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Sample records for control materials degradation

  1. Study of balloon and thermal control material degradation aboard LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letton, Alan; Rock, Neil I.; Williams, Kevin D.; Strganac, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The initial results of analysis performed on a number of polymeric materials which were exposed aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) are discussed. These materials include two typical high altitude balloon films (a polyester and a polyethylene) and silver-backed Teflon from thermal control blanket samples. The techniques used for characterizing changes in mechanical properties, chemical structure and surface morphology include Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and dynamic mechanical analysis.

  2. Degradation of thermal control materials under a simulated radiative space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. K.; Sridhara, N.

    2012-11-01

    A spacecraft with a passive thermal control system utilizes various thermal control materials to maintain temperatures within safe operating limits. Materials used for spacecraft applications are exposed to harsh space environments such as ultraviolet (UV) and particle (electron, proton) irradiation and atomic oxygen (AO), undergo physical damage and thermal degradation, which must be considered for spacecraft thermal design optimization and cost effectiveness. This paper describes the effect of synergistic radiation on some of the important thermal control materials to verify the assumptions of beginning-of-life (BOL) and end-of-life (EOL) properties. Studies on the degradation in the optical properties (solar absorptance and infrared emittance) of some important thermal control materials exposed to simulated radiative geostationary space environment are discussed. The current studies are purely related to the influence of radiation on the degradation of the materials; other environmental aspects (e.g., thermal cycling) are not discussed. The thermal control materials investigated herein include different kind of second-surface mirrors, white anodizing, white paints, black paints, multilayer insulation materials, varnish coated aluminized polyimide, germanium coated polyimide, polyether ether ketone (PEEK) and poly tetra fluoro ethylene (PTFE). For this purpose, a test in the constant vacuum was performed reproducing a three year radiative space environment exposure, including ultraviolet and charged particle effects on North/South panels of a geostationary three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Reflectance spectra were measured in situ in the solar range (250-2500 nm) and the corresponding solar absorptance values were calculated. The test methodology and the degradations of the materials are discussed. The most important degradations among the low solar absorptance materials were found in the white paints whereas the rigid optical solar reflectors remained quite

  3. Degradation of Hubble Space Telescope Metallized Teflon(trademark) FEP Thermal Control Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Yoshikawa, Yukio; Castro, J. David; Triolo, Jack J.; Peters, Wanda C.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanical and optical properties of the metallized Teflon Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) thermal control materials on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have degraded over the seven years the telescope has been in orbit. Astronaut observations and photographic documentation from the Second Servicing Mission revealed severe cracks of the multi-layer insulation (MLI) blanket outer layer in many locations around the telescope, particularly on solar facing surfaces. Two samples, the outer Teflon FEP MLI layer and radiator surfaces, were characterized post- mission through exhaustive mechanical, thermal, chemical, and optical testing. The observed damage to the thermal control materials, the sample retrieval and handling, and the significant changes to the radiator surfaces of HST will be discussed. Each of these issues is addressed with respect to current and future mission requirements.

  4. Study of Degradation Processes in Dielectric Materials Used in Electronic Control Equipment Operated in ``Kozloduy'' NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naydenov, Nayden; Popov, Angel

    2007-04-01

    The electronic equipment for control of different systems of Units 5 and 6 is studied for presence of degradation processes occurring in result of continuous usage in conditions of controlled radiation background in compliance with ``Kozloduy'' NPP safety codes. Systems, operated in a continuous mode in the course of about 10 years were chosen - separate units containing different dielectric materials (varnish coating, circuit board bases, cable insulations, electro protective elements, etc.) were extrapolated. Series of test samples were prepared which were connected with flat or coaxial condensers and their characteristic parameters were measured: tgδ, ɛ, low voltage conductivity and leak currents at voltages that exceed the working ones several times. When comparing the obtained data with the reference ones, a conclusion is made about the effectiveness of electric ageing during operation in the course of time.

  5. Degradation of Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce; Banks, Bruce; deGroh, Kim; Miller, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    This chapter includes descriptions of specific space environmental threats to exterior spacecraft materials. The scope will be confined to effects on exterior spacecraft surfaces, and will not, therefore, address environmental effects on interior spacecraft systems, such as electronics. Space exposure studies and laboratory simulations of individual and combined space environemntal threats will be summarized. A significant emphasis is placed on effects of Earth orbit environments, because the majority of space missions have been flown in Earth orbits which have provided a significant amount of data on materials effects. Issues associated with interpreting materials degradation results will be discussed, and deficiencies of ground testing will be identified. Recommendations are provided on reducing or preventing space environmental degradation through appropriate materials selection.

  6. A novel method to control hydrolytic degradation of nanocomposite biocompatible materials via imparting superhydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakbaz, Mobina; Hejazi, Iman; Seyfi, Javad; Jafari, Seyed-Hassan; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali; Davachi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Acceleration of hydrolytic degradation of biomedical materials is not always desirable. For instance, terpolymers based on L-lactide, glycolide and trimethylene carbonate exhibit very fast hydrolytic degradation due to their amorphous structure, hydrophilicity, and high water absorption capability. Therefore, an attempt was made in the current study to impede the hydrolytic degradation for these materials through imparting superhydrophobicity to their surfaces. The used terpolymer has been shown to have promising potential applications as bio-absorbable surgical sutures and other biomedical materials, and thus, its applicability could be further extended upon impeding its hydrolytic degradation. Moreover, a novel method including combined use of non-solvent and nanoparticles was utilized to achieve superhydrophobicity. Very diverse wettability results were obtained which were attributed to the obtained various morphologies according to scanning electron microscopy results. More importantly, a unique hierarchical morphology was found to be responsible for the observed water repellent behavior. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results revealed co-existence of nanosilica particles and terpolymer chains on the surface's top layer. Finally, it was found that the superhydrophobic sample exhibited a significantly impeded hydrolytic degradation as compared with the hydrophilic pure terpolymer which was attributed to the formation of air pockets on the surface's top layer.

  7. LWR Aging Management Using a Proactive Approach to Control Materials Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Taylor, W Boyd; Hull, Amy; Malik, Shah

    2009-05-12

    Material issues can be the limiting factor for the operation of nuclear power plants. There is growing interest in new and improved philosophies and methodolgies for plant life management, which include the migration from reliance on periodic inservice inspection to include condition-based maintenance. A further step in the development of plant management is the move from proactive responses based on ISI to become proactive, through the investigation of the potential for implementation of a proactive management of materials degradation program and its potential impact on the managements of LWRs

  8. Final report for the designed synthesis of controlled degradative materials LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    LOY,DOUGLAS A.; ULIBARRI,TAMARA A.; CURRO,JOHN G.; SAUNDERS,R.; DERZON,DORA K.; GUESS,TOMMY R.; BAUGHER,B.M.

    2000-02-01

    The main goal of this research was to develop degradable systems either by developing weaklink-containing polymers or identifying commercial polymeric systems which are easily degraded. In both cases, the degradation method involves environmentally friendly chemistries. The weaklinks are easily degradable fragments which are introduced either randomly or regularly in the polymer backbone or as crosslinking sites to make high molecular weight systems via branching. The authors targeted three general application areas: (1) non-lethal deterrents, (2) removable encapsulants, and (3) readily recyclable/environmentally friendly polymers for structural and thin film applications.

  9. Methods for degrading lignocellulosic materials

    DOEpatents

    Vlasenko, Elena; Cherry, Joel; Xu, Feng

    2011-05-17

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading a lignocellulosic material, comprising: treating the lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying a lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant; (b) fermenting the saccharified lignocellulosic material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microorganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  10. Methods for degrading lignocellulosic materials

    DOEpatents

    Vlasenko, Elena; Cherry, Joel; Xu, Feng

    2008-04-08

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading a lignocellulosic material, comprising: treating the lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying a lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant; (b) fermenting the saccharified lignocellulosic material of step (a) with one or more fermentating microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  11. Degradation of FEP thermal control materials returned from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuby, Thomas M.; Degroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1995-01-01

    After an initial 3.6 years of space flight, the Hubble Space Telescope was serviced through a joint effort with the NASA and the European Space Agency. Multi-layer insulation (MLI) was retrieved from the electronics boxes of the two magnetic sensing systems (MSS), also called the magnetometers, and from the returned solar array (SA-I) drive arm assembly. The top layer of each MLI assembly is fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP, a type of Teflon). Dramatic changes in material properties were observed when comparing areas of high solar fluence to areas of low solar fluence. Cross sectional analysis shows atomic oxygen (AO) erosion values up to 25.4 mu m (1 mil). Greater occurrences of through-thickness cracking and surface microcracking were observed in areas of high solar exposure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed increases in surface microhardness measurements with increasing solar exposure. Decreases in FEP tensile strength and elongation were measured when compared to non-flight material. Erosion yield and tensile results are compared with FEP data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility. AO erosion yield data, solar fluence values, contamination, micrometeoroid or debris impact sites, and optical properties are presented.

  12. Characterization of Thermally Degraded Energetic Materials: Mechanical and Chemical Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.C.; Renlund, A.M.; Schmitt, R.G.; Wellman, G.W.

    1998-12-04

    We report the results of recent experiments on thermally degraded HMX and HMX/binder materials. Small-scale samples were heated confined in either constant-volume or load- controlled configurations. A main emphasis of the work reported here is developing an understanding of the complex coupling of the mechanical and chemical responses during thermal degradation.

  13. Material Corrion/Degradation Database

    SciTech Connect

    Kinkead, S.A.

    1999-07-08

    The corrosion of a variety of structural metals and materials is presented. Data on specific material--and for well-studied agents--has been abstracted from the corrosion literature. In addition, limited data on one superacid (so-called ''Magic Acid,'' a mixture of 100% fluorosulfonic acid, HSO{sub 3}F, with 25% (w/w) of antimony pentafluoride (SbF{sub 5}) added) is tabulated.

  14. Mechanical degradation temperature of waste storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, M.C.; Meyer, M.L.

    1993-05-13

    Heat loading analysis of the Solid Waste Disposal Facility (SWDF) waste storage configurations show the containers may exceed 90{degrees}C without any radioactive decay heat contribution. Contamination containment is primarily controlled in TRU waste packaging by using multiple bag layers of polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene. Since literature values indicate that these thermoplastic materials can begin mechanical degradation at 66{degrees}C, there was concern that the containment layers could be breached by heating. To better define the mechanical degradation temperature limits for the materials, a series of heating tests were conducted over a fifteen and thirty minute time interval. Samples of a low-density polyethylene (LDPE) bag, a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) high efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA) container, PVC bag and sealing tape were heated in a convection oven to temperatures ranging from 90 to 185{degrees}C. The following temperature limits are recommended for each of the tested materials: (1) low-density polyethylene -- 110{degrees}C; (2) polyvinyl chloride -- 130{degrees}C; (3) high-density polyethylene -- 140{degrees}C; (4) sealing tape -- 140{degrees}C. Testing with LDPE and PVC at temperatures ranging from 110 to 130{degrees}C for 60 and 120 minutes also showed no observable differences between the samples exposed at 15 and 30 minute intervals. Although these observed temperature limits differ from the literature values, the trend of HDPE having a higher temperature than LDPE is consistent with the reference literature. Experimental observations indicate that the HDPE softens at elevated temperatures, but will retain its shape upon cooling. In SWDF storage practices, this might indicate some distortion of the waste container, but catastrophic failure of the liner due to elevated temperatures (<185{degrees}C) is not anticipated.

  15. Controlling the Degradation of Bioresorbable Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, Istvan; Crowley, Brian; Brundage, Elizabeth; Rende, Deniz; Ozisik, Rahmi

    Bioresorbable polymers play a vital role in the development of implantable materials that are used in surgical procedures, controlled drug delivery systems; and tissue engineering scaffolds. The half-life of common bioresorbable polymers ranges from 3 to over 12 months and slow bioresorption rates of these polymers restrict their use to a limited set of applications. The use of embedded enzymes was previously proposed to control the degradation rate of bioresorbable polymers, and was shown to decrease average degradation time to about 0.5 months. In this study, electromagnetic actuation of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles embedded in an encapsulant polymer, poly(ethyleneoxide), PEO, was employed to initiate enzyme assisted degradation of bioresorbable polymer poly(caprolactone), PCL. Results indicate that the internal temperature of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle doped PEO samples can be increased via an alternating magnetic field, and temperature increase depends strongly on nanoparticle concentration and magnetic field parameters. The temperature achieved is sufficient to relax the PEO matrix and to enable the diffusion of enzymes from PEO to a surrounding PCL matrix. Current studies are directed at measuring the degradation rate of PCL due to the diffused enzyme. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1538730.

  16. Degradation of materials in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Graedel, T.E.; R. McGill

    1986-11-01

    This paper provides a perspective on the potential for materials degradation as a consequence of atmospheric exposure. Ferrous metals, masonry, zinc, copper, and perhaps some paints appear most likely to be degraded. The regimes of greatest concern vary with different materials, but they include dew, fog, airborne particles, and indoor air. The results, however, rest on a rather sparse data base and take no account of synergistic deterioration effects of corrodents; thus, the presentation should be considered a starting point for discussion and experimentation.

  17. Elastomer degradation sensor using a piezoelectric material

    DOEpatents

    Olness, Dolores U.; Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B.

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring the degradation of elastomeric materials is provided. Piezoelectric oscillators are placed in contact with the elastomeric material so that a forced harmonic oscillator with damping is formed. The piezoelectric material is connected to an oscillator circuit,. A parameter such as the resonant frequency, amplitude or Q value of the oscillating system is related to the elasticity of the elastomeric material. Degradation of the elastomeric material causes changes in its elasticity which, in turn, causes the resonant frequency, amplitude or Q of the oscillator to change. These changes are monitored with a peak height monitor, frequency counter, Q-meter, spectrum analyzer, or other measurement circuit. Elasticity of elastomers can be monitored in situ, using miniaturized sensors.

  18. Self-degradable Cementitious Sealing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Butcher, T., Lance Brothers, Bour, D.

    2010-10-01

    A self-degradable alkali-activated cementitious material consisting of a sodium silicate activator, slag, Class C fly ash, and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) additive was formulated as one dry mix component, and we evaluated its potential in laboratory for use as a temporary sealing material for Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells. The self-degradation of alkali-activated cementitious material (AACM) occurred, when AACM heated at temperatures of {ge}200 C came in contact with water. We interpreted the mechanism of this water-initiated self-degradation as resulting from the in-situ exothermic reactions between the reactants yielded from the dissolution of the non-reacted or partially reacted sodium silicate activator and the thermal degradation of the CMC. The magnitude of self-degradation depended on the CMC content; its effective content in promoting degradation was {ge}0.7%. In contrast, no self-degradation was observed from CMC-modified Class G well cement. For 200 C-autoclaved AACMs without CMC, followed by heating at temperatures up to 300 C, they had a compressive strength ranging from 5982 to 4945 psi, which is {approx}3.5-fold higher than that of the commercial Class G well cement; the initial- and final-setting times of this AACM slurry at 85 C were {approx}60 and {approx}90 min. Two well-formed crystalline hydration phases, 1.1 nm tobermorite and calcium silicate hydrate (I), were responsible for developing this excellent high compressive strength. Although CMC is an attractive, as a degradation-promoting additive, its addition to both the AACM and the Class G well cement altered some properties of original cementitious materials; among those were an extending their setting times, an increasing their porosity, and lowering their compressive strength. Nevertheless, a 0.7% CMC-modified AACM as self-degradable cementitious material displayed the following properties before its breakdown by water; {approx}120 min initial- and {approx}180 min final

  19. Mass-Loss Buttons Monitor Material Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C. N.

    1982-01-01

    Small button-sized samples attached to parent materials are simple way of monitoring degradation of parent in harsh environments. Samples determine effects of multiple exposures to environmental extremes without disturbing fit or function of parent. They are less costly and more convenient than complex instrumentation normally required to measure complete temperature/pressure time history of parent component.

  20. Designing degradable hydrogels for orthogonal control of cell microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Kharkar, Prathamesh M.

    2013-01-01

    Degradable and cell-compatible hydrogels can be designed to mimic the physical and biochemical characteristics of native extracellular matrices and provide tunability of degradation rates and related properties under physiological conditions. Hence, such hydrogels are finding widespread application in many bioengineering fields, including controlled bioactive molecule delivery, cell encapsulation for controlled three-dimensional culture, and tissue engineering. Cellular processes, such as adhesion, proliferation, spreading, migration, and differentiation, can be controlled within degradable, cell-compatible hydrogels with temporal tuning of biochemical or biophysical cues, such as growth factor presentation or hydrogel stiffness. However, thoughtful selection of hydrogel base materials, formation chemistries, and degradable moieties is necessary to achieve the appropriate level of property control and desired cellular response. In this review, hydrogel design considerations and materials for hydrogel preparation, ranging from natural polymers to synthetic polymers, are overviewed. Recent advances in chemical and physical methods to crosslink hydrogels are highlighted, as well as recent developments in controlling hydrogel degradation rates and modes of degradation. Special attention is given to spatial or temporal presentation of various biochemical and biophysical cues to modulate cell response in static (i.e., non-degradable) or dynamic (i.e., degradable) microenvironments. This review provides insight into the design of new cell-compatible, degradable hydrogels to understand and modulate cellular processes for various biomedical applications. PMID:23609001

  1. Energetic oxygen atom material degradation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a study designed to test potential Shuttle surface materials for the extents of degradation and mass loss expected to be suffered in space from the velocity impacts of ambient oxygen atoms, a novel technique was developed for generation of a high flux of energetic oxygen atoms. The generation technique involves laser-induced breakdown of molecular oxygen followed by a rapid expansion of energetic oxygen atoms. The high-velocity streams developed in an evacuated hypersonic nozzle have average O-atom velocities of about 5 to 13 km/s, with an estimated total production of 10 to the 18th atoms per pulse over pulse durations of several microseconds. Results on preliminary material degradation tests conducted with this test facility have been reported by Caledonia et al. (1987). Diagrams of the experimental setup are included.

  2. Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60,???

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Nanstad, Randy K; Stoller, Roger E; Feng, Zhili; Naus, Dan J

    2008-04-01

    Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the key issue with materials aging and cable/piping as the top concerns for plant reliability. Materials degradation within a nuclear power plant is very complex. There are many different types of materials within the reactor itself: over 25 different metal alloys can be found with can be found within the primary and secondary systems, not to mention the concrete containment vessel, instrumentation and control, and other support facilities. When this diverse set of materials is placed in the complex and harsh environment coupled with load, degradation over an extended life is indeed quite complicated. To address this issue, the USNRC has developed a Progressive Materials Degradation Approach (NUREG/CR-6923). This approach is intended to develop a foundation for appropriate actions to keep materials degradation from adversely impacting component integrity and safety and identify materials and locations where degradation can reasonably be expected in the future. Clearly, materials degradation will impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Routine surveillance and component replacement can mitigate these factors, although failures still occur. With reactor life extensions to 60 years or beyond or power uprates, many components must tolerate the reactor environment for even longer times. This may increase

  3. Redox control of protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, Marta; Jiménez-Moreno, Natalia; Dias, Irundika H.K.; Debelec, Bilge; Vucetic, Milica; Fladmark, Kari E.; Basaga, Huveyda; Ribaric, Samo; Milisav, Irina; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular proteolysis is critical to maintain timely degradation of altered proteins including oxidized proteins. This review attempts to summarize the most relevant findings about oxidant protein modification, as well as the impact of reactive oxygen species on the proteolytic systems that regulate cell response to an oxidant environment: the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), autophagy and the unfolded protein response (UPR). In the presence of an oxidant environment, these systems are critical to ensure proteostasis and cell survival. An example of altered degradation of oxidized proteins in pathology is provided for neurodegenerative diseases. Future work will determine if protein oxidation is a valid target to combat proteinopathies. PMID:26381917

  4. Characterization of thermally degraded energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Renlund, A.M.; Miller, J.C.; Trott, W.M.; Erickson, K.L.; Hobbs, M.L.; Schmitt, R.G.; Wellman, G.W.; Baer, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    Characterization of the damage state of a thermally degraded energetic material (EM) is a critical first step in understanding and predicting cookoff behavior. Unfortunately, the chemical and mechanical responses of heated EMs are closely coupled, especially if the EM is confined. The authors have examined several EMs in small-scale experiments (typically 200 mg) heated in both constant-volume and constant-load configurations. Fixtures were designed to minimize free volume and to contain gas pressures to several thousand psi. The authors measured mechanical forces or displacements that correlated to thermal expansion, phase transitions, material creep and gas pressurization as functions of temperature and soak time. In addition to these real-time measurements, samples were recovered for postmortem examination, usually with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analysis. The authors present results on EMs (HMX and TATB), with binders (e.g., PBX 9501, PBX 9502, LX-14) and propellants (Al/AP/HTPB).

  5. Dedication to Degradation: The Beauty of Materials Designed to Lay in Ruin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nychka, John A.; Kruzic, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Degradation of materials is typically perceived to be a negative response in service. Many designs, and materials, have been and are ruined due to corrosion, fatigue, weathering, ultraviolet light, fungal attack, bacterial attack, erosion, wear, electromigration… and on the list goes. However, the carefully controlled and purposeful degradation of materials is a prerequisite for success for some designs—and such ability is a beautiful necessity when it comes to many regenerative biomaterials. In other instances, we must seek first to understand the degradation mechanisms before we can achieve degradation prevention—and the resistance of some materials to degradation is also beautiful. Regardless of whether we try to prevent or elicit degradation, our dedication to degradation of materials is ever present in materials design.

  6. Polymer scaffold degradation control via chemical control

    DOEpatents

    Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.; Dirk, Shawn; Cicotte, Kirsten

    2016-01-05

    A variety of polymers and copolymers suitable for use as biologically compatible constructs and, as a non-limiting specific example, in the formation of degradable tissue scaffolds as well methods for synthesizing these polymers and copolymers are described. The polymers and copolymers have degradation rates that are substantially faster than those of previously described polymers suitable for the same uses. Copolymers having a synthesis route which enables one to fine tune the degradation rate by selecting the specific stoichiometry of the monomers in the resulting copolymer are also described. The disclosure also provides a novel synthesis route for maleoyl chloride which yields monomers suitable for use in the copolymer synthesis methods described herein.

  7. Tuning the Degradation Profiles of Poly(l-lactide)-Based Materials through Miscibility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effective use of biodegradable polymers relies on the ability to control the onset of and time needed for degradation. Preferably, the material properties should be retained throughout the intended time frame, and the material should degrade in a rapid and controlled manner afterward. The degradation profiles of polyester materials were controlled through their miscibility. Systems composed of PLLA blended with poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (a-PHB) and polypropylene adipate (PPA) with various molar masses were prepared through extrusion. Three different systems were used: miscible (PLLA/a-PHB5 and PLLA/a-PHB20), partially miscible (PLLA/PPA5/comp and PLLA/PPA20/comp), and immiscible (PLLA/PPA5 and PLLA/PPA20) blends. These blends and their respective homopolymers were hydrolytically degraded in water at 37 °C for up to 1 year. The blends exhibited entirely different degradation profiles but showed no diversity between the total degradation times of the materials. PLLA presented a two-stage degradation profile with a rapid decrease in molar mass during the early stages of degradation, similar to the profile of PLLA/a-PHB5. PLLA/a-PHB20 presented a single, constant linear degradation profile. PLLA/PPA5 and PLLA/PPA20 showed completely opposing degradation profiles relative to PLLA, exhibiting a slow initial phase and a rapid decrease after a prolonged degradation time. PLLA/PPA5/comp and PLLA/PPA20/comp had degradation profiles between those of the miscible and the immiscible blends. The molar masses of the materials were approximately the same after 1 year of degradation despite their different profiles. The blend composition and topographical images captured at the last degradation time point demonstrate that the blending component was not leached out during the period of study. The hydrolytic stability of degradable polyester materials can be tailored to obtain different and predetermined degradation profiles for future applications. PMID:24279455

  8. O-atom degradation mechanisms of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Chung, Shirley Y.; Smith, Keri Oda; Gupta, Amitava

    1987-01-01

    The low Earth orbit environment is described and the critical issues relating to oxygen atom degradation are discussed. Some analytic techniques for studying the problem and preliminary results on the underlying degradation mechanisms are presented.

  9. Geochemistry Model Validation Report: Material Degradation and Release Model

    SciTech Connect

    H. Stockman

    2001-09-28

    The purpose of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) is to validate the Material Degradation and Release (MDR) model that predicts degradation and release of radionuclides from a degrading waste package (WP) in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This AMR is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 17). The intended use of the MDR model is to estimate the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages (WPs) containing U. S . Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed with High Level Waste (HLW) glass, commercial SNF, and Immobilized Plutonium Ceramic (Pu-ceramic) codisposed with HLW glass. The model is intended to predict (1) the extent to which criticality control material, such as gadolinium (Gd), will remain in the WP after corrosion of the initial WP, (2) the extent to which fissile Pu and uranium (U) will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water, and (3) the chemical composition and amounts of minerals and other solids left in the WP. The results of the model are intended for use in criticality calculations. The scope of the model validation report is to (1) describe the MDR model, and (2) compare the modeling results with experimental studies. A test case based on a degrading Pu-ceramic WP is provided to help explain the model. This model does not directly feed the assessment of system performance. The output from this model is used by several other models, such as the configuration generator, criticality, and criticality consequence models, prior to the evaluation of system performance. This document has been prepared according to AP-3.10Q, ''Analyses and Models'' (Ref. 2), and prepared in accordance with the technical work plan (Ref. 17).

  10. Degradation of Spacecraft Materials in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    When we think of space, we typically think of a vacuum containing very little matter that lies between the Earth and other planetary and stellar bodies. However, the space above Earth's breathable atmosphere and beyond contains many things that make designing durable spacecraft a challenge. Depending on where the spacecraft is flyng, it may encounter atomic oxygen, ultraviolet and other forms of radiation, charged particles, micrormeteoroids and debris, and temperature extremes. These environments on their own and in combination can cause degradation and failure of polymers, composites, paints and other materials used on the exterior of spacecraft for thermal control, structure, and power generation. This article briefly discusses and gives examples of some of the degradation experienced on spacecraft and night experiments as a result of the space environment and the use of ground and space data to predict durability.

  11. Gradual surface degradation of restorative materials by acidic agents.

    PubMed

    Hengtrakool, Chanothai; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acidic agents on surface roughness and characteristics of four restorative materials. Fifty-two discs were created from each restorative material: metal-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Ketac-S), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC), resin composite (Filtek Z250), and amalgam (Valiant-PhD); each disc was 12 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm thick. The specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=13) and immersed for 168 hours in four storage media: deionized water (control); citrate buffer solution; green mango juice; and pineapple juice. Surface roughness measurements were performed with a profilometer, both before and after storage media immersion. Surface characteristics were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistical significance among each group was analyzed using two-way repeated ANOVA and Tukey's tests. Ketac-S demonstrated the highest roughness changes after immersion in acidic agents (p<0.05), followed by Fuji II LC. Valiant-PhD and Filtek Z250 illustrated some minor changes over 168 hours. The mango juice produced the greatest degradation effect of all materials tested (p<0.05). SEM photographs demonstrated gradual surface changes of all materials tested after immersions. Of the materials evaluated, amalgam and resin composite may be the most suitable for restorations for patients with tooth surface loss. PMID:21903509

  12. AGING MANAGEMENT USING PROACTIVE MANAGEMENT OF MATERIALS DEGRADATION

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S. R.; Bond, L. J.; Cumblidge, S. E.; Bruemmer, S. M.; Taylor, W. B.; Carpenter, C. E.; Hull, A. B.; Malik, S. N.

    2010-02-22

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken a program to lay the technical foundations for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors. The current focus is existing plants; however, if applied to new construction, there is potential to better monitor and manage plants throughout their life cycle. This paper discusses the NRC's Proactive Management of Materials Degradation program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems, and components.

  13. Aging Management using Proactive Management of Materials Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Taylor, W Boyd; Carpenter, C. E.; Hull, Amy B.; Malik, Shah

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken a program to lay the technical foundations for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs). The current focus is existing plants; however, if applied to new construction, there is potential to better monitor and manage plants throughout their life cycle. This paper discusses the NRC’s Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems, and components (SSC).

  14. Aging Management Using Proactive Management of Materials Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctor, S. R.; Bond, L. J.; Cumblidge, S. E.; Bruemmer, S. M.; Taylor, W. B.; Carpenter, C. E.; Hull, A. B.; Malik, S. N.

    2010-02-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken a program to lay the technical foundations for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors. The current focus is existing plants; however, if applied to new construction, there is potential to better monitor and manage plants throughout their life cycle. This paper discusses the NRC's Proactive Management of Materials Degradation program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems, and components.

  15. Degradation of experimental composite materials and in vitro wear simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givan, Daniel Allen

    2001-12-01

    The material, mechanical, and clinical aspects of surface degradation of resin composite dental restorative materials by in vitro wear simulation continues to be an area of active research. To investigate wear mechanisms, a series of experimental resin composites with variable and controlled filler particle shape and loading were studied by in vitro wear simulation. The current investigation utilized a simulation that isolated the wear environment, entrapped high and low modulus debris, and evaluated the process including machine and fluid flow dynamics. The degradation was significantly affected by filler particle shape and less by particle loading. The spherical particle composites demonstrated wear loss profiles suggesting an optimized filler loading may exist. This was also demonstrated by the trends in the mechanical properties. Very little difference in magnitude was noted for the wear of irregular particle composites as a function of particulate size; and as a group they were more wear resistant than spherical particle composites. This was the result of different mechanisms of wear that were correlated with the three-dimensional particle shape. The abrasive effects of the aggregate particles and the polymeric stabilization of the irregular shape versus the destabilization and "plucking" of the spherical particles resulted in an unprotected matrix that accounted for significantly greater wear of spherical composite. A model and analysis was developed to explain the events associated with the progressive material wear loss. The initial phase was explained by fatigue-assisted microcracking and loss of material segments in a zone of high stress immediately beneath a point of high stress contact. The early phase was characterized by the development of a small facet primarily by fatigue-assisted microcracking. Although the translation effects were minimal, some three-body and initial two-body wear events were also present. In the late phases, the abrasive effects

  16. Hubble Space Telescope Metallized Teflon(registered trademark) FEP Thermal Control Materials: On-Orbit Degradation and Post-Retrieval Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hansen, Patricia A.; Dever, J. A.; deGroh, K. K.; Banks, B.; Wang, L.; He, C.

    1988-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Second Servicing Mission (SM2), degradation of unsupported Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), used as the outer layer of the multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets, was evident as large cracks on the telescope light shield. A sample of the degraded outer layer was retrieved during the mission and returned to Earth for ground testing and evaluation. The results of the Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP sample evaluation and additional testing of pristine Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP led the investigative team to theorize that the HST damage was caused by thermal cycling with deep-layer damage from electron and proton radiation which allowed the propagation of cracks along stress concentrations , and that the damage increased with the combined total dose of electrons, protons, UV and x-rays along with thermal cycling. This paper discusses the testing and evaluation of the retrieved Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP.

  17. Controlled degradation pattern of hydroxyapatite/calcium carbonate composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ning; Zhong, Qiwei; Zhou, Ying; Kundu, Subhas C; Yao, Juming; Cai, Yurong

    2016-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is widely used in clinic due to its good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity except for its slow degradation speed. In the present study, spherical calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) is fabricated in the presence of silk protein sericin, which is transmuted into HAP microsphere in phosphate solution with the assistance of microwave irradiation. The effect of reaction conditions on the conversion of CaCO3 is investigated including reaction time, chemical composition of phosphate solution, and microwave power to get a series of HAP/CaCO3 composites. The degradation property of the composites is evaluated in vitro. Results show the degradation speed of the composite with higher HAP content is slower. The degradation rate of the composite could be changed effectively by modulating the proportion of HAP and CaCO3 . This work provides a feasible method for the preparation of spherical HAP/CaCO3 composite with controllable degradability. The composite thus obtained may be an ideal material for bone tissue engineering application. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:518-524, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27037606

  18. Storage life of parachutes -- long time material degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, R.H.; Whinery, L.D.

    1995-04-01

    This study considers the long-time storage of single-use nylon and Kevlar{reg_sign} parachutes. The authors present data from a 29-year-old nylon parachute, and nylon and Kevlar{reg_sign} test samples stored 14 years under ambient conditions in the absence of sunlight. They compare the results with existing predictions of parachute material degradation and other aging data. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses were preformed on Nylon and Kevlar{reg_sign} fabrics that were degraded by elevated temperature aging. The results suggest that this technique should be further examined as a {open_quotes}non-destructive{close_quotes} method of detecting degradation.

  19. MATERIAL CONTROL ACCOUNTING INMM

    SciTech Connect

    Hasty, T.

    2009-06-14

    Since 1996, the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC - formerly known as K-26), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have been cooperating under the cooperative Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program between the Russian Federation and the U.S. Governments. Since MCC continues to operate a reactor for steam and electricity production for the site and city of Zheleznogorsk which results in production of the weapons grade plutonium, one of the goals of the MPC&A program is to support implementation of an expanded comprehensive nuclear material control and accounting (MC&A) program. To date MCC has completed upgrades identified in the initial gap analysis and documented in the site MC&A Plan and is implementing additional upgrades identified during an update to the gap analysis. The scope of these upgrades includes implementation of MCC organization structure relating to MC&A, establishing material balance area structure for special nuclear materials (SNM) storage and bulk processing areas, and material control functions including SNM portal monitors at target locations. Material accounting function upgrades include enhancements in the conduct of physical inventories, limit of error inventory difference procedure enhancements, implementation of basic computerized accounting system for four SNM storage areas, implementation of measurement equipment for improved accountability reporting, and both new and revised site-level MC&A procedures. This paper will discuss the implementation of MC&A upgrades at MCC based on the requirements established in the comprehensive MC&A plan developed by the Mining and Chemical Combine as part of the MPC&A Program.

  20. Materials Degradation and Detection (MD2): Deep Dive Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Henager, Charles H.; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2013-02-01

    An effort is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a fundamental and general framework to foster the science and technology needed to support real-time monitoring of early degradation in materials used in the production of nuclear power. The development of such a capability would represent a timely solution to the mounting issues operators face with materials degradation in nuclear power plants. The envisioned framework consists of three primary and interconnected “thrust” areas including 1) microstructural science, 2) behavior assessment, and 3) monitoring and predictive capabilities. A brief state-of-the-art assessment for each of these core technology areas is discussed in the paper.

  1. Materials Degradation Studies for High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; Pavel Medvedev; Kevin DeWall; Paul Lessing

    2007-06-01

    Experiments are currently in progress to assess the high temperature degradation behavior of materials in solid oxide electrolysis systems. This research includes the investigation of various electrolysis cell components and balance of plant materials under both anodic and cathodic gas atmospheres at temperatures up to 850°C. Current results include corrosion data for a high temperature nickel alloy used for the air-side flow field in electrolysis cells and a commercial ferritic stainless steel used as the metallic interconnect. Three different corrosion inhibiting coatings were also tested on the steel material. The samples were tested at 850ºC for 500 h in both air and H2O/H2 atmospheres. The results of this research will be used to identify degradation mechanisms and demonstrate the suitability of candidate materials for long-term operation in electrolysis cells.

  2. Thermal/chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Damle, A.S.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are developed to separate gases produced by coal combustion and coal gasification. Membrane materials tested include alumina, vycor, platinum foil, and palladium foils. The porosity, permeability, and characterization of physical and chemical changes after exposure to hot gas streams is described.

  3. Thermochemical alkaline degradation of polysaccharide materials: Product characterization and identification

    SciTech Connect

    Krochta, J.M.; Hudson, J.S.; Tillin, S.J.; Spala, K.

    1985-01-01

    Degradation of cellulosics or starch in alkaline solution produces mostly organic acids which are monocarboxylic in nature. Seven of the organic acids have been identified as formic, acetic, glycolic, lactic, 2-hydroxybutyric, 2-hydroxyisobutyric and 2-hydroxyvaleric acids. In total, their yields amount to 41-46% of starting material weight.

  4. Probabilistic material degradation under high temperature, fatigue, and creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, L.

    1993-01-01

    A methodology has been developed and embodied in two computer codes for quantitatively characterizing the material strength degradation of aerospace propulsion system structural components that are subjected to various random effects over the course of their service lives. The codes, PROMISS and PROMISC, constitute a material-resistance model that is used in the NESSUS aerospace structural-reliability program. NESSUS addresses the service life-reducing effects of high temperature, mechanical fatigue, and creep.

  5. Irradiation of bioresorbable biomaterials for controlled surface degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, M.; Gilmore, B. F.; Miller, A.; Helt-Hansen, J.; Buchanan, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Bioresorbable polymers increasingly are the materials of choice for implantable orthopaedic fixation devices. Controlled degradation of these polymers is vital for preservation of mechanical properties during tissue repair and controlled release of incorporated agents such as osteoconductive or anti-microbial additives. The work outlined in this paper investigates the use of low energy electron beam irradiation to surface modify polyhydroxyacid samples incorporating beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). This work uniquely demonstrates that surface modification of bioresorbable polymers through electron beam irradiation allows for the early release of incorporated agents such as bioactive additives. Samples were e-beam irradiated at an energy of 125 keV and doses of either 150 kGy or 500 kGy. Irradiated and non-irradiated samples were degraded in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), to simulate bioresorption, followed by characterisation. The results show that low energy e-beam irradiation enhances surface hydrolytic degradation in comparison to bulk and furthermore allows for earlier release of incorporated calcium via dissolution into the surrounding medium.

  6. Oxidation and degradation of graphitic materials by naphthalene-degrading bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Zhu, Chunlin; Fan, Mengmeng; Chen, Chuntao; Huang, Yang; Hao, Qingli; Yang, Jiazhi; Wang, Haiyan; Sun, Dongping

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, biologically oxidizing graphitic materials is of great importance for practical applications as an eco-friendly and low-cost method. In this work, a bacterial strain is isolated from the contaminated soil in a graphite mine and its ability to oxidize graphite, graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is confirmed. After being cultivated with bacteria, graphite is inhomogeneously oxidized, and moreover oxidized sheets exfoliated from graphite are detected in the medium. RGO shows a higher degree of oxidation compared to graphite owing to more original defects, while GO breaks into small pieces and becomes full of holes. Both the holes in GO and the exfoliated sheets from graphite caused by bacteria have a size of below 1 μm, in agreement with the size of bacterial cells. Besides, the preliminary mechanism of the bacterial oxidation is explored, suggesting that the contact between bacterial cells and materials promotes the oxidation of graphitic materials. The ability of naphthalene-degrading bacteria to oxidize and degrade the graphitic materials shows the potential for producing GO in an eco-friendly way and degrading carbon nanomaterials in the environment.Nowadays, biologically oxidizing graphitic materials is of great importance for practical applications as an eco-friendly and low-cost method. In this work, a bacterial strain is isolated from the contaminated soil in a graphite mine and its ability to oxidize graphite, graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is confirmed. After being cultivated with bacteria, graphite is inhomogeneously oxidized, and moreover oxidized sheets exfoliated from graphite are detected in the medium. RGO shows a higher degree of oxidation compared to graphite owing to more original defects, while GO breaks into small pieces and becomes full of holes. Both the holes in GO and the exfoliated sheets from graphite caused by bacteria have a size of below 1 μm, in agreement with the size of bacterial

  7. Degradation Of Cementitious Materials Associated With Saltstone Disposal Units

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G. P; Smith, F. G. III

    2013-03-19

    The Saltstone facilities at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) stabilize and dispose of low-level radioactive salt solution originating from liquid waste storage tanks at the site. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives treated salt solution and mixes the aqueous waste with dry cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash to form a grout slurry which is mechanically pumped into concrete disposal cells that compose the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The solidified grout is termed “saltstone”. Cementitious materials play a prominent role in the design and long-term performance of the SDF. The saltstone grout exhibits low permeability and diffusivity, and thus represents a physical barrier to waste release. The waste form is also reducing, which creates a chemical barrier to waste release for certain key radionuclides, notably Tc-99. Similarly, the concrete shell of an SDF disposal unit (SDU) represents an additional physical and chemical barrier to radionuclide release to the environment. Together the waste form and the SDU compose a robust containment structure at the time of facility closure. However, the physical and chemical state of cementitious materials will evolve over time through a variety of phenomena, leading to degraded barrier performance over Performance Assessment (PA) timescales of thousands to tens of thousands of years. Previous studies of cementitious material degradation in the context of low-level waste disposal have identified sulfate attack, carbonation influenced steel corrosion, and decalcification (primary constituent leaching) as the primary chemical degradation phenomena of most relevance to SRS exposure conditions. In this study, degradation time scales for each of these three degradation phenomena are estimated for saltstone and concrete associated with each SDU type under conservative, nominal, and best estimate assumptions. The nominal value (NV) is an intermediate result that is more probable than the conservative

  8. Techniques used for limiting degradation products of polymeric materials for use in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, C. E.; Park, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for limiting or controlling the degradation products (outgassing) of polymeric materials in the space environment. One technique, now ASTM E-595-77, is used to screen out those materials which lose greater than 1% Total Mass Loss when in vacuum for 24 hours at 125 C and which have more than 0.10% Collected Volatile Condensable Materials condensing on a collector surface at 25 C. Examples of silicone materials which are high and low in outgassing are given. The numerous mechanical motions in spacecraft experiments require liquid lubricants which also might degrade in space. Labyrinth seals and barrier films are utilized to limit the degradation of or from these lubricants. A recoverable in-flight experiment has been proposed for making definitive measurements of how effective these techniques are in limiting the amounts and escape paths of outgassed molecules.

  9. Physical and mechanical properties of degraded waste surrogate material

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, F.D.; Mellegard, K.D.

    1998-03-01

    This paper discusses rock mechanics testing of surrogate materials to provide failure criteria for compacted, degraded nuclear waste. This daunting proposition was approached by first assembling all known parameters such as the initial waste inventory and rock mechanics response of the underground setting after the waste is stored. Conservative assumptions allowing for extensive degradation processes helped quantify the lowest possible strength conditions of the future state of the waste. In the larger conceptual setting, computations involve degraded waste behavior in transient pressure gradients as gas exits the waste horizon into a wellbore. Therefore, a defensible evaluation of tensile strength is paramount for successful analyses and intentionally provided maximal failed volumes. The very conservative approach assumes rampant degradation to define waste surrogate composition. Specimens prepared from derivative degradation product were consolidated into simple geometries for rock mechanics testing. Tensile strength thus derived helped convince a skeptical peer review panel that drilling into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) would not likely expel appreciable solids via the drill string.

  10. On the degradation of granular materials due to internal erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Li, Jiachun

    2015-10-01

    A new state-based elasto-plastic constitutive relationship along with the discrete element model is established to estimate the degradation of granular materials due to internal erosion. Four essential effects of internal erosion such as the force network damage and relaxation are proposed and then incorporated into the constitutive relationship to formulate internal erosion impacts on the mechanical behavior of granular materials. Most manifestations in the degradation of granular materials, such as reduction of peak strength and dilatancy are predicted by the modified constitutive relationship in good agreement with the discrete element method (DEM) simulation. In particular, the sudden reduction of stress for conspicuous mass erosion in a high stress state is captured by force network damage and the relaxation mechanism. It is concluded that the new modified constitutive relationship is a potential theory to describe the degradation of granular materials due to internal erosion and would be very useful, for instance, in the prediction and assessment of piping disaster risk during the flood season.

  11. Fungal degradation of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, J. D.; Lu, C.; Mitchell, R.; Thorp, K.; Crasto, A.

    1997-01-01

    As described in a previous report, a fungal consortium isolated from degraded polymeric materials was capable of growth on presterilized coupons of five composites, resulting in deep penetration into the interior of all materials within five weeks. Data describing the utilization of composite constituents as nutrients for the microflora are described in this article. Increased microbial growth was observed when composite extract was incubated with the fungal inoculum at ambient temperatures. Scanning electron microscopic observation of carbon fibers incubated with a naturally developed population of microorganisms showed the formation of bacterial biofilms on the fiber surfaces, suggesting possible utilization of the fiber chemical sizing as carbon and energy sources. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to monitor the phenomena occurring at the fiber-matrix interfaces. Significant differences were observed between inoculated and sterile panels of the composite materials. A progressive decline in impedance was detected in the inoculated panels. Several reaction steps may be involved in the degradation process. Initial ingress of water into the resin matrix appeared to be followed by degradation of fiber surfaces, and separation of fibers from the resin matrix. This investigation suggested that composite materials are susceptible to microbial attack by providing nutrients for growth.

  12. Gamma-ray-induced degradation of lignocellulosic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Y.W.; Timpa, J.; Ciegler, A.; Courtney, J.; Curry, W.F.; Lambremont, E.N.

    1981-11-01

    Lignocellulosic plant materials were treated with various swelling agents and exposed to gamma radiation from 60Co or 137Cs. At dosages of 50 Mrad or above, lignocellulosic materials were extensively degraded and solubilized in water. Addition of water, NaOH, or H2SO4 to the substrate increased the degree of solubilization. Complete solubilization was achieved for samples of sugarcane bagasse, newspaper, cotton linters, cotton cloth, sawdust, and alpha-cellulose powder. About 35% total sugar and 5% reducing sugar per dry weight of sugarcane bagasse could be obtained by this method. Most of the soluble carbohydrates seemed to be disaccharides or larger molecules and glucose degradation products. Solubilization of cellulose was dosage dependent and although the rate of solubilization was increased by adding alkali, released sugar was further decomposed by the alkali and by high dosages of radiation. (Refs. 14).

  13. Significant aspects on thermal degradation of hybrid biocomposite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavan, D. Saravana; Kumar, G. C. Mohan

    2013-06-01

    Interest in use of bio fibers is increasing rapidly in structural and automotive applications because of few important properties such as low density, mechanical properties, renewability, biodegradation and sustainability. The present work is focused on fabricating a hybrid bio-composite material processed through compression molding technique. Natural fibers of maize and jute with bio polymeric resin of epoxidized soya bean oil are used as a matrix in obtaining a hybrid bio composite material. Thermal degradation of the prepared material is studied through Thermal gravimetric analyzer. Chemical treatment of the fibers was performed to have a better adhesion between the fibers and the matrix. The work is also surveyed on various parameters influencing the thermal properties and other aspects for a hybrid bio composite material.

  14. Recyclability Evaluation Method Considering Material Combination and Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyasato, Naohiko; Kobayashi, Hideki

    A new method of recyclability evaluation is proposed. The recyclability of a product is given by summing up recyclability of all units to which the product is manually disassembled. The recyclability of a unit is calculated if all names and amounts of materials of which the unit is composed are known. The recyclability of a disassembled unit consisting of multiple materials is judged on the grounds of removability of impurities, miscibility and marketability of polymer blends. Recyclability of a long-lifetime product can be estimated from recyclability of units, which are modeled as probabilistically distributed degradation of materials. The proposed method is applied to recyclability evaluation for a refrigerator with several scenarios of disassembly levels. The practical disassembly scenarios limit the maximum recyclability rate of the product. Therefore, recyclability rates calculated based on the proposed method are considerably lower than those of the recyclable materials of which the product consisted.

  15. Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) and Enhanced Structural Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Hull, Amy; Malik, Shah

    2009-09-01

    This paper discusses the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) activities to further the Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD), including those to determine the effectiveness of emerging NDE techniques. The paper discusses the first part of the development of a methodology to determine the effectiveness of these emerging NDE techniques for managing metallic degradation. This methodology draws on experience derived from evaluating techniques that have ‘emerged’ in the past. The methodology will follow five stages: a definition of inspection parameters, a technical evaluation, laboratory testing, round-robin testing, and the design of a performance demonstration program. This methodology will document the path taken for previous techniques and set a standardized course for future NDE techniques.

  16. Stress and Damage in Polymer Matrix Composite Materials Due to Material Degradation at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McManus, Hugh L.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes analytical methods for calculating stresses and damage caused by degradation of the matrix constituent in polymer matrix composite materials. Laminate geometry, material properties, and matrix degradation states are specified as functions of position and time. Matrix shrinkage and property changes are modeled as functions of the degradation states. The model is incorporated into an existing composite mechanics computer code. Stresses, strains, and deformations at the laminate, ply, and micro levels are calculated, and from these calculations it is determined if there is failure of any kind. The rationale for the model (based on published experimental work) is presented, its integration into the laminate analysis code is outlined, and example results are given, with comparisons to existing material and structural data. The mechanisms behind the changes in properties and in surface cracking during long-term aging of polyimide matrix composites are clarified. High-temperature-material test methods are also evaluated.

  17. Enhanced material classification using turbulence-degraded polarimetric imagery.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Milo W; Schmidt, Jason D; Havrilla, Michael J; Cain, Stephen C

    2010-11-01

    An enhanced material-classification algorithm using turbulence-degraded polarimetric imagery is presented. The proposed technique improves upon an existing dielectric/metal material-classification algorithm by providing a more detailed object classification. This is accomplished by redesigning the degree-of-linear-polarization priors in the blind-deconvolution algorithm to include two subclasses of metals--an aluminum group classification (includes aluminum, copper, gold, and silver) and an iron group classification (includes iron, titanium, nickel, and chromium). This new classification provides functional information about the object that is not provided by existing dielectric/metal material classifiers. A discussion of the design of these new degree-of-linear-polarization priors is provided. Experimental results of two painted metal samples are also provided to verify the algorithm's accuracy. PMID:21042363

  18. Damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mantena, R.; Gibson, R.F.; Place, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the application of damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials. A recently developed impulse-frequency response technique was used to obtain damping capacity measurements on crossplied E-glass/epoxy laminates which had been subjected to four-point bending and cantilever bending to produce matrix cracking in the transverse plies. The size and location of the damage zone were correlated with changes in damping. With the expected introduction of Rapidly Solidified Alloys (RSA) as effective alternatives to conventional materials, the applicability of damping capacity measurements as a nondestructive means of evaluating degradation in these materials was also studied. A conventional A710 structural steel having three different microstructures was used for developing the methodology to be used later on RSA specimens. It is shown that damping is more sensitive to matrix cracking than stiffness is in E-glass/epoxy composite specimens. In the case of A710 steel, the damping changes at low strain, though significant, do not correlate with the mechanical property data. Damping data at high strains does correlate with the mechanical property data, however.

  19. Novel oxygen atom source for material degradation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krech, R. H.; Caledonia, G. E.

    1988-01-01

    Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed a high flux pulsed source of energetic (8 km/s) atomic oxygen to bombard specimens in experiments on the aging and degradation of materials in a low earth orbit environment. The proof-of-concept of the PSI approach was demonstrated in a Phase 1 effort. In Phase 2 a large O-atom testing device (FAST-2) has been developed and characterized. Quantitative erosion testing of materials, components, and even small assemblies (such as solar cell arrays) can be performed with this source to determine which materials and/or components are most vulnerable to atomic oxygen degradation. The source is conservatively rated to irradiate a 100 sq cm area sample at greater than 10(exp 17) atoms/s, at a 10 Hz pulse rate. Samples can be exposed to an atomic oxygen fluence equivalent to the on-orbit ram direction exposure levels incident on Shuttle surfaces at 250 km during a week-long mission in a few hours.

  20. Degradation of chitosan-based materials after different sterilization treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Juan, A.; Montembault, A.; Gillet, D.; Say, J. P.; Rouif, S.; Bouet, T.; Royaud, I.; David, L.

    2012-02-01

    Biopolymers have received in recent years an increasing interest for their potential applications in the field of biomedical engineering. Among the natural polymers that have been experimented, chitosan is probably the most promising in view of its exceptional biological properties. Several techniques may be employed to sterilize chitosan-based materials. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of common sterilization treatments on the degradation of chitosan-based materials in various physical states: solutions, hydrogels and solid flakes. Four sterilization methods were compared: gamma irradiation, beta irradiation, exposure to ethylene oxide and saturated water steam sterilization (autoclaving). Exposure to gamma or beta irradiation was shown to induce an important degradation of chitosan, regardless of its physical state. The chemical structure of chitosan flakes was preserved after ethylene oxide sterilization, but this technique has a limited use for materials in the dry state. Saturated water steam sterilization of chitosan solutions led to an important depolymerization. Nevertheless, steam sterilization of chitosan flakes bagged or dispersed in water was found to preserve better the molecular weight of the polymer. Hence, the sterilization of chitosan flakes dispersed in water would represent an alternative step for the preparation of sterilized chitosan solutions. Alternatively, autoclaving chitosan physical hydrogels did not significantly modify the macromolecular structure of the polymer. Thus, this method is one of the most convenient procedures for the sterilization of physical chitosan hydrogels after their preparation.

  1. LDEF (Postflight), S1006 : Balloon Material Degradation, Tray E06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The postflight photograph was taken in the SAEF-II facility prior to removal of experiment trays from the LDEF and shows the positions of four (4) LDEF experiments mounted in a three (3) inch deep LDEF peripheral tray. The Balloon Materials Degradation Experiment (S1006) experiment is located in the center one third (1/3rd) section, the Multiple Foil Microabrasion Package (MAP) Experiment (AO023) occupies the left one third (1/3rd) section, the Measurement of Heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei on LDEF Experiment (M0002-02) is located in the lower one half (1/2) of the right section and the Ion Beam Textured and Coated Surfaces Experiment (S1003) is shown in the top right section of the tray. The tray flanges appear as prelaunch but the white paint dots on tray clamp blocks have varying degrees of discoloration. The paint color on the lower-center clamp block is white, paint on the left-center clamp block is lightly discolored and paint on the top-right clamp block is heavily discolored. The Balloon Materials Degradation experiment, located in the center one third (1/3rd) tray section, consist of 38 polymer film specimen, in the form of either thin film or reinforced tape, and 24 fibrous cord specimen. The ends of each test polymer film specimen, approximately 1.0 inch wide and 6.0 inches long, were secured between aluminum clamp strips that attached to aluminum experiment mounting plates. The cord specimen, approximately 4.0 inches long, are secured along the left and right edges of the experiment mounting plates in a similar manner. The aluminum clamp strips and experiment mounting plates have a thermal coat of IITRI S13G-LO white paint. Non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners are used for the experiment assembly and for attaching the experiment mounting plate to the tray structure. The thin film polymeric material samples in the Balloon Materials Degradation experiment appear to have been severely degraded. All 26 of the unreinforced thin film samples have curled edges with

  2. LDEF (Flight), S1006 : Balloon Material Degradation, Tray E06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The flight photograph was taken from the orbiter aft flight deck during the LDEF retrieval and shows the positions of four (4) LDEF experiments mounted in a three (3) inch deep LDEF peripheral tray. The Balloon Materials Degradation Experiment (S1006) experiment is located in the center one third (1/3rd) section, the Multiple Foil Microabrasion Package (MAP) Experiment (AO023) occupies the left one third (1/3rd) section, the Measurement of Heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei on LDEF Experiment (M0002-02) is located in the lower one half (1/2) of the right section and the Ion Beam Textured and Coated Surfaces Experiment (S1003) is shown in the top-right section of the tray.The tray flanges appear as pre- launch but the white paint dots on tray clamp blocks have varying degrees of discoloration. The paint color on the lower-center clamp block is white, paint on the left-center clamp block is lightly discolored and paint on the upper-right clamp block is heavily discolored. The Balloon Materials Degradation experiment, located in the center one third (1/3rd) tray section, consist of 38 polymer film specimen, in the form of either thin film or reinforced tape, and 24 fibrous cord specimen. The ends of each test polymer film specimen, approximately 1.0 inch wide and 6.0 inches long, were secured between aluminum clamp strips that attached to aluminum experiment mounting plates. The cord specimen, approximately 4.0 inches long, are secured along the left and right edges of the experiment mounting plates in a similar manner. The aluminum clamp strips and experiment mounting plates have a thermal coat of IITRI S13G-LO white paint. Non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners are used for the experiment assembly and for attaching the experiment mounting plate to the tray structure. The thin film polymeric material samples in the Balloon Materials Degradation experiment appear to have been severely degraded. All 26 of the unreinforced thin film samples have curled edges, 12 samples appear to

  3. Degradation of Piezoelectric Materials for Energy Harvesting Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillatsch, P.; Shashoua, N.; Holmes, A. S.; Yeatman, E. M.; Wright, P. K.

