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Sample records for control promotes pancreatic

  1. Optogenetic Control of Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Reinbothe, Thomas M; Mollet, Inês G

    2016-01-01

    In light of the emerging diabetes epidemic, new experimental approaches in islet research are needed to elucidate the mechanisms behind pancreatic islet dysfunction and to facilitate the development of more effective therapies. Optogenetics has created numerous new experimental tools enabling us to gain insights into processes little was known about before. The spatial and temporal precision that it can achieve is also attractive for studying the cells of the pancreatic islet and we set out to explore the possibilities of this technology for our purposes. We here describe how to use the islets of an "optogenetic beta-cell" mouse line in islet batch incubations and Ca(2+) imaging experiments. This protocol enables light-induced insulin release and provides an all-optical solution to control and measure intracellular Ca(2+) levels in pancreatic beta-cells. The technique is easy to set up and provides a useful tool for controlling the activity of distinct islet cell populations. PMID:26965119

  2. Emodin promoted pancreatic claudin-5 and occludin expression in experimental acute pancreatitis rats

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xian-Ming; Li, Bang-Ku; Xing, Shi-Mei; Ruan, Hai-Ling

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of emodin on pancreatic claudin-5 and occludin expression, and pancreatic paracellular permeability in acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Experimental pancreatitis was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Emodin was injected via the external jugular vein 0 or 6 h after induction of AP. Rats from sham operation and AP groups were injected with normal saline at the same time. Samples of pancreas were obtained 6 or 12 h after drug administration. Pancreatic morphology was examined with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Pancreatic edema was estimated by measuring tissue water content. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 level were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pancreatic paracellular permeability was assessed by tissue dye extravasation. Expression of pancreatic claudin-5 and occludin was examined by immunohistology, quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. RESULTS: Pancreatic TNF-α and IL-6 levels, wet/dry ratio, dye extravasation, and histological score were significantly elevated at 3, 6 and 12 h following sodium taurocholate infusion; treatment with emodin prevented these changes at all time points. Immunostaining of claudin-5 and occludin was detected in rat pancreas, which was distributed in pancreatic acinar cells, ductal cells and vascular endothelial cells, respectively. Sodium taurocholate infusion significantly decreased pancreatic claudin-5 and occludin mRNA and protein levels at 3, 6 and 12 h, and that could be promoted by intravenous administration of emodin at all time points. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that emodin could promote pancreatic claudin-5 and occludin expression, and reduce pancreatic paracellular permeability. PMID:22563203

  3. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. {yields} Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. {yields} PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. {yields} This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated {beta}-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered

  4. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ginesta, Mireia M.; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71–80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms. PMID:27602165

  5. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26510396

  6. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D; Tuveson, David; Miller, George

    2015-11-16

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis. PMID:26481685

  7. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H.; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D.; Tuveson, David

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis. PMID:26481685

  8. Decreased TUSC3 Promotes Pancreatic Cancer Proliferation, Invasion and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Xiu; Shen, Jie; Zhao, Haibin; Yu, Xuetao; Chen, Yong’an; Zhuang, Zhuonan; Deng, Xiaolong; Feng, Hua; Wang, Yunfei; Peng, Long

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with dismal prognosis. It is of paramount importance to understand the underlying etiological mechanisms and identify novel, consistent, and easy-to-apply prognostic factors for precision therapy. TUSC3 (tumor suppressor candidate 3) was identified as a potential tumor suppressor gene and previous study showed TUSC3 is decreased in pancreatic cancer at mRNA level, but its putative tumor suppressor function remains to be verified. In this study, TUSC3 expression was found to be suppressed both at mRNA and protein levels in cell line models as well as in clinical samples; decreased TUSC3 expression was associated with higher pathological TNM staging and poorer outcome. In three pairs of cell lines with different NF-κB activity, TUSC3 expression was found to be reversely correlated with NF-κB activity. TUSC3-silenced pancreatic cancer cell line exhibited enhanced potential of proliferation, migration and invasion. In an orthotopic implanted mice model, TUSC3 silenced cells exhibited more aggressive phenotype with more liver metastasis. In conclusion, the current study shows that decreased immunological TUSC3 staining is a factor prognostic of poor survival in pancreatic cancer patients and decreased TUSC3 promotes pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis. The reverse correlation between NF-κB activity and TUSC3 expression may suggest a novel regulation pattern for this molecule. PMID:26871953

