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Sample records for control e-csf osmolarity

  1. A dual-core double emulsion platform for osmolarity-controlled microreactor triggered by coalescence of encapsulated droplets.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xuewei; Hou, Likai; Ren, Yukun; Deng, Xiaokang; Lang, Qi; Jia, Yankai; Hu, Qingming; Tao, Ye; Liu, Jiangwei; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-05-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has provided a means to generate multi-core double emulsions, which are versatile platforms for microreactors in materials science, synthetic biology, and chemical engineering. To provide new opportunities for double emulsion platforms, here, we report a glass capillary microfluidic approach to first fabricate osmolarity-responsive Water-in-Oil-in-Water (W/O/W) double emulsion containing two different inner droplets/cores and to then trigger the coalescence between the encapsulated droplets precisely. To achieve this, we independently control the swelling speed and size of each droplet in the dual-core double emulsion by controlling the osmotic pressure between the inner droplets and the collection solutions. When the inner two droplets in one W/O/W double emulsion swell to the same size and reach the instability of the oil film interface between the inner droplets, core-coalescence happens and this coalescence process can be controlled precisely. This microfluidic methodology enables the generation of highly monodisperse dual-core double emulsions and the osmolarity-controlled swelling behavior provides new stimuli to trigger the coalescence between the encapsulated droplets. Such swelling-caused core-coalescence behavior in dual-core double emulsion establishes a novel microreactor for nanoliter-scale reactions, which can protect reaction materials and products from being contaminated or released. PMID:27279935

  2. [Plasma osmolarity and cerebral volume].

    PubMed

    Boulard, G

    2001-02-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, the osmolarity of extracellular fluids (ECFs) and natremia are controlled by two regulatory mechanisms modulating the water balance and sodium outflow from information collected by the osmoreceptors and baroreceptors, respectively. As well, under normal physiological conditions, water and electrolytes of brain ECFs are secreted by the endothelial cells of brain capillaries. Furthermore, isotonicity is present on both sides of the blood-brain barrier. In the event of systemic osmolarity disorders, water transport subject to osmosis laws occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier. In the case of plasmatic hyperosmolarity cerebral dehydration is observed, while cerebral edema occurs in the contrary case. However, plasmatic osmolarity disorders have less effect on the cerebral volume when their introduction is slow. Experimentation in acute conditions shows that measured variations of the cerebral water content are lower than calculated variations, thus suggesting the existence of an adaptive mechanism, that is, the cerebral osmoregulation which limits the variation of the volume of brain cells by modulating their osmoactive molecule content. These osmoactive molecules are, on the one hand, the electrolytes, which are early and rapidly mobilized, and, on the other hand, the organic osmoles (amino acids, etc.), whose secretion is slower and delayed. This phenomenon should be taken into account in the treatment of osmolarity disorders. Thus, the related-risk of treatment for natremia disorders is therapeutic reversal of the osmotic gradient at the level of the blood-brain barrier. This reversal, which corresponds to a second osmotic stress, requires the implementation of a new procedure of cerebral osmoregulation in the opposite direction of the preceding one. As successive osmotic stresses decrease the effectiveness of brain osmoregulation, the risk for cerebral dehydration and pontine myelinolysis increases when the treatment

  3. Osmolarity, a Key Environmental Signal Controlling Expression of Leptospiral Proteins LigA and LigB and the Extracellular Release of LigA

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, James; Sanchez, Yolanda; Xu, Xiaoyi; Haake, David A.

    2005-01-01

    The high-molecular-weight leptospiral immunoglobulin-like repeat (Lig) proteins are expressed only by virulent low-passage forms of pathogenic Leptospira species. We examined the effects of growth phase and environmental signals on the expression, surface exposure, and extracellular release of LigA and LigB. LigA was lost from stationary-phase cells, while LigB expression was maintained. The loss of cell-associated LigA correlated with selective release of a lower-molecular-weight form of LigA into the culture supernatant, while LigB and the outer membrane lipoprotein LipL41 remained associated with cells. Addition of tissue culture medium to leptospiral culture medium induced LigA and LigB expression and caused a substantial increase in released LigA. The sodium chloride component of tissue culture medium was primarily responsible for the enhanced release of LigA. Addition of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, or sodium sulfate to leptospiral medium to physiological osmolarity caused the induction of both cell-associated LigA and LigB, indicating that osmolarity regulates the expression of Lig proteins. Osmotic induction of Lig expression also resulted in enhanced release of LigA and increased surface exposure of LigB, as determined by surface immunofluorescence. Osmolarity appears to be a key environmental signal that controls the expression of LigA and LigB. PMID:15618142

  4. The Effects of Hemodialysis on Tear Osmolarity.

    PubMed

    Taskapili, Muhittin; Serefoglu Cabuk, Kubra; Aydin, Rukiye; Atalay, Kursat; Kirgiz, Ahmet; Sit, Dede; Kayabasi, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To determine the effects of hemodialysis (HD) on tear osmolarity and to define the blood biochemical tests correlating with tear osmolarity among patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Material-Method. Tear osmolarity of ESRD patients before and after the hemodialysis program was determined as well as the blood biochemical data including glucose, sodium, potassium, calcium, urea, and creatinine levels. Results. Totally 43 eyes of 43 patients (20 females and 23 males) with a mean age of 53.98 ± 18.06 years were included in the study. Tear osmolarity of patients was statistically significantly decreased after hemodialysis (314.06 ± 17.77 versus 301.88 ± 15.22 mOsm/L, p = 0.0001). In correlation analysis, pre-HD tear osmolarity was negatively correlated with pre-HD blood creatinine level (r = -0.366,  p = 0.016). Post-HD tear osmolarity was statistically significantly correlated with the post-HD glucose levels (r = 0.305  p = 0.047). Tear osmolarity alteration by HD was negatively correlated with creatinine alteration, body weight alteration, and ultrafiltration (r = -0.426,  p = 0.004; r = -0.365,  p = 0.016; and r = -0.320, p = 0.036, resp.). There was no correlation between tear osmolarity and Kt/V and URR values. Conclusion. HD effectively decreases tear osmolarity to normal values and corrects the volume and composition of the ocular fluid transiently. Tear osmolarity alteration induced by HD is correlated with body weight changes, creatinine alterations, and ultrafiltration. PMID:26640702

  5. Safety and Efficacy of Low-osmolarity ORS vs. Modified Rehydration Solution for Malnourished Children for Treatment of Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition and Diarrhea: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ruchika; Kumar, Praveen; Aneja, S; Kumar, Virendra; Rehan, Harmeet S

    2015-12-01

    World Health Organization-recommended rehydration solution for malnourished children (ReSoMal) for rehydrating severe acute malnourished children is not available in India. In present study, 110 consecutive children aged 6-59 months with severely acute malnourishment and acute diarrhea were randomized to low-osmolarity oral rehydration solution (ORS) (osmolarity: 245, sodium: 75) with added potassium (20 mmol/l) or modified ReSoMal (osmolarity: 300, sodium: 45). In all, 15.4% of modified ReSoMal group developed hyponatremia as compared with 1.9% in low-osmolarity ORS, but none developed severe hyponatremia or hypernatremia. Both groups had equal number of successful rehydration (52 each). Both types of ORS were effective in correcting hypokalemia and dehydration, but rehydration was achieved in shorter duration with modified ReSoMal. PMID:26314308

  6. [Ringer solution: osmolarity and composition revisited].

    PubMed

    Kees, M G; Schlotterbeck, H; Passemard, R; Pottecher, T; Diemunsch, P

    2005-06-01

    The composition of Ringer solution, a crystalloid fluid that is often used in anaesthesia and intensive care, varies depending on the manufacturer. The knowledge of the actual content in electrolytes and of the characteristics of this fluid is necessary before it is used. We call attention to a certain Ringer solution (Ringer Maco Pharma, Maco Pharma), for which the manufacturer's information about the tonicity and the osmolarity was incorrect. Contrary to what is written on the bag and in the product description (isotonicity, osmolarity of 276.8 mOsm/l), the theoretical osmolarity was 221.4 mOsm/l and the measured osmolality was about 208 mmol/kg, exposing the hypotonic characteristics of this fluid. The use of this product is potentially dangerous in patients with pathologies where the infusion of free water is especially badly supported. PMID:15876513

  7. Osmolarity: A hidden factor in Nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Moayyedi, Saeid; Mashinchian, Omid; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-01-01

    In the field of drug delivery, long circulating nanocarriers in the blood have many advantages such as targeted drug delivery and sustained release. Based on our current knowledge, evaluation of the effect of long circulating nanocarriers in the blood stream on osmolarity of plasma has not been reported before. In this study, osmotic pressure developed by some commercially available nanocarriers was estimated based on Van't Hoff equation. It is noteworthy that theoretically, nanocarriers do not have any significant effect on osmolarity of plasma. However, it is worth being evaluated experimentally in order to be taken into account in future studies. PMID:27001042

  8. Osmolality/osmolarity data and calculations.

    PubMed

    Schott, H

    1979-04-01

    In view of the increasing interest in the osmolarity of parenteral solutions, an extensive compilation of pertinent numerical data is described. This compilation tabulates values of density, molar concentration, freezing point lowering,real osmolality, and molar concentration of the isotonic sodium chloride solution for 99 compounds, two-thirds of which are of use in pharmacy. A wide range of concentrations is covered for each compound, the values being listed in increments of 0.50, 1.00, or 2.00 percent w/w. Simple equations to convert molar into molal concentrations and to correlate freezing point lowering, osmotic pressure, osmolality and molality are presented. The practical use and theoretical meaning of the osmotic coefficient are discussed. As an example of a solution with several solutes, the real osmolality and osmolarity of Ringer's Solution is computed from the tabulated values of the freezing point depressions of the component salts. PMID:482340

  9. Changes in rabbit lacrimal gland fluid osmolarity with flow rate.

    PubMed

    Gilbard, J P; Dartt, D A

    1982-12-01

    To determine whether the osmolarity of rabbit lacrimal gland fluid (LGF) changes with flow rate, microvolumes (approximately 0.2 microliters) were collected directly from he cannulated glandular excretory duct of anesthetized rabbits. Low flow rates were obtained by collection of LGF 5 min after instillation of proparacaine: higher flow rates were obtained by stimulation with 0.45, 0.9, 3.8, or 15 micrograms of acetylcholine administered by local arterial injection. At low flow rates (less than 0.11 microliters/min), LGF osmolarity was 334 +/- 4 mOsm/L (n = 19). As flow rate increased to maximal rates (13.0 to 19.1 microliters/min), LGF osmolarity decreased to a value of 299 +/- 2 mOsm/L (n = 7). In keratoconjunctivitis sicca, increase in LGF osmolarity, as well as tear film evaporation, may contribute to elevated tear film osmolarity. PMID:7141824

  10. Influence of osmolarity on the optical properties of human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebel, Moritz; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina C.

    2010-09-01

    Plasma osmolarity influences the volume and shape of red blood cells (RBCs). The volume change is inversely related to the hemoglobin concentration and as a consequence to the complex refractive index within the cell. These morphological changes can be linked to changes in the optical behavior of the cells. The optical parameters, absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, and effective scattering phase function of red blood cells are investigated in dependence on osmolarity in the spectral range from 250 to 1100 nm. Integrating sphere measurements of light transmittance and reflectance in combination with inverse Monte-Carlo simulations are carried out for osmolarities from 225 to 400 mosmol/L. Osmolarity changes have a significant influence on the optical parameters, which can in part be explained by changes in the complex refractive index, cell shape, and cell volume. Spherical forms of RBCs induced by low osmolarity show reduced scattering effects compared to the normal RBC biconcave disk shape. Spinocytes, which are crenated erythrocytes induced by high osmolarity, show the highest scattering effects. Even only a 10% change in osmolarity has a drastic influence on the optical parameters, which appears to be of the same order as for 10% hematocrit and oxygen saturation changes.

  11. Piezo1-dependent regulation of urinary osmolarity.

    PubMed

    Martins, Joana Raquel; Penton, David; Peyronnet, Rémi; Arhatte, Malika; Moro, Céline; Picard, Nicolas; Kurt, Birgül; Patel, Amanda; Honoré, Eric; Demolombe, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    The collecting duct (CD) is the final segment of the kidney involved in the fine regulation of osmotic and ionic balance. During dehydration, arginine vasopressin (AVP) stimulates the expression and trafficking of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) to the apical membrane of CD principal cells, thereby allowing water reabsorption from the primary urine. Conversely, when the secretion of AVP is lowered, as for instance upon water ingestion or as a consequence of diabetes insipidus, the CD remains water impermeable leading to enhanced diuresis and urine dilution. In addition, an AVP-independent mechanism of urine dilution is also at play when fasting. Piezo1/2 are recently discovered essential components of the non-selective mechanically activated cationic channels. Using quantitative PCR analysis and taking advantage of a β-galactosidase reporter mouse, we demonstrate that Piezo1 is preferentially expressed in CD principal cells of the inner medulla at the adult stage, unlike Piezo2. Remarkably, siRNAs knock-down or conditional genetic deletion of Piezo1 specifically in renal cells fully suppresses activity of the stretch-activated non-selective cationic channels (SACs). Piezo1 in CD cells is dispensable for urine concentration upon dehydration. However, urinary dilution and decrease in urea concentration following rehydration are both significantly delayed in the absence of Piezo1. Moreover, decreases in urine osmolarity and urea concentration associated with fasting are fully impaired upon Piezo1 deletion in CD cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that Piezo1 is critically required for SAC activity in CD principal cells and is implicated in urinary osmoregulation. PMID:27023350

  12. Relationships among Tear Film Stability, Osmolarity, and Dryness Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Thao N.; Graham, Andrew D.; Lin, Meng C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationships among tear osmolarity, tear film stability, and several measures of dry eye (DE) symptoms in a multivariable analysis. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 137 subjects (68 non–contact lens [CL] wearers and 69 soft CL wearers) recruited from a university campus. Tear breakup time (TBUT) was measured noninvasively (NITBUT) and with fluorescein (FTBUT). Tear osmolarity was measured by an osmometer. Dry eye symptoms were assessed using the Dry Eye Flow Chart and several different questionnaires. Results Subjects ranged in age from 18 to 67 years, with a mean of 28 years. Subjects had a mean (SD) osmolarity of 293 (10) mOsm/L, NITBUT of 14.1 (10.9) seconds, and FTBUT of 14.8 (12.6) seconds. Shorter NITBUT and FTBUT were significantly associated with female sex (p = 0.001 and p = 0.027, respectively) and Asian ethnicity (p = 0.030 and p = 0.004, respectively). There were no clinically significant relationships between tear osmolarity and FTBUT, NITBUT, or DE symptoms. Higher Dry Eye Flow Chart score (i.e., worse symptoms) was associated with older age (p < 0.001), female sex (p = 0.014), CL wear (p < 0.001), shorter NITBUT (p < 0.001), and shorter FTBUT (p = 0.028). The sensitivities and specificities for using clinical measurements to diagnose moderate to severe DE were as follows: osmolarity, 0.67 and 0.46, respectively; NITBUT, 0.72 and 0.52, respectively; and FTBUT, 0.68 and 0.57, respectively. Conclusions In a population of asymptomatic, mild and moderate DE patients, increased tear osmolarity was not significantly associated with reported symptom severity and frequency. Tear osmolarity, NITBUT, and FTBUT exhibited similar sensitivities and specificities when used to diagnose moderate to severe DE. PMID:26154693

  13. A Model for Tear Film Thinning With Osmolarity and Fluorescein

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Richard J.; Gewecke, Nicholas R.; Begley, Carolyn G.; King-Smith, P. Ewen; Siddique, Javed I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We developed a mathematical model predicting dynamic changes in fluorescent intensity during tear film thinning in either dilute or quenching regimes and we model concomitant changes in tear film osmolarity. Methods. We solved a mathematical model for the thickness, osmolarity, fluorescein concentration, and fluorescent intensity as a function of time, assuming a flat and spatially uniform tear film. Results. The tear film thins to a steady-state value that depends on the relative importance of the rates of evaporation and osmotic supply, and the resulting increase of osmolarity and fluorescein concentrations are calculated. Depending on the initial thickness, the rate of osmotic supply and the tear film thinning rate, the osmolarity increase may be modest or it may increase by as much as a factor of eight or more from isosmotic levels. Regarding fluorescent intensity, the quenching regime occurs for initial concentrations at or above the critical fluorescein concentration where efficiency dominates, while lower concentrations show little change in fluorescence with tear film thinning. Conclusions. Our model underscores the importance of using fluorescein concentrations at or near the critical concentration clinically so that quenching reflects tear film thinning and breakup. In addition, the model predicts that, depending on tear film and osmotic factors, the osmolarity within the corneal compartment of the tear film may increase markedly during tear film thinning, well above levels that cause marked discomfort. PMID:24458153

  14. Sensitivity of a hyperosmolar or "low"-osmolar test solution for sugar absorption in recognizing small intestinal mucosal damage in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Uil, J J; van Elburg, R M; Janssens, P M; Mulder, C J; Heymans, H S

    2000-04-01

    Reliability of differential sugar absorption tests is hampered by a lack of standardization of the content and osmolarity of the test solutions. We evaluated the effect of osmolarity of the test solution of the sugar absorption test on the 5 hour urine excretion of orally administered lactulose and mannitol. A group of 28 controls and 14 coeliacs, with villous atrophy grade II to IV, ingested a hyperosmolar sugar absorption test solution and a "low"-osmolar solution, respectively. After an overnight fast, each subject ingested hyperosmolar sugar absorption test solution (2 g mannitol, 5 g lactulose and 40 g sucrose/100 ml (around 1,560 mmol/l)). After two days, this procedure was repeated with low-osmolar solution (2 g mannitol and 5 g lactulose/100 ml (around 375 mmol/l). The influence of the sequence of the tests on the results had previously been excluded. All urine from the 5 h-period following ingestion of the test solution was collected. To calculate the low-osmolar solution ratio, samples were analysed for lactulose and mannitol concentrations by gas chromatography The sensitivity of hyperosmolar SAT solution and low-osmolar solution for the detection of mucosal abnormalities in coeliacs was 64% and 43%, respectively. In conclusion, a hyperosmolar solution discriminates better between normal and damaged mucosa of the small bowel such as villous atrophy due to a relative increase in permeability for lactulose. PMID:10975768

  15. Coupling Osmolarity Dynamics within Human Tear Film on an Eye-Shaped Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longfei; Braun, R. J.; Driscoll, T. A.; Henshaw, W. D.; Banks, J. W.; King-Smith, P. E.

    2013-11-01

    The concentration of ions in the tear film (osmolarity) is a key variable in understanding dry eye symptoms and disease. We derived a mathematical model that couples osmolarity (treated as a single solute) and fluid dynamics within the tear film on a 2D eye-shaped domain. The model concerns the physical effects of evaporation, surface tension, viscosity, ocular surface wettability, osmolarity, osmosis and tear fluid supply and drainage. We solved the governing system of coupled nonlinear PDEs using the Overture computational framework developed at LLNL, together with a new hybrid time stepping scheme (using variable step BDF and RKC) that was added to the framework. Results of our numerical simulations show good agreement with existing 1D models (for both tear film and osmolarity dynamics) and provide new insight about the osmolarity distribution over the ocular surface during the interblink.

  16. Differential activation of signaling pathways by low-osmolar and iso-osmolar radiocontrast agents in human renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Andreucci, Michele; Faga, Teresa; Russo, Domenico; Bertucci, Bernardo; Tamburrini, Oscar; Pisani, Antonio; Sabbatini, Massimo; Fuiano, Giorgio; Michael, Ashour

    2014-02-01

    Radiocontrast media (RCM)-induced nephrotoxicity (CIN) is a major clinical problem accounting for 12% of all hospital-acquired cases of acute kidney injury (AKI). The pathophysiology of AKI due to RCM is not well understood, but direct toxic effects on renal cells have been postulated as contributing to CIN. It is believed that iso-osmolar RCM (IOCM) are less nephrotoxic than low-osmolar RCM (LOCM) but clinical data have been controversial. We have investigated the intracellular signaling pathways that may be affected by the LOCM iomeprol (IOM) and the IOCM iodixanol (IOD). Both IOM and IOD caused a dramatic decrease in phosphorylation of the kinase Akt at Ser473 and Thr308 in human renal tubular (HK-2) cells, with IOM having a greater effect; IOM also caused a greater decrease in cell viability. IOM also had a greater effect on phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinases, JNKs, and NF-kB (Ser276), and caused a marked decrease in the phosphorylation of forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). However, IOD caused a greater decrease in the phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448) and phospho-ERK 1/2 while both RCM caused a similar decrease in the phosphorylation of phospho-p70S6 kinase (Ser371). In vivo studies showed that both IOM and IOD caused a significant decrease in both pAkt (Ser473) and pERK 1/2 in rat kidneys. Our study gives an insight into the possible mechanism of toxicity of RCM via their action on intracellular signaling pathways and may help in developing pharmacological interventions for their side-effects. PMID:24023012

  17. Computed tear film and osmolarity dynamics on an eye-shaped domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Longfei; Braun, Richard J; Driscoll, Tobin A; Henshaw, William D; Banks, Jeffrey W; King-Smith, P Ewen

    2016-06-01

    The concentration of ions, or osmolarity, in the tear film is a key variable in understanding dry eye symptoms and disease. In this manuscript, we derive a mathematical model that couples osmolarity (treated as a single solute) and fluid dynamics within the tear film on a 2D eye-shaped domain. The model includes the physical effects of evaporation, surface tension, viscosity, ocular surface wettability, osmolarity, osmosis and tear fluid supply and drainage. The governing system of coupled non-linear partial differential equations is solved using the Overture computational framework, together with a hybrid time-stepping scheme, using a variable step backward differentiation formula and a Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev method that were added to the framework. The results of our numerical simulations provide new insight into the osmolarity distribution over the ocular surface during the interblink. PMID:25883248

  18. The potential role of NFAT5 and osmolarity in peritoneal injury.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Harald; Kitterer, Daniel; Latus, Joerg; Alscher, Mark Dominik; Braun, Niko; Segerer, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    A rise in osmotic concentration (osmolarity) activates the transcription factor Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells 5 (NFAT5, also known as Tonicity-responsive Enhancer Binding Protein, TonEBP). This is part of a regulatory mechanism of cells adjusting to environments of high osmolarity. Under physiological conditions these are particularly important in the kidney. Activation of NFAT5 results in the modulation of various genes including some which promote inflammation. The osmolarity increases in patients with renal failure. Additionally, in peritoneal dialysis the cells of the peritoneal cavity are repeatedly exposed to a rise and fall in osmotic concentrations. Here we review the current information about NFAT5 activation in uremic patients and patients on peritoneal dialysis. We suggest that high osmolarity promotes injury in the "uremic" milieu, which results in inflammation locally in the peritoneal membrane, but most likely also in the systemic circulation. PMID:26495302

  19. Osmolarity and glucose differentially regulate aldose reductase activity in cultured mouse podocytes.

    PubMed

    Lewko, Barbara; Latawiec, Elżbieta; Maryn, Anna; Barczyńska, Anna; Pikuła, Michał; Zieliński, Maciej; Rybczyńska, Apolonia

    2011-01-01

    Podocyte injury is associated with progression of many renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. In this study we examined whether aldose reductase (AR), the enzyme implicated in diabetic complications in different tissues, is modulated by high glucose and osmolarity in podocyte cells. AR mRNA, protein expression, and activity were measured in mouse podocytes cultured in both normal and high glucose and osmolarity for 6 hours to 5 days. Hyperosmolarity acutely stimulated AR expression and activity, with subsequent increase of AR expression but decrease of activity. High glucose also elevated AR protein level; however, this was not accompanied by respective enzyme activation. Furthermore, high glucose appeared to counteract the osmolarity-dependent activation of AR. In conclusion, in podocytes AR is modulated by high glucose and increased osmolarity in a different manner. Posttranslational events may affect AR activity independent of enzyme protein amount. Activation of AR in podocytes may be implicated in diabetic podocytopathy. PMID:22253613

  20. Red cell volume with changes in plasma osmolarity during maximal exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.

    1973-01-01

    The volume of the red cell in vivo was measured during acute changes in plasma osmolarity evoked through short (6 to 8 min) maximal exercise in six male volunteer subjects. Simultaneous measurements of mean corpuscular red cell volume (MCV), hematocrit, blood hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and plasma osmolarity showed that there was no change in the MCV or MCHC with a concomitant rise of nearly 6% in plasma osmolarity. Apparently, in vivo, the volume of the red cell in exercising healthy human subjects does not change measurably, in spite of significant changes in osmotic pressure of the surrounding medium. Consequently, it is not justified to correct postexercise hematocrit measurements for changes in plasma osmolarity.

