Science.gov

Sample records for control center environment

  1. Adaptation of a Control Center Development Environment for Industrial Process Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killough, Ronnie L.; Malik, James M.

    1994-01-01

    In the control center, raw telemetry data is received for storage, display, and analysis. This raw data must be combined and manipulated in various ways by mathematical computations to facilitate analysis, provide diversified fault detection mechanisms, and enhance display readability. A development tool called the Graphical Computation Builder (GCB) has been implemented which provides flight controllers with the capability to implement computations for use in the control center. The GCB provides a language that contains both general programming constructs and language elements specifically tailored for the control center environment. The GCB concept allows staff who are not skilled in computer programming to author and maintain computer programs. The GCB user is isolated from the details of external subsystem interfaces and has access to high-level functions such as matrix operators, trigonometric functions, and unit conversion macros. The GCB provides a high level of feedback during computation development that improves upon the often cryptic errors produced by computer language compilers. An equivalent need can be identified in the industrial data acquisition and process control domain: that of an integrated graphical development tool tailored to the application to hide the operating system, computer language, and data acquisition interface details. The GCB features a modular design which makes it suitable for technology transfer without significant rework. Control center-specific language elements can be replaced by elements specific to industrial process control.

  2. Secure Remote Access Issues in a Control Center Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Lee; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ISS finally reached an operational state and exists for local and remote users. Onboard payload systems are managed by the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC). Users access HOSC systems by internet protocols in support of daily operations, preflight simulation, and test. In support of this diverse user community, a modem security architecture has been implemented. The architecture has evolved over time from an isolated but open system to a system which supports local and remote access to the ISS over broad geographic regions. This has been accomplished through the use of an evolved security strategy, PKI, and custom design. Through this paper, descriptions of the migration process and the lessons learned are presented. This will include product decision criteria, rationale, and the use of commodity products in the end architecture. This paper will also stress the need for interoperability of various products and the effects of seemingly insignificant details.

  3. HOW TO MANAGE ENVIRONMENT FROM A CENTRAL CONTROL CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MULLER, HENRY J.

    THE PROBLEMS OF REGULATION AND MAINTENANCE OF HEATING, VENTILATING, AND AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT IN MULTIBUILDING SITUATIONS HAS LEAD TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN AUTOMATIC MONITOR AND CONTROL SYSTEM AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY. THE WORK LOAD HAS INCREASED WITH--(1) THE ADDITION OF MORE BUILDINGS, (2) THE INSTALLATION OF MORE COMPLEX SYSTEMS IN EXISTING…

  4. Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) in a Control Center Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvelage, Steven; Fooshee, Doug; Pirani. Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The technology of transmitting voice over data networks has been available for over 10 years. Mass market VoIP services for consumers to make and receive standard telephone calls over broadband Internet networks have grown in the last 5 years. While operational costs are less with VoIP implementations as opposed to time division multiplexing (TDM) based voice switches, is it still advantageous to convert a mission control center s voice system to this newer technology? Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) has converted its mission voice services to a commercial product that utilizes VoIP technology. Results from this testing, design, and installation have shown unique considerations that must be addressed before user operations. There are many factors to consider for a control center voice design. Technology advantages and disadvantages were investigated as they refer to cost. There were integration concerns which could lead to complex failure scenarios but simpler integration for the mission infrastructure. MSFC HOSC will benefit from this voice conversion with less product replacement cost, less operations cost and a more integrated mission services environment.

  5. Instrumentation and Controls Division Overview: Sensors Development for Harsh Environments at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, Mary V.; Lei, Jih-Fen

    2002-01-01

    The Instrumentation and Controls Division is responsible for planning, conducting and directing basic and applied research on advanced instrumentation and controls technologies for aerospace propulsion and power applications. The Division's advanced research in harsh environment sensors, high temperature high power electronics, MEMS (microelectromechanical systems), nanotechnology, high data rate optical instrumentation, active and intelligent controls, and health monitoring and management will enable self-feeling, self-thinking, self-reconfiguring and self-healing Aerospace Propulsion Systems. These research areas address Agency challenges to deliver aerospace systems with reduced size and weight, and increased functionality and intelligence for future NASA missions in advanced aeronautics, economical space transportation, and pioneering space exploration. The Division also actively supports educational and technology transfer activities aimed at benefiting all humankind.

  6. The Electronic Documentation Project in the NASA mission control center environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Leigh, Albert

    1994-01-01

    NASA's space programs like many other technical programs of its magnitude is supported by a large volume of technical documents. These documents are not only diverse but also abundant. Management, maintenance, and retrieval of these documents is a challenging problem by itself; but, relating and cross-referencing this wealth of information when it is all on a medium of paper is an even greater challenge. The Electronic Documentation Project (EDP) is to provide an electronic system capable of developing, distributing and controlling changes for crew/ground controller procedures and related documents. There are two primary motives for the solution. The first motive is to reduce the cost of maintaining the current paper based method of operations by replacing paper documents with electronic information storage and retrieval. And, the other is to improve the efficiency and provide enhanced flexibility in document usage. Initially, the current paper based system will be faithfully reproduced in an electronic format to be used in the document viewing system. In addition, this metaphor will have hypertext extensions. Hypertext features support basic functions such as full text searches, key word searches, data retrieval, and traversal between nodes of information as well as speeding up the data access rate. They enable related but separate documents to have relationships, and allow the user to explore information naturally through non-linear link traversals. The basic operational requirements of the document viewing system are to: provide an electronic corollary to the current method of paper based document usage; supplement and ultimately replace paper-based documents; maintain focused toward control center operations such as Flight Data File, Flight Rules and Console Handbook viewing; and be available NASA wide.

  7. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  8. Soviet Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo is an overall view of the Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia during the Expedition Seven mission. The Expedition Seven crew launched aboard a Soyez spacecraft on April 26, 2003. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  9. Towards cheaper control centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Lionel

    1994-01-01

    Today, any approach to the design of new space systems must take into consideration an important constraint, namely costs. This approach is our guideline for new missions and also applies to the ground segment, and particularly to the control center. CNES has carried out a study on a recent control center for application satellites in order to take advantage of the experience gained. This analysis, the purpose of which is to determine, a posteriori, the costs of architecture needs and choices, takes hardware and software costs into account and makes a number of recommendations.

  10. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  11. A Virtual Mission Operations Center: Collaborative Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina, Barbara; Bussman, Marie; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Virtual Mission Operations Center - Collaborative Environment (VMOC-CE) intent is to have a central access point for all the resources used in a collaborative mission operations environment to assist mission operators in communicating on-site and off-site in the investigation and resolution of anomalies. It is a framework that as a minimum incorporates online chat, realtime file sharing and remote application sharing components in one central location. The use of a collaborative environment in mission operations opens up the possibilities for a central framework for other project members to access and interact with mission operations staff remotely. The goal of the Virtual Mission Operations Center (VMOC) Project is to identify, develop, and infuse technology to enable mission control by on-call personnel in geographically dispersed locations. In order to achieve this goal, the following capabilities are needed: Autonomous mission control systems Automated systems to contact on-call personnel Synthesis and presentation of mission control status and history information Desktop tools for data and situation analysis Secure mechanism for remote collaboration commanding Collaborative environment for remote cooperative work The VMOC-CE is a collaborative environment that facilitates remote cooperative work. It is an application instance of the Virtual System Design Environment (VSDE), developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Systems Engineering Services & Advanced Concepts (SESAC) Branch. The VSDE is a web-based portal that includes a knowledge repository and collaborative environment to serve science and engineering teams in product development. It is a "one stop shop" for product design, providing users real-time access to product development data, engineering and management tools, and relevant design specifications and resources through the Internet. The initial focus of the VSDE has been to serve teams working in the early portion of the system

  12. Providing a Learning-Centered Instructional Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ruby

    This paper describes efforts made by the faculty at Santa Fe Community College (Florida) to provide a learning-centered instructional environment for students in an introductory statistics class. Innovation in instruction has been stressed as institutions switch from "teacher-centered classrooms" to "student-centered classrooms." The incorporation…

  13. Predictions of the Space Environment Services Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    The types of users of the Space Environment Services Center are identified. All the data collected by the Center are listed and a short description of each primary index or activity summary is given. Each type of regularly produced forecast is described, along with the methods used to produce each prediction.

  14. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  15. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

  16. Selection of a Data Acquisition and Controls System Communications and Software Architecture for Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory Thermal and Vacuum Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Eric A.

    2004-01-01

    Upgrade of data acquisition and controls systems software at Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) involved the definition, evaluation and selection of a system communication architecture and software components. A brief discussion of the background of the SESL and its data acquisition and controls systems provides a context for discussion of the requirements for each selection. Further framework is provided as upgrades to these systems accomplished in the 1990s and in 2003 are compared to demonstrate the role that technological advances have had in their improvement. Both of the selections were similar in their three phases; 1) definition of requirements, 2) identification of candidate products and their evaluation and testing and 3) selection by comparison of requirement fulfillment. The candidates for the communication architecture selection embraced several different methodologies which are explained and contrasted. Requirements for this selection are presented and the selection process is described. Several candidates for the software component of the data acquisition and controls system are identified, requirements for evaluation and selection are presented, and the evaluation process is described.

  17. Advanced technologies for Mission Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, John T.; Hughes, Peter M.

    1991-01-01

    Advance technologies for Mission Control Centers are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: technology needs; current technology efforts at GSFC (human-machine interface development, object oriented software development, expert systems, knowledge-based software engineering environments, and high performance VLSI telemetry systems); and test beds.

  18. Controlled environment specimen transfer.

    PubMed

    Damsgaard, Christian D; Zandbergen, Henny; W Hansen, Thomas; Chorkendorff, Ib; B Wagner, Jakob

    2014-08-01

    Specimen transfer under controlled environment conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and gas composition, is necessary to conduct successive complementary in situ characterization of materials sensitive to ambient conditions. The in situ transfer concept is introduced by linking an environmental transmission electron microscope to an in situ X-ray diffractometer through a dedicated transmission electron microscope specimen transfer holder, capable of sealing the specimen in a gaseous environment at elevated temperatures. Two catalyst material systems have been investigated; Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for methanol synthesis and a Co/Al2O3 catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Both systems are sensitive to ambient atmosphere as they will oxidize after relatively short air exposure. The Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst, was reduced in the in situ X-ray diffractometer set-up, and subsequently, successfully transferred in a reactive environment to the environmental transmission electron microscope where further analysis on the local scale were conducted. The Co/Al2O3 catalyst was reduced in the environmental microscope and successfully kept reduced outside the microscope in a reactive environment. The in situ transfer holder facilitates complimentary in situ experiments of the same specimen without changing the specimen state during transfer. PMID:24824787

  19. Environment control system

    DOEpatents

    Sammarone, Dino G.

    1978-01-01

    A system for controlling the environment of an enclosed area in nuclear reactor installations. The system permits the changing of the environment from nitrogen to air, or from air to nitrogen, without the release of any radioactivity or process gas to the outside atmosphere. In changing from a nitrogen to an air environment, oxygen is inserted into the enclosed area at the same rate which the nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture is removed from the enclosed area. The nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture removed from the enclosed area is mixed with hydrogen, the hydrogen recombining with the oxygen present in the gas to form water. The water is then removed from the system and, if it contains any radioactive products, can be utilized to form concrete, which can then be transferred to a licensed burial site. The process gas is purified further by stripping it of carbon dioxide and then distilling it to remove any xenon, krypton, and other fission or non-condensable gases. The pure nitrogen is stored as either a cryogenic liquid or a gas. In changing from an air to nitrogen environment, the gas is removed from the enclosed area, mixed with hydrogen to remove the oxygen present, dried, passed through adsorption beds to remove any fission gases, and reinserted into the enclosed area. Additionally, the nitrogen stored during the nitrogen to air change, is inserted into the enclosed area, the nitrogen from both sources being inserted into the enclosed area at the same rate as the removal of the gas from the containment area. As designed, the amount of nitrogen stored during the nitrogen to air change substantially equals that required to replace oxygen removed during an air to nitrogen change.

  20. 3. CONNECTING TUNNEL AT BOTTOM CENTER TO CENTER, CONTROL BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. CONNECTING TUNNEL AT BOTTOM CENTER TO CENTER, CONTROL BUILDING B AT CENTER, WATER TANK TO UPPER LEFT, VIEW TOWARDS WEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Control Building B, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  1. A Virtual Mission Operations Center - Collaborative Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina, Barbara; Bussman, Marie

    2002-01-01

    Development of technologies that enable significant reductions in the cost of space mission operations is critical if constellations, formations, federations and sensor webs, are to be economically feasible. One approach to cost reduction is to infuse automation technologies into mission operations centers so that fewer personnel are needed for mission support. But missions are more culturally and politically adverse to the risks of automation. Reducing the mission risk associated with increased use of automation within a MOC is therefore of great importance. The belief that mission risk increases as more automation is used stems from the fact that there is inherently less direct human oversight to investigate and resolve anomalies in an unattended MOC. The Virtual Missions Operations Center - Collaborative Environment (VMOC-CE) project was launched to address this concern. The goal of the VMOC-CE project is to identify, develop, and infuse technology to enable mission operations between onsite operators and on-call personnel in geographically dispersed locations. VMOC-CE enables missions to more readily adopt automation because off-site operators and engineers can more easily identify, investigate, and resolve anomalies without having to be present in the MOC. The VMOC-CE intent is to have a single access point for all resources used in a collaborative mission operations environment. Team members will be able to interact during spacecraft operations, specifically for resolving anomalies, utilizing a desktop computer and the Internet. Mission operations management can use the VMOC-CE as a tool to participate in and monitor status of anomaly resolution or other mission operations issues. In this paper we present the VMOC-CE project, system capabilities and technologies, operations concept, and results of its pilot in support of the Earth Science Mission Operations System (ESMOS).

  2. Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Undergraduate students Kristina Wines and Dena Renzo at Rensselaer Poloytech Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY, monitor the progress of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) mission (STS-87), Nov. 19 - Dec.5, 1997). Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC) like this one will become more common during operations with the International Space Station. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. Photo credit: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

  3. Prototype software reuse environment at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt

    1989-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) work is organized into four phases and includes participation by a contractor, CTA, Inc. The first phase was an automation study, which began with a comprehensive survey of software development automation technologies. Eight technical areas were analyzed for goals, current capabilities, and obstacles. The study documented current software development practice in GSFC Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate, and presented short- and long-term recommendations that included focus on reuse and object-oriented development. The second phase, which has been completed, developed a prototype reuse environment with tools supporting object-oriented requirements analysis and design. This phase addressed the operational concept of software reuse, i.e., it attempted to understand how software can be reused. This environment has two semantic networks: object and keywords, and includes automated search, interactive browsing and a graphical display of database contents. Phase 3 was a domain analysis of Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) software. The goal in this phase was to create an initial repository of reusable components and techniques. Seven existing Operations Control Centers at GSFC were studied, but the domain analysis proved to be very slow. A lesson learned from this was that senior people who understand the environment and the functionality of the area are needed to perform successful domain analyses.

  4. 3. EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER, OPERATIONS CONTROL. AS SYSTEM BECOMES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER, OPERATIONS CONTROL. AS SYSTEM BECOMES INCREASINGLY AUTOMATED, EAGLE ROCK WILL BECOME MORE AND MORE THE CENTRAL CONTROL SYSTEM OF THE METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. - Eagle Rock Operations Control Center, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2441 Control center. Each LNG plant must have a control center from which operations and warning devices are monitored as required by this...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2441 Control center. Each LNG plant must have a control center from which operations and warning devices are monitored as required by this...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2441 Control center. Each LNG plant must have a control center from which operations and warning devices are monitored as required by this...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2441 Control center. Each LNG plant must have a control center from which operations and warning devices are monitored as required by this...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2441 Control center. Each LNG plant must have a control center from which operations and warning devices are monitored as required by this...

  10. Poison control center - emergency number

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES This national hotline number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. ... centers in the United States use this national number. You should call if you have any questions ...

  11. Customizing graphical user interface technology for spacecraft control centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Edward; Giancola, Peter; Gibson, Steven; Mahmot, Ronald

    1993-01-01

    The Transportable Payload Operations Control Center (TPOCC) project is applying the latest in graphical user interface technology to the spacecraft control center environment. This project of the Mission Operations Division's (MOD) Control Center Systems Branch (CCSB) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed an architecture for control centers which makes use of a distributed processing approach and the latest in Unix workstation technology. The TPOCC project is committed to following industry standards and using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software components wherever possible to reduce development costs and to improve operational support. TPOCC's most successful use of commercial software products and standards has been in the development of its graphical user interface. This paper describes TPOCC's successful use and customization of four separate layers of commercial software products to create a flexible and powerful user interface that is uniquely suited to spacecraft monitoring and control.

  12. The Poison Control Center--Its Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manoguerra, Anthony S.

    1976-01-01

    Poison Control Centers are being utilized by more schools of pharmacy each year as training sites for students. This paper discusses what such a center is, its services, changes anticipated in the poison center system in the next several years and how they may influence pharmacy education, specifically as it relates to clinical toxicology.…

  13. Virtual Control Systems Environment (VCSE)

    ScienceCinema

    Atkins, Will

    2014-02-26

    Will Atkins, a Sandia National Laboratories computer engineer discusses cybersecurity research work for process control systems. Will explains his work on the Virtual Control Systems Environment project to develop a modeling and simulation framework of the U.S. electric grid in order to study and mitigate possible cyberattacks on infrastructure.

  14. Virtual Control Systems Environment (VCSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, Will

    2012-10-08

    Will Atkins, a Sandia National Laboratories computer engineer discusses cybersecurity research work for process control systems. Will explains his work on the Virtual Control Systems Environment project to develop a modeling and simulation framework of the U.S. electric grid in order to study and mitigate possible cyberattacks on infrastructure.

  15. Modern control centers and computer networking

    SciTech Connect

    Dy-Liacco, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    The automation of power system operation is generally achieved with the implementation of two control centers, one for the operation of the generation-transmission system and the other for the operation of the distribution system. These control centers are referred to, respectively, as the energy management system (EMS) and the distribution management system (DMS). The EMS may consist of several control centers in a hierarchy. The DMS may be made up of several independent distribution control centers. This article features the fundamental design aspects of modern EMS and DMS control centers (computer networks, distributed processing, and distributed databases), the linking of computer networks, and the communications that support such internetworking. The extension of such networking beyond the confines of system operation to other corporate networks is now made practical by the maturing concepts of client-server architectures and by the availability of modern communication technologies.

  16. 18. Station Service Control and Motor Control Center #2, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Station Service Control and Motor Control Center #2, view to the northeast. Note the circuit breaker switch on cart in left corner of photograph. This switch is part of the motor control center which has been temporarily removed from the slot marked with a tag that is visible at lower left end of control center. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  17. Learner-Centered Environments: Creating Effective Strategies Based on Student Attitudes and Faculty Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Catharine F.; Caston, Michael I.; King, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Learner-centered environments effectively implement multiple teaching techniques to enhance students' higher education experience and provide them with greater control over their academic learning. This qualitative study involves an exploration of the eight reasons for learner-centered teaching found in Terry Doyle's 2008 book,…

  18. PNNL?s Building Operations Control Center

    ScienceCinema

    Belew, Shan

    2016-06-14

    PNNL's Building Operations Control Center (BOCC) video provides an overview of the center, its capabilities, and its objectives. The BOCC was relocated to PNNL's new 3820 Systems Engineering Building in 2015. Although a key focus of the BOCC is on monitoring and improving the operations of PNNL buildings, the center's state-of-the-art computational, software and visualization resources also have provided a platform for PNNL buildings-related research projects.

  19. PNNL’s Building Operations Control Center

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, Shan

    2015-09-29

    PNNL's Building Operations Control Center (BOCC) video provides an overview of the center, its capabilities, and its objectives. The BOCC was relocated to PNNL's new 3820 Systems Engineering Building in 2015. Although a key focus of the BOCC is on monitoring and improving the operations of PNNL buildings, the center's state-of-the-art computational, software and visualization resources also have provided a platform for PNNL buildings-related research projects.

  20. "Suicide" as Seen in Poison Control Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntire, Matilda S.; Angle, Carol R.

    1971-01-01

    Data on age and sex characteristics, intent and diagnosis of suicide, and toxicology are presented for 1,103 cases of poisoning (children ages 6-18 years) admitted to 50 poison control centers during 1 year. (KW)

  1. Poison control center - Emergency number (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... anywhere in the United States. This national hotline number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. ... control centers in the U.S. use this national number. You should call if you have any questions ...