  9. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Hu, Yanling; Ni, Jianbo; Yin, Guojian; Xing, Miao; Shen, Jie; Tang, Maochun; Chen, Congying; Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xingpeng; and others

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway.

  10. Autophagy Inhibition Dysregulates TBK1 Signaling and Promotes Pancreatic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shenghong; Imamura, Yu; Jenkins, Russell W; Cañadas, Israel; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Aref, Amir; Brannon, Arthur; Oki, Eiji; Castoreno, Adam; Zhu, Zehua; Thai, Tran; Reibel, Jacob; Qian, Zhirong; Ogino, Shuji; Wong, Kwok K; Baba, Hideo; Kimmelman, Alec C; Pasca Di Magliano, Marina; Barbie, David A

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy promotes tumor progression downstream of oncogenic KRAS, yet also restrains inflammation and dysplasia through mechanisms that remain incompletely characterized. Understanding the basis of this paradox has important implications for the optimal targeting of autophagy in cancer. Using a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis, we found that loss of autophagy by deletion of Atg5 enhanced activation of the IκB kinase (IKK)-related kinase TBK1 in vivo, associated with increased neutrophil and T-cell infiltration and PD-L1 upregulation. Consistent with this observation, pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of autophagy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells, including suppression of the autophagy receptors NDP52 or p62, prolonged TBK1 activation and increased expression of CCL5, IL6, and several other T-cell and neutrophil chemotactic cytokines in vitro Defective autophagy also promoted PD-L1 upregulation, which is particularly pronounced downstream of IFNγ signaling and involves JAK pathway activation. Treatment with the TBK1/IKKε/JAK inhibitor CYT387 (also known as momelotinib) not only inhibits autophagy, but also suppresses this feedback inflammation and reduces PD-L1 expression, limiting KRAS-driven pancreatic dysplasia. These findings could contribute to the dual role of autophagy in oncogenesis and have important consequences for its therapeutic targeting. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 520-30. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27068336

  11. Hippo transducer TAZ promotes epithelial mesenchymal transition and supports pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dacheng; Cui, Jiujie; Xia, Tian; Jia, Zhiliang; Wang, Liang; Wei, Wenfei; Zhu, Anna; Gao, Yong; Xie, Keping; Quan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional co-activator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ) is a transducer of the Hippo pathway and promotes cancer development and progression. In the present study, we sought to determine the roles and underlying mechanisms of elevated expression and activation of TAZ in pancreatic cancer development and progression. The mechanistic role of TAZ and Hippo signaling in promotion of pancreatic cancer development and progression was examined using cell culture, molecular biology, and mouse models. The relevance of our experimental and mechanistic findings was validated using human pancreatic tumor specimens. We found that TAZ expression was markedly higher in pancreatic tumors than in normal pancreatic tissue. Further analysis of the correlation of TAZ expression with tissue microarray clinicopathologic parameters revealed that this expression was positively associated with tumor differentiation. Also, TAZ expression was higher in pancreatic cancer cell lines than in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. TAZ activation in pancreatic cancer cells promoted their proliferation, migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that aberrant expression and activation of TAZ in pancreatic cancer cells resulted from suppression of the expression of Merlin, a positive regulator upstream of the Hippo pathway, and that the oncogenic function of TAZ in pancreatic cancer cells was mediated by TEA/ATTS domain transcription factors. Therefore, TAZ functioned as an oncogene and promoted pancreatic cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition and progression. TAZ thus may be a target for effective therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26416426