  1. Changes in Central Sodium and not Osmolarity or Lactate Induce Panic-Like Responses in a Model of Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Molosh, Andre I; Johnson, Philip L; Fitz, Stephanie D; DiMicco, Joseph A; Herman, James P; Shekhar, Anantha

    2010-01-01

    Panic disorder is a severe anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent panic attacks that can be consistently provoked with intravenous (i.v.) infusions of hypertonic (0.5 M) sodium lactate (NaLac), yet the mechanism/CNS site by which this stimulus triggers panic attacks is unclear. Chronic inhibition of GABAergic synthesis in the dorsomedial hypothalamus/perifornical region (DMH/PeF) of rats induces a vulnerability to panic-like responses after i.v. infusion of 0.5 M NaLac, providing an animal model of panic disorder. Using this panic model, we previously showed that inhibiting the anterior third ventricle region (A3Vr; containing the organum vasculosum lamina terminalis, the median preoptic nucleus, and anteroventral periventricular nucleus) attenuates cardiorespiratory and behavioral responses elicited by i.v. infusions of NaLac. In this study, we show that i.v. infusions of 0.5 M NaLac or sodium chloride, but not iso-osmolar -mannitol, increased ‘anxiety' (decreased social interaction) behaviors, heart rate, and blood pressure responses. Using whole-cell patch-clamp preparations, we also show that bath applications of NaLac (positive control), but not lactic acid (lactate stimulus) or -mannitol (osmolar stimulus), increases the firing rates of neurons in the A3Vr, which are retrogradely labeled from the DMH/PeF and which are most likely glutamatergic based on a separate study using retrograde tracing from the DMH/PeF in combination with in situ hybridization for vesicular glutamate transporter 2. These data show that hypertonic sodium, but not hyper-osmolarity or changes in lactate, is the key stimulus that provokes panic attacks in panic disorder, and is consistent with human studies. PMID:20130534

  2. Isolation and Characterization of High-Osmolarity-Sensitive Mutants of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Hirofumi; Kawaura, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yamada, Hisami; Takegawa, Kaoru; Mizuno, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    For the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adaptation to high-osmolarity medium is mediated by a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade, involving the Wis1 MAP kinase kinase and the Sty1 MAP kinase. The MAP kinase pathway transduces an osmotic signal and accordingly regulates the expression of the downstream target gene (gpd1+) that encodes NADH-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, in order to adaptively accumulate glycerol inside the cells as an osmoprotectant. We previously characterized a set of high-osmolarity-sensitive S. pombe mutants, including wis1, sty1, and gpd1. In this study, we attempted to further isolate novel osmolarity-sensitive mutants. For some of the mutants isolated, profiles of glycerol production in response to the osmolarity of the growth medium were indistinguishable from that of the wild-type cells, suggesting that they are novel types. They were classified into three distinct types genetically and, thus, were designated hos1, hos2, and hos3 (high osmolarity sensitive) mutants. One of them, the hos1 mutant, was characterized in detail. The hos1 mutant was demonstrated to have a mutational lesion in the known ryh1+ gene, which encodes a small GTP-binding protein. Disruption of the ryh1+ gene results not only in osmosensitivity but also in temperature sensitivity for growth. It was also found that the Δryh1 mutant is severely sterile. These results are discussed with special reference to the osmoadaptation of S. pombe. PMID:9748434

  3. High osmolarity glycerol response PtcB phosphatase is important for Aspergillus fumigatus virulence.

    PubMed

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Zambelli; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Brown, Neil Andrew; Rajendran, Ranjith; Ramage, Gordon; Bovier, Elodie; Dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Savoldi, Marcela; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2015-04-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that is capable of adapting to different host niches and to avoid host defenses. An enhanced understanding of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes is essential for the development of improved disease control strategies. Protein phosphatases are central to numerous signal transduction pathways. To comprehend the functions of protein phosphatases in A. fumigatus, 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit encoding genes were identified. We have recognized PtcB as one of the phosphatases involved in the high osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway. The ΔptcB mutant has both increased phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. The ΔptcB strain was more sensitive to cell wall damaging agents, had increased chitin and β-1,3-glucan, and impaired biofilm formation. The ΔptcB strain was avirulent in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. These results stress the importance of the HOG pathway in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in A. fumigatus. PMID:25597841

  4. Tear film osmolarity and dry eye disease: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, Richard; Makari, Sarah; Rapuano, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the evidence in the peer-reviewed literature regarding the use of tear osmolarity as a physiological marker to diagnose, grade severity, and track therapeutic response in dry eye disease (DED). In addition, to review the evidence for the role of tear osmolarity in the pathophysiology of DED and ocular surface disease. Methods A literature review of all publications after the year 2000, which included the keywords “tear osmolarity”, was conducted. Relevant articles were graded according to quality of evidence and research, using the University of Michigan Practice Guideline and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) rating systems. Articles were further categorized by the nature of any reported financial support and by the overall impression they provided related to tear osmolarity. Results A total of 164 articles were identified as relevant to the search criteria, although some were editorials, and some were written in a foreign language. Of the total, it was possible to grade 159, and an overall impression was generated for 163. A positive impression of tear osmolarity in DED diagnosis was evident in 72% (117/163) of all articles, with a neutral impression in a further 21% (35/163); 7% had a negative impression. The percentage of positive impressions appeared independent of the quality of research; 73% (38/52) of articles graded high/moderate quality supported the use of tear film osmolarity measurement in DED diagnosis. Impressions were also independent of the source of financial support, with 72% (75/104) of independent studies positive. Conclusion The literature broadly supports the use of tear film osmolarity as an objective numerical measure for diagnosing, grading severity, and managing treatment of DED. PMID:26586933

  5. Renal Safety of Iodinated Contrast Media Depending on Their Osmolarity – Current Outlooks

    PubMed Central

    Mruk, Bartosz

    2016-01-01

    Summary Iodinated contrast media (ICM) are commonly administered pharmaceutical agents. Most often they are used intravenously and intraarterially. Although iodinated contrast agents are relatively safe and widely used, adverse events occur and questions remain about their use, safety, and interactions. The most important adverse effects of contrast media include hypersensitivity reactions, thyroid dysfunction, and contrast-induced nephropathy. Radiologists must be aware of the risk factors for reactions to contrast media. Nonionic iodinated contrast agents can be divided into monomeric, low-osmolar, and dimeric, iso-osmolar classes. The osmotic characteristics of contrast media have been a significant focus in many investigations of contrast-induced nephropathy. PMID:27141236

  6. Effect of chronic anti-glaucoma medications and trabeculectomy on tear osmolarity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S-Y; Wong, T T; Chua, J; Boo, C; Soh, Y F; Tong, L

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the tear film osmolarity (TFO) and ocular surface clinical signs and symptoms in chronically medicated glaucoma patients and post-trabeculectomy patients. Methods This is a single-center, prospective case-controlled study. One-hundred and thirty eyes of 130 participants aged ≥45 years were included (49 normal controls, 50 glaucoma patients on chronic preserved anti-glaucoma medication ≥6 months, and 31 post-trabeculectomy patients not on medication ≥6 months). TFO, tear break-up time (TBUT), Schirmer's test I and dry eye symptoms were evaluated. Data from both groups of glaucoma patients were compared with age and sex-matched controls. Logistic regression was performed to calculate the odds ratios. Results Mean TFO in the three groups were 301.4±7.7, 307.0±9.3, and 307.4±11.6 mOsm/l, respectively. Compared with normal controls, chronically medicated glaucoma patients and post-trabeculectomy patients were more likely to have a raised TFO, with odds ratios (95% CI) of 4.43 (1.74–11.32) and 2.76 (1.02–7.94), respectively. Both groups of glaucoma patients were also more likely to experience dry eye symptoms, with ORs of 4.72 (1.92–11.59) and 4.24 (1.54–11.72). There was no significant difference in TFO and symptoms between both groups of glaucoma patients, and in TBUT and Schirmer's test across all three groups. Conclusions Patients on chronic topical anti-glaucoma medication and post-trabeculectomy patients were more likely to have raised TFO and dry eye symptoms, suggesting significant ocular surface disease. Glaucoma practitioners should be aware that dry eye symptoms and raised TFO may occur in the absence of TBUT and Schirmer's test abnormality. PMID:23846375

  7. Hyponatraemia alters the biophysical properties of neuronal cells independently of osmolarity: a study on Ni(2+) -sensitive current involvement.

    PubMed

    Squecco, Roberta; Luciani, Paola; Idrizaj, Eglantina; Deledda, Cristiana; Benvenuti, Susanna; Giuliani, Corinna; Fibbi, Benedetta; Peri, Alessandro; Francini, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? Hyponatraemia, an electrolyte disorder encountered in hospitalized patients, can cause neurological symptoms usually attributed to a reduction in plasma osmolarity. Here, we investigated whether low [Na(+) ] per se can cause neuronal changes independent of osmolarity, focusing on involvement of the Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger. What is the main finding and its importance? We show that hyponatraemia per se causes alterations of neuronal properties. The novel finding of Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger involvement helps us to elucidate the volume regulation following hyponatraemia. This might have relevance in a translational perspective because Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger could be a target for novel therapies. Hyponatraemia is the most frequent electrolyte disorder encountered in hospitalized patients, and it can cause a wide variety of neurological symptoms. Most of the negative effects of this condition on neuronal cells are attributed to cell swelling because of the reduction of plasma osmolarity, although in hyponatraemia different membrane proteins are supposed to be involved in the conservation of neuronal volume. We have recently reported detrimental effects of hyponatraemia on two different neuronal cell lines, SK-N-AS and SH-SY5Y, independent of osmotic alterations. In this study we investigated, in the same cell lines, whether hyponatraemic conditions per se can cause electrophysiological alterations and whether these effects vary over time. Accordingly, we carried out experiments in low-sodium medium in either hyposmotic [Osm(-)] or isosmotic [Osm(+)] conditions, for a short (24 h) or long time (7 days). Using a patch pipette in voltage-clamp conditions, we recorded possible modifications of cell capacitance (Cm ) and membrane conductance (Gm ). Our results indicate that in both Osm(-) and Osm(+) medium, Cm and Gm show a similar increase, but such effects are dependent on the time in culture in different ways. Notably

  8. A Model for the Precorneal Tear Film with Osmolarity and Corneal Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R. J.; King-Smith, P. E.

    2010-11-01

    In the human tear film, a thin liquid layer is spread with a blink; it subsequently levels due to surface tension and evaporates more slowly than pure water due to the floating lipid layer. While eventually the tear film almost always ruptures, recent evidence suggests that in some cases supply of fluid from the cornea or conjunctiva may prolong the life of the tear film and prevent the osmolarity (combined concentration of certain salts and sugars) from reaching very large values that can cause irritation and damage. We incorporate osmolarity into a lubrication model for the tear film and study the dynamics of the tear film with osmotic supply from the corneal surface by numerically solving equations for the film thickness and osmolarity. It is treated as a classical osmotic semi-permeable barrier with parameters appropriate to the cornea. The tear film thinning may be slowed by these effects, and in some cases rupture prevented. The value of the osmolarity in regions thinned by evaporation is reduced by osmosis from the underlying surface.

  9. Comparison of the effects of first and second generation silicone hydrogel contact lens wear on tear film osmolarity

    PubMed Central

    Iskeleli, Guzin; Karakoc, Yunus; Ozkok, Ahmet; Arici, Ceyhun; Ozcan, Omer; Ipcioglu, Osman

    2013-01-01

    AIM To compare the effects of first and second generation silicone hydrogel (SiH) contact lens wear on tear film osmolarity. METHODS The healthy subjects who have never used contact lenses before were enrolled in the study. Tear film osmolarity values of 16 eyes (group 1) who wore first generation SiH contact lenses were compared with those of 18 eyes (group 2) who wore second generation SiH contact lenses after three months follow-up. RESULTS Before contact lens wear, tear film osmolarity of groups 1 and 2 were 305.02±49.08 milliosmole (mOsm) and 284.66±30.18mOsm, respectively. After three months of contact lens wear, osmolarity values were found 317.74±60.23mOsm in group 1 and 298.40±37.77mOsm in group 2. Although osmolarity values for both groups of SiH contact lens wear after three months periods were slightly higher than before the contact lens wear, the difference was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION Contact lens wear may cause evaporation from the tear film and can increase tear film osmolarity leading to symptoms of dry eye disease. In the current study, there is a tendency to increase tear film osmolarity for both groups of SiH contact lens wear, but the difference is not statistically significant. PMID:24195046

  10. Efficacy of standard glucose-based and reduced-osmolarity maltodextrin-based oral rehydration solutions: effect of sugar malabsorption.

    PubMed Central

    el-Mougi, M.; Hendawi, A.; Koura, H.; Hegazi, E.; Fontaine, O.; Pierce, N. F.

    1996-01-01

    Previously we reported that standard oral rehydration salts (ORS) solution is not as effective as a reduced-osmolarity glucose-based ORS for the treatment of children with acute noncholera diarrhoea: with standard ORS the diarrhoea lasts longer, stool output is greater, serum sodium is higher, and there is more need for supplemental intravenous infusion. We studied a reduced-osmolarity maltodextrin (MD)-based ORS to determine whether it had similar benefits, and also the effect of sugar malabsorption on the efficacy of standard and MD-based ORS. A total of 90 boys aged 3-24 months with acute noncholera diarrhoea and moderate dehydration were randomly assigned to either standard ORS (glucose 20 g/l, osmolarity 311 mmol/l) or MD-ORS (MD 50 g/l, osmolarity 227 mmol/l). There were no differences in treatment results. Some 46% of subjects had a high total stool output (> 300 g/kg), which was unrelated to the type of ORS given. High stool output was significantly associated with a longer duration of diarrhoea (33 vs. 15 hours; P < 0.001), a persistently elevated serum sodium (149 vs. 144 mmol/l at 24 h; P < 0.02), the need for intravenous infusion (11/41 vs. 0/48; P < 0.002), and an increase in faecal reducing substances (10.8 vs. 3.4 g/l at 24 h; P < 0.001). We conclude that some children given standard ORS develop osmotic diarrhoea owing to the combined effect of transient sugar malabsorption and slight hypertonicity of the ORS. Earlier studies show that this adverse outcome can largely be avoided when extra water is given in reduced-osmolarity glucose-based ORS. Reduced osmolarity has no benefit, however, when glucose is replaced by maltodextrin, probably because the sugars released by hydrolysis of MD, when malabsorbed, raise the intraluminal osmolarity to equal or exceed that of standard ORS. Thus, reduced-osmolarity glucose-based ORS is superior to both standard ORS and reduced-osmolarity solutions based on maltodextrin and probably other complex carbohydrates

  11. On the disparity in osmolarity-induced vascular reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Michelle Hunt, C.; Li, Na; Harris, Patrick D.; Neal Garrison, R.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional Peritoneal dialysis solutions (PDS) are vasoactive. This study was conducted to identify vasoactive components of PDS and to quantitatively describe such vasoactivity. Anesthetized nonheparinized rats were continuously monitored for hemodynamics, while the microvasculature of the jejunum was studied with in vivo intravital microscopy. In separate experiments, vascular reactivity of rat endothelium-intact and –denuded aortic rings (2mm) was studied ex vivo in a standard tissue bath. In both studies, suffusion of the vessels was performed with filter-sterilized isotonic and hypertonic solutions containing glucose or mannitol as osmotic agents. PDS served as a control (Delflex® 2.25%). Hypertonic glucose and mannitol solutions produced a significant vascular reactivity in aortic rings, and instantaneous and sustained vascular relaxation at all levels of the intestinal microvasculature. Similarly, lactate dissolved in a low pH isotonic physiologic salt solution produced significant force generation in aortic rings. While isotonic glucose and mannitol solutions had no vasoactivity in aortic rings, isotonic glucose produced a selective, insidious and time-dependent vasodilation in the intestinal premucosal arterioles (18±0.2% of baseline), which was not observed in the larger inflow arterioles (100 μm). This isotonic glucose-mediated vascular relaxation can be attenuated by ∼50% with combined adenosine A2a, A2b receptor antagonists, and completely abolished by adenosine A1 receptor inhibition. By using two different experimental techniques, this study demonstrates that hyperosmolality and lactate are the major vasoactive components of clinical peritoneal dialysis solutions. The pattern and magnitude of such reactivity is dependent on vessel size and on the solutes' metabolic activity. Low pH of conventional peritoneal dialysis solutions is not a vasoactive component by itself; but renders lactate vasoactive. Energy-dependent transport of glucose into

  12. Reduced tissue osmolarity increases TRPV4 expression and pro-inflammatory cytokines in intervertebral disc cells.

    PubMed

    Walter, B A; Purmessur, D; Moon, A; Occhiogrosso, J; Laudier, D M; Hecht, A C; Iatridis, J C

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour and cellular metabolism of intervertebral discs (IVDs) and articular cartilage are strongly influenced by their proteoglycan content and associated osmotic properties. This osmotic environment is a biophysical signal that changes with disease and may contribute to the elevated matrix breakdown and altered biologic response to loading observed in IVD degeneration and osteoarthritis. This study tested the hypothesis that changes in osmo-sensation by the transient receptor potential vallinoid-4 (TRPV4) ion channel occur with disease and contribute to the inflammatory environment found during degeneration. Immunohistochemistry on bovine IVDs from an inflammatory organ culture model were used to investigate if TRPV4 is expressed in the IVD and how expression changes with degeneration. Western blot, live-cell calcium imaging, and qRT-PCR were used to investigate whether osmolarity changes or tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) regulate TRPV4 expression, and how altered TRPV4 expression influences calcium signalling and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. TRPV4 expression correlated with TNFα expression, and was increased when cultured in reduced medium osmolarity and unaltered with TNFα-stimulation. Increased TRPV4 expression increased the calcium flux following TRPV4 activation and increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 gene expression in IVD cells. TRPV4 expression was qualitatively elevated in regions of aggrecan depletion in degenerated human IVDs. Collectively, results suggest that reduced tissue osmolarity, likely following proteoglycan degradation, can increase TRPV4 signalling and enhance pro-inflammatory cytokine production, suggesting changes in TRPV4 mediated osmo-sensation may contribute to the progressive matrix breakdown in disease. PMID:27434269

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid control of neurogenesis induced by retinoic acid during early brain development.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M I; Martín, C; Carnicero, E; Bueno, D; Gato, A

    2011-07-01

    Embryonic-cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) plays crucial roles in early brain development including the control of neurogenesis. Although FGF2 and lipoproteins present in the E-CSF have previously been shown to be involved in neurogenesis, the main factor triggering this process remains unknown. E-CSF contains all-trans-retinol and retinol-binding protein involved in the synthesis of retinoic acid (RA), a neurogenesis inducer. In early chick embryo brain, only the mesencephalic-rombencephalic isthmus (IsO) is able to synthesize RA. Here we show that in chick embryo brain development: (1) E-CSF helps to control RA synthesis in the IsO by means of the RBP and all-trans-retinol it contains; (2) E-CSF has retinoic acid activity, which suggests it may act as a diffusion pathway for RA; and (3) the influence of E-CSF on embryonic brain neurogenesis is to a large extent due to its involvement in RA synthesis. These data help to understand neurogenesis from neural progenitor cells. PMID:21594951

  14. Increased osmolarity with low molecular weight solutes inhibits CTL-mediated cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Howcroft, T.K.; Lindquist, R.R.

    1986-03-01

    Sucrose induced hyperosmolarity, which has no effect on complement-mediated lysis, was examined for its effect on CTL-mediated cell lysis. Sucrose (0.15M) inhibited H-2/sup b/ anti-H-2/sup d/ PEL specific lysis, as measured by /sup 51/Cr-release, 82.7% (52 +/-1.4 vs. 9 +/- 0.6). The effect of sucrose on the killer cell independent phase was investigated by allowing the killers and targets to interact for 10 minutes at 37/sup 0/C, and then inactivating the killers by a 5 minute incubation at 44/sup 0/C before adjusting the osmolarity. Under these conditions killing was reduced 65.5% (58 +/- 0.5 vs. 20 +/- 0.8) when hit P815 target cells were incubated in 0.15M sucrose; thus indicating inhibition was at the level of the target cell. This effect was not limited to sucrose as Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (.08M) also inhibited /sup 51/Cr-release. Nuclear fragmentation as indicated by release of incorporated /sup 3/H-thymidine also was inhibited in the presence of high osmolarity, although to a lesser extent, 34% (47 +/- 1.6 vs 31 +/- 0.6) after 40 minutes. These data suggest a surprising difference between poly C9 and CTL polyperforins, in light of their reported homologies.

  15. Osmolarity and spectrophotometric property of brilliant blue green define the degree of toxicity on retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to surgical endoilluminator

    PubMed Central

    Balaiya, Sankarathi; Sambhav, Kumar; Cook, William B; Chalam, Kakarla V

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of varying concentrations of brilliant blue green (BBG) and their different biochemical characteristics on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells under xenon light source illumination at varying distances to identify safe parameters for intraoperative use. Methods Human retinal RPE cells (ARPE-19) were exposed to two concentrations (0.25 and 0.50 mg/mL) of BBG and illuminated with a xenon surgical illuminator at varying distances (10 and 25 mm), intensity levels, and time intervals (1, 5, and 15 minutes). Additionally, the effect of osmolarity was examined by diluting BBG in different concentrations of glucose. Cytotoxicity of BBG and osmolarity effects on cell viability were evaluated using a WST-1 assay. Light absorption and emission characteristic of BBG in different solvents were measured using a plate reader at different wavelengths. Lastly, the activity of caspase-3 was also studied. Results Cell viability of ARPE-19 cells was 77.4%±12.7%, 78.7%±17.0%, and 65.0%±19.7% at 1, 5, and 15 minutes to exposure of high illumination xenon light at 10 mm (P<0.05) compared to controls. At both distances of illumination (10 and 25 mm), similar cell viabilities were seen between 1 and 5 minutes of exposure. However, there was a decline in viability when the illumination was carried out to 15 minutes in all groups (P<0.05). There was no significant reduction in cell viability in presence or absence of xenon light in different osmolar solutions concentrations of glucose (P>0.05). Maximal light absorption of BBG was noted between 540 and 680 nm. Activated caspase-3 level was not significant in both the concentrations of BBG (P>0.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that BBG at 0.25 mg/mL during vitreoretinal surgery is safe and not toxic to RPE cells up to 5 minutes under focal high illumination (10 mm) and up to 15 minutes under medium diffuse illumination (25 mm). BBG was safe to be mixed with isotonic glucose solution at the

  16. TolC Promotes ExPEC Biofilm Formation and Curli Production in Response to Medium Osmolarity

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Bo; Meng, Xian-Rong; Zhang, Li-Yuan; Tan, Chen; Jin, Hui; Zhou, Rui; Gao, Jian-Feng; Wu, Bin; Li, Zi-Li; Chen, Huan-Chun; Bi, Ding-Ren; Li, Shao-Wen

    2014-01-01

    While a high osmolarity medium activates Cpx signaling and causes CpxR to repress csgD expression, and efflux protein TolC protein plays an important role in biofilm formation in Escherichia coli, whether TolC also responds to an osmolarity change to regulate biofilm formation in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) remains unknown. In this study, we constructed ΔtolC mutant and complement ExPEC strains to investigate the role of TolC in the retention of biofilm formation and curli production capability under different osmotic conditions. The ΔtolC mutant showed significantly decreased biofilm formation and lost the ability to produce curli fimbriae compared to its parent ExPEC strain PPECC42 when cultured in M9 medium or 1/2 M9 medium of increased osmolarity with NaCl or sucrose at 28°C. However, biofilm formation and curli production levels were restored to wild-type levels in the ΔtolC mutant in 1/2 M9 medium. We propose for the first time that TolC protein is able to form biofilm even under high osmotic stress. Our findings reveal an interplay between the role of TolC in ExPEC biofilm formation and the osmolarity of the surrounding environment, thus providing guidance for the development of a treatment for ExPEC biofilm formation. PMID:25243151

  17. Osmolarity effects on red blood cell elution in sedimentation field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Assidjo, N E; Chianéa, T; Clarot, I; Dreyfuss, M F; Cardot, P J

