The number and areas of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci (preneoplastic lesions in the liver) were compared between respective groups. When 10 heterocyclic amines were mixed in the diet at one-tenth dose level, clear synergism was observed, but no combined effects were evident with the one-hundredth dose levels. In the pesticide experiment, treatment of rats with the 20-pesticide mixture at the ADI dose level did not enhance GST-P-positive foci. In contrast, a mixture of 100 times the ADI significantly increased those values. In a multiorgan bioassay of 28 weeks, mixtures of 40 high-volume compounds and 20 pesticides (suspected carcinogens) added together at their respective ADI levels did not enhance carcinogenesis in any organs initiated by five different carcinogens (DEN, N-methylnitrosourea, dimethylhydrazine, N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine, and dihydroxy-di-n-propylnitrosamine) in combination. The combination effect of low dietary levels of five antioxidants, butylated hydroxyanisole, caffeic acid, sesamol, 4-methoxyphenol, and catechol, were also examined using the multiorgan bioassay. The incidence of forestomach papillomas was significantly increased only in the combination group and the results indicate that combination of the five antioxidants can

  18. Ion/ion proton transfer reactions for protein mixture analysis.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, J L; McLuckey, S A

    1996-11-15

    Ion/ion proton transfer reactions are shown to be an effective means to facilitate the resolution of ions in electrospray mass spectrometry that differ in mass and charge but are similar in mass-to-charge ratio. Examples are shown in which a minor contaminant protein in a ribonuclease B solution is clearly apparent after ion/ion proton transfer but not in the conventional electrospray mass spectrum. A further example involving a mixture of bovine serum albumin and bovine transferrin also showed the identification of previously unnoticed "contaminant" polymer. The latter mixture also illustrated important issues in the use of the quadrupole ion trap as a reaction vessel and mass analyzer for high mass-to-charge ratio ions. The results suggest that the use of ion trap operating parameters specifically tailored for storage, ejection, detection, and mass-to-charge analysis of high mass-to-charge ratio ions can have attractive analytical figures of merit for determining mixtures of relatively high-mass proteins and, by extension, other types of high-mass biopolymers. PMID:8916454

  19. Toxicity of binary mixtures of metals and pyrethroid insecticides to Daphnia magna Straus. Implications for multi-substance risks assessment.

    PubMed

    Barata, Carlos; Baird, D J; Nogueira, A J A; Soares, A M V M; Riva, M C

    2006-06-10

    Two different concepts, termed concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA), describe general relationships between the effects of single substances and their corresponding mixtures allowing calculation of an expected mixture toxicity on the basis of known toxicities of the mixture components. Both concepts are limited to cases in which all substances in a mixture influence the same experimental endpoint, and are usually tested against a "fixed ratio design" where the mixture ratio is kept constant throughout the studies and the overall concentration of the mixture is systematically varied. With this design, interaction among toxic components across different mixture ratios and endpoints (i.e. lethal versus sublethal) is not assessed. In this study lethal and sublethal (feeding) responses of Daphnia magna individuals to single and binary combinations of similarly and dissimilarly acting chemicals including the metals (cadmium, copper) and the pyrethroid insecticides (lambda-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin) were assayed using a composite experimental design to test for interactions among toxic components across mixture effect levels, mixture ratios, lethal and sublethal toxic effects. To account for inter-experiment response variability, in each binary mixture toxicity assay the toxicity of the individual mixture constituents was also assessed. Model adequacy was then evaluated comparing the slopes and elevations of predicted versus observed mixture toxicity curves with those estimated for the individual components. Model predictive abilities changed across endpoints. The IA concept was able to predict accurately mixture toxicities of dissimilarly acting chemicals for lethal responses, whereas the CA concept did so in three out of four pairings for feeding response, irrespective of the chemical mode of action. Interaction effects across mixture effect levels, evidenced by crossing slopes, were only observed for the binary mixture Cd and Cu for lethal effects

  20. Perceptual blending in odor mixtures depends on the nature of odorants and human olfactory expertise.

    PubMed

    Barkat, S; Le Berre, E; Coureaud, G; Sicard, G; Thomas-Danguin, T

    2012-02-01

    Our olfactory system is confronted with complex mixtures of odorants, often recognized as single entities due to odor blending (e.g., coffee). In contrast, we are also able to discriminate odors from complex mixtures (e.g., off-odors). Therefore, the olfactory system is able to engage either configural or elemental processes when confronted with mixtures. However, the rules that govern the involvement of these processes during odor perception remain poorly understood. In our first experiment, we examined whether simple odorant mixtures (binary/ternary) could elicit configural perception. Twenty untrained subjects were asked to evaluate the odor typicality of mixtures and their constituents. The results revealed a significant increase in odor typicality in some but not all mixtures as compared with the single components, which suggest that perceptual odor blending can occur only in specific mixtures (configural processing). In our second experiment, we tested the hypothesis that general olfactory expertise can improve elemental perception of mixtures. Thirty-two trained subjects evaluated the odor typicality of the stimuli presented during the first experiment, and their responses were compared with those obtained from the untrained panelists. The results support the idea that general training with odors increases the elemental perception of binary and ternary blending mixtures. PMID:21873604

  1. Interpreting DNA mixtures with the presence of relatives.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-Qing; Fung, Wing K

    2003-02-01

    The assessment of DNA mixtures with the presence of relatives is discussed in this paper. The kinship coefficients are incorporated into the evaluation of the likelihood ratio and we first derive a unified expression of joint genotypic probabilities. A general formula and seven types of detailed expressions for calculating likelihood ratios are then developed for the case that a relative of the tested suspect is an unknown contributor to the mixed stain. These results can also be applied to the case of a non-tested suspect with one tested relative. Moreover, the formula for calculating the likelihood ratio when there are two related unknown contributors is given. Data for a real situation are given for illustration, and the effect of kinship on the likelihood ratio is shown therein. Some interesting findings are obtained. PMID:12592594

  2. Variable compression ratio control

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.

    1988-04-19

    In a four cycle engine that includes a crankshaft having a plural number of main shaft sections defining the crankshaft rotational axis and a plural number of crank arms defining orbital shaft sections, a plural number of combustion cylinders, a movable piston within each cylinder, each cylinder and its associated piston defining a combustion chamber, a connecting rod connecting each piston to an orbital shaft section of the crankshaft, and a plural number of stationary support walls spaced along the crankshaft axis for absorbing crankshaft forces: the improvement is described comprising means for adjustably supporting the crankshaft on the stationary walls such that the crankshaft rotational axis is adjustable along the piston-cylinder axis for the purpose of varying a resulting engine compression ratio; the adjustable support means comprising a circular cavity in each stationary wall. A circular disk swivably is seated in each cavity, each circular disk having a circular opening therethrough eccentric to the disk center. The crankshaft is arranged so that respective ones of its main shaft sections are located within respective ones of the circular openings; means for rotating each circular disk around its center so that the main shaft sections of the crankshaft are adjusted toward and away from the combustion chamber; a pinion gear on an output end of the crankshaft in axial alignment with and positioned beyond the respective ones of the main shaft sections, and a rotary output gear located about and engaged with teeth extending from the pinion gear.

  3. Multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuylsteke, Pieter; Schoeters, Emile P.

    1994-05-01

    This article presents a novel approach to the problem of detail contrast enhancement, based on multiresolution representation of the original image. The image is decomposed into a weighted sum of smooth, localized, 2D basis functions at multiple scales. Each transform coefficient represents the amount of local detail at some specific scale and at a specific position in the image. Detail contrast is enhanced by non-linear amplification of the transform coefficients. An inverse transform is then applied to the modified coefficients. This yields a uniformly contrast- enhanced image without artefacts. The MUSICA-algorithm is being applied routinely to computed radiography images of chest, skull, spine, shoulder, pelvis, extremities, and abdomen examinations, with excellent acceptance. It is useful for a wide range of applications in the medical, graphical, and industrial area.

  4. Contrast-enhanced refraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher J.; Rogers, Keith D.; Lewis, Rob A.; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Arfelli, Fulvia; Siu, Karen K.; Benci, A.; Kitchen, M.; Pillon, Alessandra; Rigon, Luigi; Round, Andrew J.; Hufton, Alan P.; Evans, Andrew; Pinder, Sarah E.; Evans, S.

    2004-01-01

    An attempt has been made, for the first time, to extend the capabilities of diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) using low concentrations of a contrast agent. A phantom has been constructed to accommodate a systematic series of diluted bromine deoxyuridase (BrDU) samples in liquid form. This was imaged using a conventional DEI arrangement and at a range of energies traversing the Br K-edge. The images were analyzed to provide a quantitative measure of contrast as a function of X-ray energy and (BrDU) concentration. The results indicate that the particular experimental arrangement was not optimized to exploit the potential of this contrast enhancement and several suggestions are discussed to improve this further.

  5. Phase Contrast Imaging in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Kai; Ernst, Thomas; Buchthal, Steve; Speck, Oliver; Anderson, Lynn; Chang, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance phase images can yield superior gray and white matter contrast compared to conventional magnitude images. However, the underlying contrast mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Previous studies have been limited to high field acquisitions in adult volunteers and patients. In this study, phase imaging in the neonatal brain is demonstrated for the first time. Compared to adults, phase differences between gray and white matter are significantly reduced but not inverted in neonates with little myelination and iron deposits in their brains. The remaining phase difference between the neonatal and adult brains may be due to different macromolecule concentration in the unmyelinated brain of the neonates and thus different frequency due to water macromolecule exchange. Additionally, the susceptibility contrast from brain myelination can be separately studied in neonates during brain development. Therefore, magnetic resonance phase imaging is suggested as a novel tool to study neonatal brain development and pathologies in neonates. PMID:21232619

  6. Polycatechol Nanoparticle MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiwen; Huang, Yuran; Wang, Zhao; Carniato, Fabio; Xie, Yijun; Patterson, Joseph P; Thompson, Matthew P; Andolina, Christopher M; Ditri, Treffly B; Millstone, Jill E; Figueroa, Joshua S; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Scadeng, Miriam; Botta, Mauro; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2016-02-01

    Amphiphilic triblock copolymers containing Fe(III) -catecholate complexes formulated as spherical- or cylindrical-shaped micellar nanoparticles (SMN and CMN, respectively) are described as new T1-weighted agents with high relaxivity, low cytotoxicity, and long-term stability in biological fluids. Relaxivities of both SMN and CMN exceed those of established gadolinium chelates across a wide range of magnetic field strengths. Interestingly, shape-dependent behavior is observed in terms of the particles' interactions with HeLa cells, with CMN exhibiting enhanced uptake and contrast via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with SMN. These results suggest that control over soft nanoparticle shape will provide an avenue for optimization of particle-based contrast agents as biodiagnostics. The polycatechol nanoparticles are proposed as suitable for preclinical investigations into their viability as gadolinium-free, safe, and effective imaging agents for MRI contrast enhancement. PMID:26681255

  7. Contrasting coloration in terrestrial mammals

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Here I survey, collate and synthesize contrasting coloration in 5000 species of terrestrial mammals focusing on black and white pelage. After briefly reviewing alternative functional hypotheses for coloration in mammals, I examine nine colour patterns and combinations on different areas of the body and for each mammalian taxon to try to identify the most likely evolutionary drivers of contrasting coloration. Aposematism and perhaps conspecific signalling are the most consistent explanations for black and white pelage in mammals; background matching may explain white pelage. Evidence for contrasting coloration is being involved in crypsis through pattern blending, disruptive coloration or serving other functions, such as signalling dominance, lures, reducing eye glare or in temperature regulation has barely moved beyond anecdotal stages of investigation. Sexual dichromatism is limited in this taxon and its basis is unclear. Astonishingly, the functional significance of pelage coloration in most large charismatic black and white mammals that were new to science 150 years ago still remains a mystery. PMID:18990666

  8. Segment aberration effects on contrast.

    PubMed

    Crossfield, Ian J; Troy, Mitchell

    2007-07-20

    High-contrast imaging, particularly the direct detection of extrasolar planets, is a major science driver for the next generation of telescopes. This science requires the suppression of scattered starlight at extremely high levels and that telescopes be correctly designed today to meet these stringent requirements in the future. The challenge increases in systems with complicated aperture geometries such as obscured, segmented telescopes. Such systems can also require intensive modeling and simulation efforts in order to understand the trade-offs between different optical parameters. The feasibility and development of a contrast prediction tool for use in the design and systems engineering of these telescopes is described. The performance of a particular starlight suppression system on a large segmented telescope is described analytically. These analytical results and the results of a contrast predictor are then compared with the results of a full wave-optics simulation. PMID:17609697

  9. A wavelet contrast metric for the targeting task performance metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Bradley L.; Flug, Eric A.

    2016-05-01

    Target acquisition performance depends strongly on the contrast of the target. The Targeting Task Performance (TTP) metric, within the Night Vision Integrated Performance Model (NV-IPM), uses a combination of resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast to predict and model system performance. While the dependence on resolution and SNR are well defined and understood, defining a robust and versatile contrast metric for a wide variety of acquisition tasks is more difficult. In this correspondence, a wavelet contrast metric (WCM) is developed under the assumption that the human eye processes spatial differences in a manner similar to a wavelet transform. The amount of perceivable information, or useful wavelet coefficients, is used to predict the total viewable contrast to the human eye. The WCM is intended to better match the measured performance of the human vision system for high-contrast, low-contrast, and low-observable targets. After further validation, the new contrast metric can be incorporated using a modified TTP metric into the latest Army target acquisition software suite, the NV-IPM.

  10. Contrast-guided image interpolation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhe; Ma, Kai-Kuang

    2013-11-01

    In this paper a contrast-guided image interpolation method is proposed that incorporates contrast information into the image interpolation process. Given the image under interpolation, four binary contrast-guided decision maps (CDMs) are generated and used to guide the interpolation filtering through two sequential stages: 1) the 45(°) and 135(°) CDMs for interpolating the diagonal pixels and 2) the 0(°) and 90(°) CDMs for interpolating the row and column pixels. After applying edge detection to the input image, the generation of a CDM lies in evaluating those nearby non-edge pixels of each detected edge for re-classifying them possibly as edge pixels. This decision is realized by solving two generalized diffusion equations over the computed directional variation (DV) fields using a derived numerical approach to diffuse or spread the contrast boundaries or edges, respectively. The amount of diffusion or spreading is proportional to the amount of local contrast measured at each detected edge. The diffused DV fields are then thresholded for yielding the binary CDMs, respectively. Therefore, the decision bands with variable widths will be created on each CDM. The two CDMs generated in each stage will be exploited as the guidance maps to conduct the interpolation process: for each declared edge pixel on the CDM, a 1-D directional filtering will be applied to estimate its associated to-be-interpolated pixel along the direction as indicated by the respective CDM; otherwise, a 2-D directionless or isotropic filtering will be used instead to estimate the associated missing pixels for each declared non-edge pixel. Extensive simulation results have clearly shown that the proposed contrast-guided image interpolation is superior to other state-of-the-art edge-guided image interpolation methods. In addition, the computational complexity is relatively low when compared with existing methods; hence, it is fairly attractive for real-time image applications. PMID:23846469

  11. Nimesulide-modified gum karaya solid mixtures: preparation, characterization, and formulation development.

    PubMed

    Babu, G V Murali Mohan; Kumar, N Ravi; Himasankar, K; Seshasayana, A; Murthy, K V Ramana

    2003-09-01

    Solid mixtures of nimesulide (NS) and modified gum karaya (MGK) were prepared to improve the dissolution rate of NS. The effect of drug-carrier ratio on dissolution rate of NS was investigated by preparing the solid mixtures of different ratios by cogrinding method. Solid mixtures were also prepared by physical mixing, kneading, and solid dispersion techniques to study the influence of method of preparation. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and equilibrium solubility studies were performed to explain the results of in vitro dissolution rate studies. It was clearly evident from the results that the NS dissolution rate was dependent on the concentration of MGK in the solid mixtures, and optimum weight ratio was found to be 1:4 (NS:MGK). Though the dissolution rate of NS from all solid mixtures prepared by different methods improved significantly, maximum improvement in dissolution rate was observed with solid dispersions. The order of methods basing on their effect on dissolution efficiency is solid dispersion > kneading > cogrinding > physical mixing > pure NS. Tablets of pure drug and solid mixtures (1:4 w/w, NS:MGK) were prepared. Though the best results from the dissolution test were obtained for the tablets containing solid dispersions, tablets containing cogrinding mixture were found to be suitable, from a practical point of view, for commercialization. PMID:14570306

  12. Brain processing of a configural vs elemental odor mixture in the newborn rabbit.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nanette Y; Datiche, Frédérique; Wilson, Donald A; Gigot, Vincent; Thomas-Danguin, Thierry; Ferreira, Guillaume; Coureaud, Gérard

    2016-06-01

    Organisms are surrounded throughout life by chemically complex odors. How individuals process an odorant within a mixture or a mixture as a whole is a key question in neuroethology and chemical senses. This question is addressed here by using newborn rabbits, which can be rapidly conditioned to a new stimulus by single association with the mammary pheromone. After conditioning to ethyl maltol (odorant B), pups behaviorally respond to B and an A'B' mixture (68/32 ratio) but not to ethyl isobutyrate (odorant A) or an AB mixture (30/70 ratio). This suggests elemental and configural perception of A'B' and AB, respectively. We then explored the neural substrates underlying the processing of these mixtures with the hypothesis that processing varies according to perception. Pups were pseudoconditioned or conditioned to B on postnatal day 3 before exposure to B, A'B' or AB on day 4. Fos expression was not similar between groups (mainly in the olfactory bulb and posterior piriform cortex) suggesting a differential processing of the stimuli that might reflect either stimulus complexity or conditioning effect. Thus, the ratio of components in A'B' vs AB leads to differential activation of the olfactory system which may contribute to elemental and configural percepts of these mixtures. In addition, together with recent behavioral data, this highlights that configural perception occurs even in relatively immature animals, emphasizing the value of the newborn rabbit for exploration of odor mixture processing from molecules to brain and behavior. PMID:25982221

  13. Sound Modes of a Bose-Fermi Mixture Superfluid at Finite Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yosuke; Sakamoto, Ryohei; Mori, Hiroyuki; Arahata, Emiko

    2016-06-01

    We study the sound modes of a Bose-Fermi mixture superfluid at finite temperatures in the collisional hydrodynamic regime. We extend Landau's hydrodynamic theory to deal with a Bose-Fermi mixture superfluid and show the existence of three sound modes. We calculate the hydrodynamic sound velocities numerically using the Nozières and Schmitt-Rink theory at unitarity. The three-sound-modes hybrid in Bose-Fermi mixture superfluids contrasts with the two sound modes exhibited by 3He and 4He superfluids.