  2. Plant productivity in controlled environments.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, F B; Bugbee, B

    1988-04-01

    To assess the cost and area/volume requirements of a farm in a space station or Lunar or Martian base, a few laboratories in the United States, the Soviet Union, France, and Japan are studying optimum controlled environments for the production of selected crops. Temperature, light, photoperiod, CO2, humidity, the root-zone environment, and cultivars are the primary factors being manipulated to increase yields and harvest index. Our best wheat yields on a time basis (24 g m-2 day-1 of edible biomass) are five times good field yields and twice the world record. Similar yields have been obtained in other laboratories with potatoes and lettuce; soybeans are also promising. These figures suggest that approximately 30 m2 under continuous production could support an astronaut with sufficient protein and about 2800 kcal day-1. Scientists under Iosif Gitelzon in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, have lived in a closed system for up to 5 months, producing 80% of their own food. Thirty square meters for crops were allotted to each of the two men taking part in the experiment. A functional controlled-environment life-support system (CELSS) will require the refined application of several disciplines: controlled-environment agriculture, food preparation, waste disposal, and control-systems technology, to list only the broadest categories. It has seemed intuitively evident that ways could be found to prepare food, regenerate plant nutrients from wastes, and even control and integrate several subsystems of a CELSS. But could sufficient food be produced in the limited areas and with the limited energy that might be available? Clearly, detailed studies of food production were necessary. PMID:11537758

  3. Plant productivity in controlled environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Bugbee, B.

    1988-01-01

    To assess the cost and area/volume requirements of a farm in a space station or Lunar or Martian base, a few laboratories in the United States, the Soviet Union, France, and Japan are studying optimum controlled environments for the production of selected crops. Temperature, light, photoperiod, CO2, humidity, the root-zone environment, and cultivars are the primary factors being manipulated to increase yields and harvest index. Our best wheat yields on a time basis (24 g m-2 day-1 of edible biomass) are five times good field yields and twice the world record. Similar yields have been obtained in other laboratories with potatoes and lettuce; soybeans are also promising. These figures suggest that approximately 30 m2 under continuous production could support an astronaut with sufficient protein and about 2800 kcal day-1. Scientists under Iosif Gitelzon in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, have lived in a closed system for up to 5 months, producing 80% of their own food. Thirty square meters for crops were allotted to each of the two men taking part in the experiment. A functional controlled-environment life-support system (CELSS) will require the refined application of several disciplines: controlled-environment agriculture, food preparation, waste disposal, and control-systems technology, to list only the broadest categories. It has seemed intuitively evident that ways could be found to prepare food, regenerate plant nutrients from wastes, and even control and integrate several subsystems of a CELSS. But could sufficient food be produced in the limited areas and with the limited energy that might be available? Clearly, detailed studies of food production were necessary.

  4. User-centered virtual environment design for virtual rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As physical and cognitive rehabilitation protocols utilizing virtual environments transition from single applications to comprehensive rehabilitation programs there is a need for a new design cycle methodology. Current human-computer interaction designs focus on usability without benchmarking technology within a user-in-the-loop design cycle. The field of virtual rehabilitation is unique in that determining the efficacy of this genre of computer-aided therapies requires prior knowledge of technology issues that may confound patient outcome measures. Benchmarking the technology (e.g., displays or data gloves) using healthy controls may provide a means of characterizing the "normal" performance range of the virtual rehabilitation system. This standard not only allows therapists to select appropriate technology for use with their patient populations, it also allows them to account for technology limitations when assessing treatment efficacy. Methods An overview of the proposed user-centered design cycle is given. Comparisons of two optical see-through head-worn displays provide an example of benchmarking techniques. Benchmarks were obtained using a novel vision test capable of measuring a user's stereoacuity while wearing different types of head-worn displays. Results from healthy participants who performed both virtual and real-world versions of the stereoacuity test are discussed with respect to virtual rehabilitation design. Results The user-centered design cycle argues for benchmarking to precede virtual environment construction, especially for therapeutic applications. Results from real-world testing illustrate the general limitations in stereoacuity attained when viewing content using a head-worn display. Further, the stereoacuity vision benchmark test highlights differences in user performance when utilizing a similar style of head-worn display. These results support the need for including benchmarks as a means of better understanding user outcomes

  5. Technologies for the marketplace from the Centers for Disease Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid-Sanden, Frances L.; Greene, R. Eric; Malvitz, Dolores M.

    1991-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control, a Public Health Service agency, is responsible for the prevention and control of disease and injury. Programs range from surveillance and prevention of chronic and infectious diseases to occupational health and injury control. These programs have produced technologies in a variety of fields, including vaccine development, new methods of disease diagnosis, and new tools to ensure a safer work environment.

  6. Capaciflector-based virtual force control and centering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a novel concept of force control, called virtual force control. The virtual force concept avoids sudden step transition of position control to contact force control resulting in contact force disturbance when a robot end-effector makes contact with the environment. A virtual force/position control scheme consists of two loops: the force control loop and the position control loop. While the position control loop regulates the free motion, the force control loop regulates the contact force after making contact with the environment and the virtual force measured by a range sensor called capaciflector in the virtual environment. After presenting the concept of virtual force control, the report introduces a centering scheme in which the virtual force controller is employed to measure three points on a cone so that its center can be located. Experimental results of a one-degree-of-freedom virtual force control scheme applied in berthing an orbital replaceable unit are reported and compared with those of conventional pure contact force control cases.

  7. Decoherence control in different environments

    SciTech Connect

    Paavola, J.; Maniscalco, S.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate two techniques for controlling decoherence, focusing on the crucial role played by the environmental spectrum. We show how environments with different spectra lead to very different dynamical behaviors. Our study clearly proves that such differences must be taken into account when designing decoherence control schemes. The two techniques we consider are reservoir engineering and quantum Zeno control. We focus on a quantum harmonic oscillator initially prepared in a nonclassical state and derive analytically its non-Markovian dynamics in the presence of different bosonic thermal environments. On the one hand, we show how, by modifying the spectrum of the environment, it is possible to prolong or reduce the life of a Schroedinger cat state. On the other hand, we study the effect of nonselective energy measurements on the degradation of quantumness of initial Fock states. In this latter case, we see that the crossover between quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects, discussed by Maniscalco et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 130402 (2006)], is highly sensitive to the details of the spectrum. In particular, for certain types of spectra, even very small variations of the system frequency may cause a measurement-induced acceleration of decoherence rather than its inhibition.

  8. Control centers design for ergonomics and safety.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Leonardo; Lizarazo, Cesar; Bernal, Oscar; Cordoba, Jorge; Arias, Claudia; Monroy, Magda; Cotrino, Carlos; Montoya, Olga

    2012-01-01

    This paper shows the general design conditions about ergonomics and safety for control centers in the petrochemical process industry. Some of the topics include guidelines for the optimized workstation design, control room layout, building layout, and lighting, acoustical and environmental design. Also takes into account the safety parameters in the control rooms and centers design. The conditions and parameters shown in this paper come from the standards and global advances on this topic on the most recent publications. And also the work was supplemented by field visits of our team to the control center operations in a petrochemical company, and technical literature search efforts. This guideline will be useful to increase the productivity and improve the working conditions at the control rooms. PMID:22317199

  9. Operating and Managing a Backup Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Angela L.; Pirani, Joseph L.; Bornas, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Due to the criticality of continuous mission operations, some control centers must plan for alternate locations in the event an emergency shuts down the primary control center. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is the Mission Control Center (MCC) for the International Space Station (ISS). Due to Houston s proximity to the Gulf of Mexico, JSC is prone to threats from hurricanes which could cause flooding, wind damage, and electrical outages to the buildings supporting the MCC. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the capability to be the Backup Control Center for the ISS if the situation is needed. While the MSFC Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) does house the BCC, the prime customer and operator of the ISS is still the JSC flight operations team. To satisfy the customer and maintain continuous mission operations, the BCC has critical infrastructure that hosts ISS ground systems and flight operations equipment that mirrors the prime mission control facility. However, a complete duplicate of Mission Control Center in another remote location is very expensive to recreate. The HOSC has infrastructure and services that MCC utilized for its backup control center to reduce the costs of a somewhat redundant service. While labor talents are equivalent, experiences are not. Certain operations are maintained in a redundant mode, while others are simply maintained as single string with adequate sparing levels of equipment. Personnel at the BCC facility must be trained and certified to an adequate level on primary MCC systems. Negotiations with the customer were done to match requirements with existing capabilities, and to prioritize resources for appropriate level of service. Because some of these systems are shared, an activation of the backup control center will cause a suspension of scheduled HOSC activities that may share resources needed by the BCC. For example, the MCC is monitoring a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico. As the threat to MCC

  10. Wheat production in controlled environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, Frank B.; Bugbee, Bruce; Bubenheim, David

    1987-01-01

    The present optimization study for maximum yield and quality conditions in the lunar or Martian Controlled Environment Life Support System (CELSS)-based growth of wheat has determined that, for 23-57 g/sq m per day of edible biomass, minimum CELSS size must be of the order of 12-30 sq m/person. About 600 W/sq m of electricity would be consumed by the artificial lighting required; temperature, irradiance, photoperiod, CO2 levels, humidity, and wind velocity are all controlled. A rock wool plant support allows direct seeding, and densities of up to 10,000 plants/sq m. Densities of up to 2000 plants/sq m appear to increase seed yields.

  11. Usability Evaluation of the Student Centered e-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junus, Inas Sofiyah; Santoso, Harry Budi; Isal, R. Yugo K.; Utomo, Andika Yudha

    2015-01-01

    Student Centered e-Learning Environment (SCeLE) has substantial roles to support learning activities at Faculty of Computer Science, Universitas Indonesia (Fasilkom UI). Although it has been utilized for about 10 years, the usability aspect of SCeLE as an e-Learning system has not been evaluated. Therefore, the usability aspects of SCeLE Fasilkom…

  12. 78 FR 11889 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National..., National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of...

  13. Wheat production in controlled environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, Frank B.; Bugbee, Bruce; Bubenheim, David

    1987-01-01

    Conditions are optimized for maximum yield and quality of wheat to be used in a controlled environment life support system (CELSS) in a Lunar or Martian base or a spacecraft. With yields of 23 to 57 g/sq m/d of edible biomass, a minimum size for a CELSS would be between 12 and 30 sq m per person, utilizing about 600 W/sq m of electrical energy for artificial light. Temperature, irradiance, photoperiod, carbon dioxide levels, humidity, and wind velocity are controlled in growth chambers. Nutrient solutions (adjusted for wheat) are supplied to the roots via a recirculating system that controls pH by adding HNO3 and controlling the NO3/NH4 ratio in solution. A rock-wool plant support allows direct seeding and densities up to 10,000 plants sq m. Densities up to 2000 plants/sq m appear to increase seed yield. Biomass production increases almost linearily with increasing irradiance from 400 to 1700 micromol/sq m/s of photosynthetic photon flux, but the efficiency of light utilization decreases over this range. Photoperiod and temperature both have a profound influence on floral initiation, spikelet formation, stem elongation, and fertilization.

  14. Remote Operations and Ground Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Barry S.; Lankford, Kimberly; Pitts, R. Lee

    2004-01-01

    The Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center supports the International Space Station (ISS) through remote interfaces around the world. The POIC was originally designed as a gateway to space for remote facilities; ranging from an individual user to a full-scale multiuser environment. This achievement was accomplished while meeting program requirements and accommodating the injection of modern technology on an ongoing basis to ensure cost effective operations. This paper will discuss the open POIC architecture developed to support similar and dissimilar remote operations centers. It will include technologies, protocols, and compromises which on a day to day basis support ongoing operations. Additional areas covered include centralized management of shared resources and methods utilized to provide highly available and restricted resources to remote users. Finally, the effort of coordinating the actions of participants will be discussed.

  15. Wheat production in controlled environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, Frank B.; Bugbee, Bruce; Bubenheim, David

    Our goal is to optimize conditions for maximum yield and quality of wheat to be used in a controlled-environment, life-support system (CELSS) in a Lunar or Martian base or perhaps in a space craft. With yields of 23 to 57 g m-2 d-1 of edible biomass, a minimum size for a CELSS would be between 12 and 30 m2 per person, utilizing about 600 W m-2 of electrical energy for artificial light. Temperature, irradiance, photoperiod, carbon-dioxide levels, humidity, and wind velocity are controlled in state-of-the-art growth chambers. Nutrient solutions (adjusted for wheat) are supplied to the roots via a recirculating system that controls pH by adding HNO3 and controlling the NO3/NH4 ratio in solution. A rock-wool plant support allows direct seeding and densities up to 10,000 plants per meter2. Densities up to 2000 plants m-2 appear to increase seed yield. Biomass production increases almost linearily with increasing irradiance from 400 to 1700 μmol m-2 s-1 of photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), but the efficiency of light utilization decreases over this range. Photoperiod and temperature both have a profound influence on floral initiation, spikelet formation, stem elongation, and fertilization. High temperatures (25 to 27°C) and long days shorten the life cycle and promote rapid growth, but cooler temperatures (20°C) and shorter days greatly increase seed number per head and thus yield (g m-2). The life cycle is lengthened in these conditions but yield per day (g m-2 d-1) is still increased. We have evaluated about 600 cultivars from around the world and have developed several breeding lines for our controlled conditions. Some of our ultra-dwarf lines (30 to 50 cm tall) look especially promising with high yields and high harvest indices (percent edible biomass).

  16. Wheat production in controlled environments.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, F B; Bugbee, B; Bubenheim, D

    1987-01-01

    Our goal is to optimize conditions for maximum yield and quality of wheat to be used in a controlled-environment, life-support system (CELSS) in a Lunar or Martian base or perhaps in a space craft. With yields of 23 to 57 g m-2 d-1 of edible biomass, a minimum size for a CELSS would be between 12 and 30 m2 per person, utilizing about 600 W m-2 of electrical energy for artificial light. Temperature, irradiance, photoperiod, carbon-dioxide levels, humidity, and wind velocity are controlled in state-of-the-art growth chambers. Nutrient solutions (adjusted for wheat) are supplied to the roots via a recirculating system that controls pH by adding HNO3 and controlling the NO3/NH4 ratio in solution. A rock-wool plant support allows direct seeding and densities up to 10,000 plants per meter2. Densities up to 2000 plants m-2 appear to increase seed yield. Biomass production increases almost linearly with increasing irradiance from 400 to 1700 micromoles m-2 s-1 of photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), but the efficiency of light utilization decreases over this range. Photoperiod and temperature both have a profound influence on floral initiation, spikelet formation, stem elongation, and fertilization. High temperatures (25 to 27 degrees C) and long days shorten the life cycle and promote rapid growth, but cooler temperatures (20 degrees C) and shorter days greatly increase seed number per head and thus yield (g m-2). The life cycle is lengthened in these conditions but yield per day (g m-2 d-1) is still increased. We have evaluated about 600 cultivars from around the world and have developed several breeding lines for our controlled conditions. Some of our ultra-dwarf lines (30 to 50 cm tall) look especially promising with high yields and high harvest indices (percent edible biomass). PMID:11537261

  17. [Population control and environment protection].

    PubMed

    Qu, G

    1982-01-29

    Although many factors cause environmental pollution and damage, the most important and basic factor is a rapidly increasing population. Therefore, a balanced development of population and environment is essential. The pressure a rapidly increasing populaton exerts on the environment has many aspects. The pressure of population on land resources results in increased land use and increased insecticide use due to increased insect tolerance leading to decreased productivity of cultivated land, increased desert formation, and decreased food supply. Population pressure on forest resources leads to land erosion; one of the major causes of the 1981 flood in Sichuan was attributed to excessive logging activities. Demand for fuels (firewood, straws, animal manures) by an increasing population leads to decrease in natural fertilizers, decreased food production, and energy shortage in rural areas. Population pressure on cities leads to air, water, noise and other environmental pollution as well as decrease in housing facilities and in green vegetation. Problems resulting from population pressures on industrial development include industrial and environmental pollution and unemployment. Population increases and accompanying industrial activities affect the weather which in turn affects the quality of agriculture, forests, and lakes. Thus, if unchecked, atmospheric carbon dioxide level would double by the middle of the next century, which would lead to increase in atmospheric temperature with disastrous consequences. Therefore, a well planned program for population control is essential for achieving decent quality of life. PMID:12338285

  18. Logistics distribution centers location problem and algorithm under fuzzy environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lixing; Ji, Xiaoyu; Gao, Ziyou; Li, Keping

    2007-11-01

    Distribution centers location problem is concerned with how to select distribution centers from the potential set so that the total relevant cost is minimized. This paper mainly investigates this problem under fuzzy environment. Consequentially, chance-constrained programming model for the problem is designed and some properties of the model are investigated. Tabu search algorithm, genetic algorithm and fuzzy simulation algorithm are integrated to seek the approximate best solution of the model. A numerical example is also given to show the application of the algorithm.

  19. Probing an NV Center's Nuclear Spin Environment with Coherent Population Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levonian, David; Goldman, Michael; Singh, Swati; Markham, Matthew; Twitchen, Daniel; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have emerged as a versatile atom-like system, finding diverse applications in metrology and quantum information science, but interaction between the NV center's electronic spin and its nuclear spin environment represent a major source of decoherence. We use optical techniques to monitor and control the nuclear bath surrounding an NV center. Specifically, we create an optical Λ-system using the | +/- 1 > components of the NV center's spin-triplet ground state. When the Zeeman splitting between the two states is equal to the two-photon detuning between the lasers, population is trapped in the resulting dark state. Measuring the rate at which the NV center escapes from the dark state therefore gives information on how spin bath dynamics change the effective magnetic field experienced by the NV center. By monitoring statistics of the emitted photons, we plan to probe non-equilibrium dynamics of the bath.

  20. SPOT4 Operational Control Center (CMP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaouche, G.

    1993-01-01

    CNES(F) is responsible for the development of a new generation of Operational Control Center (CMP) which will operate the new heliosynchronous remote sensing satellite (SPOT4). This Operational Control Center takes large benefit from the experience of the first generation of control center and from the recent advances in computer technology and standards. The CMP is designed for operating two satellites all the same time with a reduced pool of controllers. The architecture of this CMP is simple, robust, and flexible, since it is based on powerful distributed workstations interconnected through an Ethernet LAN. The application software uses modern and formal software engineering methods, in order to improve quality and reliability, and facilitate maintenance. This software is table driven so it can be easily adapted to other operational needs. Operation tasks are automated to the maximum extent, so that it could be possible to operate the CMP automatically with very limited human interference for supervision and decision making. This paper provides an overview of the SPOTS mission and associated ground segment. It also details the CMP, its functions, and its software and hardware architecture.

  1. Research into language concepts for the mission control center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellenback, Steven W.; Barton, Timothy J.; Ratner, Jeremiah M.

    1990-01-01

    A final report is given on research into language concepts for the Mission Control Center (MCC). The Specification Driven Language research is described. The state of the image processing field and how image processing techniques could be applied toward automating the generation of the language known as COmputation Development Environment (CODE or Comp Builder) are discussed. Also described is the development of a flight certified compiler for Comps.

  2. Space Weather Operational Products in the NOAA Space Environment Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtagh, W. J.; Onsager, T. G.

    2006-12-01

    The NOAA Space Environment Center (SEC) is the Nation's official source of space weather alerts and warnings, and provides real-time monitoring and forecasting of solar and geophysical events. The SEC, a 24- hour/day operations center, provides space weather products to the scientific and user communities in the United States and around the world. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the SEC current suite of space weather products, with an emphasis on models and products recently introduced into the Operations Center. Customer uses of products will be discussed, which will highlight the diverse customer base for space weather services. Also, models in SEC's testbed will be introduced. SEC's testbed facility is dedicated to moving space environment models from a research-development mode to an operational mode. The status of efforts to replace NASA's aging real-time monitor (ACE) in the solar wind ahead of Earth, an "upstream data buoy", will also be described. Numerous existing and planned space weather products and models rely on near real-time solar wind data.

  3. Seismometer readings studied in Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The seismometer reading from the impact made by the Apollo 15 Saturn S-IVB stage when it struck the lunar surface is studied by scientists in the Mission Control Center. Dr. Gary Latham (dark suit, wearing lapel button) of Columbia University is responsible for the design and experiment data analysis of the Passive Seismic Experiment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP). The man on the left, writing, is Nafi Toksos of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Looking on at upper left is Dave Lammlein, also with Columbia.

  4. 29. Launch Control Center, view looking in, alert crew mannequin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Launch Control Center, view looking in, alert crew mannequin at end of Launch Control Center. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  5. 2. CONNECTING TUNNEL AT LEFT, CONTROL BUILDING B AT CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CONNECTING TUNNEL AT LEFT, CONTROL BUILDING B AT CENTER, WATER TANK AT TOP CENTER, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Control Building B, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  6. Intelligent tutoring in the spacecraft command/control environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walter F.

    1988-01-01

    The spacecraft command/control environment is becoming increasingly complex. As we enter the era of Space Station and the era of more highly automated systems, it is evident that the critical roles played by operations personnel in supervising the many required control center system components is becoming more cognitively demanding. In addition, the changing and emerging roles in the operations picture have far-reaching effects on the achievement of mission objectives. Thus highly trained and competent operations personnel are mandatory for success. Keeping pace with these developments has been computer-aided instruction utilizing various artificial intelligence technologies. The impacts of this growing capability on the stringent requirements for efficient and effective control center operations personnel is an area of much concentrated study. Some of the research and development of automated tutoring systems for the spacecraft command/control environment is addressed.