    1999-07-01

    Field-flow fractionation (FFF) is an analytical technique particularly suitable for the separation, isolation, and characterization of macromolecules and micrometer- or submicrometer-sized particles. This chromatographic-like methodology can modulate the retention of micron-sized species according to an elution mode described to date as "steric hyperlayer". In such a model, differences in sample species size, density, or other physical parameters make particle selective elution possible depending on the configuration and the operating conditions of the FFF system. Elution characteristics of micron-sized particles of biological origin, such as cells, can be modified using media and carrier phases of different osmolarities. In these media, a cells average size, density, and shape are modified. Therefore, systematic studies of a single reference cell population, red blood cells (RBCs), are performed with 2 sedimentation FFF systems using either gravity (GrFFF) or a centrifugational field (SdFFF). However, in all cases, normal erythrocyte in isotonic suspension elutes as a single peak when fractionated in these systems. With carrier phases of different osmolarities, FFF elution characteristics of RBCs are modified. Retention modifications are qualitatively consistent with the "steric-hyperlayer" model. Such systematic studies confirm the key role of size, density, and shape in the elution mode of RBCs in sedimentation FFF for living, micronsized biological species. Using polymers as an analogy, the RBC population is described as highly "polydisperse". However, this definition must be reconsidered depending on the parameters under concern, leading to a matricial concept: multipolydispersity. It is observed that multipolydispersity modifications of a given RBC population are qualitatively correlated to the eluted sample band width. PMID:10422264

  18. Direct and Osmolarity-Dependent Effects of Glycine on Preimplantation Bovine Embryos.

    PubMed

    Herrick, Jason R; Lyons, Sarah M; Greene, Alison F; Broeckling, Corey D; Schoolcraft, William B; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of glycine (Gly) in embryo culture media are often lower (~0.1 mM) than those in oviductal or uterine fluids (≥1.2 mM). The objective of this study was to determine direct and osmolarity-dependent effects of physiological concentrations of Gly on blastocyst formation and hatching, cell allocation to the trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM), and metabolic activity of bovine embryos. In experiment 1, zygotes were cultured with 100 or 120 mM NaCl and 0 or 1 mM Gly for the first 72 h of culture. Blastocyst formation and hatching were improved (P<0.05) when embryos were cultured with 100 compared to 120 mM NaCl. Inclusion of 1 mM Gly improved (P<0.05) blastocyst formation compared to 0 mM Gly, but this effect was only significant (P<0.05) for embryos cultured with 120 mM NaCl, suggesting bovine embryos can utilize Gly as an osmolyte. In experiment 2, embryos were cultured with 0.1, 1.1, 2.1, or 4.1 mM Gly (100 mM NaCl) for the final 96 h of culture. Blastocyst development was not affected (P>0.05) by Gly, but hatching (0.1 mM Gly, 18.2%) was improved (P<0.05) when embryos were cultured with 1.1 (31.4%) or 2.1 (29.4%) mM Gly. Blastocyst, TE, and ICM cell numbers were not affected (P>0.05) by Gly in either experiment. Blastocysts produced alanine, glutamine, pyruvate, and urea and consumed aspartate, but this metabolic profile was not affected (P>0.05) by Gly. In conclusion, Gly (1.0 mM) improves the development of both early and late stage embryos, but beneficial effects are more pronounced for early embryos exposed to elevated osmolarity. PMID:27459477

  19. Direct and Osmolarity-Dependent Effects of Glycine on Preimplantation Bovine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Sarah M.; Greene, Alison F.; Broeckling, Corey D.; Schoolcraft, William B.; Krisher, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of glycine (Gly) in embryo culture media are often lower (~0.1 mM) than those in oviductal or uterine fluids (≥1.2 mM). The objective of this study was to determine direct and osmolarity-dependent effects of physiological concentrations of Gly on blastocyst formation and hatching, cell allocation to the trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM), and metabolic activity of bovine embryos. In experiment 1, zygotes were cultured with 100 or 120 mM NaCl and 0 or 1 mM Gly for the first 72 h of culture. Blastocyst formation and hatching were improved (P<0.05) when embryos were cultured with 100 compared to 120 mM NaCl. Inclusion of 1 mM Gly improved (P<0.05) blastocyst formation compared to 0 mM Gly, but this effect was only significant (P<0.05) for embryos cultured with 120 mM NaCl, suggesting bovine embryos can utilize Gly as an osmolyte. In experiment 2, embryos were cultured with 0.1, 1.1, 2.1, or 4.1 mM Gly (100 mM NaCl) for the final 96 h of culture. Blastocyst development was not affected (P>0.05) by Gly, but hatching (0.1 mM Gly, 18.2%) was improved (P<0.05) when embryos were cultured with 1.1 (31.4%) or 2.1 (29.4%) mM Gly. Blastocyst, TE, and ICM cell numbers were not affected (P>0.05) by Gly in either experiment. Blastocysts produced alanine, glutamine, pyruvate, and urea and consumed aspartate, but this metabolic profile was not affected (P>0.05) by Gly. In conclusion, Gly (1.0 mM) improves the development of both early and late stage embryos, but beneficial effects are more pronounced for early embryos exposed to elevated osmolarity. PMID:27459477

  20. Effect of fluid countermeasures of varying osmolarity on cardiovascular responses to orthostatic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John E.

    1989-01-01

    Current operational procedures for shuttle crewmembers include the ingestion of a fluid countermeasure approximately 2 hours before reentry into the earth's gravitational field. The ingestion of the fluid countermeasure is thought to restore plasma volume and improve orthostatic responses upon reentry. The present countermeasure consists of ingesting salt tablets and water to achieve an isotonic solution. It has yet to be determined whether this is the optimal drink to restore orthostatic tolerance. It is also not known whether the drink solution is effective in increasing plasma volume. The purpose here is to evaluate the effectiveness of drink solutions of different osmolarity on restoring plasma volume and orthostatic responses. A hypertonic drink solution was more effective in restoring plasma volume after dehydration than an isotonic solution. However, there were no differences in their effects on an orthostatic challenge. These data suggest that the plasma volume differences produced in this study were not sufficient to produce differences in the cardiovascular responses to an orthostatic challenge, or there are other changes that occur during space flight that are more important in determining orthostatic intolerance.

  1. Hyper-osmolarity and calcium chelation: Effects on cystic fibrosis mucus.

    PubMed

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Gustafsson, Jenny K; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-10-01

    A non-functional Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) leads to the disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Although the CFTR is expressed in multiple organs, pulmonary disease is the major cause of illness and death in patients with CF. Stagnant mucus, causing airway obstruction, bacterial overgrowth, persistent inflammation and tissue destruction characterizes the disease, but how the defect in CFTR function is coupled to the mucus phenotype is still controversial. We have recently shown that bicarbonate ions passing through CFTR are necessary for proper unfolding of the MUC2 mucin, thus highlighting the importance of bicarbonate ion transport via the CFTR and the ability of these ions to raise the pH and chelate calcium bound to the mucin as the important steps in forming normal mucus. In order to find potential CF treatments and expand our knowledge about the usefulness of bicarbonate as an active ingredient in formulations to alleviate mucus plugging, we used an Ussing-type chamber and explants from the F508del-CFTR mutant mouse ileum to test the effect of calcium chelators on mucus attachment, either in isolation or in combination with osmolytes such as mannitol or hypertonic saline. We found that increasing the concentration of bicarbonate, both alone or in combination with increased osmolarity of the solution, detached the otherwise attached CF mucus. PMID:26134505

  2. A short-term study of corneal collagen cross-linking with hypo-osmolar riboflavin solution in keratoconic corneas

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shao-Feng; Fan, Zhao-Shan; Wang, Li-Hua; Tao, Xiang-Chen; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Chun-Qin; Wang, Ya; Mu, Guo-Ying

    2015-01-01

    AIM To report the 3mo outcomes of collagen cross-linking (CXL) with a hypo-osmolar riboflavin in thin corneas with the thinnest thickness less than 400 µm without epithelium. METHODS Eight eyes in 6 patients with age 26.2±4.8y were included in the study. All patients underwent CXL using a hypo-osmolar riboflavin solution after its de-epithelization. Best corrected visual acuity, manifest refraction, the thinnest corneal thickness, and endothelial cell density were evaluated before and 3mo after the procedure. RESULTS The mean thinnest thickness of the cornea was 408.5±29.0 µm before treatment and reduced to 369.8±24.8 µm after the removal of epithelium. With the application of the hypo-osmolar riboflavin solution, the thickness increased to 445.0±26.5 µm before CXL and recover to 412.5±22.7 µm at 3mo after treatment, P=0.659). Before surgery, the mean K-value of the apex of the keratoconus corneas was 57.6±4.0 diopters, and slightly decreased (54.7±4.9 diopters) after surgery (P=0.085). Mean best-corrected visual acuity was 0.55±0.23 logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution, and increased to 0.53±0.26 logarithm after surgery (P=0.879). The endothelial cell density was 2706.4±201.6 cells/mm2 before treatment, and slightly decreased (2641.2±218.2 cells/mm2) at last fellow up (P=0.002). CONCLUSION Corneal collagen cross-linking with a hypo-osmolar riboflavin in thin corneas seems to be a promising treatment. Further study should be done to evaluate the safety and efficiency of CXL in thin corneas for the long-term. PMID:25709915

  3. Activation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae filamentation/invasion pathway by osmotic stress in high-osmolarity glycogen pathway mutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, K. D.; Williams, K. E.; Ullmann, B. D.; Gustin, M. C.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are frequently used signal transduction mechanisms in eukaryotes. Of the five MAPK cascades in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the high-osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway functions to sense and respond to hypertonic stress. We utilized a partial loss-of-function mutant in the HOG pathway, pbs2-3, in a high-copy suppressor screen to identify proteins that modulate growth on high-osmolarity media. Three high-copy suppressors of pbs2-3 osmosensitivity were identified: MSG5, CAK1, and TRX1. Msg5p is a dual-specificity phosphatase that was previously demonstrated to dephosphorylate MAPKs in yeast. Deletions of the putative MAPK targets of Msg5p revealed that kss1delta could suppress the osmosensitivity of pbs2-3. Kss1p is phosphorylated in response to hyperosmotic shock in a pbs2-3 strain, but not in a wild-type strain nor in a pbs2-3 strain overexpressing MSG5. Both TEC1 and FRE::lacZ expressions are activated in strains lacking a functional HOG pathway during osmotic stress in a filamentation/invasion-pathway-dependent manner. Additionally, the cellular projections formed by a pbs2-3 mutant on high osmolarity are absent in strains lacking KSS1 or STE7. These data suggest that the loss of filamentation/invasion pathway repression contributes to the HOG mutant phenotype.

  4. Alterations in protein expression caused by the hha mutation in Escherichia coli: influence of growth medium osmolarity.

    PubMed

    Balsalobre, C; Johansson, J; Uhlin, B E; Juárez, A; Muñoa, F J

    1999-05-01

    The Hha protein belongs to a new family of regulators involved in the environmental regulation of virulence factors. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the hha mutation on the overall protein pattern of Escherichia coli cells by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The growth medium osmolarity clearly influenced the effect of the hha mutation. The number of proteins whose expression was altered in hha cells, compared with wild-type cells, was three times larger at a high osmolarity than at a low osmolarity. Among the proteins whose expression was modified by the hha allele, both OmpA and protein IIAGlc of the phosphotransferase system could be identified. As this latter enzyme participates in the regulation of the synthesis of cyclic AMP and hence influences the catabolite repression system, we tested whether the expression of the lacZ gene was also modified in hha mutants. This was the case, suggesting that at least some of the pleiotropic effects of the hha mutation could be caused by its effect on the catabolite repression system. PMID:10322001

  5. A mass and solute balance model for tear volume and osmolarity in the normal and the dry eye.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, E A; Tiffany, J M; Yokoi, N; Bron, A J

    2010-01-01

    Tear hyperosmolarity is thought to play a key role in the mechanism of dry eye, a common symptomatic condition accompanied by visual disturbance, tear film instability, inflammation and damage to the ocular surface. We have constructed a model for the mass and solute balance of the tears, with parameter estimation based on extensive data from the literature which permits the influence of tear evaporation, lacrimal flux and blink rate on tear osmolarity to be explored. In particular the nature of compensatory events has been estimated in aqueous-deficient (ADDE) and evaporative (EDE) dry eye. The model reproduces observed osmolarities of the tear meniscus for the healthy eye and predicts a higher concentration in the tear film than meniscus in normal and dry eye states. The differential is small in the normal eye, but is significantly increased in dry eye, especially for the simultaneous presence of high meniscus concentration and low meniscus radius. This may influence the interpretation of osmolarity values obtained from meniscus samples since they need not fully reflect potential damage to the ocular surface caused by tear film hyperosmolarity. Interrogation of the model suggests that increases in blink rate may play a limited role in compensating for a rise in tear osmolarity in ADDE but that an increase in lacrimal flux, together with an increase in blink rate, may delay the development of hyperosmolarity in EDE. Nonetheless, it is predicted that tear osmolarity may rise to much higher levels in EDE than ADDE before the onset of tear film breakup, in the absence of events at the ocular surface which would independently compromise tear film stability. Differences in the predicted responses of the pre-ocular tears in ADDE compared to EDE or hybrid disease to defined conditions suggest that no single, empirically-accessible variable can act as a surrogate for tear film concentration and the potential for ocular surface damage. This emphasises the need to measure

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of calculated serum osmolarity to predict dehydration in older people: adding value to pathology laboratory reports

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Lee; Abdelhamid, Asmaa; Ali, Adam; Bunn, Diane K; Jennings, Amy; John, W Garry; Kerry, Susan; Lindner, Gregor; Pfortmueller, Carmen A; Sjöstrand, Fredrik; Walsh, Neil P; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Potter, John F; Hunter, Paul R; Shepstone, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess which osmolarity equation best predicts directly measured serum/plasma osmolality and whether its use could add value to routine blood test results through screening for dehydration in older people. Design Diagnostic accuracy study. Participants Older people (≥65 years) in 5 cohorts: Dietary Strategies for Healthy Ageing in Europe (NU-AGE, living in the community), Dehydration Recognition In our Elders (DRIE, living in residential care), Fortes (admitted to acute medical care), Sjöstrand (emergency room) or Pfortmueller cohorts (hospitalised with liver cirrhosis). Reference standard for hydration status Directly measured serum/plasma osmolality: current dehydration (serum osmolality >300 mOsm/kg), impending/current dehydration (≥295 mOsm/kg). Index tests 39 osmolarity equations calculated using serum indices from the same blood draw as directly measured osmolality. Results Across 5 cohorts 595 older people were included, of whom 19% were dehydrated (directly measured osmolality >300 mOsm/kg). Of 39 osmolarity equations, 5 showed reasonable agreement with directly measured osmolality and 3 had good predictive accuracy in subgroups with diabetes and poor renal function. Two equations were characterised by narrower limits of agreement, low levels of differential bias and good diagnostic accuracy in receiver operating characteristic plots (areas under the curve >0.8). The best equation was osmolarity=1.86×(Na++ K+)+1.15×glucose+urea+14 (all measured in mmol/L). It appeared useful in people aged ≥65 years with and without diabetes, poor renal function, dehydration, in men and women, with a range of ages, health, cognitive and functional status. Conclusions Some commonly used osmolarity equations work poorly, and should not be used. Given costs and prevalence of dehydration in older people we suggest use of the best formula by pathology laboratories using a cutpoint of 295 mOsm/L (sensitivity 85%, specificity 59%), to report

  7. Stage-specific effects of the osmolarity of a culture medium on the development of parthenogenetic diploids in the pig.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V T; Kure-bayashi, S; Harayama, H; Nagai, T; Miyake, M

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of osmolarity of culture media on the development of porcine parthenogenetic diploids. Oocyte-cumulus-granulosa cell complexes were collected from ovaries and then in vitro-cultured for 48 h. The mature oocytes were subjected to a single electro-stimulation (El-St; 100 micros, 1500 V/cm), treated with 5.0 microg/ml Cytochalasin B for 4h and then cultured under various conditions as described below. In Experiment 1, the diploids were cultured for 168 h after El-St in modified Whitten's medium with 256 mOsmol (mWM256), mKRB with 309 mOsmol, and mWM with 309 mOsmol (mWM309), in which the osmolarity was adjusted by addition of NaCl or mannitol, or by reduction of distilled water. In Experiment 2, the diploids were cultured in the five media used in Experiment 1 for the first 48 h, and then in mWM256 until 168 h after El-St. In Experiment 3, the diploids were cultured for the first 48 h in mWM with osmolarity adjusted from 256 to 330 mOsmol by addition of NaCl for the first 48 h and then in mWM256 until 168 h after El-St. In Experiment 4, the diploids were cultured in mWM with 290 mOsmol (mWM290) for the first period of 24, 48, or 72 h, and then in mWM256 until 168 h after El-St. In Experiment 5, after diploids were cultured in mWM290 for the first 48 h, the obtained 4-cell diploids were transferred to mWM with osmolarity adjusted from 200 to 310 mOsmol by addition of NaCl, then cultured until 168 h after El-St. All media were supplemented with 0.5mg/ml hyaluronic acid and 4.0mg/ml bovine serum albumin. The results obtained in Experiments 1-5 indicate that the osmolarity of a medium, but not the Na(+)/K(+) ratio, exerts effects on the development of diploids to the blastocyst stage. The change of osmolarity of the culture media after the 4-cell stage increased the rate of expanded blastocyst formation in porcine diploids. The optimal osmolarities of culture medium for the first 48 h after El-St (before the 4

  8. Medium Osmolarity and Pericellular Matrix Development Improves Chondrocyte Survival When Photoencapsulated in Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Hydrogels at Low Densities

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Idalis; Bishop, Nikki L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to encapsulate cells over a range of cell densities is important toward mimicking cell densities of native tissues and rationally designing strategies where cell source and/or cell numbers are clinically limited. Our preliminary findings demonstrate that survival of freshly isolated adult bovine chondrocytes dramatically decreases when photoencapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels at low densities (4 million cells/mL). During enzymatic digestion of cartilage, chondrocytes undergo a harsh change in their microenvironment. We hypothesize that the absence of exogenous antioxidants, the hyposmotic environment, and the loss of a protective pericellular matrix (PCM) increase chondrocytes' susceptibility to free radical damage during photoencapsulation. Incorporation of antioxidants and serum into the encapsulation medium improved cell survival twofold compared to phosphate-buffered saline. Increasing medium osmolarity from 330 to 400 mOsm (physiological) improved cell survival by 40% and resulted in ∼2-fold increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production 24 h postencapsulation. However, cell survival was only temporary. Allowing cells to reproduce some PCM before photoencapsulation in 400 mOsm medium resulted in superior cell survival during and postencapsulation for up to 15 days. In summary, the combination of antioxidants, physiological osmolarity, and the development of some PCM result in an improved robustness against free radical damage during photoencapsulation. PMID:19331581

  9. Evidence for antagonistic regulation of cell growth by the calcineurin and high osmolarity glycerol pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shitamukai, Atsunori; Hirata, Dai; Sonobe, Shinya; Miyakawa, Tokichi

    2004-01-30

    Because Ca(2+) signaling of budding yeast, through the activation of calcineurin and the Mpk1/Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, performs redundant function(s) in the events essential for growth, the simultaneous deletion of both these pathways (Delta cnb1 Delta mpk1) leads to lethality. A PTC4 cDNA that encodes a protein phosphatase belonging to the PP2C family was obtained as a high dosage suppressor of the lethality of Delta cnb1 Delta mpk1 strain. Overexpression of PTC4 led to a decrease in the high osmolarity-induced Hog1 phosphorylation, and HOG1 deletion remarkably suppressed the synthetic lethality, indicating an antagonistic role of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway and the Ca(2+) signaling pathway in growth regulation. The calcineurin-Crz1 pathway was required for the down-regulation of the HOG pathway. Analysis of the time course of actin polarization, bud formation, and the onset of mitosis in synchronous cell cultures demonstrated that calcineurin negatively regulates actin polarization at the bud site, whereas the HOG pathway positively regulates bud formation at a later step after actin has polarized. PMID:14583627

  10. Rectal Application of a Highly Osmolar Personal Lubricant in a Macaque Model Induces Acute Cytotoxicity but Does Not Increase Risk of SHIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Morris, Monica R.; Wolitski, Richard J.; Luo, Wei; Rose, Charles E.; Blau, Dianna M.; Tsegaye, Theodros; Zaki, Sherif R.; Garber, David A.; Jenkins, Leecresia T.; Henning, Tara C.; Patton, Dorothy L.; Hendry, R. Michael; McNicholl, Janet M.; Kersh, Ellen N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal lubricant use is common during anal intercourse. Some water-based products with high osmolality and low pH can damage genital and rectal tissues, and the polymer polyquaternium 15 (PQ15) can enhance HIV replication in vitro. This has raised concerns that lubricants with such properties may increase STD/HIV infection risk, although in vivo evidence is scarce. We use a macaque model to evaluate rectal cytotoxicity and SHIV infection risk after use of a highly osmolar (>8,000 mOsm/kg) water-based lubricant with pH of 4.4, and containing PQ15. Methods Cytotoxicity was documented by measuring inflammatory cytokines and epithelial tissue sloughing during six weeks of repeated, non-traumatic lubricant or control buffer applications to rectum and anus. We measured susceptibility to SHIVSF162P3 infection by comparing virus doses needed for rectal infection in twenty-one macaques treated with lubricant or control buffer 30 minutes prior to virus exposure. Results Lubricant increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and tissue sloughing while control buffer (phosphate buffered saline; PBS) did not. However, the estimated AID50 (50% animal infectious dose) was not different in lubricant- and control buffer-treated macaques (p = 0.4467; logistic regression models). Conclusions Although the test lubricant caused acute cytotoxicity in rectal tissues, it did not increase susceptibility to infection in this macaque model. Thus neither the lubricant-induced type/extent of inflammation nor the presence of PQ15 affected infection risk. This study constitutes a first step in the in vivo evaluation of lubricants with regards to HIV transmission. PMID:25853710

  11. Extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit. Influence of blood pressure, osmolarity, and blood-brain barrier damage

    SciTech Connect

    Go, K.G.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Paans, A.M.; Vaalburg, W.; Woldring, M.G.

    1981-09-01

    By external detection, the influence of arterial blood pressure (BP), osmolarity, and cold-induced blood-brain barrier damage was assessed on the extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit in the rat. There was an inverse relation between arterial BP and extraction that was attributable to the influence of arterial BP on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the relation between CBF and extraction. Neither arterial BP nor osmolarity of the injected bolus had any direct effect on extraction of water 15O, signifying that the diffusional exchange component (determined by blood flow) of extraction greatly surpasses the convection flow contribution by hydrostatic or osmotic forces. Damage to the blood-brain barrier did not change its permeability to water.