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of energy harvesting is to provide long term alternatives to replaceable batteries across a number of applications. Piezoelectric vibration harvesting provides advantages over other transduction methods due to the ability to generate large voltages even on a small scale. However, the operation in energy harvesting is different from typical sensors or actuators. The applied stress is often at the material limit in order to generate the maximum power output. Under these conditions, the degradation of the materials becomes an important factor for long term deployment. In this work bimorph piezoelectric beams were sub jected to lifetime testing through electromagnetic tip actuation for a large number of cycles. The results of two measurement series at different amplitudes are discussed. The dominant effect observed was a shift in mechanical resonance frequencies of the beams which could be very detrimental to resonant harvesters.

  4. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  5. Degradation, fatigue and failure of resin dental composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, James L.

    2008-01-01

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle or fiber filler containing, indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed mode loading on the flexure strength and fracture toughness. Next several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading and then an examination of 3D tomography using multiaxial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection) and after that time period from secondary decay. PMID:18650540

  6. LDEF (Prelaunch), S1006 : Balloon Material Degradation, Tray E06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The prelaunch photograph shows the positions of four (4) LDEF experiments in a three (3) inch deep LDEF peripheral tray. The Balloon Materials Degradation Experiment (S1006) experiment is located in the center one third (1/3rd) section, the Multiple Foil Microabrasion Package (MAP) Experiment (AO023) occupies the left one third (1/3rd) section, the Measurement of Heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei on LDEF Experiment (M0002-02) is located in the lower one half (1/2) of the right section and the Ion Beam Textured and Coated Surfaces Experiment (S1003) is shown in the top right section of the tray. The Balloon Materials Degradation experiment, located in the center one third (1/3rd) tray section, consist of 38 polymer film specimen, in the form of either thin film or reinforced tape, and 24 fibrous cord specimen. The ends of each test polymer film specimen, approximately 1.0 inch wide and 6.0 inches long, were secured between aluminum clamp strips that attached to aluminum experiment mounting plates. Two specimen of metallized film, aluminized polyester, are mounted on the lower experiment base plate with the reinforced polymer tapes. The cord specimen, approximately 4.0 inches long, are secured along the left and right edges of the experiment mounting plates in a similar manner. Non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners are used for the experiment assembly and for attaching the experiment mounting plate to the tray structure.

  7. Computational simulation of coupled material degradation processes for probabilistic lifetime strength of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Lola; Bast, Callie C.

    1992-01-01

    The research included ongoing development of methodology that provides probabilistic lifetime strength of aerospace materials via computational simulation. A probabilistic material strength degradation model, in the form of a randomized multifactor interaction equation, is postulated for strength degradation of structural components of aerospace propulsion systems subjected to a number of effects or primative variables. These primative variable may include high temperature, fatigue or creep. In most cases, strength is reduced as a result of the action of a variable. This multifactor interaction strength degradation equation has been randomized and is included in the computer program, PROMISS. Also included in the research is the development of methodology to calibrate the above described constitutive equation using actual experimental materials data together with linear regression of that data, thereby predicting values for the empirical material constraints for each effect or primative variable. This regression methodology is included in the computer program, PROMISC. Actual experimental materials data were obtained from the open literature for materials typically of interest to those studying aerospace propulsion system components. Material data for Inconel 718 was analyzed using the developed methodology.

  8. Global nuclear material control model

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.A.

    1996-05-01

    The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of a disposition program for special nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool that treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. Such a tool must represent the fundamental data, information, and capabilities of the fuel cycle including an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, and a framework supportive of national or international perspective. They have developed a prototype global nuclear material management and control systems analysis capability, the Global Nuclear Material Control (GNMC) model. The GNMC model establishes the framework for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material.

  9. Control of Several Emissions during Olive Pomace Thermal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Teresa; Nogales, Sergio; Román, Silvia; Montero, Irene; Arranz, José Ignacio; Sepúlveda, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Biomass plays an important role as an energy source, being an interesting alternative to fossil fuels due to its environment-friendly and sustainable characteristics. However, due to the exposure of customers to emissions during biomass heating, evolved pollutants should be taken into account and controlled. Changing raw materials or mixing them with another less pollutant biomass could be a suitable step to reduce pollution. This work studied the thermal behaviour of olive pomace, pyrenean oak and their blends under combustion using thermogravimetric analysis. It was possible to monitor the emissions released during the process by coupling mass spectrometry analysis. The experiments were carried out under non-isothermal conditions at the temperature range 25–750 °C and a heating rate of 20 °C·min−1. The following species were analysed: aromatic compounds (benzene and toluene), sulphur emissions (sulphur dioxide), 1,4-dioxin, hydrochloric acid, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides. The results indicated that pollutants were mainly evolved in two different stages, which are related to the thermal degradation steps. Thus, depending on the pollutant and raw material composition, different emission profiles were observed. Furthermore, intensity of the emission profiles was related, in some cases, to the composition of the precursor. PMID:25314298

  10. Control of several emissions during olive pomace thermal degradation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Teresa; Nogales, Sergio; Román, Silvia; Montero, Irene; Arranz, José Ignacio; Sepúlveda, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Biomass plays an important role as an energy source, being an interesting alternative to fossil fuels due to its environment-friendly and sustainable characteristics. However, due to the exposure of customers to emissions during biomass heating, evolved pollutants should be taken into account and controlled. Changing raw materials or mixing them with another less pollutant biomass could be a suitable step to reduce pollution. This work studied the thermal behaviour of olive pomace, pyrenean oak and their blends under combustion using thermogravimetric analysis. It was possible to monitor the emissions released during the process by coupling mass spectrometry analysis. The experiments were carried out under non-isothermal conditions at the temperature range 25-750 °C and a heating rate of 20 °C·min⁻¹. The following species were analysed: aromatic compounds (benzene and toluene), sulphur emissions (sulphur dioxide), 1,4-dioxin, hydrochloric acid, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides. The results indicated that pollutants were mainly evolved in two different stages, which are related to the thermal degradation steps. Thus, depending on the pollutant and raw material composition, different emission profiles were observed. Furthermore, intensity of the emission profiles was related, in some cases, to the composition of the precursor. PMID:25314298

  11. Environmental Degradation of Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories Engineered Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2006-12-24

    Several countries are considering geological repositories for the storage of nuclear waste. Most of the environments for these repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, copper, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  12. Common causes of material degradation in buried piping

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C.F.

    1997-01-20

    Buried pipe may fail for innumerable reasons. Causes can be mechanical damage/breakage, chemically initiated corrosion, or a combination. Failures may originate either internally or externally on the pipe. They may be related to flaws in the design, to excessive or unanticipated internal pressure or ground level loading, and/or to poor or uncertain installation practice. Or the pipe may simply ``wear out`` in service. Steel is strong and very forgiving in underground applications, especially with regard to backfill. However, soil support developed through densification or compaction is critical for brittle concrete and vitrified clay tile pipe, and is very important for cast iron and plastic pipe. Chemistry of the soil determines whether or not it will enhance corrosion or other types of degradation. Various causes and mechanisms for deterioration of buried pipe are indicated. Some peculiarities of the different materials of construction are characterized. Repair methods and means to circumvent special problems are described.

  13. Degradation study on optical materials for concentrator photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltermann, Fabian; Roeder, Kerstin; Wiesenfarth, Maike; Wilde, Juergen; Bett, Andreas W.

    2012-10-01

    In this work the impact of accelerated aging on the spectral transmission and the mechanical robustness of silicone elastomers for concentrator photovoltaic applications was investigated. Therefore, specific test samples were manufactured. The samples were annealed at 150 °C to assure a complete cross-linking. These samples were exposed to humidity freeze, to a pressure cooker test, and to UV light. To investigate optical materials under UVA intensity up to 10 W/cm2 a test setup was developed. Thus, a UV dosage of 10000 kWh/m2 was applied to the silicone samples after thermal treatment. The mean transmission was used as a measure to identify changes in the spectral behavior and was, therefore, compared after the stress tests with the initial value. No total failures but rather degradation was observed, mainly in the range of ultraviolet and visible light. In addition, the shear strengths for the silicone elastomers were compared before and after stress.

  14. Material Aging and Degradation Detection and Remaining Life Assessment for Plant Life Management

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Henager, Charles H.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Pitman, Stan G.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-12-31

    One of the major factors that may impact long term operations is structural material degradation, Detecting materials degradation, estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of the component, and determining approaches to mitigating the degradation are important from the perspective of long term operations. In this study, multiple nondestructive measurement and monitoring methods were evaluated for their ability to assess the material degradation state. Metrics quantifying the level of damage from these measurements were defined, and evaluated for their ability to provide estimates of remaining life of the component. An example of estimating the RUL from nondestructive measurements of material degradation condition is provided.

  15. Small-molecule control of protein degradation using split adaptors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph H; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2011-11-18

    Targeted intracellular degradation provides a method to study the biological function of proteins and has numerous applications in biotechnology. One promising approach uses adaptor proteins to target substrates with genetically encoded degradation tags for proteolysis. Here, we describe an engineered split-adaptor system, in which adaptor assembly and delivery of substrates to the ClpXP protease depends on a small molecule (rapamycin). This degradation system does not require modification of endogenous proteases, functions robustly over a wide range of adaptor concentrations, and does not require new synthesis of adaptors or proteases to initiate degradation. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system in E. coli by degrading tagged variants of LacI repressor and FtsA, an essential cell-division protein. In the latter case, addition of rapamycin causes pronounced filamentation because daughter cells cannot divide. Strikingly, washing rapamycin away reverses this phenotype. Our system is highly modular, with clearly defined interfaces for substrate binding, protease binding, and adaptor assembly, providing a clear path to extend this system to other degradation tags, proteases, or induction systems. Together, these new reagents should be useful in controlling protein degradation in bacteria. PMID:21866931

  16. Small-molecule control of protein degradation using split adaptors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph H.; Baker, Tania A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted intracellular degradation provides a method to study the biological function of proteins and has numerous applications in biotechnology. One promising approach uses adaptor proteins to target substrates with genetically encoded degradation tags for proteolysis. Here, we describe an engineered split-adaptor system, in which adaptor assembly and delivery of substrates to the ClpXP protease depends on a small molecule (rapamycin). This degradation system does not require modification of endogenous proteases, functions robustly over a wide range of adaptor concentrations, and does not require new synthesis of adaptors or proteases to initiate degradation. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system in E. coli by degrading tagged variants of LacI repressor and FtsA, an essential cell-division protein. In the latter case, addition of rapamycin causes pronounced filamentation because daughter cells cannot divide. Strikingly, washing rapamycin away reverses this phenotype. Our system is highly modular, with clearly-defined interfaces for substrate binding, protease binding, and adaptor assembly, providing a clear path to extend this system to other degradation tags, proteases, or induction systems. Together, these new reagents should be useful in controlling protein degradation in bacteria. PMID:21866931

  17. Protein Quality Control and Degradation in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuejun; Su, Huabo; Ranek, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    The heart is constantly under stress and cardiomyocytes face enormous challenges to correctly fold nascent polypeptides and keep mature proteins from denaturing. To meet the challenge, cardiomyocytes have developed multi-layered protein quality control (PQC) mechanisms which are carried out primarily by chaperones and ubiquitin-proteasome system mediated proteolysis. Autophagy may also participate in PQC in cardiomyocytes, especially under pathological conditions. Cardiac PQC often becomes inadequate in heart disease, which may play an important role in the development of congestive heart failure. PMID:18495153

  18. Photocatalytic Degradation of Cell Membrane Coatings for Controlled Drug Release.

    PubMed

    Rao, Lang; Meng, Qian-Fang; Huang, Qinqin; Liu, Pei; Bu, Lin-Lin; Kondamareddy, Kiran Kumar; Guo, Shi-Shang; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Biomimetic cell-membrane-camouflaged particles with desirable features have been widely used for various biomedical applications. However, there are few reports on employing these particles for cancer drug delivery due to the failure of the membrane coatings to be efficiently degraded in the tumor microenvironment which hampers the drug release. In this work, core-shell SiO2 @TiO2 nanoparticles with enhanced photocatalytic activity are used for controlled degradation of surface erythrocyte membrane coatings. The antitumor drug docetaxel is encapsulated into nanocarriers to demonstrate the controlled drug release under ultraviolet irradiation, and the drug-loaded nanoparticles are further used for enhanced cancer cell therapy. Here, a simple but practical method for degradation of cell membrane coatings is presented, and a good feasibility of using cell membrane-coated nanocarriers for controlled drug delivery is demonstrated. PMID:27191802

  19. Effects of Material Degradation on the Structural Integrity of Composite Materials: Experimental Investigation and Modeling of High Temperature Degradation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Ronan A.; McManus, Hugh L.

    1996-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that simple coupled reaction-diffusion models can approximate the aging behavior of PMR-15 resin subjected to different oxidative environments. Based on empirically observed phenomena, a model coupling chemical reactions, both thermal and oxidative, with diffusion of oxygen into the material bulk should allow simulation of the aging process. Through preliminary modeling techniques such as this it has become apparent that accurate analytical models cannot be created until the phenomena which cause the aging of these materials are quantified. An experimental program is currently underway to quantify all of the reaction/diffusion related mechanisms involved. The following contains a summary of the experimental data which has been collected through thermogravimetric analyses of neat PMR-15 resin, along with analytical predictions from models based on the empirical data. Thermogravimetric analyses were carried out in a number of different environments - nitrogen, air and oxygen. The nitrogen provides data for the purely thermal degradation mechanisms while those in air provide data for the coupled oxidative-thermal process. The intent here is to effectively subtract the nitrogen atmosphere data (assumed to represent only thermal reactions) from the air and oxygen atmosphere data to back-figure the purely oxidative reactions. Once purely oxidative (concentration dependent) reactions have been quantified it should then be possible to quantify the diffusion of oxygen into the material bulk.

  20. Probabilistic analysis for fatigue strength degradation of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royce, Lola

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first year of a research program conducted for NASA-LeRC by the University of Texas at San Antonio. The research included development of methodology that provides a probabilistic treatment of lifetime prediction of structural components of aerospace propulsion systems subjected to fatigue. Material strength degradation models, based on primitive variables, include both a fatigue strength reduction model and a fatigue crack growth model. Linear elastic fracture mechanics is utilized in the latter model. Probabilistic analysis is based on simulation, and both maximum entropy and maximum penalized likelihood methods are used for the generation of probability density functions. The resulting constitutive relationships are included in several computer programs, RANDOM2, RANDOM3, and RANDOM4. These programs determine the random lifetime of an engine component, in mechanical load cycles, to reach a critical fatigue strength or crack size. The material considered was a cast nickel base superalloy, one typical of those used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine.

  1. Measurement Control Workshop Instructional Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Philip; Crawford, Cary; McGinnis, Brent

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  2. Material control and accountability alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    1991-08-12

    Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations governing material control and accountability in nuclear facilities have become more restrictive in the past decade, especially in areas that address the insider threat. As the insider threat receives greater credibility, regulations have been strengthened to increase the probability of detecting insider activity and to prevent removal of a significant quantity of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) from areas under control of the protective force.

  3. Controlling Material Reactivity Using Architecture.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kyle T; Zhu, Cheng; Duoss, Eric B; Gash, Alexander E; Kolesky, David B; Kuntz, Joshua D; Lewis, Jennifer A; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    3D-printing methods are used to generate reactive material architectures. Several geometric parameters are observed to influence the resultant flame propagation velocity, indicating that the architecture can be utilized to control reactivity. Two different architectures, channels and hurdles, are generated, and thin films of thermite are deposited onto the surface. The architecture offers an additional route to control, at will, the energy release rate in reactive composite materials. PMID:26669517

  4. Development of materials resistant to metal dusting degradation.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Zeng, Z.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-12-07

    The deposition of carbon from carbonaceous gaseous environments is prevalent in many chemical and petrochemical processes such as, hydrogen-, ammonia-, and methanol-reforming systems, syngas production systems, and iron-ore reduction plants. One of the major consequences of carbon deposition is the degradation of structural materials by a phenomenon known as ''metal dusting''. There are two major issues of importance in metal dusting. First is formation of coke and subsequent deposition of coke on metallic structural components. Second is the initiation and subsequent propagation of metal dusting degradation of the structural alloy. In the past, we reported on the mechanism for metal dusting of Fe- and Ni-base alloys. In this report, we present metal dusting data on both Fe- and Ni-base alloys after exposure in high and atmospheric pressure environments that simulate the gas chemistry in operating hydrogen reformers. We have also measured the progression of pits by measuring the depth as a function of exposure time for a variety of Fe- and Ni-base structural alloys. We have clearly established the role of transport of iron in forming a non-protective spinel phase in the initiation process and presence of carbon transfer channels in the oxide scale for the continued propagation of pits, by nano-beam X-ray analysis using the advance photon source (APS), Raman scattering, and SEM/EDX analysis. In this report, we have developed correlations between weight loss and pit progression rates and evaluated the effects of carbon activity, system pressure, and alloy chemistry, on weight loss and pit propagation. To develop pit propagation data for the alloys without incurring substantial time for the initiation of pits, especially for the Ni-base alloys that exhibit incubation times of thousands of hours, a pre-pitting method has been developed. The pre-pitted alloys exhibited pit propagation rates similar to those of materials tested without pre-pitting. We have also developed

  5. New insights into redox control of starch degradation.

    PubMed

    Santelia, Diana; Trost, Paolo; Sparla, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    Starch is one of the major sinks of fixed carbon in photosynthetic tissues of higher plants. Carbon fixation and the synthesis of primary starch occur during the day in the chloroplast stroma, whereas starch degradation typically occurs during the following night to fuel the whole plant with energy and carbon in the absence of photosynthesis. Redox-based regulatory systems play a central role in the modulation of several chloroplastic pathways. Reversible oxidations of cysteine residues are post-translational modifications that orchestrate the precise functioning of chloroplast pathways together with changes in pH, Mg(2+) and concentrations of metabolic intermediates. Leaf starch metabolism has been intensively studied. The enzymes involved in starch synthesis and degradation have been identified and characterized. However, the redox control of the enzymes responsible for starch degradation at night remains elusive, and their response to redox transitions conflicts with the timing of the physiological events. Most of the enzymes of starch degradation are activated by reducing conditions, characteristic of daytime. Thus, redox control may have only a minor role during starch degradation at night, but could become relevant for daily stomatal opening in guard cells or in the re-allocation of fixed carbon in mesophyll cells in response to stress conditions. PMID:25899330

  6. Environmental degradation of materials in nuclear power systems-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference which focused on corrosion damage in light water reactors. Topics considered include material degradation issues in key components, material degradation in service, microstructural and compositional effects, the effects of the environment, the effects of mechanical variables, and environment and material remedies.

  7. Attenuation of landfill leachate by UK Triassic sandstone aquifer materials. 2. Sorption and degradation of organic pollutants in laboratory columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Steven F.; Bright, Mildred I.; Lerner, David N.; Tellam, John H.

    2000-05-01

    The sorption and degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and 13 organic micropollutants (BTEX, aromatic hydrocarbons, chloro-aromatic and -aliphatic compounds, and pesticides) in acetogenic and methanogenic landfill leachate was studied in laboratory columns containing Triassic sandstone aquifer materials from the English Midlands. Solute sorption and degradation relationships were evaluated using a simple transport model. Relative to predictions, micropollutant sorption was decreased up to eightfold in acetogenic leachate, but increased up to sixfold in methanogenic leachate. This behaviour reflects a combination of interactions between the micropollutants, leachate DOM and aquifer mineral fraction. Sorption of DOM was not significant. Degradation of organic fractions occurred under Mn-reducing and SO 4-reducing conditions. Degradation of some micropollutants occurred exclusively under Mn-reducing conditions. DOM and benzene were not significantly degraded under the conditions and time span (up to 280 days) of the experiments. Most micropollutants were degraded immediately or after a lag phase (32-115 days). Micropollutant degradation rates varied considerably (half-lives of 8 to >2000 days) for the same compounds (e.g., TeCE) in different experiments, and for compounds (e.g., naphthalene, DCB and TeCA) within the same experiment. Degradation of many micropollutants was both simultaneous and sequential, and inhibited by the utilisation of different substrates. This mechanism, in combination with lag phases, controls micropollutant degradation potential in these systems more than the degradation rate. These aquifer materials have a potentially large capacity for in situ bioremediation of organic pollutants in landfill leachate and significant degradation may occur in the Mn-reducing zones of leachate plumes. However, degradation of organic pollutants in acetogenic leachate may be limited in aquifers with low pH buffering capacity and reducible Mn oxides

  8. Materials Degradation & Failure: Assessment of Structure and Properties. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This module provides information on materials destruction (through corrosion, oxidation, and degradation) and failure. A design brief includes objective, student challenge, resources, student outcomes, and quiz. (SK)

  9. Proactive Management of Materials Degradation for Nuclear Power Plant Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Taylor, Theodore T.; Doctor, Steven R.; Hull, Amy; Malik, Shah

    2008-09-01

    There are approximately 440 operating reactors in the global nuclear power plant (NPP) fleet, and these have an average age greater than 20 years. These NPPs had design lives of 30 or 40 years. The United States is currently implementing license extensions of 20 years on many plants and consideration is now being given to the concept of “life-beyond-60,” a further period of license extension from 60 to 80 years, and potentially longer. In almost all countries with NPPs, authorities are looking at some form of license renewal program. There is a growing urgency as a number of plants face either approvals for license extension or shut down, which will require deployment of new power plants. In support of NPP license extension over the past decade, various national and international programs have been initiated. This paper reports part of the work performed in support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program. The paper concisely explains the basic principles of PMMD, its relationship to advanced diagnostics and prognostics and provides an assessment of some the technical gaps in PMMD and prognostics that need to be addressed.

  10. Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the results of a literature review to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate gaseous products produced by the gasification or combustion of coal in fixed-, fluidized-, and entrained-bed gasifiers, direct coal-fired turbines, and pressurized-fluidized-bed combustors. Several impurities, such as H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and trace metal compounds are generated during coal conversion, and they must be removed from the coal gas or the combustor flue gas to meet environmental standards. The use of membranes to separate these noxious gases is an attractive alternative to their removal by sorbents such as zinc titanate or calcium oxide. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. The U.S. Department of Energy is supporting investigations to develop inorganic membranes for separating hydrogen from coal gas streams and noxious impurities from hot coal- and flue-gas streams. Membrane materials that have been investigated in the past include glass (silica), alumina, zirconia, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt).

  11. Materials Control for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The distant future of mankind and the ultimate survivability of the human race, as it is known today, will depend on mans' ability to break earthly bonds and establish new territorial positions throughout the universe. Man must therefore be positioned to not only travel to, but also, to readily adapt to numerous and varying environments. For this mass migration across the galaxies nothing is as import to the human race as is NASA's future missions into Low Earth Orbit (LEO), to the moon, and/or Mars. These missions will form the building blocks to eternity for mankind. From these missions, NASA will develop the foundations for these building blocks based on sound engineering and scientific principles, both known and yet to be discovered. The integrity of the program will lead to development, tracking and control of the most basic elements of hardware production: That being development and control of applications of space flight materials. Choosing the right material for design purposes involves many considerations, such as governmental regulations associated with manufacturing operations, both safety of usage and of manufacturing, general material usage requirements, material longevity and performance requirements, material interfacing compatibility and material usage environments. Material performance is subject to environmental considerations in as much as a given material may perform exceptionally well at standard temperatures and pressures while performing poorly under non-standard conditions. These concerns may be found true for materials relative to the extreme temperatures and vacuum gradients of high altitude usage. The only way to assure that flight worthy materials are used in design is through testing. However, as with all testing, it requires both time on schedule and cost to the operation. One alternative to this high cost testing approach is to rely on a materials control system established by NASA. The NASA community relies on the MAPTIS materials

  12. Torso RTK controls Capicua degradation by changing its subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Oliver; Sanchez Zini, Victoria; Kim, Yoosik; Casanova, Jordi; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Wieschaus, Eric

    2012-11-01

    The transcriptional repressor Capicua (Cic) controls multiple aspects of Drosophila embryogenesis and has been implicated in vertebrate development and human diseases. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can antagonize Cic-dependent gene repression, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are not fully understood. Based on genetic and imaging studies in the early Drosophila embryo, we found that Torso RTK signaling can increase the rate of Cic degradation by changing its subcellular localization. We propose that Cic is degraded predominantly in the cytoplasm and show that Torso reduces the stability of Cic by controlling the rates of its nucleocytoplasmic transport. This model accounts for the experimentally observed spatiotemporal dynamics of Cic in the early embryo and might explain RTK-dependent control of Cic in other developmental contexts. PMID:23048183

  13. Damage Assessment technologies for Prognostics and Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Hull, Amy; Malik, Shah

    2009-04-17

    Summary for Special Session Invited paper "The Best of NPIC&HMIT 2009" The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has undertaken the Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program to lay the groundwork for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs) including nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The PMMD program is examining LWR component materials and the degradation phenomena that affect them. Of particular interest is how such phenomena can be monitored to predict degradation and prevent component failure.

  14. Heat and Mass Transport from Thermally Degrading Thin Cellulosic Materials in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushida, G.; Baum, H. R.; Kashiwagi, T.; Di Blasi, C.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a theoretical model describing the behavior of a thermally thin cellulosic sheet heated by external thermal radiation in a quiescent microgravity environment. This model describes thermal and oxidative degradation of the sheet and the heat and mass transfer of evolved degradation products from the heated cellulosic surface into the gas phase. Two calculations are carried out: heating without thermal degradation, and heating with thermal degradation of the sheet with endothermic pyrolysis, exothermic thermal oxidative degradation, and highly exothermic char oxidation. It is shown that pyrolysis is the main degradation reaction. Self-sustained smoldering is controlled and severely limited by the reduced oxygen supply.

  15. A test and instrumentation system for the investigation of degradation of electrical insulating materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The basic test methods of aging and deterioration mechanisms of electrical insulating materials are discussed. A comprehensive test system developed to study the degradation process is described. This system is completely checked, and calibrated with a few insulating material samples.

  16. Thermal/chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurgo, A.; Wood, B.J.

    1993-09-01

    The specific objectives of this program are to (1) identify and evaluate long-term degradation mechanisms for inorganic membranes exposed to hot coal gasification and combustion gas streams using data from the existing literature, (2) quantify the extent of the degradation process for the most serious mechanisms by performing experiments under laboratory-scale conditions, and (3) develop a predictive model that allows estimation of membrane degradation under operating conditions. To achieve the above objectives, the program is divided into the following tasks: (1) Development of evaluation methodology; (2) evaluation of potential long-term degradation mechanism; (3) submission of a topical report and a plan for experimental testing; (4) experimental testing; and (5) model development. Tasks 4 and 5 are separate options that may be exercised by the US Department of Energy at the conclusion of Task 3. Accomplishments are presented for Tasks 1, 2 and 3.

  17. Kinetics for the degradation of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, I.

    1986-01-01

    The degradation of nylon 66 and Kevlar 29 yarns at elevated temperatures and over a broad range of humidities was studied and a rate relationship developed which models the degradation and permits computation of rate constants. The degradation rates are slow initially due to the presence of an inhibitor but increase rapidly as the inhibitor is depleted. The effect of relative humidity (RH) can be very large especially at values in the 100% range. An exponential relationship exists for nylon between the rate constant and RH. Kinetic parameters were evaluated and the rate constants at 25/sup 0/C calculated. These values showed that the tensile strength of nylon 66 will remain at a safe level over a 25-year period if the humidity is maintained at the 10% range or less. Kevlar 29 is more resistant and can tolerate humidity levels in the range of 90% or less. Degradation is governed by thermal-oxidative and moisture induced mechanisms. At the very high humidities the moisture induced degradation predominates. A relationship is developed which predicts the degradation rate over a very broad range of temperatures and humidities.

  18. Steam generator degradation: Current mitigation strategies for controlling corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, P.

    1997-02-01

    Steam Generator degradation has caused substantial losses of power generation, resulted in large repair and maintenance costs, and contributed to significant personnel radiation exposures in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) operating throughout the world. EPRI has just published the revised Steam Generator Reference Book, which reviews all of the major forms of SG degradation. This paper discusses the types of SG degradation that have been experienced with emphasis on the mitigation strategies that have been developed and implemented in the field. SG degradation is presented from a world wide perspective as all countries operating PWRs have been effected to one degree or another. The paper is written from a US. perspective where the utility industry is currently undergoing tremendous change as a result of deregulation of the electricity marketplace. Competitive pressures are causing utilities to strive to reduce Operations and Maintenance (O&M) and capital costs. SG corrosion is a major contributor to the O&M costs of PWR plants, and therefore US utilities are evaluating and implementing the most cost effective solutions to their corrosion problems. Mitigation strategies developed over the past few years reflect a trend towards plant specific solutions to SG corrosion problems. Since SG degradation is in most cases an economic problem and not a safety problem, utilities can focus their mitigation strategies on their unique financial situation. Accordingly, the focus of R&D has shifted from the development of more expensive, prescriptive solutions (e.g. reduced impurity limits) to corrosion problems to providing the utilities with a number of cost effective mitigation options (e.g. molar ratio control, boric acid treatment).

  19. Damage Assessment Technologies for Prognostics and Proactive Management of Materials Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Hull, Amy; Malik, Shah

    2011-02-26

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has undertaken a program to lay the groundwork for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs). This paper discusses the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The PMMD program is examining LWR component materials and the degradation phenomena that affect them. Of particular interest is how such phenomena can be monitored to predict degradation and prevent component failure. Some forms of degradation, such as stress corrosion cracking, are characterized by a long initiation time followed by a rapid growth phase. Monitoring such long-term degradation will require new NDE methods and measurement procedures. A critical analysis of all reactor components is required to determine if new inspection strategies are required to effectively manage slow degradation mechanisms that may lead to component failure. As reactor lifetimes are extended, degradation mechanisms previously considered too long-term to be of consequence (such as concrete and wiring insulation degradation) may become more important. This paper includes a review of techniques with potential for sensing and monitoring degradation in its early stages and will concisely explain the basic principles of PMMD and its relationship to in-service inspection, condition based maintenance, and advanced diagnostics and prognostics.

  20. Damage Assessment Technologies for Prognostics and Proactive Management of Materials Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Hull, Amy B.; Malik, Shah

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has undertaken a program to lay the groundwork for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs). This paper discusses the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The PMMD program is examining LWR component materials and the degradation phenomena that affect them. Of particular interest is how such phenomena can be monitored to predict degradation and prevent component failure. Some forms of degradation, including some modes of stress corrosion cracking, are characterized by a long initiation time followed by a rapid growth phase. Monitoring such long-term degradation will require new non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods and measurement procedures. A critical analysis of all reactor components is required to determine if new inspection strategies are required to effectively manage slow degradation mechanisms that may lead to component failure. As reactor lifetimes are extended, degradation mechanisms previously considered too long-term to be of consequence (such as concrete and wiring insulation degradation) may become more important. This paper includes a review of techniques with potential for sensing and monitoring degradation in its early stages and will concisely explain the basic principles of PMMD and its relationship to in-service inspection, condition based maintenance, and advanced diagnostics and prognostics.

  1. Electrochemical degradation of trichloroacetic acid in aqueous media: influence of the electrode material.

    PubMed

    Esclapez, M D; Díez-García, M I; Sàez, V; Bonete, P; González-García, José

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical degradation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in water has been analysed through voltammetric studies with a rotating disc electrode and controlled-potential bulk electrolyses. The influence of the mass-transport conditions and initial concentration of TCAA for titanium, stainless steel and carbon electrodes has been studied. It is shown that the electrochemical reduction of TCAA takes place prior to the massive hydrogen evolution in the potential window for all electrode materials studied. The current efficiency is high (> 18%) compared with those normally reported in the literature, and the fractional conversion is above 50% for all the electrodes studied. Only dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and chloride anions were routinely detected as reduction products for any of the electrodes, and reasonable values of mass balance error were obtained. Of the three materials studied, the titanium cathode gave the best results. PMID:23530352

  2. Materials and processes control for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Materials and processes control relative to space applications is discussed. The components of a total material and process control system are identified, contamination control issues are listed, and recommendations are made.

  3. Degradation of dental ZrO2-based materials after hydrothermal fatigue. Part I: XRD, XRF, and FESEM analyses.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Jorge; Pinto, Ana M; Monteiro, Regina C C; Braz Fernandes, Francisco M; Laranjeira, Pedro; Veiga, João P

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of simulated low-temperature degradation (s-LTD) and hydrothermal fatigue on the degradation of three ZrO(2)-based dental materials. Lava, IPS, and NanoZr discs were randomly assigned to (1) Control-Storage in distilled water at 37°C; (2) Aging at 134°C for 5 h (s-LTD); (3) Thermocycling in saliva for 30,000 cycles (TF). XRD revealed that ZrO(2) m phase was identified in all groups but TF increased the m phase only for Lava. Under the FESEM, Lava showed no alterations under s-LTD, but displayed corrosion areas up to 60 µm wide after TF. We conclude that TF accelerated the degradation of Lava through an increase in the m phase and grain pull-out from the material surface. PMID:22447060

  4. Main chain acid-degradable polymers for the delivery of bioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Frechet, Jean M. J.; Standley, Stephany M.; Jain, Rachna; Lee, Cameron C.

    2012-03-20

    Novel main chain acid degradable polymer backbones and drug delivery systems comprised of materials capable of delivering bioactive materials to cells for use as vaccines or other therapeutic agents are described. The polymers are synthesized using monomers that contain acid-degradable linkages cleavable under mild acidic conditions. The main chain of the resulting polymers readily degrade into many small molecules at low pH, but remain relatively stable and intact at physiological pH. The new materials have the common characteristic of being able to degrade by acid hydrolysis under conditions commonly found within the endosomal or lysosomal compartments of cells thereby releasing their payload within the cell. The materials can also be used for the delivery of therapeutics to the acidic regions of tumors and other sites of inflammation.

  5. Advanced Materials for RSOFC Dual Operation with Low Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Eric, Tang; Tony, Wood; Sofiane, Benhaddad; Casey, Brown; Hongpeng, He; Jeff, Nelson; Oliver, Grande; Ben, Nuttall; Mark, Richards; Randy, Petri

    2012-12-27

    Reversible solid oxide fuel cells (RSOFCs) are energy conversion devices. They are capable of operating in both power generation mode (SOFC) and electrolysis modes (SOEC). RSOFC can integrate renewable production of electricity and hydrogen when power generation and steam electrolysis are coupled in a system, which can turn intermittent solar and wind energy into "firm power." In this DOE EERE project, VPS continuously advanced RSOFC cell stack technology in the areas of endurance and performance. Over 20 types of RSOFC cells were developed in the project. Many of those exceeded performance (area specific resistance less than 300 mohmcm2) and endurance (degradation rate less than 4% per 1000 hours) targets in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes at 750C. One of those cells, RSOFC-7, further demonstrated the following: Steady-state electrolysis with a degradation rate of 1.5% per 1000 hours. Ultra high current electrolysis over 3 A/cm2 at 75% water electrolysis efficiency voltage of 1.67 V. Daily SOFC/SOEC cyclic test of over 600 days with a degradation rate of 1.5% per 1000 hours. Over 6000 SOFC/SOEC cycles in an accelerated 20-minute cycling with degradation less than 3% per 1000 cycles. In RSOFC stack development, a number of kW-class RSOFC stacks were developed and demonstrated the following: Steady-state electrolysis operation of over 5000 hours. Daily SOFC/SOEC cyclic test of 100 cycles. Scale up capability of using large area cells with 550 cm2 active area showing the potential for large-scale RSOFC stack development in the future. Although this project is an open-ended development project, this effort, leveraging Versa Power Systems' years of development experience, has the potential to bring renewable energy RSOFC storage systems significantly closer to commercial viability through improvements in RSOFC durability, performance, and cost. When unitized and deployed in renewable solar and wind installations, an RSOFC system can enable higher availability for

  6. Probabilistic constitutive relationships for material strength degradation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    In the present probabilistic methodology for the strength of aerospace propulsion system structural components subjected to such environmentally-induced primitive variables as loading stresses, high temperature, chemical corrosion, and radiation, time is encompassed as an interacting element, allowing the projection of creep and fatigue effects. A probabilistic constitutive equation is postulated to account for the degradation of strength due to these primitive variables which may be calibrated by an appropriately curve-fitted least-squares multiple regression of experimental data. The resulting probabilistic constitutive equation is embodied in the PROMISS code for aerospace propulsion component random strength determination.

  7. Controllably degradable β-sheet nanofibers and gels from self-assembling depsipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ye F.; Hudalla, Gregory A.; Han, Huifang; Collier, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembled peptide materials have received considerable interest for a range of applications, including 3D cell culture, tissue engineering, and the delivery of cells and drugs. One challenge in applying such materials within these areas has been the extreme stability of β-sheet fibrillized peptides, which are resistant to proteolysis, degradation, and turnover in biological environments. In this study, we designed self-assembling depsipeptides containing ester bonds within the peptide backbone. Beta-sheet fibrillized nanofibers were formed in physiologic conditions, and two of these nanofiber-forming depsipeptides produced hydrogels that degraded controllably over the course of days-to-weeks via ester hydrolysis. With HPLC, TEM, and oscillating rheometry, we show that the rate of hydrolysis can be controlled in a straightforward manner by specifying the amino acid residues surrounding the ester bond. In 3D cell cultures, depsipeptide gels softened over the course of several days and permitted considerably more proliferation and spreading of C3H10T1/2 pluripotent stem cells than non-degradable analogs. This approach now provides a reliable and reproducible means to soften or clear β-sheet fibrillized peptide materials from biological environments. PMID:24224082

  8. Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, Paul F.; Maness, Pin-Ching

    1993-01-01

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer.

  9. Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, P.F.; Pinching Maness.

    1993-10-05

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer. 3 figures.

  10. The History and Future of NDE in the Management of Nuclear Power Plant Materials Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.

    2009-04-01

    The author has spent more than 25 years conducting engineering and research studies to quantify the performance of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) in nuclear power plant (NPP) applications and identifying improvements to codes and standards for NDE to manage materials degradation. This paper will review this fundamental NDE engineering/research work and then look to the future on how NDE can be optimized for proactively managing materials degradation in NPP components.

  11. Phosphate Ions - Does Exposure Lead to Degradation of Cementitious Materials?

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J; Mattus, Catherine H; Dole, Leslie Robert

    2008-01-01

    An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results indicate that no harmful interactions occur between phosphate ions and cememtitious materials unless phosphates are present in form of phosphoric acid.

  12. Ground and space based optical analysis of materials degradation in low-Earth-orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, John A.; Synowicki, Ron; Hale, Jeffrey S.; Peterkin, Jane; Machlab, Hassanayn; De, Bhola N.; Johs, Blaine

    1991-01-01

    There is strong interest in being able to accurately and sensitively monitor materials degradation in both ground-based and space-based environments. Two optical techniques for sensitive degradation monitoring are reviewed: spectroscopic ellipsometry and photothermal spectroscopy. These techniques complement each other in that ellipsometry is sensitive to atomically thin surface and subsurface changes, and photothermal spectroscopy is sensitive to local defects, pin-holes, subsurface defects, and delamination. Progress in applying these spectroscopies (both ex situ and in situ) to atomic oxygen degradation of space materials is reviewed.

  13. Coherent control in hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chao; Sukharev, Maxim; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2013-05-01

    A quickly growing field of hybrid materials is emerging on the base of latest advancements in nanoplasmonic science. Here one merges plasmonics with atomic and molecular physics considering systems comprised of quantum emitters and metal nano-structures. Such systems exhibit a wide variety of new phenomena. It has long been realized that quantum control could be successfully applied to optically active nano-systems. In this paper we explore the ideas of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) applied to ensembles of atoms optically coupled to plasmonic systems. We demonstrate the implementation of STIRAP as a tool to control scattering, reflection, and transmission properties of hybrid systems. As an example we consider a core-shell silver nanowire with resonantly coupled layer of three-level atoms. A self-consistent model of Maxwell-Liouville-von Neumann equations is implemented that allows taking into account the collective effects between atoms. We show that both linear and nonlinear optical properties of atomic ensembles may be controlled by coupling to plasmonic nano-structures. The work is partially supported by NSF.

  14. Degradable thermoresponsive nanogels for protein encapsulation and controlled release.

    PubMed

    Bhuchar, Neha; Sunasee, Rajesh; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Thundat, Thomas; Narain, Ravin

    2012-01-18

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization technique was used for the fabrication of stable core cross-linked micelles (CCL) with thermoresponsive and degradable cores. Well-defined poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine), poly(MPC) macroRAFT agent, was first synthesized with narrow molecular weight distribution via the RAFT process. These CCL micelles (termed as nanogels) with hydrophilic poly(MPC) shell and thermoresponsive core consisting of poly(methoxydiethylene glycol methacrylate) (poly(MeODEGM) and poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylamide hydrochloride) (poly(AEMA) were then obtained in a one-pot process by RAFT polymerization in the presence of an acid degradable cross-linker. These acid degradable nanogels were efficiently synthesized with tunable sizes and low polydispersities. The encapsulation efficiencies of the nanogels with different proteins such as insulin, BSA, and β-galactosidase were studied and found to be dependent of the cross-linker concentration, size of protein, and the cationic character of the nanogels imparted by the presence of AEMA in the core. The thermoresponsive nature of the synthesized nanogels plays a vital role in protein encapsulation: the hydrophilic core and shell of the nanogels at low temperature allow easy diffusion of the proteins inside out and, with an increase in temperature, the core becomes hydrophobic and the nanogels are easily separated out with entrapped protein. The release profile of insulin from nanogels at low pH was studied and results were analyzed using bicinchoninic assay (BCA). Controlled release of protein was observed over 48 h. PMID:22171688

  15. Bioprinting three-dimensional cell-laden tissue constructs with controllable degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhengjie; Su, Xin; Xu, Yuanyuan; Kong, Bin; Sun, Wei; Mi, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Alginate hydrogel is a popular biologically inert material that is widely used in 3D bioprinting, especially in extrusion-based printing. However, the printed cells in this hydrogel could not degrade the surrounding alginate gel matrix, causing them to remain in a poorly proliferating and non-differentiating state. Here, we report a novel study of the 3D printing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs)/collagen/gelatin/alginate hydrogel incubated with a medium containing sodium citrate to obtain degradation-controllable cell-laden tissue constructs. The 3D-printed hydrogel network with interconnected channels and a macroporous structure was stable and achieved high cell viability (over 90%). By altering the mole ratio of sodium citrate/sodium alginate, the degradation time of the bioprinting constructs can be controlled. Cell proliferation and specific marker protein expression results also revealed that with the help of sodium citrate degradation, the printed HCECs showed a higher proliferation rate and greater cytokeratin 3(CK3) expression, indicating that this newly developed method may help to improve the alginate bioink system for the application of 3D bioprinting in tissue engineering. PMID:27091175

  16. Bioprinting three-dimensional cell-laden tissue constructs with controllable degradation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengjie; Su, Xin; Xu, Yuanyuan; Kong, Bin; Sun, Wei; Mi, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Alginate hydrogel is a popular biologically inert material that is widely used in 3D bioprinting, especially in extrusion-based printing. However, the printed cells in this hydrogel could not degrade the surrounding alginate gel matrix, causing them to remain in a poorly proliferating and non-differentiating state. Here, we report a novel study of the 3D printing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs)/collagen/gelatin/alginate hydrogel incubated with a medium containing sodium citrate to obtain degradation-controllable cell-laden tissue constructs. The 3D-printed hydrogel network with interconnected channels and a macroporous structure was stable and achieved high cell viability (over 90%). By altering the mole ratio of sodium citrate/sodium alginate, the degradation time of the bioprinting constructs can be controlled. Cell proliferation and specific marker protein expression results also revealed that with the help of sodium citrate degradation, the printed HCECs showed a higher proliferation rate and greater cytokeratin 3(CK3) expression, indicating that this newly developed method may help to improve the alginate bioink system for the application of 3D bioprinting in tissue engineering. PMID:27091175

  17. Long-Term Lunar Radiation Degradation Effects on Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; ORourke, Mary Jane; Koontz, Steve; Alred, John; Hill, Charles; Devivar, Rodrigo; Morera-Felix, Shakira; Atwell, William; Nutt, Steve; Sabbann, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is focused on developing technologies for extending human presence beyond low Earth orbit. These technologies are to advance the state-of-the-art and provide for longer duration missions outside the protection of Earth's magnetosphere. One technology of great interest for large structures is advanced composite materials, due to their weight and cost savings, enhanced radiation protection for the crew, and potential for performance improvements when compared with existing metals. However, these materials have not been characterized for the interplanetary space environment, and particularly the effects of high energy radiation, which is known to cause damage to polymeric materials. Therefore, a study focusing on a lunar habitation element was undertaken to investigate the integrity of potential structural composite materials after exposure to a long-term lunar radiation environment. An overview of the study results are presented, along with a discussion of recommended future work.

  18. Top-Down Control of Diesel-Degrading Prokaryotic Communities.

    PubMed

    Sauret, Caroline; Böttjer, Daniela; Talarmin, Agathe; Guigue, Catherine; Conan, Pascal; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Ghiglione, Jean-François

    2015-08-01

    Biostimulation through the addition of inorganic nutrients has been the most widely practiced bioremediation strategy in oil-polluted marine waters. However, little attention has so far been paid to the microbial food web and the impact of top-down control that directly or indirectly influences the success of the bioremediation. We designed a mesocosm experiment using pre-filtered (<50 μm) surface seawater from the Bay of Banyuls-sur-Mer (North-Western Mediterranean Sea) and examined the top-down effect exerted by heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) and virus-like particles (VLP) on prokaryotic abundance, activity and diversity in the presence or absence of diesel fuel. Prokaryotes, HNF and VLP abundances showed a predator-prey succession, with a co-development of HNF and VLP. In the polluted system, we observed a stronger impact of viral lysis on prokaryotic abundances than in the control. Analysis of the diversity revealed that a bloom of Vibrio sp. occurred in the polluted mesocosm. That bloom was rapidly followed by a less abundant and more even community of predation-resistant bacteria, including known hydrocarbon degraders such as Oleispira spp. and Methylophaga spp. and opportunistic bacteria such as Percisivirga spp., Roseobacter spp. and Phaeobacter spp. The shift in prokaryotic dominance in response to viral lysis provided clear evidence of the 'killing the winner' model. Nevertheless, despite clear effects on prokaryotic abundance, activity and diversity, the diesel degradation was not impacted by top-down control. The present study investigates for the first time the functioning of a complex microbial network (including VLP) using a nutrient-based biostimulation strategy and highlights some key processes useful for tailoring bioremediation. PMID:25805213

  19. Toxicity of thermal degradation products of spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, W. H.; Turner, J. E.; Sanford, C.; Foster, S.; Baldwin, E.; Oconnor, J.

    1982-01-01

    Three polymeric materials were evaluated for relative toxicity of their pyrolysis products to rats by inhalation: Y-7683 (LS 200), Y-7684 (Vonar 3 on Fiberglass), and Y-7685 (Vonar 3 on N W Polyester). Criteria employed for assessing relative toxicity were (1) lethality from in-chamber pyrolysis, (2) lethality from an outside-of-chamber pyrolysis MSTL Procedure, and (3) disruption of trained rats' shock-avoidance performance during sub-lethal exposures to in-chamber pyrolysis of the materials.

  20. A novel method for on-orbit measurement of space materials degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Verker, Ronen; Grossman, Eitan; Gouzman, Irina

    2011-02-15

    The low Earth orbit (LEO) environment is considered hazardous to spacecraft, resulting in materials degradation. Currently, in order to evaluate the degradation of materials in LEO, a retrieval of space exposed samples is required. In this study, a novel approach is proposed to evaluate degradation of materials in LEO without the need of retrieval. The method is utilizing photovoltaic cells (PVCs), an existing component onboard of any satellite. The PVCs are coated by various materials which are sensitive to different LEO constituents, such as atomic oxygen (AO) or ultra-violet (UV) radiation. The method's acronym is ORMADD (on-ORbit MAterials Degradation Detector). The ORMADD's principle of operation is based on measuring the PVC output power which depends on the cell coating material's optical transmission. Erosion of the coating by AO or coloring due to UV radiation affects its optical transmission and, accordingly, the PVC output. The ORMADD performance was tested using different coatings, such as polyimide and amorphous carbon (sensitive to AO), and siloxane based coating which is sensitive to UV radiation. The proposed ORMADD reveals sensitivity to different LEO components and can be used either as material degradation detector or as an AO monitor.

  1. Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

  2. Caveolin: a possible biomarker of degradable metallic materials toxicity in vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Purnama, Agung; Mantovani, Diego; Couet, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    Iron-based materials could constitute an interesting option for cardiovascular biodegradable stent applications due to their appropriate ductility compared with their counterparts, magnesium alloys. However, the predicted degradation rate of pure iron is considered to be too slow for such applications. We explored manganese (35 wt.%) as an alloying element in combination with iron to circumvent this problem through powder metallurgical processing (Fe-35Mn). Manganese, on the other hand, is highly cytotoxic. We recently explored a new method to better characterize the safety of degradable metallic materials (DMMs) by establishing the gene expression profile (GEP) of cells (mouse 3T3 fibroblasts) exposed to Fe-35Mn degradation products in order to better understand their global response to a potentially cytotoxic DMM. We identified a number of up- and down-regulated genes and confirmed the regulation of a subset of them by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. Caveolin-1 (cav1), the structural protein of caveolae, small, smooth plasma membrane invaginations present in various differentiated cell types, was one of the most down-regulated genes in our GEPs. In the present study we further studied the potential of this 22 kDa protein to become a biomarker for cytotoxicity after exposure to degradable metallic elements. In order to better characterize cav1 expression in this context 3T3 mouse fibroblasts were exposed to either ferrous and manganese ions at cytostatic concentrations for 24 or 48 h. cav1 gene expression was not influenced by exposure to ferrous ions. On the other hand, exposure to manganese for 24h reduced cav1 gene expression by about 30% and by >65% after 48 h compared with control 3T3 cells. The cav1 cellular protein content was reduced to the same extent. The same pattern of expression of cav3 (the muscle-specific caveolin subtype) was also observed in this study. This strong and reproducible pattern of regulation of caveolins thus

  3. Fungi and bacterial degradation of polyamide coated aircraft material

    SciTech Connect

    Trick, K.A.; Keil, G.

    1999-11-01

    Atmospheric chemical corrosion is a severe threat to metal aircraft structures. A study has been initiated to investigate the extent and mechanism of the contribution of microorganisms to degradation of coatings and corrosion of aluminum. The study involves investigation of the effects of three parameters: type of inhibitor present in primer coating, presence or absence of a biocide in primer coating, and inoculation with microorganisms. Three variations of inhibitor are being studied, chromate inhibitor, a non-chromate inhibitor, and no inhibitor. The study is also designed to investigate three microorganism inoculations: fungal consortium, bacterial consortium and sterile. Current findings from the study indicated that the presence of a biocide may reduce corrosion. There is also indication that panels inoculated with a bacterial consortium show more corrosion than those inoculated with a fungal consortium. Currently chromates, known to be both toxic and carcinogenic, are added to organic coatings to inhibit corrosion of aluminum alloys. The results of this investigation could provide direction in the development of environmentally safe coatings.

  4. Immobilization of fungal laccase onto a nonionic surfactant-modified clay material: application to PAH degradation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Tang; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Liu, Keng-Hua; Liao, Yi-Fen; Yang, Vivian

    2016-03-01

    Nonionic surfactant-modified clay is a useful absorbent material that effectively removes hydrophobic organic compounds from soil/groundwater. We developed a novel material by applying an immobilized fungal laccase onto nonionic surfactant-modified clay. Low-water-solubility polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (naphthalene/phenanthrene) were degraded in the presence of this bioactive material. PAH degradation by free laccase was higher than degradation by immobilized laccase when the surfactant concentration was allowed to form micelles. PAH degradation by immobilized laccase on TX-100-modified clay was higher than on Brij35-modified clay. Strong laccase degradation of PAH can be maintained by adding surfactant monomers or micelles. The physical adsorption of nonionic surfactants onto clay plays an important role in PAH degradation by laccase, which can be explained by the structure and molecular interactions of the surfactant with the clay and enzyme. A system where laccase is immobilized onto TX-100-monomer-modified clay is a good candidate bioactive material for in situ PAHs bioremediation. PMID:25739840

  5. Attitudinal effects of degrading themes and sexual explicitness in video materials.

    PubMed

    Golde, J A; Strassberg, D S; Turner, C M; Lowe, K

    2000-07-01

    This study examined the independent and interactive effects of sexual explicitness and degrading themes toward women on mens' attitudes following exposure to video presentations of male-female interactions. Subjects were 83 male college students who viewed video vignettes under one of four stimulus conditions: (a) sexually explicit/degrading, (b) sexually explicit/nondegrading, (c) nonexplicit/degrading, and (d) nonexplicit/nondegrading. Results revealed that men exposed to degrading material, regardless of explicitness, were significantly more likely to express attitudes supportive of rape, while explicitness had no significant main or interactive effect on these attitudes. Further, the interaction of explicitness with degradation was found to impact scores on a measure of sexual callousness. Theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:10904993

  6. Susceptibility of a polycaprolactone-based root canal filling material to degradation using an agar-well diffusion assay

    PubMed Central

    Hiraishi, Noriko; Sadek, Fernanda T.; King, Nigel M.; Ferrari, Marco; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cholesterol esterase is both a component of salivary hydrolases as well as an inflammatory cell-derived enzyme and has been shown to cause biodegradation of methacrylate-based resin composites. This study examined whether Resilon, a polycaprolactone-based thermoplastic root filling material is susceptible to biodegradation by cholesterol esterase using agar-well diffusion assay of serially-diluted aqueous Resilon emulsions that were dispersed in agar. Materials and methods Emulsions of Resilon and polycaprolactone were prepared and dispersed in agar on culture plates. Two different concentrations of a cholesterol esterase (0.3 and 1.2 U/mL) were prepared and fed to wells prepared in the agar plates using an agar-well diffusion assay for examination the degradation of polymeric materials. Results Degradation of the emulsified Resilon was manifested as the formation of clear zones of different sizes around the agar wells. No clear zones were observed in agar wells that contain sterile distilled water as the negative control. Clinical significance Although dispersion Resilon into an emulsion is not the way in which this material is employed as a root filling material, the potential for Resilon to be degraded by cholesterol esterase is of potential concern as one cannot limit the degradation of extruded Resilon from a root apex by monocyte-derived macrophages to just the anatomical root apex. As the present study employed a high concentration of cholesterol esterase, further studies should be directed to examining the degradation of Resilon using macrophage cell cultures. PMID:18578181

  7. Degradation mode surveys of high performance candidate container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1990-12-01

    Corrosion resistant materials are being considered for the metallic barrier of the Yucca Mountain Project`s high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. Nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys and titanium alloys have good corrosion resistance properties and are considered good candidates for the metallic barrier. The localized corrosion phenomena, pitting and crevice corrosion, are considered as potentially limiting for the barrier lifetime. An understanding of the mechanisms of localized corrosion and of how various parameters affect it will be necessary for adequate performance assessment of candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns involving localized corrosion are discussed. The effects of various parameters, such as temperature and concentration of halide species, on localized corrosion are given. In addition, concerns about aging of the protective oxide layer in the expected service temperature range (50 to 250{degree}C) are presented. Also some mechanistic considerations of localized corrosion are given. 45 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Damping capacity measurements of degradation in advanced materials. [Rapidly solidified alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mantena, R.; Gibson, R.F.; Place, T.A.