  7. 77 FR 12845 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Disease, Disability, and Injury... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (CDC/ATSDR... meetings and other committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and...

  8. Application for temperature and humidity monitoring of data center environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Ş.; Truşcǎ, M. R. C.; Soran, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The technology and computer science registered a large development in the last years. Most systems that use high technologies require special working conditions. The monitoring and the controlling are very important. The temperature and the humidity are important parameters in the operation of computer systems, industrial and research, maintaining it between certain values to ensure their proper functioning being important. Usually, the temperature is maintained in the established range using an air conditioning system, but the humidity is affected. In the present work we developed an application based on a board with own firmware called "AVR_NET_IO" using a microcontroller ATmega32 type for temperature and humidity monitoring in Data Center of INCDTIM. On this board, temperature sensors were connected to measure the temperature in different points of the Data Center and outside of this. Humidity monitoring is performed using data from integrated sensors of the air conditioning system, thus achieving a correlation between humidity and temperature variation. It was developed a software application (CM-1) together with the hardware, which allows temperature monitoring and register inside Data Center and trigger an alarm when variations are greater with 3°C than established limits of the temperature.

  9. Lighting and the Controlled Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holophane Co., Inc. New York, NY.

    More sophisticated and better controlled light, a key factor in environmental engineering, is discussed in three sections as follows--(1) how light should be released into interior spaces to satisfy the optical, physiological and psychological characteristics of people, (2) ways of reducing reflected glare, including the use of polarization, and…

  10. Teaching the environment to control quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pechen, Alexander; Rabitz, Herschel

    2006-06-15

    A nonequilibrium, generally time-dependent, environment whose form is deduced by optimal learning control is shown to provide a means for incoherent manipulation of quantum systems. Incoherent control by the environment (ICE) can serve to steer a system from an initial state to a target state, either mixed or in some cases pure, by exploiting dissipative dynamics. Implementing ICE with either incoherent radiation or a gas as the control is explicitly considered, and the environmental control is characterized by its distribution function. Simulated learning control experiments are performed with simple illustrations to find the shape of the optimal nonequilibrium distribution function that best affects the posed dynamical objectives.

  11. Plant growth chamber based on space proven controlled environment technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatius, R.W.; Ignatius, M.H.; Imberti, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Quantum Devices, Inc., in conjunction with Percival Scientific, Inc., and the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) have developed a controlled environment plant growth chamber for terrestrial agricultural and scientific applications. This chamber incorporates controlled environment technology used in the WCSAR ASTROCULTURE{trademark} flight unit for conducting plant research on the Space Shuttle. The new chamber, termed CERES 2010, features air humidity, temperature, and carbon dioxide control, an atmospheric contaminant removal unit, an LED lighting system, and a water and nutrient delivery system. The advanced environment control technology used in this chamber will increase the reliability and repeatability of environmental physiology data derived from plant experiments conducted in this chamber. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Environment and health: Probes and sensors for environment digital control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettini, Chiara

    2014-05-01

    The idea of studying the environment using New Technologies (NT) came from a MIUR (Ministry of Education of the Italian Government) notice that allocated funds for the realization of innovative school science projects. The "Environment and Health" project uses probes and sensors for digital control of environment (water, air and soil). The working group was composed of 4 Science teachers from 'Liceo Statale G. Mazzini ', under the coordination of teacher Chiara Schettini. The Didactic Section of Naples City of Sciences helped the teachers in developing the project and it organized a refresher course for them on the utilization of digital control sensors. The project connects Environment and Technology because the study of the natural aspects and the analysis of the chemical-physical parameters give students and teachers skills for studying the environment based on the utilization of NT in computing data elaboration. During the practical project, samples of air, water and soil are gathered in different contexts. Sample analysis was done in the school's scientific laboratory with digitally controlled sensors. The data are elaborated with specific software and the results have been written in a booklet and in a computing database. During the first year, the project involved 6 school classes (age of the students 14—15 years), under the coordination of Science teachers. The project aims are: 1) making students more aware about environmental matters 2) achieving basic skills for evaluating air, water and soil quality. 3) achieving strong skills for the utilization of digitally controlled sensors. 4) achieving computing skills for elaborating and presenting data. The project aims to develop a large environmental conscience and the need of a ' good ' environment for defending our health. Moreover it would increase the importance of NT as an instrument of knowledge.

  13. Extravehicular Activity Testing in Analog Environments: Evaluating the Effects of Center of Gravity and Environment on Human Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Steve P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Center of gravity (CG) is likely to be an important variable in astronaut performance during partial gravity extravehicular activity (EVA). The Apollo Lunar EVA experience revealed challenges with suit stability and control. The EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance Project (EPSP) in conjunction with the Constellation EVA Systems Project Office have developed plans to systematically understand the role of suit weight, CG and suit pressure on astronaut performance in partial gravity environments. This presentation based upon CG studies seeks to understand the impact of varied CG on human performance in lunar gravity.

  14. Technology Of Controlled-Environment Agriculture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Bates, Maynard E.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses controlled-environment agriculture (CEA) for commercial production of organisms, whether plants or animals. Practiced in greenhouses to produce food on nonarable lands. Describes conceptual regenerative system that incorporates biological, physical, and chemical processes to support humans in extraterrestrial environments.

  15. 78 FR 25279 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and Date: 12... announcements of meetings and other committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease...

  16. 75 FR 30409 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and...)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and..., Public Health Analyst, National Center for Chronic Disease and Health Promotion, Office of the...

  17. DIII-D PLASMA CONTROL SIMULATION ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    LEUER,J.A; DERANIAN,R.D; FERRON,J.R; HUMPHREYS,D.A; JOHNSON,R.D; PENAFLOR,B.G; WALKER,M.L; WELANDER,A.S; KHAYRUTDINOV,R.R; DOKOUKA,V; EDGELL,D.H; FRANSSON,C.M

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 Many advanced have been made to the DIII-D plasma control simulation environment since the previously developed hardware-in-the-loop plasma shape simulation capability was reported. In the present paper they summarize the major improvements to this simulation environment, including, introduction of the non-linear plasma evolution code DINA. Comparisons with DIII-D experimental results are presented. Recent model developments in advanced neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) and resistive wall mode (RWM) control are presented.

  18. Intelligent Controlling System of Aquiculture Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Deshen; Hu, Xuemei

    The paper has analyzed present aquiculture conditions and controlling problems of water environment factors of aquiculture, and constructed effective security aquiculture breeding intelligence controlling system suitable to Chinese situation, and presented the control strategy of neural network realizing dynamic decoupling for the factory aquiculture, and specially solved the water environment control and so on the key questions. The long term practice has shown that the system operation is simple and effective safe by applying some breeding bases in Zhenjiang, the system has met the requirements of culturists and enhanced international market competition for aquiculture.

  19. International Lighting in Controlled Environments Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbits, Ted W. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Lighting is a central and critical aspect of control in environmental research for plant research and is gaining recognition as a significant factor to control carefully for animal and human research. Thus this workshop was convened to reevaluate the technology that is available today and to work toward developing guidelines for the most effective use of lighting in controlled environments with emphasis on lighting for plants but also to initiate interest in the development of improved guidelines for human and animal research.

  20. Atlanta Air Route Traffic Control Center's involvement in aviation weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    The distribution of weather information throughout the Air Traffic Control System is discussed along with the development of meteorological radar, and the modifications to the Air Route Traffic Control Center radars for locating and determining the severity of storms' cells. The planned improvements in the availability of weather data to the control centers are listed.

  1. The NASA Ames Controlled Environment Research Chamber: Present status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Harper, Lynn D.; Force, Edwin L.

    1994-01-01

    The Controlled Environment Research Chamber (CERC) at the NASA Ames Research Center was created for early-on investigation of promising new technologies for life support of advanced space exploration missions. The CERC facility is being used to address the advanced technology requirements necessary to implement an integrated working and living environment for a planetary habitat. The CERC, along with a human-powered centrifuge, a planetary terrain simulator, advanced displays, and a virtual reality, is able to develop and demonstrate applicable technologies for future planetary exploration. There will be several robotic mechanisms performing exploration tasks external to the habitat that will be controlled through the virtual environment to provide representative workloads for the crew. Finally, there will be a discussion of innovative new multidisciplinary test facilities, and how effective they are to the investigation of the wide range of human and machine problems inherent in exploration missions.

  2. The NASA Ames Controlled Environment Research Chamber - Present status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Harper, Lynn D.; Force, Edwin L.

    1994-01-01

    The Controlled Environment Research Chamber (CERC) at the NASA Ames Research Center was created for early-on investigation of promising new technologies for life support of advanced space exploration missions. The CERC facility is being used to address the advanced technology requirements necessary to implement an integrated working and living environment for a planetary habitat. The CERC, along with a human-powered centrifuge, a planetary terrain simulator, advanced displays, and a virtual reality capability, is able to develop and demonstrate applicable technologies for future planetary exploration. There will be several robotic mechanisms performing exploration taskes external to the habitat that will be controlled through the virtual environment to provide representative workloads for the crew. Finally, there will be a discussion of innovative new multidisciplinary test facilities, and how effective they are to the investigation of the wide range of human and machine problems inherent in exploration missions.

  3. Visual operations control in administrative environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, M.L.; Levine, L.O.

    1995-03-01

    When asked what comes to mind when they think of ``controlling work`` in the office, people may respond with ``overbearing boss,`` ``no autonomy,`` or ``Theory X management.`` The idea of controlling work in white collar or administrative environments can have a negative connotation. However, office life is often chaotic and miserable precisely because the work processes are out of control, and managers must spend their time looking over people`s shoulders and fighting fires. While management styles and structures vary, the need for control of work processes does not. Workers in many environments are being reorganized into self-managed work teams. These teams are expected to manage their own work through increased autonomy and empowerment. However, even empowered work teams must manage their work processes because of process variation. The amount of incoming jobs vary with both expected (seasonal) and unexpected demand. The mixture of job types vary over time, changing the need for certain skills or knowledge. And illness and turnover affect the availability of workers with needed skills and knowledge. Clearly, there is still a need to control work, whether the authority for controlling work is vested in one person or many. Visual control concepts provide simple, inexpensive, and flexible mechanisms for managing processes in work teams and continuous improvement administrative environments.

  4. Making the Change: From a Teacher-Centered to a Learner-Centered Environment--A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roof, Patty L.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education is calling for transformation in teaching practices which includes learner-centered environments. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore 15 nursing faculty life experiences as they relate to the choice of a learning environment. Participants expressed their life experiences through interview…

  5. Hierarchical Robot Control In A Multisensor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanu, Bir; Thune, Nils; Lee, Jih Kun; Thune, Mari

    1987-03-01

    Automatic recognition, inspection, manipulation and assembly of objects will be a common denominator in most of tomorrow's highly automated factories. These tasks will be handled by intelligent computer controlled robots with multisensor capabilities which contribute to desired flexibility and adaptability. The control of a robot in such a multisensor environment becomes of crucial importance as the complexity of the problem grows exponentially with the number of sensors, tasks, commands and objects. In this paper we present an approach which uses CAD (Computer-Aided Design) based geometric and functional models of objects together with action oriented neuroschemas to recognize and manipulate objects by a robot in a multisensor environment. The hierarchical robot control system is being implemented on a BBN Butterfly multi processor. Index terms: CAD, Hierarchical Control, Hypothesis Generation and Verification, Parallel Processing, Schemas

  6. 83. Shock absorber attaching "egg" to the launch control center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. Shock absorber attaching "egg" to the launch control center, southwest corner - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  7. 86. Shock absorber, top of launch control center, southeast corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. Shock absorber, top of launch control center, southeast corner - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  8. 13. Sewage treatment lagoon, drainage control at center left, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Sewage treatment lagoon, drainage control at center left, looking south - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  9. Attitudinal Effects of a Student-Centered Active Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Allen, Deedee

    2005-06-01

    The importance of attitudes toward science has risen from widely accepted assumptions that achievement and attitude are positively interdependent and that affective variables are as important as cognitive variables in molding student learning. This report examines the effect on student attitudes toward learning chemistry in an active learning environment that has incorporated elements believed to positively influence student attitudes toward science including cooperative learning, hands-on activities, real-world applications, and engaging technology. These elements were considered for synergetic effects and not as individual contributors to the overall results. Two different sections of the same general chemistry course participated. The lecture setting was used as the control. Residualized gain scores were used to compare net changes in student attitudes. Data were analyzed for possible differences in gain for different academic majors. Anxiety in chemistry was monitored for the two class settings in three areas, learning in chemistry, chemistry evaluation, and chemical handling. Qualitative student feedback was also collected and is summarized in this report on the attitudinal aspects of instruction.

  10. Controlling multiple security robots in a warehouse environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, H. R.; Gilbreath, G. A.; Heath-Pastore, T. A.; Laird, R. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Naval Command Control and Ocean Surveillance Center (NCCOSC) has developed an architecture to provide coordinated control of multiple autonomous vehicles from a single host console. The multiple robot host architecture (MRHA) is a distributed multiprocessing system that can be expanded to accommodate as many as 32 robots. The initial application will employ eight Cybermotion K2A Navmaster robots configured as remote security platforms in support of the Mobile Detection Assessment and Response System (MDARS) Program. This paper discusses developmental testing of the MRHA in an operational warehouse environment, with two actual and four simulated robotic platforms.

  11. Use of a "Freak Out" Control Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casse, Robert M.

    1970-01-01

    A student staffed center, established to help those on bad trips", utilizes services of volunteer personnel for therapeutic support. A physician is on call to administer chemotherapy when needed. During the first year of operation, no cases of hepatitis or freak outs have been reported. (CJ)

  12. RoboCon: A general purpose telerobotic control center

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Noakes, M.W.; Schempf, H.; Blair, L.M.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes human factors issues involved in the design of RoboCon, a multi-purpose control center for use in US Department of Energy remote handling applications. RoboCon is intended to be a flexible, modular control center capable of supporting a wide variety of robotic devices.

  13. Virtual environments for telerobotic shared control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Brian K.

    1994-01-01

    The use of a virtual environment to bring about telerobotic shared control is discussed. A knowledge base, referred to as the World Model, is used to aid the system in its decision making. Information from the World Model is displayed visually in order to aid the human side of human-computer interface.

  14. International lighting in controlled environments workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Lighting is a central and critical aspect of control in environmental research for plant research and is gaining recognition as a significant factor to control carefully for animal and human research. Thus this workshop was convened to reevaluate the technology that is available today and to work toward developing guidelines for the most effective use of lighting in controlled environments with emphasis on lighting for plants but also to initiate interest in the development of improved guidelines for human and animal research. There are a number of established guidelines for lighting in human and animal environments. Development of new lighting guidelines is necessary for three reasons: (1) recent scientific discoveries show that in addition to supporting the sensation of vision, light has profound nonvisual biological and behavioral effects in both animals and humans; (2) federal regulations (EPACT 1992) are requiring all indoor environments to become more energy efficient with a specific emphasis on energy conservation in lighting; (3) lighting engineers and manufacturers have developed a wealth of new light sources and lighting products that can be applied in animal and human environments. The workshop was aimed at bringing together plant scientists and physical scientists to interact in the discussions. It involved participation of biological scientists involved in studying mechanisms of light reactions and those involved in utilizing lighting for production of plants and maintenance of animals in controlled environments. It included participation of physical scientists from universities and government involved in research as well as those from industry involved in producing lamps and in construction of controlled growth facilities. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. Physiological Disorders in Closed, Controlled Environment Crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Morrow, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the physiological disorders that affect crops grown in closed controlled environments. A physiological disorder is understood to be a problem resulting from the influence of environmental and horticultural factors on plan development other than a problem caused by a pathogen or some other abiotic cause. The topics that are addressed are: (1) Calcium-Related Disorders (2) Oedema (Intumescence) (3) Long-Photoperiod Injury (4) Light Spectral Quality Effects (5) Super-Elevated CO2 Injuries (6) Ethylene (7) Other Disorders (8) Considerations for Closed Space Environments. Views of plant with the disorders are shown.

  16. Homeostasis control of building environment using sensor agent robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahama, Eri; Mita, Akira

    2012-04-01

    A human centered system for building is demanded to meet variety of needs due to the diversification and maturation of society. Smart buildings and smart houses have been studied to satisfy this demand. However, it is difficult for such systems to respond flexibly to unexpected events and needs that are caused by aging and complicate emotion changes. With this regards, we suggest "Biofied Buildings". The goal for this research is to realize buildings that are safer, more comfortable and more energy-efficient by embedding adaptive functions of life into buildings. In this paper, we propose a new control system for building environments, focused on physiological adaptation, particularly homeostasis, endocrine system and immune system. Residents are used as living sensors and controllers in the control loop. A sensor agent robot is used to acquire resident's discomfort feeling, and to output hormone-like signals to activate devices to control the environments. The proposed system could control many devices without establishing complicated scenarios. Results obtained from some simulations and the demonstration experiments using an LED lighting system showed that the proposed system were able to achieve robust and stable control of environments without complicated scenarios.

  17. Is function-based control room design human-centered?

    SciTech Connect

    Norros, L.; Savioja, P.

    2006-07-01

    Function-based approaches to system interface design appears an appealing possibility in helping designers and operators to cope with the vast amount of information needed to control complex processes. In this paper we provide evidence of operator performance analyses showing that outcome-centered performance measures may not be sufficiently informative for design. We need analyses indicating habitual patterns of using information, operator practices. We argue that practices that portray functional orienting to the task support mastery of the process. They also create potential to make use of function-based information presentation. We see that functional design is not an absolute value. Instead, such design should support communication of the functional significance of the process information to the operators in variable situations. Hence, it should facilitate development of practices that focus to interpreting this message. Successful function-based design facilitates putting operations into their contexts and is human-centered in an extended sense: It aids making sense in the complex, dynamic and uncertain environment. (authors)

  18. Lessons learned in control center technologies and non-technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Elaine R.

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) Control Center and the Oculometer and Automated Space Interface System (OASIS). Topics covered include SME mission operations functions; technical and non-technical features of the SME control center; general tasks and objects within the Space Station Freedom (SSF) ground system nodes; OASIS-Real Time for the control and monitoring of of space systems and subsystems; and OASIS planning, scheduling, and PC architecture.

  19. Teachers' Evaluation of Student-Centered Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cubukcu, Zuhal

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: The student-centered teaching is the arrangement of the teaching experience focusing on the students' responsibilities and activities in the learning process which takes into consideration the students' interests, demands and needs. According to this approach, while teaching experiences are planned, different learning strategies…

  20. Integrated Information Centers within Academic Environments: Introduction and Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunin, Luis F., Ed.; D'Elia, George, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Introduces eight articles on the Integrated Information Center (IIC) Project, which investigated significant behavioral, technological, organizational, financial, and legal factors involved in the management of IICs. Four articles address design and management issues of general interest, and four focus on specific design considerations and a…

  1. Temperature Control Diagnostics for Sample Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Santodonato, Louis J; Walker, Lakeisha MH; Church, Andrew J; Redmon, Christopher Mckenzie

    2010-01-01

    In a scientific laboratory setting, standard equipment such as cryocoolers are often used as part of a custom sample environment system designed to regulate temperature over a wide range. The end user may be more concerned with precise sample temperature control than with base temperature. But cryogenic systems tend to be specified mainly in terms of cooling capacity and base temperature. Technical staff at scientific user facilities (and perhaps elsewhere) often wonder how to best specify and evaluate temperature control capabilities. Here we describe test methods and give results obtained at a user facility that operates a large sample environment inventory. Although this inventory includes a wide variety of temperature, pressure, and magnetic field devices, the present work focuses on cryocooler-based systems.

  2. Environment Assessment for the Construction of a Visitor/Education Center at NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Carolyn D.

    2006-01-01

    This document is an environmental assessment that examines the environmental impacts of a proposed plan to clear land and to construct a building for the operation of a Visitor/Education Center at a location next to the Mississippi Welcome Center on Interstate 10 along highway 607 in Hancock County Mississippi.

  3. MCCx C3I Control Center Interface Emulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mireles, James R.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the project to develop and demonstrate alternate Information Technologies and systems for new Mission Control Centers that will reduce the cost of facility development, maintenance and operational costs and will enable more efficient cost and effective operations concepts for ground support operations. The development of a emulator for the Control Center capability will enable the facilities to conduct the simulation requiring interactivity with the Control Center when it is off line or unavailable, and it will support testing of C3I interfaces for both command and telemetry data exchange messages (DEMs).

  4. Integrating Learning, Problem Solving, and Engagement in Narrative-Centered Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Jonathan P.; Shores, Lucy R.; Mott, Bradford W.; Lester, James C.