  12. Epigenetic silencing of EYA2 in pancreatic adenocarcinomas promotes tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Hong, Seung-Mo; Hu, Chaoxin; Omura, Noriyuki; Young, Angela; Kim, Haeryoung; Yu, Jun; Knight, Spencer; Ayars, Michael; Griffith, Margaret; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael

    2014-01-01

    To identify potentially important genes dysregulated in pancreatic cancer, we analyzed genome-wide transcriptional analysis of pancreatic cancers and normal pancreatic duct samples and identified the transcriptional coactivator, EYA2 (Drosophila Eyes Absent Homologue-2) as silenced in the majority of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the role of epigenetic mechanisms of EYA2 gene silencing in pancreatic cancers, performed in vitro and in vivo proliferation and migration assays to assess the effect of EYA2 silencing on tumor cell growth and metastasis formation, and expression analysis to identify genes transcriptionally regulated by EYA2. We found loss of tumoral Eya2 expression in 63% of pancreatic cancers (120/189 cases). Silencing of EYA2 expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines correlated with promoter methylation and histone deacetylation and was reversible with DNA methyltransferase and HDAC inhibitors. EYA2 knockdown in pancreatic cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation. Compared to parental pancreatic cancer cells, pancreatic cancers stably-expressing EYA2 grew more slowly and had fewer metastases in orthotopic models. The transcriptional changes after stable expression of EYA2 in pancreatic cancer cells included induction of genes in the TGFbeta pathway. Epigenetic silencing of EYA2 is a common event in pancreatic cancers and stable expression EYA2 limits the growth and metastases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:24810906

  13. Nanotopography Promotes Pancreatic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Woo; Cha, Kyoung Je; Han, Jiyou; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-03-22

    Although previous studies suggest that nanotopographical features influence properties and behaviors of stem cells, only a few studies have attempted to derive clinically useful somatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells using nanopatterned surfaces. In the present study, we report that polystyrene nanopore-patterned surfaces significantly promote the pancreatic differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. We compared different diameters of nanopores and showed that 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces highly upregulated the expression of PDX1, a critical transcription factor for pancreatic development, leading to an approximately 3-fold increase in the percentage of differentiating PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitors compared with control flat surfaces. Furthermore, in the presence of biochemical factors, 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces profoundly enhanced the derivation of pancreatic endocrine cells producing insulin, glucagon, or somatostatin. We also demonstrate that nanopore-patterned surface-induced upregulation of PDX1 is associated with downregulation of TAZ, suggesting the potential role of TAZ in nanopore-patterned surface-mediated mechanotransduction. Our study suggests that appropriate cytokine treatments combined with nanotopographical stimulation could be a powerful tool for deriving a high purity of desired cells from human pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26900863

  14. HOXB7 Promotes Invasion and Predicts Survival in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kovochich, Anne Nguyen; Arensman, Michael; Lay, Anna R.; Rao, Nagesh P.; Donahue, Timothy; Li, Xinmin; French, Samuel W.; Dawson, David W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The homeobox gene HOXB7 is overexpressed across a range of cancers and promotes tumorigenesis through varying effects on proliferation, survival, invasion, and angiogenesis. Although published microarray data suggest HOXB7 is overexpressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), its function in pancreatic cancer has not been studied. METHODS HOXB7 message and protein levels were examined in PDAC cell lines and patient samples, as well as in normal pancreas. HOXB7 protein expression in patient tumors was determined by immunohistochemistry and correlated with clinicopathologic factors and survival. The impact of HOXB7 on cell proliferation, growth, and invasion was assessed by knockdown and overexpression in PDAC cell lines. Candidate genes whose expression levels were altered following HOXB7 knockdown were determined by microarray analysis. RESULTS HOXB7 message and protein levels were significantly elevated in PDAC cell lines and patient tumor samples relative to normal pancreas. Evaluation of a tissue microarray of 145 resected PDACs found high HOXB7 protein expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis (P = .034) and an independent predictor of worse overall survival in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio = 1.56, 95% confidence interval = 1.02–2.39). HOXB7 knockdown or overexpression in PDAC cell lines resulted in decreased or increased invasion, respectively, without influencing proliferation or cell viability. CONCLUSIONS HOXB7 is frequently overexpressed in PDAC, specifically promotes invasive phenotype, and is associated with lymph node metastasis and worse survival outcome. HOXB7 and its downstream targets may represent novel clinical biomarkers or targets of therapy for inhibiting the invasive and metastatic capacity of PDAC. PMID:22914903