    1986-04-01

    This paper describes the application of damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials. A recently developed impulse-frequency response technique was used to obtain damping capacity measurements on crossplied E-glass/epoxy laminates that had been subjected to four-point bending and cantilever bending to produce matrix cracking in the transverse plies. The size and location of the damage zone were correlated with changes to damping. With the expected introduction of Rapidly Solidified Alloys (RSA) as effective alternatives to conventional materials, the applicability of damping capacity measurements as a non destructive means of evaluating degradation in these materials was also studied. 17 references, 15 figures.

  9. Measurements and simulations of boron carbide as degrader material for proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Baumgarten, Christian; Kiselev, Daniela; van der Meer, Robert; Risters, Yannic; Schippers, Marco

    2016-07-21

    We report on test measurements using boron carbide (B4C) as degrader material in comparison with the conventional graphite, which is currently used in many proton therapy degraders. Boron carbide is a material of lower average atomic weight and higher density than graphite. Calculations predict that, compared to graphite, the use of boron carbide results in a lower emittance behind the degrader due to the shorter degrader length. Downstream of the acceptance defining collimation system we expect a higher beam transmission, especially at low beam energies. This is of great interest in proton therapy applications as it allows either a reduction of the beam intensity extracted from the cyclotron leading to lower activation or a reduction of the treatment time. This paper summarizes the results of simulations and experiments carried out at the PROSCAN facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute(1). The simulations predict an increase in the transmitted beam current after the collimation system of approx. 30.5% for beam degradation from 250 to 84 MeV for a boron carbide degrader compared to graphite. The experiment carried out with a boron carbide block reducing the energy to 84 MeV yielded a transmission improvement of 37% compared with the graphite degrader set to that energy. PMID:27351317

  10. Measurements and simulations of boron carbide as degrader material for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Baumgarten, Christian; Kiselev, Daniela; van der Meer, Robert; Risters, Yannic; Schippers, Marco

    2016-07-01

    We report on test measurements using boron carbide (B4C) as degrader material in comparison with the conventional graphite, which is currently used in many proton therapy degraders. Boron carbide is a material of lower average atomic weight and higher density than graphite. Calculations predict that, compared to graphite, the use of boron carbide results in a lower emittance behind the degrader due to the shorter degrader length. Downstream of the acceptance defining collimation system we expect a higher beam transmission, especially at low beam energies. This is of great interest in proton therapy applications as it allows either a reduction of the beam intensity extracted from the cyclotron leading to lower activation or a reduction of the treatment time. This paper summarizes the results of simulations and experiments carried out at the PROSCAN facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute1. The simulations predict an increase in the transmitted beam current after the collimation system of approx. 30.5% for beam degradation from 250 to 84 MeV for a boron carbide degrader compared to graphite. The experiment carried out with a boron carbide block reducing the energy to 84 MeV yielded a transmission improvement of 37% compared with the graphite degrader set to that energy.

  11. Material degradation of liquid organic semiconductors analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Junichi; Fukuchi, Masashi; Kaji, Hironori; Hirata, Shuzo; Jung, Heo Hyo; Adachi, Chihaya; Hirata, Osamu; Shibano, Yuki

    2015-08-15

    Liquid organic light-emitting diodes (liquid OLEDs) are unique devices consisting only of liquid organic semiconductors in the active layer, and the device performances have been investigated recently. However, the device degradation, especially, the origin has been unknown. In this study, we show that material degradation occurs in liquid OLEDs, whose active layer is composed of carbazole with an ethylene glycol chain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments clearly exhibit that the dimerization reaction of carbazole moiety occurs in the liquid OLEDs during driving the devices. In contrast, cleavages of the ethylene glycol chain are not detected within experimental error. The dimerization reaction is considered to be related to the device degradation.

  12. Substrate-anchored and degradation-sensitive anti-inflammatory coatings for implant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Duo; Chen, Xingyu; Chen, Tianchan; Ding, Chunmei; Wu, Wei; Li, Jianshu

    2015-06-01

    Implant materials need to be highly biocompatible to avoid inflammation in clinical practice. Although biodegradable polymeric implants can eliminate the need for a second surgical intervention to remove the implant materials, they may produce acidic degradation products in vivo and cause non-bacterial inflammation. Here we show the strategy of “substrate-anchored and degradation-sensitive coatings” for biodegradable implants. Using poly(lactic acid)/hydroxyapatite as an implant material model, we constructed a layer-by-layer coating using pH-sensitive star polymers and dendrimers loaded with an anti-inflammatory drug, which was immobilised through a hydroxyapatite-anchored layer. The multifunctional coating can effectively suppress the local inflammation caused by the degradation of implant materials for at least 8 weeks in vivo. Moreover, the substrate-anchored coating is able to modulate the degradation of the substrate in a more homogeneous manner. The “substrate-anchored and degradation-sensitive coating” strategy therefore exhibits potential for the design of various self-anti-inflammatory biodegradable implant materials.

  13. Substrate-anchored and degradation-sensitive anti-inflammatory coatings for implant materials

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Duo; Chen, Xingyu; Chen, Tianchan; Ding, Chunmei; Wu, Wei; Li, Jianshu

    2015-01-01

    Implant materials need to be highly biocompatible to avoid inflammation in clinical practice. Although biodegradable polymeric implants can eliminate the need for a second surgical intervention to remove the implant materials, they may produce acidic degradation products in vivo and cause non-bacterial inflammation. Here we show the strategy of “substrate-anchored and degradation-sensitive coatings” for biodegradable implants. Using poly(lactic acid)/hydroxyapatite as an implant material model, we constructed a layer-by-layer coating using pH-sensitive star polymers and dendrimers loaded with an anti-inflammatory drug, which was immobilised through a hydroxyapatite-anchored layer. The multifunctional coating can effectively suppress the local inflammation caused by the degradation of implant materials for at least 8 weeks in vivo. Moreover, the substrate-anchored coating is able to modulate the degradation of the substrate in a more homogeneous manner. The “substrate-anchored and degradation-sensitive coating” strategy therefore exhibits potential for the design of various self-anti-inflammatory biodegradable implant materials. PMID:26077243

  14. Correlation of electrical reactor cable failure with materials degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Stuetzer, O.M.

    1986-03-01

    Complete circuit failure (shortout) of electrical cables typically used in nuclear power plant containments is investigated. Failure modes are correlated with the mechanical deterioration of the elastomeric cable materials. It is found that for normal reactor operation, electrical cables are reliable and safe over very long periods. During high temperature excursions, however, cables pulled across corners under high stress may short out due to conductor creep. Severe cracking will occur in short times during high temperatures (>150/sup 0/C) and in times of the order of years at elevated temperatures (100/sup 0/C to 140/sup 0/C). A theoretical treatment of stress distribution responsible for creep and for cracking by J.E. Reaugh of Science Applications, Inc. is contained in the Appendix. 29 refs., 32 figs.

  15. Degradation of thermal shield materials in the space radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoji, S.; Kimura, H.; Koitabashi, M.; Imamura, T.; Kasai, R.; Matsushita, M.

    1983-12-01

    Changes in temperature distribution data of Experimental Technology Satellite 4 after its 3 months mission term are discussed. Analysis of the data suggested that the thermal shields loose their function in the space radiation environment. The effect of energetic particles on the shield materials was investigated. Electron beams of 500 keV and proton beams of 900 keV were irradiated on silver-Teflon and aluminized Kapton films. The fluences were changed between 10 to the 14th and 10 to the 16th power sqcm. Temperature varied between -100 and 100C. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, tensile strength and elongation rate were measured. Thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were performed. Electron fluxes have remarkable effects on the mechanical properties, proton fluxes on the thermophysical properties of silver-Teflon film. Kapton films do not change much.

  16. Condition monitoring methods applied to degradation of chlorosulfonated polyethylene cable jacketing materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Bernstein, Robert; Celina, Mathias Christopher

    2005-05-01

    Three promising polymer material condition monitoring (CM) methods were applied to eight commercial chlorosulfonated polyethylene cable jacket materials aged under both elevated temperature and high-energy radiation conditions. The CM methods examined, cross-sectional modulus profiling, solvent uptake and NMR T{sub 2} relaxation time measurements of solvent-swelled samples, are closely related since they are all strongly influenced by the changes in overall crosslink density of the materials. Each approach was found to correlate well with ultimate tensile elongation measurements, the most widely used method for following degradation of elastomeric materials. In addition approximately universal failure criteria were found to be applicable for the modulus profiling and solvent uptake measurements, independent of the CSPE material examined and its degradation environment. For an arbitrarily assumed elongation 'failure' criterion of 50% absolute, the CSPE materials typically reached 'failure' when the modulus increased to {approx}35 MPa and the uptake factor in p-xylene decreased to {approx}1.6.

  17. Controllable degradation kinetics of POSS nanoparticle-integrated poly(ε-caprolactone urea)urethane elastomers for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Yildirimer, Lara; Buanz, Asma; Gaisford, Simon; Malins, Edward L; Remzi Becer, C; Moiemen, Naiem; Reynolds, Gary M; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable elastomers are a popular choice for tissue engineering scaffolds, particularly in mechanically challenging settings (e.g. the skin). As the optimal rate of scaffold degradation depends on the tissue type to be regenerated, next-generation scaffolds must demonstrate tuneable degradation patterns. Previous investigations mainly focussed on the integration of more or less hydrolysable components to modulate degradation rates. In this study, however, the objective was to develop and synthesize a family of novel biodegradable polyurethanes (PUs) based on a poly(ε-caprolactone urea)urethane backbone integrating polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-PCLU) with varying amounts of hard segments (24%, 28% and 33% (w/v)) in order to investigate the influence of hard segment chemistry on the degradation rate and profile. PUs lacking POSS nanoparticles served to prove the important function of POSS in maintaining the mechanical structures of the PU scaffolds before, during and after degradation. Mechanical testing of degraded samples revealed hard segment-dependent modulation of the materials' viscoelastic properties, which was attributable to (i) degradation-induced changes in the PU crystallinity and (ii) either the presence or absence of POSS. In conclusion, this study presents a facile method of controlling degradation profiles of PU scaffolds used in tissue engineering applications. PMID:26463421

  18. Development of materials resistant to metal dusting degradation.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Zeng, Z.

    2006-04-24

    Metal dusting corrosion has been a serious problem in the petroleum and petrochemical industries, such as reforming and syngas production systems. This form of deterioration has led to worldwide material loss for 50 years. For the past three years, we have studied the mechanism of metal dusting for Fe- and Ni-base alloys. In this report, we present a correlation between the weight loss and depth of pits that form in Ni-base alloys. Nickel-base alloys were also tested at 1 and 14.8 atm (210 psi), in a high carbon activity environment. Higher system pressure was found to accelerate corrosion in most Ni-base alloys. To reduce testing time, a pre-pitting method was developed. Mechanical scratches on the alloy surface led to fast metal dusting corrosion. We have also developed preliminary data on the performance of weldments of several Ni-base alloys in a metal dusting environment. Finally, Alloy 800 tubes and plates used in a reformer plant were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and Raman spectroscopy. The oxide scale on the surface of the Alloy 800 primarily consists of Fe{sub 1+x}Cr{sub 2-X}O{sub 4} spinel phase with high Fe content. Carbon can diffuse through this oxide scale. It was discovered that the growth of metal dusting pits could be stopped by means of a slightly oxidized alloy surface. This leads to a new way to solve metal dusting problem.

  19. On probabilistic aspects in the dynamic degradation of ductile materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Gilles; Trumel, Hervé; Hild, Francois; Pellegrini, Yves-Patrick; Denoual, Christophe

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic loadings produce high stress waves leading to the spallation of ductile materials such as aluminium, copper, magnesium or tantalum [1-3]. The main mechanism used to explain the change in the number of cavities with the stress rate is nucleation inhibition, induced by the growth of already nucleated cavities [4]. The dependence of the spall strength and critical time with the loading rate is investigated in the framework of a probabilistic model [4]. The present approach, which explains previous experimental findings on the strain rate dependence of the spall strength, is applied to analyze experimental data on tantalum [5]. [3pt] References: [1] Meyers M.A., Aimone C. T., 1983, ``Dynamic Fracture (Spalling) of Metals'', Prog. Mater. Sci., 18(1),pp. 1-96 [2] Curran D.R., Seaman L., Shockey D.A., 1987, ``Dynamic Fracture of Solids'', Phys. Rep., 147, pp. 253-388 [3] Grady D.E., 1988, ``The Spall Strength of Condensed Matter'', J. Mech. Phys. Sol., 36(3), pp. 353-384 [4] Trumel H., Hild F., Roy G., Pellegrini Y.-P., Denoual C., submitted to J. Mech. Phys. Sol., 2008. [5] Roy G., 2003, ``Vers une modelisation approfondie de l'endommagement dynamique ductile. Investigation experimentale d'une nuance de tantale et developpements theoriques'', Ph.D. Thesis, Poitiers University, France

  20. Material degradation due to moisture and temperature. Part 1: mathematical model, analysis, and analytical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Mudunuru, M. K.; Nakshatrala, K. B.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical response, serviceability, and load-bearing capacity of materials and structural components can be adversely affected due to external stimuli, which include exposure to a corrosive chemical species, high temperatures, temperature fluctuations (i.e., freezing-thawing), cyclic mechanical loading, just to name a few. It is, therefore, of paramount importance in several branches of engineering—ranging from aerospace engineering, civil engineering to biomedical engineering—to have a fundamental understanding of degradation of materials, as the materials in these applications are often subjected to adverse environments. As a result of recent advancements in material science, new materials such as fiber-reinforced polymers and multi-functional materials that exhibit high ductility have been developed and widely used, for example, as infrastructural materials or in medical devices (e.g., stents). The traditional small-strain approaches of modeling these materials will not be adequate. In this paper, we study degradation of materials due to an exposure to chemical species and temperature under large strain and large deformations. In the first part of our research work, we present a consistent mathematical model with firm thermodynamic underpinning. We then obtain semi-analytical solutions of several canonical problems to illustrate the nature of the quasi-static and unsteady behaviors of degrading hyperelastic solids.

  1. Investigating the control of chlorophyll degradation by genomic correlation mining

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorophyll degradation is an intricate process that is critical in a variety of plant tissues at different times during the plant life cycle. Many of the photoactive chlorophyll degradation intermediates are exceptionally cytotoxic necessitating that the pathway be carefully coordinated and regulat...

  2. Control of Materials Flammability Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Dennis E.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on selecting, using, and configuring spacecraft materials in such a way as to minimize the ability of fire to spread onboard a spacecraft. The presentation gives an overview of the flammability requirements of NASA-STD-6001, listing specific tests and evaluation criteria it requires. The presentation then gives flammability reduction methods for specific spacecraft items and materials.

  3. Probabilistic material degradation model for aerospace materials subjected to high temperature, mechanical and thermal fatigue, and creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, L.

    1992-01-01

    A probabilistic general material strength degradation model has been developed for structural components of aerospace propulsion systems subjected to diverse random effects. The model has been implemented in two FORTRAN programs, PROMISS (Probabilistic Material Strength Simulator) and PROMISC (Probabilistic Material Strength Calibrator). PROMISS calculates the random lifetime strength of an aerospace propulsion component due to as many as eighteen diverse random effects. Results are presented in the form of probability density functions and cumulative distribution functions of lifetime strength. PROMISC calibrates the model by calculating the values of empirical material constants.

  4. Controlling Weapons-Grade Fissile Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotblat, J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the problems of controlling weapons-grade fissionable material. Projections of the growth of fission nuclear reactors indicates sufficient materials will be available to construct 300,000 atomic bombs each containing 10 kilograms of plutonium by 1990. (SL)

  5. Dependence on material choice of degradation of organic solar cells following exposure to humid air

    PubMed Central

    Glen, Tom S.; Scarratt, Nicholas W.; Yi, Hunan; Iraqi, Ahmed; Wang, Tao; Kingsley, James; Buckley, Alastair R.; Lidzey, David G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Electron microscopy has been used to study the degradation of organic solar cells when exposed to humid air. Devices with various different combinations of commonly used organic solar cell hole transport layers and cathode materials have been investigated. In this way the ingress of water and the effect it has on devices could be studied. It was found that calcium and aluminum in the cathode both react with water, causing voids and delamination within the device. The use of poly(3,4‐ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) was found to increase the degradation by easing water ingress into the device. Replacing these materials removed these degradation features. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2016, 54, 216–224 PMID:27594763

  6. Materials and degradation modes in an alternative LLW (low-level waste) disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, M.G.; MacKenzie, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The materials used in the construction of alternative low-level waste disposal facilities will be subject to interaction with both the internal and the external environments associated with the facilities and unless precautions are taken, may degrade, leading to structural failure. This paper reviews the characteristics of both environments with respect to three alternative disposal concepts, then assesses how reaction with them might affect the properties of the materials, which include concrete, steel-reinforced concrete, structural steel, and various protective coatings and membranes. It identifies and evaluates the probability of reactions occurring which might lead to degradation of the materials and so compromise the structure. The probability of failure (interpreted relative to the ability of the structure to restrict ingress and egress of water) is assessed for each material and precautionary measures, intended to maximize the durability of the facility, are reviewed. 19 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Recommendations for Exploring the Disfluency Hypothesis for Establishing Whether Perceptually Degrading Materials Impacts Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlosky, John; Mueller, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    The target articles explore a common hypothesis pertaining to whether perceptually degrading materials will improve reasoning, memory, and metamemory. Outcomes are mixed, yet some evidence was garnered in support of a version of the disfluency hypothesis that includes moderators, and along with evidence from prior research, researchers will likely…

  8. A Review of Material Degradation Modelling for the Analysis and Design of Bioabsorbable Stents.

    PubMed

    Boland, Enda L; Shine, Rosa; Kelly, Nicola; Sweeney, Caoimhe A; McHugh, Peter E

    2016-02-01

    The field of percutaneous coronary intervention has witnessed many progressions over the last few decades, more recently with the advancement of fully degradable bioabsorbable stents. Bioabsorbable materials, such as metallic alloys and aliphatic polyesters, have the potential to yield stents which provide temporary support to the blood vessel and allow native healing of the tissue to occur. Many chemical and physical reactions are reported to play a part in the degradation of such bioabsorbable materials, including, but not limited to, corrosion mechanisms for metals and the hydrolysis and crystallization of the backbone chains in polymers. In the design and analysis of bioabsorbable stents it is important to consider the effect of each aspect of the degradation on the material's in vivo performance. The development of robust computational modelling techniques which fully capture the degradation behaviour of these bioabsorbable materials is a key factor in the design of bioabsorable stents. A critical review of the current computational modelling techniques used in the design and analysis of these next generation devices is presented here, with the main accomplishments and limitations of each technique highlighted. PMID:26271520

  9. Materials Degradation Issues in the U.S. High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon; F. Hua

    2005-04-12

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation processes by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) with focus on interaction between the in-drift environmental conditions and long-term materials degradation of waste packages and drip shields within the repository system during the first 10,000-years after repository closure. This paper provides an overview of the degradation of the waste packages and drip shields in the repository after permanent closure of the facility. The degradation modes discussed in this paper include aging and phase instability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and hydrogen induced cracking of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys. The effects of microbial activity and radiation on the degradation of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys are also discussed. Further, for titanium alloys, the effects of fluorides, bromides, and galvanic coupling to less noble metals are considered. It is concluded that the materials and design adopted will provide sufficient safety margins for at least 10,000-years after repository closure.

  10. DEGRADATION OF EMISSIONS CONTROL PERFORMANCE OF WOODSTOVES IN CRESTED BUTTE, CO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the degradation of emissions control performance of woodstoves in Crested Butte, Colorado. Four seasons of field monitoring of EPA-certified woodstoves in and around Crested Butte has demonstrated some significant failures in emissions control performance. In...

  11. LANL material control indicator analysis program

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, G. S.

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of SNM diversion/theft is a major concern to organizations charged with control of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Several methods have been put in place to deter and or detect losses of SNM. These include inventory, material control physical barriers and the use of material control indicators (MCI). This paper will discuss the multi-tier LANL review mechanism for detecting and isolating missing SNM by the use of Material Control Indicators. Los Alamos MCI include daily analysis and review of item adjustments, weekly review of item adjustments, monthly analysis and review of inventory differences by Process Status and by Material Balance Areas, and quarterly analysis and review of Propagation of Variance. This paper, by providing an introduction to a site-specific application of MCI's, assists safeguards professionals in understanding the importance of an MCI Program in detecting accumulation for subsequent diversion/theft of special nuclear material.

  12. Role of synergy between wear and corrosion in degradation of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzi, Marwan

    Tribocorrosion is a term used to describe the material degradation due to the combination of electrochemical and tribological processes. Due to a synergetic effect, the material loss can be larger than the sum of the losses due to wear and corrosion acting separately. In this thesis, the synergy of wear and corrosion was investigated for different types of material, namely the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, the SS316L stainless steel coated with a thin film of Diamond Like Carbon (DLC), and the SS301 stainless steel coated with a thin film of chromium silicon nitride (CrSiN). A tribocorrosion apparatus was designed and constructed to conduct wear experiments in corrosive media. Sliding ball-on-plate configuration was used in this design, where the contact between the ball and the specimen is totally immersed in the test electrolyte. The specimen was connected to a potentiostat to control its electrochemical parameters, namely the potential and the current. Electrochemical techniques were used to control the kinetics of corrosion reactions, and therefore it was possible to assess separately the role of corrosion and wear in the total degradation of material, and to evaluate the synergy between them. For Ti-6Al-4V, it was found that the corrosion and tribocorrosion depend strongly on the structure of the material. The alpha-equiaxed microstructure with fine dispersed beta-phase exhibited the best corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance was found to decrease when the basal plane was preferentially aligned parallel to the surface, which is attributed to a low resistance to charge transfer in the oxide films formed on this plane. On the other hand, when wear and corrosion were involved simultaneously, the oxide layer protecting the substrate against dissolution was mechanically destroyed leading to a high corrosion rate. It was found that the hardness was the most important factor determining the tribocorrosion behavior of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy; samples with high hardness

  13. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  14. Radiation-induced electrical degradation experiments in the Japan materials testing reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Farnum, E.; Scharborough, K.; Shikama, Tatsuo

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the extent of degradation during neutron irradiation of electrical and optical properties of candidate dielectric materials. The goals are to identify promising dielectrics for ITER and other fusion machines for diagnostic applications and establish the basis for optimization of candidate materials. An experiment to measure radiation-induced electrical degradation (REID) in sapphire and MgO-insulated cables was conducted at the JMTR light water reactor. The materials were irradiated at about 260 {degree}C to a fluence of 3{times}10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) with an applied DC electric field between 100 kV/m and 500 kV/m.

  15. Quantification of uncertainties in coupled material degradation processes - High temperature, fatigue and creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development of methodology that provides for quantification of uncertainties in lifetime strength of aerospace materials subjected to a number of diverse effects. A probabilistic material degradation model, in the form of a randomized multifactor interaction equation, has been postulated for lifetime strength degradation of structural components of aerospace propulsion systems. The model includes effects that typically reduce lifetime strength and may include temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep and others. The paper also includes the analysis of experimental data from the open literature for Inconel 718. These data are used to provide an initial check for model validity, as well as for calibration of the model's empirical material constants. The model validity check and calibration is carried out for three effects, namely, high temperature, mechanical fatigue and creep.

  16. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic cross-flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lane, J.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-11-01

    This report summarizes the 14-month, Phase 1 effort conducted by Westinghouse on the Thermal/Chemical Degradation of Ceramic Cross-Flow Filter Materials program. In Phase 1 expected filter process conditions were identified for a fixed-bed, fluid-bed, and entrained-bed gasification, direct coal fired turbine, and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. Ceramic cross-flow filter materials were also selected, procured, and subjected to chemical and physical characterization. The stability of each of the ceramic cross-flow materials was assessed in terms of potential reactions or phase change as a result of process temperature, and effluent gas compositions containing alkali and fines. In addition chemical and physical characterization was conducted on cross-flow filters that were exposed to the METC fluid-bed gasifier and the New York University pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Long-term high temperature degradation mechanisms were proposed for each ceramic cross-flow material at process operating conditions. An experimental bench-scale test program is recommended to be conducted in Phase 2, generating data that support the proposed cross-flow filter material thermal/chemical degradation mechanisms. Papers on the individual subtasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  17. Enhanced Atrazine Degradation and Implications for Weed Control in Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced atrazine degradation is the phenomenon whereby the herbicide is rapidly biodegraded by a population of soil bacteria that has developed the ability to use the pesticide as a nutrient source because of previous exposure to it or other s-triazine herbicides. This phenomenon has been reported...

  18. Material control and accountability excess fissile material disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Snowden, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    The surplus fissile materials control and disposition project will present new concerns for safeguarding the surplus special nuclear material. Current methods of material control and accountability as well as physical security will be challenged. The challenges for safeguards will occur in whatever immobilization medium is used; i.e., ceramic, glass or Deep Borehole. If DOE Order 5633.3B is the controlling MC and A order, verification/confirmation measurements and the acceptance of these measurements must be done on large amounts of material in a very short time frame. Furthermore, if the excess material is to be spiked with fission product like 137 Cs, MC and A measurements after spiking need to be well thought out. A methodology and an agreement of what constitutes a valid measurement may need to be agreed to before processing starts. Safeguards concerns relating to immobilization must be considered in parallel with other concerns like criticality, plant design, and decommissioning. A project of this magnitude produces challenges for Material Control and Accountability, as well as physical security.

  19. Damage Assessment Technologies for Prognostics and Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Hull, Amy B.; Malik, Shah

    2009-01-16

    There are approximately 440 operating reactors in the global nuclear power plant (NPP) fleet with an average age greater than 20 years and design lives of 30 or 40 years. The United States is currently implementing license extensions of 20 years on many plants, and consideration is now being given to the concept of "life-beyond-60", license extension from 60 to 80 years and potentially longer. In almost all countries with NPPs, authorities are looking at some form of license renewal program. In support of NPP license renewal over the past decade, various national and international programs have been initiated. This paper discusses stressor-based prognostics and its role as part of emerging trends in Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) applied to nuclear power plant structures, systems and components (SSC). The paper concisely explains the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) program in PMMD, the basic principles of PMMD and its relationship to advanced diagnostics and prognostics. It then provides an assessment of the state of maturity for diagnostic and prognostic technologies, including NDE and related technologies for damage assessment, and the current trend to move from condition-based maintenance to on-line monitoring for advanced diagnostics and stressor-based prognostics. This development in technology requires advances in sensors; better understanding of what and how to measure within a nuclear power plant; enhanced data interrogation, communication and integration; new prediction models for damage/aging evolution; system integration for real-world deployments and quantification of uncertainties in what are inherently ill-posed problems. Stressor-based analysis is based upon understanding which stressor characteristics (e.g., pressure transients) provide a percussive indication that can be used for mapping subsequent damage due to a specific degradation mechanism. The resulting physical damage and the associated decrease in asset

  20. Degradation mechanisms of materials for large space systems in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, William L.; Hoffman, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Degradation was explored of various materials used in aerospace vehicles after severe loss of polymeric material coatings (Kapton) was observed on an early shuttle flight in low Earth orbit. Since atomic oxygen is the major component of the atmosphere at 300 km, and the shuttle's orbital velocity produced relative motion corresponding to approx. 5 eV of oxygen energy, it was natural to attribute much of this degradation to oxygen interaction. This assumption was tested using large volume vacuum systems and ion beam sources, in an exploratory effort to produce atomic oxygen of the appropriate energy, and to observe mass loss from various samples as well as optical radiation. Several investigations were initiated and the results of these investigations are presented in four papers. These papers are summarized. They are entitled: (1) The Space Shuttle Glow; (2) Laboratory Degradation of Kapton in a Low Energy Oxygen Ion Beam; (3) The Energy Dependence and Surface Morphology of Kapton Degradation Under Atomic Oxygen Bombardment; and (4) Surface Analysis of STS 8 Samples.

  1. Study of the degradation of mulch materials in vegetable crops for organic farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Moreno, Marta; Mancebo, Ignacio; Moreno, Carmen; Villena, Jaime; Meco, Ramón

    2014-05-01

    Mulching is the most common technique used worldwide by vegetable growers in protected cultivation. For this purpose, several plastic materials have been used, with polyethylene (PE) being the most widespread. However, PE is produced from petroleum derivatives, it is not degradable, and thus pollutes the environment for periods much longer than the crop duration (Martín-Closas and Pelacho, 2011), which are very important negative aspects especially for organic farmers. A large portion of plastic films is left on the field or burnt uncontrollably by the farmers, with the associated negative consequences to the environment (Moreno and Moreno, 2008). Therefore, the best solution is to find a material with a lifetime similar to the crop duration time that can be later incorporated by the agricultural system through a biodegradation process (Martín-Closas and Pelacho, 2011). In this context, various biodegradable materials have been considered as alternatives in the last few years, including oxo-biodegradable films, biopolymer mulches, different types of papers, and crop residues (Kasirajan and Ngouajio, 2012). In this work we evaluate the evolution of different properties related to mulch degradation in both the buried and the superficial (exposed) part of mulch materials of different composition (standard black PE, papers and black biodegradable plastics) in summer vegetable crops under organic management in Castilla-La Mancha (Central Spain). As results, it is remarkable the early deterioration suffered by the buried part of the papers, disappearing completely in the soil at the end of the crop cycles and therefore indicating the total incorporation of these materials to the soil once the crop has finished. In the case of the degradation of the exposed mulch, small differences between crops were observed. In general, all the materials were less degraded under the plants than when receiving directly the solar radiation. As conclusion, biodegradable mulches degrade

  2. Understanding Fundamental Material Degradation Processes in High Temperature Aggressive Chemomechanical Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, James; Gewirth, Andrew; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Sofronis, Petros; Robertson, Ian

    2014-01-16

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that limit materials durability for very high-temperature applications. Current design limitations are based on material strength and corrosion resistance. This project will characterize the interactions of high-temperature creep, fatigue, and environmental attack in structural metallic alloys of interest for the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) or Next–Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and for the associated thermo-chemical processing systems for hydrogen generation. Each of these degradation processes presents a major materials design challenge on its own, but in combination, they can act synergistically to rapidly degrade materials and limit component lives. This research and development effort will provide experimental results to characterize creep-fatigue-environment interactions and develop predictive models to define operation limits for high-temperature structural material applications. Researchers will study individually and in combination creep-fatigue-environmental attack processes in Alloys 617, 230, and 800H, as well as in an advanced Ni-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel (ODS) system. For comparison, the study will also examine basic degradation processes in nichrome (Ni-20Cr), which is a basis for most high-temperature structural materials, as well as many of the superalloys. These materials are selected to represent primary candidate alloys, one advanced developmental alloy that may have superior high-temperature durability, and one model system on which basic performance and modeling efforts can be based. The research program is presented in four parts, which all complement each other. The first three are primarily experimental in nature, and the last will tie the work together in a coordinated modeling effort. The sections are (1) dynamic creep-fatigue-environment process, (2) subcritical crack processes, (3) dynamic corrosion – crack

  3. Enhanced s-triazine Degradation and Sugar Cane Weed Control Options

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil borne bacteria on all continents except Antarctica have developed the ability to rapidly degrade the herbicide atrazine. Reduced residual weed control with atrazine in soils exhibiting enhanced degradation was confirmed under Mississippi Delta corn production and is expected to be occurring in...

  4. Cluster of genes controlling proline degradation in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Ratzkin, B; Roth, J

    1978-01-01

    A cluster of genes essential for degradation of proline to glutamate (put) is located between the pyrC and pyrD loci at min 22 of the Salmonella chromosome. A series of 25 deletion mutants of this region have been isolated and used to construct a fine-structure map of the put genes. The map includes mutations affecting the proline degradative activities, proline oxidase and pyrroline-5-carboxylic dehydrogenase. Also included are mutations affecting the major proline permease and a regulatory mutation that affects both enzyme and permease production. The two enzymatic activities appear to be encoded by a single gene (putA). The regulatory mutation maps between the putA gene and the proline permease gene (putP). PMID:342507

  5. Investigating the Control of Chlorophyll Degradation by Genomic Correlation Mining.

    PubMed

    Ghandchi, Frederick P; Caetano-Anolles, Gustavo; Clough, Steven J; Ort, Donald R

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophyll degradation is an intricate process that is critical in a variety of plant tissues at different times during the plant life cycle. Many of the photoactive chlorophyll degradation intermediates are exceptionally cytotoxic necessitating that the pathway be carefully coordinated and regulated. The primary regulatory step in the chlorophyll degradation pathway involves the enzyme pheophorbide a oxygenase (PAO), which oxidizes the chlorophyll intermediate pheophorbide a, that is eventually converted to non-fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites. There is evidence that PAO is differentially regulated across different environmental and developmental conditions with both transcriptional and post-transcriptional components, but the involved regulatory elements are uncertain or unknown. We hypothesized that transcription factors modulate PAO expression across different environmental conditions, such as cold and drought, as well as during developmental transitions to leaf senescence and maturation of green seeds. To test these hypotheses, several sets of Arabidopsis genomic and bioinformatic experiments were investigated and re-analyzed using computational approaches. PAO expression was compared across varied environmental conditions in the three separate datasets using regression modeling and correlation mining to identify gene elements co-expressed with PAO. Their functions were investigated as candidate upstream transcription factors or other regulatory elements that may regulate PAO expression. PAO transcript expression was found to be significantly up-regulated in warm conditions, during leaf senescence, and in drought conditions, and in all three conditions significantly positively correlated with expression of transcription factor Arabidopsis thaliana activating factor 1 (ATAF1), suggesting that ATAF1 is triggered in the plant response to these processes or abiotic stresses and in result up-regulates PAO expression. The proposed regulatory network includes the

  6. Proactive Management of Materials Degradation - A Review of Principles and Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Taylor, Theodore T.

    2008-08-28

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken a program to lay the technical foundation for defining proactive actions so that future degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs) is limited and, thereby, does not diminish either the integrity of important LWR components or the safety of operating plants. This technical letter report was prepared by staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the NRC Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program and relies heavily on work that was completed by Dr. Joseph Muscara and documented in NUREG/CR-6923. This report concisely explains the basic principles of PMMD and its relationship to prognostics, provides a review of programs related to PMMD being conducted worldwide, and provides an assessment of the technical gaps in PMMD and prognostics that need to be addressed. This technical letter report is timely because the majority of the U.S. reactor fleet is applying for license renewal, and many plants are also applying for increases in power rating. Both of these changes could increase the likelihood of materials degradation and underline, therefore, the interest in proactive management in the future.

  7. Degradation mechanisms of nylon separator materials for a nickel-cadmium cell in KOH electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.S.; Margerum, J.D.; Verzwyvelt, S.A.; Lackner, A.M.; Knechtli, R.C.

    1989-03-01

    Degradation reactions of a nylon 6 battery separator material have been studied in 4-34% aqueous KOH electrolytes at 35/sup 0/-110/sup 0/C. In a Ni/Cd cell, this degradation involves a slow hydrolysis reaction followed by fast electrochemical oxidations of the hydrolysis reaction products. Arrhenius activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction in 34% KOH was 20.0 +- 0.3 kcal/mole. A plot of the hydrolysis rate at 100/sup 0/C vs. hydroxyl ion concentration gave a rate maximum at about 16% KOH, and the mechanism for this effect is discussed. Electrochemical oxidations of the hydrolysis product, 6-aminocaproate ion, appear to proceed rapidly in several sequential steps at a nickel oxide electrode. In a Ni/Cd cell, the combination of nylon separator hydrolysis followed by electrochemical oxidation of the products can seriously degrade the battery lifetime. The rate of the hydrolysis of nylon 66 separator material was approximately one half of that of the nylon 6 material.

  8. Towards Coherent Control of Energetic Material Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, M. T.; McGrane, S. D.; Scharff, R. J.; Moore, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    We present direct optical initiation (DOI) of energetic materials using coherent control of localized energy deposition. DOI requires depositing energy into the material to produce a critical size hot spot, which allows propagation of the reaction and thereby initiation. The hot spot characteristics needed for growth to initiation can be studied using quantum controlled initiation (QCI). Achieving QCI in condensed phase energetic materials requires optimally shaped ultrafast laser pulses to coherently guide the energy flow along desired paths. As a test of our quantum control capabilities we have successfully demonstrated our ability to control the reaction pathway of the chemical system stilbene. An acousto-optical modulator based pulse shaper was used at 266 nm, in a shaped pump/supercontinuum probe technique, to enhance and suppress the relative yields of the cis- to trans-stilbene isomerization. The quantum control techniques tested in the stilbene experiments are currently being used to investigate QCI of the explosive hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB).

  9. High-Resolution Crack Imaging Reveals Degradation Processes in Nuclear Reactor Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Olszta, Matthew J.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Thomas, Larry E.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2012-04-01

    Corrosion and cracking represent critical failure mechanisms for structural materials in many applications. Although a crack can often be seen with the unaided eye, higher resolution imaging techniques are required to understand the nature of the crack tips and underlying degradation processes. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) employ a suite of microscopy techniques and site-specific material sampling to analyze corrosion and crack structures, producing images and compositional analyses with near-atomic spatial resolution. The samples are cracked components removed from commercial light-water reactor service or laboratory samples tested in simulated reactor environments.

  10. Assessment of material degradation considering the characteristics of its pore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kočí, Jan; Černý, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In this paper a simple damage function for the relative assessment of the material degradation is presented. The damage function is based on the analysis of temperature and moisture content fields in the investigated material together with its pore size distribution function. In this way the relative assessment of frost induced damage can be provided. The application of the damage function is demonstrated on several wall assemblies exposed to several environmental loads in the Czech Republic and the comparison of weather year severity to the studied constructions is presented.

  11. Degradation of wide band-gap electrolumienscent materials by exciton-polaron interactions (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Hany; Wang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    The limited performance stability and gradual loss in the electroluminescence efficiency of OLEDs utilizing wide band-gap materials, such as blue-emitting phosphorescent and fluorescent devices, continues to be a challenge for wider technology adoption. We recently found that interactions between excitons and polarons play an important role in the aging behavior of electroluminescent materials, and that a correlation exists between the susceptibility of these materials to this aging mode and their band-gap. This degradation mode is also found to be often associated with the emergence of new bands - at longer wavelength - in the electroluminescence spectra of the materials, that can often be detected after prolonged electrical driving. Such bands contribute to the increased spectral broadening and color purity loss often observed in these devices over time. Exciton-polaron interactions, and the associated degradation, are also found to occur most significantly in the vicinity of device inter-layer interfaces such as at the interface between the emitter layer and the electron or hole transport layers. New results obtained from investigations of these phenomena in a wide range of commonly used host and guest OLED materials will be presented.

  12. Engineering hyaluronic acid hydrogel degradation to control cellular interactions and adult stem cell fate in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khetan, Sudhir

    The design and implementation of extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimetic hydrogels for tissue engineering (TE) applications requires an intensive understanding of cell-material interactions, including matrix remodeling and stem cell differentiation. However, the influence of microenvironmental cues, e.g., matrix biodegradability, on cell behavior in vitro has not been well studied in the case of direct cell encapsulation within 3-dimensional (3D) hydrogels. To address these issues, a facile sequential crosslinking technique was developed that provides spatial and temporal control of 3D hydrogel degradability to investigate the importance of material design on cell behavior. Specifically, hydrogels were synthesized from hyaluronic acid (HA) macromers in a sequential process: (1) a primary Michael-type addition crosslinking using cell adhesive and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-degradable oligopeptides to consume a portion of total reactive groups and resulting in "-UV" hydrogels permissive to cell-mediated degradation, followed by (2) a secondary, light initiated free-radical crosslinking to consume remaining reactive groups and "switch" the network to a non-degradable structure ("+UV") via the addition of non-degradable kinetic chains. Using this approach, we demonstrated control of encapsulated hMSC spreading by varying the crosslink type (i.e., the relative hydrogel biodegradability), including with spatial control. Upon incubation with bipotential soluble differentiation factors, these same degradation-mediated spreading cues resulted in an hMSC differentiation fate switch within -UV versus +UV environments. Follow-up studies demonstrated that degradation-mediated traction generation, rather than matrix mechanics or cell morphology, is the critical biophysical signal determining hMSC fate. Sequentially crosslinked HA hydrogels were also studied for the capacity to support remodeling by in vivo and ex vivo tissues, including with spatial control, toward tissue

  13. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

  14. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

  15. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, D.A.

    1994-09-06

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drill string in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drill string at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone. 6 figs.

  16. The influence of cathode material on electrochemical degradation of trichloroethylene in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Rajic, Ljiljana; Fallahpour, Noushin; Podlaha, Elizabeth; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2016-03-01

    In this study, different cathode materials were evaluated for electrochemical degradation of aqueous phase trichloroethylene (TCE). A cathode followed by an anode electrode sequence was used to support reduction of TCE at the cathode via hydrodechlorination (HDC). The performance of iron (Fe), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), aluminum (Al) and carbon (C) foam cathodes was evaluated. We tested commercially available foam materials, which provide large electrode surface area and important properties for field application of the technology. Ni foam cathode produced the highest TCE removal (68.4%) due to its high electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen generation and promotion of HDC. Different performances of the cathode materials originate from differences in the bond strength between atomic hydrogen and the material. With a higher electrocatalytic activity than Ni, Pd catalyst (used as cathode coating) increased TCE removal from 43.5% to 99.8% for Fe, from 56.2% to 79.6% for Cu, from 68.4% to 78.4% for Ni, from 42.0% to 63.6% for Al and from 64.9% to 86.2% for C cathode. The performance of the palladized Fe foam cathode was tested for degradation of TCE in the presence of nitrates, as another commonly found groundwater species. TCE removal decreased from 99% to 41.2% in presence of 100 mg L(-1) of nitrates due to the competition with TCE for HDC at the cathode. The results indicate that the cathode material affects TCE removal rate while the Pd catalyst significantly enhances cathode activity to degrade TCE via HDC. PMID:26761603

  17. Control of Swe1p degradation by the morphogenesis checkpoint.

    PubMed Central

    Sia, R A; Bardes, E S; Lew, D J

    1998-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a cell cycle checkpoint coordinates mitosis with bud formation. Perturbations that transiently depolarize the actin cytoskeleton cause delays in bud formation, and a 'morphogenesis checkpoint' detects the actin perturbation and imposes a G2 delay through inhibition of the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc28p. The tyrosine kinase Swe1p, homologous to wee1 in fission yeast, is required for the checkpoint-mediated G2 delay. In this report, we show that Swe1p stability is regulated both during the normal cell cycle and in response to the checkpoint. Swe1p is stable during G1 and accumulates to a peak at the end of S phase or in early G2, when it becomes unstable and is degraded rapidly. Destabilization of Swe1p in G2 and M phase depends on the activity of Cdc28p in complexes with B-type cyclins. Several different perturbations of actin organization all prevent Swe1p degradation, leading to the persistence or further accumulation of Swe1p, and cell cycle delay in G2. PMID:9822611

  18. Synthesis and application of green mixed-metal oxide nano-composite materials from solid waste for dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Seema; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra; Mandal, Tapas Kumar; Mall, Indra Deo; Lo, Shang Lien

    2016-10-01

    Present study demonstrates reutilization of electrochemical (EC) sludge as a potential low-cost green catalyst for dye degradation. Hexagonal Fe2O3 type phase with trevorite (NiFe2O4)-type cubic phase nanocomposite material (NCM) was synthesized from solid waste sludge generated during EC treatment of textile industry wastewater with stainless steel electrode. For NCM synthesis, sludge was heated at different temperatures under controlled condition. Various synthesized NCMs were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The synthesized NCMs were found to contain iron, chromium, nickel and oxygen in the form of α-Fe2O3 (metal: oxygen = 40:60), (Fe,Cr,Ni)2O3 and trevorite NiFe2O4, (Ni,Fe,Cr) (Fe,Cr,Ni)2O4 (metal: oxygen = 43:57). Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), pore size distribution, and atomic force microscope (AFM) analysis showed distribution of grains of different shapes and sizes. Catalytic activity of NCM was studied by the methylene red dye degradation by using the catalytic wet peroxidation process. Zeta potential study was performed under different pH so as to determine the performance of the NCMs during dye degradation. PMID:27341375

  19. Dose rate effects in radiation degradation of polymer-based cable materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaček, V.; Bartoníček, B.; Hnát, V.; Otáhal, B.

    2003-08-01

    Cable ageing under the nuclear power plant (NPP) conditions must be effectively managed to ensure that the required plant safety and reliability are maintained throughout the plant service life. Ionizing radiation is one of the main stressors causing age-related degradation of polymer-based cable materials in air. For a given absorbed dose, radiation-induced damage to a polymer in air environment usually depends on the dose rate of the exposure. In this work, the effect of dose rate on the degradation rate has been studied. Three types of NPP cables (with jacket/insulation combinations PVC/PVC, PVC/PE, XPE/XPE) were irradiated at room temperature using 60Co gamma ray source at average dose rates of 7, 30 and 100 Gy/h with the doses up to 590 kGy. The irradiated samples have been tested for their mechanical properties, thermo-oxidative stability (using differential scanning calorimetry, DSC), and density. In the case of PVC and PE samples, the tested properties have shown evident dose rate effects, while the XPE material has shown no noticeable ones. The values of elongation at break and the thermo-oxidative stability decrease with the advanced degradation, density tends to increase with the absorbed dose. For XPE samples this effect can be partially explained by the increase of crystallinity. It was tested by the DSC determination of the crystalline phase amount.

  20. Degradation of Microcellular PET reflective materials used in LED-based products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guangjun; van Driel, W. D.; Fan, Xuejun; Yazdan Mehr, M.; Fan, Jiajie; Jansen, K. M. B.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2015-11-01

    Microcellular PET is an emerging reflective material used for solid state lighting. This paper experimentally investigated its degradation mechanisms and quantified both lumen decay and color shift effects of LED-based products with this material aged under different conditions. The results show that: (1) A humidity test at 85 °C & 85%RH for 4000 h (or even shorter) can lead to hydrolytic degradation, which causes both the obvious inconsistent decrease of reflectivity and a severe embrittlement; (2) Oxidative degradation occurred at 85 °C for 4000 h can cause a slight reflectance spectrum change, while the additional blue light exposure has little impact; (3) Color shift induced by thermal aging at 85 °C for 4000 h is 0.0001 and lumen efficiency decreased by 1.57%. When Microcellular PET falls off due to the embrittlement during humidity test, the color shift increases to 0.0004 and the lumen efficiency is reduced by 4.47%.

  1. The relation of microdamage to fracture and material property degradation in human cortical bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkus, Ozan

    This dissertation investigates the relation of microdamage to fracture and material property degradation of human cortical bone tissue. Fracture resistance and fatigue crack growth of microcracks were examined experimentally and material property degradation was examined through theoretical modeling. To investigate the contribution of microdamage to static fracture resistance, fracture toughness tests were conducted in the transverse and longitudinal directions to the osteonal orientation of normal bone tissue. Damage accumulation was monitored by acoustic emission during testing and was spatially observed by histological observation following testing. The results suggested that the propagation of the main crack involved weakening of the tissue by diffuse damage at the fracture plane and by formation of linear microcracks away from the fracture plane for the transverse specimens. For the longitudinal specimens, growth of the main crack occurred in the form of separations at lamellar interfaces. Acoustic emission results supported the histological observations. To investigate the contribution of ultrastructure to static fracture resistance, fracture toughness tests were conducted after altering the collagen phase of the bone tissue by gamma radiation. A significant decrease in the fracture toughness, Work-to-Fracture and the amount damage was observed due to irradiation in both crack growth directions. For cortical bone irradiated at 27.5kGy, fracture toughness is reduced due to the inhibition of damage formation at and near the crack tip. Microcrack fatigue crack growth and arrest were investigated through observations of surface cracks during cyclic loading. At the applied cyclic stresses, the microcracks propagated and arrested in less than 10,000 cycles. In addition, the microcracks were observed not to grow beyond a length of 150mum and a DeltaK of 0.5MNm-3/2, supporting a microstructural barrier concept. Finally, the contribution of linear microcracks to

  2. Environmental degradation of composites for marine structures: new materials and new applications.

    PubMed

    Davies, Peter

    2016-07-13

    This paper describes the influence of seawater ageing on composites used in a range of marine structures, from boats to tidal turbines. Accounting for environmental degradation is an essential element in the multi-scale modelling of composite materials but it requires reliable test data input. The traditional approach to account for ageing effects, based on testing samples after immersion for different periods, is evolving towards coupled studies involving strong interactions between water diffusion and mechanical loading. These can provide a more realistic estimation of long-term behaviour but still require some form of acceleration if useful data, for 20 year lifetimes or more, are to be obtained in a reasonable time. In order to validate extrapolations from short to long times, it is essential to understand the degradation mechanisms, so both physico-chemical and mechanical test data are required. Examples of results from some current studies on more environmentally friendly materials including bio-sourced composites will be described first. Then a case study for renewable marine energy applications will be discussed. In both cases, studies were performed first on coupons at the material level, then during structural testing and analysis of large components, in order to evaluate their long-term behaviour. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242304

  3. Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Seungmin Mondal, Paramita

    2014-06-01

    The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete. This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 °C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed. The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C–S–H nano-structure and shrinkage of C–S–H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste. - Highlights: • The thermal degradation of hydration products of cement is characterized at micro- and nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). • The interface between unhydrated cement particles and the paste matrix is considered the origin of micro-cracks. • When cement paste is exposed to temperatures above 300 ºC, the nano-structure of C-S-H becomes a more loosely packed globular structure, which could be indicative of C-S-H shrinkage.

  4. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.; Weiss, H.; Farmer, J.C. ); Bullen, D.B. )

    1988-06-01

    This volume surveys the effects of welding on the degradation modes of three austenitic alloys: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. These materials are candidates for the fabrication of containers for the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste. The metallurgical characteristics of fusion welds are reviewed here and related to potential degradation modes of the containers. Three specific areas are discussed in depth: (1) decreased resistance to corrosion in the forms of preferential corrosion, sensitization, and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking, (2) hot cracking in the heat-affected zone and the weld zone, and (3) formation of intermetallic phases. The austenitic alloys are ranked as follows in terms of overall weldability: Alloy 825 (best) > Type 316L stainless steel > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 108 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Effect of pretreatment of rubber material on its biodegradability by various rubber degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Berekaa, M M; Linos, A; Reichelt, R; Keller, U; Steinbüchel, A

    2000-03-15

    The effect of pretreatment of several cis-1,4-polyisoprene containing rubbers on their biodegradability was examined. Tests were carried out with six recently isolated and characterized rubber degrading bacteria belonging to the genera Gordonia (strains Kb2, Kd2 and VH2), Mycobacterium, Micromonospora and Pseudomonas. All strains were able to use natural rubber (NR) as well as NR latex gloves as sole carbon source. Extraction of NR latex gloves by organic solvents resulted in an enhancement of growth for three of the selected strains. On the other hand, growth of Gordonia sp. (strain Kb2 and Kd2), Mycobacterium fortuitum NF4 and Micromonospora aurantiaca W2b on synthetic cis-1,4-polyisoprene did only occur after removal of the antioxidants, that are usually added during manufacture to prevent aging of the materials. Detailed degradation studies performed with Gordonia sp. Kb2 revealed an enhanced mineralization of pretreated NR latex gloves and mineralization of purified natural rubber (NR), indicating the actual mineralization of cis-1,4-polyisoprene rubber constituent even after removal of non-rubber constituent that may act as co-metabolic substrate and support microbial growth. Further analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) clearly demonstrated the enhanced colonization efficiency of these bacteria towards pretreated NR latex gloves. Colonization was additionally visualized by staining of overgrown NR latex gloves with Schiff's reagent, and the purple color produced in the area of degradation was an evidence for the accumulation of aldehydes containing oligomers. Further enhancement of latex gloves degradation could be achieved after successive replacement of mineral salts medium during cultivation. Thereby, a rapid disintegration of untreated NR latex gloves material was accomplished by Gordonia sp. strain VH2. PMID:10713421

  6. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ≥ 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ≥ 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS

  7. Stability of CIGS solar cells and component materials evaluated by a step-stress accelerated degradation test method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15°C and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40°C/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85°C/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear "stepwise" feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH >= 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and "capacitor quality" factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells' p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH >= 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS

  8. Occurrence, degradation, and effect of polymer-based materials in the environment.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Scott; Sinclair, Chris; Boxall, Alistair

    2014-01-01

    There is now a plethora of polymer-based materials (PBMs) on the market, because of the increasing demand for cheaper consumable goods, and light-weight industrial materials. Each PBM constitutes a mixture of their representative polymer/sand their various chemical additives. The major polymer types are polyethylene, polypropylene,and polyvinyl chloride, with natural rubber and biodegradable polymers becoming increasingly more important. The most important additives are those that are biologically active, because to be effective such chemicals often have properties that make them resistant to photo-degradation and biodegradation. During their lifecycle,PBMs can be released into the environment form a variety of sources. The principal introduction routes being general littering, dumping of unwanted waste materials,migration from landfills and emission during refuse collection. Once in the environment,PBMs are primarily broken down by photo-degradation processes, but due to the complex chemical makeup of PBMs, receiving environments are potentially exposed to a mixture of macro-, meso-, and micro-size polymer fragments, leached additives, and subsequent degradation products. In environments where sunlight is absent (i.e., soils and the deep sea) degradation for most PBMs is minimal .The majority of literature to date that has addressed the environmental contamination or disposition of PBMs has focused on the marine environment. This is because the oceans are identified as the major sink for macro PBMs, where they are known to present a hazard to wildlife via entanglement and ingestion. The published literature has established the occurrence of microplastics in marine environment and beach sediments, but is inadequate as regards contamination of soils and freshwater sediments. The uptake of microplastics for a limited range of aquatic organisms has also been established, but there is a lack of information regarding soil organisms, and the long-term effects of

  9. Thermal control materials in Mercury environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonenko, J.

    2003-09-01

    Thermal control materials are under development concerning the BepiColombo mission to the planet Mercury. The vicinity to the sun creates extreme heat and radiation fluxes and, advanced materials are needed. A Multi-Layer Insulation has been developed able to withstand the high temperatures and particle fluxes. Upilex has been preferred to Kapton for the reflective screens of the MLI and Tissue Glass is used as a spacer. On sunlit surfaces a sun shield will be added to the MLI employing a ceramic fabric. Further developments for application on external surfaces are a Solar Reflector Coating and an Optical Surface Reflector. An Infrared Rejection Device will be applied within the entrance port of nadir pointing instruments and serve as a protective element to reflect or absorb the planetary infra-red radiation. This paper presents the current status in the development of the thermal insulation and the other thermal control materials. The materials selection and available test results are presented.

  10. High intensity 5 eV O-atom exposure facility for material degradation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.; Spangler, L. H.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Archuleta, F. A.; Leger, Lubert; Visentine, James; Hunton, Don E.; Cross, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atomic oxygen exposure facility was developed for studies of material degradation. The goal of these studies is to provide design criteria and information for the manufacture of long life (20 to 30 years) construction materials for use in low Earth orbit. The studies that are being undertaken will provide: (1) absolute reaction cross sections for the engineering design problems, (2) formulations of reaction mechanisms for use in the selection of suitable existing materials and the design of new more resistant ones, and (3) the calibration of flight hardware (mass spectrometers, etc.) in order to directly relate experiments performed in low Earth orbit to ground based investigations. The facility consists of a CW laser sustained discharge source of O-atoms, an atomic beam formation and diagnostics system, a spinning rotor viscometer, and provision for using the system for calibration of actual flight instruments.

  11. The nuclear materials control technology briefing book

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, J.K.; Fernandez, S.J.