    2011-01-01

    A key promise of narrative-centered learning environments is the ability to make learning engaging. However, there is concern that learning and engagement may be at odds in these game-based learning environments. This view suggests that, on the one hand, students interacting with a game-based learning environment may be engaged but unlikely to…

  5. Controlled environments alter nutrient content of soybeans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgonski, L. J.; Smart, D. J.; Bugbee, B.; Nielsen, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Information about compositional changes in plants grown in controlled environments is essential for developing a safe, nutritious diet for a Controlled Ecological Life-Support System (CELSS). Information now is available for some CELSS candidate crops, but detailed information has been lacking for soybeans. To determine the effect of environment on macronutrient and mineral composition of soybeans, plants were grown both in the field and in a controlled environment where the hydroponic nutrient solution, photosynthetic flux (PPF), and CO_2 level were manipulated to achieve rapid growth rates. Plants were harvested at seed maturity, separated into discrete parts, and oven dried prior to chemical analysis. Plant material was analyzed for proximate composition (moisture, protein, lipid, ash, and carbohydrate), total nitrogen (N), nonprotein N (NPN), nitrate, minerals, amino acid composition, and total dietary fiber. The effect of environment on composition varied by cultivar and plant part. Chamber-grown plants generally exhibited the following characteristics compared with field-grown plants: 1) increased total N and protein N for all plant parts, 2) increased nitrate in leaves and stems but not in seeds, 3) increased lipids in seeds, and 4) decreased Ca:P ratio for stems, pods, and leaves. These trends are consistent with data for other CELSS crops. Total N, protein N, and amino acid contents for 350 ppm CO_2 and 1000 ppm CO_2 were similar for seeds, but protein N and amino acid contents for leaves were higher at 350 ppm CO_2 than at 1000 ppm CO_2. Total dietary fiber content of soybean leaves was higher with 350 ppm CO_2 than with 1000 ppm CO_2. Such data will help in selecting of crop species, cultivars, and growing conditions to ensure safe, nutritious diets for CELSS.

  6. Automated Tutoring in Interactive Environments: A Task-Centered Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolz, Ursula; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discusses tutoring and consulting functions in interactive computer environments. Tutoring strategies are considered, the expert model and the user model are described, and GENIE (Generated Informative Explanations)--an answer generating system for the Berkeley Unix Mail system--is explained as an example of an automated consulting system. (33…

  7. 37. Shock isolator at left of Launch Control Center entrance. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Shock isolator at left of Launch Control Center entrance. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  8. 38. Shock isolator at right of Launch Control Center entrance. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Shock isolator at right of Launch Control Center entrance. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  9. 107. UMBILICAL MAST HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IN CENTER OF ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. UMBILICAL MAST HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IN CENTER OF ROOM UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (109), LSB (BDLG. 770), FACING WEST - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. View of entrance tunnel. Tunnel right to Control Center, left ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of entrance tunnel. Tunnel right to Control Center, left to Antenna Silos - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. 5. FERROCEMENT APRON, CONTROL BUILDING B AT UPPER CENTER, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. FERROCEMENT APRON, CONTROL BUILDING B AT UPPER CENTER, VIEW TOWARD SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  12. Contemplating the plasmalemmal control center model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickard, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    An abundant epidermal mechanosensory calcium-selective ion channel appears able not only to detect mechanical stimuli such as those that initiate gravitropism but also to detect thermal, electrical, and various chemical stimuli. Because it responds to multimodal input with a second messenger output, this channel system seems likely to be an integrator that can engage in feedbacks with many other systems of the cell--and feedback is the hallmark of regulation. In general, the mechanical tension required for channel activation is likely transmitted from the relatively rigid cell wall to the plasma membrane system via linkage or adhesion sites that display antigenicities recognized by antibodies to animal beta-1 integrin, vitronectin, and fibronectin and which have mechanical connections to the cytoskeleton. Thus, functionally, leverage exerted against any given adhesion site will tend to control channels within a surrounding domain. Reactions initiated by passage of calcium ions through the channels could presumably be more effectively regulated if channels within the domains were somewhat clustered and if appropriate receptors, kinases, porters, pumps, and some key cytoskeletal anchoring sites were in turn clustered about them. Accumulating evidence suggests not only that activity of clusters of channels may contribute to control of cytoskeletal architecture and of regulatory protein function within their domain, but also that both a variety of regulatory proteins and components of the cortical cytoskeleton may contribute to control of channel activity. The emerging capabilities of electronic optical microscopy are well suited for resolving the spatial distributions of many of these cytoskeletal and regulatory molecules in living cells, and for following some of their behaviors as channels are stimulated to open and cytosolic calcium builds in their vicinity. Such microscopy, coupled with biochemical and physiological probing, should help to establish the nature of

  13. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view of Mission Operations Control Room in Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) during the ceremonies aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission. The Apollo 13 spacecraft, with Astronauts James Lovell, John Swigert, and Fred Haise aboard splashed down in the South Pacific at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970.

  14. Coherence times of precise depth controlled NV centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Zhang, Wenlong; Zhang, Jian; You, Jie; Li, Yan; Guo, Guoping; Feng, Fupan; Song, Xuerui; Lou, Liren; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Guanzhong

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the depth dependence of coherence times of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers through precise depth control using oxidative etching at 580 °C in air. By successive nanoscale etching, NV centers could be brought close to the diamond surface step by step, which enabled us to track the evolution of the number of NV centers remaining in the chip and to study the depth dependence of coherence times of NV centers with diamond etching. Our results showed that the coherence times of NV centers declined rapidly with the depth reduction in the last about 22 nm before they finally disappeared, which revealed a critical depth for the influence of a rapid fluctuating surface spin bath. Moreover, by using the slow etching method combined with low-energy nitrogen implantation, NV centers with depths shallower than the initially implanted depths can be generated, which are preferred for detecting external spins with higher sensitivity.

  15. STS-26 Mission Control Center (MCC) activity at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A wide angle view shows flight controllers in JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 flight control room (FCR) as they listen to a presentation by STS-26 crewmembers on the fourth day of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, orbital mission. Flight Director James M. (Milt) Heflin (standing at center) and astronaut and spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM) G. David Low (standing at right) briefly look away from a television image of the crew on a screen in the front of the FCR. Heflin, Low, and other flight controllers listen as each member relates some inner feelings while paying tribute to the 51L Challenger crew.

  16. System for controlling child safety seat environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Richard W. (Inventor); Elrod, Susan V. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A system is provided to control the environment experienced by a child in a child safety seat. Each of a plurality of thermoelectric elements is individually controllable to be one of heated and cooled relative to an ambient temperature. A first portion of the thermoelectric elements are positioned on the child safety seat such that a child sitting therein is positioned thereover. A ventilator coupled to the child safety seat moves air past a second portion of the thermoelectric elements and filters the air moved therepast. One or more jets coupled to the ventilator receive the filtered air. Each jet is coupled to the child safety seat and can be positioned to direct the heated/cooled filtered air to the vicinity of the head of the child sitting in the child safety seat.

  17. Candidate Species Selection and Controlled Environment Injuries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    Research was undertaken to attempt to identify the causal agents for intumescences that develop on many different species of plants in controlled environments. Concentration and filtration procedures were not successful in identifying any particular compounds. The injury was found to develop, even though the atmosphere for the plants is filtered through activated charcoal, potassium permanganate, or is subjected to catalytic combustion at 450 C. Thus, the causal agent is apparently either an oxidized compound or specific element, or the result of some unrecognized variation in physical conditions around the plants. The research has demonstrated that the injury is controlled to a significant extent by temperature. Growing temperatures of 20 degrees and 25 degrees C resulted in serious injury on plants, but temperatures of 30 C resulted in very little injury.

  18. STS-26 Mission Control Center (MCC) activity at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Flight controllers in JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 flight control room (FCR) listen to a presentation by STS-26 crewmembers on the fourth day of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, orbital mission. Flight Directors Charles W. Shaw and James M. (Milt) Heflin (in the foreground) and other controllers view a television image of Earth on a screen in the front of the FCR while listening to crewmembers.

  19. STS-26 Mission Control Center (MCC) activity at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Flight controllers in JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 flight control room (FCR) listen to a presentation by STS-26 crewmembers on the fourth day of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, orbital mission. Instrumentation and Communications Officers (INCOs) Harold Black (left foreground) and John F. Muratore and other controllers view a television (TV) transmission of the crew on a screen in front of the FCR as each member relates some inner feelings while paying tribute to the 51L Challenger crew.

  20. Graphite patterning in a controlled gas environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joonkyu; Kim, K. B.; Park, Jun-Young; Choi, T.; Seo, Yongho

    2011-08-01

    Although a number of methods using scanning probe lithography to pattern graphene have already been introduced, the fabrication of real devices still faces limitations. We report graphite patterning using scanning probe lithography with control of the gas environment. Patterning processes using scanning probe lithography of graphite or graphene are normally performed in air because water molecules forming the meniscus between the tip and the sample mediate the etching reaction. This water meniscus, however, may prevent uniform patterning due to its strong surface tension or large contact angle on surfaces. To investigate this side effect of water, our experiment was performed in a chamber where the gas environment was controlled with methyl alcohol, oxygen or isopropanol gases. We found that methyl alcohol facilitates graphite etching, and a line width as narrow as 3 nm was achieved as methyl alcohol also contains an oxygen atom which gives rise to the required oxidation. Due to its low surface tension and highly adsorptive behavior, methyl alcohol has advantages for a narrow line width and high speed etching conditions.

  1. Current Activities and Capabilities of the Terrestrial Environment Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Batts, Wade

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) designated Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) the center of excellence for space transportation. The Aerospace Environments and Effects (AEE) team of the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch (EL23) in the Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory at MSFC, supports the center of excellence designation by providing near-Earth space, deep space, planetary, and terrestrial environments expertise to projects as required. The Terrestrial Environment (TE) group within the AEE team maintains an extensive TE data base. Statistics and models derived from this data are applied to the design and development of new aerospace vehicles, as well as performance enhancement of operational vehicles such as the Space Shuttle. The TE is defined as the Earth's atmospheric environment extending from the surface to orbital insertion altitudes (approximately 90 km).

  2. 60. Shock isolator at center, pneumatic control group panel at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. Shock isolator at center, pneumatic control group panel at left, power distribution box at right, all at right of entrance to lcc. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  3. Environment, safety and health compliance assessment, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The Secretary of Energy established independent Tiger Teams to conduct environment, safety, and health (ES H) compliance assessments at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. This report presents the assessment of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the assessment at FMPC is to provide the Secretary with information regarding current ES H compliance status, specific ES H noncompliance items, evaluation of the adequacy of the ES H organizations and resources (DOE and contractor), and root causes for noncompliance items. Areas reviewed included performance under Federal, state, and local agreements and permits; compliance with Federal, state and DOE orders and requirements; adequacy of operations and other site activities, such as training, procedures, document control, quality assurance, and emergency preparedness; and management and staff, including resources, planning, and interactions with outside agencies.

  4. Maximizing Information on the Environment by Dynamically Controlled Qubit Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwick, Analia; Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Kurizki, Gershon

    2016-01-01

    We explore the ability of a qubit probe to characterize unknown parameters of its environment. By resorting to the quantum estimation theory, we analytically find the ultimate bound on the precision of estimating key parameters of a broad class of ubiquitous environmental noises ("baths") which the qubit may probe. These include the probe-bath coupling strength, the correlation time of generic types of bath spectra, and the power laws governing these spectra, as well as their dephasing times T2. Our central result is that by optimizing the dynamical control on the probe under realistic constraints one may attain the maximal accuracy bound on the estimation of these parameters by the least number of measurements possible. Applications of this protocol that combines dynamical control and estimation theory tools to quantum sensing are illustrated for a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond used as a probe.

  5. Supporting Self-Regulation in Student-Centered Web-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbagh, Nada; Kitsantas, Anastasia

    2004-01-01

    Numerous benefits of student-centered web-based learning environments have been documented in the literature; however the effects on student learning are questionable, particularly for low self-regulated learners primarily because these environments require students to exercise a high degree of self-regulation to succeed. Currently few guidelines…

  6. Mini All-purpose Satellite Control Center (MASCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaouche, Gerard

    1994-01-01

    A new generation of Mini All-purpose Satellite Control Centers (MASCC) has been developed by CNES (F). They turn out to be easily adaptable to different kinds of satellites, both Low Earth Orbital or Geostationary. The features of MASCC allow both standard satellite control activities, and checking of passengers experiments hosted on a space platform. In the different environments in which it may be used, MASCC provides standard broadcasting of telemetry parameters on animated synoptics (curves, bar graphs, alphanumeric displays, ...), which turns out to be a very useful and ergonomic medium for operational teams or satellite specialists. Special care has been taken during the MASCC development about two points: - automation of all routine tasks, allowing automated operation, and limiting human commitment to system supervision and decision making, - software adaptability. To reach these two main objectives, the MASCC design provides:(1) a simple, robust and flexible hardware architecture, based on powerful distributed workstations; and (2) a table-driven software architecture, easily adapted to various operational needs. Satellite characteristics are described in a central Data Base. Hence, the processing of telemetry and commands is largely independent from the satellite itself. In order to validate these capabilities, the MASCC has been customized to several types of satellites and orbital platforms: (1) SPOT4, the French new generation of remote sensing satellites; (2) TELECOM2, the French geostationary TV and telecommunication satellite; and (3) MIR, the Russian orbital platform. MASCC development has been completed by the third quarter of 1993. This paper will provide first a description of the MASCC basic functions, of its hardware and software design. It will then detail the increased automation capability, along with the easy adaptation of the MASCC to new satellites with minimal software modifications.

  7. Controlling Social Stress in Virtual Reality Environments

    PubMed Central

    Hartanto, Dwi; Kampmann, Isabel L.; Morina, Nexhmedin; Emmelkamp, Paul G. M.; Neerincx, Mark A.; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy has been proposed as a viable alternative in the treatment of anxiety disorders, including social anxiety disorder. Therapists could benefit from extensive control of anxiety eliciting stimuli during virtual exposure. Two stimuli controls are studied in this study: the social dialogue situation, and the dialogue feedback responses (negative or positive) between a human and a virtual character. In the first study, 16 participants were exposed in three virtual reality scenarios: a neutral virtual world, blind date scenario, and job interview scenario. Results showed a significant difference between the three virtual scenarios in the level of self-reported anxiety and heart rate. In the second study, 24 participants were exposed to a job interview scenario in a virtual environment where the ratio between negative and positive dialogue feedback responses of a virtual character was systematically varied on-the-fly. Results yielded that within a dialogue the more positive dialogue feedback resulted in less self-reported anxiety, lower heart rate, and longer answers, while more negative dialogue feedback of the virtual character resulted in the opposite. The correlations between on the one hand the dialogue stressor ratio and on the other hand the means of SUD score, heart rate and audio length in the eight dialogue conditions showed a strong relationship: r(6) = 0.91, p = 0.002; r(6) = 0.76, p = 0.028 and r(6) = −0.94, p = 0.001 respectively. Furthermore, more anticipatory anxiety reported before exposure was found to coincide with more self-reported anxiety, and shorter answers during the virtual exposure. These results demonstrate that social dialogues in a virtual environment can be effectively manipulated for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24671006

  8. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 liftoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Sigurd A. Sjoberg, Director of Flight Operations at Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), views the Apollo 13 liftoff from a console in the MSC Mission Control Center, bldg 30. Apollo 13 lifted off at 1:13 p.m., April 11, 1970 (34627); Astronaut Thomas F. Mattingly II, who was scheduled as a prime crewman for the Apollo 13 mission but was replaced in the final hours when it was discovered he had been exposed to measles, watches the liftoff phase of the mission. He is seated at a console in the Mission Control Center's Mission Operations Control Room. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, a spacecraft communicator for the mission, looks on at right (34628).

  9. Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS): VAPEPS management center remote access guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, J. P.; Mills, D.

    1991-01-01

    A Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) Management Center was established at the JPL. The center utilizes the VAPEPS software package to manage a data base of Space Shuttle and expendable launch vehicle payload flight and ground test data. Remote terminal access over telephone lines to the computer system, where the program resides, was established to provide the payload community a convenient means of querying the global VAPEPS data base. This guide describes the functions of the VAPEPS Management Center and contains instructions for utilizing the resources of the center.

  10. Vibroacoustic payload environment prediction system (VAPEPS): Data base management center remote access guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, V. C.

    1986-01-01

    A Vibroacoustic Data Base Management Center has been established at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The center utilizes the Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) software package to manage a data base of shuttle and expendable launch vehicle flight and ground test data. Remote terminal access over telephone lines to a dedicated VAPEPS computer system has been established to provide the payload community a convenient means of querying the global VAPEPS data base. This guide describes the functions of the JPL Data Base Management Center and contains instructions for utilizing the resources of the center.

  11. Attitude, achievement, and classroom environment in a learner-centered introductory biology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Bonnie Day

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of the revision of an undergraduate biology course to meet the standards set forth by current science education reform documents. This course was revised by a collaborate team at a small, religious, liberal arts university located in an urban area of South Texas. This institution is a Hispanic serving institution where the majority of students are Hispanic. The female population of this institution is approximately 70 percent. The course was revised to meet teaching standards called for in the National Science Education Standards. The guiding principle was to use an instructional model that was based on constructivist theories of learning. The lecture and laboratory sections of the course were combined into a class that met two days a week for three hours. A learner-centered instructional model based on learning cycles and the 5E model were used to organize instruction. Three sections of the experimental course were compared to three control sections that were taught in a traditional format of a three-hour lecture with a separate lab. Instruments that measured classroom learning environment, achievement, and attitude toward science were given at the beginning and conclusion of the course. Qualitative data was gathered from a questionnaire, university course evaluations, and student portfolios. Results of the learning environment survey found that two sections of the control class used some active learning within the context of the traditional lecture. These sections were analyzed as a modified lecture and the other control section as the traditional lecture. The experimental sections were the integrated sections. Subjects in the traditional and integrated sections scored higher on the content knowledge test than those in the modified section. This suggests that the integrated course was as successful as the traditional method in acquisition of content knowledge. Subjects the integrated course and the

  12. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view of Mission Operations Control Room in Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) during the ceremonies aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission. Dr. Donald K. Slayton (in black shirt, left of center), Director of Flight Crew Operations at MSC, and Chester M. Lee of the Apollo Program Directorate, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters, shake hands, while Dr. Rocco A. Petrone, Apollo Program Director, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters (standing, near Lee), watches the large screen showing Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., Apollo 13 commander, during the on-board ceremonies. In the foreground, Glynn S. Lunney (extreme left) and Eugene F. Kranz (smoking a cigar), two Apollo 13 Flight Directors, view the activity from their consoles.

  13. Views of the mission control center during STS-9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A group of payloads operation flight controllers follows early progress of the Spacelab 1 mission. Standing behind the row of consoles are European Space Agency's (ESA) Director General Erik Quistgaard and NASA Headquarters Dr. Michael J. Wiskerchen (44919); After opening of Spacelab in the cargo bay of Columbia, these flight controllers in the payloads operations control center (POCC) at JSC discuss agenda of experiments. Quistgaard, center, ESA's Director General, talks to ESA's Mel Brooks, left, and NASA headquarters Wiskerchen (44920); Flight controllers on duty in the POCC at JSC monitor day 1 activity aboard the Spacelab module. Behind them is a banner representing the West German state of Baden-Wurtenbug from which payload specialist Ulf Merbold hails (44921).

  14. Test and Analysis Capabilities of the Space Environment Effects Team at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Edwards, D. L.; Vaughn, J. A.; Schneider, T. A.; Hovater, M. A.; Hoppe, D. T.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed world-class space environmental effects testing facilities to simulate the space environment. The combined environmental effects test system exposes temperature-controlled samples to simultaneous protons, high- and low-energy electrons, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, and near-ultraviolet (NUV) radiation. Separate chambers for studying the effects of NUV and VUV at elevated temperatures are also available. The Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility exposes samples to atomic oxygen of 5 eV energy to simulate low-Earth orbit (LEO). The LEO space plasma simulators are used to study current collection to biased spacecraft surfaces, arcing from insulators and electrical conductivity of materials. Plasma propulsion techniques are analyzed using the Marshall magnetic mirror system. The micro light gas gun simulates micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. Candidate materials and hardware for spacecraft can be evaluated for durability in the space environment with a variety of analytical techniques. Mass, solar absorptance, infrared emittance, transmission, reflectance, bidirectional reflectance distribution function, and surface morphology characterization can be performed. The data from the space environmental effects testing facilities, combined with analytical results from flight experiments, enable the Environmental Effects Group to determine optimum materials for use on spacecraft.