  15. The canonical Wnt pathway regulates the metastasis-promoting mucin MUC4 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pai, Priya; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Macha, Muzafar A; Sheinin, Yuri; Smith, Lynette M; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P; Batra, Surinder K

    2016-02-01

    Aberrant Wnt signaling frequently occurs in pancreatic cancer (PC) and contributes to disease progression/metastases. Likewise, the transmembrane-mucin MUC4 is expressed de novo in early pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs) and incrementally increases with PC progression, contributing to metastasis. To determine the mechanism of MUC4 upregulation in PC, we examined factors deregulated in early PC progression, such as Wnt/β-catenin signaling. MUC4 promoter analysis revealed the presence of three putative TCF/LEF-binding sites, leading us to hypothesize that MUC4 can be regulated by β-catenin. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of rapid autopsy PC tissues showed a correlation between MUC4 and cytosolic/nuclear β-catenin expression. Knock down (KD) of β-catenin in CD18/HPAF and T3M4 cell lines resulted in decreased MUC4 transcript and protein. Three MUC4 promoter luciferase constructs, p3778, p3000, and p2700, were generated. The construct p3778, encompassing the entire MUC4 promoter, elicited increased luciferase activity in the presence of stabilized β-catenin. Mutation of the TCF/LEF site closest to the transcription start site (i.e., -2629/-2612) and furthest from the start site (i.e., -3425/-3408) reduced MUC4 promoter luciferase activity. Transfection with dominant negative TCF4 decreased MUC4 transcript and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed enrichment of β-catenin on -2629/-2612 and -3425/-3408 of the MUC4 promoter in CD18/HPAF. Functionally, CD18/HPAF and T3M4 β-catenin KD cells showed decreased migration and decreased Vimentin, N-cadherin, and pERK1/2 expression. Tumorigenicity studies in athymic nude mice showed CD18/HPAF β-catenin KD cells significantly reduced primary tumor sizes and metastases compared to scrambled control cells. We show for the first time that β-catenin directly governs MUC4 in PC. PMID:26526617

  16. Risk Factors for Pancreatic Cancer: Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Manal M.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Pisters, Peter W.; Evans, Douglas B.; Khan, Rabia; Chou, Ta-Hsu; Lenzi, Renato; Jiao, Li; Li, Donghui

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Although cigarette smoking is the most well-established environmental risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the interaction between smoking and other risk factors has not been assessed. We evaluated the independent effects of multiple risk factors for pancreatic cancer and determined whether the magnitude of cigarette smoking was modified by other risk factors in men and women. METHODS We conducted a hospital-based case-control study involving 808 patients with pathologically diagnosed pancreatic cancer and 808 healthy frequency-matched controls. Information on risk factors was collected by personal interview, and unconditional logistic regression was used to determine adjusted odds ratios (AORs) by the maximum-likelihood method. RESULTS Cigarette smoking, family history of pancreatic cancer, heavy alcohol consumption (>60 mL ethanol/day), diabetes mellitus, and history of pancreatitis were significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We found synergistic interactions between cigarette smoking and family history of pancreatic cancer (AOR 12.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6–108.9) and diabetes mellitus (AOR 9.3, 95% CI 2.0–44.1) in women, according to an additive model. Approximately 23%, 9%, 3%, and 5% of pancreatic cancer cases in this study were related to cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, heavy alcohol consumption, and family history of pancreatic cancer, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The significant synergy between these risk factors suggests a common pathway for carcinogenesis of the pancreas. Determining the underlying mechanisms for such synergies may lead to the development of pancreatic cancer prevention strategies for high-risk individuals. PMID:17764494