    1992-03-01

    As national and international interests in nuclear arms control and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, intensify, it becomes ever more important that contributors be aware of the technologies available for the measurement and control of the nuclear materials important to nuclear weapons development. This briefing book presents concise, nontechnical summaries of various special nuclear material (SNM) and tritium production monitoring technologies applicable to the control of nuclear materials and their production. Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) operates a multinational, on-site-inspector-based safeguards program in support of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), many (but not all) of the technologies reported in this document are in routine use or under development for IAEA safeguards.

  12. Measurement control administration for nuclear materials accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Rudy, C.R.

    1991-01-31

    In 1986 a measurement control program was instituted at Mound to ensure that measurement performance used for nuclear material accountability was properly monitored and documented. The organization and management of various aspects of the program are discussed. Accurate measurements are the basis of nuclear material accountability. The validity of the accountability values depends on the measurement results that are used to determine inventories, receipts, and shipments. With this measurement information, material balances are calculated to determine losses and gains of materials during a specific time period. Calculation of Inventory Differences (ID) are based on chemical or physical measurements of many items. The validity of each term is dependent on the component measurements. Thus, in Figure 1, the measured element weight of 17 g is dependent on the performance of the particular measurement system that was used. In this case, the measurement is performed using a passive gamma ray method with a calibration curve determined by measuring representative standards containing a range of special nuclear materials (Figure 2). One objective of a measurement control program is to monitor and verify the validity of the calibration curve (Figure 3). In 1986 Mound's Nuclear Materials Accountability (NMA) group instituted a formal measurement control program to ensure the validity of the numbers that comprise this equation and provide a measure of how well bulk materials can be controlled. Most measurements used for accountability are production measurements with their own quality assurance programs. In many cases a measurement control system is planned and maintained by the developers and operators of the particular measurement system with oversight by the management responsible for the results. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Synthesis and Study of Polymers Designed for Controlled Degradation with Light as a Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejniczak, Jason Edward

    Light is an ideal stimulus to externally control the properties of materials for many applications. Light is able to initiate chemical reactions largely independent of a material's local environment making it particularly useful as a bio-orthogonal and on-demand trigger in living systems. The benefits of light as a trigger are diminished by various drawbacks of its use. Light of relatively short wavelengths, in the UV range, is most commonly used to initiate chemistries. This is because UV light has high energy, enough to affect bonds in molecules. But this high energy causes problems in off target effects. Many biological molecules are able to absorb and be modified detrimentally by UV light, limiting the use of UV light in biological systems. The problems of UV light for release in biological systems can be potentially overcome in various ways and this dissertation will describe two main strategies. In the first chapter the use of long wavelength responsive polymers will be described. These materials are intended for the encapsulation of a payload in a polymeric nanoparticle which can degrade and release in response to two-photon absorption of near-infrared light. This long wavelength light is absorbed by far fewer biological molecules and so can penetrate deeper through tissue than UV light while also causing less damage. Another method to mitigate the damaging effects of UV light is by using a material that requires less of a stimulus to release. These materials use UV light to trigger release but are designed to need minimal amounts of light. The polymers described with these properties, a poly(?-hydroxyl acid) in chapter 2 and a polyketal in chapter 3, are intriguing novel polymer backbones on their own and could be applied with appropriate triggering groups to respond to different stimuli.

  14. Degradation of 1-hydroxy-2,4-dinitrobenzene from aqueous solutions by electrochemical oxidation: role of anodic material.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Marco A; Sánchez-Salas, José L; Reyna, Silvia; Bandala, Erick R; Peralta-Hernández, Juan M; Martínez-Huitle, Carlos A

    2014-03-15

    Electrochemical oxidation (ECOx) of 1-hydroxy-2,4-dinitrobenzene (or 2,4-dinitrophenol: 2,4-DNP) in aqueous solutions by electrolysis under galvanostatic control was studied at Pb/PbO2, Ti/SnO2, Ti/IrxRuySnO2 and Si/BDD anodes as a function of current density applied. Oxidative degradation of 2,4-DNP has clearly shown that electrode material and the current density applied were important parameters to optimize the oxidation process. It was observed that 2,4-DNP was oxidized at few substrates to CO2 with different results, obtaining good removal efficiencies at Pb/PbO2, Ti/SnO2 and Si/BDD anodes. Trends in degradation way depend on the production of hydroxyl radicals (OH) on these anodic materials, as confirmed in this study. Furthermore, HPLC results suggested that two kinds of intermediates were generated, polyhydroxylated intermediates and carboxylic acids. The formation of these polyhydroxylated intermediates seems to be associated with the denitration step and substitution by OH radicals on aromatic rings, this being the first proposed step in the reaction mechanism. These compounds were successively oxidized, followed by the opening of aromatic rings and the formation of a series of carboxylic acids which were at the end oxidized into CO2 and H2O. On the basis of these information, a reaction scheme was proposed for each type of anode used for 2,4-D oxidation. PMID:24462986

  15. Failure Prevention For Nuclear Power Plants Through Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Hull, Amy; Malik, Shah

    2009-05-01

    Failure prevention is central to the operation of nuclear power plants. To meet this goal there is growing interest in new and improved philosophies and methodologies for plant life management (PLiM), which include the migration from reliance on periodic inservice inspection to include condition-based maintenance. A further step in the development of plant management is the move from reactive responses based on ISI to become proactive, through the investigation of the potential for implementation of a proactive management of materials degradation (PMMD) program and its potential impact on the management of LWRs.

  16. Factors Controlling Elevated Temperature Strength Degradation of Silicon Carbide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    For 5 years, the cooperative agreement NCC3-763 has focused on the development and understanding of Sic-based composites. Most of the work was performed in the area of SiC fiber-reinforced composites for UEET and NGLT and in collaboration with Goodrich Corporation under a partially reimbursable Space Act Agreement. A smaller amount of work was performed on C fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites for NGLT. Major accomplishments during this agreement included: Improvements to the interphase used in melt-infiltrated (MI) SiC/SiC composites which increases the life under stressed-oxidation at intermediate temperatures referred to as "outside-debonding". This concept is currently in the patent process and received a Space Act Award. Mechanistic-based models of intermediate temperature degradation for MI SiC/SiC Quantification and relatively robust relationships for matrix crack evolution under stress in SiC/SiC composites which serve as the basis for stress-strain and elevated temperature life models The furthering of acoustic emission as a useful tool in composite damage evolution and the extension of the technique to other composite systems Development of hybrid C-SiC fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites Numerous presentations at conferences, industry partners, and government centers and publications in recognized proceedings and journals. Other recognition of the author's accomplishments by NASA with a TGIR award (2004), NASA's Medal for Public Service (2004), and The American Ceramic Society s Richard M. Fulrath Award (2005). The following will briefly describe the work of the past five years in the three areas of interest: SiC/SiC composite development, mechanistic understanding and modeling of SiC/SiC composites, and environmental durability of C/SiC composites. More detail can be found in the publications cited at the end of this report.

  17. Dual degradation signals control Gli protein stability and tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Huntzicker, Erik G.; Estay, Ivette S.; Zhen, Hanson; Lokteva, Ludmila A.; Jackson, Peter K.; Oro, Anthony E.

    2006-01-01

    Regulated protein destruction controls many key cellular processes with aberrant regulation increasingly found during carcinogenesis. Gli proteins mediate the transcriptional effects of the Sonic hedgehog pathway, which is implicated in up to 25% of human tumors. Here we show that Gli is rapidly destroyed by the proteasome and that mouse basal cell carcinoma induction correlates with Gli protein accumulation. We identify two independent destruction signals in Gli1, DN and DC, and show that removal of these signals stabilizes Gli1 protein and rapidly accelerates tumor formation in transgenic animals. These data argue that control of Gli protein accumulation underlies tumorigenesis and suggest a new avenue for antitumor therapy. PMID:16421275

  18. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic candle filter materials. Final report, September 1988--October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    High-temperature ceramic candle filters are being developed for use in advanced power generation systems such as the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbine (DCFT). The direct firing of coal produces particulate matter which must be removed to meet both environmental and process limitations. The ceramic candles increase the efficiency of the advanced power generation systems and protect downstream equipment from erosion and impingement of particulate matter in the hot exhaust gases. Ceramic candle filters are rigid, closed-ended (capped on one side) porous cylinders which generally have a flange on the open-ended side. The flange at the open end allows the candle to be suspended by a tubesheet in the filter vessel. Candle filters have shown promise, but have also encountered durability problems during use in hostile, high-temperature environments. Limitations in the candle lifetime lower the economic advantages of using candle filters for this application. Candles typically fail by cracking at the flange or in the body of the candle. The objective of this project was to test and analyze ceramic candle filter materials and to evaluate the degradation mechanisms. The tests were conducted such that the effects of each degradation mechanism could be examined. Separately. The overall objective of the project was to: (a) develop a better understanding of the thermal and chemical degradation mechanisms of ceramic candle filter materials in advanced coal utilization projects, (b) develop test procedures, and (c) recommend changes to increase filter lifetime. 15 refs., 67 figs., 17 tabs.

  19. Environmental VOSCs--formation and degradation of dimethyl sulfide, methanethiol and related materials.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Ronald; Chasteen, Thomas G

    2004-04-01

    Volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) play a major role in the global sulfur cycle. Two components, dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and methanethiol (MT) are formed in large amounts by living systems (e.g. algae, bacteria, plants), particularly in marine environments. A major route to DMS is by action of a lyase enzyme on dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). DMSP has other roles, for instance as an osmoprotectant and cryoprotectant. Demethiolation of DMSP and other materials leads to MT. A major transport process is release of DMS from the oceans to the atmosphere. Oxidation of DMS in the atmosphere by hydroxyl and nitrate radicals produces many degradation products including CO2, COS, dimethyl sulfoxide, dimethyl sulfone, organic oxyacids of sulfur, and sulfate. These materials also have roles in biotic processes and there are complex metabolic interrelationships between some of them. This review emphasizes the chemical reactions of the organic sulfur cycle. For biotic reactions, details of relevant enzymes are provided when possible. PMID:14987929

  20. Experimental simulation of materials degradation of plasma-facing components using lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, N.; Harilal, S. S.; El-Atwani, O.; Ding, H.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-01-01

    The damage and erosion of plasma-facing components (PFCs) due to extremely high heat loads and particle bombardment is a key issue for the nuclear fusion community. Currently high current ion and electron beams are used in laboratories for simulating the behaviour of PFC materials under ITER-like conditions. Our results indicate that high-power nanosecond lasers can be used for laboratory simulation of high heat flux PFC material degradation. We exposed tungsten (W) surfaces with repetitive laser pulses from a nanosecond laser with a power density ˜ a few GW cm-2. Emission spectroscopic analysis showed that plasma features at early times followed by intense particle emission at later times. Analysis of laser-exposed W surface demonstrated cracks and grain structures. Our results indicate that the typical particle emission features from laser-irradiated tungsten are consistent with high-power particle beam simulation results.

  1. Cometabolic Degradation of Trichloroethene by Rhodococcus sp. Strain L4 Immobilized on Plant Materials Rich in Essential Oils▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Suttinun, Oramas; Müller, Rudolf; Luepromchai, Ekawan

    2010-01-01

    The cometabolic degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) by Rhodococcus sp. L4 was limited by the loss of enzyme activity during TCE transformation. This problem was overcome by repeated addition of inducing substrates, such as cumene, limonene, or cumin aldehyde, to the cells. Alternatively, Rhodococcus sp. L4 was immobilized on plant materials which contain those inducers in their essential oils. Cumin seeds were the most suitable immobilizing material, and the immobilized cells tolerated up to 68 μM TCE and degraded TCE continuously. The activity of immobilized cells, which had been inactivated partially during TCE degradation, could be reactivated by incubation in mineral salts medium without TCE. These findings demonstrate that immobilization of Rhodococcus sp. L4 on plant materials rich in essential oils is a promising method for efficient cometabolic degradation of TCE. PMID:20472723

  2. Materials and techniques for controllable microwave surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Alan; Ford, Kenneth L.; Wright, Peter V.; Chambers, Barry; Smith, Christopher D.; Thompson, Denise A.; Pavri, Francis

    2000-08-01

    Discs and waveguide samples of polymeric mixed conductor nanocomposite materials comprising a conducting polymer and redox active switching agent in a polymer electrolyte have been prepared and studied. These novel materials have been shown to exhibit large, rapid and reversible changes in their microwave impedance when small d.c. electric fields are applied across them from the edges. The results of simultaneous cyclic voltammetry or potential square waves and microwave transmission measurements have shown that the changes are apparantly instantaneous with the application or removal of the applied field. Analysis of the microwave results has shown that the impedance of the materials changes by a factor of up to almost 50 with the imposition or removal of the fields. Nanocomposite materials having either poly(pyrrole) or poly(aniline) as the conducting polymer component and either silver/silver tetrafluoroborate or copper/copper(II) tetrafluoroborate as the redox active components have been investigated. The results of the nanocomposite materials are compared with those of microparticulate composities of similar composition. A new configuration of single layer tunable microwave absorber using only resistive control has been investigated and shown to exhibit wideband, low reflectivity performance combined with reduced thickness. A major advantage of the new topology is the requirement for only a 3:1 change in controllable resistance.

  3. Degradation Signals for Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Cytosolic Protein Quality Control (CytoQC) in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Matthew J; Spear, Eric D; Yu, Allen T; Lee, Evan J; Shahzad, Saba; Michaelis, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Cellular protein quality control (PQC) systems selectively target misfolded or otherwise aberrant proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). How cells discern abnormal from normal proteins remains incompletely understood, but involves in part the recognition between ubiquitin E3 ligases and degradation signals (degrons) that are exposed in misfolded proteins. PQC is compartmentalized in the cell, and a great deal has been learned in recent years about ER-associated degradation (ERAD) and nuclear quality control. In contrast, a comprehensive view of cytosolic quality control (CytoQC) has yet to emerge, and will benefit from the development of a well-defined set of model substrates. In this study, we generated an isogenic "degron library" in Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of short sequences appended to the C-terminus of a reporter protein, Ura3 About half of these degron-containing proteins are substrates of the integral membrane E3 ligase Doa10, which also plays a pivotal role in ERAD and some nuclear protein degradation. Notably, some of our degron fusion proteins exhibit dependence on the E3 ligase Ltn1/Rkr1 for degradation, apparently by a mechanism distinct from its known role in ribosomal quality control of translationally paused proteins. Ubr1 and San1, E3 ligases involved in the recognition of some misfolded CytoQC substrates, are largely dispensable for the degradation of our degron-containing proteins. Interestingly, the Hsp70/Hsp40 chaperone/cochaperones Ssa1,2 and Ydj1, are required for the degradation of all constructs tested. Taken together, the comprehensive degron library presented here provides an important resource of isogenic substrates for testing candidate PQC components and identifying new ones. PMID:27172186

  4. Degradation Signals for Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Cytosolic Protein Quality Control (CytoQC) in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Matthew J.; Spear, Eric D.; Yu, Allen T.; Lee, Evan J.; Shahzad, Saba; Michaelis, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Cellular protein quality control (PQC) systems selectively target misfolded or otherwise aberrant proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). How cells discern abnormal from normal proteins remains incompletely understood, but involves in part the recognition between ubiquitin E3 ligases and degradation signals (degrons) that are exposed in misfolded proteins. PQC is compartmentalized in the cell, and a great deal has been learned in recent years about ER-associated degradation (ERAD) and nuclear quality control. In contrast, a comprehensive view of cytosolic quality control (CytoQC) has yet to emerge, and will benefit from the development of a well-defined set of model substrates. In this study, we generated an isogenic “degron library” in Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of short sequences appended to the C-terminus of a reporter protein, Ura3. About half of these degron-containing proteins are substrates of the integral membrane E3 ligase Doa10, which also plays a pivotal role in ERAD and some nuclear protein degradation. Notably, some of our degron fusion proteins exhibit dependence on the E3 ligase Ltn1/Rkr1 for degradation, apparently by a mechanism distinct from its known role in ribosomal quality control of translationally paused proteins. Ubr1 and San1, E3 ligases involved in the recognition of some misfolded CytoQC substrates, are largely dispensable for the degradation of our degron-containing proteins. Interestingly, the Hsp70/Hsp40 chaperone/cochaperones Ssa1,2 and Ydj1, are required for the degradation of all constructs tested. Taken together, the comprehensive degron library presented here provides an important resource of isogenic substrates for testing candidate PQC components and identifying new ones. PMID:27172186

  5. Control of protein function through regulated protein degradation: biotechnological and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Jyotsna; Tan, Ju Lin; Truscott, Kaye N; Heras, Begoña; Dougan, David A

    2013-01-01

    Targeted protein degradation is crucial for the correct function and maintenance of a cell. In bacteria, this process is largely performed by a handful of ATP-dependent machines, which generally consist of two components - an unfoldase and a peptidase. In some cases, however, substrate recognition by the protease may be regulated by specialized delivery factors (known as adaptor proteins). Our detailed understanding of how these machines are regulated to prevent uncontrolled degradation within a cell has permitted the identification of novel antimicrobials that dysregulate these machines, as well as the development of tunable degradation systems that have applications in biotechnology. Here, we focus on the physiological role of the ClpP peptidase in bacteria, its role as a novel antibiotic target and the use of protein degradation as a biotechnological approach to artificially control the expression levels of a protein of interest. PMID:23920496

  6. Fuzzy controllers in nuclear material accounting

    SciTech Connect

    Zardecki, A.

    1994-10-01

    Fuzzy controllers are applied to predicting and modeling a time series, with particular emphasis on anomaly detection in nuclear material inventory differences. As compared to neural networks, the fuzzy controllers can operate in real time; their learning process does not require many iterations to converge. For this reason fuzzy controllers are potentially useful in time series forecasting, where the authors want to detect and identify trends in real time. They describe an object-oriented implementation of the algorithm advanced by Wang and Mendel. Numerical results are presented both for inventory data and time series corresponding to chaotic situations, such as encountered in the context of strange attractors. In the latter case, the effects of noise on the predictive power of the fuzzy controller are explored.

  7. Radiation Induced Degradation of White Thermal Control Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Zwiener, J. M.; Wertz, G. E.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, M. M.; Meshishnek, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper details a comparison analysis of the zinc-oxide pigmented white thermal control paints Z-93 and Z-93P. Both paints were simultaneously exposed to combined space environmental effects and analyzed using an in-vacuo reflectance technique. The dose applied to the paints was approximately equivalent to 5 yr in a geosynchronous orbit. This comparison analysis showed that Z-93P is an acceptable substitute for Z-93. Irradiated samples of Z-93 and Z-93P were subjected to additional exposures of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and analyzed using the in-vacuo reflectance technique to investigate UV activated reflectance recovery. Both samples showed minimal UV activated reflectance recovery after an additional 190 equivalent Sun hour (ESH) exposure. Reflectance response utilizing nitrogen as a repressurizing gas instead of air was also investigated. This investigation found the rates of reflectance recovery when repressurized with nitrogen are slower than when repressurized with air.

  8. Radiation Induced Degradation of White Thermal Control Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Zwiener, J. M.; Wertz, G. E.; Vaughn, J. A.; Kamenetzky, R. R.; Finckenor, M. M.; Meshishnek, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper details a comparison analysis of the Zinc Oxide pigmented white thermal control paints Z-93 and Z-93P. Both paints were simultaneously exposed to combined space environmental effects and analyzed using an in-vacuum reflectance technique. The dose applied to the paints was approximately equivalent to 5 years in a geosynchronous orbit. This comparison analysis showed that Z-93P is an acceptable substitute for Z-93. Irradiated samples of Z-93 and Z-93P were subjected to additional exposures of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and analyzed using the in-vacuum reflectance technique to investigate UV activated reflectance recovery. Both samples showed minimal UV activated reflectanc6 recovery after an additional 190 Equivalent Sun Hour (ESH) exposure. Reflectance response utilizing nitrogen as a repressurizing gas instead of air was also investigated. This investigation found the rates of reflectance recovery when repressurized with nitrogen are slower than when repressurized with air.

  9. Radiation Induced Degradation of White Thermal Control Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Zwiener, J. M.; Wertz, G. E.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, M. M.; Meshishnek, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper details a comparison analysis of the zinc-oxide pigmented white thermal control paints Z-93 and Z-93P. Both paints were simultaneously exposed to combined space environmental effects and analyzed using an in-vacuo reflectance technique. The dose applied to the paints was approximately equivalent to 5 yr in a geosynchronous orbit. This comparison analysis showed that Z-93P is an acceptable substitute for Z-93. Irradiated samples of Z-93 and Z-93P were subjected to additional exposures of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and analyzed using the in-vacuo reflectance technique to investigate UV activated reflectance recovery. Both samples showed minimal UV activated reflectance recovery after an additional 190 equivalent Sun hour (ESH) exposure. Reflectance response utilizing nitrogen as a repressurizing gas instead of air was also investigated. This investigation found the rates of reflectance recovery when repressurized with nitrogen are slower than when repressurized with air.

  10. Degradation of zinc containing phosphate-based glass as a material for orthopedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Qaysi, Mustafa Al; Petrie, Aviva; Shah, Rishma; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2016-10-01

    Phosphate-based glasses have been examined in many studies as a potential biomaterial for bone repair because of its degradation properties, which can be controlled and allow the release of various elements to promote osteogenic tissue growth. However most of these experiments studied either tertiary or quaternary glass systems. This study investigated a qinternary system that included titanium dioxide for degradation rate control and zinc that is considered to have a role in bone formation. Zinc and titanium phosphate glass discs of different compositions were melt synthesized and samples of each composition was tested for different physical, chemical and biological characteristics via density measurement, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, mass loss, ion release, scanning electron microscopy, biocompatibility studies via live/dead assays at three time points (day 1, 4, and 7). The results showed that the glass was amorphous and that the all thermal variables decreased as zinc oxide amount raised, mass loss as well as ion release increased as zinc oxide increased, and the maximum rise was with ZnO15. The cellular studies showed that all the formulation showed similar cytocompatibility properties with MG63 except ZnO15, which displayed cytotoxic properties and this was confirmed also by the scanning electron microscope images. In conclusion, replacing calcium oxide with zinc oxide in proportion less than 10 % can have a positive effect on bone forming cells. PMID:27620740

  11. Insider Threat - Material Control and Accountability Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H; Roche, Charles T

    2011-01-01

    The technical objectives of nuclear safeguards are (1) the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful uses to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown and (2) the deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards and security program must address both outsider threats and insider threats. Outsider threats are primarily addressed by the physical protection system. Insider threats can be any level of personnel at the site including passive or active insiders that could attempt protracted or abrupt diversion. This could occur by an individual acting alone or by collusion between an individual with material control and accountability (MC&A) responsibilities and another individual who has responsibility or control within both the physical protection and the MC&A systems. The insider threat is one that must be understood and incorporated into the safeguards posture. There have been more than 18 documented cases of theft or loss of plutonium or highly enriched uranium. The insider has access, authority, and knowledge, as well as a set of attributes, that make him/her difficult to detect. An integrated safeguards program is designed as a defense-in-depth system that seeks to prevent the unauthorized removal of nuclear material, to provide early detection of any unauthorized attempt to remove nuclear material, and to rapidly respond to any attempted removal of nuclear material. The program is also designed to support protection against sabotage, espionage, unauthorized access, compromise, and other hostile acts that may cause unacceptable adverse impacts on national security, program continuity, the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment. Nuclear MC&A play an essential role in the capabilities of an integrated safeguards system to deter and detect theft or diversion of nuclear material. An integrated safeguards system with

  12. Controlled release of photoswitch drugs by degradable polymer microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Groynom, Rebecca; Shoffstall, Erin; Wu, Larry S.; Kramer, Richard H.; Lavik, Erin B.

    2016-01-01

    Background QAQ and DENAQ are synthetic photoswitch compounds that change conformation in response to light, altering current flow through voltage-gated ion channels in neurons. These compounds are drug candidates for restoring light sensitivity in degenerative blinding diseases such as AMD. Purpose However, these photoswitch compounds are cleared from the eye within several days, they must be administered through repeated intravitreal injections. Therefore, we are investigating local, sustained delivery formulations to constantly replenish these molecules and have the potential to restore sight. Methods Here, we encapsulate QAQ and DENAQ into several molecular weights of PLGA through an emulsion technique to assess the viability of delivering the compounds in their therapeutic window over many weeks. We characterize the loading efficiency, release profile, and bioactivity of the compounds after encapsulation. Results A very small burst release was observed for all of the formulations with the majority being delivered over the following two months. The lowest molecular weight PLGA led to the highest loading and most linear delivery for both QAQ and DENAQ. Bioactivity was retained for both compounds across the polymers. Conclusion These results present encapsulation into polymers by emulsion as a viable option for controlled release of QAQ and DENAQ. PMID:26453166

  13. Effect of top electrode material on radiation-induced degradation of ferroelectric thin film structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Steven J.; Deng, Carmen Z.; Callaway, Connor P.; Paul, McKinley K.; Fisher, Kenzie J.; Guerrier, Jonathon E.; Rudy, Ryan Q.; Polcawich, Ronald G.; Jones, Jacob L.; Glaser, Evan R.; Cress, Cory D.; Bassiri-Gharb, Nazanin

    2016-07-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation on the dielectric and piezoelectric responses of Pb[Zr0.52Ti0.48]O3 (PZT) thin film stacks were investigated for structures with conductive oxide (IrO2) and metallic (Pt) top electrodes. The samples showed, generally, degradation of various key dielectric, ferroelectric, and electromechanical responses when exposed to 2.5 Mrad (Si) 60Co gamma radiation. However, the low-field, relative dielectric permittivity, ɛr, remained largely unaffected by irradiation in samples with both types of electrodes. Samples with Pt top electrodes showed substantial degradation of the remanent polarization and overall piezoelectric response, as well as pinching of the polarization hysteresis curves and creation of multiple peaks in the permittivity-electric field curves post irradiation. The samples with oxide electrodes, however, were largely impervious to the same radiation dose, with less than 5% change in any of the functional characteristics. The results suggest a radiation-induced change in the defect population or defect energy in PZT with metallic top electrodes, which substantially affects motion of internal interfaces such as domain walls. Additionally, the differences observed for stacks with different electrode materials implicate the ferroelectric-electrode interface as either the predominant source of radiation-induced effects (Pt electrodes) or the site of healing for radiation-induced defects (IrO2 electrodes).

  14. Peptide assembly for nanoscale control of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochan, Darrin

    2011-03-01

    Self-assembly of molecules is an attractive materials construction strategy due to its simplicity in application. By considering peptidic, charged synthetic molecules in the bottom-up materials self-assembly design process, one can take advantage of inherently biomolecular attributes; intramolecular folding events, secondary structure, and electrostatic interactions; in addition to more traditional self-assembling molecular attributes such as amphiphilicty, to define hierarchical material structure and consequent properties. Design strategies for materials self-assembly based on small (less than 24 amino acids) beta-hairpin peptides will be discussed. Self-assembly of the peptides is predicated on an intramolecular folding event caused by desired solution properties. Importantly, kinetics of self-assembly can be tuned in order to control gelation time. The final gel behaves as a shear thinning, but immediately rehealing, solid that is potentially useful for cell injection therapies. The morphological, and viscoelastic properties of these peptide hydrogels will be discussed. In addition, slight changes in peptide primary sequence can have drastic effects on the self-assembled morphology. Additional sequences will be discussed that do not form hydrogels but rather form nanoscale templates for inorganic material assembly.

  15. Degradation-mediated protein quality control at the inner nuclear membrane

    PubMed Central

    Boban, Mirta; Foisner, Roland

    2016-01-01

    abstract An intricate machinery protects cells from the accumulation of misfolded, non-functional proteins and protein aggregates. Protein quality control pathways have been best described in the cytoplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum, however, recent findings indicate that the nucleus is also an important compartment for protein quality control. Several nuclear ubiquitinylation pathways target soluble and membrane proteins in the nucleus and mediate their degradation through nuclear proteasomes. In addition, emerging data suggest that nuclear envelope components are also degraded by autophagy, although the mechanisms by which cytoplasmic autophagy machineries get access to nuclear targets remain unclear. In this minireview we summarize the nuclear ubiquitin-proteasome pathways in yeast, focusing on pathways involved in the protein degradation at the inner nuclear membrane. In addition, we discuss potential mechanisms how nuclear targets at the nuclear envelope may be delivered to the cytoplasmic autophagy pathways in yeast and mammals. PMID:26760377

  16. Controlled degradation of hydrogels using multi-functional cross-linking molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Bouhadir, Kamal H; Mooney, David J

    2004-06-01

    Hydrogels, chemically cross-linked or physically entangled, have found a number of applications as novel delivery vehicles of drugs and cells. However, the narrow ranges of degradation rates and mechanical strength currently available from many hydrogels limits their applications. We have hypothesized that utilization of multi-functional cross-linking molecules to form hydrogels could provide a wider range and tighter control over the degradation rates and mechanical stiffness of gels than bi-functional cross-linking molecules. To address the possibility, we isolated alpha-L-guluronate residues of sodium alginate, and oxidized them to prepare poly(aldehyde guluronate) (PAG). Hydrogels were formed with either poly(acrylamide-co-hydrazide) (PAH) as a multi-functional cross-linking molecule or adipic acid dihydrazide (AAD) as a bi-functional cross-linking molecule. The initial properties and degradation behavior of both PAG gel types were monitored. PAG/PAH hydrogels showed higher mechanical stiffness before degradation and degraded more slowly than PAG/AAD gels, at the same concentration of cross-linking functional groups. The enhanced mechanical stiffness and prolonged degradation behavior could be attributed to the multiple attachment points of PAH in the gel at the same concentration of functional groups. This approach to regulating gel properties with multifunctional cross-linking molecules could be broadly used in hydrogels. PMID:14751730

  17. Improvement of COD removal by controlling the substrate degradability during the anaerobic digestion of recalcitrant wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Minako; Nagao, Norio; Kawasaki, Nobuyuki; Imai, Akio; Toda, Tatsuki

    2016-10-01

    The recalcitrant landfill leachate was anaerobically digested at various mixing ratios with labile synthetic wastewater to evaluate the degradation properties of recalcitrant wastewater. The proportion of leachate to the digestion system was increased in three equal steps, starting from 0% to 100%, and later decreased back to 0% with the same steps. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) for organic carbon and other components were calculated by analyzing the COD and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and the removal efficiencies of COD carbon and COD others were evaluated separately. The degradation properties of COD carbon and COD others shifted owing to changing of substrate degradability, and the removal efficiencies of COD carbon and COD others were improved after supplying 100% recalcitrant wastewater. The UV absorptive property and total organic carbon (TOC) of each molecular size using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with UVA and TOC detectors were also investigated, and the degradability of different molecular sizes was determined. Although the SEC system detected extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are produced by microbes in stressful environments, during early stages of the experiment, EPS were not detected after feeding 100% recalcitrant wastewater. These results suggest that the microbes had acclimatized to the recalcitrant wastewater degradation. The high removal rates of both COD carbon and COD others were sustained when the proportion of labile wastewater in the substrate was 33%, indicating that the effective removal of recalcitrant COD might be controlled by changing the substrate's degradability. PMID:27449962

  18. Effects of material thickness and processing method on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) degradation and mechanical performance.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Reyhaneh Neghabat; Aldabbagh, Fawaz; Ronan, William; Erxleben, Andrea; Rochev, Yury; McHugh, Peter

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the effects of material thickness and processing method on the degradation rate and the changes in the mechanical properties of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) material during simulated physiological degradation were investigated. Two types of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) materials were considered: 0.12 mm solvent-cast films and 1 mm compression-moulded plates. The experimental results presented in this study were compared to the experimental results of Shirazi et al. (Acta Biomaterialia 10(11):4695-703, 2014) for 0.25 mm solvent-cast films. These experimental observations were used to validate the computational modelling predictions of Shirazi et al. (J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 54: 48-59, 2016) on critical diffusion length scale and also to refine the model parameters. The specific material processing methods considered here did not have a significant effect on the degradation rate and the changes in mechanical properties during degradation; however, they influenced the initial molecular weight and they determined the stiffness and hardness of the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) material. The experimental observations strongly supported the computational modelling predictions that showed no significant difference in the degradation rate and the changes in the elastic modulus of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) films for thicknesses larger than 100 μm. PMID:27590824

  19. Debris generation from Mechanical degradation of MLI and thermo-control coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duzellier, Sophie; Drolshagen, Gerhard; Pons, Claude; Rey, Romain; Gordo, Paulo; Horstmann, Andre

    2016-07-01

    Space environment is a harsh environment for exposed materials. Amongst all environmental constraints, ionizing radiation in GEO (particles, UV), atomic oxygen in LEO and temperature variation through synergy mechanisms may lead to serious damage and loss of performance of surface materials (thermo-optical or mechanical properties). Optical and radar observations from the ground as well as analysis of retrieved hardware have shown an abundance of space debris objects that seem to result from the degradation of outer spacecraft surfaces. Recent surveys of the GEO and GTO region have found many objects with high area-to-mass ratio (HAMR debris, see T. Childknecht et al. 2003, 2004, 2005) indicating that they must consist of relatively thin material, like foils. This paper explores the cause, amount and characteristics of space debris objects resulting from spacecraft surface degradation in order to improve space debris population models and support the selection of materials in the context of debris mitigation measures. 20-year GEO dose profile along with thermal cycling has been applied to a set of MLI assemblies and painting samples. The material degradation was monitored through in and ex situ characterizations (visual observation, mechanical and thermo-optical). No self-flaking was observed for paintings nor for MLIs. However, paint surfaces became very brittle, whereas reclosable fasteners of MLIs and Mylar inner foils were strongly damaged as well. Potential scenarios for delamination of MLI foils could be defined.

  20. PAH degradation and redox control in an electrode enhanced sediment cap

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Reible, Danny D.

    2012-01-01

    Capping is typically used to control contaminant release from the underlying sediments. However, the presence of conventional sediment caps will often eliminate or slow natural degradation that might otherwise occur at the surface sediment. The objective of this study was to explore the potential of a novel reactive capping, an electrode enhanced cap for the remediation of PAH contaminated sediment. The study on electrode enhanced biodegradation of PAH in slurries showed that naphthalene concentration decreased from ~1000 μg/L to ~50 μg/L, and phenanthrene decreased from ~150 μg/L to ~30 μg/L in ElectroBioReactor within 4 days, and the copy numbers of PAH degrading genes increased by almost 2 orders of magnitude. In a cap microcosm, two carbon electrodes were emplaced within a sediment cap with an applied potential of 2 V. The anode was placed at the sediment-cap interface encouraging oxidizing conditions. Oxidation and Reduction Potential (ORP) profiles showed redox potential approximately 60-100 mV higher at the sediment-cap interface with the application of voltage than in controls. Vertical profiles of phenanthrene porewater concentration were obtained by PDMS-coated fiber, and results showed that phenanthrene at the depth of 0-0.5 cm below the anode was degraded to ~70% of the initial concentration within 10 weeks. PAH degrading genes showed an increase of approximately 1 order of magnitude at the same depth. The no power controls showed no degradation of PAH. These findings suggest that electrode enhanced capping can be used to control redox potential, provide microbial electron acceptor, and stimulate PAH degradation. PMID:23329859

  1. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D. ); Gdowski, G.E. )

    1988-06-01

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free, high-purity copper), CDA 613 (aluminum bronze), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are candidates for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. Waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as borosilicate glass, and will be sent to the prospective repository site at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluxes of gamma radiation outside the containers. In this environment, container materials might degrade by atmospheric oxidation, general aqueous phase corrosion, localized corrosion (LC), and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This volume is a critical survey of available data on pitting and crevice corrosion of the copper-based candidates. Pitting and crevice corrosion are two of the most common forms of LC of these materials. Data on the SCC of these alloys is surveyed in Volume 4. Pitting usually occurs in water that contains low concentrations of bicarbonate and chloride anions, such as water from Well J-13 at the Nevada Test Site. Consequently, this mode of degradation might occur in the repository environment. Though few quantitative data on LC were found, a tentative ranking based on pitting corrosion, local dealloying, crevice corrosion, and biofouling is presented. CDA 102 performs well in the categories of pitting corrosion, local dealloying, and biofouling, but susceptibility to crevice corrosion diminishes its attractiveness as a candidate. The cupronickel alloy, CDA 715, probably has the best overall resistance to such localized forms of attack. 123 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Phase-controllable synthesis of nanosized nickel phosphides and comparison of photocatalytic degradation ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yonghong; Jin, Lina; Hong, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we employed a facile hydrothermal route to successfully synthesize nanosized nickel phosphide particles with controlled phases via selecting different surfactants at different temperatures and times. The phases of the as-obtained products were determined by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns and Rietveld refinement of XRD data. The morphologies of the products were characterized by (high resolution) transmission electron microscopy (HR/TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Experiments indicated that pure Ni2P phase could be prepared when nontoxic red phosphorus and nickel dichloride were used as starting materials in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, 30 K), sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or polyethylene glycol 10000 (PEG-10000) at 160 °C for 10 h. When acrylamide (AM) was selected as the surfactant, however, pure Ni12P5 phase could be prepared by prolonging the reaction time to 20 h at 160 °C, or enhancing the reaction temperature to 180 °C for 10 h. Furthermore, the experiments indicated that the pure Ni2P phase possessed a stronger photocatalytic degradation ability than the pure Ni12P5 phase.

  3. Phase-controllable synthesis of nanosized nickel phosphides and comparison of photocatalytic degradation ability.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yonghong; Jin, Lina; Hong, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we employed a facile hydrothermal route to successfully synthesize nanosized nickel phosphide particles with controlled phases via selecting different surfactants at different temperatures and times. The phases of the as-obtained products were determined by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns and Rietveld refinement of XRD data. The morphologies of the products were characterized by (high resolution) transmission electron microscopy (HR/TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Experiments indicated that pure Ni2P phase could be prepared when nontoxic red phosphorus and nickel dichloride were used as starting materials in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, 30 K), sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or polyethylene glycol 10000 (PEG-10000) at 160 °C for 10 h. When acrylamide (AM) was selected as the surfactant, however, pure Ni12P5 phase could be prepared by prolonging the reaction time to 20 h at 160 °C, or enhancing the reaction temperature to 180 °C for 10 h. Furthermore, the experiments indicated that the pure Ni2P phase possessed a stronger photocatalytic degradation ability than the pure Ni12P5 phase. PMID:21049133

  4. Early detection of critical material degradation by means of electromagnetic multi-parametric NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Szielasko, Klaus; Tschuncky, Ralf; Rabung, Madalina; Altpeter, Iris; Dobmann, Gerd; Seiler, Georg; Herrmann, Hans-Georg; Boller, Christian

    2014-02-18

    With an increasing number of power plants operated in excess of their original design service life an early recognition of critical material degradation in components will gain importance. Many years of reactor safety research allowed for the identification and development of electromagnetic NDE methods which detect precursors of imminent damage with high sensitivity, at elevated temperatures and in a radiation environment. Regarding low-alloy heat-resistant steel grade WB 36 (1.6368, 15NiCuMoNb5), effects of thermal and thermo-mechanical aging on mechanical-technological properties and several micromagnetic parameters have been thoroughly studied. In particular knowledge regarding the process of copper precipitation and its acceleration under thermo-mechanical load has been enhanced. Whilst the Cu-rich WB 36 steel is an excellent model material to study and understand aging effects related to neutron radiation without the challenge of handling radioactive specimens in a hot cell, actually neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel materials were investigated as well. The neutron fluence experienced and the resulting shift of the ductile-brittle transition temperature were determined electromagnetically, and it was shown that weld and base material can be distinguished from the cladded side of the RPV wall. Low-cycle fatigue of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 347 (1.4550, X6CrNiNb18-10) has been characterized with electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) at temperatures of up to 300 °C. Time-of-flight and amplitude of the transmitted ultrasound signal were evaluated against the number of load cycles applied and observed as an indication of the imminent material failure significantly earlier than monitoring stresses or strains.

  5. Early detection of critical material degradation by means of electromagnetic multi-parametric NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szielasko, Klaus; Tschuncky, Ralf; Rabung, Madalina; Seiler, Georg; Altpeter, Iris; Dobmann, Gerd; Herrmann, Hans-Georg; Boller, Christian

    2014-02-01

    With an increasing number of power plants operated in excess of their original design service life an early recognition of critical material degradation in components will gain importance. Many years of reactor safety research allowed for the identification and development of electromagnetic NDE methods which detect precursors of imminent damage with high sensitivity, at elevated temperatures and in a radiation environment. Regarding low-alloy heat-resistant steel grade WB 36 (1.6368, 15NiCuMoNb5), effects of thermal and thermo-mechanical aging on mechanical-technological properties and several micromagnetic parameters have been thoroughly studied. In particular knowledge regarding the process of copper precipitation and its acceleration under thermo-mechanical load has been enhanced. Whilst the Cu-rich WB 36 steel is an excellent model material to study and understand aging effects related to neutron radiation without the challenge of handling radioactive specimens in a hot cell, actually neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel materials were investigated as well. The neutron fluence experienced and the resulting shift of the ductile-brittle transition temperature were determined electromagnetically, and it was shown that weld and base material can be distinguished from the cladded side of the RPV wall. Low-cycle fatigue of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 347 (1.4550, X6CrNiNb18-10) has been characterized with electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) at temperatures of up to 300 °C. Time-of-flight and amplitude of the transmitted ultrasound signal were evaluated against the number of load cycles applied and observed as an indication of the imminent material failure significantly earlier than monitoring stresses or strains.

  6. Control of the molecular degradation of hyaluronic acid hydrogels for tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun Ju; Kang, Sun-Woong; Kim, Byung-Soo; Jiang, Ge; Cho, Il Hwan; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2008-09-01

    A novel protocol to control the molecular degradation of hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels was successfully developed for tissue augmentation applications. HA has a different conformational structure in water and organic solvent, and the carboxyl group of HA is known to be the recognition site of hyaluronidase and HA receptors. Based on these findings, HA was chemically modified by grafting adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) to the carboxyl group of HA in the water to prepare HA-ADH(WATER) and in the mixed solvent of water and ethanol to prepare degradation-controlled HA-ADH(WATER/ETHANOL). Three kinds of HA hydrogels were prepared by the crosslinking of HA-ADH(WATER) or HA-ADH(WATER/ETHANOL) with bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate, and by the crosslinking of HA-OH with divinyl sulfone (DVS). In vitro and in vivo degradation tests showed that HA-DVS hydrogels were degraded most rapidly, followed by HA-ADH(WATER) hydrogels and HA-ADH(WATER/ETHANOL) hydrogels. There was no adverse effect during and after in vivo degradation tests. All of the HA hydrogel samples appeared to be biocompatible, according to the histological analysis with hematoxylin-eosin and Alcian blue. PMID:18022803

  7. Degradation Mechanisms and Lifetime Prediction for Lithium-Ion Batteries -- A Control Perspective: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kandler; Shi, Ying; Santhanagopalan, Shriram

    2015-07-29

    Predictive models of Li-ion battery lifetime must consider a multiplicity of electrochemical, thermal, and mechanical degradation modes experienced by batteries in application environments. To complicate matters, Li-ion batteries can experience different degradation trajectories that depend on storage and cycling history of the application environment. Rates of degradation are controlled by factors such as temperature history, electrochemical operating window, and charge/discharge rate. We present a generalized battery life prognostic model framework for battery systems design and control. The model framework consists of trial functions that are statistically regressed to Li-ion cell life datasets wherein the cells have been aged under different levels of stress. Degradation mechanisms and rate laws dependent on temperature, storage, and cycling condition are regressed to the data, with multiple model hypotheses evaluated and the best model down-selected based on statistics. The resulting life prognostic model, implemented in state variable form, is extensible to arbitrary real-world scenarios. The model is applicable in real-time control algorithms to maximize battery life and performance. We discuss efforts to reduce lifetime prediction error and accommodate its inevitable impact in controller design.

  8. Controlled Degradation of Poly(Ethyl Cyanoacrylate-Co-Methyl Methacrylate)(PECA-Co-PMMA) Copolymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a method for modifying poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate) in order to control the degradation and the stability as well as the glass transition temperatures. Copolymers of poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate) (PECA-co-PMMA) with various compositions were synthesized by free ...

  9. Thermal control materials on EOIM-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria M.; Linton, Roger C.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Vaughn, Jason A.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal control paints, anodized aluminum, and beta cloth samples were flown on STS-46 as part of the Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials Experiment (EOIM-3). The thermal control paints flown on EOIM-3 include ceramic and polyurethane-based paints. Passively exposed samples are compared to actively heated samples and controlled exposure samples. Optical property measurements of absorptivity, emissivity, and spectrofluorescence are presented for each paint. Several variations of anodized aluminum, including chromic acid anodize, sulfuric acid anodize, and boric/sulfuric acid anodize were flown on the actively heated trays and the passive exposure trays. The post-flight optical properties are within tolerances for these materials. Also flown were two samples of yellow anodized aluminum. The yellow anodized aluminum samples darkened noticeably. Samples of aluminized and unaluminized beta cloth, a fiberglass woven mat impregnated with TFE Teflon, were flown with passive exposure to the space environment. Data from this part of the experiment is correlated to observations from LDEF and erosion of the Teflon thin film samples also flown on EOIM-3 and LDEF.

  10. Lost circulation control materials. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    Work in FY 94 continued to investigate the use of calcium phosphate cements as lost circulation control materials for geothermal wells. The calcium phosphate cements were produced by reacting calcium aluminate cement with sodium phosphate compounds. Pumpable formulations with thickening times up to two hours at temperatures between 25 to 90{degrees}C were developed and characterized. The materials showed rapid set behaviour, early strength development, low permeability and acceptable durability in hydrothermal environments. Strengths up to 4 MPa were achieved four hours after mixing and water permeabilities were of the order of 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} cm/s at 24 hours. Partial replacement of calcium aluminate cement with ground granulated blast furnace slag was found to reduce the amount of borax retarder required to maintain pumpability at elevated temperatures and pressures.

  11. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.E.; Bullen, D.B. )

    1988-08-01

    Six alloys are being considered as possible materials for the fabrication of containers for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Three of these candidate materials are copper-based alloys: CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The other three are iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. Radioactive waste will include spent-fuel assemblies from reactors as well as waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The waste-package containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, the containers must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after emplacement of the containers in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. This radiation will promote the radiolytic decomposition of moist air to hydrogen. This volume surveys the available data on the effects of hydrogen on the six candidate alloys for fabrication of the containers. For copper, the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement is discussed, and the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of the copper-based alloys are reviewed. The solubilities and diffusivities of hydrogen are documented for these alloys. For the austenitic materials, the degradation of mechanical properties by hydrogen is documented. The diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen in these alloys are also presented. For the copper-based alloys, the ranking according to resistance to detrimental effects of hydrogen is: CDA 715 (best) > CDA 613 > CDA 102 (worst). For the austenitic alloys, the ranking is: Type 316L stainless steel {approx} Alloy 825 > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 87 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Adaptive binary material classification of an unknown object using polarimetric images degraded by atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mu J.; Hyde, Milo W.

    2012-10-01

    An improved binary material-classification algorithm using passive polarimetric imagery degraded by atmospheric turbulence is presented. The technique implements a modified version of an existing polarimetric blind-deconvolution algorithm in order to remove atmospheric distortion and correctly classify the unknown object. The classification decision, dielectric or metal in this case, is based on degree of linear polarization (DoLP) estimates provided by the blind-deconvolution algorithm augmented by two DoLP priors - one statistically modeling the polarization behavior of metals and the other statistically modeling the polarization behavior of dielectrics. The DoLP estimate which maximizes the log-likelihood function determines the image pixel's classification. The method presented here significantly improves upon a similar published polarimetric classification method by adaptively updating the DoLP priors as more information becomes available about the scene. This new adaptive method significantly extends the range of validity of the existing polarimetric classification technique to near-normal collection geometries where most polarimetric material classifiers perform poorly. In this paper, brief reviews of the polarimetric blind-deconvolution algorithm and the functional forms of the DoLP priors are provided. Also provided is the methodology for making the algorithm adaptive including three techniques for updating the DoLP priors using in-progress DoLP estimates. Lastly, the proposed technique is experimentally validated by comparing classification results of two dielectric and metallic samples obtained using the new method to those obtained using the existing technique.

  13. Evaluation of near surface material degradation in concrete using nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, J.; Kim, J.-Y.; Jacobs, L. J.; Kurtis, K. E.; Qu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Comparative studies of nondestructive evaluation methods have shown that nonlinear ultrasonic techniques are more sensitive than conventional linear methods to changes in material microstructure and the associated small-scale damage. Many of the material degradation processes such as carbonation in concrete, corrosion in metals, etc., initiate at the surface. In such cases, ultrasonic Rayleigh surface waves are especially appropriate for detection and characterization of damage since their energy is concentrated in the top layer of the test object. For the civil engineering infrastructure, only a limited number of field applicable nonlinear ultrasonic techniques have been introduced. In this paper a nonlinear ultrasonic measurement technique based on the use of Rayleigh waves is developed and used to characterize carbonation in concrete samples. This work develops a collinear mixing technique for concrete structures. Wedge transducer is used for the generation and an accelerometer for the detection of the fundamental and nonlinearity modulated ultrasonic signal components. The measurements are made by varying the input voltage and along the propagation distance. The slope of the normalized modulation amplitudes is taken as the nonlinearity parameter. Concrete samples with two different levels of damage are examined, and the difference of the two fundamental frequencies is used to quantify damage state.

  14. Comparison of three different DNA extraction methods from a highly degraded biological material.

    PubMed

    Kuś, M; Ossowski, A; Zielińska, G

    2016-05-01

    The identification of unknown victims is one of the most challenging tasks faced by forensic medicine. This is due to the rapid decomposition of tissues, beginning at the moment of death and caused by released enzymes and microbial activity. Decay is directly associated with the decomposition of soft tissues and also the degradation of genetic material inside cells. Decomposition rates vary depending on a number of environmental factors, including temperature, humidity, season, and soil properties. Decomposition also differs between bodies left in the open air or buried. To date, forensic medicine has identified mainly people who were the victims of various types of criminal offences. However, with advances in identification methods, increasingly frequent attempts are made to identify the victims of armed conflicts, crimes of totalitarian regimes, or genocide. The aim of the study was to compare three different methods for the extraction of nuclear DNA from material considered in forensic medicine as difficult to handle, i.e. fragments of bones and teeth, and to determine the performance of these methods and their suitability for identification procedures. PMID:27016882

  15. Analysis of degradation phenomena in ancient, traditional and improved building materials of historical monuments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, M. O.; Silva, T. P.; Veiga, J. P.

    2008-07-01

    A review is presented on constructive techniques plus materials and the processes involved in degradation phenomena observed in two historical monuments: the Zambujeiro dolmen (Portugal) and the Roman Aqueduct of Carthage (Tunisia). Dolmens are particularly impressive megalithic constructions for the dimensions of granite blocks. At Zambujeiro, the upright stones have undergone a catastrophic evolution after the archaeological exploitation due to accelerated weathering through a process apparently distinct from natural granite decay in nearby outcrops. The biological attack of granite minerals by lichen exudates has emphasized the hazardous character of bromine and more has been learnt about construction techniques, namely, the insertion in the mound of an impermeable clay stratum that hinders water penetration into the dolmen chamber. The characterization of original Roman ashlar blocks, including masonry and the diagnosis of Byzantine and medieval reconstruction testimonies in the Aqueduct of Carthage were the object of a detailed study by X-ray diffraction and synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence. Traditional constructive techniques and local construction materials were studied and successive historical, modern and recent rehabilitations were reappraised.

  16. Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Final report, August 1992--May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, A.S.; Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

    1995-05-01

    SRI International conducted a theoretical and experimental program to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate the gaseous products of coal gasification. A variety of developmental efforts are underway, including a number of projects sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to improve the selectivity and permeability of porous inorganic membranes. DOE is also sponsoring efforts to extend the use of metallic membranes to new applications. Most developmental efforts have focused on hydrogen separation by inorganic membranes, which may be used to maximize hydrogen production from coal gas or to remove H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} contaminants via thermal or catalytic decomposition in integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) systems. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. Membrane materials that have been investigated include glass (silica), alumina, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt). This report describes inorganic membrane materials, long term membrane exposure tests, membrane permeation tests, coal gasifier exposure tests, conclusions, and recommendations.

  17. Cullin 3 mediates SRC-3 ubiquitination and degradation to control the retinoic acid response

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, Christine; Gaouar, Samia; Fischer, Benoit; Boeglin, Marcel; Paul, Nicodeme; Samarut, Eric; Piskunov, Aleksandr; Pankotai-Bodo, Gabriella; Brino, Laurent; Rochette-Egly, Cecile

    2011-01-01

    SRC-3 is an important coactivator of nuclear receptors including the retinoic acid (RA) receptor α. Most of SRC-3 functions are facilitated by changes in the posttranslational code of the protein that involves mainly phosphorylation and ubiquitination. We recently reported that SRC-3 is degraded by the proteasome in response to RA. Here, by using an RNAi E3-ubiquitin ligase entry screen, we identified CUL-3 and RBX1 as components of the E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in the RA-induced ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of SRC-3. We also show that the RA-induced ubiquitination of SRC-3 depends on its prior phosphorylation at serine 860 that promotes binding of the CUL-3–based E3 ligase in the nucleus. Finally, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation of SRC-3 cooperate to control the dynamics of transcription. In all, this process participates to the antiproliferative effect of RA. PMID:22147914

  18. Natural Guided Genome Engineering Reveals Transcriptional Regulators Controlling Quorum-Sensing Signal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Mothe, Nicolas; Velours, Christophe; Legrand, Pierre; Moréra, Solange; Faure, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-quenching (QQ) are natural or engineered processes disrupting the quorum-sensing (QS) signalling which controls virulence and persistence (e.g. biofilm) in numerous bacteria. QQ involves different enzymes including lactonases, amidases, oxidases and reductases which degrade the QS molecules such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHL). Rhodococcus erythropolis known to efficiently degrade NAHL is proposed as a biocontrol agent and a reservoir of QQ-enzymes for biotechnology. In R. erythropolis, regulation of QQ-enzymes remains unclear. In this work, we performed genome engineering on R. erythropolis, which is recalcitrant to reverse genetics, in order to investigate regulation of QQ-enzymes at a molecular and structural level with the aim to improve the QQ activity. Deep-sequencing of the R. erythropolis enhanced variants allowed identification of a punctual mutation in a key-transcriptional factor QsdR (Quorum sensing degradation Regulation) which regulates the sole QQ-lactonase QsdA identified so far. Using biophysical and structural studies on QsdR, we demonstrate that QQ activity can be improved by modifying the regulation of QQ-enzymes degrading QS signal. This modification requiring the change of only one amino-acid in a transcriptional factor leads to an enhanced R. erythropolis in which the QS-signal degradation pathway is strongly activated. PMID:26554837

  19. In vivo degradation in modern orthopaedic UHMWPE bearings and structural characterization of a novel alternative UHMWPE material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinitz, Steven D.

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains the most common bearing material for total joint arthroplasty. Advances in radiation cross-linking and other post-consolidation treatments have led to a rapid differentiation of polyethylene products on the market, with more than twenty unique materials currently being sold by the five largest orthopaedic manufacturers alone. Through oxidation, cross-link density, and free radical measurements, this work demonstrates for the first time that in vivo material degradation is occurring in cross-linked UHMWPE materials. Based on the rate of the reaction in certain materials, it is concluded that oxidative degradation may compromise the mechanical properties of the bearings in as few as ten years, potentially leading to early clinical failure of the devices. Using the knowledge gained from this work as well as previously published observations about UHMWPE oxidation, a two-mechanism model of oxidation is proposed that offers an explanation for the observed in vivo changes. From this model it is concluded that oxidative degradation is in part the result of in vivo chemical species. The two-mechanism model of oxidation suggests that different processing techniques for UHMWPE may reduce the risk of oxidative degradation. It is concluded that by avoiding any radiation cross-linking step, Equal Channel Angular Processing (ECAP) can produce UHMWPE materials with a reduced risk for in vivo oxidation while at the same time offering superior mechanical properties compared to commercially available UHMWPE materials, as well as similar wear behavior. Using dynamic mechanical analysis, the entanglement density in ECAP materials is quantified, and is related back to the ECAP processing parameters. The relationship between entanglement density and resultant material properties is established. The results will allow informed processing parameter selection for producing optimized materials for orthopaedics and other applications.