  14. Quantitative analysis of the near-wall mixture formation process in a passenger car direct-injection Diesel engine by using linear Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taschek, Marco; Egermann, Jan; Schwarz, Sabrina; Leipertz, Alfred

    2005-11-01

    Optimum fuel preparation and mixture formation are core issues in the development of modern direct-injection (DI) Diesel engines, as these are crucial for defining the border conditions for the subsequent combustion and pollutant formation process. The local fuel/air ratio can be seen as one of the key parameters for this optimization process, as it allows the characterization and comparison of the mixture formation quality. For what is the first time to the best of our knowledge, linear Raman spectroscopy is used to detect the fuel/air ratio and its change along a line of a few millimeters directly and nonintrusively inside the combustion bowl of a DI Diesel engine. By a careful optimization of the measurement setup, the weak Raman signals could be separated successfully from disturbing interferences. A simultaneous measurement of the densities of air and fuel was possible along a line of about 10 mm length, allowing a time- and space-resolved measurement of the local fuel/air ratio. This could be performed in a nonreacting atmosphere as well as during fired operating conditions. The positioning of the measurement volume next to the interaction point of one of the spray jets with the wall of the combustion bowl allowed a near-wall analysis of the mixture formation process for a six-hole nozzle under varying injection and engine conditions. The results clearly show the influence of the nozzle geometry and preinjection on the mixing process. In contrast, modulation of the intake air temperature merely led to minor changes of the fuel concentration in the measurement volume.

  15. Spinodal decomposition in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Roberto; Shinnar, Reuel; Triantafyllou, George

    1996-03-01

    We study the early stage of the phase separation of a binary mixture far from its critical point of demixing. Whenever the mixture of two mutually repulsive species is quenched to a temperature below its critical point of miscibility, the effect of the enthalpic repulsive force prevails upon the entropic tendency to mix, so that the system eventually separates itno two coexisting phases. We have developed a highly nonlinear model, in close analogy with the linear theory of Cahn and Hilliard, where a generalized free energy is defined in terms of two parameters ψ and a, the first describing the equilibrium composition of the two phases, ad the second denoting a characteristic length scale that is inversely proportional to the equilibrium surface tension. The linear stability analysis predicts that any perturbation of the initial mixture composition with wave number k smaller than √2ψ /a will grow exponentially in time, with a maximum growth corresponding to kmax= √ψ /a. A numerical solution of the equation shows that nonlinear effects saturate the exponential growth, and that the concentraiton distribution tends to a steady state, peroidic profile with wavelength λ=2πa/ √ψ corresponding to the fastest growing mode of the linear regime. The main result of our theoretical model is that this steady state does not depend on the form of the initial perturbation to the homogeneous composition profile.

  16. Structural and magnetic properties of a mechanochemically activated Ti-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} solid mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cristobal, A.A.; Ramos, C.P.; Bercoff, P.G.; Conconi, S.; Aglietti, E.F.; Botta, P.M.; Lopez, J.M. Porto

    2010-12-15

    The mechanochemical effects on the reactivity and properties of a titanium/hematite powder mixture with molar ratio of 1/2 are investigated. Crystalline-phase structure, composition, hyperfine and magnetic behaviors were analyzed as a function of activation time by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results showed that at relatively short activation times metallic Ti reduces part of the ferric ions, yielding a complex product formed mainly by a mix of two solid solutions Fe{sub 3-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 4} (titanomagnetites), both with very different x values (0 < x < 1). Also metallic iron and superparamagnetic hematite particles were detected by Moessbauer spectroscopy. As the mechanical treatment extends the composition of the reactive mixture changes, prevailing in the end the solid solution with higher x value. In contrast, when these activated samples are thermally treated the fraction of the solid solution which is richer in Ti diminishes. This fact produces a significant variation of the saturation magnetization of the obtained material.

  17. Validated spectrofluorimetric determination of two pharmaceutical antihypertensive mixtures containing amlodipine besylate together with either candesartan cilexetil or telmisartan.

    PubMed

    Belal, Tarek S; Mahrous, Mohamed S; Abdel-Khalek, Magdi M; Daabees, Hoda G; Khamis, Mona M

    2014-11-01

    Amlodipine besylate (AML) is available in fixed-dose combination tablets with either candesartan cilexetil (CAN) or telmisartan (TEL). This work describes a simple, selective and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method for analysis of AML/CAN and AML/TEL binary mixtures without prior separation. The method involves measurement of the native fluorescence of AML at excitation and emission wavelengths of 367 and 454 nm, respectively, in water without interference from either of the two drugs. By contrast, the intrinsic fluorescence of CAN was measured at excitation and emission wavelengths of 265 and 392 nm, respectively, in ethanol, while TEL was measured at 366 nm in 0.05 M sodium hydroxide solution using 294 nm as the excitation wavelength. The proposed spectrofluorimetric procedure was validated with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, selectivity, robustness, detection and quantification limits. Regression analysis showed a good correlation between fluorescence intensity and concentration over the ranges 0.1-1.4, 0.025-0.25 and 0.0025-0.05 µg/mL for AML, CAN and TEL, respectively. Limits of detection were 0.034, 0.0063 and 0.0007 µg/mL for AML, CAN and TEL, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of several synthetic binary mixtures of different ratios and laboratory-prepared tablets with good recoveries, and no interference from common pharmaceutical additives was observed. PMID:24615878

  18. Contrast Analysis for Scale Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olejnik, Stephen F.; And Others

    Research on tests for scale equality have focused exclusively on an overall test statistic and have not examined procedures for identifying specific differences in multiple group designs. The present study compares four contrast analysis procedures for scale differences in the single factor four-group design: (1) Tukey HSD; (2) Kramer-Tukey; (3)…

  19. Cluster Analysis by Linear Contrasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafto, Michael

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest a technique of cluster analysis which is similar in aim to the Interactive Intercolumnar Correlation Analysis (IICA), though different in detail. Two methods are proposed for extracting a single bipolar factor (a "contrast compenent") directly from the initial similarities matrix. The advantages of this…

  20. Development of infant contrast sensitivity to chromatic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Morrone, M C; Burr, D C; Fiorentini, A

    1993-12-01

    We have monitored the development of contrast sensitivity to equiluminant red-green chromatic patterns by monitoring visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in 13 infants. The results confirm our previous report [Morrone, Burr and Fiorentini, Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 242 (1990a)] that, before 7-8 weeks of age, there was no response to purely chromatic stimuli, while at the same age luminance stimuli of 20% contrast produced reliable responses. At all ages (even before the onset of a chromatic response) the colour mixture to yield equiluminance was similar to that of adults, suggesting that the relative proportion and efficacy of medium- and long-wave cones is similar for infants as for adults. For both luminance and chromatic stimuli, amplitude increased roughly linearly with log-contrast, so sensitivity thresholds could be predicted by linear extrapolation to the abscissa. Detailed contrast sensitivity curves were measured for four infants at various ages. The results show that luminance and chromatic contrast sensitivity develop independently at different rates, probably reflecting differential development of postreceptoral neural mechanisms. PMID:8249333

  1. Uncertainty in Mixtures and Cumulative Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans and environmental species are rarely exposed to single chemicals. These chemicals typically affect multiple tissues through multiple modes of action, which may depend on the dose. Mixtures risk assessment may employ dose response information from the mixture of interest,...

  2. CLUSTERING CRITERIA AND MULTIVARIATE NORMAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    New clustering criteria for use when a mixture of multivariate normal distributions is an appropriate model are presented. They are derived from maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches corresponding to different assumptions about the covariance matrices of the mixture componen...

  3. Compression ratio control in reciprocating piston engines

    SciTech Connect

    Doundoulakis, G.J.

    1989-08-29

    The patent describes compression ratio control for reciprocating piston engines. It comprises: a reciprocating engine crankcase; a plurality of compression/expansion cylinders rigidly attached to the crankcase; each of the cylinders including a curved surface and a cylinder head; a fuel mixture in-taken in the cylinders; a piston reciprocating along each cylinder's curved surface for providing compression/expansion to the fuel mixture; a crank mechanism including a crankshaft rotating about an axial line that is substantially equidistant from the heads, crankcheek lobes radially extending from the crankshaft, crankpins inside and in contact with crankpin bearings, axially extending between the crankcheek lobes, and crankshaft journal bearings for providing low frictional support to the crankshaft; a connecting rod for each of the cylinders connecting the piston with the crankpin; crankshaft positioning; a first transmission gear, a crankshaft gear for meshing with the transmission gear, and a slot cut on the crankcase; wherein the constraint in the displacement of the crankshaft in the horizontal sense is provided by the vertical edges of the slot, and wherein the vertical edges of the slot are preferably being curved with a radius of curvature substantially equal to the average pitch diameter of the crankshaft gear and thee first transmission gear for accurate meshing of the gears.

  4. Thermoregulatory response to an organophosphate and carbamate insecticide mixture: testing the assumption of dose-additivity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Herr, David W; Gennings, Chris; Graff, Jaimie E; McMurray, Matthew; Stork, LeAnna; Coffey, Todd; Hamm, Adam; Mack, Cina M

    2006-01-01

    Most toxicity data are based on studies using single compounds. This study assessed if there is an interaction between mixtures of the anticholinesterase insecticides chlorpyrifos (CHP) and carbaryl (CAR) using hypothermia and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition as toxicological endpoints. Core temperature (T(c)) was continuously monitored by radiotelemetry in adult Long-Evans rats administered CHP at doses ranging from 0 to 50mg/kg and CAR doses of 0-150 mg/kg. The temperature index (TI), an integration of the change in T(c) over a 12h period, was quantified. Effects of mixtures of CHP and CAR in 2:1 and 1:1 ratios on the TI were examined and the data analyzed using a statistical model designed to assess significant departures from additivity for chemical mixtures. CHP and CAR elicited a marked hypothermia and dose-related decrease in the TI. The TI response to a 2:1 ratio of CHP:CAR was significantly less than that predicted by additivity. The TI response to a 1:1 ratio of CHP and CAR was not significantly different from the predicted additivity. Plasma and brain ChE activity were measured 4h after dosing with CHP, CAR, and mixtures in separate groups of rats. There was a dose-additive interaction for the inhibition of brain ChE for the 2:1 ratio, but an antagonistic effect for the 1:1 ratio. The 2:1 and 1:1 mixtures had an antagonistic interaction on plasma ChE. Overall, the departures from additivity for the physiological (i.e., temperature) and biochemical (i.e., ChE inhibition) endpoints for the 2:1 and 1:1 mixtures studies did not coincide as expected. An interaction between CHP and CAR appears to depend on the ratio of compounds in the mixture as well as the biological endpoint. PMID:16182429

  5. Improving photoacoustic imaging contrast of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Leo; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu; Tang, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy for treating prostate cancer where the radiation sources are seeds inserted into the prostate. Accurate localization of seeds during prostate brachytherapy is essential to the success of intraoperative treatment planning. The current standard modality used in intraoperative seeds localization is transrectal ultrasound. Transrectal ultrasound, however, suffers in image quality due to several factors such speckle, shadowing, and off-axis seed orientation. Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic phenomenon, is an emerging imaging modality. The contrast generating mechanism in photoacoustic imaging is optical absorption that is fundamentally different from conventional B-mode ultrasound which depicts changes in acoustic impedance. A photoacoustic imaging system is developed using a commercial ultrasound system. To improve imaging contrast and depth penetration, absorption enhancing coating is applied to the seeds. In comparison to bare seeds, approximately 18.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio as well as a doubling of imaging depth are achieved. Our results demonstrate that the coating of the seeds can further improve the discernibility of the seeds.

  6. Contrast optimization in broadband polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Lijo; Hu, Haofeng; Boffety, Matthieu; Goudail, François

    2016-05-01

    For the sake of polarimetric accuracy, polarization imaging systems based on liquid crystal modulators often work at one given wavelength due to the strong chromatic properties of the liquid crystal retarders. This often requires the use of narrowband filters which reduces the amount of light in the system and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. For applications where the main parameter of interest is the target/background discriminability rather than polarimetric accuracy, spectral filtering may not be the best option. In this work, we investigate the impact of broadening the spectrum of the light entering the system on the discriminability performance of passive and active polarimetric systems. Through simulations, we show that broadening the bandwidth of the illumination can increase the contrast between two regions, as the increase of light flux compensates for the loss of polarimetric precision. Moreover, we show that taking into account the chromatic characteristics of the components of the imaging system can further enhance the contrast. We validate these findings through experiments in passive and active configurations, and demonstrate that the illumination bandwidth can be seen as an additional parameter to optimize polarimetric imaging set-ups.

  7. Combustion of coal/water mixtures with thermal preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Novack, M.; Roffe, G.; Miller, G.

    1987-07-01

    Thermal preconditioning is a process in which coal/water mixtures are vaporized to produce coal/steam suspensions, and then superheated to allow the coal to devolatilize producing suspensions of char particles in hydrocarbon gases and steam. This final product of the process can be injected without atomization, and burned directly in a gas turbine combustor. This paper reports on the results of an experimental program in which thermally preconditioned coal/water mixture was successfully burned with a stable flame in a gas turbine combustor test rig. Tests were performed at a mixture flowrate of 300 lb/hr and combustor pressure of 8 atm. The coal/water mixture was thermally preconditioned and injected into the combustor over a temperature range from 340/sup 0/F to 600/sup 0/F, and combustion air was supplied at between 600/sup 0/F to 725/sup 0/F. Test durations varied between 10 and 20 min. Major results of the combustion testing were that: A stable flame was maintained over a wide equivalence ratio range, between phi = 2.2 (rich) and 0.2 (lean); and combustion efficiency of over 99 percent was achieved when the mixture was preconditioned to 600/sup 0/F and the combustion air preheated to 725/sup 0/F. Measurements of ash particulates, captured in the exhaust sampling probe located 20 in. from the injector face, show typical sizes collected to be about 1 ..mu..m, with agglomerates of these particulates to be not more than 8 ..mu..m. The original mean coal particle size for these tests, prior to preconditioning, was 25 ..mu..m. Results of additional tests showed that one third of the sulfur contained in the solids of a coal/water mixture with 3 percent sulfur was evolved in gaseous form (under mild thermolized conditions) mainly as H/sub 2/S with the remainder as light mercaptans.

  8. SOA Formation from Photooxidation of Individual PAHs and Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. L.; Kacarab, M.; Tang, P.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2014-12-01

    Individual SOA experiments on PAHs such as naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes were conducted at the UCR CE-CERT environmental chamber. Measurements were made with a suite of instrumentation that includes HR-ToF-AMS, VTDMA, and APM-SMPS to comprehensively understand the chemical composition characteristics, volatility and density of particles. Our results indicated that the SOA yield from PAHs is large and the elemental and chemical composition analysis of HR-ToF-AMS revealed that oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O/C) increases with oxidation time and also suggested that the SOA from these three PAHs are mostly low volatility OOA. The density of aerosol formed from 1-methylnaphthalene photooxidation under high NOx condition was observed to decrease from 1.5 g/cm3 to 0.7 g/cm3 during the course of experiment. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of 1-methylnaphthalene SOA showed that the SOA coagulated after 5~6 hours photooxidation to form fractal-like particles. The sensitivity of SOA formation to varying HC mixtures is further explored. Serial mixtures of PAHs photooxidation experiments were conducted, including naphthalene, 1-methylnapthalene, 2-methylnaphtalene with m-xylene, and/or the surrogate mixture used to develop the Carter O3 reactivity scales. Preliminary results show that the SOA formation from m-xylene and naphthalene mixture photooxidation was found to be suppressed by m-xylene, and the volatility measured as volume remaining fraction (VRF) of the m-xylene and naphthalene mixture increases from 0.2 to 0.4, which indicates the volatility of mixture SOA is dominated by m-xylene SOA.

  9. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a...