  15. Future Concepts for Realtime Data Interfaces for Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearney, Mike W., III

    2004-01-01

    Existing methods of exchanging realtime data between the major control centers in the International Space Station program have resulted in a patchwork of local formats being imposed on each Mission Control Center. This puts the burden on a data customer to comply with the proprietary data formats of each data supplier. This has increased the cost and complexity for each participant, limited access to mission data and hampered the development of efficient and flexible operations concepts. Ideally, a universal format should be promoted in the industry to prevent the unnecessary burden of each center processing a different data format standard for every external interface with another center. With the broad acceptance of XML and other conventions used in other industries, it is now time for the Aerospace industry to fully engage and establish such a standard. This paper will briefly consider the components that would be required by such a standard (XML schema, data dictionaries, etc.) in order to accomplish the goal of a universal low-cost interface, and acquire broad industry acceptance. We will then examine current approaches being developed by standards bodies and other groups. The current state of CCSDS panel work will be reviewed, with a survey of the degree of industry acceptance. Other widely accepted commercial approaches will be considered, sometimes complimentary to the standards work, but sometimes not. The question is whether de facto industry standards are in concert with, or in conflict with the direction of the standards bodies. And given that state of affairs, the author will consider whether a new program establishing its Mission Control Center should implement a data interface based on those standards. The author proposes that broad industry support to unify the various efforts will enable collaboration between control centers and space programs to a wider degree than is currently available. This will reduce the cost for programs to provide realtime

  16. 34. Launch Control Center, bottom of drawer of commander's console, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Launch Control Center, bottom of drawer of commander's console, signed by alert crew members on their last alerts. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  17. CONTROL TECHNOLOGY CENTER, 1990 - A YEAR OF EXPANDING SERVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses services provided by EPA's Control Technology Center (CTC) during FY90. he CTC, developed by EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) and Office of Air Planning Quality and Standards (OAQPS), is an innovative technical assistance program for state and l...

  18. 60. View of radome hydraulic module control center in mezzanine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. View of radome hydraulic module control center in mezzanine level in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  19. MOD control center automated information systems security evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Rich

    1991-01-01

    The role of the technology infusion process in future Control Center Automated Information Systems (AIS) is highlighted. The following subject areas are presented in the form of the viewgraphs: goals, background, threat, MOD's AISS program, TQM, SDLC integration, payback, future challenges, and bottom line.

  20. Future applications of artificial intelligence to Mission Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Future applications of artificial intelligence to Mission Control Centers are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: basic objectives of the NASA-wide AI program; inhouse research program; constraint-based scheduling; learning and performance improvement for scheduling; GEMPLAN multi-agent planner; planning, scheduling, and control; Bayesian learning; efficient learning algorithms; ICARUS (an integrated architecture for learning); design knowledge acquisition and retention; computer-integrated documentation; and some speculation on future applications.

  1. Person-centered work environments, psychological safety, and positive affect in healthcare: a theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Rathert, Cheryl; May, Douglas R

    2008-01-01

    We propose that in order to systematically improve healthcare quality, healthcare organizations (HCOs) need work environments that are person-centered: environments that support the careprovider as well as the patient. We further argue that HCOs have a moral imperative to provide a workplace where professional care standards can be achieved. We draw upon a large body of research from several disciplines to propose and articulate a theoretical framework that explains how the work environment should be related to the well-being of patients and careproviders, that is, the potential mediating mechanisms. Person-centered work environments include: 1. Climates for patient-centered care. 2. Climates for quality improvement. 3. Benevolent ethical climates. Such a work environment should support the provision of patient-centered care, and should lead to positive psychological states for careproviders, including psychological safety and positive affect. The model contributes to theory by specifying relationships between important organizational variables. The model can potentially contribute to practice by linking specific work environment attributes to outcomes for careproviders and patients. PMID:18839753

  2. Managing information in the academic medical center: building an integrated information environment.

    PubMed

    Fuller, S; Braude, R M; Florance, V; Frisse, M E

    1995-10-01

    The strategic importance of integrated information systems and resources for academic medical centers should not be underestimated. Ten years ago, the National Library of Medicine in collaboration with the Association of Academic Medical Centers initiated the Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) program to assist academic medical centers in defining a process for addressing deficiencies in their information environments. The authors give a brief history of the IAIMS program, and they describe both the characteristics of an integrated information environment and the technical and organizational structures necessary to create such an environment. Strategies some institutions have used to implement integrated information systems are also outlined. Finally, the authors discuss the role of librarians in integrated information system design. PMID:7575920

  3. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Education, Aeronautics, Space, Autonomy, Earth and Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamshidi, M. (Editor); Lumia, R. (Editor); Tunstel, E., Jr. (Editor); White, B. (Editor); Malone, J. (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This first volume of the Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE) Center Press Series on NASA University Research Center's (URC's) Advanced Technologies on Space Exploration and National Service constitute a report on the research papers and presentations delivered by NASA Installations and industry and Report of the NASA's fourteen URC's held at the First National Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico from February 16-19, 1997.

  4. Biological control in a disturbed environment

    PubMed Central

    Gubbins, S.; Gilligan, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Most ecological and epidemiological models describe systems with continuous uninterrupted interactions between populations. Many systems, though, have ecological disturbances, such as those associated with planting and harvesting of a seasonal crop. In this paper, we introduce host–parasite–hyperparasite systems as models of biological control in a disturbed environment, where the host–parasite interactions are discontinuous. One model is a parasite–hyperparasite system designed to capture the essence of biological control and the other is a host–parasite–hyperparasite system that incorporates many more features of the population dynamics. Two types of discontinuity are included in the models. One corresponds to a pulse of new parasites at harvest and the other reflects the discontinuous presence of the host due to planting and harvesting. Such discontinuities are characteristic of many ecosystems involving parasitism or other interactions with an annual host. The models are tested against data from an experiment investigating the persistent biological control of the fungal plant parasite of lettuce Sclerotinia minor by the fungal hyperparasite Sporidesmium sclerotivorum, over successive crops. Using a combination of mathematical analysis, model fitting and parameter estimation, the factors that contribute the observed persistence of the parasite are examined. Analytical results show that repeated planting and harvesting of the host allows the parasite to persist by maintaining a quantity of host tissue in the system on which the parasite can reproduce. When the host dynamics are not included explicitly in the model, we demonstrate that homogeneous mixing fails to predict the persistence of the parasite population, while incorporating spatial heterogeneity by allowing for heterogeneous mixing prevents fade-out. Including the host's dynamics lessens the effect of heterogeneous mixing on persistence, though the predicted values for the parasite population

  5. Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Spacelab-3 launched aboard STS-51B, with the major science objective being to perform engineering tests on two new facilities: the rodent animal holding facility and the primate animal holding facility. In addition, scientists observed the animals to obtain first hand knowledge of the effects of launch and reentry stresses and behavior. The need for suitable animal housing to support research in space led to the development of the Research Animal Holding Facility at the Ames Research Center. Scientists often study animals to find clues to human physiology and behavior. Rats, insects, and microorganisms had already been studied aboard the Shuttle on previous missions. On Spacelab-3, scientists had a chance to observe a large number of animals living in space in a specially designed and independently controlled housing facility. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) had management responsibility for the Spacelab-3 mission. This photograph depicts activities during the mission at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at MSFC.

  6. Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Spacelab-3 launched aboard STS-51B, with the major science objective being to perform engineering tests on two new facilities: the rodent animal holding facility and the primate animal holding facility. In addition, scientists observed the animals to obtain first hand knowledge of the effects of launch and reentry stresses and behavior. The need for suitable animal housing to support research in space led to the development of the Research Animal Holding Facility at the Ames Research Center. Scientists often study animals to find clues to human physiology and behavior. Rats, insects, and microorganisms had already been studied aboard the Shuttle on previous missions. On Spacelab-3, scientists had a chance to observe a large number of animals living in space in a specially designed and independently controlled housing facility. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) had management responsibility for the Spacelab 3 mission. This photograph depicts activities during the mission at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at MSFC.

  7. Control Systems Security Test Center - FY 2004 Program Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Robert E. Polk; Alen M. Snyder

    2005-04-01

    In May 2004, the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) was established at Idaho National Laboratory to execute assessment activities to reduce the vulnerability of the nation’s critical infrastructure control systems to terrorist attack. The CSSC implements a program to accomplish the five goals presented in the US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security. This report summarizes the first year funding of startup activities and program achievements that took place in FY 2004 and early FY 2005. This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center of the National Cyber Security Division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs federal departments to identify and prioritize the critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the National Cyber Security Division to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems.

  8. Mechanical spin control of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond.

    PubMed

    MacQuarrie, E R; Gosavi, T A; Jungwirth, N R; Bhave, S A; Fuchs, G D

    2013-11-27

    We demonstrate direct coupling between phonons and diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins by driving spin transitions with mechanically generated harmonic strain at room temperature. The amplitude of the mechanically driven spin signal varies with the spatial periodicity of the stress standing wave within the diamond substrate, verifying that we drive NV center spins mechanically. These spin-phonon interactions could offer a route to quantum spin control of magnetically forbidden transitions, which would enhance NV-based quantum metrology, grant access to direct transitions between all of the spin-1 quantum states of the NV center, and provide a platform to study spin-phonon interactions at the level of a few interacting spins. PMID:24329469

  9. Real-time automated failure identification in the Control Center Complex (CCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Sarah; Lauritsen, Janet; Pack, Ginger; Ha, Anhhoang; Jowers, Steven; Mcnenny, Robert; Truong, The; Dell, James

    1993-01-01

    A system which will provide real-time failure management support to the Space Station Freedom program is described. The system's use of a simplified form of model based reasoning qualifies it as an advanced automation system. However, it differs from most such systems in that it was designed from the outset to meet two sets of requirements. First, it must provide a useful increment to the fault management capabilities of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Control Center Complex (CCC) Fault Detection Management system. Second, it must satisfy CCC operational environment constraints such as cost, computer resource requirements, verification, and validation, etc. The need to meet both requirement sets presents a much greater design challenge than would have been the case had functionality been the sole design consideration. The choice of technology, discussing aspects of that choice and the process for migrating it into the control center is overviewed.

  10. Capabilities of the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Revised 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Suggs, Rob; Roberts, Barry C.; Cooke, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The Natural Environment Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the responsibility to provide natural environments engineering support to programs and projects. The Natural Environments Branch is responsible for natural environments definitions, modeling, database development, and analytical assessments of effects. Natural Environments Branch personnel develop requirements for flight projects and provide operational support for space and launch vehicle systems. To accomplish these responsibilities, models and analytical tools have been developed in the areas of planetary atmospheres, meteoroids, ionizing radiation, plasmas and ionospheres, magnetic and gravitational fields, spacecraft charging modeling, and radiation effects on electronic parts. This paper will build on a previous paper published in 2006 and provide updated descriptions of the capabilities within the Natural Environments Branch1. Updates describing improvements and new releases of several analytical tools and models will be presented. Separate sections will specifically describe modifications in the Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM), and the Marshall Solar Activity Future Estimation (MSAFE) capabilities.

  11. 76 FR 77537 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal..., National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

  12. Career Centers and Employers: Creating Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Affirmative Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, John W.; Peevey, JoAnne C.

    1997-01-01

    Describes how recent legislation and corporate changes have helped to make the workplace a more affirmative environment for gays, lesbians, and bisexuals (GLB). Focuses on recent changes in GLB workplace issues, GLB workplace issues and the press, the career center and GLB students, and the workplace and GLB employees. (RJM)

  13. An Instrument to Assess the Obesogenic Environment of Child Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Dianne; Hales, Derek; Haverly, Katie; Marks, Julie; Benjamin, Sara; Ball, Sarah; Trost, Stewart

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To describe protocol and interobserver agreements of an instrument to evaluate nutrition and physical activity environments at child care. Methods: Interobserver data were collected from 9 child care centers, through direct observation and document review (17 observer pairs). Results: Mean agreement between observer pairs was 87.26%…

  14. 78 FR 717 - ENE (Environment Northeast); Greater Boston Real Estate Board; National Consumer Law Center...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ENE (Environment Northeast); Greater Boston Real Estate Board; National Consumer Law Center; NEPOOL Industrial Customer Coalition; v. Bangor Hydro-Electric Company; Central Maine Power Company; New England Power...

  15. Managing Information in the Academic Medical Center: Building an Integrated Information Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Sherrilynne; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A program designed by the National Library of Medicine and the Association of American Medical Colleges to help academic medical centers develop appropriate information systems is described. The characteristics of such an integrated information environment, technical and organizational structures necessary for creating it, and the librarian's role…

  16. Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). [spacelab flight operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, D. L.; Noneman, S. R.; Terry, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    The Spacelab payload operations control center (POCC) timeline analysis program which is used to provide POCC activity and resource information as a function of mission time is described. This program is fully automated and interactive, and is equipped with tutorial displays. The tutorial displays are sufficiently detailed for use by a program analyst having no computer experience. The POCC timeline analysis program is designed to operate on the VAX/VMS version V2.1 computer system.

  17. Air Route Traffic Control Center. Controller Over-The-Shoulder Training Review: Instruction Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The instruction manual provides 12 step-by-step instructions for air traffic control supervisors in conducting over-the-shoulder training observations of enroute center controllers. Since the primary purpose of the review is to quickly identify training needs and requirements, the control responsibilities are approached from a deficiency…

  18. NSP controls generation and T&D in single control center

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, T.

    1995-11-01

    Northern States Power Co. (NSP) recently started using a new electric system control center that combines generation, transmission and distribution (T&D) in one location. This article describes the system.

  19. 75 FR 78999 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Centers for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Centers for Autism and Developmental Disabilities Research and... Discussed: The meeting will include the initial review, discussion, and evaluation of ``Centers for...

  20. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    This lecture will provide an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the current state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. The traditional engine control problem has been to provide a means to safely transition the engine from one steady-state operating point to another based on the pilot throttle inputs. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, other government agencies, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research Mission. The second part of the lecture provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges and the key progress to date are summarized. The technologies to be discussed include system level engine control concepts, gas path diagnostics, active component control, and distributed engine control architecture. The lecture will end with a futuristic perspective of how the various current technology developments will lead to an Intelligent and Autonomous Propulsion System requiring none to very minimum pilot interface

  1. Spacecraft control center automation using the generic inferential executor (GENIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Jonathan; Luczak, Ed; Stump, Doug

    1996-01-01

    The increasing requirement to dramatically reduce the cost of mission operations led to increased emphasis on automation technology. The expert system technology used at the Goddard Space Flight Center (MD) is currently being applied to the automation of spacecraft control center activities. The generic inferential executor (GENIE) is a tool which allows pass automation applications to be constructed. The pass script templates constructed encode the tasks necessary to mimic flight operations team interactions with the spacecraft during a pass. These templates can be configured with data specific to a particular pass. Animated graphical displays illustrate the progress during the pass. The first GENIE application automates passes of the solar, anomalous and magnetospheric particle explorer (SAMPEX) spacecraft.

  2. Emission and nonradiative decay of nanodiamond NV centers in a low refractive index environment.

    PubMed

    Inam, Faraz A; Grogan, Michael D W; Rollings, Mathew; Gaebel, Torsten; Say, Jana M; Bradac, Carlo; Birks, Tim A; Wadsworth, William J; Castelletto, Stefania; Rabeau, James R; Steel, Michael J

    2013-05-28

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center is the most widely studied single optical defect in diamond with great potential for applications in quantum technologies. Development of practical single-photon devices requires an understanding of the emission under a range of conditions and environments. In this work, we study the properties of a single NV center in nanodiamonds embedded in an air-like silica aerogel environment which provides a new domain for probing the emission behavior of NV centers in nanoscale environments. In this arrangement, the emission rate is governed primarily by the diamond crystal lattice with negligible contribution from the surrounding environment. This is in contrast to the conventional approach of studying nanodiamonds on a glass coverslip. We observe an increase in the mean lifetime due to the absence of a dielectric interface near the emitting dipoles and a distribution arising from the irregularities in the nanodiamond geometry. Our approach results in the estimation of the mean quantum efficiency (~0.7) of the nanodiamond NV emitters. PMID:23586780

  3. Internal Control Systems in the Library Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begg, Robert T.

    1985-01-01

    Examines system for safeguarding assets and guaranteeing reliability of library's financial records within context of management functions that comprise accounting controls: planning by budget or other standard of comparison; operation of effective accounting and record-keeping system; personnel management practices. Cash controls as example of…

  4. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance, and affordability, as well as the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA Aeronautics Research Mission programs. The rest of the paper provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges, and the key progress to date are summarized.

  5. Overview of Active Flow Control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, L. G.; Joslin, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    The paper summarizes Active Flow Control projects currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center. Technology development is being pursued within a multidisciplinary, cooperative approach, involving the classical disciplines of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, material science, acoustics, and stability and control theory. Complementing the companion papers in this session, the present paper will focus on projects that have the goal of extending the state-of-the-art in the measurement, prediction, and control of unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics. Toward this goal, innovative actuators, micro and macro sensors, and control strategies are considered for high payoff flow control applications. The target payoffs are outlined within each section below. Validation of the approaches range from bench-top experiments to wind-tunnel experiments to flight tests. Obtaining correlations for future actuator and sensor designs are implicit in the discussion. The products of the demonstration projects and design tool development from the fundamental NASA R&D level technology will then be transferred to the Applied Research components within NASA, DOD, and US Industry. Keywords: active flow control, separation control, MEMS, review

  6. Chemical environment manipulation for pest insects control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenblatt, J. A.; Lewis, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    The chemical environment of pest species may be considered a habitat susceptible to management Management may be by means of manipulation of the environment of the pest for population suppression or for enhancement of natural enemies Examples of each are reviewed here Chemical stimuli influencing the behavior of phytophagous insects include host plant originated stimuli and pheromones The latter, especially sex pheromones, have proved most successful as tools for manipulation of pest population dynamics Factors influencing search behavior of natural enemies include habitat characteristics such as crop, associated plants and plant assemblages, host plant characteristics, influence of associated organisms, and characteristics of the searching entomophage Recent studies have shown potential for simultaneous management of a pest species and enhancement of natural enemies using pest pheromones

  7. The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers: Transdisciplinary Research on the Role of the Environment in Breast Cancer Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, Robert A.; Haslam, Sandra Z.; Osuch, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We introduce and describe the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers (BCERC), a research network with a transdisciplinary approach to elucidating the role of environmental factors in pubertal development as a window on breast cancer etiology. We describe the organization of four national centers integrated into the BCERC network. Data sources Investigators use a common conceptual framework based on multiple levels of biologic, behavioral, and social organization across the life span. The approach connects basic biologic studies with rodent models and tissue culture systems, a coordinated multicenter epidemiologic cohort study of prepubertal girls, and the integration of community members of breast cancer advocates as key members of the research team to comprise the network. Data extraction Relevant literature is reviewed that describes current knowledge across levels of organization. Individual research questions and hypotheses in BCERC are driven by gaps in our knowledge that are presented at genetic, metabolic, cellular, individual, and environmental (physical and social) levels. Data synthesis As data collection on the cohort, animal experiments, and analyses proceed, results will be synthesized through a transdisciplinary approach. Conclusion Center investigators are addressing a large number of specific research questions related to early pubertal onset, which is an established risk factor for breast cancer. BCERC research findings aimed at the primary prevention of breast cancer will be disseminated to the scientific community and to the public by breast cancer advocates, who have been integral members of the research process from its inception. PMID:20049199

  8. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month continued with the Phase I DOE/PRDA investigation of the Clear Liquor Scrubbing Process with Anhydrite Production and Chloride Control. The Phase I DOE/PRDA testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHE) also continued this month as the inlet particulate control system (installed September 1996) is maintaining the inlet particulate mass loading to the unit at an average value of 0.2 lb./MMBTU. The one-year tube wear analysis project conducted across this unit will be completed in the early part of March. At the completion of testing, a final inspection will be conducted before the unit is cleaned, disassembled, and returned to B&W and CH Corp. for additional analysis. Once the unit is removed from the ECTC, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber unit will be assembled and configured back into the flue gas path for future testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the Carbon Injection System (the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter configuration) remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. In February 1997, the Clear Liquor Scrubbing with Anhydrite Production test block continued. This PRDA project is being jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute and the Department of Energy and is part of the DOE`s Advanced Power Systems Program, whose mission is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The pilot portion of the CLS/Anhydrite project is being conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit at EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). The project is designed to develop an advanced FGD process incorporating chloride control, clear liquor scrubbing, and anhydrite (anhydrous calcium sulfate) production. While the three areas of the

  9. A real-time navigation monitoring expert system for the Space Shuttle Mission Control Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lui; Fletcher, Malise

    1993-03-01

    The ONAV (Onboard Navigation) Expert System has been developed as a real time console assistant for use by ONAV flight controllers in the Mission Control Center at the Johnson Space Center. This expert knowledge based system is used to monitor the Space Shuttle onboard navigation system, detect faults, and advise flight operations personnel. This application is the first knowledge-based system to use both telemetry and trajectory data from the Mission Operations Computer (MOC). To arrive at this stage, from a prototype to real world application, the ONAV project has had to deal with not only AI issues but operating environment issues. The AI issues included the maturity of AI languages and the debugging tools, verification, and availability, stability and size of the expert pool. The environmental issues included real time data acquisition, hardware suitability, and how to achieve acceptance by users and management.