  17. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  18. Transgenic expression of the human growth hormone minigene promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baan, Mieke; Kibbe, Carly R; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Harris, Ted W; Sherman, Dawn S; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic mouse models are designed to study the role of specific proteins. To increase transgene expression the human growth hormone (hGH) minigene, including introns, has been included in many transgenic constructs. Until recently, it was thought that the hGH gene was not spliced, transcribed, and translated to produce functional hGH protein. We generated a transgenic mouse with the transcription factor Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) followed by the hGH minigene, under control of the mouse insulin promoter (MIP) to target expression specifically in the pancreatic β-cell. Expression of FoxM1 in isolated pancreatic islets in vitro stimulates β-cell proliferation. We aimed to investigate the effect of FoxM1 on β-cell mass in a mouse model for diabetes mellitus. However, we found inadvertent coexpression of hGH protein from a spliced, bicistronic mRNA. MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice had lower blood glucose and higher pancreatic insulin content, due to increased β-cell proliferation. hGH signals through the murine prolactin receptor, and expression of its downstream targets tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1), tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), and cytokine-inducible SH2 containing protein (Cish) was increased. Conversely, transcriptional targets of FoxM1 were not upregulated. Our data suggest that the phenotype of MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice is due primarily to hGH activity and that the FoxM1 protein remains largely inactive. Over the past decades, multiple transgenic mouse strains were generated that make use of the hGH minigene to increase transgene expression. Our work suggests that each will need to be carefully screened for inadvertent hGH production and critically evaluated for the use of proper controls. PMID:26202070

  19. GSH2 promoter methylation in pancreatic cancer analyzed by quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    GAO, FEI; HUANG, HAO-JIE; GAO, JUN; LI, ZHAO-SHEN; MA, SHU-REN

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene silencing via promoter hypermethylation is an important event in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. Aberrant DNA hypermethylation events are highly tumor specific, and may provide a diagnostic tool for pancreatic cancer patients. The objective of the current study was to identify novel methylation-related genes that may potentially be used to establish novel therapeutic and diagnostic strategies against pancreatic cancer. The methylation status of the GS homeobox 2 (GSH2) gene was analyzed using the sodium bisulfite sequencing method. The GSH2 methylation ratio was examined in primary carcinomas and corresponding normal tissues derived from 47 patients with pancreatic cancer, using quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Methylation ratios were found to be associated with the patient's clinicopathological features. GSH2 gene methylation was detected in 26 (55.3%) of the 47 pancreatic cancer patients, indicating that it occurs frequently in pancreatic cancer. A significant association with methylation was observed for tumor-node-metastasis stage (P=0.031). GSH2 may be a novel methylation-sensitive tumor suppressor gene in pancreatic cancer and may be a tumor-specific biomarker of the disease. PMID:26171036

  20. TGFβ Signaling in the Pancreatic Tumor Microenvironment Promotes Fibrosis and Immune Evasion to Facilitate Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Principe, Daniel R; DeCant, Brian; Mascariñas, Emman; Wayne, Elizabeth A; Diaz, Andrew M; Akagi, Naomi; Hwang, Rosa; Pasche, Boris; Dawson, David W; Fang, Deyu; Bentrem, David J; Munshi, Hidayatullah G; Jung, Barbara; Grippo, Paul J