  14. Effect of the Key Mixture Parameters on Shrinkage of Reactive Powder Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Reactive powder concrete (RPC) mixtures are reported to have excellent mechanical and durability characteristics. However, such concrete mixtures having high amount of cementitious materials may have high early shrinkage causing cracking of concrete. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the simultaneous effects of three key mixture parameters on shrinkage of the RPC mixtures. Considering three different levels of the three key mixture factors, a total of 27 mixtures of RPC were prepared according to 33 factorial experiment design. The specimens belonging to all 27 mixtures were monitored for shrinkage at different ages over a total period of 90 days. The test results were plotted to observe the variation of shrinkage with time and to see the effects of the key mixture factors. The experimental data pertaining to 90-day shrinkage were used to conduct analysis of variance to identify significance of each factor and to obtain an empirical equation correlating the shrinkage of RPC with the three key mixture factors. The rate of development of shrinkage at early ages was higher. The water to binder ratio was found to be the most prominent factor followed by cement content with the least effect of silica fume content. PMID:25050395

  15. Effect of the key mixture parameters on shrinkage of reactive powder concrete.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shamsad; Zubair, Ahmed; Maslehuddin, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Reactive powder concrete (RPC) mixtures are reported to have excellent mechanical and durability characteristics. However, such concrete mixtures having high amount of cementitious materials may have high early shrinkage causing cracking of concrete. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the simultaneous effects of three key mixture parameters on shrinkage of the RPC mixtures. Considering three different levels of the three key mixture factors, a total of 27 mixtures of RPC were prepared according to 3(3) factorial experiment design. The specimens belonging to all 27 mixtures were monitored for shrinkage at different ages over a total period of 90 days. The test results were plotted to observe the variation of shrinkage with time and to see the effects of the key mixture factors. The experimental data pertaining to 90-day shrinkage were used to conduct analysis of variance to identify significance of each factor and to obtain an empirical equation correlating the shrinkage of RPC with the three key mixture factors. The rate of development of shrinkage at early ages was higher. The water to binder ratio was found to be the most prominent factor followed by cement content with the least effect of silica fume content. PMID:25050395

  16. Detonation cell size measurements in H/sub 2/-air-H/sub 2/O mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.; Shepherd, J.E.; Knystautas, R.; Lee, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Conclusions of this study are: (1) For H/sub 2/-air mixtures at 20/sup 0/C and a total pressure of 101 kPa, detonations have been achieved between 13.5% and 70% H/sub 2/ mole fraction. This compositional range is wider than the detonability limits previously reported for smaller tubes. (2) The addition of CO/sub 2/ to H/sub 2/-air mixtures greatly reduces the detonability of the mixture. (3) For a given initial temperature, air density and equivalence ratio, the addition of steam to a H/sub 2/-Air mixture greatly decreases the detonability of the mixture. (4) At 100/sup 0/C and an air density of 41.6 moles/m/sup 3/, detonation of H/sub 2/-air mixtures with up to 30% steam have been recorded. (5) For H/sub 2/-air mixtures, the detonability increases with increasing initial temperature at constant density. Consequently, the diluent effect of the addition of steam to a fixed volume of an H/sub 2/-air mixture in reducing detonability is partially offset if there is a concomitant temperature increase. (6) At 100/sup 0/C and an air density of 41.6 moles/m/sup 3/, a 13.0% H/sub 2/-air mixture has been detonated. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Within- and between-city contrasts in nitrogen dioxide and mortality in 10 Canadian cities; a subset of the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC)

    PubMed Central

    Crouse, Dan L; Peters, Paul A; Villeneuve, Paul J; Proux, Marc-Olivier; Shin, Hwashin H; Goldberg, Mark S; Johnson, Markey; Wheeler, Amanda J; Allen, Ryan W; Atari, Dominic Odwa; Jerrett, Michael; Brauer, Michael; Brook, Jeffrey R; Cakmak, Sabit; Burnett, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    The independent and joint effects of within- and between-city contrasts in air pollution on mortality have been investigated rarely. To examine the differential effects of between- versus within-city contrasts in pollution exposure, we used both ambient measurements and land use regression models to assess associations with mortality and exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) among ~735,600 adults in 10 of the largest Canadian cities. We estimated exposure contrasts partitioned into within- and between-city contrasts, and the sum of these as overall exposures, for every year from 1984 to 2006. Residential histories allowed us to follow subjects annually during the study period. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for many personal and contextual variables. In fully-adjusted, random-effects models, we found positive associations between overall NO2 exposures and mortality from non-accidental causes (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.05; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03–1.07), cardiovascular disease (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01–1.06), ischaemic heart disease (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.02–1.08) and respiratory disease (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.99–1.08), but not from cerebrovascular disease (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.96–1.06). We found that most of these associations were determined by within-city contrasts, as opposed to by between-city contrasts in NO2. Our results suggest that variation in NO2 concentrations within a city may represent a more toxic mixture of pollution than variation between cities. PMID:25605445

  18. Potentiation and antagonism of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin effects in a complex environmental mixture.

    PubMed

    Silkworth, J B; Cutler, D S; O'Keefe, P W; Lipinskas, T

    1993-04-01

    There is increasing need to understand the toxicity of complex environmental mixtures. The organic phase of a leachate (OPL) from the Love Canal chemical dump site is a complex mixture that contains over 100 organic compounds, including 0.74 ppm 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Mice congenic at the Ah locus were used to evaluate several toxic effects of the OPL, including immune function and hepatic enzyme induction. OPL toxicity was compared with that of pure TCDD in both C57BL/6J Ahb/b and congenic C57BL/6 Ahd/d (B6.D2) mice. Mice were given single oral doses of up to 2 g OPL/kg or 100 micrograms TCDD/kg, immunized, and evaluated after 7 days. The TCDD equivalent of the OPL was determined to be 3.9 and 5.0 ppm in C57BL/6J and B6.D2 mice, respectively. This is six times the TCDD content. The Ah phenotype-dependent response ratio was calculated by dividing the dose required to cause an effect in the B6.D2 strain by the dose causing the same effect in the C57BL/6J strain. Ratios based on both ED50s and the lowest observed adverse effect levels were used to determine whether each adverse effect was Ah phenotype-dependent, the extent to which TCDD contributed to the effect, whether there were interactive effects between the AhR ligands and nonligands and if they were additive, antagonistic, or synergistic, and whether the response was predictable based on the known chemical composition of the mixture. It was concluded that the non-TCDD component potentiated TCDD immune suppression, and possibly thymic atrophy, through AhR mechanisms. In contrast, this analysis indicated that the non-TCDD component of the OPL antagonized the ability of the TCDD component to induce hepatic AHH activity whereas OPL hepatomegaly was caused primarily by the non-TCDD component of the OPL. This study demonstrates that the toxicity of mixtures containing TCDD may not be accurately predicted based on the TCDD content alone and that this approach could be useful in the toxicologic

  19. Ratio estimation in SIMS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogliore, R. C.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.

    2011-09-01

    The determination of an isotope ratio by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) traditionally involves averaging a number of ratios collected over the course of a measurement. We show that this method leads to an additive positive bias in the expectation value of the estimated ratio that is approximately equal to the true ratio divided by the counts of the denominator isotope of an individual ratio. This bias does not decrease as the number of ratios used in the average increases. By summing all counts in the numerator isotope, then dividing by the sum of counts in the denominator isotope, the estimated ratio is less biased: the bias is approximately equal to the ratio divided by the summed counts of the denominator isotope over the entire measurement. We propose a third ratio estimator (Beale's estimator) that can be used when the bias from the summed counts is unacceptably large for the hypothesis being tested. We derive expressions for the variance of these ratio estimators as well as the conditions under which they are normally distributed. Finally, we investigate a SIMS dataset showing the effects of ratio bias, and discuss proper ratio estimation for SIMS analysis.

  20. Segregation in mixtures of granular chains and spherical grains under vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaoxian; Zheng, Ning; Shi, Qingfan; Sun, Gang; Li, Liangsheng

    2013-04-01

    We experimentally investigate segregation behaviors of binary granular mixtures consisting of granular chains and spherical grains with different interstitial media under vertical vibrations. A quantitative criterion is proposed to locate the boundaries between different vibrating phases. The water-immersed granular mixture exhibits two interesting types of segregation behaviors: chain-on-top and sandwich patterns. However, the phenomenon of sandwich segregation is absent for the air-immersed mixture. The topological differences of phase diagrams between two different environments indicate that the interstitial fluid plays an important role on the granular demixing. Additionally, the phase behaviors of mixtures for the different chain lengths show a not significant discrepancy. Finally, the vibrating thickness ratio determining the phase boundary characterizes the mixing extent of the granular bed. The estimated ratios for various chain lengths exhibit a monotonically decreasing dependence, when the vibration frequency increases.

  1. Mixture Models for Dependent Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric mixture models appropriate for data presented in homogeneous blocks of varying sizes from several unidentified source populations are considered. For most applications, the data elements within each block are dependent. Models are proposed for multivariate normal data incorporating two types of dependence, exchangeability of elements within blocks, and a Markov structure for blocks. The consequences of assuming exchangeability, when in fact the Markov structure holds, are explored. Computational problems for each model are considered, and results of a simple test of the exchangeability hypothesis for LANDSAT data are presented.

  2. High-contrast imaging testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Silva, D; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Bauman, B; Palmer, D; Remington, T; Delgadillo-Lariz, M

    2008-01-23

    Several high-contrast imaging systems are currently under construction to enable the detection of extra-solar planets. In order for these systems to achieve their objectives, however, there is considerable developmental work and testing which must take place. Given the need to perform these tests, a spatially-filtered Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics system has been assembled to evaluate new algorithms and hardware configurations which will be implemented in these future high-contrast imaging systems. In this article, construction and phase measurements of a membrane 'woofer' mirror are presented. In addition, results from closed-loop operation of the assembled testbed with static phase plates are presented. The testbed is currently being upgraded to enable operation at speeds approaching 500 hz and to enable studies of the interactions between the woofer and tweeter deformable mirrors.

  3. Chronic toxicity of a mixture of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fun-In; Kuo, Min-Liang; Shun, Chia-Tung; Ma, Yee-Chung; Wang, Jung-Der; Ueng, Tzuu-Huei

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the chronic toxicity of a mixture of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes (CA) consisting of chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene. These chlorinated organic solvents were present in the underground water near an electronic appliances manufactory in Taoyuan, Taiwan. Male and female weanling ICR mice were treated with low-, medium-, and high-dose CA mixtures in drinking water for 16 and 18 mo, respectively. A significant number of male mice treated with the high-dose CA mixture developed tail alopecia and deformation, which was not prominent in CA-treated female mice. Medium- and high-dose CA mixtures induced marginal increases of liver and lung weights, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine levels in male mice. In female mice, the high-dose CA mixture increased liver, kidney, and uterus and ovary total weights, without affecting serum biochemistry parameters. CA mixtures had no effects on the total glutathione content or the level of glutathione S-transferase activity in the livers and kid- neys of male and female mice. Treatments with CA mixtures produced a trend of increasing frequency of hepatocelluar neoplasms in male mice, compared to male and female controls and CA-treated female mice. The high-dose CA mixture induced a significantly higher incidence of mammary adenocarcinoma in female mice. The calculated odds ratios of mammary adenocarcinoma in female mice induced by low-, medium-, and high-dose CA mixtures were 1.14, 1.37, and 3.53 times that of the controls, respectively. The low-dose CA mixture induced a higher incidence of cysts and inflammation in and around the ovaries. This study has demonstrated that the CA mixture is a potential carcinogen to male and female mice. These animal toxicology data may be important in assessing the health effects of individuals exposed to the CA mixture. PMID:11911491

  4. 40 CFR 86.321-79 - NDIR water rejection ratio check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... presssure (P WB) from § 86.344(d). (g) Calculate the water concentration (Z) in the mixture from: Z = (P WB /GP)(106) (h) Calculate the water rejection ratio (WRR) from: WRR = (Z/AR) ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NDIR water rejection ratio check....

  5. Pulsed high-voltage dielectric properties of ethylene glycol/water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenneman, David B.

    1982-12-01

    Measurements of the (complex) dielectric constant, intrinsic time constant, and electrical breakdown strength of highly purified ethylene glycol/water mixtures as functions of temperature and mixture ratio are presented. Over the frequency range from 0.5 to 108 MHz, the dielectric constant is found to be well represented by a simple Debye model. When cooled to near their freezing points, these mixtures have dielectric constants of the same order as pure water (˜80) but with intrinsic time constants at least an order of magnitude greater than water. The mixtures are found to support fields greater than 15 MV/m for periods exceeding a millisecond. The observed high-voltage decay is nonsimple due to the phenomenon of charge injection. The ability to sustain high fields for millisecond time scales suggests the use of such mixtures as the dielectric in the pulse forming lines of large-pulse power machines.

  6. The nonlinear model for emergence of stable conditions in gas mixture in force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalutskov, Oleg; Uvarova, Liudmila

    2016-06-01

    The case of M-component liquid evaporation from the straight cylindrical capillary into N - component gas mixture in presence of external forces was reviewed. It is assumed that the gas mixture is not ideal. The stable states in gas phase can be formed during the evaporation process for the certain model parameter valuesbecause of the mass transfer initial equationsnonlinearity. The critical concentrations of the resulting gas mixture components (the critical component concentrations at which the stable states occur in mixture) were determined mathematically for the case of single-component fluid evaporation into two-component atmosphere. It was concluded that this equilibrium concentration ratio of the mixture components can be achieved by external force influence on the mass transfer processes. It is one of the ways to create sustainable gas clusters that can be used effectively in modern nanotechnology.

  7. Influence of molecular weight on structure and rheological properties of microcrystalline chitosan mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Katarzyna

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, the atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies and rheological properties of aqueous solutions of microcrystalline chitosan (MCCh), polyacrylamide (PAM) and their mixtures at different weight ratios have been investigated. Flow measurements were carried out using on solutions of native polymers and their mixtures with various weight fractions of components. It has been observed that the polymer solutions and their mixtures exhibited the non-Newtonian behavior with shear-thinning and/or shear-thickening areas. Rheological parameters from power law and activation energy of viscous flow are determined and discussed. The AFM images showed difference in surface properties films for the native polymers and their mixtures. The roughness of the mixtures increases with the increase of MCCh content. This may indicate a strong interaction between the polymeric components. PMID:26014140

  8. Advancing High Contrast Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, M.; Poyneer, L.; GPI Team

    2014-09-01

    A long-standing challenge has been to directly image faint extrasolar planets adjacent to their host suns, which may be ~1-10 million times brighter than the planet. Several extreme AO systems designed for high-contrast observations have been tested at this point, including SPHERE, Magellan AO, PALM-3000, Project 1640, NICI, and the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI, Macintosh et al. 2014). The GPI is the world's most advanced high-contrast adaptive optics system on an 8-meter telescope for detecting and characterizing planets outside of our solar system. GPI will detect a previously unstudied population of young analogs to the giant planets of our solar system and help determine how planetary systems form. GPI employs a 44x44 woofer-tweeter adaptive optics system with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor operating at 1 kHz. The controller uses Fourier-based reconstruction and modal gains optimized from system telemetry (Poyneer et al. 2005, 2007). GPI has an apodized Lyot coronal graph to suppress diffraction and a near-infrared integral field spectrograph for obtaining planetary spectra. This paper discusses current performance limitations and presents the necessary instrumental modifications and sensitivity calculations for scenarios related to high-contrast observations of non-sidereal targets.

  9. Electrofluidic systems for contrast management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, Keith J.; Maranchi, Jeffrey P.; Tiffany, Jason E.; Brown, Christopher Y.; Maisano, Adam J.; Hagedon, Matthew A.; Heikenfeld, Jason C.

    2012-06-01

    Operating in dynamic lighting conditions and in greatly varying backgrounds is challenging. Current paints and state-ofthe- art passive adaptive coatings (e.g. photochromics) are not suitable for multi- environment situations. A semi-active, low power, skin is needed that can adapt its reflective properties based on the background environment to minimize contrast through the development and incorporation of suitable pigment materials. Electrofluidic skins are a reflective display technology for electronic ink and paper applications. The technology is similar to that in E Ink but makes use of MEMS based microfluidic structures, instead of simple black and white ink microcapsules dispersed in clear oil. Electrofluidic skin's low power operation and fast switching speeds (~20 ms) are an improvement over current state-ofthe- art contrast management technologies. We report on a microfluidic display which utilizes diffuse pigment dispersion inks to change the contrast of the underlying substrate from 5.8% to 100%. Voltage is applied and an electromechanical pressure is used to pull a pigment dispersion based ink from a hydrophobic coated reservoir into a hydrophobic coated surface channel. When no voltage is applied, the Young-Laplace pressure pushes the pigment dispersion ink back down into the reservoir. This allows the pixel to switch from the on and off state by balancing the two pressures. Taking a systems engineering approach from the beginning of development has enabled the technology to be integrated into larger systems.

  10. Study of sensory diversity and redundancy to encode for chemical mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Gálvez, Agustín; Fernandez, Luis; Marco, Santiago

    2011-09-01

    Inspired by sensory diversity and redundancy at the olfactory epithelium, we have built a large chemical sensor array based on commercial MOX sensors. Different sensor families along with temperature modulation accounts for sensory diversity, whereas sensors of the same family combined with different load resistors provide redundancy to the system. To study the encoding of odor mixtures, a data collection consisting on the response of the array to 3 binary mixtures of ethanol, acetone, and butanone with 18 different concentration ratios is obtained.