  12. The HU Regulon Is Composed of Genes Responding to Anaerobiosis, Acid Stress, High Osmolarity and SOS Induction

    PubMed Central

    Oberto, Jacques; Nabti, Sabrina; Jooste, Valérie; Mignot, Hervé; Rouviere-Yaniv, Josette

    2009-01-01

    Background The Escherichia coli heterodimeric HU protein is a small DNA-bending protein associated with the bacterial nucleoid. It can introduce negative supercoils into closed circular DNA in the presence of topoisomerase I. Cells lacking HU grow very poorly and display many phenotypes. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the transcription profile of every Escherichia coli gene in the absence of one or both HU subunits. This genome-wide in silico transcriptomic approach, performed in parallel with in vivo genetic experimentation, defined the HU regulon. This large regulon, which comprises 8% of the genome, is composed of four biologically relevant gene classes whose regulation responds to anaerobiosis, acid stress, high osmolarity, and SOS induction. Conclusions/Significance The regulation a large number of genes encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism and catabolism pathways by HU explains the highly pleiotropic phenotype of HU-deficient cells. The uniform chromosomal distribution of the many operons regulated by HU strongly suggests that the transcriptional and nucleoid architectural functions of HU constitute two aspects of a unique protein-DNA interaction mechanism. PMID:19194530

  13. The Blockade of IL6 Counterparts the Osmolar Stress-Induced Apoptosis in Human Conjunctival Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hee-Jung; Byun, Yong-Soo; Mok, Jee-Won

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of hyperosmolarity on cell survival/apoptosis of conjunctival epithelial cells and evaluate the possible role of IL6, Wong-Kilbourne derivative of Chang conjunctival cell line (WKD) was used in this study. Confluent cells were incubated under different osmolarity (290 mOsm and 500 mOsm) with or without neutralizing IL6 antibody (50 ng/mL). The expression of IL6 level was measured in the supernatant of each conditioned medium. Cell viability/apoptosis assay was performed using Annexin V/Propidium Iodide (PI) and Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). Western blot was conducted to measure the abundance of apoptotic markers and IL6 related downstream signaling pathway. The concentration of IL6 showed time-dependent increase in cells treated with 500 mOsm. Although apoptosis of WKD cell is increased in treated 500 mOsm for 24 h, apoptosis reduced in WKD cell treated 500 mOsm with anti-IL6 for 24 h. Anti-IL6 inhibited the activation of JAK-STAT signaling pathway, which was induced by hyperosmolarity. Hyperosmolar condition induced apoptosis in conjunctival epithelial cells, along with increase of IL6 production. IL6 neutralizing antibody inhibited apoptosis and JAK-STAT signaling in hyperosmolar condition. These findings suggested that IL6 may be involved in apoptotic change and in hyperosmolarity. PMID:27555966

  14. The Effect of Ramadan Fasting and Physical Activity on Body Composition, Serum Osmolarity Levels and Some Parameters of Electrolytes in Females

    PubMed Central

    Attarzadeh Hosseini, Seyyed Reza; Sardar, Mohammad Ali; Hejazi, Keyvan; Farahati, Samaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background So far, there have been a few and incoherent results about the effects of physical activities. Fasting in Ramadan has an effect on the level of osmolarity and the concentration of serum electrolytes both in active and inactive females. Objectives The aim of this study was to observe the changes of serum electrolytes and osmolarity levels according to regular exercise during fasting. Patients and Methods Twenty two healthy females who were elected by convenience sampling method were divided into two groups: 1) fasting + exercise (FE; n = 11) and 2) fasting + non exercise (FNE; n = 15). The FE group participated in aerobic training for four sessions per week during the fasting. All measurements were done once before the first day, on the second week, on the fourth week and two weeks after fasting month and these measures were used to analyze test results. Results The mean differences were as follows: significant weight loss, BMI, WHR, in two groups at the end of Ramadan (P < 0.05). The mean of weight, BMI, WHR, body fat, protein, mineral and total water showed no difference between groups (P > 0.05). Potassium, creatinine, urea and uric acid had been decreased significantly in both groups (P < 0.05). Variance between groups was significant only in variable urea (P < 0.05). Variations within group had been changed in FBS; sodium, phosphorus and osmolarity levels were not changed significantly. Conclusions According to this result, regular exercise in case of fasting in Ramadan led to some changes in serum osmolarity index, electrolytes and water. Therefore, it is important for female athletes to consider applying a suitable nutritious diet and sufficient water consumption during Ramadan PMID:23825979

  15. High osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway-induced phosphorylation and activation of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase are essential for glycerol accumulation and yeast cell proliferation under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Dihazi, Hassan; Kessler, Renate; Eschrich, Klaus

    2004-06-01

    In response to changes in the environment, yeast cells coordinate intracellular activities to optimize survival and proliferation. The transductions of diverse extracellular stimuli are exerted through multiple mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. The high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) MAPK pathway is activated by increased environmental osmolarity and results in a rise of the cellular glycerol concentration to adapt the intracellular osmotic pressure. We studied the importance of the short time regulation of glycolysis under hyperosmotic stress for the survival and proliferation of yeast cells. A stimulation of the HOG-MAPK pathway by increasing the medium osmolarity through addition of salt or glucose to cultivated yeast leads to an activation of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (PFK2), which is accompanied by a complex phosphorylation pattern of the enzyme. An increase in medium osmolarity with 5% NaCl activates PFK2 3-fold over the initial value. This change in the activity is the result of a 4-fold phosphorylation of the enzyme mediated by protein kinases from the HOG-MAPK pathway. In the case of hyperosmolar glucose a 5-fold PFK2 activation was achieved by a single phosphorylation with protein kinase A near the carboxyl terminus of the protein on Ser(644) and an additional 5-fold phosphorylation within the same amino-terminal fragment as in the presence of salt. The effect of hyperosmolar glucose is the result of an activation of the Ras-cAMP pathway together with the HOG-MAPK pathway. The activation of PFK2 leads to an activation of the upper part of glycolysis, which is a precondition for glycerol accumulation. Yeast cells containing PFK2 accumulate three times more glycerol than cells lacking PFK2, which are not able to grow under hypertonic stress. PMID:15037628

  16. The influence of osmolarity on the reduction of exogenous cytochrome c and permeability of the inner membrane of Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, John M.; Kirk, Betty I.

    1974-01-01

    The stimulation of succinate–cytochrome c reductase in Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria by lowering osmolarity was found to be associated with conformational changes in the inner membrane rather than with rupture of the outer membrane. This conclusion is based on the following evidence. (1) When the activation of succinate dehydrogenase was measured by using either K3Fe(CN)6 or exogenous cytochrome c as an electron acceptor, electron flow to cytochrome c was always 7% of that to K3Fe(CN)6 throughout the activation process. (2) The rate of exogenous cytochrome c reduction by succinate and NADH was directly related to the maximum rate of electron flow as determined by oxygen utilization. These two observations are not consistent with the low rate of succinate–cytochrome c reductase being limited by a permeability barrier at the outer membrane. (3) In addition to stimulating the succinate–cytochrome c reductase, lowering the osmolarity caused simultaneous changes in the permeability of the inner membrane to ferricyanide and NADH. The data show that lowering the osmolarity results in progressive changes in the permeability of the inner membrane. The first change detected was an increased permeability to K3Fe(CN)6, then a simultaneous increase in accessibility of the respiratory chain to exogenous cytochrome c and an increased permeability to NADH, followed finally by rupture as measured by the release of malate dehydrogenase. PMID:4375472

  17. Role of Ptc2 type 2C Ser/Thr phosphatase in yeast high-osmolarity glycerol pathway inactivation.

    PubMed

    Young, Christian; Mapes, James; Hanneman, Jennifer; Al-Zarban, Sheikha; Ota, Irene

    2002-12-01

    Three type 2C Ser/Thr phosphatases (PTCs) are negative regulators of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Ptc2 and Ptc3 are 75% identical to each other and differ from Ptc1 in having a noncatalytic domain. Previously, we showed that Ptc1 inactivates the pathway by dephosphorylating the Hog1 MAPK; Ptc1 maintains low basal Hog1 activity and dephosphorylates Hog1 during adaptation. Here, we examined the function of Ptc2 and Ptc3. First, deletion of PTC2 and/or PTC3 together with PTP2, encoding the protein tyrosine phosphatase that inactivates Hog1, produced a strong growth defect at 37 degrees C that was dependent on HOG1, providing further evidence that PTC2 and PTC3 are negative regulators. Second, overexpression of PTC2 inhibited Hog1 activation but did not affect Hog1-Tyr phosphorylation, suggesting that Ptc2 inactivates the pathway by dephosphorylating the Hog1 activation loop phosphothreonine (pThr) residue. Indeed, in vitro studies confirmed that Ptc2 was specific for Hog1-pThr. Third, deletion of both PTC2 and PTC3 led to greater Hog1 activation upon osmotic stress than was observed in wild-type strains, although no obvious change in Hog1 inactivation during adaptation was seen. These results indicate that Ptc2 and Ptc3 differ from Ptc1 in that they limit maximal Hog1 activity. The function of the Ptc2 noncatalytic domain was also examined. Deletion of this domain decreased V(max) by 1.6-fold and increased K(m) by 2-fold. Thus Ptc2 requires an additional amino acid sequence beyond the catalytic domain defined for PTCs for full activity. PMID:12477803

  18. Reconstruction of the High-Osmolarity Glycerol (HOG) Signaling Pathway from the Halophilic Fungus Wallemia ichthyophaga in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Konte, Tilen; Terpitz, Ulrich; Plemenitaš, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The basidiomycetous fungus Wallemia ichthyophaga grows between 1.7 and 5.1 M NaCl and is the most halophilic eukaryote described to date. Like other fungi, W. ichthyophaga detects changes in environmental salinity mainly by the evolutionarily conserved high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) signaling pathway. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the HOG pathway has been extensively studied in connection to osmotic regulation, with a valuable knock-out strain collection established. In the present study, we reconstructed the architecture of the HOG pathway of W. ichthyophaga in suitable S. cerevisiae knock-out strains, through heterologous expression of the W. ichthyophaga HOG pathway proteins. Compared to S. cerevisiae, where the Pbs2 (ScPbs2) kinase of the HOG pathway is activated via the SHO1 and SLN1 branches, the interactions between the W. ichthyophaga Pbs2 (WiPbs2) kinase and the W. ichthyophaga SHO1 branch orthologs are not conserved: as well as evidence of poor interactions between the WiSho1 Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain and the WiPbs2 proline-rich motif, the absence of a considerable part of the osmosensing apparatus in the genome of W. ichthyophaga suggests that the SHO1 branch components are not involved in HOG signaling in this halophilic fungus. In contrast, the conserved activation of WiPbs2 by the S. cerevisiae ScSsk2/ScSsk22 kinase and the sensitivity of W. ichthyophaga cells to fludioxonil, emphasize the significance of two-component (SLN1-like) signaling via Group III histidine kinase. Combined with protein modeling data, our study reveals conserved and non-conserved protein interactions in the HOG signaling pathway of W. ichthyophaga and therefore significantly improves the knowledge of hyperosmotic signal processing in this halophilic fungus. PMID:27379041

  19. Two-Component Signaling Regulates Osmotic Stress Adaptation via SskA and the High-Osmolarity Glycerol MAPK Pathway in the Human Pathogen Talaromyces marneffei.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Kylie J; Cao, Cunwei; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2016-01-01

    For successful infection to occur, a pathogen must be able to evade or tolerate the host's defense systems. This requires the pathogen to first recognize the host environment and then signal this response to elicit a complex adaptive program in order to activate its own defense strategies. In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, two-component signaling systems are utilized to sense and respond to changes in the external environment. The hybrid histidine kinases (HHKs) at the start of the two-component signaling pathway have been well characterized in human pathogens. However, how these HHKs regulate processes downstream currently remains unclear. This study describes the role of a response regulator downstream of these HHKs, sskA, in Talaromyces marneffei, a dimorphic human pathogen. sskA is required for asexual reproduction, hyphal morphogenesis, cell wall integrity, osmotic adaptation, and the morphogenesis of yeast cells both in vitro at 37°C and during macrophage infection, but not during dimorphic switching. Comparison of the ΔsskA mutant with a strain in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway (SakA) has been deleted suggests that SskA acts upstream of this pathway in T. marneffei to regulate these morphogenetic processes. This was confirmed by assessing the amount of phosphorylated SakA in the ΔsskA mutant, antifungal resistance due to a lack of SakA activation, and the ability of a constitutively active sakA allele (sakA(F316L) ) to suppress the ΔsskA mutant phenotypes. We conclude that SskA regulates morphogenesis and osmotic stress adaptation in T. marneffei via phosphorylation of the SakA MAPK of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway. IMPORTANCE This is the first study in a dimorphic fungal pathogen to investigate the role of a response regulator downstream of two-component signaling systems and its connection to the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway. This study will inspire further research into the

  20. Two-Component Signaling Regulates Osmotic Stress Adaptation via SskA and the High-Osmolarity Glycerol MAPK Pathway in the Human Pathogen Talaromyces marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Cunwei; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT For successful infection to occur, a pathogen must be able to evade or tolerate the host’s defense systems. This requires the pathogen to first recognize the host environment and then signal this response to elicit a complex adaptive program in order to activate its own defense strategies. In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, two-component signaling systems are utilized to sense and respond to changes in the external environment. The hybrid histidine kinases (HHKs) at the start of the two-component signaling pathway have been well characterized in human pathogens. However, how these HHKs regulate processes downstream currently remains unclear. This study describes the role of a response regulator downstream of these HHKs, sskA, in Talaromyces marneffei, a dimorphic human pathogen. sskA is required for asexual reproduction, hyphal morphogenesis, cell wall integrity, osmotic adaptation, and the morphogenesis of yeast cells both in vitro at 37°C and during macrophage infection, but not during dimorphic switching. Comparison of the ΔsskA mutant with a strain in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway (SakA) has been deleted suggests that SskA acts upstream of this pathway in T. marneffei to regulate these morphogenetic processes. This was confirmed by assessing the amount of phosphorylated SakA in the ΔsskA mutant, antifungal resistance due to a lack of SakA activation, and the ability of a constitutively active sakA allele (sakAF316L) to suppress the ΔsskA mutant phenotypes. We conclude that SskA regulates morphogenesis and osmotic stress adaptation in T. marneffei via phosphorylation of the SakA MAPK of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway. IMPORTANCE This is the first study in a dimorphic fungal pathogen to investigate the role of a response regulator downstream of two-component signaling systems and its connection to the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway. This study will inspire further research into

  1. Transcription levels of CHS5 and CHS4 genes in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis mycelial phase, respond to alterations in external osmolarity, oxidative stress and glucose concentration.

    PubMed

    Niño-Vega, Gustavo A; Sorais, Françoise; San-Blas, Gioconda

    2009-10-01

    The complete sequence of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis CHS5 gene, encoding a putative chitin synthase revealed a 5583nt open reading frame, interrupted by three introns of 82, 87 and 97bp (GenBank Accession No EF654132). The deduced protein contains 1861 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 206.9kDa. Both its large size and the presence of a N-terminal region of approx. 800 residues with a characteristic putative myosin motor-like domain, allow us to include PbrChs5 into class V fungal chitin synthases. Sequence analysis of over 4kb from the 5' UTR region in CHS5, revealed the presence of a previously reported CHS4 gene in P. brasiliensis, arranged in a head-to-head configuration with CHS5. A motif search in this shared region showed the presence of stress response elements (STREs), three binding sites for the transcription activators Rlm1p (known to be stimulated by hypo-osmotic stress) and clusters of Adr1 (related to glucose repression). A quantitative RT-PCR analysis pointed to changes in transcription levels for both genes following oxidative stress, alteration of external osmolarity and under glucose-repressible conditions, suggesting a common regulatory mechanism of transcription. PMID:19616626

  2. Heat stress activates the yeast high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and protein tyrosine phosphatases are essential under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Astrid; Arkind, Christopher; Mattison, Christopher P; Burkholder, Anne; Knoche, Kathryn; Ota, Irene

    2002-04-01

    The yeast high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been characterized as being activated solely by osmotic stress. In this work, we show that the Hog1 MAPK is also activated by heat stress and that Sho1, previously identified as a membrane-bound osmosensor, is required for heat stress activation of Hog1. The two-component signaling protein, Sln1, the second osmosensor in the HOG pathway, was not involved in heat stress activation of Hog1, suggesting that the Sho1 and Sln1 sensors discriminate between stresses. The possible function of Hog1 activation during heat stress was examined, and it was found that the hog1 delta strain does not recover as rapidly from heat stress as well as the wild type. It was also found that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) Ptp2 and Ptp3, which inactivate Hog1, have two functions during heat stress. First, they are essential for survival at elevated temperatures, preventing lethality due to Hog1 hyperactivation. Second, they block inappropriate cross talk between the HOG and the cell wall integrity MAPK pathways, suggesting that PTPs are important for maintaining specificity in MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:12455951

  3. Heat Stress Activates the Yeast High-Osmolarity Glycerol Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway, and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Are Essential under Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Astrid; Arkind, Christopher; Mattison, Christopher P.; Burkholder, Anne; Knoche, Kathryn; Ota, Irene

    2002-01-01

    The yeast high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been characterized as being activated solely by osmotic stress. In this work, we show that the Hog1 MAPK is also activated by heat stress and that Sho1, previously identified as a membrane-bound osmosensor, is required for heat stress activation of Hog1. The two-component signaling protein, Sln1, the second osmosensor in the HOG pathway, was not involved in heat stress activation of Hog1, suggesting that the Sho1 and Sln1 sensors discriminate between stresses. The possible function of Hog1 activation during heat stress was examined, and it was found that the hog1Δ strain does not recover as rapidly from heat stress as well as the wild type. It was also found that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) Ptp2 and Ptp3, which inactivate Hog1, have two functions during heat stress. First, they are essential for survival at elevated temperatures, preventing lethality due to Hog1 hyperactivation. Second, they block inappropriate cross talk between the HOG and the cell wall integrity MAPK pathways, suggesting that PTPs are important for maintaining specificity in MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:12455951

  4. Salt-sensitivity of σ(H) and Spo0A prevents sporulation of Bacillus subtilis at high osmolarity avoiding death during cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Widderich, Nils; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Commichau, Fabian M; Fischer, Kathleen E; Ramirez-Guadiana, Fernando H; Rudner, David Z; Bremer, Erhard

    2016-04-01

    The spore-forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis frequently experiences high osmolarity as a result of desiccation in the soil. The formation of a highly desiccation-resistant endospore might serve as a logical osmostress escape route when vegetative growth is no longer possible. However, sporulation efficiency drastically decreases concomitant with an increase in the external salinity. Fluorescence microscopy of sporulation-specific promoter fusions to gfp revealed that high salinity blocks entry into the sporulation pathway at a very early stage. Specifically, we show that both Spo0A- and SigH-dependent transcription are impaired. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the association of SigH with core RNA polymerase is reduced under these conditions. Suppressors that modestly increase sporulation efficiency at high salinity map to the coding region of sigH and in the regulatory region of kinA, encoding one the sensor kinases that activates Spo0A. These findings led us to discover that B. subtilis cells that overproduce KinA can bypass the salt-imposed block in sporulation. Importantly, these cells are impaired in the morphological process of engulfment and late forespore gene expression and frequently undergo lysis. Altogether our data indicate that B. subtilis blocks entry into sporulation in high-salinity environments preventing commitment to a developmental program that it cannot complete. PMID:26712348

  5. Extracellular osmolarity regulates matrix homeostasis in the intervertebral disc and articular cartilage: evolving role of TonEBP.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Zariel I; Shapiro, Irving M; Risbud, Makarand V

    2014-11-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is characterized by changes in proteoglycan status, loss of bound water molecules, decreased tissue osmotic pressure and a resulting mechanical failure of the disc. A similar spectrum of changes is evident in osteoarthritic articular cartilage. When healthy, resident cells in these skeletal tissues respond to applied mechanical loads by regulating their own osmotic state and the hydration of the extracellular matrix. The transcription factor Tonicity-Responsive Enhancer Binding Protein (TonEBP or NFAT5) is known to mediate the osmoadaptive response in these and other tissues. While the molecular basis of how osmotic loading controls matrix homeostasis is not completely understood, TonEBP regulates the expression of aggrecan and β1,3-glucoronosyltransferase in nucleus pulposus cells, in addition to targets that allow for survival under hypertonic stress. Moreover, in chondrocytes, TonEBP controls expression of several collagen subtypes and Sox9, a master regulator of aggrecan and collagen II expression. Thus, TonEBP-mediated regulation of the matrix composition allows disc cells and chondrocytes to modify the extracellular osmotic state itself. On the other hand, TonEBP in immune cells induces expression of TNF-α, ΙL-6 and MCP-1, pro-inflammatory molecules closely linked to matrix catabolism and pathogenesis of both disc degeneration and osteoarthritis, warranting investigations of this aspect of TonEBP function in skeletal cells. In summary, the TonEBP system, through its effects on extracellular matrix and osmoregulatory genes can be viewed primarily as a protective or homeostatic response to physiological loading. PMID:25172826

  6. A single point mutation in the listerial betL σ(A)-dependent promoter leads to improved osmo- and chill-tolerance and a morphological shift at elevated osmolarity.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Roland F; McLernon, Susan; Feeney, Audrey; Hill, Colin; Sleator, Roy D

    2013-01-01

    Betaine uptake in Listeria monocytogenes is mediated by three independent transport systems, the simplest of which in genetic terms is the secondary transporter BetL. Using a random mutagenesis approach, based on the E. coli XL1 Red mutator strain, we identified a single point mutation in a putative promoter region upstream of the BetL coding region which leads to a significant increase in betL transcript levels under osmo- and chill-stress conditions and a concomitant increase in stress tolerance. Furthermore, the mutation appears to counter the heretofore unreported "twisted" cell morphology observed for L. monocytogenes grown at elevated osmolarities in tryptone soy broth. PMID:23478432

  7. A single point mutation in the listerial betL σA-dependent promoter leads to improved osmo- and chill-tolerance and a morphological shift at elevated osmolarity

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Roland F; McLernon, Susan; Feeney, Audrey; Hill, Colin; Sleator, Roy D

    2013-01-01

    Betaine uptake in Listeria monocytogenes is mediated by three independent transport systems, the simplest of which in genetic terms is the secondary transporter BetL. Using a random mutagenesis approach, based on the E. coli XL1 Red mutator strain, we identified a single point mutation in a putative promoter region upstream of the BetL coding region which leads to a significant increase in betL transcript levels under osmo- and chill-stress conditions and a concomitant increase in stress tolerance. Furthermore, the mutation appears to counter the heretofore unreported “twisted” cell morphology observed for L. monocytogenes grown at elevated osmolarities in tryptone soy broth. PMID:23478432

  8. Protein kinase FgSch9 serves as a mediator of the target of rapamycin and high osmolarity glycerol pathways and regulates multiple stress responses and secondary metabolism in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qin; Zhang, Chengqi; Yu, Fangwei; Yin, Yanni; Shim, Won-Bo; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein kinase Sch9 is one of the downstream effectors of the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 1 and plays multiple roles in stress resistance, longevity and nutrient sensing. However, the functions of Sch9 orthologs in filamentous fungi, particularly in pathogenic species, have not been characterized to date. Here, we investigated biological and genetic functions of FgSch9 in Fusarium graminearum. The FgSCH9 deletion mutant (ΔFgSch9) was defective in aerial hyphal growth, hyphal branching and conidial germination. The mutant exhibited increased sensitivity to osmotic and oxidative stresses, cell wall-damaging agents, and to rapamycin, while showing increased thermal tolerance. We identified FgMaf1 as one of the FgSch9-interacting proteins that plays an important role in regulating mycotoxin biosynthesis and virulence of F. graminearum. Co-immunoprecipitation and affinity capture-mass spectrometry assays showed that FgSch9 also interacts with FgTor and FgHog1. More importantly, both ΔFgSch9 and FgHog1 null mutant (ΔFgHog1) exhibited increased sensitivity to osmotic and oxidative stresses. This defect was more severe in the FgSch9/FgHog1 double mutant. Taken together, we propose that FgSch9 serves as a mediator of the TOR and high osmolarity glycerol pathways, and regulates vegetative differentiation, multiple stress responses and secondary metabolism in F. graminearum. PMID:24903410

  9. Response of isolated rat liver mitochondria to variation of external osmolarity in KCl medium: regulation of matrix volume and oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Devin, A; Guérin, B; Rigoulet, M

    1997-12-01

    When isolated rat liver mitochondria are incubated in KCI medium, matrix volume, flux, and forces in both hypo- and hyperosmolarity are time-dependent. In hypoosmotic KCl medium, matrix volume is regulated via the K+/H+ exchanger. In hyperosmotic medium, the volume is regulated in such a manner that at steady state, which is reached within 4 min, it is maintained whatever the hyperosmolarity. This regulation is Pi- and deltamuH+-dependent, indicating Pi-K salt entry into the matrix. Under steady state, hyperosmolarity has no effect on isolated rat liver mitochondria energetic parameters such as respiratory rate, proton electrochemical potential difference, and oxidative phosphorylation yield. Hypoosmolarity decreases the NADH/NAD+ ratio, state 3 respiratory rate, and deltamuH+, while oxidative phosphorylation yield is not significantly modified. This indicates kinetic control upstream the respiratory chain. This study points out the key role of potassium on the regulation of matrix volume, flux, and forces. Indeed, while matrix volume is regulated in NaCl hyperosmotic medium, flux and force restoration in hyperosmotic medium occurs only in the presence of external potassium. PMID:9559859

  10. Protein quality control in the bacterial periplasm.

    PubMed

    Merdanovic, Melisa; Clausen, Tim; Kaiser, Markus; Huber, Robert; Ehrmann, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Protein quality control involves sensing and treatment of defective or incomplete protein structures. Misfolded or mislocalized proteins trigger dedicated signal transduction cascades that upregulate the production of protein quality-control factors. Corresponding proteases and chaperones either degrade or repair damaged proteins, thereby reducing the level of aggregation-prone molecules. Because the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria is particularly exposed to environmental changes and respective protein-folding stresses connected with the presence of detergents, low or high osmolarity of the medium, elevated temperatures, and the host's immune response, fine-tuned protein quality control systems are essential for survival under these unfavorable conditions. This review discusses recent advances in the identification and characterization of the key cellular factors and the emerging general principles of the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:21639788

  11. Remote ischemic preconditioning to reduce contrast-induced nephropathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing use of pre- and posthydration protocols and low-osmolar instead of high-osmolar iodine-containing contrast media, the incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is still significant. There is evidence that contrast media cause ischemia-reperfusion injury of the medulla. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is a non-invasive, safe, and low-cost method to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury. Methods The RIPCIN study is a multicenter, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial in which 76 patients at risk of CIN will receive standard hydration combined with RIPC or hydration with sham preconditioning. RIPC will be applied by four cycles of 5 min ischemia and 5 min reperfusion of the forearm by inflating a blood pressure cuff at 50 mmHg above the actual systolic pressure. The primary outcome measure will be the change in serum creatinine from baseline to 48 to 72 h after contrast administration. Discussion A recent pilot study reported that RIPC reduced the incidence of CIN after coronary angioplasty. The unusual high incidence of CIN in this study is of concern and limits its generalizability. Therefore, we propose a randomized controlled trial to study whether RIPC reduces contrast-induced kidney injury in patients at risk for CIN according to the Dutch guidelines. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN76496973 PMID:24721127