  10. A real-time navigation monitoring expert system for the Space Shuttle Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Fletcher, Malise

    1993-01-01

    The ONAV (Onboard Navigation) Expert System has been developed as a real time console assistant for use by ONAV flight controllers in the Mission Control Center at the Johnson Space Center. This expert knowledge based system is used to monitor the Space Shuttle onboard navigation system, detect faults, and advise flight operations personnel. This application is the first knowledge-based system to use both telemetry and trajectory data from the Mission Operations Computer (MOC). To arrive at this stage, from a prototype to real world application, the ONAV project has had to deal with not only AI issues but operating environment issues. The AI issues included the maturity of AI languages and the debugging tools, verification, and availability, stability and size of the expert pool. The environmental issues included real time data acquisition, hardware suitability, and how to achieve acceptance by users and management.

  11. Capabilities of the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Suggs, Rob; Roberts, Barry C.

    2006-01-01

    The Natural Environment Branch at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the responsibility to provide engineering support to programs and projects in natural environments. The Natural Environments Branch (EV13) is responsible for natural environments definitions, modelling, database development and effects assessments. EV13 personnel develop requirements for flight projects and provide operational support for space and launch vehicle systems. To accomplish these responsibilities, Branch . personnel have developed modelling and analytical tools which include planetary atmospheres, meteoroids, ionizing radiation, plasmas and ionospheres, magnetic and gravitational fields, spacecraft charging modelling, and radiation effects on electronic parts. NASA s Meteoroid Environment Office is operated within the EV13 and provides meteoroid engineering models and shower forecasts to spacecraft designers and operators. This paper will describe the capabilities within the Natural Environments Effects Branch including; examples of natural environment definitions, radiation transport, output from the Global Reference Atmosphere Models for Earth, Venus, Mars, Titan, and Neptune), recent NASCAP 2K results from solar sail modelling, and meteor stream models

  12. Authority Control in the Online Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludy, Lorene E.; Rogers, Sally A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the effect of online library catalogs on when, how, and by whom authority control work is done, focusing on experiences at Ohio State University Libraries. Shifts include removal of authority work from automated cataloging procedures, separation of mechanical and intellectual tasks, unique headings and references, and original…

  13. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), as appropriate, for the location where it is installed. In... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1) provides guidance on the differences between devices meeting... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers....

  14. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), as appropriate, for the location where it is installed. In... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1) provides guidance on the differences between devices meeting... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers....

  15. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), as appropriate, for the location where it is installed. In... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1) provides guidance on the differences between devices meeting... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers....

  16. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), as appropriate, for the location where it is installed. In... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1) provides guidance on the differences between devices meeting... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers....

  17. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), as appropriate, for the location where it is installed. In... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1) provides guidance on the differences between devices meeting... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers....

  18. Advanced interactive displays for deployable command and control centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrysik, Peter A.; Parada, Francisco E.; Stedman, Terrance A.; Zhang, Jingyuan

    2003-09-01

    Command and control in today's battlefield environment requires efficient and effective control of massive amounts of constantly changing information from a variety of databases and real-time sensors. Using advanced information technology for presentation and interactive control enables more extensive data fusion and correlation to present an accurate picture of the battlespace to commanders and their staffs. The Interactive DataWall being developed by the Advanced Displays and Intelligent Interfaces (ADII) technology team of the Air Force Research Laboratory's Information Directorate (AFRL/IF) is a strong contender for solving the information management problems facing the 21st century military commander. It provides an ultra high-resolution large screen display with multi-modal, wireless interaction. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology has been combined with specialized hardware and software developed in-house to provide a unique capability for multimedia data display and control. The technology once isolated to a laboratory environment has been packaged into deployable systems that have been successfully transitioned to support the warfighter in the field.

  19. Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2007-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. Also the propulsion systems required to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Vision for Space Exploration in an affordable manner will need to have high reliability, safety and autonomous operation capability. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet these challenges through the concept of Intelligent Propulsion Systems. This paper describes the current activities of the CDB under the NASA Aeronautics Research and Exploration Systems Missions. The programmatic structure of the CDB activities is described along with a brief overview of each of the CDB tasks including research objectives, technical challenges, and recent accomplishments. These tasks include active control of propulsion system components, intelligent propulsion diagnostics and control for reliable fault identification and accommodation, distributed engine control, and investigations into unsteady propulsion systems.

  20. Overview of active flow control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Joslin, Ronald D.

    1998-06-01

    The paper summarizes active flow control projects currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center. Technology development is being pursued within a multidisciplinary, cooperative approach, involving the classical disciplines of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, material science, acoustics, and stability and control theory. Complementing the companion papers in this session, the present paper will focus on projects that have the goal of extending the state- of-the-art in the measurement, prediction, and control of unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics. Toward this goal, innovative actuators, micro and macro sensors, and control strategies are considered for high payoff flow control applications. The target payoffs are outlined within each section below. Validation of the approaches range from bench-top experiments to wind-tunnel experiments to flight tests. Obtaining correlations for future actuator and sensor designs are implicit in the discussion. The products of the demonstration projects and design tool development from the fundamental NASA R and D level technology will then be transferred to the Applied Research components within NASA, DOD, and US Industry.

  1. Thermal control materials in Mercury environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonenko, J.

    2003-09-01

    Thermal control materials are under development concerning the BepiColombo mission to the planet Mercury. The vicinity to the sun creates extreme heat and radiation fluxes and, advanced materials are needed. A Multi-Layer Insulation has been developed able to withstand the high temperatures and particle fluxes. Upilex has been preferred to Kapton for the reflective screens of the MLI and Tissue Glass is used as a spacer. On sunlit surfaces a sun shield will be added to the MLI employing a ceramic fabric. Further developments for application on external surfaces are a Solar Reflector Coating and an Optical Surface Reflector. An Infrared Rejection Device will be applied within the entrance port of nadir pointing instruments and serve as a protective element to reflect or absorb the planetary infra-red radiation. This paper presents the current status in the development of the thermal insulation and the other thermal control materials. The materials selection and available test results are presented.

  2. Operator-centered control of a semi-autonomous industrial robot

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Jones, S.L.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents work done by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Remotec, Inc., to develop a new operator-centered control system for Remotec`s Andros telerobot. Andros robots are presently used by numerous electric utilities, the armed forces, and numerous law enforcement agencies to perform tasks which are hazardous for human operators. This project has automated task components and enhanced the video graphics display of the robot`s position in the environment to significantly reduce operator workload. The procedure of automating a telerobot requires the addition of computer power to the robot, along with a variety of sensors and encoders to provide information about the robots performance in and relationship to its environment The resulting vehicle serves as a platform for research on strategies to integrate automated tasks with those performed by a human operator. The addition of these capabilities will greatly enhance the safety and efficiency of performance in hazardous environments.

  3. Extravehicular Activity Testing in Analog Environments: Evaluating the Effects of Center of Gravity and Environment on Human Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, M.L.; Chappell, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    The EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance (EPSP) Project is performing tests in different analog environments to understand human performance during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) with the aim of developing more safe and efficient systems for lunar exploration missions and the Constellation Program. The project is characterizing human EVA performance in studies using several test beds, including the underwater NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) and Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) facilities, JSC fs Partial Gravity Simulator (POGO), and the NASA Reduced Gravity Office (RGO) parabolic flight aircraft. Using these varied testing environments, NASA can gain a more complete understanding of human performance issues related to EVA and the limitations of each testing environment. Tests are focused on identifying and understanding the EVA system factors that affect human performance such as center of gravity (CG), inertial mass, ground reaction forces (GRF), suit weight, and suit pressure. The test results will lead to the development of lunar EVA systems operations concepts and design requirements that optimize human performance and exploration capabilities. METHODS: Tests were conducted in the NBL and during NEEMO missions in the NOAA Aquarius Habitat. A reconfigurable back pack with repositionable mass was used to simulate Perfect, Low, Forward, High, Aft and NASA Baseline CG locations. Subjects performed simulated exploration tasks that included ambulation, kneel and recovery, rock pick-up, and shoveling. Testing using POGO, that simulates partial gravity via pneumatic weight offload system and a similar reconfigurable rig, is underway for a subset of the same tasks. Additionally, test trials are being performed on the RGO parabolic flight aircraft. Subject performance was assessed using a modified Cooper-Harper scale to assess operator compensation required to achieve desired performance. All CG locations are based on the assumption of a

  4. History and applications in controlled environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The widespread application of electric (often called artificial) light in greenhouses, growing rooms, and plant growth chambers would presuppose that the role of phytochrome would be considered in the selection and use of such lighting systems. Unfortunately this is not usually the case. Part of the problem is that many students, and indeed an unfortunate number of senior scientists, seem to regard phytochrome as a laboratory phenomenon without much application in the real world. They simply have not grasped the concept that phytochrome is functioning through all stages of plant development, wherever plants are grown. It is certainly true, as Meijer (1971) stated, that one cannot compare experimental results obtained under very strict laboratory conditions with plant irradiation in glasshouses and in growth rooms. When Karl Norris developed the first practical portable spectroradiometer about 1962, some of the first measurements were to determine the red/far-red ratios under tree canopies. These measurements showed clearly the predominance of far-red in the understory and suggested that far-red was contributing to the elongation exhibited by many species growing in the shade, and possibly was a factor in the induction of light requirements in seeds. Subsequently we used Catalpa leaves as far-red filters to make light-insensitive lettuce seed light requiring. Much more detailed work has since been done on phytochrome effects in the natural environment, and it is encouraging to note that efforts are bring made to apply phytochrome research to horticulture.

  5. Creating the Thermal Environment for Safely Testing the James Webb Space Telescope at the Johnson Space Center's Chamber A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, Jonathan L.; Lauterbach, John; Garcia, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center and is one of the largest space environment chambers in the world. The chamber is 19.8 m (65 ft) in diameter and 36.6 m (120 ft) tall and is equipped with cryogenic liquid nitrogen panels (shrouds) and gaseous helium shrouds to create a simulated space environment. The chamber was originally built to support testing of the Apollo Service and Command Module for lunar missions, but underwent major modifications to be able to test the James Webb Space Telescope in a simulated deep space environment. To date seven tests have been performed in preparation of testing the flight optics for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Each test has had a uniquie thermal profile and set of thermal requirements for cooling down and warming up, controlling contamination, and releasing condensed air. These range from temperatures from 335K to 15K, with tight uniformity and controllability for maintining thermal stability and pressure control. One unique requirement for two test was structurally proof loading hardware by creating thermal gradients at specific temperatures. This paper will discuss the thermal requirements and goals of the tests, the original requirements of the chamber thermal systems for planned operation, and how the new requirements were met by the team using the hardware, system flexiblilty, and engineering creativity. It will also discuss the mistakes and successes to meet the unique goals, especially when meeting the thermal proof load.

  6. Mission Control Center/Building 30. Historical Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    As part of this nation-wide study, in September 2006, historical survey and evaluation of NASA-owned and managed facilities was conducted by NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. The results of this study are presented in a report entitled, Survey and Evaluation of NASA-owned Historic Facilities and Properties in the Context of the U.S. Space Shuttle Program, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, prepared in November 2007 by NASA JSC s contractor, Archaeological Consultants, Inc. As a result of this survey, the Mission Control Center (Building 30) was determined eligible for listing in the NRHP, with concurrence by the Texas State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO). The survey concluded that Building 30 is eligible for the NRHP under Criteria A and C in the context of the U.S. Space Shuttle Program (1969-2010). Because it has achieved significance within the past 50 years, Criteria Consideration G applies. It should be noted that the Mission Control Center was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1985 for its role in the Apollo 11 Lunar Landing. At the time of this documentation, Building 30 was still used to support the SSP as an engineering research facility, which is also sometimes used for astronaut training. This documentation package precedes any undertaking as defined by Section 106 of the NHPA, as amended, and implemented in 36 CFR Part 800, as NASA JSC has decided to proactively pursue efforts to mitigate the potential adverse affects of any future modifications to the facility. It includes a historical summary of the Space Shuttle program; the history of JSC in relation to the SSP; a narrative of the history of Building 30 and how it supported the SSP; and a physical description of the structure. In addition, photographs documenting the construction and historical use of Building 30 in support of the SSP, as well as photographs of the facility documenting the existing conditions, special technological features

  7. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Brandon S.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry (e.g. blocking diodes). Key elements of the space environment which must be accounted for in a PV system design include: Solar Photon Radiation, Charged Particle Radiation, Plasma, and Thermal Cycling. While solar photon radiation is central to generating power in PV systems, the complete spectrum includes short wavelength ultraviolet components, which photo-ionize materials, as well as long wavelength infrared which heat materials. High energy electron radiation has been demonstrated to significantly reduce the output power of III-V type PV cells; and proton radiation damages material surfaces - often impacting coverglasses and antireflective coatings. Plasma environments influence electrostatic charging of PV array materials, and must be understood to ensure that long duration arcs do not form and potentially destroy PV cells. Thermal cycling impacts all components on a PV array by inducing stresses due to thermal expansion and contraction. Given such demanding environments, and the complexity of structures and materials that form a PV array system, mission success can only be ensured through realistic testing in the laboratory. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a broad space environment test capability to allow PV array designers and manufacturers to verify their system's integrity and avoid costly on-orbit failures. The Marshall Space Flight Center test capabilities are available to government, commercial, and university customers. Test solutions are tailored to meet the customer's needs, and can include performance assessments, such as flash testing in the case of PV cells.

  8. Aerothermal environment in control surface gaps in hypersonic flow - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, A. R.; Walsh, J. L.; Bey, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental and analytical research by the NASA Langley Research Center to develop an understanding of the fluid and thermal environment in control surface gaps such as the spanwise gap of the wing elevon and chordwise gap of a split elevon configuration typical of the Space Shuttle are summarized. Although the experimental and analytical studies were initiated too late to significantly impact the basic Shuttle design they do provide a fundamental understanding of the basic fluid/thermal environment in control surface gaps and help to establish a firm data base for future vehicle design.

  9. Mission Control Center (MCC) System Specification for the Shuttle Orbital Flight Test (OFT) Timeframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    System specifications to be used by the mission control center (MCC) for the shuttle orbital flight test (OFT) time frame were described. The three support systems discussed are the communication interface system (CIS), the data computation complex (DCC), and the display and control system (DCS), all of which may interfere with, and share processing facilities with other applications processing supporting current MCC programs. The MCC shall provide centralized control of the space shuttle OFT from launch through orbital flight, entry, and landing until the Orbiter comes to a stop on the runway. This control shall include the functions of vehicle management in the area of hardware configuration (verification), flight planning, communication and instrumentation configuration management, trajectory, software and consumables, payloads management, flight safety, and verification of test conditions/environment.

  10. The transition to massively parallel computing within a production environment at a DOE access center

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M.G.

    1993-04-01

    In contemplating the transition from sequential to MP computing, the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) is faced with the frictions inherent in the duality of its mission. There have been two goals, the first has been to provide a stable, serviceable, production environment to the user base, the second to bring the most capable early serial supercomputers to the Center to make possible the leading edge simulations. This seeming conundrum has in reality been a source of strength. The task of meeting both goals was faced before with the CRAY 1 which, as delivered, was all iron; so the problems associated with the advent of parallel computers are not entirely new, but they are serious. Current vector supercomputers, such as the C90, offer mature production environments, including software tools, a large applications base, and generality; these machines can be used to attack the spectrum of scientific applications by a large user base knowledgeable in programming techniques for this architecture. Parallel computers to date have offered less developed, even rudimentary, working environments, a sparse applications base, and forced specialization. They have been specialized in terms of programming models, and specialized in terms of the kinds of applications which would do well on the machines. Given this context, why do many service computer centers feel that now is the time to cease or slow the procurement of traditional vector supercomputers in favor of MP systems? What are some of the issues that NERSC must face to engineer a smooth transition? The answers to these questions are multifaceted and by no means completely clear. However, a route exists as a result of early efforts at the Laboratories combined with research within the HPCC Program. One can begin with an analysis of why the hardware and software appearing shortly should be made available to the mainstream, and then address what would be required in an initial production environment.

  11. Adaptation of Control Center Software to Commerical Real-Time Display Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing an enhanced Huntsville Operation Support Center (HOSC) system designed to support multiple spacecraft missions. The Enhanced HOSC is based upon a distributed computing architecture using graphic workstation hardware and industry standard software including POSIX, X Windows, Motif, TCP/IP, and ANSI C. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is currently developing a prototype of the Display Services application for this system. Display Services provides the capability to generate and operate real-time data-driven graphic displays. This prototype is a highly functional application designed to allow system end users to easily generate complex data-driven displays. The prototype is easy to use, flexible, highly functional, and portable. Although this prototype is being developed for NASA-MSFC, the general-purpose real-time display capability can be reused in similar mission and process control environments. This includes any environment depending heavily upon real-time data acquisition and display. Reuse of the prototype will be a straight-forward transition because the prototype is portable, is designed to add new display types easily, has a user interface which is separated from the application code, and is very independent of the specifics of NASA-MSFC's system. Reuse of this prototype in other environments is a excellent alternative to creation of a new custom application, or for environments with a large number of users, to purchasing a COTS package.

  12. Parental Low Self-Control, Family Environments, and Juvenile Delinquency.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, Ryan C; Connolly, George M; Flexon, Jamie; Guerette, Rob T

    2016-10-01

    Research consistently finds that low self-control is significantly correlated with delinquency. Only recently, however, have researchers started to examine associations between parental low self-control, family environments, and child antisocial behavior. Adding to this emerging area of research, the current study examines associations between parental low self-control, aspects of the family environment, and officially recoded juvenile delinquency among a sample (N = 101) of juveniles processed through a juvenile justice assessment facility located in the Southeastern United States. Furthermore, it considers whether aspects of family environments, particularly family cohesion, family conflict, and parental efficacy, mediate the influence of parental low self-control on delinquency. The results of a series of analyses indicate that parental low self-control is correlated with various aspects of family environments and juvenile delinquency, and that the association between parental low self-control and juvenile delinquency is mediated by family environments. Supplementary analyses also suggest that the association between parental low self-control and the family environment may be reciprocal. PMID:25943365

  13. 77 FR 14805 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the... Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health...

  14. 75 FR 19983 - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Initial Review Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Initial Review Group In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announces the following...

  15. The Network Operations Control Center upgrade task: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherif, J. S.; Tran, T.-L.; Lee, S.

    1994-01-01

    This article synthesizes and describes the lessons learned from the Network Operations Control Center (NOCC) upgrade project, from the requirements phase through development and test and transfer. At the outset, the NOCC upgrade was being performed simultaneously with two other interfacing and dependent upgrades at the Signal Processing Center (SPC) and Ground Communications Facility (GCF), thereby adding a significant measure of complexity to the management and overall coordination of the development and transfer-to-operations (DTO) effort. Like other success stories, this project carried with it the traditional elements of top management support and exceptional dedication of cognizant personnel. Additionally, there were several NOCC-specific reasons for success, such as end-to-end system engineering, adoption of open-system architecture, thorough requirements management, and use of appropriate off-the-shelf technologies. On the other hand, there were several difficulties, such as ill-defined external interfaces, transition issues caused by new communications protocols, ambivalent use of two sets of policies and standards, and mistailoring of the new JPL management standard (due to the lack of practical guidelines). This article highlights the key lessons learned, as a means of constructive suggestions for the benefit of future projects.

  16. Semi-automatic development of Payload Operations Control Center software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballin, Sidney

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the current status of CTA's investigation of methods and tools for automating the software development process in NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 500. The emphasis in this effort has been on methods and tools in support of software reuse. The most recent phase of the effort has been a domain analysis of Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) software. This report summarizes the results of the domain analysis, and proposes an approach to semi-automatic development of POCC Application Processor (AP) software based on these results. The domain analysis enabled us to abstract, from specific systems, the typical components of a POCC AP. We were also able to identify patterns in the way one AP might be different from another. These two perspectives--aspects that tend to change from AP to AP, and aspects that tend to remain the same--suggest an overall approach to the reuse of POCC AP software. We found that different parts of an AP require different development technologies. We propose a hybrid approach that combines constructive and generative technologies. Constructive methods emphasize the assembly of pre-defined reusable components. Generative methods provide for automated generation of software from specifications in a very-high-level language (VHLL).

  17. A Design and Control Environment for Internet-Based Telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oboe, Roberto; Fiorini, Paolo

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an environment for the design, simulation and control of Internet-based force-relflecting telerobotc systems. We define these systems as using a segment of the computer network to connect the master to the slave.

  18. US Search and Rescue Mission Control Center functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A satellite aided Search and Rescue (SAR) Mission concept consisting of a local coverage bent pipe system, and a global coverage system is described. The SAR instrument is to consist of a Canadian repeater and a French processor for which Canada and France, respectively are to evaluate health and trends. Performance evaluations of each system were provided. The United States and Canada will each have a Search and Rescue Mission Control Center (MCC) and their functions were also examined. A summary of the interface requirements necessary to perform each function was included as well as the information requirements between the USMCC and each of its interfaces. Physical requirements such as location, manning etc. of the USMCC were discussed.