  20. A Derivation of the Long-Term Degradation of a Pulsed Atomic Frequency Standard from a Control-Loop Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    The phase of a frequency standard that uses periodic interrogation and control of a local oscillator (LO) is degraded by a long-term random-walk component induced by downconversion of LO noise into the loop passband. The Dick formula for the noise level of this degradation is derived from an explicit solution of an LO control-loop model.

  1. Enhanced Atrazine Degradation: Evidence for Reduced Residual Weed Control and A Method for Identifying Adapted Soils and Predicting Herbicide Persistence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soilborn bacteria with novel metabolic abilities have been linked with enhanced atrazine degradation and complaints of reduced residual weed control in soils with an s-triazine use history. However, no field study has verified that enhanced degradation reduces atrazine’s residual weed control. The...

  2. Programmable temperature control system for biological materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Harrison, R. G.; Rinfret, A. P.

    1982-01-01

    A system was constructed which allows programmable temperature-time control for a 5 cu cm sample volume of arbitrary biological material. The system also measures the parameters necessary for the determination of the sample volume specific heat and thermal conductivity as a function of temperature, and provides a detailed measurement of the temperature during phase change and a means of calculating the heat of the phase change. Steady-state and dynamic temperature control is obtained by supplying heat to the sample volume through resistive elements constructed as an integral part of the sample container. For cooling purposes, this container is totally immersed into a cold heat sink. Using a mixture of dry ice and alcohol at 79 C, the sample volume can be controlled from +40 to -60 C at rates from steady state to + or - 65 C/min. Steady-state temperature precision is better than 0.2 C, while the dynamic capability depends on the temperature rate of change as well as the mass of both the sample and the container.

  3. Mechanical degradation under hydrogen of yttrium doped barium zirconate electrolyte material prepared with NiO additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciria, D.; Ben Hassine, M.; Jiménez-Melendo, M.; Iakovleva, A.; Haghi-Ashtiani, P.; Aubin, V.; Dezanneau, G.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a novel process was presented to fabricate dense yttrium-doped barium zirconate electrolytes with high proton conductivity. This process was based on the use of a NiO additive during reactive sintering. We show here that materials made from this process present a fast degradation of mechanical properties when put in hydrogen-rich conditions, while material made from conventional sintering without NiO aid remains intact in the same conditions. The fast degradation of samples made from reactive sintering, leading to sample failure under highly compressive conditions, is due to the reduction of NiO nanoparticles at grain boundaries as shown from structural and chemical analyses using Transmission Electron Microscopy. By the present study, we alert about the potential risk of cell failure due to this mechanical degradation.

  4. The Effect of Antioxidants on Suppression of Thermal Degradation of Insulation Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagae, Masahiro; Sekii, Yasuo; Yoshino, Hiroto; Miyake, Koujirou

    Thermal degradation of EPDM and the effect of antioxidants on the degradation of EPDM was investigated. Using FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer) micrometer the degree of degradation was analyzed. A new evaluation method of mapping measurement was introduced and showed to be very useful. Among oxidants studied, the phenolic antioxidant 4,4'-tiobis(3-methyl-6-tert.-Butyl phenol was confirmed to be useful. A synergetic effects between phenolic antioxidant 2,2'-methylene- bis (4-methyl-6-tert.buthylphenol) and sulfur type antioxidant, dilauryl thiodipropionate, was also confirmed. The temperature dependence of thermal degradation of EPDM was also analyzed.

  5. Novel Fe-Pd/SiO2 catalytic materials for degradation of chlorinated organic compounds in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel reactive materials for catalytic degradation of chlorinated organic compounds in water at ambient conditions have been prepared on the basis of silica-supported Pd-Fe nanoparticles. Nanoscale Fe-Pd particles were synthesized inside porous silica supports using (NH4

  6. EVALUATION OF THE RESISTANCE OF A CHLORINATED POLYETHYLENE PROTECTIVE GARMENT MATERIAL TO PERMEATION AND DEGRADATION BY LIQUID CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of the project was to investigate existing permeation and degradation resistance data for chlorinated polyethylene (CPE); to develop a laboratory test plan consistent with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test Methods F739-81 and D471-79 r...

  7. Degradation of the materials of construction in Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, J.W.; Gonzales, A.; Lucero, S.J.

    1997-03-01

    The primary current-collector materials being used in lithium-ion cells are susceptible to environmental degradation: aluminum to pitting corrosion and copper to environmentally assisted cracking. Pitting occurs at the highly oxidizing potentials associated with the positive-electrode charge condition. However, the pitting mechanism is more complex than that typically observed in aqueous systems in that the pits are filled with a mixed metal/oxide product and exist as mounds or nodules on the surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was shown to be an effective analytical tool for quantifying and verifying aluminum corrosion behavior. Two fluorocarbon-based coatings were shown to improve the resistance of Al to pitting attack. Detailed x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface analyses showed that there was very little difference in the films observed after simple immersion in either PC:DEC or EC:DMC electrolytes versus those following electrical cycling. Li and P are the predominant surface species. Finally, environmental cracking of copper can occur at or near the lithium potential and only if specific metallurgical conditions exist (work-hardening and large grain size).

  8. Structure, physicochemical properties and in vitro fermentation of enzymatically degraded cell wall materials from apples.

    PubMed

    Förster, S; Dongowski, G; Kunzek, H

    2002-06-01

    Cell wall materials (CWM) prepared from apple parenchyma tissue by treatment with commercial enzymes for maceration, mash fermentation and liquefaction were characterised with regard to their composition and structure as well as their physicochemical and physiological properties. Increasing enzymatic degradation of the CWM resulted in growing loss of the pectin matrix, decreasing porosity as well as increasing particle aggregation. Due to these structural alterations the water binding, the viscoelastic properties of the CWM-water-suspensions and the in vitro fermentation, forming short chain fatty acids, were reduced. The investigations showed that interrelations exist between enzymatic treatment and changes of (i) structure and state of matrices (evaluated by means of thermal analysis), (ii) physicochemical properties and (iii) physiological properties. So the application of liquefying enzymes can lead to a complete removal of the pectin matrix, causing an essentially improved thermal stability of the CWM preparation, but strongly reduced water binding and reduced structure-forming properties into the CWM-water-suspensions. The formation of short-chain fatty acids during in vitro fermentation of the CWM preparations by fresh human faeces flora depended on the portion and the state of the pectin matrix and the cellulose network, respectively. PMID:12108214

  9. Analysis of Retrieved Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Control Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hansen, Patricia A.; Dever, Joyce A.; Triolo, Jack J.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanical and optical properties of the thermal control materials on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have degraded over the nearly seven years the telescope has been in orbit. Astronaut observations and photographs from the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon FEP, the outer-layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. Also, the emissivity of the bonded metallized Teflon FEP radiator surfaces of the telescope has increased over time. Samples of the top layer of the MLI and radiator material were retrieved during SM2, and a thorough investigation into the de-radiation followed in order to determine the primary cause of the damage. Mapping of the cracks on HST and the ground testing showed that thermal cycling with deep-layer damage from electron and proton radiation are necessary to cause the observed embrittlement. Further, strong, evidence was found indicating that chain scission (reduced molecular weight) is the dominant form of damage to the metallized Teflon FEP.

  10. Enzymes for Degradation of Energetic Materials and Demilitarization of Explosives Stockpiles - SERDP Annual (Interim) Report, 12/98

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M.M.

    1999-01-18

    The current stockpile of energetic materials requiring disposal contains about half a million tons. Through 2001, over 2.1 million tons are expected to pass through the stockpile for disposal. Safe and environmentally acceptable methods for disposing of these materials are needed. This project is developing safe, economical, and environmentally sound processes using biocatalyst (enzymes) to degrade energetic materials and to convert them into economically valuable products. Alternative methods for destroying these materials are hazardous, environmentally unacceptable, and expensive. These methods include burning, detonation, land and sea burial, treatment at high temperature and pressure, and treatment with harsh chemicals. Enzyme treatment operates at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a water solution.

  11. Probabilistic Structural Analysis and Reliability Using NESSUS With Implemented Material Strength Degradation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie C.; Jurena, Mark T.; Godines, Cody R.; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This project included both research and education objectives. The goal of this project was to advance innovative research and education objectives in theoretical and computational probabilistic structural analysis, reliability, and life prediction for improved reliability and safety of structural components of aerospace and aircraft propulsion systems. Research and education partners included Glenn Research Center (GRC) and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) along with the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). SwRI enhanced the NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) code and provided consulting support for NESSUS-related activities at UTSA. NASA funding supported three undergraduate students, two graduate students, a summer course instructor and the Principal Investigator. Matching funds from UTSA provided for the purchase of additional equipment for the enhancement of the Advanced Interactive Computational SGI Lab established during the first year of this Partnership Award to conduct the probabilistic finite element summer courses. The research portion of this report presents the cumulation of work performed through the use of the probabilistic finite element program, NESSUS, Numerical Evaluation and Structures Under Stress, and an embedded Material Strength Degradation (MSD) model. Probabilistic structural analysis provided for quantification of uncertainties associated with the design, thus enabling increased system performance and reliability. The structure examined was a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) fuel turbopump blade. The blade material analyzed was Inconel 718, since the MSD model was previously calibrated for this material. Reliability analysis encompassing the effects of high temperature and high cycle fatigue, yielded a reliability value of 0.99978 using a fully correlated random field for the blade thickness. The reliability did not change significantly for a change in distribution type except for a change in

  12. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D. ); Bullen, D.B. )

    1988-04-01

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste containers. Waste will include fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass forms, and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides in the repository will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluences of gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including atmospheric oxidation; uniform aqueous phase corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; sensitization and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This report is an analysis of data relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the three austenitic candidate alloys. The candidates are compared in terms of their susceptibilities to these forms of corrosion. Although all three candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these types of localized corrosion (LC); such resistance is important because pits can penetrate the metal and serve as crack initiation sites. Both Types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented in Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma radiation has been found to enhance SCC in Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while the effects of microbiologically induced corrosion have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. 211 refs., 49 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Some Materials Degradation Issues in the U.S. High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository Study (The Yucca Mountain Project)

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua; P. Pasupathi; N. Brown; K. Mon

    2005-09-19

    The safe disposal of radioactive waste requires that the waste be isolated from the environment until radioactive decay has reduced its toxicity to innocuous levels for plants, animals, and humans. All of the countries currently studying the options for disposing of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) have selected deep geologic formations to be the primary barrier for accomplishing this isolation. In U.S.A., the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) designated Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the potential site to be characterized for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) disposal. Long-term containment of waste and subsequent slow release of radionuclides into the geosphere will rely on a system of natural and engineered barriers including a robust waste containment design. The waste package design consists of a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 cylindrical barrier surrounding a Type 316 stainless steel inner structural vessel. The waste package is covered by a mailbox-shaped drip shield composed primarily of Ti Grade 7 with Ti Grade 24 structural support members. The U.S. Yucca Mountain Project has been studying and modeling the degradation issues of the relevant materials for some 20 years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation processes based on the past 20 years studies on Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) materials degradation issues with focus on interaction between the in-drift environmental conditions and long-term materials degradation of waste packages and drip shields within the repository system during the 10,000 years regulatory period. This paper provides an overview of the current understanding of the likely degradation behavior of the waste package and drip shield in the repository after the permanent closure of the facility. The degradation scenario discussed in this paper include aging and phase instability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced

  14. Emergency Scenarios of a Re-Entry Vehicle due to Control Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, O.; Sachs, G.

    A controls degradation scenario is investigated for a reentry vehicle. It is assumed that one of two body flaps is blocked. The reaction control system is used to generate control moments in combination with the aerodynamic surfaces still operative. Particular emphasis is placed on implementing a control allocation method which yields an optimum utilization of the aerodynamic control surfaces in terms of minimizing the propellant mass required for the reaction control system. Minimum-propellant trajectories for the blocked body flap scenarios are determined using an efficient optimization technique. Results are presented which address blocked body flap scenarios caused by off-normal situations already in the orbital phase. The results show that no additional landing sites are required if an adequate amount of propellant mass is available.

  15. Relationship between anode material, supporting electrolyte and current density during electrochemical degradation of organic compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Duque, Fernando L; Palma-Goyes, Ricardo E; González, Ignacio; Peñuela, Gustavo; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2014-08-15

    Taking crystal violet (CV) dye as pollutant model, the electrode, electrolyte and current density (i) relationship for electro-degrading organic molecules is discussed. Boron-doped diamond (BDD) or Iridium dioxide (IrO2) used as anode materials were tested with Na2SO4 or NaCl as electrolytes. CV degradation and generated oxidants showed that degradation pathways and efficiency are strongly linked to the current density-electrode-electrolyte interaction. With BDD, the degradation pathway depends on i: If idegraded by OH radicals, whereas if i>i(lim), generated oxidants play a major role in the CV elimination. When IrO2 was used, CV removal was not dependent on i, but on the electrolyte. Pollutant degradation in Na2SO4 on IrO2 seems to occur via IrO3; however, in the presence of NaCl, degradation was dependent on the chlorinated oxidative species generated. In terms of efficiency, the Na2SO4 electrolyte showed better results than NaCl when BDD anodes were employed. On the contrary, NaCl was superior when combined with IrO2. Thus, the IrO2/Cl(-) and BDD/SO4(2-) systems were better at removing the pollutant, being the former the most effective. On the other hand, pollutant degradation with the BDD/SO4(2-) and IrO2/Cl(-) systems is favored at low and high current densities, respectively. PMID:24981674

  16. Semi-Degradable Poly(β-amino ester) Networks with Temporally-Controlled Enhancement of Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Safranski, David L.; Weiss, Daiana; Clark, J. Brian; Taylor, W.R.; Gall, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers are clinically used in numerous biomedical applications, and classically show a loss in mechanical properties within weeks of implantation. This work demonstrates a new class of semi-degradable polymers that show an increase in mechanical properties through degradation via a controlled shift in a thermal transition. Semi-degradable polymer networks, poly(β-amino ester)-co-methyl methacrylate, were formed from a low glass transition temperature crosslinker, poly(β-amino ester), and high glass transition temperature monomer, methyl methacrylate, which degraded in a manner dependent upon the crosslinker chemical structure. In vitro and in vivo degradation revealed changes in mechanical behavior due to the degradation of the crosslinker from the polymer network. This novel polymer system demonstrates a strategy to temporally control the mechanical behavior of polymers and to enhance the initial performance of smart biomedical devices. PMID:24769113

  17. Controlling DNA degradation from a distance: a new role for the Mu transposition enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wonyoung; Saha, Rudra P.; Jang, Sooin; Harshey, Rasika M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Phage Mu is unique among transposable elements in employing a transposition enhancer. The enhancer DNA segment is the site where the transposase MuA binds and makes bridging interactions with the two Mu ends, interwrapping the ends with the enhancer in a complex topology essential for assembling a catalytically active transpososome. The enhancer is also the site at which regulatory proteins control divergent transcription of genes that determine the phage lysis-lysogeny decision. Here we report a third function for the enhancer - that of regulating degradation of extraneous DNA attached to both ends of infecting Mu. This DNA is protected from nucleases by a phage protein until Mu integrates into the host chromosome, after which it is rapidly degraded. We find that leftward transcription at the enhancer, expected to disrupt its topology within the transpososome, blocks degradation of this DNA. Disruption of the enhancer would lead to the loss or dislocation of two non-catalytic MuA subunits positioned in the transpososome by the enhancer. We provide several lines of support for this inference, and conclude that these subunits are important for activating degradation of the flanking DNA. This work also reveals a role for enhancer topology in phage development. PMID:25256747

  18. 78 FR 67225 - Amendments to Material Control and Accounting Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 40, 70, 72, 74, and 150 RIN 3150-AI61 Amendments to Material Control and Accounting... Commission (NRC) is proposing to amend its regulations for material control and accounting (MC&A) of special... would requirements be added to designate material balance areas, item control areas, and custodians?...

  19. Phase change material for temperature control and material storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Jr., Francis C. (Inventor); Blackwood, James M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A phase change material comprising a mixture of water and deuterium oxide is described, wherein the mole fraction of deuterium oxide is selected so that the mixture has a selected phase change temperature within a range between 0.degree. C. and 4.degree. C. The mixture is placed in a container and used for passive storage and transport of biomaterials and other temperature sensitive materials. Gels, nucleating agents, freezing point depression materials and colorants may be added to enhance the characteristics of the mixture.

  20. Controlled Access of p53 to the Nucleus Regulates its Proteasomal Degradation by MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Davis, James R.; Mossalam, Mohanad; Lim, Carol S.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 can be sent to the proteasome for degradation by placing its nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling under ligand control. Endogenous p53 is ubiquitinated by MDM2 in the nucleus, and controlling the access of p53 to the nuclear compartment regulates its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. This was accomplished by the use of a “protein switch” that places nuclear translocation under the control of externally applied dexamethasone. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that sending protein switch p53 (PS-p53) to the nucleus produces a distinct punctate distribution in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The nuclear role in accessing the proteasome was investigated by inhibiting classical nuclear export with leptomycin B. Trapping PS-p53 in the nucleus only allows this punctate staining in that compartment, suggesting that PS-p53 must translocate first to the nuclear compartment for cytoplasmic punctate staining to occur. The role of MDM2 binding was explored by inhibiting MDM2/p53 binding with nutlin-3. Inhibition of this interaction blocked both nuclear export and cytoplasmic and nuclear punctate staining, providing evidence that any change in localization after nuclear translocation is due to MDM2 binding. Further, blocking the proteolytic activity of the proteasome maintained the nuclear localization of the construct. Truncations of p53 were made to determine smaller constructs still capable of interacting with MDM2, and their subcellular localization and degradation potential was observed. PS-p53 and a smaller construct, construct containing the two MDM2 binding regions of p53 (Box I+V) were indeed degraded by the proteasome as measured by loss of enhanced green fluorescent protein that was also fused to the construct. The influence of these constructs on p53 gene transactivation function was assessed, and revealed that PS-p53 decreased gene transactivation, while PS-p53(BoxI+V) did not significantly change baseline gene transactivation. PMID

  1. Controlled intermittent interfacial bond concept for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, T. U.; Atkins, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    Concept will enhance fracture resistance of high-strength filamentary composite without degrading its tensile strength or elastic modulus. Concept provides more economical composite systems, tailored for specific applications, and composite materials with mechanical properties, such as tensile strength, fracture strain, and fracture toughness, that can be optimized.

  2. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System Effectiveness Tool (MSET)

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H; Roche, Charles T; Campbell, Billy J; Hammond, Glenn A; Meppen, Bruce W; Brown, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    A nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) has been developed in the United States for use in evaluating material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) systems in nuclear facilities. The project was commissioned by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation. MSET was developed by personnel with experience spanning more than six decades in both the U.S. and international nuclear programs and with experience in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the nuclear power industry. MSET offers significant potential benefits for improving nuclear safeguards and security in any nation with a nuclear program. MSET provides a design basis for developing an MC&A system at a nuclear facility that functions to protect against insider theft or diversion of nuclear materials. MSET analyzes the system and identifies several risk importance factors that show where sustainability is essential for optimal performance and where performance degradation has the greatest impact on total system risk. MSET contains five major components: (1) A functional model that shows how to design, build, implement, and operate a robust nuclear MC&A system (2) A fault tree of the operating MC&A system that adapts PRA methodology to analyze system effectiveness and give a relative risk of failure assessment of the system (3) A questionnaire used to document the facility's current MPC&A system (provides data to evaluate the quality of the system and the level of performance of each basic task performed throughout the material balance area [MBA]) (4) A formal process of applying expert judgment to convert the facility questionnaire data into numeric values representing the performance level of each basic event for use in the fault tree risk assessment calculations (5) PRA software that performs the fault tree risk assessment calculations and produces risk importance factor reports on the

  3. An investigation of the degradation of Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) copolymer thermal blanketing materials aboard LDEF in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, A. E.; Brinza, David E.; Anderson, Mark S.; Minton, Timothy K.; Laue, Eric G.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1991-01-01

    Samples of fluorinated ethylene propylene copolymer thermal blanketing material, recovered from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), were investigated to determine the nature and the extent of degradation due to exposure to the low-Earth-orbit environment. Samples recovered from the ram-facing direction of LDEF, which received vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation and atomic-oxygen impingement, and samples from the trailing edge, which received almost exclusively VUV exposure, were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The most significant result of this investigation was found on samples that received only VUV exposure. These samples possessed a hard, embrittled surface layer that was absent from the atomic-oxygen exposed sample and from unexposed control samples. This surface layer is believed to be responsible for the 'synergistic' effect between VUV and atomic oxygen. Overall, the investigation revealed dramatically different morphologies for the two samples. The sample receiving both atomic-oxygen and VUV exposure was deeply eroded and had a characteristic 'rolling' surface morphology, while the sample that received only VUV exposure showed mild erosion and a surface morphology characterized by sharp high-frequency peaks. The morphologies observed in the LDEF samples, including the embrittled surface layer, were successfully duplicated in the laboratory.

  4. Syntrophic degradation of proteinaceous materials by the thermophilic strains Coprothermobacter proteolyticus and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kengo; Morita, Masahiko; Sasaki, Daisuke; Nagaoka, Jun; Matsumoto, Norio; Ohmura, Naoya; Shinozaki, Hiraku

    2011-11-01

    Protein is a major component of organic solid wastes, and therefore, it is necessary to further elucidate thermophilic protein degradation process. The effects of hydrogenotrophic methanogens on protein degradation were investigated using the proteolytic bacterial strain CT-1 that was isolated from a methanogenic thermophilic (55°C) packed-bed reactor degrading artificial garbage slurry. Strain CT-1 was closely related to Coprothermobacter proteolyticus, which is frequently found in methanogenic reactors degrading organic solid wastes. Strain CT-1 was cultivated in the absence or presence of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus by using 3 kinds of proteinaceous substrates. Degradation rates of casein, gelatin, and bovine serum albumin were higher in co-cultures than in monocultures. Strain CT-1 showed faster growth in co-cultures than in monocultures. M. thermautotrophicus comprised 5.5-6.0% of the total cells in co-culture. Increased production of ammonia and acetate was observed in co-cultures than in monocultures, suggesting that addition of M. thermautotrophicus increases the products of protein degradation. Hydrogen produced in the monocultures was converted to methane in co-cultures. These results suggest that thermophilic proteolytic bacteria find it favorable to syntrophically degrade protein in a methanogenic environment, and that it is important to retain hydrogen-scavenging methanogens within the reactor. PMID:21802987

  5. MATERIALS DEGRADATION ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT TO ENABLE ULTRA LOW COST, WEB-PROCESSED WHITE P-OLED FOR SSL

    SciTech Connect

    DR. DEVIN MACKENZIE

    2011-12-13

    Progress over Phase II of DE-FG02-07ER86293 'Materials Degradation Analysis and Development to Enable Ultra Low Cost, Web-Processed White P-OLED for SSL' was initially rapid in terms of device performance improvements. We exceeded our device luminance lifetime goals for printed flexible white OLEDs as laid out in our project proposal. Our Phase II performance target was to demonstrate >1500 hours luminance lifetime at 100 Cd/m2 from a printed flexible device. We now have R&D devices well in excess of 8000 hrs lifetime at 100 Cd/m2, tested in air. We also were able to produce devices which met the voltage target of >1500 hours below 15V operation. After completing the initial performance milestones, we went on to focus on color-related degradation issues which were cited as important to commercialization of the technology by our manufacturing partners. We also put additional focus on cathode work as the active material development that occurred over the STTR time period required an adaptation of the cathode from the original cathode formulations which were developed based on previous generation active layer materials. We were able to improve compatibility of the cathode with some of the newer generation active layer materials and improve device yield and voltage behavior. An additional objective of the initial Phase II was to further develop the underlying manufacturing technology and real-life product specifications. This is a key requirement that must be met to ensure eventual commercialization of this DOE-funded technology. The link between commercial investment for full commercialization and R&D efforts in OLED solid State Lighting is often a large one. Add-Vision's lower cost, printed OLED manufacturing approach is an attraction, but close engagement with manufacturing partners and addressing customer specifications is a very important link. Manufacturing technology encompasses development of moisture reduction encapsulation technology, improved cost

  6. Microbial kinetic model for the degradation of poorly soluble organic materials.

    PubMed

    Yassine, Mohamad H; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2013-03-15

    A novel mechanistic model is presented that describes the aerobic biodegradation kinetics of soybean biodiesel and petroleum diesel in batch experiments. The model was built on the assumptions that biodegradation takes place in the aqueous phase according to Monod kinetics, and that the substrate dissolution kinetics at the oil/water interface is intrinsically fast compared to biodegradation kinetics. Further, due to the very low aqueous solubility of these compounds, the change in the substrate aqueous-phase concentration over time was assumed to approaches zero, and that substrate aqueous concentration remains close to the saturation level while the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) is still significant. No former knowledge of the saturation substrate concentration (S(sat)) and the Monod half-saturation constant (K(s)) was required, as the term S(sat)/(K(s) + S(sat)) in the Monod equation remained constant during this phase. The n-alkanes C10-C24 of petroleum diesel were all utilized at a relatively constant actual specific utilization rate of 0.01-0.02 mg-alkane/mg-biomass-hr, while the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) of biodiesel were utilized at actual specific rates significantly higher with increasing carbon chain length and lower with increasing number of double bonds. The results were found to be in agreement with kinetic, genetic, and metabolic evidence reported in the literature pertaining to microbial decay rates, uptake mechanisms, and the metabolic pathway by which these compounds are assimilated into microorganisms. The presented model can be applied, without major modifications, to estimate meaningful kinetic parameters from batch experiments, as well as near source zone field application. We suggest the estimated actual microbial specific utilization rate (kC) of such materials to be a better measure of the degradation rate when compared to the maximum specific utilization rate (k), which might be orders of magnitude higher than kC and might never

  7. Imprinted sol-gel materials for monitoring degradation products in automotive oils by shear transverse wave.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Adnan; Afzal, Adeel; Glanzing, Gerd; Leidl, Anton; Lieberzeit, Peter A; Dickert, Franz L

    2010-08-18

    Titania sol-gel layers imprinted with capric acid have been used as synthetic receptors for highly sensitive detection of oxidized products resulting from degradation of automotive engine oil. These layers have been applied as sensitive coating material on shear transverse wave (STW) resonators of frequencies ranging from 100 MHz to 430 MHz. A relatively small size of STW resonators, i.e. about 2 mm for 430 MHz makes these devices extremely useful while considering the concept of miniaturization. It has been proved experimentally that by increasing fundamental resonance frequency of these devices, a very high sensor response i.e. 22 kHz up to 460 kHz can be generated. The geometry of long chain capric acid fits best as recognition element in the synthesis of imprinted TiO(2) network. The thin titania layers coated on transducer surface provide excellent diffusion pathways to oxidized products of waste engine oil for selective and reversible re-inclusion i.e. recovery time of 30 min. Viscosity effects of oxidized engine oil can be minimized by shear waves which do not dissipate considerable amount of energy that ensure smooth liquid phase operation. Different oxidized products i.e. carbonic acids and esters can be characterized in lubricant via infra-red (IR) spectroscopy. The increasing IR absorbance of different waste oil samples is a clear indication of increasing concentration of carbonyl group. The IR absorbance of carbonyl groups is directly correlated to the age of respective waste engine oil samples and a quantitative relationship between sensor responses from STWs and IR absorbance was also developed. PMID:20708116

  8. Identification and Assessment of Material Models for Age-Related Degradation of Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Kim, M. K.; Choi, I-K.

    2009-04-27

    describes the research effort performed by BNL for the Year 2 scope of work. This research focused on methods that could be used to represent the long-term behavior of materials used at NPPs. To achieve this BNL reviewed time-dependent models which can approximate the degradation effects of the key materials used in the construction of structures and passive components determined to be of interest in the Year 1 effort. The intent was to review the degradation models that would cover the most common time-dependent changes in material properties for concrete and steel components.

  9. Control of xanthan-degrading organisms in the Loudon pilot: approach, methodology, and results

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, J.R.; Maruca, S.D.; Gale, W.W.; Gall, L.S.; Wernau, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of loss of mobility control in Exxon's Loudon micellar/polymer pilot test has confirmed that loss was caused by microbial degradation of the xanthan biopolymer used to viscosify the microemulsion and polymer drive banks. This study describes techniques which were used to sample and culture bacteria from the Loudon pilot and demonstrate that these mixed cultures are able to degrade xanthan rapidly under reservoir conditions. Laboratory studies show that, under anaerobic conditions, bacteria cultured from the Loudon pilot can cause over 90% loss of xanthan viscosity in micellar/polymer fluids within 7 days. An extensive laboratory screening program was conducted to identify biocides that are effective against the offending organisms. Complete kill of the organisms, biocide compatibility (with biopolymer, formation rock, field brines, and microemulsion), cost effectiveness, and chemical stability were key parameters. Of the biocides tested, formaldehyde was found to be the most consistently effective.

  10. Assessing the biocompatibility of degradable metallic materials: state-of-the-art and focus on the potential of genetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Purnama, Agung; Hermawan, Hendra; Couet, Jacques; Mantovani, Diego

    2010-05-01

    For decades, the design, development and use of metallic biomaterials has focused on the corrosion resistance of these materials once implanted in the human body. Recently, degradable metallic biomaterials (DMMs) have been proposed for some specific applications, including paediatric, orthopaedic and cardiovascular applications. DMMs are expected to disappear via corrosion after providing structural support for a certain period of time depending on the application site. Over the past decades, a wide-ranging and comprehensive set of in vitro, in vivo and for some cases also ex vivo tests have been proposed and exhaustively investigated for conventional corrosion-resistant metallic biomaterials. Standardization and regulatory bodies in the United States, Japan and Europe have therefore developed tests to license corrosion-resistant metals for use as "biomaterials". This is not the case for DMMs. Once implanted, this new class of biomaterials is expected to support the healing process of a diseased tissue or organ while degrading at a potentially adjustable degradation rate. The tests developed for corrosion-resistant metals cannot simply be transposed to DMMs. These tests can in some cases be adapted, but the expected unique properties of DMMs should also inspire and lead to the design and the development of new specific tests. The current challenge is how to assess the tolerance of surrounding tissues and organs to the presence of degradation products. This work precisely focuses on this topic. The tests usually used to assess the biocompatibility of conventional corrosion-resistant metals are briefly reviewed. Then, genetic regulation is proposed as an original and novel approach to assess the biocompatibility of DMMs. This method appears to predict cell behaviour in the presence of degradation products that are closely related to DNA damage. Various genes have been related to the toxicity and inflammatory responses, indicating their role as biomarkers to assess

  11. 10 CFR 74.51 - Nuclear material control and accounting for strategic special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for strategic special nuclear material. 74.51 Section 74.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Formula Quantities of Strategic Special...

  12. 10 CFR 74.51 - Nuclear material control and accounting for strategic special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for strategic special nuclear material. 74.51 Section 74.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Formula Quantities of Strategic Special...

  13. 10 CFR 74.51 - Nuclear material control and accounting for strategic special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for strategic special nuclear material. 74.51 Section 74.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Formula Quantities of Strategic Special...

  14. 10 CFR 74.51 - Nuclear material control and accounting for strategic special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for strategic special nuclear material. 74.51 Section 74.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Formula Quantities of Strategic Special...

  15. 10 CFR 74.51 - Nuclear material control and accounting for strategic special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for strategic special nuclear material. 74.51 Section 74.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Formula Quantities of Strategic Special...

  16. Polyester-Based (Bio)degradable Polymers as Environmentally Friendly Materials for Sustainable Development

    PubMed Central

    Rydz, Joanna; Sikorska, Wanda; Kyulavska, Mariya; Christova, Darinka

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the polyesters such as polylactide and polyhydroxyalkonoates, as well as polyamides produced from renewable resources, which are currently among the most promising (bio)degradable polymers. Synthetic pathways, favourable properties and utilisation (most important applications) of these attractive polymer families are outlined. Environmental impact and in particular (bio)degradation of aliphatic polyesters, polyamides and related copolymer structures are described in view of the potential applications in various fields. PMID:25551604

  17. Virtual earthquake engineering laboratory with physics-based degrading materials on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, In Ho

    For the last few decades, we have obtained tremendous insight into underlying microscopic mechanisms of degrading quasi-brittle materials from persistent and near-saintly efforts in laboratories, and at the same time we have seen unprecedented evolution in computational technology such as massively parallel computers. Thus, time is ripe to embark on a novel approach to settle unanswered questions, especially for the earthquake engineering community, by harmoniously combining the microphysics mechanisms with advanced parallel computing technology. To begin with, it should be stressed that we placed a great deal of emphasis on preserving clear meaning and physical counterparts of all the microscopic material models proposed herein, since it is directly tied to the belief that by doing so, the more physical mechanisms we incorporate, the better prediction we can obtain. We departed from reviewing representative microscopic analysis methodologies, selecting out "fixed-type" multidirectional smeared crack model as the base framework for nonlinear quasi-brittle materials, since it is widely believed to best retain the physical nature of actual cracks. Microscopic stress functions are proposed by integrating well-received existing models to update normal stresses on the crack surfaces (three orthogonal surfaces are allowed to initiate herein) under cyclic loading. Unlike the normal stress update, special attention had to be paid to the shear stress update on the crack surfaces, due primarily to the well-known pathological nature of the fixed-type smeared crack model---spurious large stress transfer over the open crack under nonproportional loading. In hopes of exploiting physical mechanism to resolve this deleterious nature of the fixed crack model, a tribology-inspired three-dimensional (3d) interlocking mechanism has been proposed. Following the main trend of tribology (i.e., the science and engineering of interacting surfaces), we introduced the base fabric of solid

  18. Efficacy of Pichia caribbica in controlling blue mold rot and patulin degradation in apples.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jing; Zhang, Hongyin; Yang, Qiya; Ren, Rong

    2013-03-15

    The efficacy of Pichia caribbica in controlling postharvest blue mold and natural decay development of apples and degrading the patulin produced by Penicillium expansum was investigated. The decay incidence of the blue mold of apples treated by P. caribbica was significantly reduced compared with the control samples, and the higher the concentration of P. caribbica, the better the efficacy of the biocontrol. P. caribbica significantly controlled the natural decay development of apples following storage at 20°C for 35days or 4°C for 45 days followed by 20°C for 15 days. Germination of spores and growth of P. expansum were markedly inhibited by P. caribbica in in vitro testing. Rapid colonization of apple wounds by the yeast was observed in fruit stored at 20°C or 4°C. After incubation with P. caribbica at 20°C for 15 days, patulin production by P. expansum in apples was significantly reduced compared with the control. In vitro testing indicated that P. caribbica can degrade patulin directly. PMID:23416552

  19. USING TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT PROACTIVE MANAGEMENT OF MATERIALS DEGRADATION FOR THE U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, W Boyd; Knobbs, Katherine J.; Carpenter, C. E.; Malik, Shah

    2010-07-19

    The majority of the U.S. reactor fleet is applying for license renewal to extend the operating life from the current 40 years to 60 years, and there is now active interest in extending the operating life to beyond 60 years. Many plants are also applying for increases in power rating and both of these changes increases the need for an improved understanding of materials degradation. Many materials degrade over time and much is known about the degradation of materials under normal environmental conditions; however, less is known about the characteristics of materials degradation when the environment is subject to higher than normal radiological conditions over extended periods of time. Significant efforts are being made by industrial, academic and regulatory groups worldwide to identify, classify and mitigate potential problems arising from degradation of components in this context. From a regulatory perspective, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) is very interested in being able to identify ways to insure their licensees proactively manage the identification of materials degradation and the mitigation of its effects. To date, the USNRC has consolidated “generic” programs for mitigating aging issues in the two volume Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report (NUREG-1801) [1][2], and have encouraged applicants for license renewal to use these programs where applicable in their plant when applying for renew of their reactor’s license. The USNRC has also published a comprehensive report entitled Expert Panel Report on Proactive Materials Degradation (NUREG/CR-6923) [3] that inventories the types of degradation mechanisms that could exist in each component of a Light Water Reactor (LWR) and each degradation mechanism is assessed regarding how much is known about mitigating its effects. Since the number of plant designs and materials used varies greatly within the U.S. fleet, there are many variations to implementing aging management programs (AMPs

  20. Multilayer Films Assembled from Naturally-Derived Materials for Controlled Protein Release

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Bryan B.; Hagerman, Samantha R; Jamieson, Kelsey; Veselinovic, Jovana; O’Neill, Nicholas; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    Herein we designed and characterized films composed of naturally derived materials for controlled release of proteins. Traditional drug delivery strategies rely on synthetic or semi-synthetic materials, or utilize potentially denaturing assembly conditions that are not optimal for sensitive biologics. Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly of films uses benign conditions and can generate films with various release mechanisms including hydrolysis-facilitated degradation. These use components such as synthetic polycations that degrade into non-natural products. Herein we report the use of a naturally-derived, biocompatible and degradable polyanion, poly(β-l-malic acid), alone and in combination with chitosan in an LbL film, whose degradation products of malic acid and chitosan are both generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the FDA. We have found that films based on this polyanion have shown sustained release of a model protein, lysozyme that can be timed from tens of minutes to multiple days through different film architectures. We also report the incorporation and release of a clinically used biologic, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which demonstrates the use of this strategy as a platform for controlled release of various biologics. PMID:24825478

  1. Effects of cesium ions and cesium vapor on selected ATS-F samples. [thermal control coating degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, R. F.; Beynon, J. C.; Hall, D. F.; Luedke, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal control coating samples were subjected to cesium ion beam and vapor exposures. Degradation of solar absorptance and infrared emittance were measured. Solar cells and samples selected from surfaces on the ATS-F spacecraft likely to experience ion or vapor impingement were bombarded by 10-volt cesium ions. Other samples were subjected to high levels of cesium vapor. Aluminum and white paint were backsputtered by 550-volt cesium ions onto selected samples. For direct bombardment, the threshold for ion-induced property changes was above five-thousand trillion ions/sq cm. With material sputtered from a 450-sq cm target onto samples 36 cm distant, the threshold for noticeable effects was above 5 times 10 to the 17-th power ions/sq cm.

  2. 7 CFR 3201.68 - Erosion control materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Erosion control materials. 3201.68 Section 3201.68... Designated Items § 3201.68 Erosion control materials. (a) Definition. Woven or non-woven fiber materials manufactured for use on construction, demolition, or other sites to prevent wind or water erosion of...

  3. 7 CFR 3201.68 - Erosion control materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Erosion control materials. 3201.68 Section 3201.68... Designated Items § 3201.68 Erosion control materials. (a) Definition. Woven or non-woven fiber materials manufactured for use on construction, demolition, or other sites to prevent wind or water erosion of...

  4. 7 CFR 3201.68 - Erosion control materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Erosion control materials. 3201.68 Section 3201.68... Designated Items § 3201.68 Erosion control materials. (a) Definition. Woven or non-woven fiber materials manufactured for use on construction, demolition, or other sites to prevent wind or water erosion of...

  5. On Social and Material Aspects of Technological Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herfel, William E.

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that Hugh Lacey's example of a clear-cut distinction between material and social constraints or possibilities in the Green Revolution is misleading. Proposes a material analysis of the control situation placed within the material framework of the social structure within which the control system is employed. (Author/WRM)

  6. Degradation of insecticides used for indoor spraying in malaria control and possible solutions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The insecticide dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) is widely used in indoor residual spraying (IRS) for malaria control owing to its longer residual efficacy in the field compared to other World Health Organization (WHO) alternatives. Suitable stabilization to render these alternative insecticides longer lasting could provide a less controversial and more acceptable and effective alternative insecticide formulations than DDT. Methods This study sought to investigate the reasons behind the often reported longer lasting behaviour of DDT by exposing all the WHO approved insecticides to high temperature, high humidity and ultra-violet light. Interactions between the insecticides and some mineral powders in the presence of an aqueous medium were also tested. Simple insecticidal paints were made using slurries of these mineral powders whilst some insecticides were dispersed into a conventional acrylic paint binder. These formulations were then spray painted on neat and manure coated mud plaques, representative of the material typically used in rural mud houses, at twice the upper limit of the WHO recommended dosage range. DDT was applied directly onto mud plaques at four times the WHO recommended concentration and on manure plaques at twice WHO recommended concentration. All plaques were subjected to accelerated ageing conditions of 40°C and a relative humidity of 90%. Results The pyrethroids insecticides outperformed the carbamates and DDT in the accelerated ageing tests. Thus UV exposure, high temperature oxidation and high humidity per se were ruled out as the main causes of failure of the alternative insecticides. Gas chromatography (GC) spectrograms showed that phosphogypsum stabilised the insecticides the most against alkaline degradation (i.e., hydrolysis). Bioassay testing showed that the period of efficacy of some of these formulations was comparable to that of DDT when sprayed on mud surfaces or cattle manure coated surfaces. Conclusions

  7. Evaluation of Ultrasonic and Thermal Nondestructive Evaluation for the Characterization of Aging Degradation in Braided Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the ability of traditional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to measure the degradation of braided polymer composite materials subjected to thermal-humidity cycling to simulate aging. A series of braided composite coupons were examined using immersion ultrasonic and pulsed thermography techniques in the as received condition. These same specimens were then examined following extended thermal-humidity cycling. Results of this examination did not show a significant change in the resulting (NDE) signals.

  8. Molecular weight controllable degradation of Laminaria japonica polysaccharides and its antioxidant properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Shenghua; Zhao, Qingsheng; Zhao, Bing; Ouyang, Jie; Mo, Jianling; Chen, Jinjin; Cao, Lili; Zhang, Hong

    2016-08-01

    In this study, molecular weight controllable degradation of algal Laminaria japonica polysaccharides (LPS) was investigated by ultrasound combined with hydrogen peroxide. Three main factors, i.e., ultrasonic power (A), ultrasonic time (B), and H2O2 concentration (C) were chosen for optimizing parameters by employing three-factors, three-levels BBD. The influence of degradation on structure change and antioxidant activities was also investigated. A second-order polynomial equation including molecular weight (Y) of Laminaria japonica polysaccharides and each variable parameter, i.e., ultrasonic power (A), ultrasonic time (B), and H2O2 concentration (C), was established: Y=20718.67-4273.13 A-4000.38 B-1438.75 C+2333.25 AB+1511.00 AC+873.00 BC+2838.29 A 2 + 2490.79 B 2+873.04 C 2. The equation regression coefficient value ( R 2 = 0.969) indicated that this equation was valid. The value of the adjusted determination coefficient (adjusted R 2 = 0.914) also confirmed that the model was highly significant. The results of selected experimental degradation conditions matched with the predicted value. FT-IR spectra revealed that the structures of LPS before and after degradation were not significantly changed. Antioxidant activities of LPS revealed that low Mws possessed stronger inhibitory than the original polysaccharides. The scavenging effects on superoxide radicals was the highest when IC50 of crude LPS was 4.92 mg mL-1 and IC50 of Mw 18.576 KDa was 1.02 mg mL-1, which was fourfold higher than initial polysaccharide.

  9. Interactions between mRNA Export Commitment, 3′-End Quality Control, and Nuclear Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Libri, Domenico; Dower, Ken; Boulay, Jocelyne; Thomsen, Rune; Rosbash, Michael; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2002-01-01

    Several aspects of eukaryotic mRNA processing are linked to transcription. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, overexpression of the mRNA export factor Sub2p suppresses the growth defect of hpr1 null cells, yet the protein Hpr1p and the associated THO protein complex are implicated in transcriptional elongation. Indeed, we find that a pool of heat shock HSP104 transcripts are 3′-end truncated in THO complex mutant as well as sub2 mutant backgrounds. Surprisingly, however, this defect can be suppressed by deletion of the 3′-5′ exonuclease Rrp6p. This indicates that incomplete RNAs result from nuclear degradation rather than from a failure to efficiently elongate transcription. RNAs that are not degraded are retained at the transcription site in a Rrp6p-dependent manner. Interestingly, the addition of a RRP6 deletion to sub2 or to THO complex mutants shows a strong synthetic growth phenotype, suggesting that the failure to retain and/or degrade defective mRNAs is deleterious. mRNAs produced in the 3′-end processing mutants rna14-3 and rna15-2, as well as an RNA harboring a 3′ end generated by a self-cleaving hammerhead ribozyme, are also retained in Rrp6p-dependent transcription site foci. Taken together, our results show that several classes of defective RNPs are subject to a quality control step that impedes release from transcription site foci and suggest that suboptimal messenger ribonucleoprotein assembly leads to RNA degradation by Rrp6p. PMID:12417728

  10. A Tuneable Switch for Controlling Environmental Degradation of Bioplastics: Addition of Isothiazolinone to Polyhydroxyalkanoates

    PubMed Central

    Woolnough, Catherine Anne; Yee, Lachlan Hartley; Charlton, Timothy Stuart; Foster, Leslie John Ray

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the environmental degradation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and polyhydroxyvalerate (P(HB-co-HV)) bioplastics would expand the range of their potential applications. Combining PHB and P(HB-co-HV) films with the anti-fouling agent 4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (DCOI, <10% w/w) restricted microbial colonisation in soil, but did not significantly affect melting temperature or the tensile strength of films. DCOI films showed reduced biofouling and postponed the onset of weight loss by up to 100 days, a 10-fold increase compared to unmodified films where the microbial coverage was significant. In addition, the rate of PHA-DCOI weight loss, post-onset, reduced by about 150%; in contrast a recorded weight loss of only 0.05% per day for P(HB-co-HV) with a 10% DCOI loading was observed. This is in stark contrast to the unmodified PHB film, where a recorded weight loss of only 0.75% per day was made. The ‘switch’ that initiates film weight loss, and its subsequent reduced rate, depended on the DCOI loading to control biofouling. The control of biofouling and environmental degradation for these DCOI modified bioplastics increases their potential use in biodegradable applications. PMID:24146779

  11. Estimating the erosion and degradation performance of ceramic and polymeric insulator materials in high current arc environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, T. G.; Kristiansen, M.; O'Hair, E.; Marx, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    Modeling the erosion and holdoff degradation performance of various commercially available polymeric and ceramic insulators is addressed. The insulators are tested on a surface discharge switch at about 300 kA in atmospheric air. Test diagnostics include the surface voltage holdoff recovery and the eroded mass loss of the insulator and electrode materials used. The ceramic materials tested include several types of aluminum and magnesium silicates, several alumina and zirconia composites, and aluminum and silicon nitride. The polymeric insulators include polyvinyl chloride, low- and high-molecular-weight polyethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyamide, acetyl, polyamide-imide, and several types of glass-reinforced epoxies, melamines, and phenolics. The test results indicate that the holdoff degradation resistance and erosion rates can be qualitatively predicated by the use of merit figures which are based on the thermochemical properties of the insulator. The holdoff degradation and erosion rates can be improved for some thermoset polymers by a suitable choice of electrode material and/or by the ultraviolet stabilization of the insulator.

  12. Degradable magnesium-based implant materials with anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qiuming; Li, Kun; Han, Zengsheng; Wang, Erde; Xu, Zhigang; Liu, Riping; Tian, Yongjun

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare a new biodegradable Mg-based biomaterial, which provides good mechanical integrity in combination with anti-inflammatory function during the degradation process. The silver element was used, because it improved the mechanical properties as an effective grain refiner and it is also treated as a potential anti-inflammatory core. The new degradable Mg-Zn-Ag biomaterial was prepared by zone solidification technology and extrusion. The mechanical properties were mostly enhanced by fine grain strengthening. In addition, the alloys exhibited good cytocompatibility. The anti-inflammatory function of degradation products was identified by both interleukin-1α and nitric oxide modes. The anti-inflammatory impact was significantly associated with the concentration of silver ion. It was demonstrated that Mg-Zn-Ag system was a potential metallic stent with anti-inflammatory function, which can reduce the long-term dependence of anti-inflammatory drug after coronary stent implantation. PMID:23203562

  13. Environmental Degradation of Materials: Surface Chemistry Related to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Parallel experiments have been performed in order to develop a comprehensive model for stress cracking (SCC) in structural materials. The central objective is to determine the relationship between the activity and selectivity of the microstructure of structural materials to their dissolution kinetics and experimentally measured SCC kinetics. Zinc was chosen as a prototype metal system. The SCC behavior of two oriented single-crystal disks of zinc in a chromic oxide/sodium sulfate solution (Palmerton solution) were determined. It was found that: (1) the dissolution rate is strongly (hkil)-dependent and proportional to the exposure time in the aggressive environment; and (2) a specific slip system is selectively active to dissolution under applied stress and this slip line controls crack initiation and propagation. As a precursor to potential microgrvity experiments, electrophoretic mobility measurements of zinc particles were obtained in solutions of sodium sulfate (0.0033 M) with concentrations of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 8 ppm. The equilibrium distribution of exposed oriented planes as well as their correlation will determine the particle mobility.

  14. Advanced diffusion studies with isotopically controlled materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, Hartmut A.; Silvestri, Hughes H.; Haller, Eugene E.

    2004-11-14

    The use of enriched stable isotopes combined with modern epitaxial deposition and depth profiling techniques enables the preparation of material heterostructures, highly appropriate for self- and foreign-atom diffusion experiments. Over the past decade we have performed diffusion studies with isotopically enriched elemental and compound semiconductors. In the present paper we highlight our recent results and demonstrate that the use of isotopically enriched materials ushered in a new era in the study of diffusion in solids which yields greater insight into the properties of native defects and their roles in diffusion. Our approach of studying atomic diffusion is not limited to semiconductors and can be applied also to other material systems. Current areas of our research concern the diffusion in the silicon-germanium alloys and glassy materials such as silicon dioxide and ion conducting silicate glasses.

  15. Bibliographic Control of Nonprint Educational Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlvane, Mary E.; Tonkery, Dan

    1978-01-01

    Presents an overview of the current operation of the AVLINE system, an online data base maintained by the National Library of Medicine containing references to over 5,000 nationally available nonprint materials. (VT)

  16. Inherently antioxidant and antimicrobial tannic acid release from poly(tannic acid) nanoparticles with controllable degradability.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Nurettin; Sagbas, Selin; Aktas, Nahit; Silan, Coskun

    2016-06-01

    From a natural polyphenol, Tannic acid (TA), poly(TA) nanoparticles were readily prepared using a single step approach with three different biocompatible crosslinkers; trimethylolpropane triglycidyl ether (TMPGDE), poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEGGE), and trisodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). P(TA) particles were obtained with controllable diameters between 400 to 800nm with -25mV surface charge. The effect of synthesis conditions, such as the emulsion medium, pH values of TA solution, and the type of crosslinker, on the shape, size, dispersity, yield, and degradability of poly(Tannic Acid) (p(TA)) nanoparticles was systematically investigated. The hydrolytic degradation amount in physiological pH conditions of 5.4, 7.4, and 9.0 at 37.5°C were found to be in the order TMPGDEdegradation amounts of TA from p(TA) nanoparticles can be controlled by the appropriate choice of crosslinker, and the pH of releasing media. The highest TA release, 600mg/g, was obtained for TMPGDE-crosslinked p(TA) particles in intestinal pH conditions (pH 9) over 3 days; whereas, a slow and linear TA release profile over almost 30 days was obtained by using PEGGE-crosslinked p(TA) in body fluid pH conditions (pH 7.4). The total phenol content of p(TA) particles was calculated as 70±1μgmL(-1) for 170μgmL(-1) p(TA), and the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity was found to be 2027±104mM trolox equivalent g(-1). Moreover, p(TA) nanoparticles demonstrated strong antimicrobial effects against common bacterial strains. More interestingly, with a higher concentration of p(TA) particles, higher blood clotting indices were obtained. PMID:26970821

  17. Virtual earthquake engineering laboratory with physics-based degrading materials on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, In Ho

    For the last few decades, we have obtained tremendous insight into underlying microscopic mechanisms of degrading quasi-brittle materials from persistent and near-saintly efforts in laboratories, and at the same time we have seen unprecedented evolution in computational technology such as massively parallel computers. Thus, time is ripe to embark on a novel approach to settle unanswered questions, especially for the earthquake engineering community, by harmoniously combining the microphysics mechanisms with advanced parallel computing technology. To begin with, it should be stressed that we placed a great deal of emphasis on preserving clear meaning and physical counterparts of all the microscopic material models proposed herein, since it is directly tied to the belief that by doing so, the more physical mechanisms we incorporate, the better prediction we can obtain. We departed from reviewing representative microscopic analysis methodologies, selecting out "fixed-type" multidirectional smeared crack model as the base framework for nonlinear quasi-brittle materials, since it is widely believed to best retain the physical nature of actual cracks. Microscopic stress functions are proposed by integrating well-received existing models to update normal stresses on the crack surfaces (three orthogonal surfaces are allowed to initiate herein) under cyclic loading. Unlike the normal stress update, special attention had to be paid to the shear stress update on the crack surfaces, due primarily to the well-known pathological nature of the fixed-type smeared crack model---spurious large stress transfer over the open crack under nonproportional loading. In hopes of exploiting physical mechanism to resolve this deleterious nature of the fixed crack model, a tribology-inspired three-dimensional (3d) interlocking mechanism has been proposed. Following the main trend of tribology (i.e., the science and engineering of interacting surfaces), we introduced the base fabric of solid

  18. Arabidopsis DELLA Protein Degradation Is Controlled by a Type-One Protein Phosphatase, TOPP4

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xiaola; Yue, Jing; Huang, Yan; Xu, Xiufei; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a class of important phytohormones regulating a variety of physiological processes during normal plant growth and development. One of the major events during GA-mediated growth is the degradation of DELLA proteins, key negative regulators of GA signaling pathway. The stability of DELLA proteins is thought to be controlled by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Up to date, no phosphatase involved in this process has been identified. We have identified a dwarfed dominant-negative Arabidopsis mutant, named topp4-1. Reduced expression of TOPP4 using an artificial microRNA strategy also resulted in a dwarfed phenotype. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicated that TOPP4 regulates GA signal transduction mainly via promoting DELLA protein degradation. The severely dwarfed topp4-1 phenotypes were partially rescued by the DELLA deficient mutants rga-t2 and gai-t6, suggesting that the DELLA proteins RGA and GAI are required for the biological function of TOPP4. Both RGA and GAI were greatly accumulated in topp4-1 but significantly decreased in 35S-TOPP4 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. Further analyses demonstrated that TOPP4 is able to directly bind and dephosphorylate RGA and GAI, confirming that the TOPP4-controlled phosphorylation status of DELLAs is associated with their stability. These studies provide direct evidence for a crucial role of protein dephosphorylation mediated by TOPP4 in the GA signaling pathway. PMID:25010794

  19. Debra-mediated Ci degradation controls tissue homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-02-11

    Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control. PMID:24527387

  20. Debra-Mediated Ci Degradation Controls Tissue Homeostasis in Drosophila Adult Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control. PMID:24527387

  1. 10 CFR 835.1101 - Control of material and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....1101 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Radioactive Contamination Control... section, material and equipment in contamination areas, high contamination areas, and airborne radioactivity areas shall not be released to a controlled area if: (1) Removable surface contamination levels...

  2. 10 CFR 835.1101 - Control of material and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....1101 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Radioactive Contamination Control... section, material and equipment in contamination areas, high contamination areas, and airborne radioactivity areas shall not be released to a controlled area if: (1) Removable surface contamination levels...

  3. 10 CFR 835.1101 - Control of material and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....1101 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Radioactive Contamination Control... section, material and equipment in contamination areas, high contamination areas, and airborne radioactivity areas shall not be released to a controlled area if: (1) Removable surface contamination levels...