  11. Mass dependence of shear viscosity in a binary fluid mixture: mode-coupling theory.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sk Musharaf; Samanta, Alok; Choudhury, Niharendu; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2006-11-01

    An expression for the shear viscosity of a binary fluid mixture is derived using mode-coupling theory in order to study the mass dependence. The calculated results on shear viscosity for a binary isotopic Lennard-Jones fluid mixture show good agreement with results from molecular dynamics simulation carried out over a wide range of mass ratio at different composition. Also proposed is a new generalized Stokes-Einstein relation connecting the individual diffusivities to shear viscosity. PMID:17279895

  12. Thermal Transitions and Extrusion of Glycerol-Plasticized Whey Protein Mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of glycerol and moisture contents on the thermal transitions of whey protein isolate (WPI) powder-glycerol-water mixtures were studied. Mixtures with ratios of 100:0, 70:30, 60:40 and 50:50 WPI:glycerol on a dry basis (db) were pre-conditioned to 0.34+/-0.01 (25.4±0.4ºC) and 0.48+/-0.02...

  13. Differential effects of a complex organochlorine mixture on the proliferation of breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Aube, Michel; Larochelle, Christian; Ayotte, Pierre

    2011-04-15

    Organochlorine compounds (OCs) are a group of persistent chemicals that accumulate in fatty tissues with age. Although OCs has been tested individually for their capacity to induce breast cancer cell proliferation, few studies examined the effect of complex mixtures that comprise compounds frequently detected in the serum of women. We constituted such an OC mixture containing 15 different components in environmentally relevant proportions and assessed its proliferative effects in four breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, CAMA-1, MDAMB231) and in non-cancerous CV-1 cells. We also determined the capacity of the mixture to modulate cell cycle stage of breast cancer cells and to induce estrogenic and antiandrogenic effects using gene reporter assays. We observed that low concentrations of the mixture (100x10{sup 3} and 50x10{sup 3} dilutions) stimulated the proliferation of MCF-7 cells while higher concentrations (10x10{sup 3} and 5x10{sup 3} dilutions) had the opposite effect. In contrast, the mixture inhibited the proliferation of non-hormone-dependent cell lines. The mixture significantly increased the number of MCF-7 cells entering the S phase, an effect that was blocked by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780. Low concentrations of the mixture also caused an increase in CAMA-1 cell proliferation but only in the presence estradiol and dihydrotestosterone (p<0.05 at the 50x10{sup 3} dilution). DDT analogs and polychlorinated biphenyls all had the capacity to stimulate the proliferation of CAMA-1 cells in the presence of sex steroids. Reporter gene assays further revealed that the mixture and several of its constituents (DDT analogs, aldrin, dieldrin, {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane, toxaphene) induced estrogenic effects, whereas the mixture and several components (DDT analogs, aldrin, dieldrin and PCBs) inhibited the androgen signaling pathway. Our results indicate that the complex OC mixture increases the proliferation of MCF-7 cells due to its estrogenic potential. The

  14. Fuel properties of bituminous coal and pyrolytic oil mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Hazlin; Sharuddin, Munawar Zaman; Daud, Ahmad Rafizan Mohamad; Syed-Hassan, Syed Shatir A.

    2014-10-01

    Investigation on the thermal decomposition kinetics of coal-biooil slurry (CBS) fuel prepared at different ratios (100:0,70:30,60:40,0:100) was conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The materials consisted of Clermont bituminous coal (Australia) and bio-oil (also known as pyrolytic oil) from the source of Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) that was thermally converted by means of pyrolysis. Thermal decomposition of CBS fuel was performed in an inert atmosphere (50mL/min nitrogen) under non-isothermal conditions from room temperature to 1000°C at heating rate of 10°C/min. The apparent activation energy (Ea.) and pre-exponential factor (A) were calculated from the experimental results by using an Arrhenius-type kinetic model which first-order decomposition reaction was assumed. All kinetic parameters were tabulated based on the TG data obtained from the experiment. It was found that, the CBS fuel has higher reactivity than Clermont coal fuel during pyrolysis process, as the addition of pyrolytic oil will reduce the Ea values of the fuel. The thermal profiles of the mixtures showed potential trends that followed the characteristics of an ideal slurry fuel where high degradation rate is desirable. Among the mixture, the optimum fuel was found at the ratio of 60:40 of pyrolytic oil/coal mixtures with highest degradation rate. These findings may contribute to the development of a slurry fuel to be used in the vast existing conventional power plants.

  15. Convective instabilities of ternary mixtures in thermogravitational columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebib, Abdelfattah

    2007-11-01

    Convective instabilities in side heated infinite vertical slots containing a single fluid are stationary, shear driven when the Prandtl number Pr<12.5 while they are oscillatory, buoyancy dominated with Pr>12.5 due to the diminished influence of the thermal diffusivity with increasing Pr. Here we examine the influence of the concentration field generated by thermodiffusion in a ternary mixture of otherwise uniform concentration on this phenomenon. We first derive expressions and calculate the basic steady one-dimensional flow taking into account the vertical concentration gradients caused by thermodiffusion. Linear stability of this basic state is performed and the critical Rayleigh number, wavenumber, frequency, and vertical concentration gradients are determined as function of the two separation ratios, ratio of thermal expansivities, four Lewis numbers, and Pr. The results are in agreement with the base flow of the ternary mixture considered by Leahy-Dios et al., J. Chem. Phys. (2005). Stability results are in agreement with those from a simplified model in the long wave approximation as well as when restricted to binary mixtures. Stability restrictions on the operation of the thermogravitational column will be discussed.

  16. Fractionation in Gay-Berne liquid crystal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Razo, J. Antonio; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2007-10-01

    We present a constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulation study of the phase behavior of binary (50:50) Gay-Berne liquid crystal mixtures consisting of elongated particles with different lengths (LA>LB) and equal diameters. We focus on systems at dense liquid-state conditions. Considering three mixtures characterized by different values of LA(B) and different length ratios q=LB/LA<1 , we find complex fluid-fluid phase behavior resulting from the interplay between nematic, smectic- A -type, or smectic- B -type orientational ordering, on the one hand, and demixing into two phases of different composition (fractionation), on the other hand. The driving “forces” of demixing transitions are the temperature and the length ratio. Indeed, in the system characterized by the largest value of q (q=0.86) orientational order occurs already in mixed states, whereas full fractionation is found at q=0.71 . The two resulting states are either of type smectic- B -nematic (intermediate temperatures) or smectic- B -smectic- B (low temperatures). In the intermediate case q=0.80 we observe a stepwise ordering and demixing behavior on cooling the system from high temperatures. Moreover, our results show that the stability range of (partially) nematic structures in mixtures of sufficiently small q can be significantly larger than in the pure counterparts, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

  17. Fractionation in Gay-Berne liquid crystal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Razo, J Antonio; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2007-10-01

    We present a constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulation study of the phase behavior of binary (50:50) Gay-Berne liquid crystal mixtures consisting of elongated particles with different lengths (LA>LB) and equal diameters. We focus on systems at dense liquid-state conditions. Considering three mixtures characterized by different values of LA(B) and different length ratios q=LB/LA<1, we find complex fluid-fluid phase behavior resulting from the interplay between nematic, smectic-A-type, or smectic-B-type orientational ordering, on the one hand, and demixing into two phases of different composition (fractionation), on the other hand. The driving "forces" of demixing transitions are the temperature and the length ratio. Indeed, in the system characterized by the largest value of q (q=0.86) orientational order occurs already in mixed states, whereas full fractionation is found at q=0.71. The two resulting states are either of type smectic-B-nematic (intermediate temperatures) or smectic-B-smectic-B (low temperatures). In the intermediate case q=0.80 we observe a stepwise ordering and demixing behavior on cooling the system from high temperatures. Moreover, our results show that the stability range of (partially) nematic structures in mixtures of sufficiently small q can be significantly larger than in the pure counterparts, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. PMID:17995009

  18. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  19. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Ar-CO2 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encarnação, P. M. C. C.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Pinto, M. G. A.; Neves, P. N. B.; Trindade, A. M. F.; Escada, J.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Barata, J. A. S.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the experimental results for the mobility of ions in argon-carbon dioxide gaseous mixtures (Ar-CO2) for pressures ranging from 6 to 10 Torr and for reduced electric fields in the 10 Td to 25 Td range, at room temperature.The time-of-arrival spectra of the several mixture ratios studied revealed that the relative abundance of the ions and their mobilities depend on the mixture ratio. For Ar concentrations below 80% only one peak was observed in the spectra which was attributed to CO2+, while for Ar concentrations above 80% a second peak appears at the left side of the main peak, which may be due to impurities, probably H2O+. In this work, the time-of-arrival spectra from which reduced mobilities were obtained for Ar concentrations of 20% (K0 = 1.141±0.004 cm2V-1s-1), 50% (K0 = 1.385±0.009 cm2V-1s-1), 85% (K0 = 1.690±0.022 cm2V-1s-1) and 95% (K0 = 1.954±0.043 cm2V-1s-1) are displayed as well as other reduced mobilities values obtained similarly. The ion mobility study was performed at reduced electric field values typically used in gaseous detectors.

  20. Hard-sphere kinetic models for inert and reactive mixtures.

    PubMed

    Polewczak, Jacek

    2016-10-19

    I consider stochastic variants of a simple reacting sphere (SRS) kinetic model (Xystris and Dahler 1978 J. Chem. Phys. 68 387-401, Qin and Dahler 1995 J. Chem. Phys. 103 725-50, Dahler and Qin 2003 J. Chem. Phys. 118 8396-404) for dense reacting mixtures. In contrast to the line-of-center models of chemical reactive models, in the SRS kinetic model, the microscopic reversibility (detailed balance) can be easily shown to be satisfied, and thus all mathematical aspects of the model can be fully justified. In the SRS model, the molecules behave as if they were single mass points with two internal states. Collisions may alter the internal states of the molecules, and this occurs when the kinetic energy associated with the reactive motion exceeds the activation energy. Reactive and non-reactive collision events are considered to be hard sphere-like. I consider a four component mixture A, B, A (*), B (*), in which the chemical reactions are of the type [Formula: see text], with A (*) and B (*) being distinct species from A and B. This work extends the joined works with George Stell to the kinetic models of dense inert and reactive mixtures. The idea of introducing smearing-type effect in the collisional process results in a new class of stochastic kinetic models for both inert and reactive mixtures. In this paper the important new mathematical properties of such systems of kinetic equations are proven. The new results for stochastic revised Enskog system for inert mixtures are also provided. PMID:27545341

  1. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  2. Effect of Cement on Emulsified Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruc, Seref; Celik, Fazil; Akpinar, M. Vefa

    2007-10-01

    Emulsified asphalt mixtures have environmental, economical, and logistical advantages over hot mixtures. However, they have attracted little attention as structural layers due to their inadequate performance and susceptibility to early life damage by rainfall. The objective of this article is to provide an improved insight into how the mechanical properties of emulsion mixtures may be improved and to determine the influence of cement on emulsified asphalt mixtures. Laboratory tests on strength, temperature susceptibility, water damage, creep and permanent deformation were implemented to evaluate the mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures. The test results showed that mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures have significantly improved with Portland cement addition. This experimental study suggested that cement modified asphalt emulsion mixtures might be an alternate way of a structural layer material in pavement.

  3. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject presentation, entitled, Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment, was presented at the International Space Station (ISS) Increment 33/34 Science Symposium. This presentation provides an overview of an international collaboration between NASA and CNES to study the behavior of a dilute aqueous solution of Na2SO4 (5% w) at near-critical conditions. The Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) investigation, serves as important precursor work for subsequent Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) experiments. The SCWM investigation will be performed in DECLICs High Temperature Insert (HTI) for the purpose of studying critical fluid phenomena at high temperatures and pressures. The HTI includes a completely sealed and integrated test cell (i.e., Sample Cell Unit SCU) that will contain approximately 0.3 ml of the aqueous test solution. During the sequence of tests, scheduled to be performed in FY13, temperatures and pressures will be elevated to critical conditions (i.e., Tc = 374C and Pc = 22 MPa) in order to observe salt precipitation, precipitate agglomeration and precipitate transport in the presence of a temperature gradient without the influences of gravitational forces. This presentation provides an overview of the motivation for this work, a description of the DECLIC HTI hardware, the proposed test sequences, and a brief discussion of the scientific research objectives.

  4. Contrast media in cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Massimo; Aquaro, Giovanni; Favilli, Brunella

    2005-01-01

    Among the available imaging techniques, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is gaining an increasing role in the cardiologic setting because its specific properties such as the use of non ionising energies, the natural strong contrast between different tissues, the absence of spatial limitations, the good spatial and temporal resolution, the reduced operator dependency. To further improve the images quality and the histopathologic characterisation of tissues the use of contrast media (molecules containing gadolinium, manganese, iron, dysprosium ions) has been proposed both in the experimental and in the clinical settings. Among these ions gadolinium, which having 7 odd electrons in the external orbit has a strong magnetic momentum, is the most used. Gadolinium by itself is extremely toxic but once it is linked with a chelanting agent such as DTPA (Dietilen-Triamin-Penta-Acetic acid) the resulting complex shows a very low toxicity. The number of Gadolinium based compound is growing together with the use of contrast agents in MRI. These contrast agents are routinely used to perform Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) and to a better definition of several cardiac diseases such as the presence of a intra- or paracardiac mass, the evaluation of myocardial perfusion and the evaluation of viability. Both the latter applications have relevant clinical implications. In fact the assessment of myocardial perfusion is one of the most used approach for detecting inducible myocardial ischemia due to major coronary artery disease or to assess the presence of a microvascular disease. The presence and the extent of viable myocardium is deeply modifying the clinical decision making as this viable tissue can recruit a normal function spontaneously or after revascularisation. Furthermore, the extent of viable myocardium has a strong correlation with negative prognosis. Clinical events are also time related to the detection of viable tissue. These evidences imply that the diagnostic

  5. Contrast enhancement of propagation based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Adam; Xu, Ling; Petruccelli, Jon C.; Gupta, Rajiv; Barbastathis, George

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a quantitative X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) technique derived from propagation dependent phase change. We assume that the absorption and phase components are correlated and solve the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE). The experimental setup is simple compared to other XPCI techniques; the only requirements are a micro-focus X-ray source with sufficient temporal coherence and an X-ray detector of sufficient spatial resolution. This method was demonstrated in three scenarios, the first of which entails identification of an index-matched sphere. A rubber and nylon sphere were immersed in water and imaged. While the rubber sphere could be plainly seen on a radiograph, the nylon sphere was only visible in the phase reconstruction. Next, the technique was applied to differentiating liquid samples. In this scenario, three liquid samples (acetone, water, and hydrogen peroxide) were analyzed using both conventional computed tomography (CT) and phase contrast CT. While conventional CT was capable of differentiating between acetone and the other two liquids, it failed to distinguish between water and hydrogen peroxide; only phase CT was capable of differentiating all three samples. Finally, the technique was applied to CT imaging of a human artery specimen with extensive atherosclerotic plaque. This scenario demonstrated the increased sensitivity to soft tissue compared to conventional CT; it also uncovered some drawbacks of the method, which will be the target of future work. In all cases, the signal-to-noise ratio of phase contrast was greatly enhanced relative to conventional attenuation-based imaging.

  6. Immobilized Contrast Enhanced (ICE) MRI: Gadolinium-based long-term MR Contrast Enhancement of the Vein Graft Vessel Wall*

    PubMed Central

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Yu, Peng; Tao, Ming; Nguyen, Binh T.; Campagna, Christina M.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Mulkern, Robert V.; Ozaki, C. Keith; Rybicki, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    An implantable MR contrast agent that can be covalently immobilized on tissue during surgery has been developed. The rationale is that a durable increase in tissue contrast using an implantable contrast agent can enhance post-surgical tissue differentiation using MRI. For small vessel (e.g., vein graft) MRI, the direct benefit of such permanent “labeling” of the vessel wall by modification of its relaxation properties is to achieve more efficient imaging. This efficiency can be realized as either increased contrast leading to more accurate delineation of vessel wall and lesion tissue boundaries, or, faster imaging without penalizing contrast-to-noise ratio, or a combination thereof. We demonstrate, for the first time, stable long-term MRI enhancement using such an exogenous contrast mechanism based on immobilizing a modified Gd-DTPA complex on a human vein using a covalent amide bond. Signal enhancement due to the covalently immobilized contrast agent is demonstrated for excised human vein specimens imaged at 3T, and its long-term stability is demonstrated during a 4-month incubation period. PMID:20859994

  7. Formation of double glass in binary mixtures of anisotropic particles: Dynamic heterogeneities in rotations and displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takae, Kyohei; Onuki, Akira

    2013-10-01

    We study glass behavior in a mixture of elliptic and circular particles in two dimensions at low temperatures using an orientation-dependent Lennard-Jones potential. The ellipses have a mild aspect ratio (˜1.2) and tend to align at low temperatures, while the circular particles play the role of impurities disturbing the ellipse orientations at a concentration of 20%. These impurities have a size smaller than that of the ellipses and attract them in the homeotropic alignment. As a result, the coordination number around each impurity is mostly 5 or 4 in glassy states. We realize double glass, where both the orientations and the positions are disordered but still hold mesoscopic order. We find a strong heterogeneity in the flip motions of the ellipses, which sensitively depends on the impurity clustering. In our model, a small fraction of the ellipses still undergo flip motions relatively rapidly even at low temperatures. In contrast, the nonflip rotations (with angle changes not close to ±π) are mainly caused by the cooperative configuration changes involving many particles. Then, there arises a long-time heterogeneity in the nonflip rotations closely correlated with the dynamic heterogeneity in displacements.