    2016-05-01

    In early pancreatic carcinogenesis, TGFβ acts as a tumor suppressor due to its growth-inhibitory effects in epithelial cells. However, in advanced disease, TGFβ appears to promote tumor progression. Therefore, to better understand the contributions of TGFβ signaling to pancreatic carcinogenesis, we generated mouse models of pancreatic cancer with either epithelial or systemic TGFBR deficiency. We found that epithelial suppression of TGFβ signals facilitated pancreatic tumorigenesis, whereas global loss of TGFβ signaling protected against tumor development via inhibition of tumor-associated fibrosis, stromal TGFβ1 production, and the resultant restoration of antitumor immune function. Similarly, TGFBR-deficient T cells resisted TGFβ-induced inactivation ex vivo, and adoptive transfer of TGFBR-deficient CD8(+) T cells led to enhanced infiltration and granzyme B-mediated destruction of developing tumors. These findings paralleled our observations in human patients, where TGFβ expression correlated with increased fibrosis and associated negatively with expression of granzyme B. Collectively, our findings suggest that, despite opposing the proliferation of some epithelial cells, TGFβ may promote pancreatic cancer development by affecting stromal and hematopoietic cell function. Therefore, the use of TGFBR inhibition to target components of the tumor microenvironment warrants consideration as a potential therapy for pancreatic cancer, particularly in patients who have already lost tumor-suppressive TGFβ signals in the epithelium. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2525-39. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26980767

  1. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between −295 to −300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26320171

  2. Establishment of a novel, eco-friendly transgenic pig model using porcine pancreatic amylase promoter-driven fungal cellulase transgenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Yang, C C; Hsu, C C; Hsu, J T; Wu, S C; Lin, C J; Cheng, W T K

    2015-02-01

    Competition between humans and livestock for cereal and legume grains makes it challenging to provide economical feeds to livestock animals. Recent increases in corn and soybean prices have had a significant impact on the cost of feed for pig producers. The utilization of byproducts and alternative ingredients in pig diets has the potential to reduce feed costs. Moreover, unlike ruminants, pigs have limited ability to utilize diets with high fiber content because they lack endogenous enzymes capable of breaking down nonstarch polysaccharides into simple sugars. Here, we investigated the feasibility of a transgenic strategy in which expression of the fungal cellulase transgene was driven by the porcine pancreatic amylase promoter in pigs. A 2,488 bp 5'-flanking region of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene was cloned by the genomic walking technique, and its structural features were characterized. Using GFP as a reporter, we found that this region contained promoter activity and had the potential to control heterologous gene expression. Transgenic pigs were generated by pronuclear microinjection. Founders and offspring were identified by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Cellulase mRNA and protein showed tissue-specific expression in the pancreas of F1 generation pigs. Cellulolytic enzyme activity was also identified in the pancreas of transgenic pigs. These results demonstrated the establishment of a tissue-specific promoter of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene. Transgenic pigs expressing exogenous cellulase may represent a way to increase the intake of low-cost, fiber-rich feeds. PMID:25063310

  3. GSK-3β Governs Inflammation-Induced NFATc2 Signaling Hubs to Promote Pancreatic Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Sandra; Chen, Nai-Ming; Zhang, Jin-San; Billadeau, Daniel D; Gaisina, Irina N; Kozikowski, Alan P; Singh, Shiv K; Fink, Daniel; Ströbel, Philipp; Klindt, Caroline; Zhang, Lizhi; Bamlet, William R; Koenig, Alexander; Hessmann, Elisabeth; Gress, Thomas M; Ellenrieder, Volker; Neesse, Albrecht