  4. 10 CFR 835.1101 - Control of material and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....1101 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Radioactive Contamination Control... section, material and equipment in contamination areas, high contamination areas, and airborne radioactivity areas shall not be released to a controlled area if: (1) Removable surface contamination levels...

  5. 10 CFR 835.1101 - Control of material and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....1101 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Radioactive Contamination Control... section, material and equipment in contamination areas, high contamination areas, and airborne radioactivity areas shall not be released to a controlled area if: (1) Removable surface contamination levels...

  6. Controlled synthesis of mixed-valent Fe-containing metal organic frameworks for the degradation of phenol under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiao; Liu, Min; Li, Keyan; Han, Yitong; Zuo, Yi; Wang, Junhu; Song, Chunshan; Zhang, Guoliang; Guo, Xinwen

    2016-05-10

    A series of MIL-53(Fe)-type materials, Fe(BDC)(DMF,F), were prepared by using different ratios of n(FeCl3)/n(FeCl2), which have varied amounts of Fe(2+) in their frameworks. From FeCl3 to FeCl2, the structures of the synthesized samples transform from MIL-53(Fe) to Fe(BDC)(DMF,F). Along with this structure transformation, the crystal morphology goes through a striking change from a small irregular shape to a big triangular prism. This phenomenon indicates that the addition of FeCl2 is beneficial for the formation of a Fe(BDC)(DMF,F) structure. The catalytic activity of these iron-containing MOFs was tested in phenol degradation with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant at near neutral pH and 35 °C. The degradation efficiency of these samples increases gradually from MIL-53(Fe) to Fe(BDC)(DMF,F). (57)Fe Mössbauer spectra reveal that Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) coexist in the Fe(BDC)(DMF,F) framework, and the highest amount of Fe(2+) in the sample prepared with mixed FeCl3 and FeCl2 is 26.0%. The result illustrates that the amount of Fe(2+) in the samples can be controlled using varied n(FeCl3)/n(FeCl2) in the feed. The diverse amount of Fe(2+) in this series of FeMOF materials exactly explains the distinction of reaction efficiency. The iron leaching tests, structures of the fresh and used catalysts, and the data of the recycling runs show that the Fe-containing MOFs are stable in this liquid-phase reaction. PMID:26862863

  7. Control of enzymatic degradation of biodegradable polymers by treatment with biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, derived from Pseudozyma spp. yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Tsuchiya, Wataru; Suzuki, Ken; Watanabe, Takashi; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2016-02-01

    Cutinase-like esterase from the yeasts Pseudozyma antarctica (PaE) shows strong degradation activity in an agricultural biodegradable plastic (BP) model of mulch films composed of poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA). P. antarctica is known to abundantly produce a glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid (MEL). Here, the effects of MEL on PaE-catalyzed degradation of BPs were investigated. Based on PBSA dispersion solution, the degradation of PBSA particles by PaE was inhibited in the presence of MEL. MEL behavior on BP substrates was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using a sensor chip coated with polymer films. The positive SPR signal shift indicated that MEL readily adsorbed and spread onto the surface of a BP film. The amount of BP degradation by PaE was monitored based on the negative SPR signal shift and was decreased 1.7-fold by MEL pretreatment. Furthermore, the shape of PBSA mulch films in PaE-containing solution was maintained with MEL pretreatment, whereas untreated films were almost completely degraded and dissolved. These results suggest that MEL covering the surface of BP film inhibits adsorption of PaE and PaE-catalyzed degradation of BPs. We applied the above results to control the microbial degradation of BP mulch films. MEL pretreatment significantly inhibited BP mulch film degradation by both PaE solution and BP-degradable microorganism. Moreover, the degradation of these films was recovered after removal of the coated MEL by ethanol treatment. These results demonstrate that the biodegradation of BP films can be readily and reversibly controlled by a physical approach using MEL. PMID:26512003

  8. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers; Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.; Kass, J.N.

    1988-06-01

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys and three copper-based alloys are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The austenitic alloys are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and the high-nickel material Alloy 825. The copper-based alloys are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). Waste in the forms of both spent fuel assemblies from reactors and borosilicate glass will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including undesirable phase transformations due to a lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking; and transgranular stress corrosion cracking. Problems specific to welds, such as hot cracking, may also occur. A survey of the literature has been prepared as part of the process of selecting, from among the candidates, a material that is adequate for repository conditions. The modes of degradation are discussed in detail in the survey to determine which apply to the candidate alloys and the extent to which they may actually occur. The eight volumes of the survey are summarized in Sections 1 through 8 of this overview. The conclusions drawn from the survey are also given in this overview.

  9. Controllable degradation kinetics of POSS nanoparticle-integrated poly(ε-caprolactone urea)urethane elastomers for tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Yildirimer, Lara; Buanz, Asma; Gaisford, Simon; Malins, Edward L.; Remzi Becer, C.; Moiemen, Naiem; Reynolds, Gary M.; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable elastomers are a popular choice for tissue engineering scaffolds, particularly in mechanically challenging settings (e.g. the skin). As the optimal rate of scaffold degradation depends on the tissue type to be regenerated, next-generation scaffolds must demonstrate tuneable degradation patterns. Previous investigations mainly focussed on the integration of more or less hydrolysable components to modulate degradation rates. In this study, however, the objective was to develop and synthesize a family of novel biodegradable polyurethanes (PUs) based on a poly(ε-caprolactone urea)urethane backbone integrating polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-PCLU) with varying amounts of hard segments (24%, 28% and 33% (w/v)) in order to investigate the influence of hard segment chemistry on the degradation rate and profile. PUs lacking POSS nanoparticles served to prove the important function of POSS in maintaining the mechanical structures of the PU scaffolds before, during and after degradation. Mechanical testing of degraded samples revealed hard segment-dependent modulation of the materials’ viscoelastic properties, which was attributable to (i) degradation-induced changes in the PU crystallinity and (ii) either the presence or absence of POSS. In conclusion, this study presents a facile method of controlling degradation profiles of PU scaffolds used in tissue engineering applications. PMID:26463421

  10. Requirement for alanine in the amino acid control of deprivation-induced protein degradation in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Pösö, A R; Mortimore, G E

    1984-01-01

    Protein degradation in liver is actively controlled by a small group of inhibitory amino acids--leucine, tyrosine (or phenylalanine), glutamine, proline, histidine, tryptophan, and methionine. Other evidence, however, suggests that one or more of the remaining 12 noninhibitory amino acids is also required for suppression of proteolysis at normal concentrations. This question was investigated in livers of fed rats perfused in the single-pass mode. The deletion of alanine at normal (1x), but not at 4x or 10x normal, plasma amino acid concentrations evoked a near-maximal acceleration of protein degradation. No other noninhibitory amino acid was effective. Because alanine alone was not directly inhibitory and its omission was not associated with a decrease in inhibitory amino acid pools, alanine was presumed to act as a coregulator in the expression of inhibitory activity. When tested alone, the inhibitory group was as effective as the complete mixture at 0.5x and 4x levels, but it lost its suppressive ability within a narrow zone of concentration centered slightly above 1x. The addition of 1x (0.48 mM) alanine completely restored the inhibition. Pyruvate and lactate could be effectively substituted, but only at concentrations 10-20 times greater than that of alanine. These, together with earlier findings, indicate the existence of a regulatory complex that recognizes specific amino acids and transmits positive and negative signals to proteolytic sites. The results also suggest that alanine can provide an important regulatory link between energy demands and protein degradation. PMID:6589593

  11. Degradation of proton depth dose distributions attributable to microstructures in lung-equivalent material

    SciTech Connect

    Titt, Uwe Mirkovic, Dragan; Mohan, Radhe; Sell, Martin; Unkelbach, Jan; Bangert, Mark; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the work reported here was to investigate the influence of sub-millimeter size heterogeneities on the degradation of the distal edges of proton beams and to validate Monte Carlo (MC) methods’ ability to correctly predict such degradation. Methods: A custom-designed high-resolution plastic phantom approximating highly heterogeneous, lung-like structures was employed in measurements and in Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the degradation of proton Bragg curves penetrating heterogeneous media. Results: Significant differences in distal falloff widths and in peak dose values were observed in the measured and the Monte Carlo simulated curves compared to pristine proton Bragg curves. Furthermore, differences between simulations of beams penetrating CT images of the phantom did not agree well with the corresponding experimental differences. The distal falloff widths in CT image-based geometries were underestimated by up to 0.2 cm in water (corresponding to 0.8–1.4 cm in lung tissue), and the peak dose values of pristine proton beams were overestimated by as much as ~35% compared to measured curves or depth-dose curves simulated on the basis of true geometry. The authors demonstrate that these discrepancies were caused by the limited spatial resolution of CT images that served as a basis for dose calculations and lead to underestimation of the impact of the fine structure of tissue heterogeneities. A convolution model was successfully applied to mitigate the underestimation. Conclusions: The results of this study justify further development of models to better represent heterogeneity effects in soft-tissue geometries, such as lung, and to correct systematic underestimation of the degradation of the distal edge of proton doses.

  12. Incorporation of bioactive glass in calcium phosphate cement: material characterization and in vitro degradation.

    PubMed

    Renno, A C M; Nejadnik, M R; van de Watering, F C J; Crovace, M C; Zanotto, E D; Hoefnagels, J P M; Wolke, J G C; Jansen, J A; van den Beucken, J J J P

    2013-08-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) have been widely used as an alternative to biological grafts due to their excellent osteoconductive properties. Although degradation has been improved by using poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microspheres as porogens, the biological performance of CPC/PLGA composites is insufficient to stimulate bone healing in large bone defects. In this context, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of incorporating osteopromotive bioactive glass (BG; up to 50 wt %) on setting properties, in vitro degradation behavior and morphological characteristics of CPC/BG and CPC/PLGA/BG. The results revealed that the initial and final setting time of the composites increased with increasing amounts of incorporated BG. The degradation test showed a BG-dependent increasing effect on pH of CPC/BG and CPC/PLGA/BG pre-set scaffolds immersed in PBS compared to CPC and CPC/PLGA equivalents. Whereas no effects on mass loss were observed for CPC and CPC/BG pre-set scaffolds, CPC/PLGA/BG pre-set scaffolds showed an accelerated mass loss compared with CPC/PLGA equivalents. Morphologically, no changes were observed for CPC and CPC/BG pre-set scaffolds. In contrast, CPC/PLGA and CPC/PLGA/BG showed apparent degradation of PLGA microspheres and faster loss of integrity for CPC/PLGA/BG pre-set scaffolds compared with CPC/PLGA equivalents. Based on the present in vitro results, it can be concluded that BG can be successfully introduced into CPC and CPC/PLGA without exceeding the setting time beyond clinically acceptable values. All injectable composites containing BG had suitable handling properties and specifically CPC/PLGA/BG showed an increased rate of mass loss. Future investigations should focus on translating these findings to in vivo applications. PMID:23364896

  13. Degradation of proton depth dose distributions attributable to microstructures in lung-equivalent material

    PubMed Central

    Titt, Uwe; Sell, Martin; Unkelbach, Jan; Bangert, Mark; Mirkovic, Dragan; Oelfke, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the work reported here was to investigate the influence of sub-millimeter size heterogeneities on the degradation of the distal edges of proton beams and to validate Monte Carlo (MC) methods’ ability to correctly predict such degradation. Methods: A custom-designed high-resolution plastic phantom approximating highly heterogeneous, lung-like structures was employed in measurements and in Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the degradation of proton Bragg curves penetrating heterogeneous media. Results: Significant differences in distal falloff widths and in peak dose values were observed in the measured and the Monte Carlo simulated curves compared to pristine proton Bragg curves. Furthermore, differences between simulations of beams penetrating CT images of the phantom did not agree well with the corresponding experimental differences. The distal falloff widths in CT image-based geometries were underestimated by up to 0.2 cm in water (corresponding to 0.8–1.4 cm in lung tissue), and the peak dose values of pristine proton beams were overestimated by as much as ˜35% compared to measured curves or depth-dose curves simulated on the basis of true geometry. The authors demonstrate that these discrepancies were caused by the limited spatial resolution of CT images that served as a basis for dose calculations and lead to underestimation of the impact of the fine structure of tissue heterogeneities. A convolution model was successfully applied to mitigate the underestimation. Conclusions: The results of this study justify further development of models to better represent heterogeneity effects in soft-tissue geometries, such as lung, and to correct systematic underestimation of the degradation of the distal edge of proton doses. PMID:26520732

  14. Aquatic degradation of Cry1Ab protein and decomposition dynamics of transgenic corn leaves under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Böttger, Rita; Schaller, Jörg; Lintow, Sven; Gert Dudel, E

    2015-03-01

    The increasing cultivation of genetically modified corn plants (Zea mays) during the last decades is suggested as a potential risk to the environment. One of these genetically modified variety expressed the insecticidal Cry1Ab protein originating from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), resulting in resistance against Ostrinia nubilalis, the European corn borer. Transgenic litter material is extensively studied regarding the decomposition in soils. However, only a few field studies analyzed the fate of the Cry1Ab protein and the impact of green and senescent leaf litter from corn on the decomposition rate and related ecosystem functions in aquatic environments. Consequently, a microbial litter decomposition experiment was conducted under controlled semi-natural conditions in batch culture using two maize varieties: one variety with Cry1Ab and another one with the appertaining Iso-line as control treatment. The results showed no significant differences between the treatment with Cry1Ab and the Iso-line regarding loss of total mass in dry weight of 43% for Iso-line and 45% for Bt-corn litter, lignin content increased to 137.5% (Iso-line) and 115.7% (Bt-corn), and phenol loss decreased by 53.6% (Iso-line), 62.2% (Bt-corn) during three weeks of the experiment. At the end of the experiment Cry1Ab protein was still detected with 6% of the initial concentration. A slightly but significant lower cellulose content was found for the Cry1Ab treatment compared to the Iso-line litter at the end of the experiment. The significant higher total protein (25%) and nitrogen (25%) content in Bt corn, most likely due to the additionally expression of the transgenic protein, may increase the microbial cellulose degradation and decrease microbial lignin degradation. In conclusion a relevant year by year input of protein and therefore nitrogen rich Bt corn litter into aquatic environments may affect the balanced nutrient turnover in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25553417

  15. Microstructural Control of Additively Manufactured Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P. C.; Brice, D. A.; Samimi, P.; Ghamarian, I.; Fraser, H. L.

    2016-07-01

    In additively manufactured (AM) metallic materials, the fundamental interrelationships that exist between composition, processing, and microstructure govern these materials’ properties and potential improvements or reductions in performance. For example, by using AM, it is possible to achieve highly desirable microstructural features (e.g., highly refined precipitates) that could not otherwise be achieved by using conventional approaches. Simultaneously, opportunities exist to manage macro-level microstructural characteristics such as residual stress, porosity, and texture, the last of which might be desirable. To predictably realize optimal microstructures, it is necessary to establish a framework that integrates processing variables, alloy composition, and the resulting microstructure. Although such a framework is largely lacking for AM metallic materials, the basic scientific components of the framework exist in literature. This review considers these key components and presents them in a manner that highlights key interdependencies that would form an integrated framework to engineer microstructures using AM.

  16. E-Area Vault Concrete Material Property And Vault Durability/Degradation Projection Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M. A.

    2014-03-11

    Subsequent to the 2008 E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC 2008), two additional E-Area vault concrete property testing programs have been conducted (Dixon and Phifer 2010 and SIMCO 2011a) and two additional E-Area vault concrete durability modeling projections have been made (Langton 2009 and SIMCO 2012). All the information/data from these reports has been evaluated and consolidated herein by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) at the request of Solid Waste Management (SWM) to produce E-Area vault concrete hydraulic and physical property data and vault durability/degradation projection recommendations that are adequately justified for use within associated Special Analyses (SAs) and future PA updates. The Low Activity Waste (LAW) and Intermediate Level (IL) Vaults structural degradation predictions produced by Carey 2006 and Peregoy 2006, respectively, which were used as the basis for the 2008 ELLWF PA, remain valid based upon the results of the E-Area vault concrete durability simulations reported by Langton 2009 and those reported by SIMCO 2012. Therefore revised structural degradation predictions are not required so long as the mean thickness of the closure cap overlying the vaults is no greater than that assumed within Carey 2006 and Peregoy 2006. For the LAW Vault structural degradation prediction (Carey 2006), the mean thickness of the overlying closure cap was taken as nine feet. For the IL Vault structural degradation prediction (Peregoy 2006), the mean thickness of the overlying closure cap was taken as eight feet. The mean closure cap thicknesses as described here for both E-Area Vaults will be included as a key input and assumption (I&A) in the next revision to the closure plan for the ELLWF (Phifer et al. 2009). In addition, it has been identified as new input to the PA model to be assessed in the ongoing update to the new PA Information UDQE (Flach 2013). Once the UDQE is approved, the SWM Key I

  17. Materials control and accounting (MC and A): the evolutionary pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear materials control and accounting systems are subject to pressures of both regulatory and institutional natures. This fact, coupled with the emergence of new technology, is causing evolutionary changes in materials control and accounting systems. These changes are the subject of this paper.

  18. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3280 Clinical toxicology control material. (a) Identification. A clinical toxicology...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3280 Clinical toxicology control material. (a) Identification. A clinical toxicology...

  20. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3280 Clinical toxicology control material. (a) Identification. A clinical toxicology...

  1. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3280 Clinical toxicology control material. (a) Identification. A clinical toxicology...

  2. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3280 Clinical toxicology control material. (a) Identification. A clinical toxicology...

  3. Achieving process control through improved grinding techniques for ferrite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, J.

    1995-09-01

    In manufacturing soft ferrite materials the particle size of the raw material has a significant impact on the reactivity of calcination. The control of particle size distribution and final formulation at wet milling after calcining impacts the reactivity during sintering and the magnetic properties of the final product. This paper will deal with steps taken to improve process control during the grinding operations of raw material and calcine in soft ferrite production. Equipment modifications as well as changes to the grinding and material handling techniques will be included. All examples of process control and improvements will be supported by data.

  4. Systematic control of nonmetallic materials for improved fire safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The elements of a systematic fire safety program are summarized and consist of fire safety criteria, design considerations, testing of materials, development of nonmetallic materials, nonmetallic materials information systems, design reviews, and change control. The system described in this report was developed for the Apollo spacecraft. The system can, however, be tailored to many industrial, commercial, and military activities.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide generation and photocatalytic degradation of estrone by microstructural controlled ZnO nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangsi; Han, Jie; Qiu, Wei; Gao, Wei

    2012-12-01

    The strong oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), generated by ZnO nanorod arrays under UV light irradiation was monitored by fluorescence analysis. The ZnO nanorod arrays were synthesized via a low temperature hydrothermal method and their dimensions, i.e., diameter and height, can be controlled by adjusting the concentration of zinc nitrate (Zn(NO3)2·6H2O) and hexamethylenetetramine (HMT). The morphology, nanostructure, surface roughness and optical property were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmittance spectra, respectively. The ZnO nanorod arrays were applied in the degradation of estrone, which is an emerging steroid estrogen contaminant. The results revealed that the ZnO nanorod array produced from 25 mM Zn2+ and HMT had the highest aspect ratio, the largest surface roughness and the lowest band gap energy, which was beneficial to the efficiency of UV light utilization, photocatalytic degradation of estrone and H2O2 generation.

  6. Control of xanthan-degrading organisms in the Loudon pilot: Approach, methodology, and results

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, J.R.; Beck, D.; Gale, W.W.; Gall, L.S.; Goldman, I.M.; Laskin, A.I.; Maruca, S.D.; Naslund, L.A.; Wernau, W.C.

    1983-10-01

    An investigation of loss of mobility control in Exxon's Loudon micellar/polymer pilot test has confirmed that loss was caused by microbial degradation of the xanthan biopolymer used to viscosify the microemulsion and polymer drive banks. This paper describes techniques which were used to sample and culture bacteria from the Loudon pilot and demonstrate that these mixed cultures are able to degrade xanthan rapidly under reservoir conditions. Laboratory studies show that, under anaerobic conditions, bacteria cultured from the Loudon pilot can cause over 90% loss of xanthan viscosity in micellar/polymer fluids within seven days. To remedy this problem, an extensive laboratory screening program was conducted to identify biocides that are effective against the offending organisms. Complete kill of the organisms under repeated laboratory challenge tests was the chief screening criterion. Biocide compatibility (with biopolymer, formation rock, field brines, and microemulsion), cost effectiveness, and chemical stability were also judged key parameters for effectiveness in field applications. Of the biocides tested against the Loudon organisms, formaldehyde was found to be the most consistently effective, providing complete kill and persistence at levels of 500 to 2000 ppm. Formaldehyde was shown to reduce bacteria below detectable levels in the formation and permit propagation of xanthan in a follow-up test conducted within the highly contaminated pilot zone. Therefore, formaldehyde should be an effective biocide for future floods at Loudon.

  7. SCF(SAP) controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-01-01

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size. PMID:27048938

  8. SCFSAP controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-01-01

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size. PMID:27048938

  9. Evaluation and Control of Soil Degradation in Russia on the Basis of the Assessment of Soil Ecological Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Aleksandr

    2016-04-01

    Sustainable development of the territory is possible only under certain environmental requirements. These requirements are based on the implementation of the concept, conventionally called "zero land degradation", which cannot be reached in the process of real land use. "Zero degradation" is the establishment of acceptable ecological state of the environment and permissible anthropogenic impact on it, wherein self-healing of nature quality is possible and there is no accumulation of irreversible environmental damage. The values of parameters that characterize the relationship between the ecological state of the environment, in particular, land degradation, and the socio-economic development of the Russian Federation are represented in the materials of recent issues of the Russian State environmental report (2012 - 2014). Environmental problems in Russia are actively discussed in relation to issues of environmental and socio-economic development of the neighboring countries of the Eurasian region. So the Law "On Soil Protection", which was developed and adopted by the Union: Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, is dedicated to the protection of soil and soil degradation control. Ecological Doctrine of Russia (2012) and the State Environmental Program (2012-2020) identify the main strategic steps to combat land degradation in our country. In the first place, it has been tasked to identify and eliminate past environmental damage followed by the organization of nature "from scratch", in accordance with environmental regulations. Currently the Ministry of natural resources of Russia started implementation of the Federal program on environmental-economic assessment and the elimination of past environmental damage. The main steps of this program are: the works related to the inventory of degraded and contaminated lands and their subsequent reclamation and return to the appropriate land use system. The territory must comply with officially approved environmental requirements. The

  10. Evaluation and Control of Soil Degradation in Russia on the Basis of the Assessment of Soil Ecological Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Aleksandr

    2016-04-01

    Sustainable development of the territory is possible only under certain environmental requirements. These requirements are based on the implementation of the concept, conventionally called "zero land degradation", which cannot be reached in the process of real land use. "Zero degradation" is the establishment of acceptable ecological state of the environment and permissible anthropogenic impact on it, wherein self-healing of nature quality is possible and there is no accumulation of irreversible environmental damage. The values of parameters that characterize the relationship between the ecological state of the environment, in particular, land degradation, and the socio-economic development of the Russian Federation are represented in the materials of recent issues of the Russian State environmental report (2012 - 2014). Environmental problems in Russia are actively discussed in relation to issues of environmental and socio-economic development of the neighboring countries of the Eurasian region. So the Law "On Soil Protection", which was developed and adopted by the Union: Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, is dedicated to the protection of soil and soil degradation control. Ecological Doctrine of Russia (2012) and the State Environmental Program (2012-2020) identify the main strategic steps to combat land degradation in our country. In the first place, it has been tasked to identify and eliminate past environmental damage followed by the organization of nature "from scratch", in accordance with environmental regulations. Currently the Ministry of natural resources of Russia started implementation of the Federal program on environmental-economic assessment and the elimination of past environmental damage. The main steps of this program are: the works related to the inventory of degraded and contaminated lands and their subsequent reclamation and return to the appropriate land use system. The territory must comply with officially approved environmental requirements. The

  11. Friction stir processing of magnesium-nanohydroxyapatite composites with controlled in vitro degradation behavior.

    PubMed

    Ratna Sunil, B; Sampath Kumar, T S; Chakkingal, Uday; Nandakumar, V; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-06-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) reinforced magnesium composite (Mg-nHA) was fabricated by friction stir processing (FSP). The effect of smaller grain size and the presence of nHA particles on controlling the degradation of magnesium were investigated. Grain refinement from 1500μm to ≈3.5μm was observed after FSP. In vitro bioactivity studies by immersing the samples in supersaturated simulated body fluid (SBF 5×) indicate that the increased hydrophilicity and pronounced biomineralization are due to grain refinement and the presence of nHA in the composite respectively. Electrochemical test to assess the corrosion behavior also clearly showed the improved corrosion resistance due to grain refinement and enhanced biomineralization. Using MTT colorimetric assay, cytotoxicity study of the samples with rat skeletal muscle (L6) cells indicate marginal increase in cell viability of the FSP-Mg-nHA sample. The composite also showed good cell adhesion. PMID:24863230

  12. Controlled release of an anthrax toxin-neutralizing antibody from hydrolytically degradable polyethylene glycol hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yingkai; Coffin, Megan V; Manceva, Slobodanka D; Chichester, Jessica A; Jones, R Mark; Kiick, Kristi L

    2016-01-01

    In this study, hydrophilic and hydrolytically degradable poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels were formed via Michael-type addition and employed for sustained delivery of a monoclonal antibody against the protective antigen of anthrax. Taking advantage of the PEG-induced precipitation of the antibody, burst release from the matrix was avoided. These hydrogels were able to release active antibodies in a controlled manner from 14 days to as long as 56 days in vitro by varying the polymer architectures and molecular weights of the precursors. Analysis of the secondary and tertiary structure and the in vitro activity of the released antibody showed that the encapsulation and release did not affect the protein conformation or functionality. The results suggest the promise for developing PEG-based carriers for sustained release of therapeutic antibodies against toxins in various applications. PMID:26223817

  13. Improvements in UV stability for FEP/Ag based thermal control materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieser, James; Maas, Gerald

    2003-09-01

    Darkening of FEP/Ag based Thermal Control (TC) materials after UV exposure has been documented for several years. This End of Life (EOL) Solar Absorptance (α) increase and the corresponding performance degradation must be taken into account in the preliminary design of spacecraft. Astral Technology Unlimited, Inc. (ATU) has developed new processes and coatings to improve the UV stability of FEP/Ag based TC materials. Test results of this development effort are presented. Data for several new coating combinations along with data on the current "Industry Standard" material are compared for up to 27,000 Equivalent Sun Hours (ESH) of UV exposure. The resulting solar absorptance improvements are very dramatic and should allow future satellite designs with the EOL solar alpha to be nearly identical to the Beginning of Life (BOL) values. Satellites using these new TC materials can have optimum thermal-optical performance for the life of the spacecraft.

  14. Determination of load sequence effects on the degradation and failure of composite materials. [Graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. N.; Jones, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical model was established to predict the fatigue behavior of composite materials, with emphasis placed on predictions of the degradation of residual strength and residual stiffness during fatigue cycling. The model parameters were evaluated from three test series including static strength fatigue life and residual strength tests. The tests were applied to two graphite/epoxy laminates. Load sequence effects were emphasized for both laminates and the predicted results agreed quite well with subsequent verification tests. Dynamic as well as static stiffness reduction data were collected by use of a PDP11-03 computer, which performed quite satisfactorily and permitted the recording of a substantial amount of dynamic stiffness reduction data.

  15. Assessing the correlation between anaerobic toluene degradation activity and bssA concentrations in hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer material.

    PubMed

    Kazy, Sufia K; Monier, Amy L; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2010-09-01

    The assessment of biodegradation activity in contaminated aquifers is critical to demonstrate the performance of bioremediation and natural attenuation and to parameterize models of contaminant plume dynamics. Real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to target the catabolic bssA gene (coding for benzylsuccinate synthase) and a 16S rDNA phylogenetic gene (for total Bacteria) as potential biomarkers to infer on anaerobic toluene degradation rates. A significant correlation (P = 0.0003) was found over a wide range of initial toluene concentrations (1-100 mg/l) between toluene degradation rates and bssA concentrations in anaerobic microcosms prepared with aquifer material from a hydrocarbon contaminated site. In contrast, the correlation between toluene degradation activity and total Bacteria concentrations was not significant (P = 0.1125). This suggests that qPCR targeting of functional genes might offer a simple approach to estimate in situ biodegradation activity, which would enhance site investigation and modeling of natural attenuation at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. PMID:20204467

  16. Protein Degradation and Quality Control in Cells from Laforin and Malin Knockout Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Garyali, Punitee; Segvich, Dyann M.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Lafora disease is a progressive myoclonus epilepsy caused by mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B genes that encode a glycogen phosphatase, laforin, and an E3 ubiquitin ligase, malin, respectively. Lafora disease is characterized by accumulation of insoluble, poorly branched, hyperphosphorylated glycogen in brain, muscle, heart, and liver. The laforin-malin complex has been proposed to play a role in the regulation of glycogen metabolism and protein quality control. We evaluated three arms of the protein degradation/quality control process (the autophago-lysosomal pathway, the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from Epm2a−/−, Epm2b−/−, and Epm2a−/− Epm2b−/− mice. The levels of LC3-II, a marker of autophagy, were decreased in all knock-out cells as compared with wild type even though they still showed a slight response to starvation and rapamycin. Furthermore, ribosomal protein S6 kinase and S6 phosphorylation were increased. Under basal conditions there was no effect on the levels of ubiquitinated proteins in the knock-out cells, but ubiquitinated protein degradation was decreased during starvation or stress. Lack of malin (Epm2b−/− and Epm2a−/− Epm2b−/− cells) but not laforin (Epm2a−/− cells) decreased LAMP1, a lysosomal marker. CHOP expression was similar in wild type and knock-out cells under basal conditions or with ER stress-inducing agents. In conclusion, both laforin and malin knock-out cells display mTOR-dependent autophagy defects and reduced proteasomal activity but no defects in the ER stress response. We speculate that these defects may be secondary to glycogen overaccumulation. This study also suggests a malin function independent of laforin, possibly in lysosomal biogenesis and/or lysosomal glycogen disposal. PMID:24914213

  17. Remote inhibition of polymer degradation.

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, Roger Lee; Celina, Mathias Christopher

    2005-08-01

    Polymer degradation has been explored on the basis of synergistic infectious and inhibitive interaction between separate materials. A dual stage chemiluminescence detection system with individually controlled hot stages was applied to probe for interaction effects during polymer degradation in an oxidizing environment. Experimental confirmation was obtained that volatile antioxidants can be transferred over a relatively large distance. The thermal degradation of a polypropylene (PP) sample receiving traces of inhibitive antioxidants from a remote source is delayed. Similarly, volatiles from two stabilized elastomers were also capable of retarding a degradation process remotely. This observation demonstrates inhibitive cross-talk as a novel interactive phenomenon between different polymers and is consequential for understanding general polymer interactions, fundamental degradation processes and long-term aging effects of multiple materials in a single environment.

  18. The anaerobic degradability of thermoplastic starch: polyvinyl alcohol blends: potential biodegradable food packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Russo, Melissa A L; O'Sullivan, Cathryn; Rounsefell, Beth; Halley, Peter J; Truss, Rowan; Clarke, William P

    2009-03-01

    A systematic study on the anaerobic degradability of a series of starch:polyvinyl alcohol (TPS:PVOH) blends was performed to determine their fate upon disposal in either anaerobic digesters or bioreactor landfills. The aims of the study were to measure the rate and extent of solubilisation of the plastics. The extent of substrate solubilisation on a COD basis reached 60% for a 90:10 (w/w) blend of TPS:PVOH, 40% for 75:25, 30% for 50:50 and 15% for PVOH only. The rate of substrate solubilisation was most rapid for the 90:10 blend (0.041 h(-1)) and decreased with the amount of starch in the blend in the following order 0.034 h(-1)(75:25); 0.023 h(-1)(50:50). The total solids that remained after 900 h were 10 wt.% (90:10); 23 wt.% (75:25); 55 wt.% (50:50); 90 wt.% (0:100). Starch containing substrates produced a higher concentration of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and biogas, compared to the 0:100 substrate. The major outcome was that PVOH inhibited the degradation of the starch from the blend. PMID:18990564

  19. Controlled low strength materials (CLSM), reported by ACI Committee 229

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, N.

    1997-07-01

    Controlled low-strength material (CLSM) is a self-compacted, cementitious material used primarily as a backfill in lieu of compacted fill. Many terms are currently used to describe this material including flowable fill, unshrinkable fill, controlled density fill, flowable mortar, flowable fly ash, fly ash slurry, plastic soil-cement, soil-cement slurry, K-Krete and other various names. This report contains information on applications, material properties, mix proportioning, construction and quality-control procedures. This report`s intent is to provide basic information on CLSM technology, with emphasis on CLSM material characteristics and advantages over conventional compacted fill. Applications include backfills, structural fills, insulating and isolation fills, pavement bases, conduit bedding, erosion control, void filling, and radioactive waste management.

  20. U.S. national nuclear material control and accounting system

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S; Terentiev, V G

    1998-12-01

    Issues related to nuclear material control and accounting and illegal dealing in these materials were discussed at the April 19--20, 1996 Moscow summit meeting (G7 + Russia). The declaration from this meeting reaffirmed that governments are responsible for the safety of all nuclear materials in their possession and for the effectiveness of the national control and accounting system for these materials. The Russian delegation at this meeting stated that ''the creation of a nuclear materials accounting, control, and physical protection system has become a government priority''. Therefore, in order to create a government nuclear material control and accounting system for the Russian Federation, it is critical to study the structure, operating principles, and regulations supporting the control and accounting of nuclear materials in the national systems of nuclear powers. In particular, Russian specialists have a definite interest in learning about the National Nuclear Material Control and Accounting System of the US, which has been operating successfully as an automated system since 1968.

  1. Degradation of C1-inhibitor by plasmin: implications for the control of inflammatory processes.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, E. M.; Perkins, S. J.; Sim, R. B.; Willis, A. C.; Feighery, C.; Jackson, J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A correct balance between protease and inhibitor activity is critical in the maintenance of homoeostasis; excessive activation of enzyme pathways is frequently associated with inflammatory disorders. Plasmin is an enzyme ubiquitously activated in inflammatory disorder, and C1-inhibitor (C1-Inh) is a pivotal inhibitor of protease activity, which is particularly important in the regulation of enzyme cascades generated in plasma. The nature of the interaction between plasmin and C1-Inh is poorly understood. MATERIALS AND METHODS: C1-Inh was immunoadsorbed from the plasma of normal individuals (n = 21), from that of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 18) or adult respiratory distress syndrome (n = 9), and from the plasma and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 18). As plasmin is a putative enzyme responsible for C1-Inh was examined using SDS-PAGE. In addition, peptides cleaved from C1-Inh by plasmin were isolated and sequenced and the precise cleavage sites determined from the known primary sequence of C1-Inh. Homology models of C1-Inh were then constructed. RESULTS: Increased levels of cleaved and inactivated C1-Inh were found in each of the inflammatory disorders examined. Through SDS-PAGE analysis it was shown that plasmin rapidly degraded C1-Inh in vitro. The pattern of C1-Inh cleavage seen in vivo in patients with inflammatory disorders and that produced in vitro following incubation with plasmin were very similar. Homology models of C1-Inh indicate that the majority of the plasmin cleavage sites are adjacent to the reactive site of the inhibitor. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that local C1-Inh degradation by plasmin may be a central and critical event in the loss of protease inhibition during inflammation. These findings have important implications for our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms in inflammation and for the development of more effectively targeted therapeutic regimes. These findings may also explain

  2. ENZYMES FOR DEGRADATION OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS AND DEMILITARIZATION OF EXPLOSIVES STOCKPILES, SERDP ANNUAL (INTERIM) REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current stockpile of energetic materials requiring disposal contains about half a million tons. Through 2001. over 2.1 million tons are expected to pass through the stockpile for disposal. Safe and environmentally acceptable methods for disposing of these materials are needed...

  3. The Effect of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, J.M.; Gunther, B.; Martinez-Guridi, G.; Xing, J.; Barnes, V.

    2010-11-07

    Integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in new and advanced nuclear power plants (NPPs) will support operators in monitoring and controlling the plants. Even though digital systems typically are expected to be reliable, their potential for degradation or failure significantly could affect the operators performance and, consequently, jeopardize plant safety. This U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) research investigated the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and on plant operations. The objective was to develop technical basis and guidance for human factors engineering (HFE) reviews addressing the operator's ability to detect and manage degraded digital I&C conditions. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we evaluated the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater control system of a currently operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and the operators performance. Our findings indicated that I&C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems, and the overall effects on the plant's behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or equipment to operate unexpectedly. I&C degradations may affect the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, deterioration of the sensors can complicate the operators interpretation of displays, and sometimes may mislead them by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the findings as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance.

  4. Study of Micro and Nano Scale Features in the Fabrication, Performance, and Degradation of Advanced Engineering Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Jeffrey John

    Increasingly, modern engineering materials are designed on a micron or nano scale to fulfill a given set of requirements or to enhance the material's performance. In this dissertation several such materials will be studied including catalyst particles for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth by use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by reactor scale modeling, hermetic carbon coatings by focused ion beam/ scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) the latter of which was performed by Andrei Stolov at OFS Specialty Photonics Division (Avon, CT), and Ni/Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes using X-ray nanotomography (XNT) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) the second of which was performed by Barry Lai at APS (Argonne National Lab, IL). For each material, a subset of the material properties will be looked at to determine how the selected property affects either the fabrication, performance, or degradation of the material. Following the analysis of these materials, it was found that although the materials are different, the study of micron and nano scale features has many related traits. X-rays and electrons are frequently used to examine nanoscale structures, numerical study can be exploited to expedite measurements and extract additional information from experiments, and the study of these requires knowledge across many scientific fields. As a product of this research, detailed information about all of the materials studied has been contributed to the scientific literature including size dependance information about the oxidation states of nanometer size iron particles, optimal CVD reactor growth conditions for different CNT catalyst particle sizes and number of walls, a technique for rapid measurement of hermetic carbon film thickness, and detailed microstructural detail and sulfur poisoning mapping for Ni/YSZ SOFC anodes.

  5. HAZARDOUS WASTE DEGRADATION BY WOOD DEGRADING FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The persistence and toxicity of many hazardous waste constituents indicates that the environment has limited capacity to degrade such materials. he competence and presence of degrading organisms significantly effects our ability to treat and detoxify these hazardous waste chemica...

  6. Task 1. Monitoring real time materials degradation. NRC extended In-situ and real-time Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiari, Sasan

    2012-03-01

    The overall objective of this project was to perform a scoping study to identify, in concert with the nuclear industry, those sensors and techniques that have the most promising commercial viability and fill a critical inspection or monitoring need. Candidates to be considered include sensors to monitor real-time material degradation, characterize residual stress, monitor and inspect component fabrication, assess radionuclide and associated chemical species concentrations in ground water and soil, characterize fuel properties, and monitor severe accident conditions. Under Task 1—Monitoring Real-Time Materials Degradation—scoping studies were conducted to assess the feasibility of potential inspection and monitoring technologies (i.e., a combination of sensors, advanced signal processing techniques, and data analysis methods) that could be utilized in LWR and/or advanced reactor applications for continuous monitoring of degradation in-situ. The goal was to identify those techniques that appear to be the most promising, i.e., those that are closest to being both technically and commercially viable and that the nuclear industry is most likely to pursue. Current limitations and associated issues that must be overcome before commercial application of certain techniques have also been addressed.

  7. Adaptive coupling between damage mechanics and peridynamics: A route for objective simulation of material degradation up to complete failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Lubineau, Gilles; Azdoud, Yan

    2016-09-01

    The objective (mesh-independent) simulation of evolving discontinuities, such as cracks, remains a challenge. Current techniques are highly complex or involve intractable computational costs, making simulations up to complete failure difficult. We propose a framework as a new route toward solving this problem that adaptively couples local-continuum damage mechanics with peridynamics to objectively simulate all the steps that lead to material failure: damage nucleation, crack formation and propagation. Local-continuum damage mechanics successfully describes the degradation related to dispersed microdefects before the formation of a macrocrack. However, when damage localizes, it suffers spurious mesh dependency, making the simulation of macrocracks challenging. On the other hand, the peridynamic theory is promising for the simulation of fractures, as it naturally allows discontinuities in the displacement field. Here, we present a hybrid local-continuum damage/peridynamic model. Local-continuum damage mechanics is used to describe "volume" damage before localization. Once localization is detected at a point, the remaining part of the energy is dissipated through an adaptive peridynamic model capable of the transition to a "surface" degradation, typically a crack. We believe that this framework, which actually mimics the real physical process of crack formation, is the first bridge between continuum damage theories and peridynamics. Two-dimensional numerical examples are used to illustrate that an objective simulation of material failure can be achieved by this method.

  8. Understanding local degradation of cycled Ni-rich cathode materials at high operating temperature for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Sooyeon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Chang, Wonyoung

    2014-09-08

    We utilize transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with electron energy loss spectroscopy to investigate local degradation that occurs in Li{sub x}Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} cathode materials (NCA) after 30 cycles with cutoff voltages of 4.3 V and 4.8 V at 55 °C. NCA has a homogeneous crystallographic structure before electrochemical reactions; however, we observed that 30 cycles of charge/discharge reactions induced inhomogeneity in the crystallographic and electronic structures and also introduced porosity particularly at surface area. These changes were more noticeable in samples cycled with higher cutoff voltage of 4.8 V. Effect of operating temperature was further examined by comparing electronic structures of oxygen of the NCA particles cycled at both room temperature and 55 °C. The working temperature has a greater impact on the NCA cathode materials at a cutoff voltage of 4.3 V that is the practical the upper limit voltage in most applications, while a cutoff voltage of 4.8 V is high enough to cause surface degradation even at room temperature.

  9. Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, D.W.; Bullen, D.B.

    1995-09-22

    One of the most significant factors impacting the performance of waste package container materials under repository relevant conditions is the thermal environment. This environment will be affected by the areal power density of the repository, which is dictated by facility design, and the dominant heat transfer mechanism at the site. The near-field environment will evolve as radioactive decay decreases the thermal output of each waste package. Recent calculations (Buscheck and Nitao, 1994) have addressed the importance of thermal loading conditions on waste package performance at the Yucca Mountain site. If a relatively low repository thermal loading design is employed, the temperature and relative humidity near the waste package may significantly affect the degradation of corrosion allowance barriers due to moist air oxidation and radiolytically enhanced corrosion. The purpose this report is to present a literature review of the potential degradation modes for moderately corrosion resistant nickel copper and nickel based candidate materials that may be applicable as alternate barriers for the ACD systems in the Yucca Mountain environment. This report presents a review of the corrosion of nickel-copper alloys, summaries of experimental evaluations of oxidation and atmospheric corrosion in nickel-copper alloys, views of experimental studies of aqueous corrosion in nickel copper alloys, a brief review of galvanic corrosion effects and a summary of stress corrosion cracking in these alloys.

  10. Degradation of nano-scale cathodes: a new paradigm for selecting low-temperature solid oxide cell materials.

    PubMed

    Call, Ann V; Railsback, Justin G; Wang, Hongqian; Barnett, Scott A

    2016-05-11

    Oxygen electrodes have been able to meet area specific resistance targets for solid oxide cell operating temperatures as low as ∼500 °C, but their stability over expected device operation times of up to 50 000 h is unknown. Achieving good performance at such temperatures requires mixed ionically and electronically-conducting electrodes with nano-scale structure that makes the electrode susceptible to particle coarsening and, as a result, electrode resistance degradation. Here we describe accelerated life testing of nanostructured Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-Ce0.9Gd0.1O2 electrodes combining impedance spectroscopy and microstructural evaluation. Measured electrochemical performance degradation is accurately fitted using a coarsening model that is then used to predict cell operating conditions where required performance and long-term stability are both achieved. A new electrode material figure of merit based on both performance and stability metrics is proposed. An implication is that cation diffusion, which determines the coarsening rate, must be considered along with oxygen transport kinetics in the selection of optimal electrode materials. PMID:27117343

  11. Material-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1996-10-08

    A compact vacuum insulation panel comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning "on" and "off" the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls.

  12. Material-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1996-10-08

    A compact vacuum insulation panel is described comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning ``on`` and ``off`` the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls. 25 figs.

  13. Probabilistic Material Strength Degradation Model for Inconel 718 Components Subjected to High Temperature, Mechanical Fatigue, Creep and Thermal Fatigue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie Corinne Scheidt

    1994-01-01

    This thesis presents the on-going development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation model. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes four effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue. Statistical analysis was conducted on experimental Inconel 718 data obtained from the open literature. This analysis provided regression parameters for use as the model's empirical material constants, thus calibrating the model specifically for Inconel 718. Model calibration was carried out for four variables, namely, high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue. Methodology to estimate standard deviations of these material constants for input into the probabilistic material strength model was developed. Using the current version of PROMISS, entitled PROMISS93, a sensitivity study for the combined effects of mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue was performed. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing a combination of mechanical fatigue and high temperature effects by model to the combination by experiment were conducted. Thus, for Inconel 718, the basic model assumption of independence between effects was evaluated. Results from this limited verification study strongly supported this assumption.

  14. BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUN: A PERMEABLE BARRIER MATERIAL FOR THE DEGRADATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum is an innovative remedial material for the treatment of gasoline oxygenates in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs represent a promising environmental technology for remediation of groundwater contamination. Although zero-valent metals (ZVM) have been...

  15. Process of making porous ceramic materials with controlled porosity

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Ku, Qunyin

    1993-01-01

    A method of making metal oxide ceramic material is disclosed by which the porosity of the resulting material can be selectively controlled by manipulating the sol used to make the material. The method can be used to make a variety of metal oxide ceramic bodies, including membranes, but also pellets, plugs or other bodies. It has also been found that viscous sol materials can readily be shaped by extrusion into shapes typical of catalytic or adsorbent bodies used in industry, to facilitate the application of such materials for catalytic and adsorbent applications.

  16. Incorporation of Proteinase Inhibitors into Silk-Based Delivery Devices for Enhanced Control of Degradation and Drug Release

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Valentin, Thomas; Boison, Detlev; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Controlling the rate of silk degradation is critical to its potential use in biomedical applications, including drug delivery and tissue engineering. The effect of protease concentration on accelerating degradation, and the use of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) on reducing rates of degradation and on drug release from silk-based drug carriers was studied. Increased rates of proteolysis resulted in increased dye release from silk carriers, while EDTA release from the silk carriers inhibited proteolysis. The sustained release of EDTA from silk carriers in combination with the release of the small molecule anticonvulsant adenosine was investigated in vitro. This combination of factors resulted in delayed release of adenosine by inhibiting proteolytic activity. These results introduce a promising strategy to control drug delivery through the regulation of silk degradation rate, achieved via manipulation of local proteolytic activity. This ability to modulate enzyme function could be applicable to a range of silk biomaterial formats as well as other biodegradable polymers where enzymatic functions control biomaterial degradation and drug release rates. PMID:20950854

  17. Recent Insights into the Control of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Genome Stability, Loss, and Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Most human papillomavirus (HPV) antiviral strategies have focused upon inhibiting viral DNA replication, but it is increasingly apparent that viral DNA levels can be chemically controlled by approaches that promote its instability. HPVs and other DNA viruses have a tenuous relationship with their hosts. They must replicate and hide from the DNA damage response (DDR) and innate immune systems, which serve to protect cells from foreign or “non-self” DNA, and yet they draft these same systems to support their life cycles. DNA binding antiviral agents promoting massive viral DNA instability and elimination are reviewed. Mechanistic studies of these agents have identified genetic antiviral enhancers and repressors, antiviral sensitizers, and host cell elements that protect and stabilize HPV genomes. Viral DNA degradation appears to be an important means of controlling HPV DNA levels in some cases, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. These findings may prove useful not only for understanding viral DNA persistence but only in devising future antiviral strategies. PMID:25798290

  18. MSFC Analysis of Thermal Control Materials on MISSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria

    2006-01-01

    Many different passive thermal control materials were flown as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment, including coatings, anodizes, and multi-layer insulation materials. Engineers and scientists at the Marshall Space Flight Center have analyzed a number of these materials, including: Zinc oxide/potassium silicate coating, Zinc orthotitanate/potassium silicate coating, Sulfuric acid anodized aluminum, Various coatings for part marking, automated rendezvous and capture, and astronaut visual aids, FEP Teflon with silver/Inconel backing, and Beta cloth with and without aluminization. These and other material samples were exposed to the low Earth orbital environment of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and hard vacuum, though atomic oxygen exposure was very limited for some samples. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and mass measurements indicate the durability of these materials to withstand the space environment. The effect of contamination from an active space station on the performance of white thermal control coatings is discussed.

  19. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.E.; Bullen, D.B. )

    1988-08-01

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, they must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after the containers are emplaced in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of the high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on oxidation and corrosion of the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) and the copper-based alloy materials (CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni)), which are the present candidates for fabrication of the containers. Studies that provided a large amount of data are highlighted, and those areas in which little data exists are identified. Examples of successful applications of these materials are given. On the basis of resistance to oxidation and general corrosion, the austenitic materials are ranked as follows: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is as follows: CDA 715 and CDA 613 (both best), and CDA 102 (worst). 110 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs.

  20. Application of porous materials for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Fairly smooth porous materials were elected for study Doweave; Fibermetal; Dynapore; and perforated titanium sheet. Factors examined include: surface smoothness; suction characteristics; porosity; surface impact resistance; and strain compatibility. A laminar flow control suction glove arrangement was identified with material combinations compatible with thermal expansion and structural strain.

  1. 40 CFR 52.2054 - Control of asphalt paving material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control of asphalt paving material. 52... asphalt paving material. (a) Notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary in the Pennsylvania Implementation Plan, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation shall restrict the annual usage of asphalts...

  2. Durability of thermal control and environmental protective materials for the SSRMS in simulated LEO environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. K.

    1993-06-01

    Nine thermal control and environmental protection materials, selected on the basis of their space pedigree, thermal vacuum stability, and thermo-optical properties, were tested to determine their suitability for the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). The ground based testing was carried out to simulate the effects of atomic oxygen and thermal cycling in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. These factors are deemed most likely to cause degradation to the selected materials. With the exception of the urethane based coatings, the materials tested demonstrate sufficient resistance to atomic oxygen. The detrimental effect of thermal cycling on the adhesion of the silicate based coatings to aluminum substrate was found to depend on the pigment. A separate experiment on Beta-Cloth showed that its thermo-optical properties remained substantially unchanged as the Teflon coating was progressively removed in a plasma asher.

  3. Possible Responsibility of Silicone Materials for Degradation of the CO2 Removal System in the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baeza, Mario; Sharma, Hemant; Borrok, David; Ren, Mingua; Pannell, Keith

    2011-01-01

    From data concerning the degradation of the CO2 removal system in the International Space Station (ISS) two important features were apparent: (1) The atmosphere within the International Space Station (ISS) contained many organic compounds including alcohols, halocarbons, aldehydes, esters, and ketones, inter alia. Various cyclosiloxanes Dn, hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3) and its higher homologs (D4) and (D5) are also present presumably due to offgassing. (2) Screens within the zeolite-containing canisters, used for the removal of CO2, exhibited partial clogging due to zeolitic fragments (dust) along with "sticky" residues, that in toto significantly reduced the efficiency of the CO2 removal process. Samples of the ISS fresh zeolite, used zeolite, filter clogging zeolite particles and residual polymeric materials were examined using, inter alia, NMR, EM and HRSEM. These data were compared to equivalent samples obtained prior and subsequent to Dn polymerization experiments performed in our laboratories using the clean ISS zeolite samples as catalyst. Polysiloxane materials produced were essentially equivalent in the two cases and the EM images demonstrate a remarkable similarity between the ISS filter zeolite samples and the post-polymerization zeolite material from our experiments. In this regard even the changes in the Al/Si ratio from the virgin zeolite material to the filter samples and the post-polymerization laboratory samples samples is noteworthy. This research was supported by a contract from the Boeing Company

  4. TRUE COLORS: LEDS AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CCT, CRI, OPTICAL SAFETY, MATERIAL DEGRADATION, AND PHOTOBIOLOGICAL STIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.

    2014-08-30

    This document analyzes the optical, material, and photobiological hazards of LED light sources compared to conventional light sources. It documents that LEDs generally produce the same amount of blue light, which is the primary contributor to the risks, as other sources at the same CCT. Duv may have some effect on the amount of blue light, but CRI does not.

  5. The Study of Simulated Space Radiation Environment Effect on Conductive Properties of ITO Thermal Control Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei-Quan, Feng; Chun-Qing, Zhao; Zi-Cai, Shen; Yi-Gang, Ding; Fan, Zhang; Yu-Ming, Liu; Hui-Qi, Zheng; Xue, Zhao

    In order to prevent detrimental effects of ESD caused by differential surface charging of spacecraft under space environments, an ITO transparent conductive coating is often deposited on the thermal control materials outside spacecraft. Since the ITO coating is exposed in space environment, the environment effects on electrical property of ITO coatings concern designers of spacecraft deeply. This paper introduces ground tests to simulate space radiation environmental effects on conductive property of ITO coating. Samples are made of ITO/OSR, ITO/Kapton/Al and ITO/FEP/Ag thermal control coatings. Simulated space radiation environment conditions are NUV of 500ESH, 40 keV electron of 2 × 1016 е/cm2, 40 keV proton of 2.5 × 1015 p/cm2. Conductive property is surface resistivity measured in-situ in vacuum. Test results proved that the surface resistivity for all ITO coatings have a sudden decrease in the beginning of environment test. The reasons for it may be the oxygen vacancies caused by vacuum and decayed RIC caused by radiation. Degradation in conductive properties caused by irradiation were found. ITO/FEP/Ag exhibits more degradation than other two kinds. The conductive property of ITO/kapton/Al is stable for vacuum irradiation. The analysis of SEM and XPS found more crackers and less Sn and In concentration after irradiation which may be the reason for conductive property degradation.

  6. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Bullen, D.B.; Gdowski, G.E. )

    1988-08-01

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The copper-based alloy materials are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The austenitic materials are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. The waste-package containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr, and they must be retrievable from the disposal site during the first 50 yr after emplacement. The containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on the phase stability of both groups of candidate alloys. The austenitic alloys are reviewed in terms of the physical metallurgy of the iron-chromium-nickel system, martensite transformations, carbide formation, and intermetallic-phase precipitation. The copper-based alloys are reviewed in terms of their phase equilibria and the possibility of precipitation of the minor alloying constituents. For the austenitic materials, the ranking based on phase stability is: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is: CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper) (best), and then both CDA 715 and CDA 613. 75 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Degradation mechanism of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite materials upon exposure to humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirayama, Masaki; Kato, Masato; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Sugita, Takeshi; Fujiseki, Takemasa; Hara, Shota; Kadowaki, Hideyuki; Murata, Daisuke; Chikamatsu, Masayuki; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    Low stability of organic-inorganic perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) solar cells in humid air environments is a serious drawback which could limit practical application of this material severely. In this study, from real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization, the degradation mechanism of ultra-smooth CH3NH3PbI3 layers prepared by a laser evaporation technique is studied. We present evidence that the CH3NH3PbI3 degradation in humid air proceeds by two competing reactions of (i) the PbI2 formation by the desorption of CH3NH3I species and (ii) the generation of a CH3NH3PbI3 hydrate phase by H2O incorporation. In particular, rapid phase change occurs in the near-surface region and the CH3NH3PbI3 layer thickness reduces rapidly in the initial 1 h air exposure even at a low relative humidity of 40%. After the prolonged air exposure, the CH3NH3PbI3 layer is converted completely to hexagonal platelet PbI2/hydrate crystals that have a distinct atomic-scale multilayer structure with a period of 0.65 ± 0.05 nm. We find that conventional x-ray diffraction and optical characterization in the visible region, used commonly in earlier works, are quite insensitive to the surface phase change. Based on results obtained in this work, we discuss the degradation mechanism of CH3NH3PbI3 in humid air.