  8. Formation of double glass in binary mixtures of anisotropic particles: dynamic heterogeneities in rotations and displacements.

    PubMed

    Takae, Kyohei; Onuki, Akira

    2013-10-01

    We study glass behavior in a mixture of elliptic and circular particles in two dimensions at low temperatures using an orientation-dependent Lennard-Jones potential. The ellipses have a mild aspect ratio (∼1.2) and tend to align at low temperatures, while the circular particles play the role of impurities disturbing the ellipse orientations at a concentration of 20%. These impurities have a size smaller than that of the ellipses and attract them in the homeotropic alignment. As a result, the coordination number around each impurity is mostly 5 or 4 in glassy states. We realize double glass, where both the orientations and the positions are disordered but still hold mesoscopic order. We find a strong heterogeneity in the flip motions of the ellipses, which sensitively depends on the impurity clustering. In our model, a small fraction of the ellipses still undergo flip motions relatively rapidly even at low temperatures. In contrast, the nonflip rotations (with angle changes not close to ±π) are mainly caused by the cooperative configuration changes involving many particles. Then, there arises a long-time heterogeneity in the nonflip rotations closely correlated with the dynamic heterogeneity in displacements. PMID:24229182

  9. The production of carbon nanofibers and thin films on palladium catalysts from ethylene oxygen mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Jonathan; Doorn, Stephen; Atwater, Mark; Leseman, Zayd; Luhrs, Claudia C; Diez, Yolanda F; Diaz, Angel M

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of carbonaceous materials deposited in fuel rich ethylene-oxygen mixtures on three types of palladium: foil, sputtered film, and nanopowder, are reported. It was found that the form of palladium has a dramatic influence on the morphology of the deposited carbon. In particular, on sputtered film and powder, tight 'weaves' of sub-micron filaments formed quickly. In contrast, on foils under identical conditions, the dominant morphology is carbon thin films with basal planes oriented parallel to the substrate surface. Temperature, gas flow rate, reactant flow ratio (C2H4:02), and residence time (position) were found to influence both growth rate and type for all three forms of Pd. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, temperature-programmed oxidation, and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the crystallinity of the as-deposited carbon, and it was determined that transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were the most reliable methods for determining crystallinity. The dependence of growth on reactor position, and the fact that no growth was observed in the absence of oxygen support the postulate that the carbon deposition proceeds by combustion generated radical species.

  10. Optically measured microvascular blood flow contrast of malignant breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Choe, Regine; Putt, Mary E; Carlile, Peter M; Durduran, Turgut; Giammarco, Joseph M; Busch, David R; Jung, Ki Won; Czerniecki, Brian J; Tchou, Julia; Feldman, Michael D; Mies, Carolyn; Rosen, Mark A; Schnall, Mitchell D; DeMichele, Angela; Yodh, Arjun G

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular blood flow contrast is an important hemodynamic and metabolic parameter with potential to enhance in vivo breast cancer detection and therapy monitoring. Here we report on non-invasive line-scan measurements of malignant breast tumors with a hand-held optical probe in the remission geometry. The probe employs diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), a near-infrared optical method that quantifies deep tissue microvascular blood flow. Tumor-to-normal perfusion ratios are derived from thirty-two human subjects. Mean (95% confidence interval) tumor-to-normal ratio using surrounding normal tissue was 2.25 (1.92-2.63); tumor-to-normal ratio using normal tissues at the corresponding tumor location in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.94-2.66), and using normal tissue in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.90-2.70). Thus, the mean tumor-to-normal ratios were significantly different from unity irrespective of the normal tissue chosen, implying that tumors have significantly higher blood flow than normal tissues. Therefore, the study demonstrates existence of breast cancer contrast in blood flow measured by DCS. The new, optically accessible cancer contrast holds potential for cancer detection and therapy monitoring applications, and it is likely to be especially useful when combined with diffuse optical spectroscopy/tomography. PMID:24967878

  11. Composition and thermal analysis of binary mixtures of mee fat and palm stearin.

    PubMed

    Abdul Manaf, Yanty Noorziana; Nazrim Marikkar, Jalaldeen Mohammed; Musthafa, Shuhaimi; Saari, Miskandar Mat

    2014-01-01

    Seed fat of Madhuca longifolia known as mee fat (MF) has been considered as a potential plant fat for producing fat mixture to simulate the properties of lard. A study was carried out to evaluate the effect of addition of palm stearin (PS) on the solidification behavior of MF to formulate a mixture to become similar in solidification characteristics of lard. Three fat mixtures were prepared by blending MF with palm stearin PS in different ratios: MF:PS (99.5:0.5), MF:PS (99:1), MF:PS (98:2) (w/w), and identified by the mass ratio of MF to PS. The fat mixtures were compared with lard in terms of their fatty acid and triacylglycerol compositions, differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) thermal profiles and solid fat content (SFC) characteristics. Results showed that there were considerable differences between lard and MF:PS fat mixtures with regard to fatty acid and triacylglycerol compositions. The increasing proportion of PS in MF:PS fat mixtures caused a general increase in SFC at different temperatures with respect to the SFC profile of native MF. Of the three binary mixtures, MF:PS (99:1) was found to show the least difference to lard in terms of SFC values throughout the temperature range. PMID:24671022

  12. Sensor for measuring alcohol content of alcohol/gasoline fuel mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.J.; Swarin, S.J.; Sultan, M.F.; Lambert, D.K.; Jack, M.D.

    1993-08-31

    A sensing device is described for determining the alcohol content of an alcohol/gasoline mixture comprising: a light source emitting a light beam containing at least a first and a second wavelengths within the near-infrared spectrum, said light beam being transmitted through the alcohol/gasoline fuel mixture; means for switching the current through said light source between at least two fixed values, so as to correspondingly switch the light intensity at said first and second wavelengths which is emitted by said light source; first and second detectors which are disposed so as to receive said emitted light beam after its transmission through the alcohol/gasoline fuel mixture, said first detector determines a first amount of absorption by the alcohol/gasoline fuel mixture at said first wavelength for each of said fixed values of current, and said second detector determines a second amount of absorption by the alcohol/gasoline fuel mixture at said second wavelength for each of said fixed values of current; means for separately measuring the output voltage from said first and second detectors for each of said power settings; and computational means for determining, from said output voltages, the ratio of said first and second absorbances by the alcohol/gasoline fuel mixture at said first and said second wavelengths for each of said fixed values of current such that said ratio of absorbances provide an output indicative of the alcohol content within the alcohol/gasoline mixture.

  13. On protein abundance distributions in complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ionized atoms or molecules, dates back more than 100 years, and has both qualitative and quantitative uses for determining chemical and structural information. Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry on biological samples focuses on identifying the proteins present in the samples, and establishing the relative abundances of those proteins. Such protein inventories create the opportunity to discover novel biomarkers and disease targets. We have previously introduced a normalized, label-free method for quantification of protein abundances under a shotgun proteomics platform (Griffin et al., 2010). The introduction of this method for quantifying and comparing protein levels leads naturally to the issue of modeling protein abundances in individual samples. We here report that protein abundance levels from two recent proteomics experiments conducted by the authors can be adequately represented by Sichel distributions. Mathematically, Sichel distributions are mixtures of Poisson distributions with a rather complex mixing distribution, and have been previously and successfully applied to linguistics and species abundance data. The Sichel model can provide a direct measure of the heterogeneity of protein abundances, and can reveal protein abundance differences that simpler models fail to show. PMID:23360617

  14. Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels

    DOEpatents

    Heffel, James W.; Scott, Paul B.

    2003-09-02

    An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

  15. Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Heffel, James W.; Scott, Paul B.; Park, Chan Seung

    2011-11-01

    An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

  16. Effective contrast of colored stimuli in the mesopic range: a metric for perceived contrast based on achromatic luminance contrast.

    PubMed

    Walkey, Helen C; Barbur, John L; Harlow, J Alister; Hurden, Antony; Moorhead, Ian R; Taylor, Julie A F

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how color signals and cone- and rod-based luminance signals contribute to perceived contrast in the mesopic range. In this study the perceived contrast of colored, mesopic stimuli was matched with that of spatially equivalent achromatic stimuli. The objective was to develop a metric for perceived contrast in the mesopic range in terms of an equivalent achromatic luminance contrast, referred to here as effective contrast. Stimulus photopic luminance contrast, scotopic luminance contrast, and chromatic difference from the background all contributed to effective contrast over the mid-mesopic range, but their contributions were not independent and varied markedly with background luminance. Surprisingly, color made a significant contribution to effective contrast from 10 to approximately 0.003 cd m(-2). A model describing this relationship is introduced (R2 = 0.89) and compared with predictions of mesopic luminance contrast obtained from a number of models proposed as systems of mesopic photometry. PMID:15669611

  17. Effective contrast of colored stimuli in the mesopic range: a metric for perceived contrast based on achromatic luminance contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkey, Helen C.; Barbur, John L.; Harlow, J. Alister; Hurden, Antony; Moorhead, Ian R.; Taylor, Julie A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how color signals and cone- and rod-based luminance signals contribute to perceived contrast in the mesopic range. In this study the perceived contrast of colored, mesopic stimuli was matched with that of spatially equivalent achromatic stimuli. The objective was to develop a metric for perceived contrast in the mesopic range in terms of an equivalent achromatic luminance contrast, referred to here as effective contrast. Stimulus photopic luminance contrast, scotopic luminance contrast, and chromatic difference from the background all contributed to effective contrast over the mid-mesopic range, but their contributions were not independent and varied markedly with background luminance. Surprisingly, color made a significant contribution to effective contrast from 10 to approximately 0.003 cd m-2. A model describing this relationship is introduced (R2=0.89) and compared with predictions of mesopic luminance contrast obtained from a number of models proposed as systems of mesopic photometry.

  18. Spectral properties of ice-particulate mixtures and implications for remote sensing. I - Intimate mixtures. [of planetary and satellite surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.; Lucey, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    From laboratory spectra of many ice-particulate mixtures with high, medium, and low albedo particulates, the band depths, continuum reflectance, and ratio of band depth to continuum reflectance are derived as a function of the logarithm of thef particulate weight fraction in the sample. Ice band depths are dependent on the particulate albedo, and increase with smaller weight fractions of particulates until the bands saturate and their depths decrease. While the continuum reflectance is a complex function of the particulate albedo and wavelength of light, the band depth-to-continuum reflectance ratios appear independent of particulate albedo in such a fashion that, for a given grain size of particulate, a calibration curve to the abundance of ice and particulates is derived. Theoretically produced frost spectra show similar curves of growth for band depth, continuum reflectance, and corresponding ratio vs the photon mean optical path length.

  19. Spontaneous ignition delay characteristics of hydrocarbon fuel-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, A. H.; Freeman, W. G.; Cowell, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of pressure on the autoignition characteristics of homogeneous mixtures of hydrocarbon fuels in air is examined. Autoignition delay times are measured for propane, ethylene, methane, and acetylene in a continuous flow apparatus featuring a multi-point fuel injector. Results are presented for mixture temperatures from 670K to 1020K, pressures from 1 to 10 atmospheres, equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 0.7, and velocities from 5 to 30 m/s. Delay time is related to pressure, temperature, and fuel concentration by global reaction theory. The results show variations in global activation energy from 25 to 38 kcal/kg-mol, pressure exponents from 0.66 to 1.21, and fuel concentration exponents from 0.19 to 0.75 for the fuels studied. These results are generally in good agreement with previous studies carried out under similar conditions.

  20. Bosonic binary mixtures with Josephson-type interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Valéria de C.; Arenas, Zochil González; Barci, Daniel G.; Linhares, Cesar A.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by experiments in bosonic mixtures composed of a single element in two different hyperfine states, we study bosonic binary mixtures in the presence of Josephson interactions between species. We focus on a particular model with O(2) isospin symmetry, lifted by an imbalanced population parametrized by a Rabi frequency, ΩR, and a detuning, ν, which couples the phases of both species. We have studied the model at mean-field approximation plus Gaussian fluctuations. We have found that both species simultaneously condensate below a critical temperature Tc and the relative phases are locked by the applied laser phase, α. Moreover, the condensate fractions are strongly dependent on the ratio ΩR / ∣ ν ∣ that is not affected by thermal fluctuations.

  1. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals. PMID:12396200

  2. Quantification of signal detection performance degradation induced by phase-retrieval in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    In propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) imaging, the measured image contains a mixture of absorption- and phase-contrast. To obtain separate images of the projected absorption and phase (i.e., refractive) properties of a sample, phase retrieval methods can be employed. It has been suggested that phase-retrieval can always improve image quality in PB XPC imaging. However, when objective (task-based) measures of image quality are employed, this is not necessarily true and phase retrieval can be detrimental. In this work, signal detection theory is utilized to quantify the performance of a Hotelling observer (HO) for detecting a known signal in a known background. Two cases are considered. In the first case, the HO acts directly on the measured intensity data. In the second case, the HO acts on either the retrieved phase or absorption image. We demonstrate that the performance of the HO is superior when acting on the measured intensity data. The loss of task-specific information induced by phase-retrieval is quantified by computing the efficiency of the HO as the ratio of the test statistic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the two cases. The effect of the system geometry on this efficiency is systematically investigated. Our findings confirm that phase-retrieval can impair signal detection performance in XPC imaging.

  3. Mixture distributions in human genetics research.

    PubMed

    Schork, N J; Allison, D B; Thiel, B

    1996-06-01

    The use of mixture distributions in genetics research dates back to at least the late 1800s when Karl Pearson applied them in an analysis of crab morphometry. Pearson's use of normal mixture distributions to model the mixing of different species of crab (or 'families' of crab as he referred to them) within a defined geographic area motivated further use of mixture distributions in genetics research settings, and ultimately led to their development and recognition as intuitive modelling devices for the effects of underlying genes on quantitative phenotypic (i.e. trait) expression. In addition, mixture distributions are now used routinely to model or accommodate the genetic heterogeneity thought to underlie many human diseases. Specific applications of mixture distribution models in contemporary human genetics research are, in fact, too numerous to count. Despite this long, consistent and arguably illustrious history of use, little mention of mixture distributions in genetics research is made in many recent reviews on mixture models. This review attempts to rectify this by providing insight into the role that mixture distributions play in contemporary human genetics research. Tables providing examples from the literature that describe applications of mixture models in human genetics research are offered as a way of acquainting the interested reader with relevant studies. In addition, some of the more problematic aspects of the use of mixture models in genetics research are outlined and addressed. PMID:8817796

  4. Characterizing Olfactory Binary Mixture Interactions in Fischer 344 Rats Using Behavioral Reaction Times

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Wendy M.; Gaynor, Leslie; Windham, Ethan; Lyman, Michelle; Munizza, Olivia; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Response times provide essential subthreshold perceptual data that extend beyond accuracy alone. Behavioral reaction times (RTs) were used to characterize rats’ ability to detect individual odorants in a series of complimentary binary odorant mixture ratios. We employed an automated, liquid-dilution olfactometer to train Fischer 344 rats (N = 8) on an odor identification task using nonreinforced probe trials. Binary mixture ratios composed of aliphatic odorants (citral and octanol) were arranged such that relative contributions of the 2 components varied systematically by a factor of 1% (v/v). Odorant concentrations for the target (S+), control (S−), and mixture (S+:S−) odorants were presented relative to threshold for each rat. Rats were initially trained to respond by licking at a spout to obtain liquid reward for either citral or octanol as the reinforced target (S+) odorant. After achieving 100% accuracy, rats were transferred to variable ratio (VR 2) reinforcement for correct responding. Nonreinforced probe trials (2 per block of 22 trials) were tested for each mixture ratio and recorded as either S+ (rats lick-responded in the presence of the mixture) or S− (rats refrained from licking), thereby indicating detection of the trained, S+ odorant. To determine the perceived salience for each ratio, RTs (latency from odorant onset to lick response) were recorded for each trial. Consistent with previous studies, RTs for both odorants were shortest (~150–200ms) when the probe trials consisted of a single, monomolecular component. Binary mixtures that contained as little as 1% of the S−, nontarget odorant, however, were sufficiently different perceptually to increase behavioral RTs (i.e., rats hesitated longer before responding); RTs changed systematically as a function of the binary ratio. Interestingly, the rate of RT change was dependent on which odorant served as the S+, suggesting an asymmetric interaction between the 2 odorants. The data demonstrate

  5. Characterizing olfactory binary mixture interactions in Fischer 344 rats using behavioral reaction times.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Wendy M; Gaynor, Leslie; Windham, Ethan; Lyman, Michelle; Munizza, Olivia; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L; Smith, David W