  12. Stable Ultrathin-Shell Double Emulsions for Controlled Release.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Xia; Chen, Dong; Hui, Yue; Weitz, David A; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2016-06-01

    Double emulsions are normally considered as metastable systems and this limit in stability restricts their applications. To enhance their stability, the outer shell can be converted into a mechanically strong layer, for example, a polymeric layer, thus allowing improved performance. This conversion can be problematic for food and drug applications, as a toxic solvent is needed to dissolve the polymer in the middle phase and a high temperature is required to remove the solvent. This process can also be highly complex, for example, involving UV initiation of polymeric monomer crosslinking. In this study, we report the formation of biocompatible, water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) double emulsions with an ultrathin layer of fish oil. We demonstrate their application for the encapsulation and controlled release of small hydrophilic molecules. Without a trigger, the double emulsions remained stable for months, and the release of small molecules was extremely slow. In contrast, rapid release was achieved by osmolarity shock, leading to complete release within 2 h. This work demonstrates the significant potential of double emulsions, and provides new insights into their stability and practical applications. PMID:26934572

  13. Signal Transduction and Regulatory Mechanisms Involved in Control of the σS (RpoS) Subunit of RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Hengge-Aronis, Regine

    2002-01-01

    The σS (RpoS) subunit of RNA polymerase is the master regulator of the general stress response in Escherichia coli and related bacteria. While rapidly growing cells contain very little σS, exposure to many different stress conditions results in rapid and strong σS induction. Consequently, transcription of numerous σS-dependent genes is activated, many of which encode gene products with stress-protective functions. Multiple signal integration in the control of the cellular σS level is achieved by rpoS transcriptional and translational control as well as by regulated σS proteolysis, with various stress conditions differentially affecting these levels of σS control. Thus, a reduced growth rate results in increased rpoS transcription whereas high osmolarity, low temperature, acidic pH, and some late-log-phase signals stimulate the translation of already present rpoS mRNA. In addition, carbon starvation, high osmolarity, acidic pH, and high temperature result in stabilization of σS, which, under nonstress conditions, is degraded with a half-life of one to several minutes. Important cis-regulatory determinants as well as trans-acting regulatory factors involved at all levels of σS regulation have been identified. rpoS translation is controlled by several proteins (Hfq and HU) and small regulatory RNAs that probably affect the secondary structure of rpoS mRNA. For σS proteolysis, the response regulator RssB is essential. RssB is a specific direct σS recognition factor, whose affinity for σS is modulated by phosphorylation of its receiver domain. RssB delivers σS to the ClpXP protease, where σS is unfolded and completely degraded. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the molecular functions and interactions of these components and tries to establish a framework for further research on the mode of multiple signal input into this complex regulatory system. PMID:12208995

  14. Analysis of transcriptional control mechanisms of capsule expression in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Von Loewenich, F D; Wintermeyer, E; Dümig, M; Frosch, M

    2001-11-01

    The major virulence factor which contributes to the survival of Neisseria meningitidis in the blood stream and the cerebrospinal fluid is the capsular polysaccharide. Expression of the capsule genes of N. meningitidis serogroups B, C, W-135 and Y is controlled by an intergenic region separating the capsule biosynthesis operon (siaA-D) and the capsule transport operon (ctrA-D). To further investigate capsule expression in N. meningitidis we amplified and sequenced the intergenic region of 42 meningococcal isolates of different serogroups. Sequence variations were found mainly in a repeat region preceding the siaA start codon. Correlation between sequence variation and serogroup could not be observed. To measure the transcriptional and translational activity of the respective intergenic regions we performed transcriptional and translational fusions with the lacZ gene integrated into the chromosome of N. meningitidis. Sequence variations preceding the siaA start codon had no effect on beta-galactosidase activity. Different in vitro growth conditions such as temperature, glucose concentration, osmolarity, pH and iron concentration also did not influence beta-galactosidase activity. Sequential deletions of the intergenic region showed that an Up-like element adjacent to the predicted -35 box is necessary for full transcriptional activity. The deletion of the untranslated region preceding the siaA start codon led to a threefold higher beta-galactosidase activity compared with the full-length construct suggesting that the respective region may be involved in capsule regulation. PMID:11727820

  15. Control of erythropoiesis after high altitude acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Savourey, Gustave; Launay, Jean-Claude; Besnard, Yves; Guinet, Angélique; Bourrilhon, Cyprien; Cabane, Damien; Martin, Serge; Caravel, Jean-Pierre; Péquignot, Jean-Marc; Cottet-Emard, Jean-Marie

    2004-10-01

    Erythropoiesis was studied in 11 subjects submitted to a 4-h hypoxia (HH) in a hypobaric chamber (4,500 m, barometric pressure 58.9 kPa) both before and after a 3-week sojourn in the Andes. On return to sea level, increased red blood cells (+3.27%), packed cell volume (+4.76%), haemoglobin (+6.55%) ( P<0.05), and increased arterial partial pressure of oxygen (+8.56%), arterial oxygen saturation (+7.40%) and arterial oxygen blood content ( C(a)O(2)) (+12.93%) at the end of HH ( P<0.05) attested high altitude acclimatization. Reticulocytes increased during HH after the sojourn only (+36.8% vs +17.9%, P<0.01) indicating a probable higher reticulocyte release and/or production despite decreased serum erythropoietin (EPO) concentrations (-46%, P<0.01). Hormones (thyroid, catecholamines and cortisol), iron status (serum iron, ferritin, transferrin and haptoglobin) and renal function (creatinine, renal, osmolar and free-water clearances) did not significantly vary (except for lower thyroid stimulating hormone at sea level, P<0.01). Levels of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) increased throughout HH on return (+14.7%, P<0.05) and an inverse linear relationship was found between 2,3-DPG and EPO at the end of HH after the sojourn only ( r=-0.66, P<0.03). Inverse linear relationships were also found between C(a)O(2) and EPO at the end of HH before ( r=-0.63, P<0.05) and after the sojourn ( r=-0.60, P=0.05) with identical slopes but different ordinates at the origin, suggesting that the sensitivity but not the gain of the EPO response to hypoxia was modified by altitude acclimatization. Higher 2,3-DPG levels could partly explain this decreased sensitivity of the EPO response to hypoxia. In conclusion, we show that altitude acclimatization modifies the control of erythropoiesis not only at sea level, but also during a subsequent hypoxia. PMID:15248067

  16. Pyp1 and Pyp2 PTPases dephosphorylate an osmosensing MAP kinase controlling cell size at division in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Millar, J B; Buck, V; Wilkinson, M G

    1995-09-01

    Simultaneous inactivation of pyp1 and pyp2 PTPases in fission yeast leads to aberrant cell morphology and growth arrest. Spontaneous recessive mutations that bypass the requirement for pyp1 and pyp2 and reside in two complementation groups were isolated, sty1 and sty2. sty1- and sty2- mutant cells are substantially delayed in the timing of mitotic initiation. We have isolated the sty1 gene, which encodes a MAP kinase that is closely related to a subfamily of MAP kinases regulated by osmotic stress including Saccharomyces cervisiae HOG1 and human CSBP1. We find that sty2 is allelic to the wis1 MAP kinase kinase and that delta sty1 and delta wis1 cells are unable to grow in high osmolarity medium. Osmotic stress induces both tyrosine phosphorylation of Sty1 and a reduction in cell size at division. Pyp2 associates with and tyrosine dephosphorylates Sty1 in vitro. We find that wis1-dependent induction of pyp2 mRNA is responsible for tyrosine dephosphorylation of Sty1 in vivo on prolonged exposure to osmotic stress. We conclude that Pyp1 and Pyp2 are tyrosine-specific MAP kinase phosphatases that inactivate an osmoregulated MAP kinase, Sty1, which acts downstream of the Wis1 MAP kinase kinase to control cell size at division in fission yeast. PMID:7657164

  17. Water-balance response of Rhinella arenarum (Hensel, 1867) tadpoles to graduated increase in environmental osmolarity.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L; de la Torre, F R; Salibián, A

    2010-02-01

    The water balance and the upper limit of osmotic tolerance of premetamorphic Rhinella arenarum larvae (Gosner's stage 26) was evaluated after semistatic incubation in electrolyte (NaCl) and non-electrolyte (mannitol) media following a protocol of progressively increased osmotic pressure. Wet and dry weights were measured to calculate the water content as a derived variable indicative of the hydric balance. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate and integrated multivariate analysis. Tadpoles survived in electrolyte and non-electrolyte solutions up to 200 mOsm. The discriminant function was the best tool to describe the responses of the animals to external environmental stress under experimental conditions. The results were compared with those obtained in previous studies using a protocol of acute exposure to the same media used in this study. It was concluded that a) multivariate analysis is an appropriate approach to describe the responses of tadpoles to changes in the environmental physicochemical parameters, and b) progressive and acute acclimation to the experimental solutions induced similar responses. PMID:20231975

  18. Response of Leptospira interrogans to Physiologic Osmolarity: Relevance in Signaling the Environment-to-Host Transition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmission of pathogenic Leptospira between mammalian hosts usually involves dissemination via soil or water contaminated by the urine of reservoir hosts. The ability of Leptospira to adapt to the variety of conditions found inside and outside of the host is reflected in the relatively large geno...

  19. Silymarin for the Prevention of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy: A Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sedighifard, Zohreh; Roghani, Farshad; Bidram, Peyman; Harandi, Samaneh Aalami; Molavi, Safieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Silymarin is a flavonoid complex with nephro-protective properties. We evaluated the efficacy of silymarin in the prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). Methods: This placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 143 patients with chronic stable angina referring for elective coronary angiography. Patients with low to moderate risk for CIN were included and were randomized to receive silymarin (280 mg) or placebo 2 h before administration of the contrast material. A nonionic, iso-osmolar contrast material was used. Serum creatinine was measured before and 48 h after injection of the contrast material. CIN was defined as an increase in creatinine of ≥0.5 mg/dL or ≥25% from the baseline. Results: Serum creatinine was increased by 0.02 ± 0.07 mg/dL (P = 0.004) with silymarin and by 0.04 ± 0.15 mg/dL (P = 0.008) with placebo after contrast material injection (between group difference = 0.01 ± 0.02 mg/dL, P = 0.881). CIN was occurred less frequently, though statistically nonsignificant, with silymarin compared with placebo (2.9% vs. 10.8%, Odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 0.246 [0.050–1.203], P = 0.099). In the logistic regression analysis controlling for patients characteristics and baseline creatinine level, silymarin was nonsignificantly associated with lower frequency of CIN (OR [95% CI] = 0.203 [0.037–1.117], P = 0.067). Conclusions: We found a trend toward the efficacy of silymarin in preventing contrast-induced renal dysfunction. Further trials with larger sample size and in patients with higher risk of CIN are warranted. PMID:26941924

  20. AQP and the control of fluid transport in a salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Murakami, M; Murdiastuti, K; Hosoi, K; Hill, A E

    2006-03-01

    Experiments were performed with the perfused rat submandibular gland in vitro to investigate the nature of the coupling between transported salt and water by varying the osmolarity of the source bath and observing the changes in secretory volume flow. Glands were submitted to hypertonic step changes by changing the saline perfusate to one containing different levels of sucrose. The flow rate responded by falling to a lower value, establishing a new steady-state flow. The rate changes did not correspond to those expected from a system in which fluid production is due to simple osmotic equilibration, but were much larger. The changes were fitted to a model in which fluid production is largely paracellular, the rate of which is controlled by an osmosensor system in the basal membrane. The same experiments were done with glands from rats that had been bred to have very low levels of AQP5 (the principal aquaporin of the salivary acinar cell) in which little AQP5 is expressed at the basal membrane. In these rats, salivary secretion rates after hypertonic challenges were small and best modelled by simple osmotic equilibration. In rats which had intermediate AQP5 levels the changes in flow rate were similar to those of normal rats although their AQP5 levels were reduced.Finally, perfused normal glands were subject to retrograde ductal injection of salines containing different levels of Hg(2+) ions (0, 10 and 100 microM: ) which would act as inhibitors of AQP5 at the apical acinar membrane. The overall flow rates were progressively diminished with rising Hg(2+) concentration, but after hypertonic challenge the changes in flow rates were unchanged and similar to those of normal rats. All these results are difficult to explain by a cellular osmotic model but can be explained by a model in which paracellular flow is controlled by an osmosensor (presumably AQP5) present on the basal membrane. PMID:16868676

  1. Dream controller

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L; Wang, Qiang; Chow, Andrew J

    2013-11-26

    A method and apparatus for intelligently controlling continuous process variables. A Dream Controller comprises an Intelligent Engine mechanism and a number of Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controllers, each of which is suitable to control a process with specific behaviors. The Intelligent Engine can automatically select the appropriate MFA controller and its parameters so that the Dream Controller can be easily used by people with limited control experience and those who do not have the time to commission, tune, and maintain automatic controllers.

  2. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional control of cable pilus gene expression in Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    PubMed

    Tomich, Mladen; Mohr, Christian D

    2004-02-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an important member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of closely related bacteria that inhabits a wide variety of environmental niches in nature and that also colonizes the lungs of compromised humans. Certain strains of B. cenocepacia express peritrichous adherence organelles known as cable pili, thought to be important in the colonization of the lower respiratory tract. The genetic locus required for cable pilus biogenesis is comprised of at least five genes, designated cblB, cblA, cblC, cblD, and cblS. In this study a transcriptional analysis of cbl gene expression was undertaken. The principal promoter, located upstream of the cbl locus, was identified and characterized. By using lacZ transcriptional fusions, the effects of multiple environmental cues on cbl gene expression were examined. High osmolarity, temperature of 37 degrees C, acidic pH, and low iron bioavailability were found to induce cbl gene expression. Northern hybridization analysis of the cbl locus identified a single, stable transcript corresponding to cblA, encoding the major pilin subunit. Transcriptional fusion studies combined with reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that the stable cblA transcript is the product of an mRNA processing event. This event may ensure high levels of expression of the major pilin, relative to other components of the assembly pathway. Our findings lend further insight into the control of cable pilus biogenesis in B. cenocepacia and provide evidence for regulation of cbl gene expression on both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. PMID:14761995

  3. Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    Birth control, also known as contraception, is designed to prevent pregnancy. Birth control methods may work in a number of different ... eggs that could be fertilized. Types include birth control pills, patches, shots, vaginal rings, and emergency contraceptive ...

  4. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher),more » devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.« less

  5. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Marcia

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher), devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.

  6. All-trans retinol and retinol-binding protein from embryonic cerebrospinal fluid exhibit dynamic behaviour during early central nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Bueno, David

    2008-06-11

    Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) is involved in the regulation of survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of neuroectodermal progenitor cells, as well as in the control of mesencephalic gene expression in collaboration with the isthmic organizer. Recently, we showed the presence of retinol-binding protein (RBP) within the E-CSF proteome. RBP is an all-trans retinol carrier, a molecule that can be metabolized into retinoic acid, a morphogen involved in central nervous system (CNS) morphogenesis and patterning. Here we demonstrate the presence of all-trans retinol within the E-CSF and analyse the dynamics of RBP and all-trans retinol within this fluid, as well as the expression of retinoic acid-synthesizing enzymes during early CNS development. Our results suggest a relationship between the dynamics of these molecules and the early events of CNS patterning. PMID:18520998

  7. Rodent Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Journal of Adult Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Strategies for rodent control in crop fields, threshing yards, and rural residential areas are presented together with an operational plan for implementing a program for rodent control at the national level. Training personnel in rodent control procedures and procedures for educating the public in the necessity for control are covered. (EC)

  8. Propulsion controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkney, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Increased system requirements and functional integration with the aircraft have placed an increased demand on control system capability and reliability. To provide these at an affordable cost and weight and because of the rapid advances in electronic technology, hydromechanical systems are being phased out in favor of digital electronic systems. The transition is expected to be orderly from electronic trimming of hydromechanical controls to full authority digital electronic control. Future propulsion system controls will be highly reliable full authority digital electronic with selected component and circuit redundancy to provide the required safety and reliability. Redundancy may include a complete backup control of a different technology for single engine applications. The propulsion control will be required to communicate rapidly with the various flight and fire control avionics as part of an integrated control concept.

  9. Weight Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... obese. Achieving a healthy weight can help you control your cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar. It ... use more calories than you eat. A weight-control strategy might include Choosing low-fat, low-calorie ...

  10. Controlling Fertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnay, France

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in fertility control are presented in relation to the global demographic situation. Discussion focuses on changes in scientific knowledge and concepts that have shifted the focus from birth control to planned parenthood to the notion of controlled fertility. The place of family planning programs, including their socioeconomic…

  11. Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... to have sex makes sense Talking to your parents about sex Deciding about sex Birth control Types of birth control Could I get pregnant ... not planned. Some young people are afraid their parents will find out they’re having sex. If you get birth control from a doctor, ask about keeping the information ...

  12. Restructurable Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, R. J. (Compiler); Howell, W. E. (Compiler); Bundick, W. T. (Compiler); Ostroff, A. J. (Compiler); Hueschen, R. M. (Compiler); Belcastro, C. M. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Restructurable control system theory, robust reconfiguration for high reliability and survivability for advanced aircraft, restructurable controls problem definition and research, experimentation, system identification methods applied to aircraft, a self-repairing digital flight control system, and state-of-the-art theory application are addressed.

  13. Controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-05-18

    Essential facts Controlled drugs are defined and governed by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and associated regulations. Examples of controlled drugs include morphine, pethidine and methadone. Since 2012, appropriately qualified nurses and midwives can prescribe controlled drugs for medical conditions within their competence. There are some exceptions when treating addiction. PMID:27191427

  14. Weed control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uncontrolled weeds in pepper can result in the total loss of the crop, or make harvest not economically feasible. Weed control is a major challenge in conventional and organic production systems. Agricultural weed control costs the U.S. economy more than the cost of insect and disease control comb...

  15. Mitochondria to nucleus signaling and the role of ceramide in its integration into the suite of cell quality control processes during aging.

    PubMed

    Jazwinski, S M

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria to nucleus signaling has been the most extensively studied mode of inter-organelle communication. The first signaling pathway in this category of information transfer to be discovered was the retrograde response, with its own set of signal transduction proteins. The finding that this pathway compensates for mitochondrial dysfunction to extend the replicative lifespan of yeast cells has generated additional impetus for its study. This research has demonstrated crosstalk between the retrograde response and the target of rapamycin (TOR), small GTPase RAS, and high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathways in yeast, all of which are key players in replicative lifespan. More recently, the retrograde response has been implicated in the diauxic shift and survival in stationary phase, extending its operation to the yeast chronological lifespan as well. In this capacity, the retrograde response may cooperate with other, related mitochondria to nucleus signaling pathways. Counterparts of the retrograde response are found in the roundworm, the fruit fly, the mouse, and even in human cells in tissue culture. The exciting realization that the retrograde response is embedded in the network of cellular quality control processes has emerged over the past few years. Most strikingly, it is closely integrated with autophagy and the selective brand of this quality control process, mitophagy. This coordination depends on TOR, and it engages ceramide/sphingolipid signaling. The yeast LAG1 ceramide synthase gene was the first longevity gene cloned as such, and its orthologs hyl-1 and hyl-2 determine worm lifespan. Thus, the involvement of ceramide signaling in quality control gives these findings cellular context. The retrograde response and ceramide are essential components of a lifespan maintenance process that likely evolved as a cytoprotective mechanism to defend the organism from diverse stressors. PMID:25555678

  16. Voltage Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Power Efficiency Corporation, specifically formed to manufacture and develop products from NASA technology, has a license to a three-phase power factor controller originally developed by Frank Nola, an engineer at Marshall Space Flight Center. Power Efficiency and two major distributors, Performance Control and Edison Power Technologies, use the electronic control boards to assemble three different motor controllers: Power Commander, Performance Controller, and Energy Master. The company Power Factor Controller reduces excessive energy waste in AC induction motors. It is used in industries and applications where motors operate under variable loads, including elevators and escalators, machine tools, intake and exhaust fans, oil wells, conveyors, pumps, die casting, and compressors. Customer lists include companies such as May Department Stores, Caesars Atlantic City, Ford Motors, and American Axle.

  17. Control Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Real-Time Innovations, Inc. (RTI) collaborated with Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Stanford University to leverage NASA research to produce ControlShell software. RTI is the first "graduate" of Ames Research Center's Technology Commercialization Center. The ControlShell system was used extensively on a cooperative project to enhance the capabilities of a Russian-built Marsokhod rover being evaluated for eventual flight to Mars. RTI's ControlShell is complex, real-time command and control software, capable of processing information and controlling mechanical devices. One ControlShell tool is StethoScope. As a real-time data collection and display tool, StethoScope allows a user to see how a program is running without changing its execution. RTI has successfully applied its software savvy in other arenas, such as telecommunications, networking, video editing, semiconductor manufacturing, automobile systems, and medical imaging.

  18. Attitude Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to ITHACO, Inc. satisfied a Goddard Space Flight Center demand for a low cost altitude control system for small spacecraft. The SBIR-sponsored work resulted in the T-Wheel, built specifically for altitude control of small and medium-sized spacecraft. Another product, the T-SCANWHEEL, reduces overall system cost, minimizes mass and power and enhances reliability with a mixture of altitude control and control capacity. Additionally, the Type E Wheel is built for use on medium to large spacecraft. Through July 1996, ITHACO had delivered or was under contract for 95 T-Wheel, T-SCANWHEEL, and Type E Wheel units.

  19. Environmental Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneiderman, Helen, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental control units, or ECUs, are devices or systems which allow for alternate access to electronic or electrical devices and those objects, like draperies and doors, which may be adapted for use with electricity. Such devices offer the person with a mobility limitation the opportunity to control his or her environment, thus enhancing the…

  20. Pressure Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    EPIC is Electronic Pressure Indicating Controller produced by North American Manufacturing Company. It is a high-sensitivity device for improving combustion efficiency in industrial furnaces that interprets a signal from a pressure transducer on a furnace and regulates furnace pressure accordingly. A controller can provide savings of from five to 25 percent of an industrial user's annual furnace fuel bill.

  1. Contamination control

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, L.C.

    1983-11-01

    An evaluation showed that fluoropolymer plastic squeeze bottles can replace polyethylene bottles when used for in-process cleaning. Fluoropolymer plastic squeeze bottles do not contaminate solvents stored in the bottles as polyethylene bottles do. In addition, a limited survey of industrial practices regarding aerosol spray container control showed containers are being controlled without inconveniencing production.

  2. Control Charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Michael; Gluschke, Michael

    Control Charts may be the most powerful tool to demonstrate and to assure quality in chemical measurements. Therefore they are widely used in all kinds of laboratories and it is hard to imagine quality management systems in laboratories without control charts.

  3. Power Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The power factor controller (PFC) senses shifts in the relationship between voltage and current, and matches them with a motor's need. This prevents waste as motors do not need a high voltage when they are not operating at full load conditions. PFC is manufactured by Nordic Controls Company, among others, and has proved extremely cost effective.

  4. Control Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toso, Robert B.

    2000-01-01

    Inspired by William Glasser's Reality Therapy ideas, Control Theory (CT) is a disciplinary approach that stresses people's ability to control only their own behavior, based on internal motivations to satisfy five basic needs. At one North Dakota high school, CT-trained teachers are the program's best recruiters. (MLH)

  5. Controller for thermostatically controlled loads

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Ning; Zhang, Yu; Du, Pengwei; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2016-06-07

    A system and method of controlling aggregated thermostatically controlled appliances (TCAs) for demand response is disclosed. A targeted load profile is formulated and a forecasted load profile is generated. The TCAs within an "on" or "off" control group are prioritized based on their operating temperatures. The "on" or "off" status of the TCAs is determined. Command signals are sent to turn on or turn off the TCAs.

  6. Controlling chimeras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, Christian; Martens, Erik A.

    2015-03-01

    Coupled phase oscillators model a variety of dynamical phenomena in nature and technological applications. Non-local coupling gives rise to chimera states which are characterized by a distinct part of phase-synchronized oscillators while the remaining ones move incoherently. Here, we apply the idea of control to chimera states: using gradient dynamics to exploit drift of a chimera, it will attain any desired target position. Through control, chimera states become functionally relevant; for example, the controlled position of localized synchrony may encode information and perform computations. Since functional aspects are crucial in (neuro-)biology and technology, the localized synchronization of a chimera state becomes accessible to develop novel applications. Based on gradient dynamics, our control strategy applies to any suitable observable and can be generalized to arbitrary dimensions. Thus, the applicability of chimera control goes beyond chimera states in non-locally coupled systems.