  8. MISSE Thermal Control Materials with Comparison to Previous Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria; Pippin, H. Gary; Frey, George

    2008-01-01

    Many different passive thermal control materials were flown as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE), including inorganic coatings, anodized aluminum, and multi-layer insulation materials. These and other material samples were exposed to the low Earth orbital environment of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and hard vacuum, though atomic oxygen exposure was limited for some samples. Materials flown on MISSE-1 and MISSE-2 were exposed to the space environment for nearly four years. Materials flown on MISSE-3, MISSE-4, and MISSE-5 were exposed to the space environment for one year. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and mass measurements indicate the durability of these materials to withstand the space environment. Effects of short duration versus long duration exposure on ISS are explored, as well as comparable data from previous flight experiments, such as the Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA), Optical Properties Monitor (OPM), and Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF).

  9. Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, D.W.; Nutt, W.M.; Bullen, D.B.

    1995-06-01

    Oxidation and atmospheric corrosion data suggest that addition of Cr provides the greatest improvement in oxidation resistance. Cr-bearing cast irons are resistant to chloride environments and solutions containing strongly oxidizing constituents. Weathering steels, including high content and at least 0.04% Cu, appear to provide adequate resistance to oxidation under temperate conditions. However, data from long-term, high-temperature oxidation studies on weathering steels were not available. From the literature, it appears that the low alloy steels, plain carbon steels, cast steels, and cast irons con-ode at similar rates in an aqueous environment. Alloys containing more than 12% Cr or 36% Ni corrode at a lower rate than plain carbon steels, but pitting may be worse. Short term tests indicate that an alloy of 9Cr-1Mo may result in increased corrosion resistance, however long term data are not available. Austenitic cast irons show the best corrosion resistance. A ranking of total corrosion performance of the materials from most corrosion resistant to least corrosion resistant is: Austenitic Cast Iron; 12% Cr = 36% Ni = 9Cr-1Mo; Carbon Steel = Low Alloy Steels; and Cast Iron. Since the materials to be employed in the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) waste package are considered to be corrosion allowance materials, the austenitic cast irons, high Cr steels, high Ni steels and the high Cr-Mo steels should not be considered as candidates for the outer containment barrier. Based upon the oxidation and corrosion data available for carbon steels, low alloy steels, and cast irons, a suitable list of candidate materials for a corrosion allowance outer barrier for an ACD waste package could include, A516, 2.25%Cr -- 1%Mo Steel, and A27.

  10. Optical response of strongly absorbing inhomogeneous materials: Application to paper degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missori, M.; Pulci, O.; Teodonio, L.; Violante, C.; Kupchak, I.; Bagniuk, J.; Łojewska, J.; Conte, A. Mosca

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present a new noninvasive and nondestructive approach to recover scattering and absorption coefficients from reflectance measurements of highly absorbing and optically inhomogeneous media. Our approach is based on the Yang and Miklavcic theoretical model of light propagation through turbid media, which is a generalization of the Kubelka-Munk theory, extended to accommodate optically thick samples. We show its applications to paper, a material primarily composed of a web of fibers of cellulose, whose optical properties are strongly governed by light scattering effects. Samples studied were ancient and industrial paper sheets, aged in different conditions and highly absorbing in the ultraviolet region. The recovered experimental absorptions of cellulose fibers have been compared to theoretical ab initio quantum-mechanical computational simulations carried out within time-dependent density functional theory. In this way, for each sample, we evaluate the absolute concentration of different kinds of oxidized groups formed upon aging and acting as chromophores causing paper discoloration. We found that the relative concentration of different chromophores in cellulose fibers depends on the aging temperature endured by samples. This clearly indicates that the oxidation of cellulose follows temperature-dependent reaction pathways. Our approach has a wide range of applications for cellulose-based materials, like paper, textiles, and other manufactured products of great industrial and cultural interest, and can potentially be extended to other strongly absorbing inhomogeneous materials.

  11. PREDICTING BIOTRANSFORMATIONS IN THE SUBSURFACE: RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE ATP (ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE) CONTENT OF SUBSURFACE MATERIAL AND THE CAPACITY OF SUBSURFACE ORGANISMS TO DEGRADE TOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deeper subsurface material was collected in a manner that prevented contamination by surface microorganisms. This material was analyzed for ATP content, and for its capacity to degrade toluene, a common organic contaminant of ground water originating from release of petroleum pro...

  12. Designing synthetic materials to control stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Krishanu; Pollock, Jacob F.; Schaffer, David V.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The microenvironment in which stem cells reside regulates their fate, and synthetic materials have recently been designed to emulate these regulatory processes for various medical applications. Ligands inspired by the natural extracellular matrix, cell-cell contacts, and growth factors have been incorporated into synthetic materials with precisely engineered density and presentation. Furthermore, material architecture and mechanical properties are material design parameters that provide a context for receptor-ligand interactions and thereby contribute to fate determination of uncommitted stem cells. While significant progress has been made in biomaterials development for cellular control, the design of more sophisticated and robust synthetic materials can address future challenges in achieving spatiotemporally control of cellular phenotype and in implementing histocompatible clinical therapies. PMID:17669680

  13. Fine structure of the vaccinia virion determined by controlled degradation and immunolocalization

    PubMed Central

    Moussatche, Nissin; Condit, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The vaccinia virion is a membraned, slightly flattened, barrel-shaped particle, with a complex internal structure featuring a biconcave core flanked by lateral bodies. Although the architecture of the purified mature virion has been intensely characterized by electron microscopy, the distribution of the proteins within the virion has been examined primarily using biochemical procedures. Thus, it has been shown that non-ionic and ionic detergents combined or not with a sulfhydryl reagent can be used to disrupt virions and, to a limited degree, separate the constituent proteins in different fractions. Applying a controlled degradation technique to virions adsorbed on EM grids, we were able to immuno-localize viral proteins within the virion particle. Our results show after NP40 and DTT treatment, membrane proteins are removed from the virion surface revealing proteins that are associated with the lateral bodies and the outer layer of the core wall. Combined treatment using high salt and high DTT removed lateral body proteins and exposed proteins of the internal core wall. Cores treated with proteases could be disrupted and the internal components were exposed. Cts8, a mutant in the A3 protein, produces aberrant virus that, when treated with NP-40 and DTT, release to the exterior the virus DNA associated with other internal core proteins. With these results, we are able to propose a model for the structure the vaccinia virion. PMID:25486587

  14. Fine structure of the vaccinia virion determined by controlled degradation and immunolocalization

    SciTech Connect

    Moussatche, Nissin Condit, Richard C.

    2015-01-15

    The vaccinia virion is a membraned, slightly flattened, barrel-shaped particle, with a complex internal structure featuring a biconcave core flanked by lateral bodies. Although the architecture of the purified mature virion has been intensely characterized by electron microscopy, the distribution of the proteins within the virion has been examined primarily using biochemical procedures. Thus, it has been shown that non-ionic and ionic detergents combined or not with a sulfhydryl reagent can be used to disrupt virions and, to a limited degree, separate the constituent proteins in different fractions. Applying a controlled degradation technique to virions adsorbed on EM grids, we were able to immuno-localize viral proteins within the virion particle. Our results show after NP40 and DTT treatment, membrane proteins are removed from the virion surface revealing proteins that are associated with the lateral bodies and the outer layer of the core wall. Combined treatment using high salt and high DTT removed lateral body proteins and exposed proteins of the internal core wall. Cores treated with proteases could be disrupted and the internal components were exposed. Cts8, a mutant in the A3 protein, produces aberrant virus that, when treated with NP-40 and DTT, releases to the exterior the virus DNA associated with other internal core proteins. With these results, we are able to propose a model for the structure the vaccinia virion.

  15. Constitutive Endocytic Recycling and Protein Kinase C-mediated Lysosomal Degradation Control KATP Channel Surface Density*

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Paul T.; Smith, Andrew J.; Taneja, Tarvinder K.; Howell, Gareth J.; Lippiat, Jonathan D.; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels control insulin secretion by coupling the excitability of the pancreatic β-cell to glucose metabolism. Little is currently known about how the plasma membrane density of these channels is regulated. We therefore set out to examine in detail the endocytosis and recycling of these channels and how these processes are regulated. To achieve this goal, we expressed KATP channels bearing an extracellular hemagglutinin epitope in human embryonic kidney cells and followed their fate along the endocytic pathway. Our results show that KATP channels undergo multiple rounds of endocytosis and recycling. Further, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly decreases KATP channel surface density by reducing channel recycling and diverting the channel to lysosomal degradation. These findings were recapitulated in the model pancreatic β-cell line INS1e, where activation of PKC leads to a decrease in the surface density of native KATP channels. Because sorting of internalized channels between lysosomal and recycling pathways could have opposite effects on the excitability of pancreatic β-cells, we propose that PKC-regulated KATP channel trafficking may play a role in the regulation of insulin secretion. PMID:20026601

  16. The Thermochemical Degradation of Hot Section Materials for Gas Turbine Engines in Alternative-Fuel Combustion Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalbano, Timothy

    Gas turbine engines remain an integral part of providing the world's propulsion and power generation needs. The continued use of gas turbines requires increased temperature operation to reach higher efficiencies and the implementation of alternative fuels for a lower net-carbon footprint. This necessitates evaluation of the material coatings used to shield the hot section components of gas turbines in these new extreme environments in order to understand how material degradation mechanisms change. Recently, the US Navy has sought to reduce its use of fossil fuels by implementing a blended hydroprocessed renewable diesel (HRD) derived from algae in its fleet. To evaluate the material degradation in this alternative environment, metal alloys are exposed in a simulated combustion environment using this blended fuel or the traditional diesel-like fuel. Evaluation of the metal alloys showed the development of thick, porous scales with a large depletion of aluminum for the blend fuel test. A mechanism linking an increased solubility of the scale to the blend fuel test environment will be discussed. For power generation applications, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants can provide electricity with 45% efficiency and full carbon capture by using a synthetic gas (syngas) derived from coal, biomass, or another carbon feedstock. However, the combustion of syngas is known to cause high water vapor content levels in the exhaust stream with unknown material consequences. To evaluate the effect of increased humidity, air-plasma sprayed (APS), yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is thermally aged in an environment with and without humidity. An enhanced destabilization of the parent phase by humid aging is revealed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Microstructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning-TEM (STEM) indicate an enhanced coarsening of the domain structure of the YSZ in the humid environment. The enhanced

  17. Control over magnetic properties in bulk hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Christian; Quesada, Adrian; Saerbeck, Thomas; Rubia, Miguel Angel De La; Garcia, Miguel Angel; Fernandez, Jose Francisco; Schuller, Ivan K.; UCSD Collaboration; Instituto de Ceramica, Madrid Collaboration; Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble Collaboration

    We present control of coercivity and remanent magnetization of a bulk ferromagnetic material embedded in bulk vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3) by using a standard bulk synthesis procedure. The method generalizes the use of structural phase transitions of one material to control structural and magnetic properties of another. A structural phase transition (SPT) in the V2O3 host material causes magnetic properties of Ni to change as function of temperature. The remanent magnetization and the coercivity are reversibly controlled by the SPT without additional external magnetic fields. The reversible tuning shown here opens the pathway for controlling the properties of a vast variety of magnetic hybrid bulk systems. This Work is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science, U.S. Department of Energy, BES-DMS funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Science, DMR under grant DE FG02 87ER-45332.

  18. Evaluation of Low-Earth-Orbit Environmental Effects on International Space Station Thermal Control Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.

    1998-01-01

    Many spacecraft thermal control coatings in low Earth orbit (LEO) can be affected by solar ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen. Ultraviolet radiation can darken some polymers and oxides commonly used in thermal control materials. Atomic oxygen can erode polymer materials, but it may reverse the ultraviolet-darkening effect on oxides. Maintaining the desired solar absorptance for thermal control coatings is important to assure the proper operating temperature of the spacecraft. Thermal control coatings to be used on the International Space Station (ISS) were evaluated for their performance after exposure in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Atomic Oxygen-Vacuum Ultraviolet Exposure (AO-VUV) facility. This facility simulated the LEO environments of solar vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation (wavelength range, 115 to 200 nanometers (nm)) and VUV combined with atomic oxygen. Solar absorptance was measured in vacuo to eliminate the "bleaching" effects of ambient oxygen on VUV-induced degradation. The objective of these experiments was to determine solar absorptance increases of various thermal control materials due to exposure to simulated LEO conditions similar to those expected for ISS. Work was done in support of ISS efforts at the requests of Boeing Space and Defense Systems and Lockheed Martin Vought Systems.

  19. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    PubMed Central

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil. PMID:25538691

  20. Generation of volatile organic compounds by alpha particle degradation of WIPP plastic and rubber material

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T.; Molecke, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    The generation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hydrogen, and carbon oxides due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, and neoprene, is being investigated. A wide diversity of VOCs was found including alkenes, alkanes, alcohols, ketones, benzene derivatives, and nitro compounds. Their yields however, were quite low. The relative amounts of these compounds depended on the material, atmosphere present, and the absorbed dose. This investigation will help evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on the long-term performance assessment and regulatory compliance issues related to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

  1. Host cell capable of producing enzymes useful for degradation of lignocellulosic material

    SciTech Connect

    Los, Alrik Pieter; Sagt, Cornelis Maria Jacobus; Schooneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Damveld, Robbertus Antonius

    2015-08-18

    The invention relates to a host cell comprising at least four different heterologous polynucleotides chosen from the group of polynucleotides encoding cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is capable of producing the at least four different enzymes chosen from the group of cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is a filamentous fungus and is capable of secretion of the at least four different enzymes. This host cell can suitably be used for the production of an enzyme composition that can be used in a process for the saccharification of cellulosic material.

  2. Role of chemical reactions of arylamine hole transport materials in operational degradation of organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kondakov, Denis Y.

    2008-10-15

    We report that the representative arylamine hole transport materials undergo chemical transformations in operating organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices. Although the underlying chemical mechanisms are too complex to be completely elucidated, structures of several identified degradation products point at dissociations of relatively weak carbon-nitrogen and carbon-carbon bonds in arylamine molecules as the initiating step. Considering the photochemical reactivities, the bond dissociation reactions of arylamines occur by the homolysis of the lowest singlet excited states formed by recombining charge carriers in the operating OLED device. The subsequent chemical reactions are likely to yield long-lived, stabilized free radicals capable of acting as deep traps--nonradiative recombination centers and fluorescence quenchers. Their presence in the hole transport layer results in irreversible hole trapping and manifests as a positive fixed charge. The extent and localization of chemical transformations in several exemplary devices suggest that the free radical reactions of hole transporting materials, arylamines, can be sufficient to account for the observed luminance efficiency loss and voltage rise in operating OLEDs. The relative bond strengths and excited state energies of OLED materials appear to have a determining effect on the operational stability of OLED devices.

  3. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Bullen, D.B.; Gdowski, G.E. ); Weiss, H. )

    1988-06-01

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are being considered along with three austenitic candidates as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level reprocessing wastes in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain mechanical integrity for 50 yr after emplacement to allow for retrieval of waste during the preclosure phase of repository operation. Containment is required to be substantially complete for up to 300 to 1000 yr. During the early period, the containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. The final closure joint will be critical to the integrity of the containers. This volume surveys the available data on the metallurgy of the copper-based candidate alloys and the welding techniques employed to join these materials. The focus of this volume is on the methods applicable to remote-handling procedures in a hot-cell environment with limited possibility of postweld heat treatment. The three copper-based candidates are ranked on the basis of the various closure techniques. On the basis of considerations regarding welding, the following ranking is proposed for the copper-based alloys: CDA 715 (best) > CDA 102 > CDA 613 (worst). 49 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The effects of energetic proton bombardment on polymeric materials: Experimental studies and degradation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, D. R.; Gupta, A.; Smith, M. V.; Fornes, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes 3 MeV proton bombardment experiments on several polymeric materials of interest to NASA carried out on the Tandem Van De Graff Accelerator at the California Institute of Technology's Kellogg Radiation Laboratory. Model aromatic and aliphatic polymers such as poly(1-vinyl naphthalene) and poly(methyl methacrylate), as well as polymers for near term space applications such as Kapton, Epoxy and Polysulfone, have been included in this study. Chemical and physical characterization of the damage products have been carried out in order to develop a model of the interaction of these polymers with the incident proton beam. The proton bombardment methodology developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and reported here is part of an ongoing study on the effects of space radiation on polymeric materials. The report is intended to provide an overview of the mechanistic, as well as the technical and experimental, issues involved in such work rather than to serve as an exhaustive description of all the results.

  5. A Degradable, Thermo-sensitive Poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)-Based Scaffold with Controlled Porosity for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Anna; Long, Thomas J.; Ratner, Buddy D.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)-based scaffold with degradability and controlled porosity. Biodegradable poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) hydrogels were synthesized by photo-copolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide with 2-methylene-1,3-dioxepane and polycaprolactone dimethacrylate. The hydrogels’ phase transition temperature, swelling and viscoelastic properties, as well as hydrolytic degradability at 25 and 37°C, were explored. A sphere-templating technique was applied to fabricate hydrogel scaffolds with controllable pore size and a highly interconnected porous structure. The scaffold pore diameter change as a function of temperature was evaluated and, as expected, pores decreased in diameter when the temperature was raised to 37°C. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test results suggested neither the scaffolds nor their degradation products were cytotoxic to NIH3T3 cells. Scaffolds with 55±5 μm pore diameter were loaded with NIH3T3 cells and then were warmed to 37°C entrapping cells in pores approximately 39 μm in diameter, a size range we have found to be optimal for angiogenesis and biointegration. Cells showed uniform infiltration and an elongated morphology after 7 days of culture. Due to the controlled monodisperse pore diameter, highly interconnected architecture, fully degradable chemistry and thermoresponsive properties, the polyNIPAM-based scaffolds developed here are attractive for applications in tissue engineering. PMID:20836521

  6. Degradation and reuse of radiative thermal protection system materials for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, E. S.; Maykuth, D. J.; Grinberg, I. M.; Luce, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    Three silicide coated columbium alloys and two cobalt alloys were subjected to identical simulated reentry profiling exposures in both static (controlled vacuum leak) and dynamic (hypersonic plasma shear) environments. Primary emphasis in the columbium alloy evaluation was on the Cb752 and C129Y alloys with a lesser amount on FS85. Commercial silicide coatings of the R512E and VH109 formulations were used. The coated specimens were intentionally defected to provide the types of coating flaws that are expected in service. Temperatures were profiled up to peak temperatures of either 2350 F or 2500 F for 15 minutes in each cycle.

  7. FINAL REPORT. CONTROL OF BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE DEGRADATION ZONES BY VERTICAL HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATIONS IN FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The key objective of this research was to determine the distribution of biologically active contaminant degradation zones in a fractured, subsurface medium with respect to vertical heterogeneities. Our expectation was that
    hydrogeological properties would determine the size, d...

  8. Systems Analysis for Material Control and Accountancy Technology (SAMCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P.J., Bucher, R.G.; Rothman, A.B.; Cha, B.K.

    1990-01-01

    The Systems Analysis for Material Control and Accountancy Technology (SAMCAT) is an interactive computer-based management system developed for the Department of Energy Office of Safeguards and Security, to assist in defining and prioritizing measurement upgrades programs for Material Control and Accountancy (MC A). The accountancy upgrades options evaluated by SAMCAT in this study are: (1) improvement of the uncertainties in the SNM measurement methods, (2) reduction of throughputs and/or inventories of SNM, and (3) reduction of the material balance accounting period. The goals of the MC A upgrades program are reduced inventory differences and associated uncertainties, improved detection probabilities for theft/diversion, decreased operating costs, and enhanced material traceability. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Application of smart materials to control of a helicopter rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Friedrich K.; King, Robert J.

    1996-05-01

    Smart material actuator technology for operation `on the blade' is now becoming available and has the promise to overcome the size, weight and complexity issues of hydraulic and electric on-rotor actuation. However, the challenges of the limited output capability of the materials and the dynamic operating environment must be fully addressed and resolved. The present study covers the conceptual sizing and design of a full scale demonstration system to provide active control of noise and vibrations as well as inflight blade tracking for the MD-900 helicopter. Active control is achieved via a trailing edge flap and trim tab, both driven by on- blade smart material actuators. Overall, this ARPA sponsored program entails the design, development, and whirl tower testing of the full scale active control rotor system. If successful, an entry in the NASA Ames 40 X 80 foot wind tunnel and flight tests are planned for a follow on program.

  10. Controllable optical black hole in left-handed materials.

    PubMed

    Bai, Qiang; Chen, Jing; Shen, Nian-Hai; Cheng, Chen; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2010-02-01

    Halting and storing light by infinitely decelerating its speed, in the absence of any form of external control, is extremely di+/-cult to imagine. Here we present a theoretical prediction of a controllable optical black hole composed of a planar left-handed material slab. We reveal a criterion that the effective round-trip propagation length in one zigzag path is zero, which brings light to a complete standstill. Both theory and ab initio simulation demonstrate that this optical black hole has degrees flexible controllability for the speed of light. Surprisingly, the ab initio simulations reveal that our scheme has degrees flexible controllability for swallowing, holding, and releasing light. PMID:20174039

  11. UV Induced Degradation of Polycarbonate-Based Lens Materials and Implications for the Heath Care Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkay, J. R.; Henry, Jerry

    2006-10-01

    Experimental research is being carried out at Keene State at the undergraduate level that utilizes facilities in both physics and chemistry to study the effects of mono- and polychromatic UV radiation from various sources, including a Deuterium lamp, a solarization unit (at Polyonics, a local industry), and the Sun, to study the photodegradation of polycarbonate-based lens materials used to produce eyewear. Literature in the field of optometry and ophthalmology indicates a correlation between exposure to the UVB band of natural sunlight and the onset of cataract formation, as well as other eye disorders. The public is usually advised that plastic eyeglass lenses will provide protection from this damaging radiation. It is well known that polycarbonate plastic ``yellows'' when exposed to intense sunlight and, particularly, UV light^1,2, either via photo-Fries rearrangement or by a photooxidative process, forming polyconjugated systems and is an industrial concern primarily for cosmetic reasons. We have preliminary data, however, that indicates that the yellowing'' is an indication of a more sinister problem in the case of eyeglasses in that it is accompanied by an increase in transmissivity in the UVB band where the wearer expects and needs protection. Our group includes a local optometrist who will share results with peers in his field. [1] A. Andrady, J. Polymer Sci., 42, 1991 [2] E. P. Gorelov, Inst. Khim. Fiz., Russian Federation

  12. Silicate, borosilicate, and borate bioactive glass scaffolds with controllable degradation rate for bone tissue engineering applications. I. Preparation and in vitro degradation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Fu, Hailuo; Liu, Xin

    2010-10-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds with a microstructure similar to that of dry human trabecular bone but with three different compositions were evaluated for potential applications in bone repair. The preparation of the scaffolds and the effect of the glass composition on the degradation and conversion of the scaffolds to a hydroxyapatite (HA)-type material in a simulated body fluid (SBF) are reported here (Part I). The in vitro response of osteogenic cells to the scaffolds and the in vivo evaluation of the scaffolds in a rat subcutaneous implantation model are described in Part II. Scaffolds (porosity = 78-82%; pore size = 100-500 microm) were prepared using a polymer foam replication technique. The glasses consisted of a silicate (13-93) composition, a borosilicate composition (designated 13-93B1), and a borate composition (13-93B3), in which one-third or all of the SiO2 content of 13-93 was replaced by B2O3, respectively. The conversion rate of the scaffolds to HA in the SBF increased markedly with the B2O3 content of the glass. Concurrently, the pH of the SBF also increased with the B2O3 content of the scaffolds. The compressive strengths of the as-prepared scaffolds (5-11 MPa) were in the upper range of values reported for trabecular bone, but they decreased markedly with immersion time in the SBF and with increasing B2O3 content of the glass. The results show that scaffolds with a wide range of bioactivity and degradation rate can be achieved by replacing varying amounts of SiO(2) in silicate bioactive glass with B2O3. PMID:20544804

  13. 10 CFR 74.31 - Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of low strategic significance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of low strategic significance. 74.31 Section 74.31 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Special Nuclear Material of...

  14. 10 CFR 74.31 - Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of low strategic significance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of low strategic significance. 74.31 Section 74.31 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Special Nuclear Material of...

  15. 10 CFR 74.31 - Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of low strategic significance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of low strategic significance. 74.31 Section 74.31 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Special Nuclear Material of...

  16. 10 CFR 74.31 - Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of low strategic significance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of low strategic significance. 74.31 Section 74.31 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Special Nuclear Material of...

  17. 10 CFR 74.31 - Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of low strategic significance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of low strategic significance. 74.31 Section 74.31 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Special Nuclear Material of...

  18. PID: from material properties to outdoor performance and quality control counter measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghold, J.; Koch, S.; Pingel, S.; Janke, S.; Ukar, A.; Grunow, P.; Shioda, T.

    2015-09-01

    Although the main root causes and referring counter measures for PID are known, a significant part of the industrial modules are still found to be PID sensitive in testing and PID is increasingly evident in field. This paper discusses field occurrence of PID with respect to environmental conditions and material properties. Different PID pattern in field and in test are analyzed in terms of the potential distribution and surface conductivity. Examples are given for the correlation of PID lab tests of a (commercial) BOM with real outdoor degradation. PID progress is predicted for different locations and compared with measurement data. Suitable quality control measures are discussed for the modules as well as for the encapsulation material

  19. Initiation of polymer degradation via transfer of infectious species.

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, Roger Lee; Jones, Gary Dunn; Celina, Mathias Christopher

    2005-06-01

    A novel dual stage chemiluminescence detection system incorporating individually controlled hot stages has been developed and applied to probe for material interaction effects during polymer degradation. Utilization of this system has resulted in experimental confirmation for the first time that in an oxidizing environment a degrading polymer A (in this case polypropylene, PP) is capable of infecting a different polymer B (in this case polybutadiene, HTPB) over a relatively large distance. In the presence of the infectious degrading polymer A, the thermal degradation of polymer B is observed over a significantly shorter time period. Consistent with infectious volatiles from material A initiating the degradation process in material B it was demonstrated that traces (micrograms) of a thermally sensitive peroxide in the vicinity of PP could induce degradation remotely. This observation documents cross-infectious phenomena between different polymers and has major consequences for polymer interactions, understanding fundamental degradation processes and long-term aging effects under combined material exposures.

  20. Initiation of polymer degradation via transfer of infectious species.

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, Roger Lee; Jones, Gary D.; Celina, Mathias Christopher

    2005-02-01

    A novel dual stage chemiluminescence detection system incorporating individually controlled hot stages has been developed and applied to probe for material interaction effects during polymer degradation. Utilization of this system has resulted in experimental confirmation for the first time that in an oxidizing environment a degrading polymer A (in this case polypropylene, PP) is capable of infecting a different polymer B (in this case polybutadiene, HTPB) over a relatively large distance. In the presence of the infectious degrading polymer A, the thermal degradation of polymer B is observed over a significantly shorter time period. Consistent with infectious volatiles from material A initiating the degradation process in material B it was demonstrated that traces (micrograms) of a thermally sensitive peroxide in the vicinity of PP could induce degradation remotely. This observation documents cross-infectious phenomena between different polymers and has major consequences for polymer interactions, understanding fundamental degradation processes and long-term aging effects under combined material exposures.

  1. Dynamic and structural control utilizing smart materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of several novel 'smart material' structural control concepts that are currently under development. The thrust of these investigations is the evolution of intelligent materials and structures superceding the recently defined variable-geometry trusses and shape memory alloy-reinforced composites; the substances envisioned will be able to autonomously evaluate emergent environmental conditions and adapt to them, and even change their operational objectives. While until now the primary objective of the developmental efforts presently discussed has been materials that mimic biological functions, entirely novel concepts may be formulated in due course.

  2. Systematic control of experimental inconsistency in combinatorial materials science.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Asish Kumar; Kulshreshtha, Chandramouli; Sohn, Keemin; Sohn, Kee-Sun

    2009-01-01

    We developed a method to systematically control experimental inconsistency, which is one of the most troublesome and difficult problems in high-throughput combinatorial experiments. The topic of experimental inconsistency is never addressed, even though all scientists in the field of combinatorial materials science face this very serious problem. Experimental inconsistency and material property were selected as dual objective functions that were simultaneously optimized. Specifically, in an attempt to search for promising phosphors with high reproducibility, photoluminescence (PL) intensity was maximized, and experimental inconsistency was minimized by employing a multiobjective evolutionary optimization-assisted combinatorial materials search (MOEO combinatorial material search) strategy. A tetravalent manganese-doped alkali earth germanium/titanium oxide system was used as a model system to be screened using MOEO combinatorial materials search. As a result of MOEO reiteration, we identified a halide-detached deep red phosphor with improved PL intensity and reliable reproducibility. PMID:19061418

  3. Electromagnetic valve for controlling the flow of molten, magnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Richter, T.

    1998-06-16

    An electromagnetic valve for controlling the flow of molten, magnetic material is provided, which comprises an induction coil for generating a magnetic field in response to an applied alternating electrical current, a housing, and a refractory composite nozzle. The nozzle is comprised of an inner sleeve composed of an erosion resistant refractory material (e.g., a zirconia ceramic) through which molten, magnetic metal flows, a refractory outer shell, and an intermediate compressible refractory material, e.g., unset, high alumina, thermosetting mortar. The compressible refractory material is sandwiched between the inner sleeve and outer shell, and absorbs differential expansion stresses that develop within the nozzle due to extreme thermal gradients. The sandwiched layer of compressible refractory material prevents destructive cracks from developing in the refractory outer shell. 5 figs.

  4. Electromagnetic valve for controlling the flow of molten, magnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Richter, Tomas

    1998-01-01

    An electromagnetic valve for controlling the flow of molten, magnetic material is provided, which comprises an induction coil for generating a magnetic field in response to an applied alternating electrical current, a housing, and a refractory composite nozzle. The nozzle is comprised of an inner sleeve composed of an erosion resistant refractory material (e.g., a zirconia ceramic) through which molten, magnetic metal flows, a refractory outer shell, and an intermediate compressible refractory material, e.g., unset, high alumina, thermosetting mortar. The compressible refractory material is sandwiched between the inner sleeve and outer shell, and absorbs differential expansion stresses that develop within the nozzle due to extreme thermal gradients. The sandwiched layer of compressible refractory material prevents destructive cracks from developing in the refractory outer shell.

  5. Material Degradation during Isothermal Aging and Thermal Cycling of Hybrid Mica Seal with Ag Interlayer under SOFC Exposure Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Hardy, John S.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2006-11-01

    Hybrid phlogopite mica seals with silver interlayers were evaluated in terms of materials degradation in a combined isothermal ageing and thermal cycling test. The hybrid mica seal was composed of a phlogopite mica paper sandwiched between two Ag foils. The hybrid micas were first aged at 800oC for ~1,000 hrs in a moist, dilute hydrogen fuel (~2.7% H2/bal. Ar + ~3% H2O), followed by short-term thermal cycling between ~100oC and 800oC. The combined test was repeated for 3 times for a total of 4,000 hrs ageing at 800oC and 119 thermal cycles. The results of high temperature leak rate tests showed very good thermal stability and thermal cycle stability with 800oC leak rates of ~0.02-0.03 sccm/cm. A hybrid mica seal tested in a high water content fuel (30 v% H2O/70 v% H2) demonstrated similar leakage during isothermal ageing and subsequent thermal cycles. Post-mortem analyses showed no extensive reaction between Ag and phlogopite mica as well as no significant mica degradation. Simple calculations to estimate the effect of measured leakage on the open circuit voltage and the total fuel loss for various SOFC stack sizes suggest very small fuel losses for the current hybrid mica seals, indicating that they are good candidates for SOFC sealing applications. Corresponding author: Yeong-Shyung Chou Tel: 509-375-2527, Fax: 509-375-2186, E-mail: yeong-shyung.chou@pnl.gov

  6. Development of a murre (Uria spp.) egg control material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vander Pol, Stacy S.; Ellisor, M.B.; Pugh, R.S.; Becker, P.R.; Poster, D.L.; Schantz, M.M.; Leigh, S.D.; Wakeford, B.J.; Roseneau, D.G.; Simac, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    The Seabird Tissue Archival and Monitoring Project (STAMP) is a collaborative Alaska-wide effort by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge (USFWS/AMNWR), the US Geological Survey's Biological Resources Division (USGS/BRD), the Bureau of Indian Affairs Alaska Region Subsistence Branch (BIA/ARSB), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to monitor long-term (decadal) trends in environmental contaminants using seabird eggs. To support this effort, a matrix- (seabird egg) and concentration-specific control material was needed to ensure quality during analytical work. Although a herring gull egg quality assurance (HGQA) material is available from Environment Canada (EC), contaminant concentrations in this material tended to be higher than those observed in Alaskan murre (Uria spp.) eggs. Therefore, to prepare a more appropriate control material, a total of 12 common murre (U. aalge) and thick-billed murre (U. lomvia) eggs from four Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska nesting locations were cryohomogenized to create 190 aliquots each containing approximately 6 g. This new control material was analyzed by different methods at NIST and EC facilities for the determination of concentrations and value assignment of 63 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, 20 organochlorine pesticides, and 11 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners. The total PCB concentration is approximately 58 ng g -1 wet mass. Results obtained for analytes not listed on the certificates of analysis of the previously used control materials, HGQA and NIST's Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1946 Lake Superior Fish Tissue, are also presented. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  7. Development of a murre (Uria spp.) egg control material.

    PubMed

    Vander Pol, Stacy S; Ellisor, Michael B; Pugh, Rebecca S; Becker, Paul R; Poster, Dianne L; Schantz, Michele M; Leigh, Stefan D; Wakeford, Bryan J; Roseneau, David G; Simac, Kristin S

    2007-04-01

    The Seabird Tissue Archival and Monitoring Project (STAMP) is a collaborative Alaska-wide effort by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge (USFWS/AMNWR), the US Geological Survey's Biological Resources Division (USGS/BRD), the Bureau of Indian Affairs Alaska Region Subsistence Branch (BIA/ARSB), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to monitor long-term (decadal) trends in environmental contaminants using seabird eggs. To support this effort, a matrix- (seabird egg) and concentration-specific control material was needed to ensure quality during analytical work. Although a herring gull egg quality assurance (HGQA) material is available from Environment Canada (EC), contaminant concentrations in this material tended to be higher than those observed in Alaskan murre (Uria spp.) eggs. Therefore, to prepare a more appropriate control material, a total of 12 common murre (U. aalge) and thick-billed murre (U. lomvia) eggs from four Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska nesting locations were cryohomogenized to create 190 aliquots each containing approximately 6 g. This new control material was analyzed by different methods at NIST and EC facilities for the determination of concentrations and value assignment of 63 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, 20 organochlorine pesticides, and 11 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners. The total PCB concentration is approximately 58 ng g(-1) wet mass. Results obtained for analytes not listed on the certificates of analysis of the previously used control materials, HGQA and NIST's Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1946 Lake Superior Fish Tissue, are also presented. PMID:17103152

  8. Antimicrobial Materials for Advanced Microbial Control in Spacecraft Water Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmele, Michele; Caro, Janicce; Newsham, Gerard; Roberts, Michael; Morford, Megan; Wheeler, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Microbial detection, identification, and control are essential for the maintenance and preservation of spacecraft water systems. Requirements set by NASA put limitations on the energy, mass, materials, noise, cost, and crew time that can be devoted to microbial control. Efforts are being made to attain real-time detection and identification of microbial contamination in microgravity environments. Research for evaluating technologies for capability enhancement on-orbit is currently focused on the use of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis for detection purposes and polymerase chain reaction (peR) for microbial identification. Additional research is being conducted on how to control for microbial contamination on a continual basis. Existing microbial control methods in spacecraft utilize iodine or ionic silver biocides, physical disinfection, and point-of-use sterilization filters. Although these methods are effective, they require re-dosing due to loss of efficacy, have low human toxicity thresholds, produce poor taste, and consume valuable mass and crew time. Thus, alternative methods for microbial control are needed. This project also explores ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), surface passivation methods for maintaining residual biocide levels, and several antimicrobial materials aimed at improving current microbial control techniques, as well as addressing other materials presently under analysis and future directions to be pursued.

  9. Nanostructured Solar Irradiation Control Materials for Solar Energy Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jinho; Marshall, I. A.; Torrico, M. N.; Taylor, C. R.; Ely, Jeffry; Henderson, Angel Z.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Gibbons, L. J.; Park, C.; Lowther, S. E.; Lillehei, P. T.; Bryant, R. G.

    2012-01-01

    Tailoring the solar absorptivity (alpha(sub s)) and thermal emissivity (epsilon(sub T)) of materials constitutes an innovative approach to solar energy control and energy conversion. Numerous ceramic and metallic materials are currently available for solar absorbance/thermal emittance control. However, conventional metal oxides and dielectric/metal/dielectric multi-coatings have limited utility due to residual shear stresses resulting from the different coefficient of thermal expansion of the layered materials. This research presents an alternate approach based on nanoparticle-filled polymers to afford mechanically durable solar-absorptive and thermally-emissive polymer nanocomposites. The alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) were measured with various nano inclusions, such as carbon nanophase particles (CNPs), at different concentrations. Research has shown that adding only 5 wt% CNPs increased the alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) by a factor of about 47 and 2, respectively, compared to the pristine polymer. The effect of solar irradiation control of the nanocomposite on solar energy conversion was studied. The solar irradiation control coatings increased the power generation of solar thermoelectric cells by more than 380% compared to that of a control power cell without solar irradiation control coatings.

  10. Shape control of multi-material heterostructures for catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habas, Susan Ellen

    Shape control of nanomaterials has become increasingly important, as many of their physical and chemical properties are highly dependent on morphology. A tremendous amount of effort has been spent in attempt to control these properties through manipulation of size, composition, and shape. Nanocrystal shape control for both single- and multiple-material systems, however, remains largely empirical and still presents a major challenge. In this dissertation, new methods are described for the rational synthetic design of heterostructures with controlled morphology which is essential for tailoring the catalytic properties of these multi-material systems. Catalytic activity and selectivity are governed by the nature of the catalyst surface, making shaped nanocrystals ideal substrates for understanding the influence of surface structure on heterogeneous catalysis at the nanoscale. First, synthetic methods were developed to produce catalytically active platinum nanocrystals with control over their shape and surface chemistry. Initially, the focus was on the removal of strongly-bound surface stabilizing molecules by ligand exchange to give catalytically clean surfaces. However, the presence of foreign ions used as a shape control agent to produce cubic, cuboctahedral, and octahedrally shaped nanocrystals was found to inhibit catalytic activity. In response, a method was developed for the shape control of uniform platinum nanoparticles stabilized by weakly interacting alkylammonium ions in the absence of foreign metal ions, which showed improved activity for ethylene hydrogenation. The next section describes the application of these highly-faceted platinum nanocrystals as nucleation centers for overgrowth of a secondary metal to obtain shape-controlled heterostructures. Seeded growth allows for the use of the surface structure and corresponding chemical identity of a well-defined seed to control nucleation and growth of another material. Cubic platinum seeds can direct the

  11. Growth and enrichment of pentachlorophenol-degrading microorganisms in the nutristat, a substrate concentration-controlled continuous culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rutgers, M; Bogte, J J; Breure, A M; van Andel, J G

    1993-01-01

    The nutristat, a substrate concentration-controlled continuous culture, was used to grow pentachlorophenol (PCP)-degrading microorganisms. The PCP concentration control system consisted of on-line measurement of the PCP concentration in the culture vessel with a tangential filter and a flowthrough spectrophotometer. With PCP concentrations between 45 and 77 microM, a stable situation was established in the nutristat, with an average dilution rate of 0.035 +/- 0.003 h-1. Compared with those of fed-batch cultures and chemostat cultures, the growth rates of microorganisms in the PCP nutristat were significantly higher, leading to considerable time savings in the enrichment procedure. In addition, PCP accumulation to severe inhibitory levels in the culture is prevented because the set point determines the (maximum) PCP concentration in the culture. The use of the nutristat as a tool for the growth of bacteria that degrade toxic compounds is discussed. PMID:8250560

  12. 76 FR 28193 - Amendments to Material Control and Accounting Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Regulations AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Availability of preliminary proposed rule language... proposed rule language concerning the NRC's proposed amendments to the material control and accounting (MC...-mail to pdr.resource@nrc.gov . The preliminary proposed rule language is available electronically...

  13. PERFORMANCE TESTING OF SPILL CONTROL DEVICES ON FLOATABLE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    At the U.S. EPA's Oil and Hazardous Materials Simulated Environmental Test Tank (OHMSETT) in Leonardo, New Jersey, from September 1975 through November 1975, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the U.S. Coast Guard evaluated selected oil-spill control equipment ...

  14. Performance of thermal control tape in the protection of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Whitaker, Ann F.

    1992-01-01

    The selection of materials for construction of long duration mission spacecraft has presented many challenges to the aerospace design community. After nearly six years in low earth orbit, NASA's Long duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), retrieved in January of 1990, has provided valuable information on both the nature of the space environment as well as the effects of the space environment on potential spacecraft materials. Composites, long a favorite of the design community because of a high strength-to-weight ratio, were flown in various configurations on LDEF in order to evaluate the effects of radiation, atomic oxygen, vacuum, micrometeoroid debris, and thermal variation on their performance. Fiberglass composite samples covered with an aluminum thermal control tape were flown as part of the flight experiment A0171, the Solar Array Materials Passive LDEF Experiment (SAMPLE). Visual observations and test results indicate that the thermal control tape suffered little degradation from the space exposure and proved to be a reliable source of protection from atomic oxygen erosion and UV radiation for the underlying composite material.

  15. Effect of operating-point-control strategy on the annual energy production of degraded photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, H. M.

    1982-09-01

    A new computer simulation of the annual operation of degraded flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) arrays is used to evaluate the need for maximum-power-point tracking in real PV systems. The simulations are based on single-glitch I-V curve shapes rather than particular array degradations, making the data reported applicable to any system whose likely failure modes are predictable and result in single-glitch I-V curves. The simulations show that with a reasonable array wiring strategy, effective maintenance, periodic I-V curve tracing, and avoidance of frequent and serious array shadowing, there is no reason that considerations of degradation should force the adoption of maximum-power-point-tracking power conditioning on a PV system that would otherwise operate economically at fixed voltage.

  16. Phase change thermal control materials, method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  17. Compatibility of refractory materials for nuclear reactor poison control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Metal-clad poison rods have been considered for the control system of an advanced space power reactor concept studied at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Such control rods may be required to operate at temperatures of about 140O C. Selected poison materials (including boron carbide and the diborides of zirconium, hafnium, and tantalum) were subjected to 1000-hour screening tests in contact with candidate refractory metal cladding materials (including tungsten and alloys of tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum) to assess the compatibility of these materials combinations at the temperatures of interest. Zirconium and hafnium diborides were compatible with refractory metals at 1400 C, but boron carbide and tantalum diboride reacted with the refractory metals at this temperature. Zirconium diboride also showed promise as a reaction barrier between boron carbide and tungsten.

  18. An application of neural networks to process and materials control

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Whiteson, R.

    1991-01-01

    Process control consists of two basic elements: a model of the process and knowledge of the desired control algorithm. In some cases the level of the control algorithm is merely supervisory, as in an alarm-reporting or anomaly-detection system. If the model of the process is known, then a set of equations may often be solved explicitly to provide the control algorithm. Otherwise, the model has to be discovered through empirical studies. Neural networks have properties that make them useful in this application. They can learn (make internal models from experience or observations). The problem of anomaly detection in materials control systems fits well into this general control framework. To successfully model a process with a neutral network, a good set of observables must be chosen. These observables must in some sense adequately span the space of representable events, so that a signature metric can be built for normal operation. In this way, a non-normal event, one that does not fit within the signature, can be detected. In this paper, we discuss the issues involved in applying a neural network model to anomaly detection in materials control systems. These issues include data selection and representation, network architecture, prediction of events, the use of simulated data, and software tools. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Wavefront conjugation using electron-gun-controlled piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, George C.; Main, John A.; Martin, Jeffrey W.

    2000-07-01

    Current adaptive optics designs often rely upon multiple actuators to mechanically deform mirrored surfaces. The spatial resolution of control is dependent upon the physical size of these actuators and the number of actuators present. Piezoelectric materials may be used for actuation however the classical control methods of these materials also rely on discrete areas of actuation and require lead wiring for each electrode, patch, or stack utilized. Electron gun control of piezoelectric materials eliminates the need for discrete, segmented electrodes and their associated lead wiring. This method also holds the potential for much finer control resolution since the restraining parameter is beam size. Lightweight piezoelectric ceramics may possibly be used as wavefront conjugating mirrors. Piezo-ceramic plates can be actuated with an electron gun and a single distributed electrode of optical quality. The electron gun functions as a pointing device while varying the potential, referred to as backpressure, of the single electrode controls the magnitude of actuation. By using this method, future corrective optics may significantly surpass current design performance without significantly increasing system complexity.

  20. Materials for adaptive structural acoustic control, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.

    1993-04-01

    This report documents work carried out in the Materials Research Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University over the first year of a new ONR sponsored University Research Initiative (URI) entitled Materials for Adaptive Structural Acoustic Control. For this report the activities have been grouped under the following topic headings: (1) General Summary Papers; (2) Materials Studies; (3) Composite Sensors; (4) Actuator Studies; (5) Integration Issues; (6) Processing Studies; and (7) Thin Film Ferroelectrics. In material studies important advances have been made in the understanding of the evaluation of relaxor behavior in the PLZT's and of the order disorder behavior in lead scandium tantalate:lead titanate solid solutions and of the Morphotropic Phase Boundary in this system.

  1. Wood source and pyrolysis temperature interact to control PyOM degradation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, J. A.; Hatton, P. J.; Filley, T. R.; Chatterjee, S.; Auclerc, A.; Gormley, M.; Dastmalchi, K.; Stark, R. E.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Surprisingly little is known about how shifts in tree species composition and increased forest fire frequency and intensity will affect one of the most stable pools of soil organic matter, i.e. the pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM or char). In a previous study, we showed that wood source and pyrolysis temperature interact to control PyOM structure and potential reactivity for two tree species common in high-latitude forests, jack pine (JP) and red maple (RM). Here, we investigate whether these differences affect PyOM turnover by examining the fates of 13C/15N-enriched JP wood and PyOM pyrolyzed at 300 (JP300) and 450 °C (JP450) and RM pyrolyzed at 450 °C (RM450). The substrates were applied 1-3 cm below the O/A interface of a well-drained Spodosol in a long-term forest fire study located at the University of Michigan Biological Station (Pellston, MI, USA). 13C-CO2effluxes from the first 996 days of decay showed a significant wood source by pyrolysis temperature interaction on PyOM field mineralisation rates, with RM450 mineralising twice faster than JP450 during the first 90 days. Increasing pyrolysis temperature substantially decreased field mineralization rates during the first 996 days, with mineralisation rates 24 and 80 times slower for JP300 and JP450 compared with JP wood. After 1 year, (i) bacterial groups were large sinks for PyOM-derived C as pyrolysis temperature increased and as substrate use efficiency decreased; (ii) potential phenol oxidase and net peroxidase activities were unaffected by the PyOM addition, although net peroxidase activities measured tended to lesser for soils amended with JP450 and RM450; and (iii) Collembola detritivores appeared less likely to be found for soils amended with JP450 and RM450. PyOM-derived C and N recoveries did not differ after 1 year; we will present 3-y recovery data. Our results suggest that the composition of angiosperms (e.g. RM) and gymnosperms (e.g. JP) in high-latitude forests is an underappreciated but

  2. Spoken commands control robot that handles radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.F.; Keddy, C.; Beugelsdojk. T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Several robotic systems have been developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory to handle radioactive material. Because of safety considerations, the robotic system must be under direct human supervision and interactive control continuously. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a voice-recognition system that permits this control, yet allows the robot to perform complex preprogrammed manipulations without the operator's intervention. To provide better interactive control, we connected to the robot's control computer, a speech synthesis unit, which provides audible feedback to the operator. Thus upon completion of a task or if an emergency arises, an appropriate spoken message can be reported by the control computer. The training programming and operation of this commercially available system are discussed, as are the practical problems encountered during operations.

  3. Evaluation and Selection of Replacement Thermal Control Materials for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hansen, Patricia A.; McClendon, Mark W.; Dever, Joyce A.; Triolo, Jack J.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanical and optical properties of the metallized Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP thermal control materials on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have degraded over the nearly seven years the telescope has been in orbit. Given the damage to the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI) that was apparent during the second servicing mission (SM2), the decision was made to replace the outer layer during subsequent servicing missions. A Failure Review Board was established to investigate the damage to the MLI and identify a replacement material. The replacement material had to meet the stringent thermal requirements of the spacecraft and maintain structural integrity for at least ten years. Ten candidate materials were selected and exposed to ten-year HST-equivalent doses of simulated orbital environments. Samples of the candidates were exposed sequentially to low and high energy electrons and protons, atomic oxygen, x-ray radiation, ultraviolet radiation and thermal cycling. Following the exposures, the mechanical integrity and optical properties of the candidates were investigated using Optical Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and a Laboratory Portable Spectroreflectometer (LPSR). Based on the results of these simulations and analyses, the FRB selected a replacement material and two alternates that showed the highest likelihood of providing the requisite thermal properties and surviving for ten years in orbit.q

  4. Ground-Based Testing of Replacement Thermal Control Materials for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hansen, Patricia A.; McClendon, Mark W.; deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Triolo, Jack J.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanical and optical properties of the metallized Teflon FEP thermal control materials on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have degraded over the nearly seven years the telescope has been in orbit. Given the damage to the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI) that was apparent during the second servicing mission (SM2), the decision was made to replace the outer layer during subsequent servicing missions. A Failure Review Board was established to investigate the damage to the MLI and identify a replacement material. The replacement material had to meet the stringent thermal requirements of the spacecraft and maintain mechanical integrity for at least ten years. Ten candidate materials were selected and exposed to ten-year HST-equivalent doses of simulated orbital environments. Samples of the candidates were exposed sequentially to low and high energy electrons and protons, atomic oxygen, x-ray radiation, ultraviolet radiation and thermal cycling. Following the exposures, the mechanical integrity and optical properties of the candidates were investigated using Optical Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), a Laboratory Portable Spectroreflectometer (LPSR) and a Lambda 9 Spectroreflectometer. Based on the results of these simulations and analyses, the Failure Review Board selected a replacement material and two alternates that showed the highest likelihood of providing the requisite thermal properties and surviving for ten years in orbit.

  5. CONTROL OF BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE DEGRADATION ZONES BY VERTICAL HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATIONS IN FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is faced with cleaning up wastes from reactor and weapons production activities during the latter half of this century. Many DOE sites have contaminants that are difficult to access due to depth and complex geology and are challenging to degrad...

  6. Drosophila IAP1-Mediated Ubiquitylation Controls Activation of the Initiator Caspase DRONC Independent of Protein Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiuan; Srivastava, Mayank; Broemer, Meike; Meier, Pascal; Bergmann, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitylation targets proteins for proteasome-mediated degradation and plays important roles in many biological processes including apoptosis. However, non-proteolytic functions of ubiquitylation are also known. In Drosophila, the inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (DIAP1) is known to ubiquitylate the initiator caspase DRONC in vitro. Because DRONC protein accumulates in diap1 mutant cells that are kept alive by caspase inhibition (“undead” cells), it is thought that DIAP1-mediated ubiquitylation causes proteasomal degradation of DRONC, protecting cells from apoptosis. However, contrary to this model, we show here that DIAP1-mediated ubiquitylation does not trigger proteasomal degradation of full-length DRONC, but serves a non-proteolytic function. Our data suggest that DIAP1-mediated ubiquitylation blocks processing and activation of DRONC. Interestingly, while full-length DRONC is not subject to DIAP1-induced degradation, once it is processed and activated it has reduced protein stability. Finally, we show that DRONC protein accumulates in “undead” cells due to increased transcription of dronc in these cells. These data refine current models of caspase regulation by IAPs. PMID:21909282

  7. Metabolic signals control the selective degradation of sucrose synthase in maize leaves during de-etiolation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The content and activity of sucrose (Suc) synthase (SUS) protein is high in sink organs but low in source organs. In the present report, we examined light and metabolic signals regulating SUS protein degradation in maize (Zea mays L.) leaves during de-etiolation. We found that SUS protein accumulate...

  8. Materials for adaptive structural acoustic control, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.

    1993-04-01

    This report documents work carried out in the Materials Research Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University over the first year of a new ONR sponsored University Research Initiative (URI) entitled Materials for Adaptive Structural Acoustic Control. For this report the activities have been grouped under the following topic headings: (1) General Summary Papers; (2) Materials Studies; (3) Composite Sensors; (4) Actuator Studies; (5) Integration Issues; (6) Processing Studies; (7) Thin Film Ferroelectrics. In material studies important advances have been made in the understanding of the evaluation of relaxor behavior in the PLZT's and of the order disorder behavior in lead scandium tantalate:lead titanate solid solutions and of the Morphotropic Phase Boundary in this system. For both composite sensors and actuators we have continued to explore and exploit the remarkable versatility of the flextensional moonie type structure. Finite element (FEA) calculations have given a clear picture of the lower order resonant modes and permitted the evaluation of various end cap metals, cap geometries and load conditions. In actuator studies multilayer structures have been combined with flextensional moonie endcaps to yield high displacement (50 micrometers) compact structures. Electrically controlled shape memory has been demonstrated in lead zirconate stannate titanate compositions, and used for controlling a simple latching relay.

  9. Materials for adaptive structural acoustic control, volume 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.

    1993-04-01

    This report documents work carried out in the Materials Research Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University over the first year of a new ONR sponsored University Research Initiative (URI) entitled Materials for Adaptive Structural Acoustic Control. For this report the activities have been grouped under the following topic headings: (1) General Summary Papers; (2) Materials Studies; (3) Composite Sensors; (4) Actuator Studies; (5) Integration Issues; (6) Processing Studies; and (7) Thin Film Ferroelectrics. In material studies important advances have been made in the understanding of the evaluation of relaxor behavior in the PLZT's and of the order-disorder behavior in lead scandium tantalate:lead titanate solid solutions and of the Morphotropic Phase Boundary in this system. For both composite sensors and actuators, we have continued to explore and exploit the remarkable versatility of the flextensional moonie type structure. Finite element (FEA) calculations have given a clear picture of the lower order resonant modes and permitted the evaluation of various end cap metals, cap geometries, and load conditions. In actuator studies multilayer structures have been combined with flextensional moonie endcaps to yield high displacement (50 micrometers) compact structures. Electrically controlled shape memory has been demonstrated in lead zirconate stannate titanate compositions, and used for controlling a simple latching relay.

  10. Agricultural biological reference materials for analytical quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Ihnat, M.

    1986-01-01

    Cooperative work is under way at Agriculture Canada, US Department of Agriculture, and US National Bureau of Standards in an attempt to fill some of the gaps in the world repertoire of reference materials and to provide much needed control materials for laboratories' day to day operations. This undertaking involves the preparation and characterization of a number of agricultural and food materials for data quality control for inorganic constituents. Parameters considered in the development of these materials were material selection based on importance in commerce and analysis; techniques of preparation, processing, and packaging; physical and chemical characterization; homogeneity testing and quantitation (certification). A large number of agricultural/food products have been selected to represent a wide range of not only levels of sought-for constituents (elements) but also a wide range of matrix components such as protein, carbohydrate, dietary fiber, fat, and ash. Elements whose concentrations are being certified cover some two dozen major, minor, and trace elements of nutritional, toxicological, and environmental significance.