  19. Views of Mission Control Center during launch of STS-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Serving as spacecraft communicators (CAPCOM) are Astronauts Guy S. Gardner (left), William F. Fisher (center), Bryan D. O'Connor (seated facing console), and Jeffrey A. Hoffman. Cheevon B. Lau is seated at the flight activities officer (FAO) console to the right of the CAPCOM console. The scene on the large screen in the mission operations control room (MOCR) is a replay of the launch of the Challenger (39264); Flight Director Jay H. Greene, left, watches a replay of the STS-8 launch on the large screen in the MOCR. He is joined by O'Connor, Jeffrey A. Hoffman, Gardner and Fisher. Lau works at the FAO console near the CAPCOM console (39265); Harold Black, integrated communications officer (INCO) for STS-8 mans the INCO console during the first TV downlink from the Challengers flight. The payload bay can be seen on the screen in the front of the MOCR (39266).

  20. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month continued with the DOE/PRDA Phase I investigation of the Clear Liquor Scrubbing Process with Anhydrite Production. The DOE/PRDA Phase I testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CH) was completed this month. This one-year tube wear analysis investigation was completed on 3/10/97, and a final inspection of the unit was made on 3/21/97. The CH unit and its related equipment are currently being removed from the ECTC test configuration, disassembled, and returned to B&W and CH Corp. for additional analyses. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the Carbon Injection System (the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter) remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly.

  1. Fracture epidemiology and control in a developmental center.

    PubMed Central

    Lohiya, G S; Crinella, F M; Tan-Figueroa, L; Caires, S; Lohiya, S

    1999-01-01

    During 3.5 years, 182 fractures occurred among 994 residents of a developmental center. The fracture rate was 5.2 per 100 person-years (1.7 times greater than the rate in the US population). Fracture rate was significantly greater in residents with: epilepsy, older age, male gender, white race, independent ambulation, osteoporosis, and residence in intermediate care (versus skilled nursing) units; it was not affected by severity of mental retardation. Hand and foot bones were fractured in 58% of cases. Femur fracture occurred in 13 cases (7%). Fracture was caused by a fall in 41 cases (23%); its cause was indeterminable in 105 cases (58%). Fractures, occurring without significant injury, may be an important cause of preventable disability in this population. Control measures are suggested. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10344173

  2. Gaseous emissions from plants in controlled environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubay, Denis T.

    1988-01-01

    Plant growth in a controlled ecological life support system may entail the build-up over extended time periods of phytotoxic concentrations of volatile organic compounds produced by the plants themselves. Ethylene is a prominent gaseous emission of plants, and is the focus of this report. The objective was to determine the rate of ethylene release by spring wheat, white potato, and lettuce during early, middle, and late growth stages, and during both the light and dark segments of the diurnal cycle. Plants grown hydroponically using the nutrient film technique were covered with plexiglass containers for 4 to 6 h. At intervals after enclosure, gas samples were withdrawn with a syringe and analyzed for ethylene with a gas chromatograph. Lettuce produced 10 to 100 times more ethylene than wheat or potato, with production rates ranging from 141 to 158 ng g-dry/wt/h. Wheat produced from 1.7 to 14.3 ng g-dry/wt/h, with senescent wheat producing the least amount and flowering wheat the most. Potatoes produced the least amount of ethylene, with values never exceeding 5 ng g-dry/wt/h. Lettuce and potatoes each produced ethylene at similar rates whether in dark period or light period. Ethylene sequestering of 33 to 43 percent by the plexiglass enclosures indicated that these production estimates may be low by one-third to one-half. These results suggest that concern for ethylene build-up in a contained atmosphere should be greatest when growing lettuce, and less when growing wheat or potato.

  3. Simulation Environment for Orion Launch Abort System Control Design Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMinn, J. Dana; Jackson, E. Bruce; Christhilf, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The development and use of an interactive environment to perform control system design and analysis of the proposed Crew Exploration Vehicle Launch Abort System is described. The environment, built using a commercial dynamic systems design package, includes use of an open-source configuration control software tool and a collaborative wiki to coordinate between the simulation developers, control law developers and users. A method for switching between multiple candidate control laws and vehicle configurations is described. Aerodynamic models, especially in a development program, change rapidly, so a means for automating the implementation of new aerodynamic models is described.

  4. Controlled environment vitrification system for preparation of liquids

    DOEpatents

    Bellare, J.R.; Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E. II; Talmon, Y.

    1988-06-28

    A system is described for preparing specimens in a controlled environment to insure that a liquid or partially liquid specimen is maintained in its original state while it is being prepared, and once prepared the specimen is vitrified or solidified with minimal alteration of its microstructure. The controlled environment is provided within a chamber where humidity and temperature can be controlled precisely while the specimen is prepared. The specimen is mounted on a plunger and a shutter controlled opening is opened substantially simultaneously with release of the plunger so the specimen is propelled through the shutter into an adjacent cryogenic bath. 7 figs.

  5. Controlled environment vitrification system for preparation of liquids

    DOEpatents

    Bellare, Jayesh R.; Davis, Howard T.; Scriven, II, L. Edward; Talmon, Yeshayahu

    1988-01-01

    A system for preparing specimens in a controlled environment to insure that a liquid or partially liquid specimen is maintained in its original state while it is being prepared, and once prepared the specimen is vitrified or solidified with minimal alteration of its microstructure. The controlled environment is provided within a chamber where humidity and temperature can be controlled precisely while the specimen is prepared. The specimen is mounted on a plunger and a shutter controlled opening is opened substantially simultaneously with release of the plunger so the specimen is propelled through the shutter into an adjacent cryogenic bath.

  6. Robust Optimization Model and Algorithm for Railway Freight Center Location Problem in Uncertain Environment

    PubMed Central

    He, Shi-wei; Song, Rui; Sun, Yang; Li, Hao-dong

    2014-01-01

    Railway freight center location problem is an important issue in railway freight transport programming. This paper focuses on the railway freight center location problem in uncertain environment. Seeing that the expected value model ignores the negative influence of disadvantageous scenarios, a robust optimization model was proposed. The robust optimization model takes expected cost and deviation value of the scenarios as the objective. A cloud adaptive clonal selection algorithm (C-ACSA) was presented. It combines adaptive clonal selection algorithm with Cloud Model which can improve the convergence rate. Design of the code and progress of the algorithm were proposed. Result of the example demonstrates the model and algorithm are effective. Compared with the expected value cases, the amount of disadvantageous scenarios in robust model reduces from 163 to 21, which prove the result of robust model is more reliable. PMID:25435867

  7. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the Carbon Injection System (the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber and the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter). Testing also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger this month as the effects of increased particulate loading are being studied. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. Testing in October at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) included tests from the Pilot Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block as part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions. The 1996 program is being performed on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and the spray dryer/pulse jet fabric filter (SDA/PJFF) pilot units. The 1996 Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block is a continuation of the 1995 TER test block and will focus on up to five research areas, depending on experimental results. These areas are: (1) Mercury speciation methods; (2) Effect of FGD system operating variables on mercury removal; (3) Novel methods for elemental mercury control; (4) Catalytic methods for converting elemental mercury to oxidized mercury; and (5) Electrostatic charging of particulate material in the FGD inlet flue gas stream. The work during October continued to focus on catalytic oxidation of elemental mercury. These tests included the evaluation of two different loadings of catalyst CT-9 (carbon-based material) over extended periods (8-10 days) and an evaluation of FAB-2B (bulk bituminous fly ash taken from the first hopper of the

  8. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Phillips, Brandon S.

    2015-01-01

    CubeSats, Communication Satellites, and Outer Planet Science Satellites all share one thing in common: Mission success depends on maintaining power in the harsh space environment. For a vast majority of satellites, spacecraft power is sourced by a photovoltaic (PV) array system. Built around PV cells, the array systems also include wiring, substrates, connectors, and protection diodes. Each of these components must function properly throughout the mission in order for power production to remain at nominal levels. Failure of even one component can lead to a crippling loss of power. To help ensure PV array systems do not suffer failures on-orbit due to the space environment, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a wide ranging test and evaluation capability. Key elements of this capability include: Testing: a. Ultraviolet (UV) Exposure b. Charged Particle Radiation (Electron and Proton) c. Thermal Cycling d. Plasma and Beam Environments Evaluation: a. Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Screening b. Optical Inspection and easurement c. PV Power Output including Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) measurements This paper will describe the elements of the space environment which particularly impact PV array systems. MSFC test capabilities will be described to show how the relevant space environments can be applied to PV array systems in the laboratory. A discussion of MSFC evaluation capabilities will also be provided. The sample evaluation capabilities offer test engineers a means to quantify the effects of the space environment on their PV array system or component. Finally, examples will be shown of the effects of the space environment on actual PV array materials tested at MSFC.

  9. Internet Protocol Display Sharing Solution for Mission Control Center Video System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of broadcast television as a constant source of information throughout the NASA manned space flight Mission Control Center (MCC) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), the current Video Transport System (VTS) characteristics provides the ability to visually enhance real-time applications as a broadcast channel that decision making flight controllers come to rely on, but can be difficult to maintain and costly. The Operations Technology Facility (OTF) of the Mission Operations Facility Division (MOFD) has been tasked to provide insight to new innovative technological solutions for the MCC environment focusing on alternative architectures for a VTS. New technology will be provided to enable sharing of all imagery from one specific computer display, better known as Display Sharing (DS), to other computer displays and display systems such as; large projector systems, flight control rooms, and back supporting rooms throughout the facilities and other offsite centers using IP networks. It has been stated that Internet Protocol (IP) applications are easily readied to substitute for the current visual architecture, but quality and speed may need to be forfeited for reducing cost and maintainability. Although the IP infrastructure can support many technologies, the simple task of sharing ones computer display can be rather clumsy and difficult to configure and manage to the many operators and products. The DS process shall invest in collectively automating the sharing of images while focusing on such characteristics as; managing bandwidth, encrypting security measures, synchronizing disconnections from loss of signal / loss of acquisitions, performance latency, and provide functions like, scalability, multi-sharing, ease of initial integration / sustained configuration, integration with video adjustments packages, collaborative tools, host / recipient controllability, and the utmost paramount priority, an enterprise solution that provides ownership to the whole

  10. Efficient identity management and access control in cloud environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloster, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    As more enterprises are enticed to move data to a cloud environment to enhance data sharing and reduce operating costs by exploiting shared resources, concerns have risen over the ability to secure information within the cloud. This paper examines how a traditional Identity and Access Control (IDAM) architecture can be adapted to address security concerns of a cloud environment. We propose changing the paradigm of IDAM form a pure trust model to a risk based model will enable information to be protected securely in a cloud environment without impacting efficiencies of cloud environments.

  11. Application of Markov chain theory to ASTP natural environment launch criteria at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, M. E.; Perlmutter, M.

    1974-01-01

    To aid the planning of the Apollo Soyuz Test Program (ASTP), certain natural environment statistical relationships are presented, based on Markov theory and empirical counts. The practical results are in terms of conditional probability of favorable and unfavorable launch conditions at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). They are based upon 15 years of recorded weather data which are analyzed under a set of natural environmental launch constraints. Three specific forecasting problems were treated: (1) the length of record of past weather which is useful to a prediction; (2) the effect of persistence in runs of favorable and unfavorable conditions; and (3) the forecasting of future weather in probabilistic terms.

  12. Integrated control algorithms for plant environment in greenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kanyu; Deng, Lujuan; Gong, Youmin; Wang, Shengxue

    2003-09-01

    In this paper a survey of plant environment control in artificial greenhouse was put forward for discussing the future development. Firstly, plant environment control started with the closed loop control of air temperature in greenhouse. With the emergence of higher property computer, the adaptive control algorithm and system identification were integrated into the control system. As adaptation control is more depending on observation of variables by sensors and yet many variables are unobservable or difficult to observe, especially for observation of crop growth status, so model-based control algorithm were developed. In order to evade modeling difficulty, one method is predigesting the models and the other method is utilizing fuzzy logic and neural network technology that realize the models by the black box and gray box theory. Studies on control method of plant environment in greenhouse by means of expert system (ES) and artificial intelligence (AI) have been initiated and developed. Nowadays, the research of greenhouse environment control focus on energy saving, optimal economic profit, enviornment protection and continualy develop.

  13. Controlling the Thermal Environment of the Co-ordinated Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Darell Boyd

    The classroom environment is a working surround in which children, through participating in organized experiences, can grow and develop in an optimum manner. Classroom design requires organization of principles of environmental control in order to assure efficient and successful performance. This control cannot be left to chance. In considering…

  14. Execution environment for intelligent real-time control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sztipanovits, Janos

    1987-01-01

    Modern telerobot control technology requires the integration of symbolic and non-symbolic programming techniques, different models of parallel computations, and various programming paradigms. The Multigraph Architecture, which has been developed for the implementation of intelligent real-time control systems is described. The layered architecture includes specific computational models, integrated execution environment and various high-level tools. A special feature of the architecture is the tight coupling between the symbolic and non-symbolic computations. It supports not only a data interface, but also the integration of the control structures in a parallel computing environment.

  15. A Design of Decentralized Control System in Unstructured Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Daiki; Kageyama, Takashi; Suzuki, Jun; Tsuji, Toshiaki; Morisawa, Mitsuharu; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    Motion control is developed in control of industrial machines. However, some kind of machines working in an open environment are required in our future society. Then it is necessary to design general methodology for motion controller in open environment. In this paper, decentralized control system is applied as a motion controller for this purpose. This paper is constructed from two parts roughly: the first is a method to abstract environmental mode from environmental information, and the second is a method to design the motion controller with the environmental information. This paper applied this method to biped robot as a model case. The effectiveness of proposed method is confirmed by several simulation and experimental results.

  16. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING [VAB] AND LAUNCH CONTROL CENTER [LCC] FISHEYE VIEW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING [VAB] AND LAUNCH CONTROL CENTER [LCC] FISHEYE VIEW KSC-366-0131.01 105-KSC-366-131.1, P-01506, ARCHIVE-04313 Fisheye view of the Vehicle Assembly Building and Launch Control Center, Complex 39, John F. Kennedy Space Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. The KALI multi-arm robot programming and control environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul; Hayati, Samad; Hayward, Vincent; Tso, Kam

    1989-01-01

    The KALI distributed robot programming and control environment is described within the context of its use in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) telerobot project. The purpose of KALI is to provide a flexible robot programming and control environment for coordinated multi-arm robots. Flexibility, both in hardware configuration and software, is desired so that it can be easily modified to test various concepts in robot programming and control, e.g., multi-arm control, force control, sensor integration, teleoperation, and shared control. In the programming environment, user programs written in the C programming language describe trajectories for multiple coordinated manipulators with the aid of KALI function libraries. A system of multiple coordinated manipulators is considered within the programming environment as one motion system. The user plans the trajectory of one controlled Cartesian frame associated with a motion system and describes the positions of the manipulators with respect to that frame. Smooth Cartesian trajectories are achieved through a blending of successive path segments. The manipulator and load dynamics are considered during trajectory generation so that given interface force limits are not exceeded.

  18. The Children's Learning Center: A Study of a Self-Manipulative Physical Environment on Early Childhood Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studio of Environmental Technology, Providence, RI.

    The Children's Learning Center in Providence, Rhode Island, is a prototypical teaching/learning environment for preschool children aged 3-5. The center represents the first prototypical application of the Multi-Activity Zones for Education (MAZE) system. This study attempts to demonstrate and test the physical and operational performances of the…

  19. Early prediction of student goals and affect in narrative-centered learning environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunyoung

    Recent years have seen a growing recognition of the role of goal and affect recognition in intelligent tutoring systems. Goal recognition is the task of inferring users' goals from a sequence of observations of their actions. Because of the uncertainty inherent in every facet of human computer interaction, goal recognition is challenging, particularly in contexts in which users can perform many actions in any order, as is the case with intelligent tutoring systems. Affect recognition is the task of identifying the emotional state of a user from a variety of physical cues, which are produced in response to affective changes in the individual. Accurately recognizing student goals and affect states could contribute to more effective and motivating interactions in intelligent tutoring systems. By exploiting knowledge of student goals and affect states, intelligent tutoring systems can dynamically modify their behavior to better support individual students. To create effective interactions in intelligent tutoring systems, goal and affect recognition models should satisfy two key requirements. First, because incorrectly predicted goals and affect states could significantly diminish the effectiveness of interactive systems, goal and affect recognition models should provide accurate predictions of user goals and affect states. When observations of users' activities become available, recognizers should make accurate early" predictions. Second, goal and affect recognition models should be highly efficient so they can operate in real time. To address key issues, we present an inductive approach to recognizing student goals and affect states in intelligent tutoring systems by learning goals and affect recognition models. Our work focuses on goal and affect recognition in an important new class of intelligent tutoring systems, narrative-centered learning environments. We report the results of empirical studies of induced recognition models from observations of students

  20. Pneumococcal Vaccines: Understanding Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infection is a common and serious health problem that is best prevented by the pneumococcal vaccine. The first vaccine approved by the U.S. Federal Drug Administration in 1977 contained 14 polysaccharide antigens. An improved vaccine introduced in 1983 included 23 polysaccharide antigens. Both vaccines were effective for immunocompetent adults; however, young children and immunocompromised adults remained susceptible. A pediatric vaccine was developed consisting of the capsular antigens of seven pneumococcal serotypes commonly found in children. The antigens in this preparation are covalently conjugated to diphtheria protein to make them more antigenic. The conjugate vaccine was expanded to include 13 serotypes by 2010. Although more immunogenic, the conjugate vaccine has fewer serotypes than the older 23-valent vaccine. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that children at risk for pneumococcal pneumonia as defined by the presence of chronic disease should receive the 13-valent conjugated vaccine. Adults at risk for pneumococcal pneumonia, which includes those over 65 years of age and those who have a chronic disease, should receive the 23-polysaccharide vaccine. Immunosuppressed patients of any age should receive both vaccines. Adults should be revaccinated once at age 65 years or older with the 23-polysaccharide vaccine provided that at least 5 years have elapsed since the previous vaccination. PMID:25032872

  1. Electric Power Esearch Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the EPRI Integrated SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal process, the DOE PRDA testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX), and support for the Semi-Continuous On-line Mercury Analyzer. The test configuration utilized in the EPRI Integrated SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal process included the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber (SDA), the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter (PJFF), and a new Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) reactor installed at the ECTC. During this testing, O&M support was also required to conclude the test efforts under the EPRI Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block. This included the on-site development efforts for the Semi-Continuous On-line Mercury Analyzer. In the DOE PRDA project with the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX), the effects of the increased particulate loading to the unit were monitored throughout the month. Also, the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly.

  2. 50. VIEW OF CENTRAL CONTROL STATION AND VISITOR CENTER/RIVER SIDES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. VIEW OF CENTRAL CONTROL STATION AND VISITOR CENTER/RIVER SIDES (Visitor Center Building constructed after field negatives were taken and numbered.) - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 11, Upper Mississippi River, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  3. ISS Update: Huntsville Control Center Celebrates 12 Years – 03/07/13

    NASA Video Gallery

    From Mission Control Center, JSC Public Affairs Officer Josh Byerly commemorates 12 years of continuous space station science operations at the Payload Operations Center (POC) at Marshall Space Fli...