    2015-06-01

    Response times provide essential subthreshold perceptual data that extend beyond accuracy alone. Behavioral reaction times (RTs) were used to characterize rats' ability to detect individual odorants in a series of complimentary binary odorant mixture ratios. We employed an automated, liquid-dilution olfactometer to train Fischer 344 rats (N = 8) on an odor identification task using nonreinforced probe trials. Binary mixture ratios composed of aliphatic odorants (citral and octanol) were arranged such that relative contributions of the 2 components varied systematically by a factor of 1% (v/v). Odorant concentrations for the target (S+), control (S-), and mixture (S+:S-) odorants were presented relative to threshold for each rat. Rats were initially trained to respond by licking at a spout to obtain liquid reward for either citral or octanol as the reinforced target (S+) odorant. After achieving 100% accuracy, rats were transferred to variable ratio (VR 2) reinforcement for correct responding. Nonreinforced probe trials (2 per block of 22 trials) were tested for each mixture ratio and recorded as either S+ (rats lick-responded in the presence of the mixture) or S- (rats refrained from licking), thereby indicating detection of the trained, S+ odorant. To determine the perceived salience for each ratio, RTs (latency from odorant onset to lick response) were recorded for each trial. Consistent with previous studies, RTs for both odorants were shortest (~150-200ms) when the probe trials consisted of a single, monomolecular component. Binary mixtures that contained as little as 1% of the S-, nontarget odorant, however, were sufficiently different perceptually to increase behavioral RTs (i.e., rats hesitated longer before responding); RTs changed systematically as a function of the binary ratio. Interestingly, the rate of RT change was dependent on which odorant served as the S+, suggesting an asymmetric interaction between the 2 odorants. The data demonstrate the value

  6. In-cylinder measurement of mixture maldistribution in a L-head engine

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.; Patterson, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The distribution of fuel-air mixtures in many L-head engines is not homogeneous. If the local mixture is too rich or too lean, then incomplete combustion occurs. This can play a major role in unburned hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions. Fuel-air mixture distribution depends on in-cylinder swirl and turbulence, and is directly related to intake-manifold configuration, fuel-delivery-system design and combustion-chamber shape. Understanding the spatial mixture distribution may help improve the design of these aforementioned components. Consequently, a more complete combustion process may result, and emissions reduced. An optical fiber bundle was used to measure the emissions of CH and C{sub 2} radicals in this research to map the mixture uniformity in the combustion chamber. The experimental results showed that there exists a relationship between the intensity ratio (I{sub C2}/I{sub CH}) and the fuel equivalence ratio. The local fuel equivalence ratios can be obtained after the relationship between the light intensity ratio and fuel equivalence ratio is established. In addition, fuel-rich combustion zones were identified in the vicinity of spark plug and valves. Two fuels, propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) and Indolene (CH{sub 1.86}){sub 7} were used for investigating the effects of different types of fuel on the intensity ratio. A L-head spark-ignition engine was selected for this study since this type of engine uses a conventional carburetor in which the fuel-air mixture is relatively nonhomogeneous which produces high hydrocarbon emissions. Furthermore, the flat cylinder head supplies sufficient space for the installation of the optical fiber bundles.

  7. Mixtures Research at NIEHS: An Evolving Program

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Cynthia V; Carlin, Danielle J; DeVito, Micheal J; Thompson, Claudia L; Walker, Nigel J

    2014-01-01

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has a rich history in evaluating the toxicity of mixtures. The types of mixtures assessed by the Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP) and the extramural community (through the Division of Extramural Research and Training (DERT)) have included a broad range of chemicals and toxicants, with each study having a unique set of questions and design considerations. Some examples of the types of mixtures studied include: groundwater contaminants, pesticides/fertilizers, dioxin-like chemicals (assessing the toxic equivalency approach), drug combinations, air pollution, metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, technical mixtures (e.g. pentachlorophenol, flame retardants), and mixed entities (e.g. herbals, asbestos). These endeavors have provided excellent data on the toxicity of specific mixtures and have been informative to the human health risk assessment process in general (e.g. providing data on low dose exposures to environmental chemicals). However, the mixtures research effort at NIEHS, to date, has been driven by test article nominations to the DNTP or by investigator-initiated research through DERT. Recently, the NIEHS has embarked upon an effort to coordinate mixtures research across both intramural and extramural divisions in order to maximize mixtures research results. A path forward for NIEHS mixtures research will be based on feedback from a Request for Information (RFI) designed to gather up-to-date views on the knowledge gaps and roadblocks to evaluating mixtures and performing cumulative risk assessment, and a workshop organized to bring together mixtures experts from risk assessment, exposure science, biology, epidemiology, and statistics. The future of mixtures research at NIEHS will include projects from nominations to DNTP, studies by extramural investigators, and collaborations across government agencies that address high-priority questions in the field of mixtures research

  8. The synthesis of short- and medium-chain-length poly(hydroxyalkanoate) mixtures from glucose- or alkanoic acid-grown Pseudomonas oleovorans.

    PubMed

    Ashby, R D; Solaiman, D K Y; Foglia, T A

    2002-03-01

    Pseudomonas oleovorans NRRL B-778 accumulated mixtures of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and medium-chain-length poly(hydroxyalkanoates) (mcl-PHAs) when grown on glucose, octanoic acid or oleic acid, whereas growth on nonanoic acid or undecanoic acid resulted in copolymers of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHB-co-HV). Acetone fractionation verified the presence of PHB/mcl-PHA mixtures. The acetone-insoluble (AIS) fractions of the polymers derived from glucose (PHA-glucose), octanoic acid (PHA-octanoic) and oleic acid (PHA-oleic) were exclusively PHB while the acetone-soluble (AS) fractions contained mcl-PHA composed of differing ratios of 3-hydroxy-acid monomer units, which ranged in chain length from 6 to 14 carbon atoms. In contrast, both the AIS and AS fractions from the polymers derived from nonanoic acid (PHA-nonanoic) and undecanoic acid (PHA-undecanoic) were composed of comparable ratios of 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) and 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV). The unfractionated PHA-glucose, PHA-octanoic and PHA-oleic polymers had melting temperatures (Tm) between 177 and 179 degrees C, enthalpies of fusion (AHf) of 20 cal/g and glasstransition temperatures (Tg) of 3-4 degrees C. This was due to the large PHB content in the polymer mixtures. On the other hand, the PHA-nonanoic and PHA-undecanoic polymers had thermal properties that supported their copolymer nature. In both cases, the Tm values were 161 degrees C, deltaHf values were 7 cal/g and Tg values were - 3 degrees C. PMID:12074088

  9. Computing Isentropic Flow Properties of Air/R-134a Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Ray

    2006-01-01

    MACHRK is a computer program that calculates isentropic flow properties of mixtures of air and refrigerant R-134a (tetrafluoroethane), which are used in transonic aerodynamic testing in a wind tunnel at Langley Research Center. Given the total temperature, total pressure, static pressure, and mole fraction of R-134a in a mixture, MACHRK calculates the Mach number and the following associated flow properties: dynamic pressure, velocity, density, static temperature, speed of sound, viscosity, ratio of specific heats, Reynolds number, and Prandtl number. Real-gas effects are taken into account by treating the gases comprising the mixture as both thermally and calorically imperfect. The Redlich-Kwong equation of state for mixtures and the constant-pressure ideal heat-capacity equation for the mixture are used in combination with the departure- function approach of thermodynamics to obtain the equations for computing the flow properties. In addition to the aforementioned calculations for air/R-134a mixtures, a research version of MACHRK can perform the corresponding calculations for mixtures of air and R-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane) and for air/SF6 mixtures. [R-12 was replaced by R-134a because of environmental concerns. SF6 has been considered for use in increasing the Reynolds-number range.

  10. Spray-dried Amioca starch/Carbopol 974P mixtures as buccal bioadhesive carriers.

    PubMed

    Ameye, D; Mus, D; Foreman, P; Remon, J P

    2005-09-14

    In the present study, spray-dried Amioca starch/Carbopol 974P mixtures were evaluated as potential buccal bioadhesive tablets. Carbopol (C 974P) concentrations from 5 to 75% were tested. All spray-dried mixtures showed a comparable or better bioadhesive capacity compared to a reference formulation (DDWM/C 974P 95/5). The bioadhesive capacities of Amioca/Carbopol 974P mixtures were improved by spray-drying. All spray-dried mixtures showed significantly higher work of adhesion values compared to their equivalent physical mixtures. The influence of Carbopol concentration on the in vivo adhesion time of placebo tablets and in vitro miconazole nitrate release was tested. The ratio Amioca/C 974P 70/30 showed the longest in vivo adhesion time (24.5+/-8.5 h). Lower and higher C 974P concentrations had a shorter in vivo adhesion time. The mixtures containing between 15 and 30% C 974P could all sustain the in vitro miconazole nitrate release over 20 h. Again, lower and higher C 974P concentrations showed a faster in vitro miconazole release. The drug loading capacity of a spray-dried mixture containing 20% C 974P was investigated in vivo in dogs using testosterone as model drug. The spray-dried mixture could be loaded with 60% drug without loosing its in vivo bioadhesive and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:16019172

  11. Evaluating competing adverse and beneficial outcomes using a mixture model

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Bryan; Cole, Stephen R.; Moore, Richard D.; Gange, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A competing risk framework occurs when individuals have the potential to experience only one of several mutually exclusive outcomes. Standard survival methods often overestimate the cumulative incidence of events when competing events are censored. Mixture distributions have been previously applied to the competing risk framework to obtain inferences regarding the subdistribution of an event of interest. Often the competing event is treated as a nuisance, but it may be of interest to compare adverse events against the beneficial outcome when dealing with an intervention. In this paper, methods for using a mixture model to estimate an adverse-benefit ratio curve (ratio of the cumulative incidence curves for the two competing events) and the ratio of the subhazards for the two competing events are presented. Both parametric and semi-parametric approaches are described with some remarks for extending the model to include uncertainty in the event type that occurred, left-truncation in order to allow for time-dependent analyses, and uncertainty in the timing of the event resulting in interval censoring. The methods are illustrated with data from a HIV clinical cohort examining whether individuals initiating effective antiretroviral therapy have a greater risk of antiretroviral discontinuation or switching compared to HIV RNA suppression. PMID:18416435

  12. Confinement-driven phase separation of quantum liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Prisk, T R; Pantalei, C; Kaiser, H; Sokol, P E

    2012-08-17

    We report small-angle neutron scattering studies of liquid helium mixtures confined in Mobil Crystalline Material-41 (MCM-41), a porous silica glass with narrow cylindrical nanopores (d=3.4 nm). MCM-41 is an ideal model adsorbent for fundamental studies of gas sorption in porous media because its monodisperse pores are arranged in a 2D triangular lattice. The small-angle scattering consists of a series of diffraction peaks whose intensities are determined by how the imbibed liquid fills the pores. Pure (4)He adsorbed in the pores show classic, layer-by-layer film growth as a function of pore filling, leaving the long range symmetry of the system intact. In contrast, the adsorption of (3)He-(4)He mixtures produces a structure incommensurate with the pore lattice. Neither capillary condensation nor preferential adsorption of one helium isotope to the pore walls can provide the symmetry-breaking mechanism. The scattering is consistent with the formation of randomly distributed liquid-liquid microdomains ∼2.3 nm in size, providing evidence that confinement in a nanometer scale capillary can drive local phase separation in quantum liquid mixtures. PMID:23006380

  13. Insect diets as mixtures: optimization for a polyphagous weevil.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Stephen L; Evens, Terence J; Niedz, Randall P

    2008-07-01

    Development or improvement of artificial insect diets can be tedious, convoluted and often under-appreciated. Using n-dimensional mixture designs, we identified a set of response-optimized meridic diets that contain fewer ingredients than the current commercial diet for Diaprepes abbreviatus, a polyphagous weevil pest of the Caribbean and southern U.S. A diet blend optimized to produce maximum adult weight was predicted to produce adult D. abbreviatus that weigh 28% more compared with adults reared on the standard commercial diet. Diet blends that produced greater individual adult weights resulted in lower survival compared with those blends that yielded adults of more modest proportions. In contrast, a simplified high cottonseed meal blend produced smaller adults more similar to field-collected individuals, and produced the greatest number of adults and the greatest biomass at relatively low cost compared with diets that yielded adult weevils of greater weight. We think that many insect-rearing programs would benefit from application of mixture design methods to situations where diet optimization is desired for researcher-selected criteria. This approach is broadly applicable to any problem that can be conceptualized as a mixture problem. PMID:18606169

  14. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures.

    PubMed

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li(+) in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li(+) is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K(+) and Cl(-) species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl(-) shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li(+)Cl(-), contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements. PMID:25481154

  15. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-07

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li{sup +} in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li{sup +} is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K{sup +} and Cl{sup −} species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl{sup −} shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li{sup +}Cl{sup −}, contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements.

  16. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li+ in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li+ is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K+ and Cl- species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl- shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li+Cl-, contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements.

  17. Rheology of Dense Granular Mixtures and Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewoldebrhan, Bereket Yohannes

    Dense granular flows, characterized by multiple contacts between grains, are common in many industrial processes and natural events, such as debris flows. Understanding the characteristics of these flows is crucial to predict quantities such as bedrock erosion and distance traveled by debris flows. However, the rheological properties of these flows are complicated due to wide particle size distribution and presence of interstitial fluids. Models for dense sheared granular materials indicate that their rheological properties depend on particle size, but the representative particle size for mixtures is not obvious. Using the discrete element method (DEM) we study sheared granular binary mixtures in a Couette cell to determine the relationship and rheological parameters such as stress and effective coefficient of friction and particle size distribution. The results indicate that the stress does not depend monotonically on the average particle size as it does in models derived from simple dimensional consideration. The stress has an additional dependence on a measure of the effective free volume per particle that is adapted from an expression for packing of monosized particles near the jammed state. The effective friction also has a complicated dependence on particle size distribution. For these systems of relatively hard particles, these relationships are governed largely by the ratio between average collision times and mean-free-path times. The characteristics of shallow free surface flows, important for applications such as debris flows, are different from confined systems. To address this, we also study shallow granular flows in a rotating drum. The stress at the boundary, height profiles and segregation patterns from DEM simulations are quantitatively similar to the results obtained from physical experiments of shallow granular flows in rotating drums. Individual particle-bed impacts rather than enduring contacts dominate the largest forces on the drum bed, which

  18. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Constable, Steven; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Smith, Megan M.; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. Toward this goal, we built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. Here we report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. These results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  19. Measurements of laminar burning velocities for natural gas-hydrogen-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zuohua; Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Ke; Liu, Bing; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Deming

    2006-07-15

    Laminar flame characteristics of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames were studied in a constant-volume bomb at normal temperature and pressure. Laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths were obtained at various ratios of hydrogen to natural gas (volume fraction from 0 to 100%) and equivalence ratios (f from 0.6 to 1.4). The influence of stretch rate on flame was also analyzed. The results show that, for lean mixture combustion, the flame radius increases with time but the increasing rate decreases with flame expansion for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, while at high hydrogen fractions, there exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time. For rich mixture combustion, the flame radius shows a slowly increasing rate at early stages of flame propagation and a quickly increasing rate at late stages of flame propagation for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, and there also exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time for mixtures with high hydrogen fractions. Combustion at stoichiometric mixture demonstrates the linear relationship between flame radius and time for natural gas-air, hydrogen-air, and natural gas-hydrogen-air flames. Laminar burning velocities increase exponentially with the increase of hydrogen fraction in mixtures, while the Markstein length decreases and flame instability increases with the increase of hydrogen fractions in mixture. For a fixed hydrogen fraction, the Markstein number shows an increase and flame stability increases with the increase of equivalence ratios. Based on the experimental data, a formula for calculating the laminar burning velocities of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames is proposed. (author)

  20. Thermodynamic Calculations for Complex Chemical Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    General computer program, CECTRP, developed for calculation of thermodynamic properties of complex mixtures with option to calculate transport properties of these mixtures. Free-energy minimization technique used in equilibrium calculation. Rigorous equations used in transport calculations. Program calculates equilibrium compositions and corresponding thermodynamic and transport properties of mixtures. CECTRP accommodates up to 24 reactants, 20 elements, and 600 products, 400 of which are condensed. Written in FORTRAN IV for any large computer system.