  11. Quorum sensing controls hyphal initiation in Candida albicans through Ubr1-mediated protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Su, Chang; Unoje, Ohimai; Liu, Haoping

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common cause of invasive fungal infections in humans. Its ability to undergo the morphological transition from yeast to hyphal growth forms is critical for its pathogenesis. Hyphal initiation requires the activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway, which down-regulates the expression of NRG1, the major repressor of hyphal development. Hyphal initiation also requires inoculation of a small amount of C. albicans cells from overnight culture to fresh medium. This inoculation releases the inhibition from farnesol, a quorum-sensing molecule of C. albicans, that accumulated in the spent medium. Here, we show that farnesol inhibits hyphal initiation mainly through blocking the protein degradation of Nrg1. Through screening a kinase mutant library, we identified Sok1 as the kinase required for Nrg1 degradation during inoculation. SOK1 expression is transiently activated on inoculation during hyphal initiation, and overexpression of SOK1 overcomes the farnesol-mediated inhibition of hyphal initiation. Screening a collection of transcription factor mutants, the homeodomain-containing transcription repressor Cup9 is found to be responsible for the repression of SOK1 expression in response to farnesol inhibition. Interestingly, farnesol inhibits Cup9 degradation mediated by the N-end rule E3 ubiquitin ligase, Ubr1. Therefore, hyphal initiation requires both the cAMP-PKA pathway-dependent transcriptional down-regulation of NRG1 and Sok1-mediated degradation of Nrg1 protein. The latter is triggered by the release from farnesol inhibition of Cup9 degradation and consequently, derepression of SOK1 transcription. Neither pathway alone is sufficient for hyphal initiation. PMID:24449897

  12. Degradation of the pharmaceuticals diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole and their transformation products under controlled environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Poirier-Larabie, S; Segura, P A; Gagnon, C

    2016-07-01

    Contamination of the aquatic environment by pharmaceuticals via urban effluents is well known. Several classes of drugs have been identified in waterways surrounding these effluents in the last 15years. To better understand the fate of pharmaceuticals in ecosystems, degradation processes need to be investigated and transformation products must be identified. Thus, this study presents the first comparative study between three different natural environmental conditions: photolysis and biodegradation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions both in the dark of diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole, two common drugs present in significant amounts in impacted surface waters. Results indicated that degradation kinetics differed depending on the process and the type of drug and the observed transformation products also differed among these exposure conditions. Diclofenac was nearly degraded by photolysis after 4days, while its concentration only decreased by 42% after 57days of exposure to bacteria in aerobic media and barely 1% in anaerobic media. For sulfamethoxazole, 84% of the initial concentration was still present after 11days of exposure to light, while biodegradation decreased its concentration by 33% after 58days of exposure under aerobic conditions and 5% after 70days of anaerobic exposure. In addition, several transformation products were observed and persisted over time while others degraded in turn. For diclofenac, chlorine atoms were lost primarily in the photolysis, while a redox reaction was promoted by biodegradation under aerobic conditions. For sulfamethoxazole, isomerization was favored by photolysis while a redox reaction was also favored by the biodegradation under aerobic conditions. To summarize this study points out the occurrence of different transformation products under variable degradation conditions and demonstrates that specific functional groups are involved in the tested natural attenuation processes. Given the complexity of environmental samples

  13. 10 CFR 74.41 - Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of moderate strategic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance. 74.41 Section 74.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Special Nuclear...

  14. 10 CFR 74.41 - Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of moderate strategic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance. 74.41 Section 74.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Special Nuclear...

  15. 10 CFR 74.41 - Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of moderate strategic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance. 74.41 Section 74.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Special Nuclear...

  16. 10 CFR 74.41 - Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of moderate strategic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance. 74.41 Section 74.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Special Nuclear...

  17. 10 CFR 74.41 - Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of moderate strategic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance. 74.41 Section 74.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Special Nuclear...

  18. Nuclear material control and accounting safeguards in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Woltermann, H.A.; Rudy, C.R.; Rakel, D.A.; DeVer, E.A.

    1982-07-01

    Material control and accounting (MC and A) of special nuclear material (SNM) must supplement physical security to protect SNM from unlawful use such as terrorist activities. This article reviews MC and A safeguards of SNM in the United States. The following topics are covered: a brief perspective and history of MC and A safeguards, current MC and A practices, measurement methods for SNM, historical MC and A performance, a description of near-real-time MC and A systems, and conclusions on the status of MC and A in the United States.

  19. Application of smart materials to helicopter rotor active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Ealey, Mark A.; Schetky, Lawrence M.

    1997-05-01

    Helicopter design is limited by the compromise inherent in meeting hover and forward flight requirements, and the unsteady environment encountered in forward flight. Active control of helicopter rotors using smart material, in-blade actuation can overcome these barriers and provide substantial reductions in noise and vibrations and improved performance. The present study covers the blade/actuator integration and actuator development for a full scale system to demonstrate active control of noise and vibrations as well as inflight blade tracking on the MD Explorer helicopter. A piezoelectric multilayer stack actuator, driving a trailing edge flap, is used for active control. A shape memory alloy torsion actuator, driving a trailing edge trim tab, is used for inflight tracking. Overall, this DARPA sponsored program entails the design, development, and fabrication of the full scale active control rotor system. If successful, an entry in the NASA Ames 40 X 80 foot wind tunnel and flight tests are planned for a follow on program.

  20. Development of Tailorable Electrically Conductive Thermal Control Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. S.; Harada, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The optical characteristics of surfaces on spacecraft are fundamental parameters in controlling its temperature. Passive thermal control coatings with designed solar absorptance and infrared emittance properties have been developed and been in use for some time. In this total space environment, the coating must be stable and maintain its desired optical properties for the course of the mission lifetime. The mission lifetimes are increasing and in our quest to save weight, newer substrates are being integrated which limit electrical grounding schemes. All of this has already added to the existing concerns about spacecraft charging and related spacecraft failures or operational failures. The concern is even greater for thermal control surfaces that are very large. One way of alleviating such concerns is to design new thermal control material systems (TCMS) that can help to mitigate charging via providing charge leakage paths. The object of this program was to develop two types of passive electrically conductive TCMS.

  1. Controlling cavitation in the 1990s: Contours, materials, monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, E.

    1996-10-01

    Case studies of cavitation control methods at hydroelectric power plants are presented in the article. The control methods described include contouring of turbine blades, stainless steel runners and overlays (including 309L) and super-resistant alloys (Hydroloy 914), and cavitation monitoring equipment. Hydroelectric plants highlighted in the article include Central Maine Power Company`s Hiram Unit 2, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers` Dworshak Dam, Transalta Utilities` Spray Station, and Tennessee Valley Authority`s Raccoon Mountain. The development and testing of new materials is also highlighted.

  2. Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T. D.; Easterling, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

  3. Processing of thermal insulation materials with controlled porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Lyckfeldt, O.; Liden, E.; Carlsson, R.

    1995-08-01

    Slip-cast cordierite-based materials with reduced thermal conductivity have been manufactured with controlled introduction of porosity. The porosity was obtained by addition of different kinds of fillers (hollow Al-silicate spheres, paraffin, polystyrene, carbon black or starch particles). The processing and the ultimate thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated. The results showed that additions of corn or potato starch gave the most favourable concept, considering the processing and porosity control. A homogeneous distribution of spherical pores with the sizes 5-25 or 15-40 {mu}m was obtained after sintering. Slip-cast cordierite with 37% porosity had a thermal conductivity of 1.7 W/mK (compared with 3.7 W/mK for fully dense cordierite), and a bending strength above 50 MPa. The porosity effect correlated very well to theoretical models by Maxwell and, hence, the thermal conductivity of the porous ceramic material could be predicted.

  4. Multiple Sclerosis Autoantigen Myelin Basic Protein Escapes Control by Ubiquitination during Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, Alexey; Kudriaeva, Anna; Kuzina, Ekaterina; Smirnov, Ivan; Bobik, Tatyana; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Kravtsova-Ivantsiv, Yelena; Ciechanover, Aaron; Gabibov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of cellular proteins are degraded by the 26S proteasome after their ubiquitination. Here, we report that the major component of the myelin multilayered membrane sheath, myelin basic protein (MBP), is hydrolyzed by the 26S proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner both in vitro and in mammalian cells. As a proteasomal substrate, MBP reveals a distinct and physiologically relevant concentration range for ubiquitin-independent proteolysis. Enzymatic deimination prevents hydrolysis of MBP by the proteasome, suggesting that an abnormally basic charge contributes to its susceptibility toward proteasome-mediated degradation. To our knowledge, our data reveal the first case of a pathophysiologically important autoantigen as a ubiquitin-independent substrate of the 26S proteasome. PMID:24739384

  5. Anaerobic degradation of inedible crop residues produced in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwingel, W. R.; Sager, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    An anaerobic reactor seeded with organisms from an anaerobic lagoon was used to study the degradation of inedible crop residues from potato and wheat crops grown in a closed environment. Conversion of this biomass into other products was also evaluated. Degradation of wheat volatile solids was about 25% where that of potato was about 50%. The main product of the anaerobic fermentation of both crops was acetic acid with smaller quantities of propionate and butyrate produced. Nitrate, known to be high in concentration in inedible potato and wheat biomass grown hydroponically, was converted to ammonia in the anaerobic reactor. Both volatile fatty acid and ammonia production may have implications in a crop production system.

  6. Anaerobic degradation of inedible crop residues produced in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System.

    PubMed

    Schwingel, W R; Sager, J C

    1996-01-01

    An anaerobic reactor seeded with organisms from an anaerobic lagoon was used to study the degradation of inedible crop residues from potato and wheat crops grown in a closed environment. Conversion of this biomass into other products was also evaluated. Degradation of wheat volatile solids was about 25% where that of potato was about 50%. The main product of the anaerobic fermentation of both crops was acetic acid with smaller quantities of propionate and butyrate produced. Nitrate, known to be high in concentration in inedible potato and wheat biomass grown hydroponically, was converted to ammonia in the anaerobic reactor. Both volatile fatty acid and ammonia production may have implications in a crop production system. PMID:11538974

  7. Materials and techniques for spacecraft static charge control 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. E.; Eagles, A. E.

    1979-01-01

    Results of exploratory development on the design, fabrication and testing of transparent conductive coatings, conductive bulk materials and grounding techniques for application to high resistivity spacecraft dielectric materials to obtain control of static charge buildup are presented. Deposition techniques for application of indium oxide, indium/tin oxide and other metal oxide films on Kapton, FEP Teflon, OSR and solar cell coverglasses discussed include RF and Magnetron sputtering and vapor deposition. Development, fabrication and testing of conductive glass tiles for OSR and solar cell coverglass applications is discussed. Several grounding techniques for rapid charge dissipation from the conductively coated polymer and glass dielectrics which were developed and tested in thermal cycled and electron plasma environments are described. The optical and electrical characterization and aging effects of these coatings, bulk materials and grounding techniques are reviewed as they apply to the performance of their design functions in a geosynchronous orbit environment.

  8. Robotic control architecture development for automated nuclear material handling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, R.D.; Hurd, R.; Couture, S.; Wilhelmsen, K.

    1995-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is engaged in developing automated systems for handling materials for mixed waste treatment, nuclear pyrochemical processing, and weapon components disassembly. In support of these application areas there is an extensive robotic development program. This paper will describe the portion of this effort at LLNL devoted to control system architecture development, and review two applications currently being implemented which incorporate these technologies.

  9. Methods of Verification, Accountability and Control of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.E.

    1999-05-03

    This session demonstrates nondestructive assay (NDA) measurement, surveillance and analysis technology required to protect, control and account (MPC and A) for special nuclear materials (SNM) in sealed containers. These measurements, observations and analyses comprise state-of-the art, strengthened, SNM safeguards systems. Staff member specialists, actively involved in research, development, training and implementation worldwide, will present six NDA verification systems and two software tools for integration and analysis of facility MPC and A data.

  10. Optimizing dentin bond durability: control of collagen degradation by matrix metalloproteinases and cysteine cathepsins

    PubMed Central

    Tjäderhane, Leo; Nascimento, Fabio D.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Tersariol, Ivarne L.S.; Geraldeli, Saulo; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Carrilho, Marcela R.; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Contemporary adhesives lose their bond strength to dentin regardless of the bonding system used. This loss relates to the hydrolysis of collagen matrix of the hybrid layers. The preservation of the collagen matrix integrity is a key issue in the attempts to improve the dentin bonding durability. Methods Dentin contains collagenolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins, which are responsible for the hydrolytic degradation of collagen matrix in the bonded interface. Results The identities, roles and function of collagenolytic enzymes in mineralized dentin has been gathered only within last 15 years, but they have already been demonstrated to have an important role in dental hard tissue pathologies, including the degradation of the hybrid layer. Identifying responsible enzymes facilitates the development of new, more efficient methods to improve the stability of dentin-adhesive bond and durability of bond strength. Significance Understanding the nature and role of proteolytic degradation of dentin-adhesive interfaces has improved immensely and has practically grown to a scientific field of its own within only 10 years, holding excellent promise that stable resin-dentin bonds will be routinely available in a daily clinical setting already in a near future. PMID:22901826

  11. Insider Threat - Material Control and Accountability Mitigation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Why is the insider a concern? There are many documented cases of nuclear material available for sale - there are more insider diversions than outsider attacks and more than 18 documented cases of theft or loss of plutonium or highly enriched uranium. Insider attributes are: have access, has authority, possesses knowledge, works with absence of timeline, can test system, and may act alone or support a team. Material control and accountability (MC&A) is an essential part of an integrated safeguards system. Objectives of MC&A are: (1) Ongoing confirmation of the presence of special nuclear material (SNM) in assigned locations; (2) Prompt investigation of anomalies that may indicate a loss of SNM; (3) Timely and localized detection of loss, diversion, or theft of a goal quantity; (4) Rapid assessment and response to detection alarms; and (5) Timely generation of information to aid in the recovery of SNM in the event of an actual loss, diversion, or theft from the purview of the MC&A system. Control and accountability of material, equipment, and data are essential to minimizing insider threats.

  12. Probabilistic Material Strength Degradation Model for Inconel 718 Components Subjected to High Temperature, High-Cycle and Low-Cycle Mechanical Fatigue, Creep and Thermal Fatigue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie C.; Boyce, Lola

    1995-01-01

    The development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation is described. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes five effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, high-cycle mechanical fatigue, low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing predictions of high-cycle mechanical fatigue and high temperature effects with experiments are presented. Results from this limited verification study strongly supported that material degradation can be represented by randomized multifactor interaction models.

  13. Synthetic materials and macromolecular assemblies for control over the delivery of DNA and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Christopher M.

    The work described in this thesis is focused on the design, characterization, and application of synthetic materials that can be used to manipulate and control the delivery of biomacromolecules such as DNA and proteins to cells. The work described herein was conducted in two primary contexts: (1) the fabrication and characterization of multilayered films comprised of DNA and degradable polyamines, with applications to the surface-mediated delivery of DNA and proteins, and (2) the formation of self-assembled aggregates of DNA and redox-active lipids that could allow active control over the delivery of DNA. The first approach described in this thesis is based on the layer-by-layer assembly and characterization of thin films fabricated from hydrolytically-degradable polyamines and biomacromolecules. When contacted with cells in culture, these assemblies permit the surface-mediated delivery of DNA and proteins and may prove useful in the development of methods seeking the localized delivery of therapeutics. Additional work involving DNA-containing multilayered films deposited on the surfaces of biomedical devices such as intravascular stents has demonstrated that these assemblies are able to withstand mechanical stresses similar to those associated with stent deployment in vivo, and further, that film-coated stents are able to mediate high levels of cell transfection in vitro. The second approach described in this thesis demonstrates that lipoplexes formed from DNA and a ferrocene-containing, redox-active cationic lipid can be used to control the delivery of DNA to cells in ways that depend critically upon the redox-state of the lipid. Additional studies demonstrate that these assemblies can be chemically transformed from an inactive state (e.g., a state this is unable to mediate cell transfection) to an active state (e.g., a state that mediates high levels of cell transfection) using a chemical reducing agent. This approach could thus serve as a platform for exerting

  14. Influence of the Piping-material-originated Metal-ion on Cell Degradation of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitani, Chieko; Ishikawa, Masahiko; Mori, Kouya; Tanaka, Kenji; Hori, Michio

    Influences of metal-ion adulterations into Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (PEFC) were examined on PEFC generation characteristics and structural changes. Cupper and aluminun, novel candidate materials for forthcoming PEFC system, were introduced into polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) by ion-exchange method as contaminants, and ca. 500-hour generation tests of PEFC cells with these PEMs were conducted in this study. Introduced metal ions were to be combined to sulfonic acid groups in PEMs by electrostatic forces. For the cell containing cupric ions (Cu2+) equivalent to 1000 pmm of supfonic acid groups in PEM, a decrease in deteriorating rate of cell voltage was observed to be 83 mV/kh during 500-hour generation, in comparison with the cell without metal-ion comtamination showing 154 mV/kh. On the other hand, an increase in deteriorating rates were observed for the cells containing 10 % Cu2+ or 1000 ppm aluminum ions (Al3+). Al3+ adulteration in PEFC set off increases in activation overpotential and fluoride ion release rate (FRR) with proceeding genaration test. An increase in activation overpotentials was supressed in 1000 ppm Cu2+-adulterated cell and the reverse was observed in 10 % Cu2+-adulterated one, though Cu2+ adulterations suppressed growths of platinum catalyst particles in size and FRR regardless of Cu2+ concentration. Restriction effect of 1000 ppm Cu2+-adulteration into PEM on PEFC voltage deterioration has found to be the unprecedented knoledge with respect to PEFC degradation phenomena. Mechanisms of those influences were also discussed.

  15. Active smart material control system for buffet alleviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheta, Essam F.; Moses, Robert W.; Huttsell, Lawrence J.

    2006-05-01

    Vertical tail buffeting is a serious multidisciplinary problem that limits the performance and maneuverability of twin-tail fighter aircraft. The buffet problem occurs at high angles of attack when the vortical flow breaks down ahead of the vertical tails resulting in unsteady and unbalanced loads on the tails leading to their premature fatigue failure. An active smart material control system, using distributed piezoelectric (PZT) actuators, is developed for buffet alleviation and is presented. The surfaces of the vertical tail are equipped with PZT actuators to control the buffet responses in the first bending and torsion modes. The electrodynamics of the PZT actuators are modeled using a finite-element model. A single-input/single-output controller is designed to drive the active PZT actuators. High-fidelity analysis modules for the fluid dynamics, structural dynamics, electrodynamics of the PZT actuators, control law, fluid-structure interfacing, and grid motion are integrated into a multidisciplinary computing environment that controls the temporal synchronization of the analysis modules. The results of this study indicate that the actively controlled PZT actuators are an effective tool for buffet alleviation over wide range of angels of attack. Peak values of power spectral density of tail-tip acceleration are reduced by as much as 22% in the first bending mode and by as much as 82% in the first torsion mode. The root mean square values of tail-tip acceleration are reduced by as much as 12%.

  16. Spatiotemporal Control of Type III-A CRISPR-Cas Immunity: Coupling DNA Degradation with the Target RNA Recognition.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskiene, Migle; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Kostiuk, Georgij; Venclovas, Česlovas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2016-04-21

    Streptococcus thermophilus (St) type III-A CRISPR-Cas system restricts MS2 RNA phage and cuts RNA in vitro. However, the CRISPR array spacers match DNA phages, raising the question: does the St CRISPR-Cas system provide immunity by erasing phage mRNA or/and by eliminating invading DNA? We show that it does both. We find that (1) base-pairing between crRNA and target RNA activates single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) degradation by StCsm; (2) ssDNase activity is confined to the HD-domain of Cas10; (3) target RNA cleavage by the Csm3 RNase suppresses Cas10 DNase activity, ensuring temporal control of DNA degradation; and (4) base-pairing between crRNA 5'-handle and target RNA 3'-flanking sequence inhibits Cas10 ssDNase to prevent self-targeting. We propose that upon phage infection, crRNA-guided StCsm binding to the emerging transcript recruits Cas10 DNase to the actively transcribed phage DNA, resulting in degradation of both the transcript and phage DNA, but not the host DNA. PMID:27105119

  17. Control of degradation of spent LWR (light-water reactor) fuel during dry storage in an inert atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.E.; Simonen, E.P.; Allemann, R.T.; Levy, I.S.; Hazelton, R.F.

    1987-10-01

    Dry storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gas (referred to as inerted dry storage or IDS) is being developed as an alternative to water pool storage of spent fuel. The objectives of the activities described in this report are to identify potential Zircaloy degradation mechanisms and evaluate their applicability to cladding breach during IDS, develop models of the dominant Zircaloy degradation mechanisms, and recommend cladding temperature limits during IDS to control Zircaloy degradation. The principal potential Zircaloy cladding breach mechanisms during IDS have been identified as creep rupture, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and delayed hydride cracking (DHC). Creep rupture is concluded to be the primary cladding breach mechanism during IDS. Deformation and fracture maps based on creep rupture were developed for Zircaloy. These maps were then used as the basis for developing spent fuel cladding temperature limits that would prevent cladding breach during a 40-year IDS period. The probability of cladding breach for spent fuel stored at the temperature limit is less than 0.5% per spent fuel rod. 52 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. An okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase negatively controls the cyclin degradation pathway in amphibian eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Lorca, T; Fesquet, D; Zindy, F; Le Bouffant, F; Cerruti, M; Brechot, C; Devauchelle, G; Dorée, M

    1991-01-01

    Inhibition of okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatases released the cyclin degradation pathway from its inhibited state in extracts prepared from unfertilized Xenopus eggs arrested at the second meiotic metaphase. It also switched on cyclin protease activity in a permanent fashion in interphase extracts prepared from activated eggs. Even after cdc2 kinase inactivation, microinjection of okadaic acid-treated interphase extracts pushed G2-arrested recipient oocytes into the M phase, suggesting that the phosphatase inhibitor stabilizes the activity of an unidentified factor which shares in common with cdc2 kinase the maturation-promoting factor activity. Images PMID:1846666

  19. Using dispersive medium to control excitons in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klots, Andrey; Bolotin, Kirill I.

    Excitons in 2D materials (2DMs) are known to be sensitive to the surrounding environment. This makes it possible to modify 2D excitons by depositing materials with controlled dielectric constant on top of 2DMs. This possibility becomes especially interesting if we consider materials with dielectric permittivity ɛ that depends both on wavevector k (this happens if the medium is spatially non-uniform) and frequency ω. Here, we develop platforms to control ɛ (k , ω) and explore resulting changes in light-matter interactions of 2DMs. To examine the effect of wavevector-dependent permittivity of the medium, we study absorption/photoluminescence of graphene and MoS2 in the vicinity of highly non-uniform medium - an array of metal nanoparticles, 3-5 nm in diameter. In this case absorption of light can lead to creation of excitons with non-zero momentum. These dark states are not accessible via regular absorption spectroscopy. We study the case of frequency-dependent permittivity by surrounding MoS2 by a highly-dispersive media (e.g. dielectric liquids, graphene and VO2) . We demonstrate non-trivial frequency-dependent renormalization of the quasiparticle bandgap and exciton binding energies.

  20. Temperature controlled material irradiation in the advanced test reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, F. W.; Palmer, A. J.; Stites, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) has initiated the development of an Irradiation Test Vehicle (ITV) for fusion materials irradiation at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA. The ITV is capable of providing neutron spectral tailoring and individual temperature control for up to 15 experiment capsules simultaneously. The test vehicle consists of three In-Pile Tubes (IPTs) running the length of the reactor vessel. These IPTs are kept dry and test trains with integral instrumentation are inserted and removed through a transfer shield plate above the reactor vessel head. The test vehicle is designed to irradiate specimens as large as 2.2 cm in diameter, at temperatures of 250-800°C, achieving neutron damage rates as high as 10 displacements per atom per year. The high fast to thermal neutron flux ratio required for fusion materials testing is accomplished by using an aluminum filler to displace as much water as possible from the flux trap and surrounding the filler piece with a ring of replaceable neutron absorbing material. The gas blend temperature control system remains in place from test to test, thus hardware costs for new tests are limited to the experiment capsule train and integral instrumentation.

  1. Population dynamics in controlled unsteady-state systems: An application to the degradation of glyphosate in a sequencing batch reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Control over population dynamics and organism selection in a biological waste treatment system provides an effective means of engineering process efficiency. Examples of applications of organism selection include control of filamentous organisms, biological nutrient removal, industrial waste treatment requiring the removal of specific substrates, and hazardous waste treatment. Inherently, full scale biological waste treatment systems are unsteady state systems due to the variations in the waste streams and mass flow rates of the substrates. Some systems, however, have the capacity to impose controlled selective pressures on the biological population by means of their operation. An example of such a system is the Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) which was the experimental system utilized in this research work. The concepts of organism selection were studied in detail for the biodegradation of a herbicide waste stream, with glyphosate as the target compound. The SBR provided a reactor configuration capable of exerting the necessary selective pressures to select and enrich for a glyphosate degrading population. Based on results for bench scale SBRs, a hypothesis was developed to explain population dynamics in glyphosate degrading systems.

  2. A Contingency in the Rosetta Reaction Control System: Alternative Cruise Trajectory Strategies to Cope with Degraded Delta-V Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauske, Rainer; Companys, Vincente

    2007-01-01

    Since August 2006 a pressure transducer of the Rosetta Reaction Control System (RCS) shows anomalous telemetries indicating a possible leak in a pressurant line. The future operation mode of the RCS may be affected by this problem, resulting in performance degradation. The current propellant budget and its future evolution are evaluated to show the possible states w.r.t. the required mission delta-V. Alternative cruise trajectory strategies are analyzed, providing delta-V savings, to compensate for the expected performance loss of the RCS.

  3. Biologically engineered protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels: A cell-adhesive and plasmin-degradable biosynthetic material for tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstenberg, Sven

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the research presented in this dissertation was to create a biomimetic artificial material that exhibits functions of extracellular matrix relevant for improved nerve regeneration. Neural adhesion peptides were photoimmobilized on highly crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol)-based substrates that were otherwise non-adhesive. Neurons adhered in two-dimensional patterns for eleven hours, but no neurites extended. To enable neurite extension and nerve regeneration in three dimensions, and to address the need for specifically cell adhesive and cell degradable materials for clinical applications in tissue repair in general, an artificial protein was recombinantly expressed and purified that consisted of a repeating amino acid sequence based on fibrinogen and anti-thrombin III. The recombinant protein contained integrin-binding RGD sites, plasmin degradation sites, heparin binding sites, and six thiol-containing cysteine residues as grafting sites for poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate via Michael-type conjugate addition. The resulting protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol)acrylates were crosslinked by photopolymerization to form hydrogels. Although three-dimensional, RGD mediated and serine protease-dependent ingrowth of human fibroblasts into protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels occurred, only surface neurite outgrowth was observed from chick dorsal root ganglia. Axonal outgrowth depended on the concentration of matrix-bound heparin, suggesting that improved mechanical strength of the hydrogels and possible immobilization of neuroactive factors due to the presence of heparin promoted neurite outgrowth. Together, the above results show that specific biological functions can be harnessed by protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels to serve as matrices for tissue repair and regeneration. In particular, the two design objectives, specific cell adhesion and degradability by cell-associated proteases, were fulfilled by the material. In the future, this and

  4. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.T.; Pocard, J.A.; Bernard, T.; Le Rudulier, D.

    1988-07-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, the authors used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, /sup 14/C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared.

  5. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKY(Y115E) phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKYY115E phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  7. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L T; Pocard, J A; Bernard, T; Le Rudulier, D

    1988-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, we used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, 14C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared. PMID:3290197

  8. Enhancing the biological activity of chitosan and controlling the degradation by nanoscale interaction with bioglass.

    PubMed

    Ravarian, Roya; Craft, Michaela; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-09-01

    A nonuniform degradation of physical mixture of organic-inorganic biomaterials increases their risk of failure. In this study a chemical bonding between chitosan and bioglass was used as an alternative product to address this issue. To prepare a homogenous composite, chitosan was functionalized with γ-glycidoxypropyl trimethoxysilane and chemically bonded with bioglass during sol-gel method. The gelation time of these hybrids samples was optimized by varying parameters such as composition of chitosan and temperature. It was shown that gelation time was reduced from 7 days for pure bioglass at 25°C to less than six minutes at 70°C for chitosan 40 vol % bioglass hybrid. Furthermore, the enzymatic degradation after 4 weeks was decreased from 80% mass loss for pure chitosan to 32% for chitosan 40 vol % bioglass hybrid. The results of in vitro study demonstrated that the presence of nanoscale interaction enhanced the bioactivity of chitosan. Additionally, hybrid scaffolds were fabricated with pore sizes in the range of 200-400 µm. These scaffolds were prepared by the addition of sodium bicarbonate during sol-gel method as a gas foaming agent and a neutralizer that resulted in decreasing the gelation time of hybrids to less than three minutes. The hybrids fabricated in this study possessed superior characteristics compared to chitosan, also physical mixture of chitosan-bioglass and are promising alternatives for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:25690303

  9. Retroreflective microprismatic materials in image-based control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serikova, Mariya G.; Pantyushin, Anton V.; Gorbunova, Elena V.; Anisimov, Andrei G.

    2015-05-01

    This work addresses accurate position measurement of reference marks made of retroreective microprismatic materials by image-based systems. High reflection microprismatic technology implies tiny hermetically sealed pockets, which improve material reflectivity, but result in non-reflective preprinted netting pattern. The mark pattern to be used for measuring can be simply printed on the reflective material as an opaque area with predefined shape. However, the non-reflecting pattern acts as a spatial filter that affects resultant spatial reflectivity of the mark. When an image of the mark is taken, the desired mark shape can be deformed by the netting pattern. This deformational may prevent accurate estimation of the mark position in the image. In this paper experimental comparison of three image filtering approaches (median filtering, morphological close and filtering in a frequency domain) in order to minimize the affection of the netting pattern is provided. These filtering approaches were experimentally evaluated by processing of the images of the mark that was translated in a camera field of view. For that a developed experimental setup including a camera with LED backlight and the mark placed on a translation stage was used. The experiment showed that median filtering provided better netting pattern elimination and higher accuracy of key features position estimation (approximately +/-0.1 pix) in the condition of the experiment. The ways of future use of reference marks based on microprismatic material in image-based control applications are discussed.

  10. Teardown analysis for detecting shelf-life degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, A. S.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis is guideline in examining component materials, analytically determining physical properties and chemical compositions, and developing control data necessary for ascertaining effects of environments and their influence on deterioration and degradation mechanisms.

  11. Dysprosium titanate as an absorber material for control rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risovany, V. D.; Varlashova, E. E.; Suslov, D. N.

    2000-09-01

    Disprosium titanate is an attractive control rod material for the thermal neutron reactors. Its main advantages are: insignificant swelling, no out-gassing under neutron irradiation, rather high neutron efficiency, a high melting point (˜1870°C), non-interaction with the cladding at temperatures above 1000°C, simple fabrication and easily reprocessed non-radioactive waste. It can be used in control rods as pellets and powder. The disprosium titanate control rods have worked off in the MIR reactor for 17 years, in VVER-1000 - for 4 years without any operating problems. After post-irradiation examinations this type of control rod having high lifetime was recommended for the VVER and RBMK. The paper presents the examination results of absorber element dummies containing dysprosium titanate, irradiated in the SM reactor to the neutron fluence of 3.4×10 22 cm -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) and, also, the data on structure, thermal-physical properties of dysprosium titanate, efficiency of dysprosium titanate control rods.

  12. Selection of optimal composition-control parameters for friable materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, Yu.N.; Vdovkin, A.V.

    1988-05-01

    A method for composition analysis of coal and minerals is proposed which uses scattered gamma radiation and does away with preliminary sample preparation to ensure homogeneous particle density, surface area, and size. Reduction of the error induced by material heterogeneity has previously been achieved by rotation of the control object during analysis. A further refinement is proposed which addresses the necessity that the contribution of the radiation scattered from each individual surface to the total intensity be the same. This is achieved by providing a constant linear rate of travel for the irradiated spot through back-and-forth motion of the sensor. An analytical expression is given for the laws of motion for the sensor and test tube which provides for uniform irradiated area movement along a path analogous to the Archimedes spiral. The relationships obtained permit optimization of measurement parameters in analyzing friable materials which are not uniform in grain size.

  13. Control technology for surface treatment of materials using induction hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, J.B.; Skocypec, R.D.

    1997-04-01

    In the industrial and automotive industries, induction case hardening is widely used to provide enhanced strength, wear resistance, and toughness in components made from medium and high carbon steels. The process uses significantly less energy than competing batch process, is environmentally benign, and is a very flexible in-line manufacturing process. As such, it can directly contribute to improved component reliability, and the manufacture of high-performance lightweight parts. However, induction hardening is not as widely used as it could be. Input material and unexplained process variations produce significant variation in product case depth and quality. This necessitates frequent inspection of product quality by destructive examination, creates higher than desired scrap rates, and causes de-rating of load stress sensitive components. In addition, process and tooling development are experience-based activities, accomplished by trial and error. This inhibits the use of induction hardening for new applications, and the resultant increase in energy efficiency in the industrial sectors. In FY96, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement under the auspices of the Technology Transfer Initiative and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles was completed. A multidisciplinary team from Sandia National Labs and Delphi Saginaw Steering Systems investigated the induction hardening by conducting research in the areas of process characterization, computational modeling, materials characterization, and high speed data acquisition and controller development. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of closed-loop control for a specific material, geometry, and process. Delphi Steering estimated annual savings of $2-3 million per year due to reduced scrap losses, inspection costs, and machine down time if reliable closed-loop control could be achieved. A factor of five improvement in process precision was demonstrated and is now operational on the factory floor.

  14. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Activities directed toward the development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices are described. Topics investigated include: measurements of transistor delay time; application of the infrared response technique to the study of radiation-damaged, lithium-drifted silicon detectors; and identification of a condition that minimizes wire flexure and reduces the failure rate of wire bonds in transistors and integrated circuits under slow thermal cycling conditions. Supplementary data concerning staff, standards committee activities, technical services, and publications are included as appendixes.

  15. Development of Tailorable Electrically Conductive Thermal Control Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. S.; Harada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The optical characteristics of surfaces on spacecraft are fundamental parameters in controlling its temperature. Passive thermal control coatings with designed solar absorptance and infrared emittance properties have been developed and have been in use for some time. In this total space environment, the coating must be stable and maintain its desired optical properties as well as mechanical properties for the course of the mission lifetime. The mission lifetimes are increasing and in our quest to save weight, newer substrates are being integrated which limit electrical grounding schemes. All of this has added to already existing concerns about spacecraft charging and related spacecraft failures or operational failures. The concern is even greater for thermal control surfaces that are very large. One way of alleviating such concerns is to design new thermal control material systems (TCMS) that can help to mitigate charging via providing charge leakage paths. The objective of this program was to develop two types of passive electrically conductive TCMS. The first was a highly absorbing/emitting black surface and the second was a low (alpha(sub s)/epsilon(sub N)) type white surface. The surface resistance goals for the black absorber was 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) Omega/square, and for the white surfaces it was 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 10) Omega/square. Several material system concepts were suggested and evaluated for space environment stability and electrical performance characterization. Our efforts in designing and evaluating these material systems have resulted in several developments. New concepts, pigments and binders have been developed to provide new engineering quality TCMS. Some of these have already found application on space hardware, some are waiting to be recognized by thermal designers, and some require further detailed studies to become state-of-the-art for future space hardware and space structures. Our studies on baseline state-of-the-art materials and

  16. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1971-01-01

    The development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is discussed. The following subjects are also presented: (1) demonstration of the high sensitivity of the infrared response technique by the identification of gold in a germanium diode, (2) verification that transient thermal response is significantly more sensitive to the presence of voids in die attachment than steady-state thermal resistance, and (3) development of equipment for determining susceptibility of transistors to hot spot formation by the current-gain technique.

  17. A poly(glycerol sebacate)-coated mesoporous bioactive glass scaffold with adjustable mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dan; Yang, Kai; Tang, Wei; Liu, Yutong; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-07-01

    Various requirements in the field of tissue engineering have motivated the development of three-dimensional scaffold with adjustable physicochemical properties and biological functions. A series of multiparameter-adjustable mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) scaffolds with uncrosslinked poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) coating was prepared in this article. MBG scaffold was prepared by a modified F127/PU co-templating process and then PGS was coated by a simple adsorption and lyophilization process. Through controlling macropore parameters and PGS coating amount, the mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior of the composite scaffold could be modulated in a wide range. PGS coating successfully endowed MBG scaffold with improved toughness and adjustable mechanical strength covering the bearing range of trabecular bone (2-12MPa). Multilevel degradation rate of the scaffold and controlled-release rate of protein from mesopore could be achieved, with little impact on the protein activity owing to an "ultralow-solvent" coating and "nano-cavity entrapment" immobilization method. In vitro studies indicated that PGS coating promoted cell attachment and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, without affecting the osteogenic induction capacity of MBG substrate. These results first provide strong evidence that uncrosslinked PGS might also yield extraordinary achievements in traditional MBG scaffold. With the multiparameter adjustability, the composite MBG/PGS scaffolds would have a hopeful prospect in bone tissue engineering. The design considerations and coating method of this study can also be extended to other ceramic-based artificial scaffolds and are expected to provide new thoughts on development of future tissue engineering materials. PMID:25935647

  18. Methods of Measurement for Semiconductor Materials, Process Control, and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is reported. Significant accomplishments include: (1) Completion of an initial identification of the more important problems in process control for integrated circuit fabrication and assembly; (2) preparations for making silicon bulk resistivity wafer standards available to the industry; and (3) establishment of the relationship between carrier mobility and impurity density in silicon. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; characterization of generation-recombination-trapping centers, including gold, in silicon; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; study of scanning electron microscopy for wafer inspection and test; measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices; determination of S-parameters and delay time in junction devices; and characterization of noise and conversion loss of microwave detector diodes.

  19. Controlled Chemistry Helium High Temperature Materials Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Richard N. WRight

    2005-08-01

    A system to test aging and environmental effects in flowing helium with impurity content representative of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has been designed and assembled. The system will be used to expose microstructure analysis coupons and mechanical test specimens for up to 5,000 hours in helium containing potentially oxidizing or carburizing impurities controlled to parts per million levels. Impurity levels in the flowing helium are controlled through a feedback mechanism based on gas chromatography measurements of the gas chemistry at the inlet and exit from a high temperature retort containing the test materials. Initial testing will focus on determining the nature and extent of combined aging and environmental effects on microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of alloys proposed for structural applications in the NGNP, including Inconel 617 and Haynes 230.

  20. Expert model process control of composite materials in a press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Tony E.; Quinter, Suzanne R.; Abrams, Frances L.

    An expert model for the control of the press processing of thermoset composite materials has been developed. The knowledge base written using the PC PLUS expert system shell was interfaced with models written in FORTRAN. The expert model, which is running on a single computer with a single processor, takes advantage of the symbol-crunching capability of LISP and the number crunching capability of FORTRAN. The Expert Model control system is a qualitative-quantitative process automation (QQPA) system since it includes both quantitative model-based and qualitative rule-based expert system operations. Various physical and mechanical properties were measured from panels processed using the two cycles. Using QQPA, processing time has been reduced significantly without altering product quality.

  1. Controlling the band gap energy of cluster-assembled materials.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sukhendu; Reber, Arthur C; Qian, Meichun; Weiss, Paul S; Khanna, Shiv N; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-11-19

    Cluster-assembled materials combine the nanoscale size and composition-dependent properties of clusters, which have highly tunable magnetic and electronic properties useful for a great variety of potential technologies. To understand the emergent properties as clusters are assembled into hierarchical materials, we have synthesized 23 cluster-assembled materials composed of As7(3-)-based motifs and different countercations and measured their band gap energies. We found that the band gap energy varies from 1.09 to 2.21 eV. In addition, we have carried out first principles electronic structure studies to identify the physical mechanisms that enable control of the band gap edges of the cluster assemblies. The choice of counterion has a profound effect on the band gap energy in ionic cluster assemblies. The top of the valence band is localized on the arsenic cluster, while the conduction band edge is located on the alkali metal counterions. Changing the counterion changes the position of the conduction band edge, enabling control of the band gap energy. We can also vary the architecture of the ionic solid by incorporating cryptates as counterions, which provide charge but are separated from the clusters by bulky ligands. Higher dimensionality typically decreases the band gap energy through band broadening; however band gap energies increased upon moving from zero-dimensional (0D) to two-dimensional (2D) assemblies. This is because internal electric fields generated by the counterion preferentially stabilize the adjacent lone pair orbitals that mark the top of the valence band. Thus, the choice of the counterion can control the position of the conduction band edge of ionic cluster assemblies. In addition, the dimensionality of the solid via internal electric fields can control the valence band edge. Through covalently linking arsenic clusters into composite building blocks, we have also been able to tune the band gap energy. We used a theoretical description based on

  2. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Razvan T.; Duckworth, William C.; Levy, Jennifer L.; Fawcett, Janet

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  3. Highest Efficiency Two-Photon Degradable Copolymer for Remote Controlled Release

    PubMed Central

    Olejniczak, Jason; Sankaranarayanan, Jagadis; Viger, Mathieu L.; Almutairi, Adah

    2013-01-01

    To address the scarcity of polymers that degrade upon absorption of near infrared (NIR) light, we introduce a new polymer containing moieties in its backbone capable of highly efficient NIR-triggered photocleavage. The polymer rapidly undergoes backbone scission in response to both UV-Vis and near infrared light via two-photon absorption, as revealed by gel permeation chromatography. Cleavage of photosensitive groups from the backbone is confirmed by 1H NMR. These polymers were successfully formulated into particles encapsulating a dye that was released upon irradiation with UV-Vis and NIR light, as indicated by changes in fluorescence characteristic of increased solvent interaction with cargo. Thus, this new polymer is readily photocleaved by UV-Vis and NIR light, giving it a variety of potential applications in photopatterning and on-demand release. PMID:24044102

  4. Degradation of IF1 controls energy metabolism during osteogenic differentiation of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aragó, María; García-Bermúdez, Javier; Martínez-Reyes, Inmaculada; Santacatterina, Fulvio; Cuezva, José M

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) requires the rewiring of energy metabolism. Herein, we demonstrate that the ATPase inhibitory factor 1 (IF1) is expressed in hMSCs and in prostate and colon stem cells but is not expressed in the differentiated cells. IF1 inhibits oxidative phosphorylation and regulates the activity of aerobic glycolysis in hMSCs. Silencing of IF1 in hMSCs mimics the metabolic changes observed in osteocytes and accelerates cellular differentiation. Activation of IF1 degradation acts as the switch that regulates energy metabolism during differentiation. We conclude that IF1 is a stemness marker important for maintaining the quiescence state. PMID:23722655

  5. Controllable degradation of medical magnesium by electrodeposited composite films of mussel adhesive protein (Mefp-1) and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping-Li; Hou, Rui-Qing; Chen, Cheng-Dong; Sun, Lan; Dong, Shi-Gang; Pan, Jin-Shan; Lin, Chang-Jian

    2016-09-15

    To control the degradation rate of medical magnesium in body fluid environment, biocompatible films composed of Mussel Adhesive Protein (Mefp-1) and chitosan were electrodeposited on magnesium surface in cathodic constant current mode. The compositions and structures of the films were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). And the corrosion protection performance was investigated using electrochemical measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (Hanks' solution). The results revealed that Mefp-1 and chitosan successfully adhered on the magnesium surface and formed a protective film. Compared with either single Mefp-1 or single chitosan film, the composite film of chitosan/Mefp-1/chitosan (CPC (chitosan/Mefp-1/chitosan)) exhibited lower corrosion current density, higher polarization resistance and more homogenous corrosion morphology and thus was able to effectively control the degradation rate of magnesium in simulated body environment. In addition, the active attachment and spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells on the CPC film coated magnesium indicated that the CPC film was significantly able to improve the biocompatibility of the medical magnesium. PMID:27309944

  6. P-Bodies and Stress Granules: Possible Roles in the Control of Translation and mRNA Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Carolyn J.; Parker, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The control of translation and mRNA degradation is important in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. In general, translation and steps in the major pathway of mRNA decay are in competition with each other. mRNAs that are not engaged in translation can aggregate into cytoplasmic mRNP granules referred to as processing bodies (P-bodies) and stress granules, which are related to mRNP particles that control translation in early development and neurons. Analyses of P-bodies and stress granules suggest a dynamic process, referred to as the mRNA Cycle, wherein mRNPs can move between polysomes, P-bodies and stress granules although the functional roles of mRNP assembly into higher order structures remain poorly understood. In this article, we review what is known about the coupling of translation and mRNA degradation, the properties of P-bodies and stress granules, and how assembly of mRNPs into larger structures might influence cellular function. PMID:22763747

  7. Effects of Contamination, UV Radiation, and Atomic Oxygen on ISS Thermal Control Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visentine, Jim; Finckenor, Miria; Zwiener, Jim; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thermal control surfaces on the International Space Station (ISS) have been tailored for optimum optical properties. The space environment, particularly contamination, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and atomic oxygen (AO) may have a detrimental effect on these optical properties. These effects must be quantified for modeling and planning. Also of interest was the effect of porosity on the reaction to simulated space environment. Five materials were chosen for this study based on their use on ISS. The thermal control materials were Z-93 white coating, silverized Teflon, chromic acid anodized aluminum, sulfuric acid anodized aluminum, and 7075-T6 aluminum. Some of the samples were exposed to RTV 560 silicone; others were exposed to Tefzel offgassing products. Two samples of Z-93 were not exposed to contamination as clean "controls". VUV radiation was used to photo-fix the contaminant to the material surface, then the samples were exposed to AO. All samples were exposed to 1000 equivalent sun-hours (ESH) of vacuum ultraviolet radiation (VUV) at the AZ Technology facility and a minimum of 1.5 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm of AO at Marshall Space Flight Center. Half of the samples were exposed to an additional 2000 ESH of VUV at Huntington Beach prior to sent to AZ Technology. Darkening of the Z-93 white coating was noted after VUV exposure. AO exposure did bleach the Z-93 but not back to its original brightness. Solar absorptance curves show the degradation due to contamination and VUV and the recovery with AO exposure. More bleaching was noted on the Tefzel-contaminated samples than with the RTV-contaminated samples.

  8. Materials and techniques for spacecraft static charge control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amore, L. J.; Eagles, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the design, development, fabrication, and testing of transparent conductive coatings and conductive lattices deposited or formed on high resistivity spacecraft dielectric materials to obtain control static charge buildup on spacecraft external surfaces is presented. Fabrication techniques for the deposition of indium/tin oxide coatings and copper grid networks on Kapton and FEP Teflon films and special frit coatings for OSR and solar cell cover glasses are discussed. The techniques include sputtering, photoetching, silkscreening, and mechanical processes. A facility designed and built to simulate the electron plasma at geosynchronous altitudes is described along with test procedures. The results of material characterizations as well as electron irradiation aging effects in this facility for spacecraft polymers treated to control static charge are presented. The data presents results for electron beam energies up to 30 kV and electron current densities of 30 nA/cm squared. Parameters measured include secondary emission, surface leakage, and through the sample currents as a function of primary beam energy and voltage.

  9. Materials degradation in low earth orbit (LEO); Proceedings of the Symposium, 119th Annual Meeting of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, Anaheim, CA, Feb. 17-22, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, V. (Editor); Banks, Bruce A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The current understanding of the effect of space environment on materials and the development of protective coatings is examined in reviews and reports. Consideration is given to hyperthermal atomic oxygen reactions, the effect of atomic oxygen on altered and coated Kapton surfaces for spacecraft applications in LEO, silicon dioxide space coatings studied ellipsometrically, atomic oxygen effects on spacecraft materials, atomic oxygen beam source for erosion simulation, and atomic oxygen effects on refractory materials. Particular attention is given to ellipsometric analysis of materials degradation in space, studies of the interaction of 8 km/s oxygen atoms with selected materials, characterization and calibration of the EOIM-III flight mass spectrometer in a high velocity oxygen atom beam, the reaction efficiency of thermal energy oxygen atoms with polymeric materials, and effects of simulated space environments on the properties of selected materials.

  10. Magnetically Controlled Shape Memory Behaviour—Materials and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandy, A. P.; Sheikh, A.; Neumann, K.; Neumann, K.-U.; Pooley, D.; Ziebeck, K. R. A.

    2008-06-01

    For most metals a microscopic change in shape occurs above the elastic limit by the irreversible creation and movement of dislocations. However a large number of metallic systems undergo structural, martensitic, phase transformations which are diffusionless, displacive first order transitions from a high-temperature phase to one of lower symmetry below a certain temperature TM. These transitions which have been studied for more than a century are of vital importance because of their key role in producing shape memory phenomena enabling the system to reverse large deformations in the martensitic phase by heating into the austenite phase. In addition to a change in shape (displacement) the effect can also produce a force or a combination of both. Materials having this unique property are increasing being used in medical applications—scoliosis correction, arterial clips, stents, orthodontic wire, orthopaedic implants etc. The structural phase transition essential for shape memory behaviour is usually activated by a change in temperature or applied stress. However for many applications such as for actuators the transformation is not sufficiently rapid. Poor energy conversion also limits the applicability of many shape memory alloys. In medicine a change of temperature or pressure is often inappropriate and new ferromagnetic materials are being considered in which the phenomena can be controlled by an applied magnetic field at constant temperature. In order to achieve this, it is important to optimise three fundamental parameters. These are the saturation magnetisation σs, the Curie temperature Tc and the martensitic temperature TM. Here, σs is important because the magnetic pressure driving the twin boundary motion is 2σsH. Furthermore the material must be in the martensitic state at the operating temperature which should be at or above room temperature. This may be achieved by alloying or controlling the stoichiometry. Recently new intermetallic compounds based

  11. A targeted controlled force injection of genetic material in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ahlén, Gustaf; Frelin, Lars; Holmström, Fredrik; Smetham, Grant; Augustyn, Steve; Sällberg, Matti

    2016-01-01

    A general limitation in gene delivery is the cellular uptake in lager animals including humans. Several approaches have been tested including liposomes, micro-needles, in vivo electro-transfer, ballistic delivery, and needle-free delivery. All these techniques have individual limitations. One approach reproducibly delivering genetic material in muscle tissue in nonhuman primates is hydrodynamic injection, a forced injection of a volume equaling the volume of the tissue to be transfected thereby causing an increased local pressure resulting in an improved uptake of genetic material. We transferred the principle of hydrodynamic injection to a device, where a small injection volume can be delivered to a targeted tissue volume, termed in vivo intracellular injection (IVIN). The device is based on needle(s) with apertures along the needle shafts, where multiple needles can fix the tissue volume to be transfected. The apertures direct the injection from a central needle outward or inward to the centroid of a geometric arrangement thereby targeting the tissue to be transfected. With a controlled force, this results in a targeted injection with increased transfection efficiency. We here show that the IVIN technology reproducibly improved plasmid uptake and expression and the immunogenicity. The IVIN technology can be generally applied to a targeted delivery of genetic materials. PMID:27069951

  12. Fabrication of enzyme-degradable and size-controlled protein nanowires using single particle nano-fabrication technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omichi, Masaaki; Asano, Atsushi; Tsukuda, Satoshi; Takano, Katsuyoshi; Sugimoto, Masaki; Saeki, Akinori; Sakamaki, Daisuke; Onoda, Akira; Hayashi, Takashi; Seki, Shu

    2014-04-01

    Protein nanowires exhibiting specific biological activities hold promise for interacting with living cells and controlling and predicting biological responses such as apoptosis, endocytosis and cell adhesion. Here we report the result of the interaction of a single high-energy charged particle with protein molecules, giving size-controlled protein nanowires with an ultra-high aspect ratio of over 1,000. Degradation of the human serum albumin nanowires was examined using trypsin. The biotinylated human serum albumin nanowires bound avidin, demonstrating the high affinity of the nanowires. Human serum albumin-avidin hybrid nanowires were also fabricated from a solid state mixture and exhibited good mechanical strength in phosphate-buffered saline. The biotinylated human serum albumin nanowires can be transformed into nanowires exhibiting a biological function such as avidin-biotinyl interactions and peroxidase activity. The present technique is a versatile platform for functionalizing the surface of any protein molecule with an extremely large surface area.

  13. Helicopter control response types for hover and low-speed near-earth tasks in degraded visual conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanken, Christopher L.; Hart, Daniel C.; Hoh, Roger H.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator and Dig 1 Computer Image Generator (CIG) have been used to simulate a helicopter cockpit in a degraded visual environment in order to assess several control-response types during low-level flight. CIG visibility was reduced to the point where the horizon and other far-field cues were indiscernible. The control-response types encompassed a rate command, an attitude command/hold, and a translational rate command; piloting tasks were hover, vertical landing, a pirouette, acceleration/deceleration, and a sidestep maneuver. Visual cue ratings with a rate-command response type were initially collected to set the usable cue environment at 3. A rate-command response type provided poor Level 2 handling qualities.

  14. Exposure of Polymer Film Thermal Control Materials on the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce; Miller, Sharon; Messer, Russell; Sechkar, Edward; Tollis, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Seventy-nine samples of polymer film thermal control (PFTC) materials have been provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) for exposure to the low Earth orbit environment on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). MISSE is a materials flight experiment sponsored by the Air Force Research Lab/Materials Lab and NASA. This paper will describe background, objectives, and configurations for the GRC PFTC samples for MISSE. These samples include polyimides, fluorinated polyimides, and Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) with and without second-surface metallizing layers and/or surface coatings. Also included are polyphenylene benzobisoxazole (PBO) and a polyarylene ether benzimidazole (TOR-LM). On August 16, 2001, astronauts installed passive experiment carriers (PECs) on the exterior of the ISS in which were located twenty-eight of the GRC PFTC samples for 1-year space exposure. MISSE PECs for 3-year exposure, which will contain fifty-one GRC PFTC samples, will be installed on the ISS at a later date. Once returned from the ISS, MISSE GRC PFTC samples will be examined for changes in optical and mechanical properties and atomic oxygen (AO) erosion. Additional sapphire witness samples located on the AO exposed trays will be examined for deposition of contaminants.

  15. PEM fuel cell degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2010-01-01

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. While significant progress has been made in understanding degradation mechanisms and improving materials, further improvements in durability are required to meet commercialization targets. Catalyst and electrode durability remains a primary degradation mode, with much work reported on understanding how the catalyst and electrode structure degrades. Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) are used to rapidly evaluate component degradation, however the results are sometimes easy, and other times difficult to correlate. Tests that were developed to accelerate degradation of single components are shown to also affect other component's degradation modes. Non-ideal examples of this include ASTs examining catalyst degradation performances losses due to catalyst degradation do not always well correlate with catalyst surface area and also lead to losses in mass transport.

  16. 10 CFR 20.1802 - Control of material not in storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Control of material not in storage. 20.1802 Section 20.1802 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Storage and Control of Licensed Material § 20.1802 Control of material not in storage. The licensee shall control...

  17. 10 CFR 20.1802 - Control of material not in storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Control of material not in storage. 20.1802 Section 20.1802 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Storage and Control of Licensed Material § 20.1802 Control of material not in storage. The licensee shall control...

  18. 10 CFR 20.1802 - Control of material not in storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Control of material not in storage. 20.1802 Section 20.1802 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Storage and Control of Licensed Material § 20.1802 Control of material not in storage. The licensee shall control...

  19. 10 CFR 20.1802 - Control of material not in storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Control of material not in storage. 20.1802 Section 20.1802 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Storage and Control of Licensed Material § 20.1802 Control of material not in storage. The licensee shall control...

  20. 10 CFR 20.1802 - Control of material not in storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control of material not in storage. 20.1802 Section 20.1802 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Storage and Control of Licensed Material § 20.1802 Control of material not in storage. The licensee shall control and maintain constant surveillance of...