  4. Creating the Deep Space Environment for Testing the James Webb Space Telescope at NASA Johnson Space Center's Chamber A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, Jonathan L.; Cerimele, Mary P.; Montz, Michael E.; Bachtel, Russell; Speed, John; O'Rear, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center and is one of the largest space environment chambers in the world. The chamber is 19.8 m (65 ft.) in diameter and 36.6 m (120 ft.) tall and is equipped with cryogenic liquid nitrogen panels (shrouds) and gaseous helium shrouds to create a simulated space environment. It was originally designed and built in the mid 1960 s to test the Apollo Command and Service Module and several manned tests were conducted on that spacecraft, contributing to the success of the program. The chamber has been used since that time to test spacecraft active thermal control systems, Shuttle DTO, DOD, and ESA hardware in simulated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) conditions. NASA is now moving from LEO towards exploration of locations with environments approaching those of deep space. Therefore, Chamber A has undergone major modifications to enable it to simulate these deeper space environments. Environmental requirements were driven, and modifications were funded by the James Webb Space Telescope program, and this telescope, which will orbit Solar/Earth L2, will be the first test article to benefit from the chamber s new capabilities. To accommodate JWST, the Chamber A high vacuum system has been modernized, additional LN2 shrouds have been installed, the liquid nitrogen system has been modified to minimize dependency on electrical power and increase its reliability, a new helium shroud/refrigeration system has been installed to create a colder more stable and uniform heat sink, and the controls have been updated to increase the level of automation and improve operator interfaces. Testing of these major modifications was conducted in August of 2012 and this initial test was very successful, with all major systems exceeding their performance requirements. This paper will outline the changes in overall environmental requirements, discuss the technical design data that was used in the decisions leading to the extensive

  5. Creating the Deep Space Environment for Testing the James Webb Space Telescope at the Johnson Space Center's Chamber A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, Jonathan L.; Cerimele, Mary P.; Montz, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center and is one of the largest space environment chambers in the world. The chamber is 19.8 m (65 ft) in diameter and 36.6 m (120 ft) tall and is equipped with cryogenic liquid nitrogen panels (shrouds) and gaseous helium shrouds to create a simulated space environment. It was originally designed and built in the mid 1960's to test the Apollo Command and Service Module and several manned tests were conducted on that spacecraft, contributing to the success of the program. The chamber has been used since that time to test spacecraft active thermal control systems, Shuttle DTO, DOD, and ESA hardware in simulated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) conditions. NASA is now moving from LEO towards exploration of locations with environments approaching those of deep space. Therefore, Chamber A has undergone major modifications to enable it to simulate these deeper space environments. Environmental requirements were driven, and the modifications were funded, by the James Webb Space Telescope program, and this telescope which will orbit Solar/Earth L2, will be the first test article to benefit from the chamber s new capabilities. To accommodate JWST, the Chamber A high vacuum system has been modernized, additional LN2 shrouds have been installed, the liquid nitrogen system has been modified to remove dependency on electrical power and increase its reliability, a new helium shroud/refrigeration system has been installed to create a colder more stable and uniform heat sink and, the controls have been updated to increase the level of automation and improve operator interfaces. Testing of these major modifications was conducted in August 2012 and this initial test was very successful, with all major systems exceeding their performance requirements. This paper will outline the changes in the overall environmental requirements, discuss the technical design data that was used in the decisions leading to the extensive

  6. Creating the Deep Space Environment for Testing the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center's Chamber A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, Jonathan L.; Cerimele, Mary P.; Montz, Michael E.; Bachtel, Russell; Speed, John; O'Rear, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center and is one of the largest space environment chambers in the world. The chamber is 19.8 m (65 ft) in diameter and 36.6 m (120 ft) tall and is equipped with cryogenic liquid nitrogen panels (shrouds) and gaseous helium shrouds to create a simulated space environment. It was originally designed and built in the mid 1960 s to test the Apollo Command and Service Module and several manned tests were conducted on that spacecraft, contributing to the success of the program. The chamber has been used since that time to test spacecraft active thermal control systems, Shuttle DTO, DOD, and ESA hardware in simulated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) conditions. NASA is now moving from LEO towards exploration of locations with environments approaching those of deep space. Therefore, Chamber A has undergone major modifications to enable it to simulate these deeper space environments. Environmental requirements were driven, and modifications were funded by the James Webb Space Telescope program, and this telescope which will orbit Solar/Earth L2, will be the first test article to benefit from the chamber s new capabilities. To accommodate JWST, the Chamber A high vacuum system has been modernized, additional LN2 shrouds have been installed, the liquid nitrogen system has been modified to remove dependency on electrical power and increase its reliability, a new helium shroud/refrigeration system has been installed to create a colder more stable and uniform heat sink, and the controls have been updated to increase the level of automation and improve operator interfaces. Testing of these major modifications was conducted in August of 2012 and this initial test was very successful, with all major systems exceeding their performance requirements. This paper will outline the changes in overall environmental requirements, discuss the technical design data that was used in the decisions leading to the extensive modifications

  7. Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) Control Room During STS-35 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Due to loss of data used for pointing and operating the ultraviolet telescopes, MSFC ground teams were forced to aim the telescopes with fine tuning by the flight crew. This photo is an overview of the MSFC Payload Control Room (PCR).

  8. Modeling and control for closed environment plant production systems.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, David H; Ting, K C

    2002-01-01

    A computer program was developed to study multiple crop production and control in controlled environment plant production systems. The program simulates crop growth and development under nominal and off-nominal environments. Time-series crop models for wheat (Triticum aestivum), soybean (Glycine max), and white potato (Solanum tuberosum) are integrated with a model-based predictive controller. The controller evaluates and compensates for effects of environmental disturbances on crop production scheduling. The crop models consist of a set of nonlinear polynomial equations, six for each crop, developed using multivariate polynomial regression (MPR). Simulated data from DSSAT crop models, previously modified for crop production in controlled environments with hydroponics under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, were used for the MPR fitting. The model-based predictive controller adjusts light intensity, air temperature, and carbon dioxide concentration set points in response to environmental perturbations. Control signals are determined from minimization of a cost function, which is based on the weighted control effort and squared-error between the system response and desired reference signal. PMID:12882224

  9. Modeling and control for closed environment plant production systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleisher, David H.; Ting, K. C.; Janes, H. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A computer program was developed to study multiple crop production and control in controlled environment plant production systems. The program simulates crop growth and development under nominal and off-nominal environments. Time-series crop models for wheat (Triticum aestivum), soybean (Glycine max), and white potato (Solanum tuberosum) are integrated with a model-based predictive controller. The controller evaluates and compensates for effects of environmental disturbances on crop production scheduling. The crop models consist of a set of nonlinear polynomial equations, six for each crop, developed using multivariate polynomial regression (MPR). Simulated data from DSSAT crop models, previously modified for crop production in controlled environments with hydroponics under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, were used for the MPR fitting. The model-based predictive controller adjusts light intensity, air temperature, and carbon dioxide concentration set points in response to environmental perturbations. Control signals are determined from minimization of a cost function, which is based on the weighted control effort and squared-error between the system response and desired reference signal.

  10. Complex conditional control by pigeons in a continuous virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Muhammad A J; Reid, Sean; Cook, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    We tested two pigeons in a continuously streaming digital environment. Using animation software that constantly presented a dynamic, three-dimensional (3D) environment, the animals were tested with a conditional object identification task. The correct object at a given time depended on the virtual context currently streaming in front of the pigeon. Pigeons were required to accurately peck correct target objects in the environment for food reward, while suppressing any pecks to intermixed distractor objects which delayed the next object's presentation. Experiment 1 established that the pigeons' discrimination of two objects could be controlled by the surface material of the digital terrain. Experiment 2 established that the pigeons' discrimination of four objects could be conjunctively controlled by both the surface material and topography of the streaming environment. These experiments indicate that pigeons can simultaneously process and use at least two context cues from a streaming environment to control their identification behavior of passing objects. These results add to the promise of testing interactive digital environments with animals to advance our understanding of cognition and behavior. PMID:26781058

  11. Clay Minerals are controlled by the environment - Clay Minerals control the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahr, K.; Zarei, M.

    2012-04-01

    Where clay minerals are analyzed in soils, often there is some confusion, because in the widespread loess-affected and moraine landscapes of Europe quite a variety of clay minerals is found. The sources of these minerals are inherited from the local solid rock, transported through different processes, transformed through mineral changes and inherited from paleo-environments. Very often a miserable assemblage in the clay fraction is found with mica clay, smectite, kaolinite, chlorite and also some quartz. In order to understand the current dynamic of clay mineral formation, very detailed and quantitative analysis in comparison of horizons and landscape are necessary. It is much easier to through light on the development, if conditions are looked for where a single specific mineral can be formed like short range order minerals from volcanic ashes or smectites from basaltic parent material. Old leaching land surfaces will form kaolinitic and in tropical areas gibbsitic clay fractions. In arid environments of deserts and desert fringes, palygorskite and sepiolite can dominate. In general, clay minerals buffer the environment. This is mainly due to the extraordinary large interfaces between mineral surface and pore systems. In the last years mainly the processes of buffering through charging soil solution and of buffering through mineral organic compounds have been analyzed. Development of new microscopic and spectromethods have brought great progress in understanding the role of clays in soil environments.

  12. Systems engineering and integration of control centers in support of multiple programs. [ground control for STS payloads and unmanned vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center's new Multiprogram Control Center (MPCC) addresses the control requirements of complex STS payloads as well as unmanned vehicles. An account is given of the relationship of the MPCC to the STS Mission Control Center, with a view to significant difficulties that may be encountered and solutions thus far devised for generic problems. Examples of MPCC workstation applications encompass telemetry decommutation, engineering unit conversion, data-base management, trajectory processing, and flight design.

  13. A comparison of force control algorithms for robots in contact with flexible environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilfinger, Lee S.

    1992-01-01

    In order to perform useful tasks, the robot end-effector must come into contact with its environment. For such tasks, force feedback is frequently used to control the interaction forces. Control of these forces is complicated by the fact that the flexibility of the environment affects the stability of the force control algorithm. Because of the wide variety of different materials present in everyday environments, it is necessary to gain an understanding of how environmental flexibility affects the stability of force control algorithms. This report presents the theory and experimental results of two force control algorithms: Position Accommodation Control and Direct Force Servoing. The implementation of each of these algorithms on a two-arm robotic test bed located in the Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration (CIRSSE) is discussed in detail. The behavior of each algorithm when contacting materials of different flexibility is experimentally determined. In addition, several robustness improvements to the Direct Force Servoing algorithm are suggested and experimentally verified. Finally, a qualitative comparison of the force control algorithms is provided, along with a description of a general tuning process for each control method.

  14. Intelligent robot control using an adaptive critic with a task control center and dynamic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. L.; Ghaffari, M.; Liao, X.; Alhaj Ali, S. M.

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the design, development and simulation of a real time controller for an intelligent, vision guided robot. The use of a creative controller that can select its own tasks is demonstrated. This creative controller uses a task control center and dynamic database. The dynamic database stores both global environmental information and local information including the kinematic and dynamic models of the intelligent robot. The kinematic model is very useful for position control and simulations. However, models of the dynamics of the manipulators are needed for tracking control of the robot's motions. Such models are also necessary for sizing the actuators, tuning the controller, and achieving superior performance. Simulations of various control designs are shown. Also, much of the model has also been used for the actual prototype Bearcat Cub mobile robot. This vision guided robot was designed for the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Contest. A novel feature of the proposed approach is that the method is applicable to both robot arm manipulators and robot bases such as wheeled mobile robots. This generality should encourage the development of more mobile robots with manipulator capability since both models can be easily stored in the dynamic database. The multi task controller also permits wide applications. The use of manipulators and mobile bases with a high-level control are potentially useful for space exploration, certain rescue robots, defense robots, and medical robotics aids.

  15. Novel Hybrid Adaptive Controller for Manipulation in Complex Perturbation Environments

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alex M. C.; Yang, Chenguang; Ma, Hongbin; Culverhouse, Phil; Cangelosi, Angelo; Burdet, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a hybrid control scheme, combining the advantages of task-space and joint-space control. The controller is based on a human-like adaptive design, which minimises both control effort and tracking error. Our novel hybrid adaptive controller has been tested in extensive simulations, in a scenario where a Baxter robot manipulator is affected by external disturbances in the form of interaction with the environment and tool-like end-effector perturbations. The results demonstrated improved performance in the hybrid controller over both of its component parts. In addition, we introduce a novel method for online adaptation of learning parameters, using the fuzzy control formalism to utilise expert knowledge from the experimenter. This mechanism of meta-learning induces further improvement in performance and avoids the need for tuning through trial testing. PMID:26029916

  16. Novel hybrid adaptive controller for manipulation in complex perturbation environments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alex M C; Yang, Chenguang; Ma, Hongbin; Culverhouse, Phil; Cangelosi, Angelo; Burdet, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a hybrid control scheme, combining the advantages of task-space and joint-space control. The controller is based on a human-like adaptive design, which minimises both control effort and tracking error. Our novel hybrid adaptive controller has been tested in extensive simulations, in a scenario where a Baxter robot manipulator is affected by external disturbances in the form of interaction with the environment and tool-like end-effector perturbations. The results demonstrated improved performance in the hybrid controller over both of its component parts. In addition, we introduce a novel method for online adaptation of learning parameters, using the fuzzy control formalism to utilise expert knowledge from the experimenter. This mechanism of meta-learning induces further improvement in performance and avoids the need for tuning through trial testing. PMID:26029916

  17. Verification and Revision of the Space Environment Center's Empirical Solar Energetic Particle Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balch, C. C.

    2005-12-01

    An important aspect of space weather forecasts is the prediction of solar energetic particles. Such forecasts are needed to support human spaceflight operations, spacecraft operations which are susceptible to single event upsets, and human activities dependent on HF communication in the polar cap regions, such as transpolar airline flights. At the current time there is no capability for physics based modeling to predict these events. Consequently, in order for NOAA's Space Environment Center to fulfill its mission to provide space weather forecasts, current techniques rely on statistical analysis of historical events. The prediction model currently in operation was implemented in 1999 and is based on data that was available at that time. In this study we evaluate the performance of the model for events from 1986 to 2004, almost two solar cycles. We also investigate revisions to the model based on insight gained from the addition of more recent events and advances in theoretical understanding.

  18. 75 FR 8366 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public... for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects. To...)--Extension--National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control...

  19. Problems in modeling man machine control behavior in biodynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Reviewed are some current problems in modeling man-machine control behavior in a biodynamic environment. It is given in two parts: (1) a review of the models which are appropriate for manual control behavior and the added elements necessary to deal with biodynamic interfaces; and (2) a review of some biodynamic interface pilot/vehicle problems which have occurred, been solved, or need to be solved.

  20. Security controls in the Stockpoint Logistics Integrated Communications Environment (SPLICE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arseneault, D. S.

    1985-03-01

    This thesis examines security controls specified and implemented in the Stock Point Logistics Integrated Communications Environment (SPLICE) project. Controls provided by the Defense Data Network and the Tandem operating system are reviewed. Alternatives from current literature in areas of authentication, encryption, and dial-port protection are reviewed for the purpose of suggesting enhancements. Issues discussed apply to most interactive/decentralized systems in operation today and include administrative as well as technical recommendations.

  1. NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center Dynamics and Controls Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Steve

    2015-01-01

    NASA Armstrong continues its legacy of exciting work in the area of Dynamics and Control of advanced vehicle concepts. This presentation describes Armstrongs research in control of flexible structures, peak seeking control and adaptive control in the Spring of 2015.

  2. Fourth NASA Inter-Center Control Systems Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Space vehicle control applications are discussed, along with aircraft guidance, control, and handling qualities. System simulation and identification, engine control, advanced propulsion techniques, and advanced control techniques are also included.

  3. Teaching scientific principles through a computer-based, design-centered learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Michael Brian

    Research on science instruction indicates that the traditional science classroom is not always effective in improving students' scientific understanding. Physics courses, in particular, do not promote the ability to apply scientific principles for many reasons, based on their focus on procedural problem-solving and lab exercises. In this dissertation, I propose the Designing-to-Learn Architecture (DTLA), a design-centered goal-based scenario (GBS) architecture, theoretically grounded in the literature on design-centered learning environments, goal-based scenarios, intelligent tutoring systems and simulations. The DTLA offers an alternative approach to addressing the issues encountered in the traditional science classroom. The architecture consists of an artifact with associated design goals; components with component options; a simulation; a reference database; and guided tutorials. I describe the design of Goin' Up?, the prototype DTL application, serving as the basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the DTLA. I present results of interview and testing protocols from the formative evaluation of Goin' Up?, suggesting that learning outcomes, though not statistically significant, could be improved through DTLA enhancements informed by usage patterns in software sessions. I conclude with an analysis of the results and suggestions for improvements to the DTLA, including additional components to address reflection, provide support for novice designers, and offer tutorial guidance on the analysis of the artifact.

  4. Community built environment factors and mobility around senior wellness centers: the concept of "safe senior zones".

    PubMed

    Shendell, Derek G; Johnson, Matthew L; Sanders, Danna L; Nowakowski, Alexandra C H; Yang, Jianhua; Jeffries, Carla D; Weisman, Janet E; Moulding, Megan

    2011-03-01

    The authors investigated built environment (BE) factors in urban neighborhoods in DeKalb County, Georgia. Each volunteering, consenting senior was placed into one of two groups: walking tours outside, then discussions (n=37); and focus group discussions indoors about photographs of BE conditions potentially influencing mobility (n=43). The authors sought to identify BE factors-both real and perceived by participating seniors-related to their ability to walk around senior wellness centers in a healthy and safe manner. The authors focused specifically on available literature and pilot study data for their concept of "safe senior zones" around senior wellness centers serving urban communities in this article. They also characterized their study population regarding sociodemographic variables and doctor-diagnosed chronic diseases, and types of walking aids reported used to help prevent falls. Their results can inform future applied practice and research on traffic-related exposures and BE factors concerning seniors, and support policy and planning to benefit community environmental public health. PMID:21413557

  5. plasmatis Center for Innovation Competence: Controlling reactive component output of atmospheric pressure plasmas in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    The novel approach of using plasmas in order to alter the local chemistry of cells and cell environment presents a significant development in biomedical applications. The plasmatis center for innovation competence at the INP Greifswald e.V. performs fundamental research in plasma medicine in two interdisciplinary research groups. The aim of our plasma physics research group ``Extracellular Effects'' is (a) quantitative space and time resolved diagnostics and modelling of plasmas and liquids to determine distribution and composition of reactive species (b) to control the plasma and apply differing plasma source concepts in order to produce a tailored output of reactive components and design the chemical composition of the liquids/cellular environment and (c) to identify and understand the interaction mechanisms of plasmas with liquids and biological systems. Methods to characterize the plasma generated reactive species from plasma-, gas- and liquid phase and their biological effects will be presented. The diagnostic spectrum ranges from absorption/emission/laser spectroscopy and molecular beam mass spectrometry to electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and cell biological diagnostic techniques. Concluding, a presentation will be given of the comprehensive approach to plasma medicine in Greifswald where the applied and clinical research of the Campus PlasmaMed association is combined with the fundamental research at plasmatis center.

  6. Expert system for controlling plant growth in a contained environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, George A. (Inventor); Lanoue, Mark Allen (Inventor); Bethel, Matthew (Inventor); Ryan, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    In a system for optimizing crop growth, vegetation is cultivated in a contained environment, such as a greenhouse, an underground cavern or other enclosed space. Imaging equipment is positioned within or about the contained environment, to acquire spatially distributed crop growth information, and environmental sensors are provided to acquire data regarding multiple environmental conditions that can affect crop development. Illumination within the contained environment, and the addition of essential nutrients and chemicals are in turn controlled in response to data acquired by the imaging apparatus and environmental sensors, by an "expert system" which is trained to analyze and evaluate crop conditions. The expert system controls the spatial and temporal lighting pattern within the contained area, and the timing and allocation of nutrients and chemicals to achieve optimized crop development. A user can access the "expert system" remotely, to assess activity within the growth chamber, and can override the "expert system".

  7. Expert system for controlling plant growth in a contained environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, George A. (Inventor); Lanoue, Mark Allen (Inventor); Bethel, Matthew (Inventor); Ryan, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    In a system for optimizing crop growth, vegetation is cultivated in a contained environment, such as a greenhouse, an underground cavern or other enclosed space. Imaging equipment is positioned within or about the contained environment, to acquire spatially distributed crop growth information, and environmental sensors are provided to acquire data regarding multiple environmental conditions that can affect crop development. Illumination within the contained environment, and the addition of essential nutrients and chemicals are in turn controlled in response to data acquired by the imaging apparatus and environmental sensors, by an ''expert system'' which is trained to analyze and evaluate crop conditions. The expert system controls the spatial and temporal lighting pattern within the contained area, and the timing and allocation of nutrients and chemicals to achieve optimized crop development. A user can access the ''expert system'' remotely, to assess activity within the growth chamber, and can override the ''expert system''.

  8. Multiagent Flight Control in Dynamic Environments with Cooperative Coevolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colby, Mitchell; Knudson, Matthew D.; Tumer, Kagan

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic environments in which objectives and environmental features change with respect to time pose a difficult problem with regards to planning optimal paths through these environments. Path planning methods are typically computationally expensive, and are often difficult to implement in real time if system objectives are changed. This computational problem is compounded when multiple agents are present in the system, as the state and action space grows exponentially with the number of agents in the system. In this work, we use cooperative coevolutionary algorithms in order to develop policies which control agent motion in a dynamic multiagent unmanned aerial system environment such that goals and perceptions change, while ensuring safety constraints are not violated. Rather than replanning new paths when the environment changes, we develop a policy which can map the new environmental features to a trajectory for the agent while ensuring safe and reliable operation, while providing 92% of the theoretically optimal performance.

  9. Fuzzy control of the production environment process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, V. N.

    2015-04-01

    The fuzzy control process for support of given microclimatic production environment process parameters with loss of one from values, regulating regime of process was shown. The structural schematic decisions with algorithm of functioning and oriented to existing apparatus (means of realization) was presented.

  10. Controlling Glare Problems in the VDT Work Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleifer, Lawrence M.; Sauter, Steven L.

    1985-01-01

    The sources and characteristics (light measurement, direct and indirect or reflected glare) of glare problems in the video display terminal work environment are described. Glare control measures, including the location and design of lighting systems, managing outdoor light and using screen filters and hoods, are reviewed. Five sources are given.…