  1. Performance-based asphalt mixture design methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Al-Hosain Mansour

    Today, several State D.O.T.s are being investigating the use of tire rubber with local conventional materials. Several of the ongoing investigations identified potential benefits from the use of these materials, including improvements in material properties and performance. One of the major problems is being associated with the transferability of asphalt rubber technology without appropriately considering the effects of the variety of conventional materials on mixture behavior and performance. Typically, the design of these mixtures is being adapted to the physical properties of the conventional materials by using the empirical Marshall mixture design and without considering fundamental mixture behavior and performance. Use of design criteria related to the most common modes of failure for asphalt mixtures, such as rutting, fatigue cracking, and low temperature thermal cracking have to be developed and used for identifying the "best mixture," in term of performance, for the specific local materials and loading conditions. The main objective of this study was the development of a mixture design methodology that considers mixture behavior and performance. In order to achieve this objective a laboratory investigation able to evaluate mixture properties that can be related to mixture performance, (in terms of rutting, low temperature cracking, moisture damage and fatigue), and simulating the actual field loading conditions that the material is being exposed to, was conducted. The results proved that the inclusion of rubber into asphalt mixtures improved physical characteristics such as elasticity, flexibility, rebound, aging properties, increased fatigue resistance, and reduced rutting potential. The possibility of coupling the traditional Marshall mix design method with parameters related to mixture behavior and performance was investigated. Also, the SHRP SUPERPAVE mix design methodology was reviewed and considered in this study for the development of an integrated

  2. Catalytic Gasification of Coal using Eutectic Salt Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Atul Sheth; Pradeep Agrawal; Yaw D. Yeboah

    1998-12-04

    The objectives of this study are to: identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. A review of the collected literature was carried out. The catalysts which have been used for gasification can be roughly classified under the following five groups: alkali metal salts; alkaline earth metal oxides and salts; mineral substances or ash in coal; transition metals and their oxides and salts; and eutectic salt mixtures. Studies involving the use of gasification catalysts have been conducted. However, most of the studies focused on the application of individual catalysts. Only two publications have reported the study of gasification of coal char in CO2 and steam catalyzed by eutectic salt mixture catalysts. By using the eutectic mixtures of salts that show good activity as individual compounds, the gasification temperature can be reduced possibly with still better activity and gasification rates due to improved dispersion of the molten catalyst on the coal particles. For similar metal/carbon atomic ratios, eutectic catalysts were found to be consistently more active than their respective single salts. But the exact roles that the eutectic salt mixtures play in these are not well understood and details of the mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of the surface property of coals and the application methods of eutectic salt mixture catalysts with coal chars on the reactivity of gasification will be studied. Based on our preliminary evaluation of the literature, a ternary

  3. The sex ratio at birth.

    PubMed

    Rubin, E

    1967-10-01

    Several aspects of the disparity in birth ratio of males over females are discussed including variations among different races, variations by order of birth, by age of the parent, and in multiple births. Avenues of statistical exploration are suggested in an attempt to indicate certain peculiarities in nature. The Negro population in the United States has a sex ratio of 102 males to 100 females as opposed to 105:100 for whites, a highly significant difference. Inferences from these statistics are suggested for study of the sex ratios of mixed unions. The group classified as Mulatto show a lower sex ratio and further analysis of this was suggested including examination of slave records. For the white population sex ratio declines from 106.2 to 102.9 between 1st order and 7th order births. This is highly significant. However, nonwhite determinations were more irregular. Data limitations on sex ratio by age of parent prevented conclusive results. Multiple births among whites show a decline from 105.3 for single live births to 103.2 for twins and 86.1 for all other plural deliveries. Among nonwhites these ratios are 102.3, 99.7, and 102.6 respectively. Further information should be developed using the multiple facts relating to the sex ratio at birth. PMID:12275623

  4. Near azeotropic mixture substitute for dichlorodifluoromethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A refrigerant and a process of formulating thereof that consists of a mixture of a first mole fraction of CH.sub.2 FCF.sub.3 and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 ; a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 ; and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3.

  5. Toxicology of chemical mixtures: international perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Feron, V J; Cassee, F R; Groten, J P

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews major activities outside the United States on human health issues related to chemical mixtures. In Europe an international study group on combination effects has been formed and has started by defining synergism and antagonism. Successful research programs in Europe include the development and application of statistically designed experiments combined with multivariate data analysis and modeling in vitro and in vivo studies on a wide variety of chemicals such as petroleum hydrocarbons, aldehydes, food contaminants, industrial solvents, and mycotoxins. Other major activities focus on the development of safety evaluation strategies for mixtures such as the use of toxic equivalence factors or alternatives such as the question-and-answer approach, fractionation followed by recombination of the mixture in combination with a mixture design, and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis combined with lumping analysis and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling for studying complex mixtures. A scheme for hazard identification and risk assessment of complex mixtures and a consistent way to generate total volatile organic compound values for indoor air have also been developed. Examples of other activities are carcinogenicity studies on complex mixtures (petroleum middle distillates, foundry fumes, pesticides, heterocyclic amines, diesel exhaust, solid particles), neurotoxicity studies of mixtures of solvents alone or in combination with exposure to physical factors, and toxicity studies of outdoor air pollutants, focusing on particulates. Outside the United States, toxicologists and regulators clearly have a growing interest in the toxicology and risk assessment of chemical mixtures. PMID:9860882

  6. Cluster kinetics model for mixtures of glassformers.

    PubMed

    Brenskelle, Lisa A; McCoy, Benjamin J

    2007-10-14

    For glassformers we propose a binary mixture relation for parameters in a cluster kinetics model previously shown to represent pure compound data for viscosity and dielectric relaxation as functions of either temperature or pressure. The model parameters are based on activation energies and activation volumes for cluster association-dissociation processes. With the mixture parameters, we calculated dielectric relaxation times and compared the results to experimental values for binary mixtures. Mixtures of sorbitol and glycerol (seven compositions), sorbitol and xylitol (three compositions), and polychloroepihydrin and polyvinylmethylether (three compositions) were studied. PMID:17935407

  7. Cluster kinetics model for mixtures of glassformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenskelle, Lisa A.; McCoy, Benjamin J.

    2007-10-01

    For glassformers we propose a binary mixture relation for parameters in a cluster kinetics model previously shown to represent pure compound data for viscosity and dielectric relaxation as functions of either temperature or pressure. The model parameters are based on activation energies and activation volumes for cluster association-dissociation processes. With the mixture parameters, we calculated dielectric relaxation times and compared the results to experimental values for binary mixtures. Mixtures of sorbitol and glycerol (seven compositions), sorbitol and xylitol (three compositions), and polychloroepihydrin and polyvinylmethylether (three compositions) were studied.

  8. Multi-contrast Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie

    Photoacoustic microscopy is a hybrid imaging modality with high spatial resolution, moderate imaging depth, excellent imaging contrast and functional imaging capability. Taking full advantage of this powerful weapon, we have investigated different anatomical, functional, flow dynamic and metabolic parameter measurements using photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, Evans-blue dye was used to enhance photoacoustic microscopy of capillaries; label-free transverse and axial blood flow was measured based on bandwidth broadening and time shift of the photoacoustic signals; metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified in vivo from all the five parameters measured by photoacoustic microcopy; whole cross-sectional imaging of small intestine was achieved on a double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of focus and imaging depth; hemodynamic imaging was performed on a MEMS-mirror enhanced photoacoustic microscopy with a cross-sectional imaging rate of 400 Hz. As a maturing imaging technique, PAM is expected to find new applications in both fundamental life science and clinical practice.

  9. Sensitivity to Auditory Velocity Contrast.

    PubMed

    Locke, Shannon M; Leung, Johahn; Carlile, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A natural auditory scene often contains sound moving at varying velocities. Using a velocity contrast paradigm, we compared sensitivity to velocity changes between continuous and discontinuous trajectories. Subjects compared the velocities of two stimulus intervals that moved along a single trajectory, with and without a 1 second inter stimulus interval (ISI). We found thresholds were threefold larger for velocity increases in the instantaneous velocity change condition, as compared to instantaneous velocity decreases or thresholds for the delayed velocity transition condition. This result cannot be explained by the current static "snapshot" model of auditory motion perception and suggest a continuous process where the percept of velocity is influenced by previous history of stimulation. PMID:27291488

  10. Sensitivity to Auditory Velocity Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Shannon M.; Leung, Johahn; Carlile, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A natural auditory scene often contains sound moving at varying velocities. Using a velocity contrast paradigm, we compared sensitivity to velocity changes between continuous and discontinuous trajectories. Subjects compared the velocities of two stimulus intervals that moved along a single trajectory, with and without a 1 second inter stimulus interval (ISI). We found thresholds were threefold larger for velocity increases in the instantaneous velocity change condition, as compared to instantaneous velocity decreases or thresholds for the delayed velocity transition condition. This result cannot be explained by the current static “snapshot” model of auditory motion perception and suggest a continuous process where the percept of velocity is influenced by previous history of stimulation. PMID:27291488

  11. Protonic Ammonium Nitrate Ionic Liquids and Their Mixtures: Insights into Their Thermophysical Behavior.

    PubMed

    Canongia Lopes, José N; Esperança, José M S S; de Ferro, André Mão; Pereiro, Ana B; Plechkova, Natalia V; Rebelo, Luis P N; Seddon, Kenneth R; Vázquez-Fernández, Isabel

    2016-03-10

    This study is centered on the thermophysical characterization of different families of alkylammonium nitrate ionic liquids and their binary mixtures, namely the determination at atmospheric pressure of densities, electric conductivities and viscosities in the 288.15 < T/K < 353.15 range. First, measurements focusing on ethylammonium, propylammonium and butylammonium nitrate systems, and their binary mixtures, were determined. These were followed by studies involving binary mixtures composed of ethylammonium nitrate (with three hydrogen bond donor groups) and different homologous ionic liquids with differing numbers of hydrogen bond donor groups: diethylammonium nitrate (two hydrogen bond donors), triethylammonium nitrate (one hydrogen bond donor) and tetraethylammonium nitrate (no hydrogen bond donors). Finally, the behavior of mixtures with different numbers of equivalent carbon atoms in the alkylammonium cations was analyzed. The results show a quasi-ideal behavior for all monoalkylammonium nitrate mixtures. In contrast, the other mixtures show deviations from ideality, namely when the difference in the number of carbon atoms present in the cations increases or the number of hydrogen bond donors present in the cation decreases. Overall, the results clearly show that, besides the length and distribution of alkyl chains present in a cation such as alkylammonium, there are other structural and interaction parameters that influence the thermophysical properties of both pure compounds and their mixtures. PMID:26886188

  12. Adsorption of hydrophobin/β-casein mixtures at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Tucker, I M; Petkov, J T; Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Cox, A R; Hedges, N

    2016-09-15

    The adsorption behaviour of mixtures of the proteins β-casein and hydrophobin at the hydrophilic solid-liquid surface have been studied by neutron reflectivity. The results of measurements from sequential adsorption and co-adsorption from solution are contrasted. The adsorption properties of protein mixtures are important for a wide range of applications. Because of competing factors the adsorption behaviour of protein mixtures at interfaces is often difficult to predict. This is particularly true for mixtures containing hydrophobin as hydrophobin possesses some unusual surface properties. At β-casein concentrations ⩾0.1wt% β-casein largely displaces a pre-adsorbed layer of hydrophobin at the interface, similar to that observed in hydrophobin-surfactant mixtures. In the composition and concentration range studied here for the co-adsorption of β-casein-hydrophobin mixtures the adsorption is dominated by the β-casein adsorption. The results provide an important insight into how the competitive adsorption in protein mixtures of hydrophobin and β-casein can impact upon the modification of solid surface properties and the potential for a wide range of colloid stabilisation applications. PMID:27288573

  13. Optical imaging via biological object internal structure contrasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Tereshchenko, Sergei A.; Vorobiev, Nikolai S.; Tomilova, Larisa G.; Smirnov, Alexander V.; Ivanov, Andrei V.

    1995-01-01

    For successful application of laser tomography methods for earlier medical diagnostics the signal-to-noise ratio (contrast) must be increased. For this purpose it is possible to use the absorbing dyes. We have theoretically investigated optical imaging conditions in high scattering medium on a model object. In our experiments a YAG:Nd laser generating picosecond pulses was employed. Output radiation has been recorded by a high speed streak camera with 1.5 ps temporal resolution. The high stability of the laser and of measurement scheme characteristics was provided. We looked for the contrasting substances having tropism with pathologically changed tissue of the tumor. For this purpose some dyphthalocyanines were synthesized. The experiments with laboratory animals have demonstrated that saturated dye concentrations were noticeably lower than toxicologic dangerous concentration values. We have demonstrated a possibility of the contrasting for a model object. The experimental temporal profile of scattered radiation can be explained by the nonstationary two-flow theory.

  14. Ion acceleration using high-contrast ultra-intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; D'Humières, E.; Lefebvre, E.; Borghesi, M.; Brambrink, E.; Cecchetti, C.; Toncian, T.; Pépin, H.; Audebert, P.

    2006-06-01

    We have compared the acceleration of high-energy ions from the rear-surface of thin foils for various contrast conditions of the ultra-intense laser pulse irradiating the targets. The experiments were performed using the LULI 100 TW facility. We used Al targets of variable thicknesses and the laser pulse contrast ratio ahead of the main pulse was varied using either a fast Pockels cell or a single or double plasma mirror. The latter was installed at an intermediate field position, in between the focusing optics and the target, so that its effect was optimized. By improving with these two methods the laser pulse contrast, we have observed that we could significantly reduce the thickness of the target used for proton acceleration and at the same time increase both the cut-off energy of the accelerated protons and the energy conversion efficiency of the process.

  15. Contrast-Induced Nephropathy: An "All or None" Phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Katsiki, Niki; Athyros, Vasilios G; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-07-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) represents an important adverse effect of contrast media (CM) administration. Contrast-induced nephropathy is associated with prolonged hospitalization as well as increased cardiovascular morbidity, renal morbidity, and all-cause mortality. Several risk factors may predict CIN incidence, and various scores and ratios have been proposed to identify high-risk patients. Novel biomarkers may provide an earlier diagnosis of CIN. A multifactorial approach is required for CIN prevention including hydration, administration of low- or iso-osmolar CM, minimizing CM volume, and statin administration. Renal function may deteriorate after CM administration, even in the absence of CIN. Therefore, this deterioration may not be an "all or none" phenomenon; it may well occur in many patients receiving CM, with/without CIN, and may prove to be an underestimated risk factor. Patients should be followed up for longer periods as outpatients after CM exposure to assess kidney function and predict subsequent increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:25225196

  16. Changes in the Bolometric Contrast of Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.; Dobias, J. J.

    1993-12-01

    We report on photometric observations of sunspots carried out with the Cartesian Full Disk Telescope (CFDT) at the San Fernando Observatory (SFO). The pixel size is 5.1 arc-sec and the wavelength for the data discussed here is 6723 Angstroms. Fluctuations in total solar irradiance due to sunspots are often modeled using a constant value of alpha, which we are calling the bolometric contrast of a sunspot. We have defined alpha_ {eff} as DEF/(2 times PSI), where DEF is the sunspot's photometric deficit relative to the quiet photosphere, and PSI is the digitally determined Photometric Sunspot Index (Willson et al., 1981). For 40 sunspot groups, we find that alpha_ {eff} = (0.276 +/- 0.051) + (3.22 +/- 0.34) 10(-5) A_s, where A_s is the corrected area of the sunspot in micro-hemispheres. The coefficient of determination is r(2) = 0.1936, which is significant at the p = 0.005 level. We also find that alpha_ {eff} is highly correlated with the ratio of umbral to total spot area (A_u/A_s). For 86 sunspot-days we find alpha_ {eff} = (0.219 +/- 0.018) + (0.643 +/- 0.028) (A_u/A_s) with the linear coefficient of determination r(2) = 0.859. This suggests that an improved PSI can be constructed from knowledge of a sunspot's umbral to total area ratio. The use of such an improved PSI or, better still, actual photometry should reduce the statistical noise in comparisons with spacecraft measurements of the total solar irradiance. This work has been partially supported by grants from NSF and NASA.

  17. Spontaneous ignition characteristics of gaseous hydrocarbon-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, G.; Lefebvre, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments are conducted to determine the spontaneous ignition delay times of gaseous propane, kerosine vapor, and n-heptane vapor in mixtures with air, and oxygen-enriched air, at atmospheric pressure. Over a range of equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 0.8 it is found that ignition delay times are sensibly independent of fuel concentration. However, the results indicate a strong dependence of delay times on oxygen concentration. The experimental data for kerosine and propane demonstrate very close agreement with the results obtained previously by Mullins and Lezberg respectively.

  18. Deciding which chemical mixtures risk assessment methods work best for what mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Teuschler, Linda K.

    2007-09-01

    The most commonly used chemical mixtures risk assessment methods involve simple notions of additivity and toxicological similarity. Newer methods are emerging in response to the complexities of chemical mixture exposures and effects. Factors based on both science and policy drive decisions regarding whether to conduct a chemical mixtures risk assessment and, if so, which methods to employ. Scientific considerations are based on positive evidence of joint toxic action, elevated human exposure conditions or the potential for significant impacts on human health. Policy issues include legislative drivers that may mandate action even though adequate toxicity data on a specific mixture may not be available and risk assessment goals that impact the choice of risk assessment method to obtain the amount of health protection desired. This paper discusses three important concepts used to choose among available approaches for conducting a chemical mixtures risk assessment: (1) additive joint toxic action of mixture components; (2) toxicological interactions of mixture components; and (3) chemical composition of complex mixtures. It is proposed that scientific support for basic assumptions used in chemical mixtures risk assessment should be developed by expert panels, risk assessment methods experts, and laboratory toxicologists. This is imperative to further develop and refine quantitative methods and provide guidance on their appropriate applications. Risk assessors need scientific support for chemical mixtures risk assessment methods in the form of toxicological data on joint toxic action for high priority mixtures, statistical methods for analyzing dose-response for mixtures, and toxicological and statistical criteria for determining sufficient similarity of complex mixtures.