  7. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.; Ross, H.V.

    1958-11-18

    A control rod is described for a nuclear reactor. In certaln reactor designs it becomes desirable to use a control rod having great width but relatively llttle thickness. This patent is addressed to such a need. The neutron absorbing material is inserted in a triangular tube, leaving volds between the circular insert and the corners of the triangular tube. The material is positioned within the tube by the use of dummy spacers to achleve the desired absorption pattern, then the ends of the tubes are sealed with suitable plugs. The tubes may be welded or soldered together to form two flat surfaces of any desired width, and covered with sheetmetal to protect the tubes from damage. This design provides a control member that will not distort under the action of outside forces or be ruptured by gases generated within the jacketed control member.

  8. Infection Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... lost because of the spread of infections in hospitals. Health care workers can take steps to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. These steps are part of infection control. Proper hand washing is the most effective way ...

  9. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  10. Under Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Rich

    2001-01-01

    Offers advice on how school administrators can properly plan and monitor school construction projects to contain costs. Cost control tips discussed include project scope definition, contract bidding and awarding practice, and project management techniques. (GR)

  11. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

    1962-04-24

    A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

  12. Fuel control

    SciTech Connect

    Charrier, M.G.

    1986-08-19

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine control which responds to a compressor discharge pressure (CDP) and a compressor bleed pressure (CBP). The improvement described here consists of: (a) sensing means for sensing whether the aircraft is on the ground and (b) means coupled to the sensing means for artificially increasing the ratio of CBP/CDP which is sensed by the control, during engine startup, while the aircraft is on the ground.

  13. WetA and VosA are distinct regulators of conidiation capacity, conidial quality, and biological control potential of a fungal insect pathogen.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Shi, Han-Qiang; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Many filamentous fungi produce only conidia for dispersal and survival in vitro or in vivo. Here, we show that the developmental regulator WetA and the velvet protein VosA are not only required for conidial maturation but indispensable for conidiation in Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous entomopathogen. Deletion of wetA or vosA resulted in more than 90 % transcriptional depression of brlA and abaA, two activator genes in the central developmental pathway, during the critical period of conidiophore development and conidiation. Consequently, ΔwetA and ΔvosA strains lost 98 % in and 88 % of their conidiation capacities under optimal culture conditions, respectively. The conidia of ΔwetA showed more defective features than those of ΔvosA, including smaller size, lesser density, lower hydrophobicity, and impaired cell walls although intracellular trehalose content decreased more in the aging culture of ΔvosA than of ΔwetA. As a result, conidial sensitivity to cell wall perturbation was elevated in ΔwetA but unaffected in ΔvosA, which produced conidia more sensitive to the oxidant menadione and the wet-heat stress at 45 °C. Both deletion mutants showed similar defects in conidial tolerance to high osmolarity or UV-B irradiation but no change in conidial sensitivity to the other oxidant H2O2 or the fungicide carbendazim. Moreover, ΔwetA lost more virulence to Galleria mellonella larvae than ΔvosA. All these phenotypical changes were restored by either wetA or vosA complementation. Taken together, WetA and VosA are indispensable for asexual development and contribute differentially to conidial quality and hence the biological control potential of B. bassiana against insect pests. PMID:26243054

  14. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  15. Controlling Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelehear, Zach

    2004-01-01

    Stress occurs among all groups in a school community and can affect morale, performance, and leadership ability. This article discusses how educators must deal with and control stress. Principals must address their own stress to create a healthy school culture. Moreover, the author presents two survival strategies that can provide support and…

  16. Controlling chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, E.; Spano, M.

    1996-06-01

    The orbital complexity and exponential sensitivity of chaotic systems has the consequence that such systems offer the possibility of being feedback controlled by use of only small perturbations. The potential consequences of this recent realization are being investigated in a broad range of applications. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Kollmorgen Corporation's Mermaid II two person submersible is propeller-driven by a system of five DC brushless motors with new electronic controllers that originated in work performed in a NASA/DOE project managed by Lewis Research Center. A key feature of the system is electric commutation rather than mechanical commutation for converting AC current to DC.

  18. Controlling turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  19. Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... your health, frequency of sexual activity, number of sexual partners and desire to have children in the future. Your health care provider can help you select the best form of birth control for you. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  20. Dimethyl adenosine transferase (KsgA) deficiency in Salmonella Enteritidis confers susceptibility to high osmolarity and virulence attenuation in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Dimethyladenosine transferase (KsgA) performs diverse roles in bacteria including ribosomal maturation, DNA mismatch repair, and synthesis of KsgA is responsive to antibiotics and cold temperature. We previously showed that ksgA mutation in Salmonella Enteritidis results in impaired invasiveness i...

  1. K+ accumulation in the space between giant axon and Schwann cell in the squid Alloteuthis. Effects of changes in osmolarity.

    PubMed Central

    Astion, M L; Coles, J A; Orkand, R K; Abbott, N J

    1988-01-01

    In a train of impulses in squid giant axon, accumulation of extracellular potassium causes successive afterhyperpolarizations to be progressively less negative. In Loligo, Frankenhaeuser and Hodgkin had satisfactorily accounted for the characteristics of this effect with a model in which the axon is surrounded by a space, width theta, and a barrier of permeability P. In axons isolated from Alloteuthis, we found that the model fitted the observations quite well. Superfusing the axon with hypotonic artificial seawater (ASW) caused theta and P to decrease, and, conversely, hypertonic ASW caused them to increase: this would be the case if both the space and the pathway through the barrier were extracellular. In some cases, in normal ASW, the afterhyperpolarizations in a train decreased very little, less than 0.7 mV. In these extreme cases, theta was estimated to be 190 nm and P to be 7 x 10(-4) cm s-1, both several times the values of 30 nm and 6 x 10(-5) cm s-1 estimated by Frankenhaeuser and Hodgkin. We suggest that in vivo the periaxonal space may be considerably wider than that seen in conventionally fixed squid tissue. PMID:3345336

  2. [Brain edema treatment procedure using continuous controlled infusion of mannitol in neurosurgical patients].

    PubMed

    Taranova, I I; Kokhno, V N

    2010-01-01

    The paper evaluates the efficiency and safety of the developed osmotherapy protocol using controlled continuous infusion of 15% mannitol solution. Two hundred and nine patients with intracranial hypertension (ICH) syndrome of various etiologies had 15% mannitol infusion, the rate of which was determined by clinical criteria. The infusion rate was 50 ml/hr with midline brain structure dislocation of 8 mm or more and major depression of consciousness (a Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score of less than 8) and 25 ml/hr with brain dislocation of 7-mm or less and a GCS score of 8 or higher. The monitoring program was as follows: Block 1 comprised the clinical and instrumental data characterizing the adequacy of brain perfusion (GCS, the magnitude of focal neurological symptoms, ICH, mean blood pressure, computed tomographic dislocation); Block 2 involved the clinical and laboratory data identifying the extracerebral complications of osmotherapy (packed cell volume, plasma osmolarity, urine density, and renal ultrasonography); Block 3 consisted of cerebral oximetry (CO) and Neurotrend. The authors' early proposed integral indicators of OC, such as interhemispheric asymmetry coefficient and hemodynamic conformity index, were used to estimate the adequacy of brain perfusion. In cerebral vasospasm, a Neurotrend microsensor was implanted at 3-cm depth for the direct quantitative determination of pO2, pCO2, pH, and brain temperature. ICH was characterized by natural changes in the CO indicators. In vasospasm, the mean linear blood flow velocity was 245 +/- 14 cm/sec in the basilar arteries, which was attended by low pO2 and metabolic acidosis, as shown by readings. Optimization of artificial ventilation, stabilization of hemodynamics, and the use of postural exposures and osmo diuretics promoted ICH normalization and central perfusion pressure optimization, which was accompanied by the disappearance of tissue hypoxia and acidosis, as suggested by Neurotrend reading. The duration of

  3. Autonomous control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    KSC has been developing the Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE), which is a tool for performing automated monitoring, diagnosis, and control of electromechanical devices. KATE employs artificial intelligence computing techniques to perform these functions. The KATE system consists of a generic shell and a knowledge base. The KATE shell is the portion of the system which performs the monitoring, diagnosis, and control functions. It is generic in the sense that it is application independent. This means that the monitoring activity, for instance, will be performed with the same algorithms regardless of the particular physical device being used. The knowledge base is the portion of the system which contains specific functional and behavorial information about the physical device KATE is working with. Work is nearing completion on a project at KSC to interface a Texas Instruments Explorer running a LISP version of KATE with a Generic Checkout System (GCS) test-bed to control a physical simulation of a shuttle tanking system (humorously called the Red Wagon because of its color and mobility). The Autonomous Control System (ACS) project supplements and extends the KATE/GCS project by adding three other major activities. The activities include: porting KATE from the Texas Instruments Explorer machine to an Intel 80386-based UNIX workstation in the LISP language; rewriting KATE as necessary to run on the same 80386 workstation but in the Ada language; and investigating software and techniques to translate ANSI Standard Common LISP to Mil Standard Ada. Primary goals of this task are as follows: (1) establish the advantages of using expert systems to provide intelligent autonomous software for Space Station Freedom applications; (2) determine the feasibility of using Ada as the run-time environment for model-based expert systems; (3) provide insight into the advantages and disadvantagesof using LISP or Ada in the run-time environment for expert systems; and (4

  4. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Ruano, W.J.

    1957-12-10

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

  5. Glucose control.

    PubMed

    Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    Stress-related hyperglycemia is a common finding in acutely ill patients, and is related to the severity and outcome of the critical illness. The pathophysiology of stress hyperglycemia includes hormonal and neural signals, leading to increased production of glucose by the liver and peripheral insulin resistance mediated by the translocation of transmembrane glucose transporters. In one pioneering study, tight glycemic control by intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients was associated with improved survival. However, this major finding was not confirmed in several other prospective randomized controlled trials. The reasons underlying the discrepancy between the first and the subsequent studies could include nutritional strategy (amount of calories provided, use of parenteral nutrition), case-mix, potential differences in the optimal blood glucose level (BG) in different types of patients, hypoglycemia and its correction, and the magnitude of glucose variability. Therefore, an improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of glycemic regulation during acute illness is needed. Safe and effective glucose control will need improvement in the definition of optimal BG and in the measurement techniques, perhaps including continuous monitoring of insulin algorithms and closed-loop systems. PMID:23075589

  6. Motor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    M.H. Marks Enterprises' Power Factor Controller (PFC) matches voltage with motor's actual need. Plugged into a motor, PFC continuously determines motor load by sensing shifts between voltage and current flow. When it senses a light load, it cuts voltage to the minimum needed. It offers potential energy savings ranging from eight percent up to 65 percent depending on the application. Myles Marks started out with the notion of writing an article for Popular Electronics magazine at the same time offering to furnish kits to readers interested in assembling PFC's. Within two weeks from publication he had orders for 500 kits and orders are still coming three years later.

  7. Light Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Artificial lighting is designed to provide the light intensity necessary if there were no other source of illumination. But many rooms, particularly those in large-windowed office buildings, get a substantial amount of sunlight during the day. An automatic system which considers available sunlight and adjusts the artificial lighting level accordingly can trim energy costs appreciably. Such a system was developed by NASA's Kennedy Space Center. International Technology Corporation, Satellite Beach, Florida, obtained a NASA patent license for the technology, refined the design, and is now producing commercially an improved version known as the Automatic Lighting Controller.

  8. Signature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyati, Vittal P.

    The reduction of vehicle radar signature is accomplished by means of vehicle shaping, the use of microwave frequencies-absorbent materials, and either passive or active cancellation techniques; such techniques are also useful in the reduction of propulsion system-associated IR emissions. In some anticipated scenarios, the objective is not signature-reduction but signature control, for deception, via decoy vehicles that mimic the signature characteristics of actual weapons systems. As the stealthiness of airframes and missiles increases, their propulsion systems' exhaust plumes assume a more important role in detection by an adversary.

  9. Heliostat control

    DOEpatents

    Kaehler, James A.

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in a system and method of controlling heliostat in which the heliostat is operable in azimuth and elevation by respective stepper motors and including the respective steps or means for calculating the position for the heliostat to be at a commanded position, determining the number of steps in azimuth and elevation for each respective motor to get to the commanded position and energizing both the azimuth and elevation stepper motors to run in parallel until predetermined number of steps away from the closest commanded position in azimuth and elevation so that the closest position has been achieved, and thereafter energizing only the remaining motor to bring it to its commanded position. In this way, the heliostat can be started from a stowed position in the morning and operated by a computer means to its commanded position and kept correctly oriented throughout the day using only the time of the day without requiring the usual sensors and feedback apparatus. A computer, or microprocessor, can then control a plurality of many heliostats easily and efficiently throughout the day.

  10. H-NS controls pap and daa fimbrial transcription in Escherichia coli in response to multiple environmental cues.

    PubMed

    White-Ziegler, C A; Villapakkam, A; Ronaszeki, K; Young, S

    2000-11-01

    A comparative study was completed to determine the influence of various environmental stimuli on the transcription of three different fimbrial operons in Escherichia coli and to determine the role of the histone-like protein H-NS in this environmental regulation. The fimbrial operons studied included the pap operon, which encodes pyelonephritis-associated pili (P pili), the daa operon, which encodes F1845 fimbriae, and the fan operon, which encodes K99 fimbriae. Using lacZYA transcriptional fusions within each of the fimbrial operons, we tested temperature, osmolarity, carbon source, rich medium, oxygen levels, pH, amino acids, solid medium, and iron concentration for their effects on fimbrial gene expression. Low temperature, high osmolarity, glucose as a carbon source, and rich medium repressed transcription of all three operons. High iron did not alter transcription of any of the operons tested, whereas the remaining stimuli had effects on individual operons. For the pap and daa operons, introduction of the hns651 mutation relieved the repression, either fully or partially, due to low temperature, glucose as a carbon source, rich medium, and high osmolarity. Taken together, these data indicate that there are common environmental cues that regulate fimbrial transcription in E. coli and that H-NS is an important environmental regulator for fimbrial transcription in response to several stimuli. PMID:11053383

  11. Control apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derkacs, Thomas (Inventor); Fetheroff, Charles W. (Inventor); Matay, Istvan M. (Inventor); Toth, Istvan J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Although the method and apparatus of the present invention can be utilized to apply either a uniform or a nonuniform covering of material over many different workpieces, the apparatus (20) is advantageously utilized to apply a thermal barrier covering (64) to an airfoil (22) which is used in a turbine engine. The airfoil is held by a gripper assembly (86) while a spray gun (24) is effective to apply the covering over the airfoil. When a portion of the covering has been applied, a sensor (28) is utilized to detect the thickness of the covering. A control apparatus (32) compares the thickness of the covering of material which has been applied with the desired thickness and is subsequently effective to regulate the operation of the spray gun to adaptively apply a covering of a desired thickness with an accuracy of at least plus or minus 0.0015 inches (1.5 mils) despite unanticipated process variations.

  12. Custom controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butell, Bart

    1996-02-01

    Microsoft's Visual Basic (VB) and Borland's Delphi provide an extremely robust programming environment for delivering multimedia solutions for interactive kiosks, games and titles. Their object oriented use of standard and custom controls enable a user to build extremely powerful applications. A multipurpose, database enabled programming environment that can provide an event driven interface functions as a multimedia kernel. This kernel can provide a variety of authoring solutions (e.g. a timeline based model similar to Macromedia Director or a node authoring model similar to Icon Author). At the heart of the kernel is a set of low level multimedia components providing object oriented interfaces for graphics, audio, video and imaging. Data preparation tools (e.g., layout, palette and Sprite Editors) could be built to manage the media database. The flexible interface for VB allows the construction of an infinite number of user models. The proliferation of these models within a popular, easy to use environment will allow the vast developer segment of 'producer' types to bring their ideas to the market. This is the key to building exciting, content rich multimedia solutions. Microsoft's VB and Borland's Delphi environments combined with multimedia components enable these possibilities.

  13. Power Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The device called the Power Factor Controller (PFC) offers exceptional energy conservation potential by virtue of its ability to sense shifts in the relationship between voltage and current flow, and to match them with the motor's need. Originating from the solar heating/cooling program, the PFC senses a light load, it cuts the voltage level to the minimum needed which in turn reduces current flow and heat loss. Laboratory tests showed that the PFC could reduce power used by six to eight percent under normal motor loads, and as much as 65 percent when the motor was idling. Over 150 companies have been granted NASA licenses for commercial use of this technology. One system that utilizes this technology is the Vectrol Energy System, (VES) produced by Vectrol, Inc. a subsidiary of Westinghouse. The VES is being used at Woodward & Lothrop, on their escalators. Energy use is regulated according to how many people are on the escalator at any time. It is estimated that the energy savings are between 30 to 40 percent.

  14. Controlling Separation in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Simon; Himmel, Christoph; Power, Bronwyn; Wakelam, Christian; Xu, Liping; Hynes, Tom; Hodson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Four examples of flow control: 1) Passive control of LP turbine blades (Laminar separation control). 2) Aspiration of a conventional axial compressor blade (Turbulent separation control). 3) Compressor blade designed for aspiration (Turbulent separation control). 4.Control of intakes in crosswinds (Turbulent separation control).

  15. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - inhaled corticosteroids; Asthma - long-acting beta-agonists; Asthma - leukotriene modifiers; Asthma - cromolyn; Bronchial asthma-control drugs; Wheezing - control drugs; Reactive airway disease - control drugs

  16. CONTROL ROOM WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM CONTROLS, INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL BOXES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL ROOM WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM CONTROLS, INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL BOXES FOR THE VENTILATION SYSTEM AND A PLC SWITCH FOR AUTOMATIC CO (CARBON MONOXIDE) SYSTEM. THE AIR TESTING SYSTEM IS FREE STANDING AND THE FANS ARE COMPUTER-OPERATED. - Alaskan Way Viaduct and Battery Street Tunnel, Seattle, King County, WA

  17. Hybrid polarization control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, George R.; Ibragimov, Edem; Sluz, Joseph; Sova, Raymond

    2005-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel method of polarization control that combines rotatable waveplates (angle control) and variable retarders (retardance control). Such a "hybrid" polarization controller performs far better than conventional controllers, allowing nearly perfect arbitrary-to-arbitrary polarization transformations. We show theoretically that the two control parameters augment one another because they tend to result in orthogonal movements on the Poincaré sphere.

  18. Incoherent control of locally controllable quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Daoyi; Zhang Chenbin; Rabitz, Herschel; Pechen, Alexander; Tarn, T.-J.

    2008-10-21

    An incoherent control scheme for state control of locally controllable quantum systems is proposed. This scheme includes three steps: (1) amplitude amplification of the initial state by a suitable unitary transformation, (2) projective measurement of the amplified state, and (3) final optimization by a unitary controlled transformation. The first step increases the amplitudes of some desired eigenstates and the corresponding probability of observing these eigenstates, the second step projects, with high probability, the amplified state into a desired eigenstate, and the last step steers this eigenstate into the target state. Within this scheme, two control algorithms are presented for two classes of quantum systems. As an example, the incoherent control scheme is applied to the control of a hydrogen atom by an external field. The results support the suggestion that projective measurements can serve as an effective control and local controllability information can be used to design control laws for quantum systems. Thus, this scheme establishes a subtle connection between control design and controllability analysis of quantum systems and provides an effective engineering approach in controlling quantum systems with partial controllability information.

  19. NASA propulsion controls research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teren, F.

    1983-01-01

    Multivariable control theory is applied to the design of multiple input and output engine controls. Highly-accurate, real-time engine simulations are utilized for control development and checkout. Electro-optical control components are developed for use in electronic control systems having fiber optic data links. Integrated controls are developed for VSTOL and Rotorcraft propulsion systems. Post-stall models of engine systems are developed to aid in understanding and control of post-stall engine behavior.

  20. Neural control: Chaos control sets the pace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöll, Eckehard

    2010-03-01

    Even simple creatures, such as cockroaches, are capable of complex responses to changes in their environment. But robots usually require complicated dedicated control circuits to perform just a single action. Chaos control theory could allow simpler control strategies to realize more complex behaviour.

  1. GCFR plant control system

    SciTech Connect

    Estrine, E.A.; Greiner, H.G.

    1980-05-01

    A plant control system is being designed for a gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) demonstration plant. Control analysis is being performed as an integral part of the plant design process to ensure that control requirements are satisfied as the plant design evolves. The load control portion of the plant control system provides stable automatic (closed-loop) control of the plant over the 25% to 100% load range. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate load control system performance. The results show that the plant is controllable at full load with the control system structure selected, but gain scheduling is required to achieve desired performance over the load range.

  2. Substructural controller synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A decentralized design procedure which combines substructural synthesis, model reduction, decentralized controller design, subcontroller synthesis, and controller reduction is proposed for the control design of flexible structures. The structure to be controlled is decomposed into several substructures, which are modeled by component mode synthesis methods. For each substructure, a subcontroller is designed by using the linear quadratic optimal control theory. Then, a controller synthesis scheme called Substructural Controller Synthesis (SCS) is used to assemble the subcontrollers into a system controller, which is to be used to control the whole structure.

  3. Superconducting fault current controller/current controller

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Yung S.

    2004-06-15

    A superconducting fault current controller/current controller employs a superconducting-shielded core reactor (SSCR) with a variable impedance in a secondary circuit to control current in a primary circuit such as an electrical distribution system. In a second embodiment, a variable current source is employed in a secondary circuit of an SSCR to control current in the primary circuit. In a third embodiment, both a variable impedance in one secondary circuit and a variable current source in a second circuit of an SSCR are employed for separate and independent control of current in the primary circuit.

  4. Solid state controller three axes controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The reported flight controller features a handle grip which is mounted on a longitudinally extending control element. The handle grip is pivotally mounted on the control element about a pitch axis which is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis through the control element. The pivotal mounting includes a resilient force mounting mechanism which centers the grip relative to the control element. Rotation of the handle grip produces a direct rotation of a transducer element in a transducer which provides an electrical indication of the rotative movement about three mutually perpendicular axes.

  5. Structural Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, M. S.; Hoffman, W. M.

    This manual is designed for those who seek certification as pesticide applicators for industrial, institutional, structural, and health-related pest control. It is divided into six sections covering general pest control, wood-destroying organisms, bird control, fumigation, rodent control, and industrial weed control. The manual gives information…

  6. Malagasy Backward Object Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potsdam, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Backward control is an obligatory interpretational dependency between an overt controller and a nonovert controllee in which the controllee is structurally superior to the controller: "Meg persuaded [Delta]i" ["Roni to give up"]. It contrasts with ordinary forward control, in which the controller is structurally higher: "Meg persuaded Roni"…

  7. Directions in propulsion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed here is research at NASA Lewis in the area of propulsion controls as driven by trends in advanced aircraft. The objective of the Lewis program is to develop the technology for advanced reliable propulsion control systems and to integrate the propulsion control with the flight control for optimal full-system control.

  8. Controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chao; Wang, Xingyuan; Liu, Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this article, the controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks (ABMCNs) is studied. First, the model of Boolean multiplex control networks under Harvey' asynchronous update is presented. By means of semi-tensor product approach, the logical dynamics is converted into linear representation, and a generalized formula of control-depending network transition matrices is achieved. Second, a necessary and sufficient condition is proposed to verify that only control-depending fixed points of ABMCNs can be controlled with probability one. Third, using two types of controls, the controllability of system is studied and formulae are given to show: (a) when an initial state is given, the reachable set at time s under a group of specified controls; (b) the reachable set at time s under arbitrary controls; (c) the specific probability values from a given initial state to destination states. Based on the above formulae, an algorithm to calculate overall reachable states from a specified initial state is presented. Moreover, we also discuss an approach to find the particular control sequence which steers the system between two states with maximum probability. Examples are shown to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  9. Essure Permanent Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Implants and Prosthetics Essure Permanent Birth Control Essure Permanent Birth Control Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... evaluation of the Essure System Essure is a permanent birth control method for women (female sterilization). Implantation of Essure ...

  10. Birth control pills - combination

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000655.htm Birth control pills - combination To use the sharing features on ... frequency of your menstrual cycles. Types of Combination Birth Control Pills Birth control pills come in packages. You ...

  11. Gross motor control

    MedlinePlus

    Gross motor control is the ability to make large, general movements (such as waving an arm or lifting a ... Gross motor control is a milestone in the development of an infant. Infants develop gross motor control before they ...

  12. Birth control pills - overview

    MedlinePlus

    Contraception - pills - hormonal methods; Hormonal birth control methods; Birth control pills; Contraceptive pills; BCP; OCP ... Birth control pills are also called oral contraceptives or just "the pill." A health care provider must prescribe ...