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the mechanistic, functional, and therapeutic role of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) in the regulation and activation of the proinflammatory oncogenic transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc2) in pancreatic cancer. IHC, qPCR, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and proliferation assays were used to analyze mouse and human tissues and cell lines. Protein-protein interactions and promoter regulation were analyzed by coimmunoprecipitation, DNA pulldown, reporter, and ChIP assays. Preclinical assays were performed using a variety of pancreatic cancer cells lines, xenografts, and a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM). GSK-3β-dependent SP2 phosphorylation mediates NFATc2 protein stability in the nucleus of pancreatic cancer cells stimulating pancreatic cancer growth. In addition to protein stabilization, GSK-3β also maintains NFATc2 activation through a distinct mechanism involving stabilization of NFATc2-STAT3 complexes independent of SP2 phosphorylation. For NFATc2-STAT3 complex formation, GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of STAT3 at Y705 is required to stimulate euchromatin formation of NFAT target promoters, such as cyclin-dependent kinase-6, which promotes tumor growth. Finally, preclinical experiments suggest that targeting the NFATc2-STAT3-GSK-3β module inhibits proliferation and tumor growth and interferes with inflammation-induced pancreatic cancer progression in Kras(G12D) mice. In conclusion, we describe a novel mechanism by which GSK-3β fine-tunes NFATc2 and STAT3 transcriptional networks to integrate upstream signaling events that govern pancreatic cancer progression and growth. Furthermore, the therapeutic potential of GSK-3β is demonstrated for the first time in a relevant Kras and inflammation-induced GEMM for pancreatic cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(3); 491-502. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26823495

  4. Pancreatic cancer-associated stellate cells promote differentiation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in a STAT3-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Mace, Thomas A; Ameen, Zeenath; Collins, Amy; Wojcik, Sylwia; Mair, Markus; Young, Gregory S; Fuchs, James R; Eubank, Tim D; Frankel, Wendy L; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Bloomston, Mark; Lesinski, Gregory B

    2013-05-15

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) are a subset of pancreatic cancer-associated fibroblasts. These cells provide prosurvival signals to tumors; however, little is known regarding their interactions with immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. We hypothesized that factors produced by human PSC could enhance myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) differentiation and function, which promotes an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Primary PSC cell lines (n = 7) were generated from human specimens and phenotypically confirmed via expression of vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Luminex analysis indicated that PSC but not human fetal primary pancreatic fibroblast cells (HPF; negative controls) produced MDSC-promoting cytokines [interleukin (IL-6), VEGF, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) ] and chemokines (SDF-1, MCP-1). Culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells [peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC), n = 3 donors] with PSC supernatants or IL-6/granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; positive control) for 7 days promoted PBMC differentiation into an MDSC (CD11b+CD33+) phenotype and a subpopulation of polymorphonuclear CD11b+CD33+CD15+ cells. The resulting CD11b+CD33+ cells functionally suppressed autologous T-lymphocyte proliferation. In contrast, supernatants from HPF did not induce an MDSC phenotype in PBMCs. Culture of normal PBMCs with PSC supernatants led to STAT3 but not STAT1 or STAT5 phosphorylation. IL-6 was an important mediator as its neutralization inhibited PSC supernatant-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation and MDSC differentiation. Finally, the FLLL32 STAT3 inhibitor abrogated PSC supernatant-mediated MDSC differentiation, PSC viability, and reduced autocrine IL-6 production indicating these processes are STAT3 dependent. These results identify a novel role for PSC in driving immune escape in pancreatic cancer and extend the evidence that STAT3 acts as a driver of stromal