  19. Adaptive windowing in contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Martin, K Heath; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A

    2016-08-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is one of the most commonly-used interventional imaging techniques and has seen recent innovations which attempt to characterize the risk posed by atherosclerotic plaques. One such development is the use of microbubble contrast agents to image vasa vasorum, fine vessels which supply oxygen and nutrients to the walls of coronary arteries and typically have diameters less than 200μm. The degree of vasa vasorum neovascularization within plaques is positively correlated with plaque vulnerability. Having recently presented a prototype dual-frequency transducer for contrast agent-specific intravascular imaging, here we describe signal processing approaches based on minimum variance (MV) beamforming and the phase coherence factor (PCF) for improving the spatial resolution and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in IVUS imaging. These approaches are examined through simulations, phantom studies, ex vivo studies in porcine arteries, and in vivo studies in chicken embryos. In phantom studies, PCF processing improved CTR by a mean of 4.2dB, while combined MV and PCF processing improved spatial resolution by 41.7%. Improvements of 2.2dB in CTR and 37.2% in resolution were observed in vivo. Applying these processing strategies can enhance image quality in conventional B-mode IVUS or in contrast-enhanced IVUS, where signal-to-noise ratio is relatively low and resolution is at a premium. PMID:27161022

  20. Simulation of mixture microstructures via particle packing models and their direct comparison with real mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliver, Eric A.

    The objective of this thesis to identify and develop techniques providing direct comparison between simulated and real packed particle mixture microstructures containing submicron-sized particles. This entailed devising techniques for simulating powder mixtures, producing real mixtures with known powder characteristics, sectioning real mixtures, interrogating mixture cross-sections, evaluating and quantifying the mixture interrogation process and for comparing interrogation results between mixtures. A drop and roll-type particle-packing model was used to generate simulations of random mixtures. The simulated mixtures were then evaluated to establish that they were not segregated and free from gross defects. A powder processing protocol was established to provide real mixtures for direct comparison and for use in evaluating the simulation. The powder processing protocol was designed to minimize differences between measured particle size distributions and the particle size distributions in the mixture. A sectioning technique was developed that was capable of producing distortion free cross-sections of fine scale particulate mixtures. Tessellation analysis was used to interrogate mixture cross sections and statistical quality control charts were used to evaluate different types of tessellation analysis and to establish the importance of differences between simulated and real mixtures. The particle-packing program generated crescent shaped pores below large particles but realistic looking mixture microstructures otherwise. Focused ion beam milling was the only technique capable of sectioning particle compacts in a manner suitable for stereological analysis. Johnson-Mehl and Voronoi tessellation of the same cross-sections produced tessellation tiles with different the-area populations. Control charts analysis showed Johnson-Mehl tessellation measurements are superior to Voronoi tessellation measurements for detecting variations in mixture microstructure, such as altered

  1. Quantitative mammography contrast threshold test tool.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A J; Frey, G D

    1995-02-01

    Mammographic contrast is commonly evaluated by visualizing small objects of varying size or mass divided by projected area. These qualitative contrast determinations are commonly performed by imaging a phantom like the American College of Radiology accreditation phantom at clinical mammographic settings. However, this contrast assessment does not take into account the kVp of the machine. This work describes a quantitative mammography contrast threshold test tool which examines light object contrast on a uniform background for a contrast range of 0.32% to 1.38% at 25 kVp. For this mammography contrast threshold test tool, contrast is defined by delta I/I = loge (psi O/ psi b), where psi O is the target energy flux, and psi b is the background energy flux. Contrast threshold is defined as the lowest contrast value for which the objects are visible. Unlike traditional assessments of mammographic contrast, this measurement of contrast threshold is kVp corrected. The mammography contrast threshold test tool is constructed out of common plastics and provides a quantitative means of assessing contrast threshold for individual mammographic units and total mammographic systems. PMID:7565343

  2. Blood mixtures: impact of puncture site on blood parameters.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, X; El Hassani, M S; Lecq, S; Michel, C L; El Mouden, E H; Michaud, B; Slimani, T

    2016-08-01

    Various puncture routes, veins, arteries, heart, are used to take blood in animals. For anatomical reasons, differences in blood composition are expected among puncture sites. However, this issue has been rarely assessed and contrasted results have been reported: strong effects of puncture site versus a lack of effect. We captured free-ranging freshwater turtles from different locations to compare the mean concentrations of 12 blood parameters (metabolites, hormone, ions, and enzyme) among three puncture sites: (1) a lateral branch of the jugular vein, (2) a dorsal subcarapacial cervical plexus (sometimes incorrectly referred as the 'cervical sinus' in the literature), and (3) a caudal plexus site (sometimes incorrectly referred as the 'caudal sinus'). Because we used very small syringes (27-30G), we were able to separate lymph, blood, or blood-lymph mixtures. Our results show very strong effects of puncture site and of mixture level (mean maximal difference between sites was 250 %). We also found strong sex and geographical effects. Typically, there were differences in concentrations of blood solutes sampled from the lateral jugular vein and subcarapacial plexus, mainly due to sampling a mixture of blood and lymph from the 'blood' at the subcarapacial site and pure blood from the lateral jugular site, and likewise, samples from the caudal site were highly variable due to often sampling a mixture of blood and lymph. These results have technical and fundamental implications, especially when performing comparative analyses. Further, by selecting precise puncture sites, physiological differences between lymph and blood compartments could be investigated. PMID:27146147

  3. Time-dependence in mixture toxicity prediction

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Douglas A.; Allen, Erin M.G.; Allen, Joshua L.; Baumann, Hannah J.; Bensinger, Heather M.; Genco, Nicole; Guinn, Daphne; Hull, Michael W.; Il'Giovine, Zachary J.; Kaminski, Chelsea M.; Peyton, Jennifer R.; Schultz, T. Wayne; Pöch, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    The value of time-dependent toxicity (TDT) data in predicting mixture toxicity was examined. Single chemical (A and B) and mixture (A + B) toxicity tests using Microtox® were conducted with inhibition of bioluminescence (Vibrio fischeri) being quantified after 15, 30 and 45-min of exposure. Single chemical and mixture tests for 25 sham (A1:A2) and 125 true (A:B) combinations had a minimum of seven duplicated concentrations with a duplicated control treatment for each test. Concentration/response (x/y) data were fitted to sigmoid curves using the five-parameter logistic minus one parameter (5PL-1P) function, from which slope, EC25, EC50, EC75, asymmetry, maximum effect, and r2 values were obtained for each chemical and mixture at each exposure duration. Toxicity data were used to calculate percentage-based TDT values for each individual chemical and mixture of each combination. Predicted TDT values for each mixture were calculated by averaging the TDT values of the individual components and regressed against the observed TDT values obtained in testing, resulting in strong correlations for both sham (r2 = 0.989, n = 25) and true mixtures (r2 = 0.944, n = 125). Additionally, regression analyses confirmed that observed mixture TDT values calculated for the 50% effect level were somewhat better correlated with predicted mixture TDT values than at the 25 and 75% effect levels. Single chemical and mixture TDT values were classified into five levels in order to discern trends. The results suggested that the ability to predict mixture TDT by averaging the TDT of the single agents was modestly reduced when one agent of the combination had a positive TDT value and the other had a minimal or negative TDT value. PMID:25446331

  4. Ultracentrifuge for separating fluid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Lowry, Ralph A.

    1976-01-01

    1. A centrifuge for the separation of fluid mixtures having light and heavy fractions comprising a cylindrical rotor, disc type end-plugs closing the ends of the rotor, means for mounting said rotor for rotation about its cylindrical axis, a housing member enclosing the rotor, a vacuum chamber in said housing about the central portion of the rotor, a collection chamber at each end of the housing, the innermost side of which is substantially formed by the outer face of the end-plug, means for preventing flow of the fluid from the collection chambers to said vacuum chamber, at least one of said end-plugs having a plurality of holes therethrough communicating between the collection chamber adjacent thereto and the inside of the rotor to induce countercurrent flow of the fluid in the centrifuge, means for feeding fluid to be processed into the centrifuge, means communicating with the collection chambers to extract the light and heavy separated fractions of the fluid, and means for rotating the rotor.

  5. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1989-01-01

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

  6. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  7. Characteristics of atmospheric ions in contrasting environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkening, M.

    1984-01-01

    The general nature of atmospheric small ions with mobilities in the approximate range of 1-2 x 10/sup -4/ m/sup 2//Vs has been known for many decades. In this study changes in ion-pair production rates, ion density, mobility, and polar conductivity have been observed in contrasting environments with the results that new light is shed on the properties of these ions which play such an important role in atmospheric electricity. /sup 222/Rn, /sup 220/Rn and their daughter products are the chief ionizing agents in the lower layers of the atmosphere exceeding that due to cosmic rays and radioactive substances in the ground. A single alpha particle from the decay of /sup 222/Rn will produce about 150,000 ion pairs. It is important, therefore, to give careful consideration to the role of these natural radioactive nuclides when investigating the characteristics of atmospheric ions. Over a period of years studies of the behavior of positive and negative small ions have been made in outdoor environments at a mountain location, in the Rio Grande Valley at Socorro, New Mexico and in the Carlsbad Caverns. These sites provided wide variation in ion-pair production rates, water vapor mixing ratios, and condensation nuclei concentrations against which the atmospheric electrical characteristics could be measured and analyzed. The role of the radon-daughter ions in storm and fair weather conditions at the Langmuir Laboratory has been treated previously. 16 references, 2 tables.

  8. High contrast imaging polarimetry of circumstellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canovas Cabrera, H.

    2011-09-01

    The work presented in this thesis is based on the analysis of the results produced by ExPo, the Extreme Polarimeter. ExPo is an imaging polarimeter that has been designed and built by the group of prof. Christoph Keller, at Utrecht University. The purpose of this instrument is to use polarimetry to detect and characterize the circumstellar environments around different types of stars. In this work I focus on the polarized features that are produced by scattering by dust grains. Depending on the properties of the particles producing the scattering (size, shape...) and the scattering angle (forward, backward scattering), the light becomes polarized in higher or lower degree. The main problem when studying circumstellar environments is the high contrast ratios that are faced. For example, a young star is typically four orders of magnitude (10000 times) brighter than its protoplanetary disk. On the other hand, the light emitted by the star is largely unpolarized, while the light that is scattered (by the protoplanetary disk in this example) is polarized. Therefore, polarimetry offers a very elegant way to remove most of the starlight, allowing the detection of only the polarized photons. Furthermore, and as explained before, by studying the polarization of the light that we measure we can learn more about the properties of the circumstellar environments (dust composition, geometry, etc.). ExPo has produced a wealth of data, combining observations of very different targets such as protoplanetary disks, post-AGB stars, comets and planets of our Solar System (Venus and Saturn).

  9. RENAL CANCER STUDIES OF DRINKING WATER MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects but this may under or over represent the actual biological response. A rodent model of hereditary renal cancer (Eker rat) was used to evaluate the carcinogenicity of a mixture of DBPs...

  10. Separation of gas mixtures by centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Love, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) centrifuge utilizing electric currents and magnetic fields produces a magnetic force which develops supersonic rotational velocities in gas mixtures. Device is superior to ordinary centrifuges because rotation of gas mixture is produced by MHD force rather than mechanical means.

  11. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-02-20

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches. 6 figs.

  12. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches.

  13. Strategies for toxicological evaluation of mixtures.

    PubMed

    Eide, I

    1996-01-01

    Different strategies for the toxicological evaluation of mixtures are presented. The purpose is to determine the effects of each component (variable) in the mixture, and possible interactions between variables. The examples presented have 3-5 predictor variables and 1-3 responses, and are based on statistical experimental design, multivariate data analysis and modelling. The following examples are presented: (1) inhalation experiments with synthetic vapour mixtures of hydrocarbons formulated by means of mixture design at different vapour concentrations (the experimental) region covers both partial and complete evaporation of the liquid mixtures); (2) combination of refinery streams for fuel blending by means of mixture design with constraints, followed by engine tests and determination of exhaust particles; (3) fractionation of organic extracts of diesel exhaust particles, and recombination of the extracts by means of mixture design, followed by mutagenicity testing of the recombined extracts in the Ames Salmonella assay; (4) spiking complex mixtures with individual compounds using factorial design, and subsequent mutagenicity testing. The data obtained from these four examples were analysed by means of Projections to Latent Structures (PLS). The effects of each variable and possible interactions, were quantified by means of PLS regression coefficients. Furthermore, the empirical models obtained were evaluated by means of correlation coefficients, cross validation and predictions. PMID:9119328

  14. THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM GAS MIXTURE

    DOEpatents

    Jury, S.H.

    1964-03-17

    A method of separating uranium from a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and other gases is described that comprises bringing the mixture into contact with anhydrous calcium sulfate to preferentially absorb the uranium hexafluoride on the sulfate. The calcium sulfate is then leached with a selective solvent for the adsorbed uranium. (AEC)

  15. Mixture Modeling of Individual Learning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streeter, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We show that student learning can be accurately modeled using a mixture of learning curves, each of which specifies error probability as a function of time. This approach generalizes Knowledge Tracing [7], which can be viewed as a mixture model in which the learning curves are step functions. We show that this generality yields order-of-magnitude…

  16. The Potential of Growth Mixture Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muthen, Bengt

    2006-01-01

    The authors of the paper on growth mixture modelling (GMM) give a description of GMM and related techniques as applied to antisocial behaviour. They bring up the important issue of choice of model within the general framework of mixture modelling, especially the choice between latent class growth analysis (LCGA) techniques developed by Nagin and…

  17. Laser kinetic processes in dye mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Jie; Fu Honglang

    1988-11-01

    Radiation from rhodamine 6G+cresyl violet and rhodamine B+cresyl violet dye mixtures in ethyl alcohol pumped by N/sub 2/ laser light were studied. The rate constants of resonant transfer in the mixtures were determined. The radiative transfer processes are discussed.

  18. Separation of organic azeotropic mixtures by pervaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.

    1991-12-01

    Distillation is a commonly used separation technique in the petroleum refining and chemical processing industries. However, there are a number of potential separations involving azetropic and close-boiling organic mixtures that cannot be separated efficiently by distillation. Pervaporation is a membrane-based process that uses selective permeation through membranes to separate liquid mixtures. Because the separation process is not affected by the relative volatility of the mixture components being separated, pervaporation can be used to separate azetropes and close-boiling mixtures. Our results showed that pervaporation membranes can be used to separate azeotropic mixtures efficiently, a result that is not achievable with simple distillation. The membranes were 5--10 times more permeable to one of the components of the mixture, concentrating it in the permeate stream. For example, the membrane was 10 times more permeable to ethanol than methyl ethyl ketone, producing 60% ethanol permeate from an azeotropic mixture of ethanol and methyl ethyl ketone containing 18% ethanol. For the ethyl acetate/water mixture, the membranes showed a very high selectivity to water (> 300) and the permeate was 50--100 times enriched in water relative to the feed. The membranes had permeate fluxes on the order of 0.1--1 kg/m{sup 2}{center dot}h in the operating range of 55--70{degrees}C. Higher fluxes were obtained by increasing the operating temperature.

  19. Updated thinking on positivity ratios.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2013-12-01

    This article presents my response to the article by Brown, Sokal, and Friedman (2013), which critically examined Losada's conceptual and mathematical work (as presented in Losada, 1999; Losada & Heaphy, 2004; and Fredrickson & Losada; 2005) and concluded that mathematical claims for a critical tipping point positivity ratio are unfounded. In the present article, I draw recent empirical evidence together to support the continued value of computing and seeking to elevate positivity ratios. I also underscore the necessity of modeling nonlinear effects of positivity ratios and, more generally, the value of systems science approaches within affective science and positive psychology. Even when scrubbed of Losada's now-questioned mathematical modeling, ample evidence continues to support the conclusion that, within bounds, higher positivity ratios are predictive of flourishing mental health and other beneficial outcomes. PMID:23855895

  20. Low resistivity, low contrast pays

    SciTech Connect

    Sneider, R.M.; Kulha, J.T. |

    1996-08-01

    Major hydrocarbon accumulations have been produced over the past 40 years in low resistivity, low contrast (LRLC) sands in the Gulf of Mexico Basin (GOM). LRLC reservoirs were commonly considered wet, tight, misidentified as a shale or overlooked, but are being re-evaluated now in other world basins, including Latin America. Seismic response, drill cuttings, cores, log response, petrophysical models, and production testing provide an integrated LRLC evaluation. Causes of LRLC pay in the GOM include: laminated clean sands with shales; silts or shaly sands; clay-coated sands; glauconitic sands; sands with interstitial dispersed clay; sands with disseminated pyrite or other conductive minerals; clay-lined burrows; clay clasts; altered volcanic/feldspathic framework grains; and very fine-grained sand with very saline water. LRLC depositional systems include: deepwater fans, with levee-channel complexes; delta front and toe deposits; shingle turbidites; and alluvial and deltaic channel fills. Geological and petrophysical models developed in the GOM for evaluation of LRLC pay are applicable in Latin America. An Archie clean sand or Waxman-Smits shaly sand model are commonly used to evaluate LRLC anomalies. Often, shaly sand models are not necessarily suited for LRLC evaluation. The Archie lithology exponent (m) and saturation exponent (n) for many LRLC reservoirs range from 1.4 to 1.85, and 1.2 to 1.8, respectively. In thinly laminated LRLC reservoirs, net sand distribution is identified with high resolution logging tools, rock examination and interval testing.