  13. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a chapter for John Wiley & Son's Mechanical Engineers' Handbook, and covers issues involving air pollution control. Various technologies for controlling sulfur oxides is considered including fuel desulfurization. It also considers control of nitrogen oxides including post...

  14. Integrated Control Using the SOFFT Control Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim

    1996-01-01

    The need for integrated/constrained control systems has become clearer as advanced aircraft introduced new coupled subsystems such as new propulsion subsystems with thrust vectoring and new aerodynamic designs. In this study, we develop an integrated control design methodology which accomodates constraints among subsystem variables while using the Stochastic Optimal Feedforward/Feedback Control Technique (SOFFT) thus maintaining all the advantages of the SOFFT approach. The Integrated SOFFT Control methodology uses a centralized feedforward control and a constrained feedback control law. The control thus takes advantage of the known coupling among the subsystems while maintaining the identity of subsystems for validation purposes and the simplicity of the feedback law to understand the system response in complicated nonlinear scenarios. The Variable-Gain Output Feedback Control methodology (including constant gain output feedback) is extended to accommodate equality constraints. A gain computation algorithm is developed. The designer can set the cross-gains between two variables or subsystems to zero or another value and optimize the remaining gains subject to the constraint. An integrated control law is designed for a modified F-15 SMTD aircraft model with coupled airframe and propulsion subsystems using the Integrated SOFFT Control methodology to produce a set of desired flying qualities.

  15. Anticipatory Neurofuzzy Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, Claire L.

    1994-01-01

    Technique of feedback control, called "anticipatory neurofuzzy control," developed for use in controlling flexible structures and other dynamic systems for which mathematical models of dynamics poorly known or unknown. Superior ability to act during operation to compensate for, and adapt to, errors in mathematical model of dynamics, changes in dynamics, and noise. Also offers advantage of reduced computing time. Hybrid of two older fuzzy-logic control techniques: standard fuzzy control and predictive fuzzy control.

  16. LSST control technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolivar, A. F.

    1981-01-01

    The necessary controls technology required for precise attitude, shape, and pointing control of large space systems (LSS) is defined. The major controls tasks are summarized with emphasis on: (1) the selection of typical antenna and platform configurations, and the definition of models and performance requirements; (2) evaluating the applicability of state-of-the-art control techniques to the control of large antennas and platforms; and (3) identifying the need for and initiating the development of advanced control concepts required for LSS.

  17. CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    DeShong, J.A.

    1960-03-01

    A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

  18. Birth control pill overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Birth control pills, also called oral contraceptives, are prescription medicines used to prevent pregnancy. Birth control pill overdose occurs when someone takes more than the normal or recommended ...

  19. Unfalsified control based on the ? controller parameterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Peña, R. S.; Colmegna, P.; Bianchi, F.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an implementation of the unfalsified control (UC) method using the Riccati-based parameterisation of ? controllers. The method provides an infinite controller set to (un)falsify the real-time data streams seeking for the best performance. Different sets may be designed to increase the degrees of freedom of the set of controller candidates to perform UC. In general, a set of m central controllers could be designed, each one seeking different objectives and all with their own parameterisation as a function of a stable and bounded transfer matrix. For example, one controller parameterisation could be designed to solve the robust stability of a model set which covers the physical system, therefore guaranteeing feasibility. The implementation requires the online optimisation of either quadratic fractional or quadratic problems, depending on the selection of the cost function. A multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) time-varying model of a permanent magnet synchronous generator illustrates the use of this technique.

  20. Predictive fuzzy controller for robotic motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.J.; Hu, C.F.

    1995-12-31

    A system output prediction strategy incorporated with a fuzzy controller is proposed to manipulate the robotic motion control. Usually, the current position and velocity errors are used to operate the fuzzy logic controller for picking out a corresponding rule. When the system has fast planning speed or time varying behavior, the required tracking accuracy is difficult to achieve by adjusting the fuzzy rules. In order to improve the position control accuracy and system robustness for the industrial application, the current position error in the fuzzy rules look-up table is substituted by the predictive position error of the next step by using the grey predictive algorithm. This idea is implemented on a five degrees of freedom robot. The experimental results show that this fuzzy controller has effectively improve the system performance and achieved the facilitation of fuzzy controller implementation.

  1. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L T; Pocard, J A; Bernard, T; Le Rudulier, D

    1988-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, we used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, 14C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared. PMID:3290197

  2. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.T.; Pocard, J.A.; Bernard, T.; Le Rudulier, D.

    1988-07-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, the authors used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, /sup 14/C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared.

  3. Minimal control power of the controlled teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kabgyun; Kim, Jaewan; Lee, Soojoon

    2016-03-01

    We generalize the control power of a perfect controlled teleportation of an entangled three-qubit pure state, suggested by Li and Ghose [Phys. Rev. A 90, 052305 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.052305], to the control power of a general controlled teleportation of a multiqubit pure state. Thus, we define the minimal control power, and calculate the values of the minimal control power for a class of general three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states and the three-qubit W class whose states have zero three-tangles. Moreover, we show that the standard three-qubit GHZ state and the standard three-qubit W state have the maximal values of the minimal control power for the two classes, respectively. This means that the minimal control power can be interpreted as not only an operational quantity of a three-qubit quantum communication but also a degree of three-qubit entanglement. In addition, we calculate the values of the minimal control power for general n -qubit GHZ states and the n -qubit W -type states.

  4. Improving Control of Two Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.

    2004-01-01

    A computer program controls motors that drive translation stages in a metrology system that consists of a pair of two-axis cathetometers. This program is specific to Compumotor Gemini (or equivalent) motors and the Compumotor 6K-series (or equivalent) motor controller. Relative to the software supplied with the controller, this program affords more capabilities and is easier to use. Written as a Virtual Instrument in the LabVIEW software system, the program presents an imitation control panel that the user can manipulate by use of a keyboard and mouse. There are three modes of operation: command, movement, and joystick. In command mode, single commands are sent to the controller for troubleshooting. In movement mode, distance, speed, and/or acceleration commands are sent to the controller. Position readouts from the motors and from position encoders on the translation stages are displayed in marked fields. At any time, the position readouts can be recorded in a file named by the user. In joystick mode, the program yields control of the motors to a joystick. The program sends commands to, and receives data from, the controller via a serial cable connection, using the serial-communication portion of the software supplied with the controller.

  5. Aircraft adaptive learning control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P. S. T.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    The optimal control theory of stochastic linear systems is discussed in terms of the advantages of distributed-control systems, and the control of randomly-sampled systems. An optimal solution to longitudinal control is derived and applied to the F-8 DFBW aircraft. A randomly-sampled linear process model with additive process and noise is developed.

  6. Manual on Bibliographic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This manual outlines objectives, functions, and methods for establishing national bibliographic control as part of the development of a worldwide system for the control and exchange of bibliographic information. Chapters cover: (1) definitions of bibliographic control and related concepts including Universal Bibliographic Control (UBC) and…

  7. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid regulates neuroepithelial survival, proliferation, and neurogenesis in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Gato, Angel; Moro, J A; Alonso, M I; Bueno, D; De La Mano, A; Martín, C

    2005-05-01

    Early in development, the behavior of neuroepithelial cells is controlled by several factors, which act in a developmentally regulated manner. Diffusible factors are secreted locally by the neuroepithelium itself, although other nearby structures may also be involved. Evidence suggests a physiological role for the cerebrospinal fluid in the development of the brain. Here, using organotypic cultures of chick embryo neuroepithelial explants from the mesencephalon, we show that the neuroepithelium in vitro is not able to self-induce cell survival, replication, and neurogenesis. We also show that the embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) promotes neuroepithelial stem cell survival and induces proliferation and neurogenesis in mesencephalic explants. These data strongly suggest that E-CSF is involved in the regulation of neuroepithelial cells behavior, supporting the hypothesis that this fluid plays a key role during the early development of the central nervous system. PMID:15803475

  8. Chaotic neural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, A.; Ali, M. K.

    2001-04-01

    We consider the problem of stabilizing unstable equilibria by discrete controls (the controls take discrete values at discrete moments of time). We prove that discrete control typically creates a chaotic attractor in the vicinity of an equilibrium. Artificial neural networks with reinforcement learning are known to be able to learn such a control scheme. We consider examples of such systems, discuss some details of implementing the reinforcement learning to controlling unstable equilibria, and show that the arising dynamics is characterized by positive Lyapunov exponents, and hence is chaotic. This chaos can be observed both in the controlled system and in the activity patterns of the controller.

  9. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N.

    1983-11-01

    Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

  10. An intelligent traffic controller

    SciTech Connect

    Kagolanu, K.; Fink, R.; Smartt, H.; Powell, R.; Larsen, E.

    1995-12-01

    A controller with advanced control logic can significantly improve traffic flows at intersections. In this vein, this paper explores fuzzy rules and algorithms to improve the intersection operation by rationalizing phase changes and green times. The fuzzy logic for control is enhanced by the exploration of neural networks for families of membership functions and for ideal cost functions. The concepts of fuzzy logic control are carried forth into the controller architecture. Finally, the architecture and the modules are discussed. In essence, the control logic and architecture of an intelligent controller are explored.

  11. Quantum multiobservable control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Raj; Wu, Rebing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2008-06-01

    We present deterministic algorithms for the simultaneous control of an arbitrary number of quantum observables. Unlike optimal control approaches based on cost function optimization, quantum multiobservable tracking control (MOTC) is capable of tracking predetermined homotopic trajectories to target expectation values in the space of multiobservables. The convergence of these algorithms is facilitated by the favorable critical topology of quantum control landscapes. Fundamental properties of quantum multiobservable control landscapes, including the MOTC Gramian matrix, are introduced. The effects of multiple control objectives on the structure and complexity of optimal fields are examined. With minor modifications, the techniques described herein can be applied to general quantum multiobjective control problems.

  12. HYDRAULIC SERVO CONTROL MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Hussey, R.B.; Gottsche, M.J. Jr.

    1963-09-17

    A hydraulic servo control mechanism of compact construction and low fluid requirements is described. The mechanism consists of a main hydraulic piston, comprising the drive output, which is connected mechanically for feedback purposes to a servo control piston. A control sleeve having control slots for the system encloses the servo piston, which acts to cover or uncover the slots as a means of controlling the operation of the system. This operation permits only a small amount of fluid to regulate the operation of the mechanism, which, as a result, is compact and relatively light. This mechanism is particuiarly adaptable to the drive and control of control rods in nuclear reactors. (auth)

  13. AFWAL control technology programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehne, V. O.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of space oriented control technology programs which are applicable to flexible large space structures is presented. The spacecraft control activity is interdisciplinary with activities in structures, structural dynamics and control brought together. The large flexible structures to be controlled have many physical factors that influence the final controllability of the vehicle. Factors are studied such as rigidity of both structural elements and joints, damping inherent in both material and discrete dampers located throughout the structure, and the bandwidth of both sensors and actuators used to sense motion and control are the physical factors that are interdisciplinary and influence control.

  14. Control augmentation for lateral control wheel steering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulkes, R. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Flight control system design for lateral control wheel steering is discussed. Two alternate designs are presented. The first design is a roll-rate command, bank-angle hold system with a wings-level track-hold submode. The second is a curved-track-hold system. Design details and real-time flight simulator results are included.

  15. Simplify fuzzy control implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, K.E.; Ralston, P.A.S.; Ramaganesan, S. )

    1993-07-01

    A controller that uses fuzzy rules provides better response than a conventional linear controller in some applications. The rules are best implemented as a breakpoint function. A level control example illustrates the technique and advantages over proportional-integral (PI) control. In numerous papers on fuzzy controller development, emphasis has been primarily on formal inferencing, membership functions, and steps in building a fuzzy relation, as described by Zadeh. The rationale used in formulating the required set of rules is usually neglected, and the interpretation of the final controller as an input-output algorithm is overlooked. Also, the details of fuzzy mathematics are unfamiliar to many engineers and the implementation appears cumbersome to most. Process description and control instrumentation. This article compares a fuzzy controller designed by specifying a breakpoint function with a traditional PI controller for a level control system on a laboratory scale. In this discussion, only setpoint changes are considered.

  16. Precision digital control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskub, V. G.; Rozov, B. S.; Savelev, V. I.

    This book is concerned with the characteristics of digital control systems of great accuracy. A classification of such systems is considered along with aspects of stabilization, programmable control applications, digital tracking systems and servomechanisms, and precision systems for the control of a scanning laser beam. Other topics explored are related to systems of proportional control, linear devices and methods for increasing precision, approaches for further decreasing the response time in the case of high-speed operation, possibilities for the implementation of a logical control law, and methods for the study of precision digital control systems. A description is presented of precision automatic control systems which make use of electronic computers, taking into account the existing possibilities for an employment of computers in automatic control systems, approaches and studies required for including a computer in such control systems, and an analysis of the structure of automatic control systems with computers. Attention is also given to functional blocks in the considered systems.

  17. TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.; Persons, R.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller (DVC) provides in conjunction with the Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition System (CICADA), control and monitoring for the pumps, valves and gauges associated with each individual diagnostic vacuum system. There will be approximately 50 systems on TFTR. Two standard versions of the controller (A and B) wil be provided in order to meet the requirements of two diagnostic manifold arrangements. All pump and valve sequencing, as well as protection features, will be implemented by the controller.

  18. Fuzzy and neural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1992-01-01

    Fuzzy logic and neural networks provide new methods for designing control systems. Fuzzy logic controllers do not require a complete analytical model of a dynamic system and can provide knowledge-based heuristic controllers for ill-defined and complex systems. Neural networks can be used for learning control. In this chapter, we discuss hybrid methods using fuzzy logic and neural networks which can start with an approximate control knowledge base and refine it through reinforcement learning.

  19. Spacecraft stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    1992-01-01

    The Earth's first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1, slowly tumbled in orbit. The first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1, also tumbled out of control. Today, satellite stability and control has become a higher priority. For a satellite design that is to have a life expectancy of 14 years, appropriate spacecraft flight control systems will be reviewed, stability requirements investigated, and an appropriate flight control system recommended in order to see the design process. Disturbance torques, including aerodynamic, magnetic, gravity gradient, solar, micrometeorite, debris, collision, and internal torques, will be assessed to quantify the disturbance environment so that the required compensating torques can be determined. The control torques, including passive versus active, momentum control, bias momentum, spin stabilization, dual spin, gravity gradient, magnetic, reaction wheels, control moment gyros, inertia augmentation techniques, three-axis control, and reaction control systems (RCSs), will be considered. Conditions for stability will also be considered.

  20. Engineering control into medicine.

    PubMed

    Stone, David J; Celi, Leo Anthony; Csete, Marie

    2015-06-01

    The human body is a tightly controlled engineering miracle. However, medical training generally does not cover "control" (in the engineering sense) in physiology, pathophysiology, and therapeutics. A better understanding of how evolved controls maintain normal homeostasis is critical for understanding the failure mode of controlled systems, that is, disease. We believe that teaching and research must incorporate an understanding of the control systems in physiology and take advantage of the quantitative tools used by engineering to understand complex systems. Control systems are ubiquitous in physiology, although often unrecognized. Here we provide selected examples of the role of control in physiology (heart rate variability, immunity), pathophysiology (inflammation in sepsis), and therapeutic devices (diabetes and the artificial pancreas). We also present a high-level background to the concept of robustly controlled systems and examples of clinical insights using the controls framework. PMID:25680579

  1. Control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  2. VHDL CONTROL ROUTER. VHDL Control Routing Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Venard, J.

    1994-03-01

    The control router simulates a backplane consisting of up to 16 slot. Slot 0, reserved for a control module (cr-ctrl), generates the system clocks and provides the serial interface to the Gating Logic. The remaining 15 slots (1-15) contain routing modules (cr mod), each having up to 64 serial inputs and outputs with FIFOs. Messages to be transmitted to the Control Router are taken from text files. There are currently 17 such source files. In the model, the serial output of each source is connected to multiple receivers, so that there are 8 identical messages transmitted to the router for each message file entry.

  3. SODR Memory Control Buffer Control ASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    The Spacecraft Optical Disk Recorder (SODR) is a state of the art mass storage system for future NASA missions requiring high transmission rates and a large capacity storage system. This report covers the design and development of an SODR memory buffer control applications specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The memory buffer control ASIC has two primary functions: (1) buffering data to prevent loss of data during disk access times, (2) converting data formats from a high performance parallel interface format to a small computer systems interface format. Ten 144 p in, 50 MHz CMOS ASIC's were designed, fabricated and tested to implement the memory buffer control function.

  4. Embryonic blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier formation and function

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, David; Parvas, Maryam; Hermelo, Ismaïl; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development and adult life, brain cavities and ventricles are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF has attracted interest as an active signaling medium that regulates brain development, homeostasis and disease. CSF is a complex protein-rich fluid containing growth factors and signaling molecules that regulate multiple cell functions in the central nervous system (CNS). The composition and substance concentrations of CSF are tightly controlled. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that embryonic CSF (eCSF) has a key function as a fluid pathway for delivering diffusible signals to the developing brain, thus contributing to the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells, and to the expansion and patterning of the brain. From fetal stages through to adult life, CSF is primarily produced by the choroid plexus. The development and functional activities of the choroid plexus and other blood–brain barrier (BBB) systems in adults and fetuses have been extensively analyzed. However, eCSF production and control of its homeostasis in embryos, from the closure of the anterior neuropore when the brain cavities become physiologically sealed, to the formation of the functional fetal choroid plexus, has not been studied in as much depth and remains open to debate. This review brings together the existing literature, some of which is based on experiments conducted by our research group, concerning the formation and function of a temporary embryonic blood–CSF barrier in the context of the crucial roles played by the molecules in eCSF. PMID:25389383

  5. Aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Greg T. (Inventor); Morgan, Walter R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A span-loaded, highly flexible flying wing, having horizontal control surfaces mounted aft of the wing on extended beams to form local pitch-control devices. Each of five spanwise wing segments of the wing has one or more motors and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other wing segments, to minimize inter-segment loads. Wing dihedral is controlled by separately controlling the local pitch-control devices consisting of a control surface on a boom, such that inboard and outboard wing segment pitch changes relative to each other, and thus relative inboard and outboard lift is varied.

  6. Programmable Digital Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wassick, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    An existing three-channel analog servo loop controller has been redesigned for piezoelectric-transducer-based (PZT-based) etalon control applications to a digital servo loop controller. This change offers several improvements over the previous analog controller, including software control over proportional-integral-derivative (PID) parameters, inclusion of other data of interest such as temperature and pressure in the control laws, improved ability to compensate for PZT hysteresis and mechanical mount fluctuations, ability to provide pre-programmed scanning and stepping routines, improved user interface, expanded data acquisition, and reduced size, weight, and power.

  7. Robot welding process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  8. Segment alignment control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, JEAN-N.; Lorell, Ken R.

    1988-01-01

    The segmented primary mirror for the LDR will require a special segment alignment control system to precisely control the orientation of each of the segments so that the resulting composite reflector behaves like a monolith. The W.M. Keck Ten Meter Telescope will utilize a primary mirror made up of 36 actively controlled segments. Thus the primary mirror and its segment alignment control system are directly analogous to the LDR. The problems of controlling the segments in the face of disturbances and control/structures interaction, as analyzed for the TMT, are virtually identical to those for the LDR. The two systems are briefly compared.

  9. Control system design method

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  10. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  11. Automatic clutch control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, H.; Ogawa, N.; Hattori, T.; Ishihara, M.; Uriuhara, M.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes an automatic clutch control system, comprising: a clutch having a full clutch engagement point and a clutch contact point; a clutch actuator for controlling a clutch stroke; a plurality of solenoid valves for controlling the clutch actuator; clutch stroke sensor means for measuring the clutch stroke and for detecting the full clutch engagement point and the clutch contact point in the clutch stroke; control means, for feeding back a stroke signal detected by the clutch stroke sensor and for controlling the solenoid valves to control clutch engagement and disengagement.

  12. Propulsion Controls, 1979. [air breathing engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The state of the art of multivariable engine control is examined in order to determine future needs and problem areas and to establish the appropriate roles of government, industries, and universities in addressing these problems.

  13. Identification of a putative alternate sigma factor and characterization of a multicomponent regulatory cascade controlling the expression of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae Pss61 hrp and hrmA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Y; Heu, S; Yi, J; Lu, Y; Hutcheson, S W

    1994-01-01

    The Pseudomonas syringae hrp and hrmA genes controlling pathogenicity and elicitation of the hypersensitive response and the avr genes controlling host range have been shown previously to be regulated by carbon, nitrogen, pH, osmolarity, and hypothetical plant factors. In P. syringae pv. syringae Pss61, inactivation of hrp complementation groups II and XIII reduced expression of a plasmid-borne hrmA'-lacZ fusion. The hrp regions II and XIII were cloned on separate plasmids and shown to enhance the activity of the hrmA promoter in Escherichia coli MC4100 transformants at least 100-fold. The nucleotide sequence of region XIII revealed two open reading frames (hrpR and hrpS) whose deduced products share homology with P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 HrpS and are both related to the NtrC family of two-component signal transduction systems. HrpR and HrpS differ from most members of the protein family by lacking an amino-terminal domain which modulates the regulatory activity. A single open reading frame, hrpL, whose product shares homology with AlgU, a putative alternate sigma factor of P. aeruginosa, as well as with the related alternate sigma factors was identified within region II. Key domains are partially conserved. Inactivation of hrpS in Pss61 repressed expression of a plasmid-borne hrpL'-lacZ fusion carried by pYXPL1R, and transformation of MC4100(pYXPL1R) with a plasmid carrying hrpRS increased hrpL promoter activity at least 200-fold. Neither hrpS nor hrpR, when cloned on separate plasmids, activated the hrpL promoter activity individually. The expression of hrpL when directed by a lac promoter was sufficient to express a set of plasmid-borne hrmA'-, hrpJ'-, and hrpZ'-lacZ fusions independently of other hrp genes. The results indicate that hrpRS and hrpL are part of a regulatory cascade in which HrpR and HrpS activate expression of hrpL and HrpL, a putative sigma factor, induces expression of HrpL-responsive genes. Images PMID:8106313

  14. Temperature offset control system

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, M.

    1987-07-28

    This patent describes a temperature offset control system for controlling the operation of both heating and air conditioning systems simultaneously contained within the same premises each of which is set by local thermostats to operate at an appropriate temperature, the offset control system comprising: a central control station having means for presetting an offset temperature range, means for sensing the temperature at a central location, means for comparing the sensed temperature with the offset temperature range, means responsive to the comparison for producing a control signal indicative of whether the sensed temperature is within the offset temperature range or beyond the offset temperature range, and means for transmitting the control signal onto the standard energy lines servicing the premises; and a receiving station respectively associated with each heating and air conditioning system, the receiving stations each comprising means for receiving the same transmitted control signal from the energy lines, and switch means for controlling the energization of the respective system in response to the received control signal. The heating systems and associated local thermostat are disabled by the control signal when the control signal originates from a sensed temperature above the lower end of the offset temperature range. The air conditioning systems and associated thermostats are disabled by the same control signal when the control signal originates from a sensed temperature below the upper end of the offset temperature range.

  15. Contamination control handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Contamination Control Handbook provides technical information on avoiding contamination of physical, chemical or biological systems or products. The book includes control methods for product design, gases and liquids, airborne and surface contamination, radiation, packaging handling, storage and personnel.

  16. Insensitive control technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, C. A.; Pope, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    THe investigation of two insensitive controller synthesis techniques was reported. The finite dimensional inverse approach produces a time varying insensitive controller and/or parameter identifier by constructing inverse functions derived from a finite number of input output pair relationships. The MD/IM concept relies on the information matrix theory that was developed in the estimation and identification field. The MD/IM synthesis technique is based on the hypothesis that minimizing the information matrix will reduce system identifiability and consequently system sensitivity to uncertain parameters. The controllers designed with both techniques were evaluated on a realistic C-5A aircraft flight control problem. Results indicate that the FDI controller is more suited to trajectory type problems because of its time varying nature. The MD/IM controller performed as well as the top-rated controllers of the initial effort and has direct application to aircraft flight control problems.

  17. SETI data controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosline, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    Three data controllers developed for the SETI project are described. Two are used primarily for recording and playback of SETI data from the Radio Science Surveillance System (RSSS). The third is used as a SETI station controller for DSS 13.

  18. Consciousness and cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Kunde, Wilfried; Reuss, Heiko; Kiesel, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The implementation or change of information processing routines, known as cognitive control, is traditionally believed to be closely linked to consciousness. It seems that we exert control over our behavior if we know the reasons for, and consequences of, doing so. Recent research suggests, however, that several behavioral phenomena that have been construed as instances of cognitive control can be prompted by events of which actors are not aware. Here we give a brief review of this research, discuss possible reasons for inconsistencies in the empirical evidence, and suggest some lines of future research. Specifically, we suggest to differentiate cognitive control evoked either because of explicit or because of implicit control cues. While the former type of control seems to work outside of awareness, the latter type of control seems to be restricted to consciously registered events that call for control. PMID:22419962

  19. Birth control pills overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002599.htm Birth control pill overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Birth control pills, also called oral contraceptives, are prescription medicines ...

  20. Linear decentralized learning control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo C.; Longman, Richard W.; Phan, Minh

    1992-01-01

    The new field of learning control develops controllers that learn to improve their performance at executing a given task, based on experience performing this task. The simplest forms of learning control are based on the same concept as integral control, but operating in the domain of the repetitions of the task. This paper studies the use of such controllers in a decentralized system, such as a robot with the controller for each link acting independently. The basic result of the paper is to show that stability of the learning controllers for all subsystems when the coupling between subsystems is turned off, assures stability of the decentralized learning in the coupled system, provided that the sample time in the digital learning controller is sufficiently short.

  1. Solar Control design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information used in the evaluation of design of Solar Control's solar heating and cooling system controller and the Solarstat is given. Some of the information includes system performance specifications, design data brochures, and detailed design drawings.

  2. Nutrient Control Design Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nutrient Control Design Manual will present an extensive state-of-the-technology review of the engineering design and operation of nitrogen and phosphorous control technologies and techniques applied at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This manual will present ...

  3. Nutrient Control Seminars

    EPA Science Inventory

    These Nutrient Control Seminars will present an extensive state-of-the-technology review of the engineering design and operation of nitrogen and phosphorous control technologies and techniques applied at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). These seminars will present ...

  4. ENGINEERING CONTROL INTO MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Stone, David J.; Celi, Leo Anthony; Csete, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The human body is a tightly controlled engineering miracle. However, medical training generally does not cover ‘control’ (in the engineering sense) in physiology, pathophysiology and therapeutics. A better understanding of how evolved controls maintain normal homeostasis is critical for understanding the failure mode of controlled systems, i.e., disease. We believe that teaching and research must incorporate an understanding of the control systems in physiology, and take advantage of the quantitative tools used by engineering to understand complex systems. Control systems are ubiquitous in physiology, though often unrecognized. Here we provide selected examples of the role of control in physiology (heart rate variability, immunity), pathophysiology (inflammation in sepsis), and therapeutic devices (diabetes and the artificial pancreas). We also present a high level background to the concept of robustly controlled systems and examples of clinical insights using the controls framework. PMID:25680579

  5. Birth Control Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... control the functioning of the body's organs. How Does It Work? The combination of the hormones progesterone ... absorbed by the skin.) previous continue How Well Does It Work? Ongoing studies suggest the birth control ...

  6. System for controlling apnea

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, John F

    2015-05-05

    An implanted stimulation device or air control device are activated by an external radar-like sensor for controlling apnea. The radar-like sensor senses the closure of the air flow cavity, and associated control circuitry signals (1) a stimulator to cause muscles to open the air passage way that is closing or closed or (2) an air control device to open the air passage way that is closing or closed.

  7. Microtron Modelling and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Krist, Pavel; Bila, Jiri

    2010-01-05

    The article describes the design of the mathematical model and automatic control system of the microtron (high frequency cyclic electron accelerator). This type of accelerator was controlled manually till now. The critical values have been set up empirically on the basis of the previous operational experiences. The designed automatic control system with fuzzy controller should increase the accelerated electrons current value and improve the beam stability.

  8. Statistical process control

    SciTech Connect

    Oakland, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Addressing the increasing importance for firms to have a thorough knowledge of statistically based quality control procedures, this book presents the fundamentals of statistical process control (SPC) in a non-mathematical, practical way. It provides real-life examples and data drawn from a wide variety of industries. The foundations of good quality management and process control, and control of conformance and consistency during production are given. Offers clear guidance to those who wish to understand and implement modern SPC techniques.

  9. MEANS FOR CONTROLLING REACTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Nordheim, L.W.; Wigner, E.P.

    1961-06-27

    The patented means is described for controlling a nuclear reactor which comprises a tank containing a dispersion of a thermally fissionable material in a liquid moderator and a material convertible to a thermally fissionable material in a container disposed about the tank. The control means comprises a control rod chamber, containing only a liquid moderator, disposed within the container and adjacent to the tank and a control rod designed to be inserted into the chamber.

  10. Birth Control Explorer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Relationships STIs Media Facebook Twitter Tumblr Shares · 5 Birth Control Explorer Sort by all methods most effective methods ... MORE You are here Home » Birth Control Explorer Birth Control Explorer If you’re having sex —or if ...

  11. Birth Control Pill

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 • 2 • 3 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC About Birth Control Birth Control Methods: How Well Do They Work? ... You Need a Pelvic Exam to Get Birth Control? How Can I Get on the Pill Without Telling My Parents? How Can I Get the Pill if I ...

  12. Robust control of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.J.D. ); Abdallah, C.T. )

    1990-01-01

    The problem of controlling the variations in the rf power system can be effectively cast as an application of modern control theory. Two components of this theory are obtaining a model and a feedback structure. The model inaccuracies influence the choice of a particular controller structure. Because of the modeling uncertainty, one has to design either a variable, adaptive controller or a fixed, robust controller to achieve the desired objective. The adaptive control scheme usually results in very complex hardware; and, therefore, shall not be pursued in this research. In contrast, the robust control methods leads to simpler hardware. However, robust control requires a more accurate mathematical model of the physical process than is required by adaptive control. Our research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) has led to the development and implementation of a new robust rf power feedback system. In this paper, we report on our research progress. In section one, the robust control problem for the rf power system and the philosophy adopted for the beginning phase of our research is presented. In section two, the results of our proof-of-principle experiments are presented. In section three, we describe the actual controller configuration that is used in LANL FEL physics experiments. The novelty of our approach is that the control hardware is implemented directly in rf without demodulating, compensating, and then remodulating.

  13. Robust control of accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joel, W.; Johnson, D.; Chaouki, Abdallah T.

    1991-07-01

    The problem of controlling the variations in the rf power system can be effectively cast as an application of modern control theory. Two components of this theory are obtaining a model and a feedback structure. The model inaccuracies influence the choice of a particular controller structure. Because of the modelling uncertainty, one has to design either a variable, adaptive controller or a fixed, robust controller to achieve the desired objective. The adaptive control scheme usually results in very complex hardware; and, therefore, shall not be pursued in this research. In contrast, the robust control method leads to simpler hardware. However, robust control requires a more accurate mathematical model of the physical process than is required by adaptive control. Our research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) has led to the development and implementation of a new robust rf power feedback system. In this article, we report on our research progress. In section 1, the robust control problem for the rf power system and the philosophy adopted for the beginning phase of our research is presented. In section 2, the results of our proof-of-principle experiments are presented. In section 3, we describe the actual controller configuration that is used in LANL FEL physics experiments. The novelty of our approach is that the control hardware is implemented directly in rf. without demodulating, compensating, and then remodulating.

  14. Intermittent Control Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Thomas L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The technique of intermittent control systems for air quality control as developed and used by the Tennessee Valley Authority is investigated. Although controversial, all Tennessee Valley Authority sulfur dioxide elimination programs are scheduled to be operational this year. Existing or anticipated intermittent control systems are identified. (BT)

  15. Automated Serials Control System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Elizabeth

    In 1967, the New York State Library at Albany (NYSL) developed a tape-oriented, off-line serials control system for 10,000 active titles. The system would perform all the serials control functions: bibliographic control, check-in of current receipts, claiming for gaps in receipts and late issues, binding notification for completed sets,…

  16. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  17. CAS. Controlled Access Security

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, B.; Pomeroy, G.

    1989-12-01

    The Security Alarm System is a data acquisition and control system which collects data from intrusion sensors and displays the information in a real-time environment for operators. The Access Control System monitors and controls the movement of personnel with the use of card readers and biometrics hand readers.

  18. Control of Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuromskii, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    The principle and engineering of a system for automatic control of the tension of the thread and the productivity of the process of extrusion of polyacrylonitrile fibers have been presented. The control system is based on the use of functional features of a modern frequency controlled electric drive.

  19. Control surface actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Gerhard E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A device which actuates aircraft control surfaces is disclosed. The actuator is disposed entirely within the control surface structure. This allows the gap between the wing structural box and the control surface to be reduced. Reducing the size of the gap is especially desirable for wings with high aspect ratio, wherein the volume of the structural box is at a premium.

  20. Basophil degranulation control.

    PubMed

    Hadjaj, B; Cherruault, Y; Sainte Laudy, J

    1992-08-01

    We first present a global simulation model describing inhibition of human basophil degranulation by means of high dilutions. Then we study an optimal control problem associated to a non-linear compartmental model. This control is associated to an antigen concentration. For solving this control problem we used a dynamic programming method. PMID:1517003

  1. Floating Point Control Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-08-02

    Floating Point Control is a Library that allows for the manipulation of floating point unit exception masking funtions control exceptions in both the Streaming "Single Instruction, Multiple Data" Extension 2 (SSE2) unit and the floating point unit simultaneously. FPC also provides macros to set floating point rounding and precision control.

  2. Indirect decentralized learning control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longman, Richard W.; Lee, Soo C.; Phan, M.

    1992-01-01

    The new field of learning control develops controllers that learn to improve their performance at executing a given task, based on experience performing this specific task. In a previous work, the authors presented a theory of indirect learning control based on use of indirect adaptive control concepts employing simultaneous identification and control. This paper develops improved indirect learning control algorithms, and studies the use of such controllers in decentralized systems. The original motivation of the learning control field was learning in robots doing repetitive tasks such as on an assembly line. This paper starts with decentralized discrete time systems, and progresses to the robot application, modeling the robot as a time varying linear system in the neighborhood of the nominal trajectory, and using the usual robot controllers that are decentralized, treating each link as if it is independent of any coupling with other links. The basic result of the paper is to show that stability of the indirect learning controllers for all subsystems when the coupling between subsystems is turned off, assures convergence to zero tracking error of the decentralized indirect learning control of the coupled system, provided that the sample time in the digital learning controller is sufficiently short.

  3. Indirect decentralized repetitive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo Cheol; Longman, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    Learning control refers to controllers that learn to improve their performance at executing a given task, based on experience performing this specific task. In a previous work, the authors presented a theory of indirect decentralized learning control based on use of indirect adaptive control concepts employing simultaneous identification and control. This paper extends these results to apply to the indirect repetitive control problem in which a periodic (i.e., repetitive) command is given to a control system. Decentralized indirect repetitive control algorithms are presented that have guaranteed convergence to zero tracking error under very general conditions. The original motivation of the repetitive control and learning control fields was learning in robots doing repetitive tasks such as on an assembly line. This paper starts with decentralized discrete time systems, and progresses to the robot application, modeling the robot as a time varying linear system in the neighborhood of the desired trajectory. Decentralized repetitive control is natural for this application because the feedback control for link rotations is normally implemented in a decentralized manner, treating each link as if it is independent of the other links.

  4. Survivability via Control Objectives

    SciTech Connect

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.

    2000-08-11

    Control objectives open an additional front in the survivability battle. A given set of control objectives is valuable if it represents good practices, it is complete (it covers all the necessary areas), and it is auditable. CobiT and BS 7799 are two examples of control objective sets.

  5. Adaptive, predictive controller for optimal process control

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.K.; Baum, C.C.; Bowling, P.S.; Buescher, K.L.; Hanagandi, V.M.; Hinde, R.F. Jr.; Jones, R.D.; Parkinson, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    One can derive a model for use in a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) from first principles or from experimental data. Until recently, both methods failed for all but the simplest processes. First principles are almost always incomplete and fitting to experimental data fails for dimensions greater than one as well as for non-linear cases. Several authors have suggested the use of a neural network to fit the experimental data to a multi-dimensional and/or non-linear model. Most networks, however, use simple sigmoid functions and backpropagation for fitting. Training of these networks generally requires large amounts of data and, consequently, very long training times. In 1993 we reported on the tuning and optimization of a negative ion source using a special neural network[2]. One of the properties of this network (CNLSnet), a modified radial basis function network, is that it is able to fit data with few basis functions. Another is that its training is linear resulting in guaranteed convergence and rapid training. We found the training to be rapid enough to support real-time control. This work has been extended to incorporate this network into an MPC using the model built by the network for predictive control. This controller has shown some remarkable capabilities in such non-linear applications as continuous stirred exothermic tank reactors and high-purity fractional distillation columns[3]. The controller is able not only to build an appropriate model from operating data but also to thin the network continuously so that the model adapts to changing plant conditions. The controller is discussed as well as its possible use in various of the difficult control problems that face this community.

  6. Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation discusses active control of turbine tip clearance from a control systems perspective. It is a subset of charts that were presented at the 2003 meeting of the International Society of Air Breathing Engines which was held August 31 through September 5 in Cleveland, Ohio. The associated reference paper is cited at the end of the presentation. The presentation describes active tip clearance control research being conducted by NASA to improve turbine engine systems. The target application for this effort is commercial aircraft engines. However, it is believed that the technologies developed as part of this research will benefit a broad spectrum of current and future turbomachinery. The first part of the presentation discusses the concept of tip clearance, problems associated with it, and the benefits of controlling it. It lays out a framework for implementing tip clearance controls that enables the implementation to progress from purely analytical to hardware-in-the-loop to fully experimental. And it briefly discusses how the technologies developed will be married to the previously described ACC Test Rig for hardware-in-the-loop demonstrations. The final portion of the presentation, describes one of the key technologies in some detail by presenting equations and results for a functional dynamic model of the tip clearance phenomena. As shown, the model exhibits many of the clearance dynamics found in commercial gas turbine engines. However, initial attempts to validate the model identified limitations that are being addressed to make the model more realistic.

  7. Arbitrating Control of Control and Display Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugden, Paul C.

    2007-01-01

    The ARINC 739 Switch is a computer program that arbitrates control of two multi-function control and display units (MCDUs) between (1) a commercial flight-management computer (FMC) and (2) NASA software used in research on transport aircraft. (MCDUs are the primary interfaces between pilots and FMCs on many commercial aircraft.) This program was recently redesigned into a software library that can be embedded in research application programs. As part of the redesign, this software was combined with software for creating custom pages of information to be displayed on a CDU. This software commands independent switching of the left (pilot s) and right (copilot s) MCDUs. For example, a custom CDU page can control the left CDU while the FMC controls the right CDU. The software uses menu keys to switch control of the CDU between the FMC or a custom CDU page. The software provides an interface that enables custom CDU pages to insert keystrokes into the FMC s CDU input interface. This feature allows the custom CDU pages to manipulate the FMC as if it were a pilot.

  8. Magnetically Controlled Variable Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, Charles T.

    1994-01-01

    Improved variable-transformer circuit, output voltage and current of which controlled by use of relatively small current supplied at relatively low power to control windings on its magnetic cores. Transformer circuits of this type called "magnetic amplifiers" because ratio between controlled output power and power driving control current of such circuit large. This ratio - power gain - can be as large as 100 in present circuit. Variable-transformer circuit offers advantages of efficiency, safety, and controllability over some prior variable-transformer circuits.

  9. Conscious Control over Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges—challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown. PMID:26113753

  10. Water heater control module

    DOEpatents

    Hammerstrom, Donald J

    2013-11-26

    An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

  11. Controls and guidance research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homaifar, Abdollah; Dunn, Derome; Song, Yong-Duan; Lai, Steven H.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of the control group are concentrated on research and education. The control problem of the hypersonic space vehicle represents an important and challenging issue in aerospace engineering. The work described in this report is part of our effort in developing advanced control strategies for such a system. In order to achieve the objectives stated in the NASA-CORE proposal, the tasks were divided among the group based upon their educational expertise. Within the educational component we are offering a Linear Systems and Control course for students in electrical and mechanical engineering. Also, we are proposing a new course in Digital Control Systems with a corresponding laboratory.

  12. Digital wireless control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.

    1993-08-01

    The Digital Wireless Control System (DWCS) is designed to initiate high explosives safely while using a wireless remote control system. Numerous safety features have been designed into the fire control system to mitigate the hazards associated with remote initiation of high explosives. These safety features range from a telemetry (TM) fire control status system to mechanical timers and keyed power lockout switches. The environment, safety, and health (ES&H) Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) SP471970 is intended as a guide when working with the DWCS. This report describes the Digital Wireless Control System and outlines each component's theory of operation and its relationship to the system.

  13. STOVL Control Integration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, C.; Mcdowell, P.; Watts, S.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated flight/propulsion control for an advanced vector thrust supersonic STOVL aircraft, was developed by Pratt & Whitney and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace East. The IFPC design was based upon the partitioning of the global requirements into flight control and propulsion control requirements. To validate the design, aircraft and engine models were also developed for use on a NASA Ames piloted simulator. Different flight control implementations, evaluated for their handling qualities, are documented in the report along with the propulsion control, engine model, and aircraft model.

  14. Intelligent Control Systems Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loparo, Kenneth A.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a three phase research program into intelligent control systems are presented. The first phase looked at implementing the lowest or direct level of a hierarchical control scheme using a reinforcement learning approach assuming no a priori information about the system under control. The second phase involved the design of an adaptive/optimizing level of the hierarchy and its interaction with the direct control level. The third and final phase of the research was aimed at combining the results of the previous phases with some a priori information about the controlled system.

  15. Intelligent flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of flight control systems can be enhanced by designing them to emulate functions of natural intelligence. Intelligent control functions fall in three categories. Declarative actions involve decision-making, providing models for system monitoring, goal planning, and system/scenario identification. Procedural actions concern skilled behavior and have parallels in guidance, navigation, and adaptation. Reflexive actions are spontaneous, inner-loop responses for control and estimation. Intelligent flight control systems learn knowledge of the aircraft and its mission and adapt to changes in the flight environment. Cognitive models form an efficient basis for integrating 'outer-loop/inner-loop' control functions and for developing robust parallel-processing algorithms.

  16. Control and optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Xinsheng, Lou

    2013-02-12

    A system for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input parameter (270) and an output for outputting an output parameter (280), a control system operably connected to the chemical loop and having a multiple controller part (230) comprising a model-free controller. The control system receives the output parameter (280), optimizes the input parameter (270) based on the received output parameter (280), and outputs an optimized input parameter (270) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  17. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, R. R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to a remotely controllable mixing system in which a plurality of mixing assemblies are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly employs a central chamber and two outer, upper and lower chambers. Valves are positioned between chambers, and these valves for a given mixing assembly are operated by upper and lower control rotors, which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors. Additionally, a hoop is compressed around upper control rotors and a hoop is compressed around lower control rotors to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors and drive rotors. The drive rollers are driven by a motor.

  18. CONTROL FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lichtenberger, H.V.; Cameron, R.A.

    1959-03-31

    S>A control rod operating device in a nuclear reactor of the type in which the control rod is gradually withdrawn from the reactor to a position desired during stable operation is described. The apparatus is comprised essentially of a stop member movable in the direction of withdrawal of the control rod, a follower on the control rod engageable with the stop and means urging the follower against the stop in the direction of withdrawal. A means responsive to disengagement of the follower from the stop is provided for actuating the control rod to return to the reactor shut-down position.

  19. Decentralized adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, B. J.; Jamshidi, M.; Seraji, H.

    1988-01-01

    A decentralized adaptive control is proposed to stabilize and track the nonlinear, interconnected subsystems with unknown parameters. The adaptation of the controller gain is derived by using model reference adaptive control theory based on Lyapunov's direct method. The adaptive gains consist of sigma, proportional, and integral combination of the measured and reference values of the corresponding subsystem. The proposed control is applied to the joint control of a two-link robot manipulator, and the performance in computer simulation corresponds with what is expected in theoretical development.

  20. Instructional Prescriptions for Learner Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Jaesam; Reigeluth, Charles M.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of learner control in instructional management describes six learner control methods: (1) content control; (2) sequence control; (3) pace control; (4) display or strategy control; (5) internal processing control; and (6) advisor strategies. Relevant literature, both theoretical and empirical, is reviewed, and learner control and…

  1. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2002-09-01

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects; and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (apriori) or in response to existing contamination spread (aposteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and apriori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, aposteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  2. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2003-10-09

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  3. Compressor surge control method

    SciTech Connect

    Dziubakowski, D.J.; Keys, M.A.I.V.; Shaffer, J.J.

    1990-02-13

    This patent describes a method of controlling surge in a centrifugal compressor having a predetermined surge condition line and providing a combined output with a base load means. It comprises: establishing a main surge control line offset from the centrifugal compressor surge condition line according to a function of pressure differentials across the centrifugal compressor and across an orifice in the inlet line of the centrifugal compressor; establishing a feed forward control signal which is a function of a variable associated with the base load means which may cause the surge condition in the centrifugal compressor; and establishing an anticipatory surge control line offset from the main surge control line as a function of the established main surge control line and the established feed forward control signal.

  4. Controlling chaos faster

    SciTech Connect

    Bick, Christian; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Timme, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Predictive feedback control is an easy-to-implement method to stabilize unknown unstable periodic orbits in chaotic dynamical systems. Predictive feedback control is severely limited because asymptotic convergence speed decreases with stronger instabilities which in turn are typical for larger target periods, rendering it harder to effectively stabilize periodic orbits of large period. Here, we study stalled chaos control, where the application of control is stalled to make use of the chaotic, uncontrolled dynamics, and introduce an adaptation paradigm to overcome this limitation and speed up convergence. This modified control scheme is not only capable of stabilizing more periodic orbits than the original predictive feedback control but also speeds up convergence for typical chaotic maps, as illustrated in both theory and application. The proposed adaptation scheme provides a way to tune parameters online, yielding a broadly applicable, fast chaos control that converges reliably, even for periodic orbits of large period.

  5. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  6. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases. PMID:16287170

  7. Modeling and control of thermostatically controlled loads

    SciTech Connect

    Backhaus, Scott N; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Kundu, S.; Hiskens, I.

    2011-01-04

    As the penetration of intermittent energy sources grows substantially, loads will be required to play an increasingly important role in compensating the fast time-scale fluctuations in generated power. Recent numerical modeling of thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) has demonstrated that such load following is feasible, but analytical models that satisfactorily quantify the aggregate power consumption of a group of TCLs are desired to enable controller design. We develop such a model for the aggregate power response of a homogeneous population of TCLs to uniform variation of all TCL setpoints. A linearized model of the response is derived, and a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) has been designed. Using the TCL setpoint as the control input, the LQR enables aggregate power to track reference signals that exhibit step, ramp and sinusoidal variations. Although much of the work assumes a homogeneous population of TCLs with deterministic dynamics, we also propose a method for probing the dynamics of systems where load characteristics are not well known.

  8. Physiological and genetic responses of bacteria to osmotic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Csonka, L N

    1989-01-01

    The capacity of organisms to respond to fluctuations in their osmotic environments is an important physiological process that determines their abilities to thrive in a variety of habitats. The primary response of bacteria to exposure to a high osmotic environment is the accumulation of certain solutes, K+, glutamate, trehalose, proline, and glycinebetaine, at concentrations that are proportional to the osmolarity of the medium. The supposed function of these solutes is to maintain the osmolarity of the cytoplasm at a value greater than the osmolarity of the medium and thus provide turgor pressure within the cells. Accumulation of these metabolites is accomplished by de novo synthesis or by uptake from the medium. Production of proteins that mediate accumulation or uptake of these metabolites is under osmotic control. This review is an account of the processes that mediate adaptation of bacteria to changes in their osmotic environment. PMID:2651863

  9. Living with Bowel Control Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Living with Bowel Control Problems Resources Bowel Control Awareness Campaign Home Resources for Health Care Providers ... Living with Bowel Control Problems Living with Bowel Control Problems Living with a bowel control problem can ...

  10. Controllability of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2011-03-01

    The ultimate proof of our understanding of natural or technological systems is reflected in our ability to control them. While control theory offers mathematical tools to steer engineered systems towards a desired state, we lack a general framework to control complex self-organized systems, like the regulatory network of a cell or the Internet. Here we develop analytical tools to study the controllability of an arbitrary complex directed network, identifying the set of driver nodes whose time-dependent control can guide the system's dynamics. We apply these tools to real and model networks, finding that sparse inhomogeneous networks, which emerge in many real complex systems, are the most difficult to control. In contrast, dense and homogeneous networks can be controlled via a few driver nodes. Counterintuitively, we find that in both model and real systems the driver nodes tend to avoid the hubs. We show that the robustness of control to link failure is determined by a core percolation problem, helping us understand why many complex systems are relatively insensitive to link deletion. The developed approach offers a framework to address the controllability of an arbitrary network, representing a key step towards the eventual control of complex systems.