  5. Pancreatic Cancer-Associated Stellate Cells Promote Differentiation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in a STAT3-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Thomas A.; Ameen, Zeenath; Collins, Amy; Wojcik, Sylwia; Mair, Markus; Young, Gregory S.; Fuchs, James R.; Eubank, Tim D.; Frankel, Wendy L.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Bloomston, Mark; Lesinski, Gregory B.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) are a subset of pancreatic cancer-associated fibroblasts. These cells provide prosurvival signals to tumors; however, little is known regarding their interactions with immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. We hypothesized that factors produced by human PSC could enhance myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) differentiation and function, which promotes an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Primary PSC cell lines (n = 7) were generated from human specimens and phenotypically confirmed via expression of vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Luminex analysis indicated that PSC but not human fetal primary pancreatic fibroblast cells (HPF; negative controls) produced MDSC-promoting cytokines [interleukin (IL-6), VEGF, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)] and chemokines (SDF-1, MCP-1). Culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells [peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC), n = 3 donors] with PSC supernatants or IL-6/granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; positive control) for 7 days promoted PBMC differentiation into an MDSC (CD11b+CD33+) phenotype and a subpopulation of polymorphonuclear CD11b+CD33+CD15+ cells. The resulting CD11b+CD33+ cells functionally suppressed autologous T-lymphocyte proliferation. In contrast, supernatants from HPF did not induce an MDSC phenotype in PBMCs. Culture of normal PBMCs with PSC supernatants led to STAT3 but not STAT1 or STAT5 phosphorylation. IL-6 was an important mediator as its neutralization inhibited PSC supernatant-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation and MDSC differentiation. Finally, the FLLL32 STAT3 inhibitor abrogated PSC supernatant-mediated MDSC differentiation, PSC viability, and reduced autocrine IL-6 production indicating these processes are STAT3 dependent. These results identify a novel role for PSC in driving immune escape in pancreatic cancer and extend the evidence that STAT3 acts as a driver of stromal

  6. MMTV/LTR Promoter-Driven Transgenic Expression of EpCAM Leads to the Development of Large Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Vercollone, Jeffrey R; Balzar, Maarten; Litvinov, Sergey V; Yang, Wendy; Cirulli, Vincenzo

    2015-08-01

    Our previous work demonstrated an important role of EpCAM in the regulation of pancreatic cell adhesion, growth and differentiation. Here we investigated the consequences of human EpCAM (hEpCAM) overexpression under the control of the MMTV-LTR promoter, known to drive robust gene expression in a number of ductal epithelia, including the pancreas. In this animal model (MMTV-hEpCAM) we uncovered a striking pancreatic phenotype exhibiting a 12-fold increase in the islet cell mass, with normal expression patterns of insulin and the transcription factor PDX-1. Intriguingly, these large islet clusters revealed an altered architectural organization of α- and δ-cells that appeared interspersed with β-cells in the islet cores. This suggests an effect of the hEpCAM transgene on the function of other cell adhesion molecules that we have previously shown to regulate islet cell type segregation. Consistent with this finding, we show that the pancreatic epithelium in MMTV-hEpCAM transgenic mice exhibits a redistribution of β-catenin, a known regulator of E-cadherin-mediated adhesions. Collectively, these results provide an important in vivo validation of hEpCAM signaling properties in normal epithelia and offer unique opportunities to further explore the function of this glycoprotein in select pancreatic cell lineages to elicit islet cell expansion, and/or regeneration in diabetes. PMID:26216137

  7. Hyperglycemia Promotes the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Pancreatic Cancer via Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and pancreatic cancer are intimately related, as approximately 85% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have impaired glucose tolerance or even DM. Our previous studies have indicated that high glucose could promote the invasive and migratory abilities of pancreatic cancer cells. We therefore explored the underlying mechanism that hyperglycemia modulates the metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer. Our data showed that streptozotocin- (STZ-) treated diabetic nude mice exhibit larger tumor size than that of the euglycemic mice. The number of nude mice that develop liver metastasis or ascites is much more in the STZ-treated group than that in the euglycemic group. Hyperglycemic mice contain a higher plasma H2O2-level than that from euglycemic mice. The injection of polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT), an H2O2 scavenger, may reverse hyperglycemia-induced tumor metastasis. In addition, hyperglycemia could also modulate the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition- (EMT-) related factors in pancreatic tumor tissues, as the E-cadherin level is decreased and the expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin as well as transcription factor snail is strongly increased. The injection of PEG-CAT could also reverse hyperglycemia-induced EMT. These results suggest that the association between hyperglycemia and poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer can be attributed to the alterations of EMT through the production of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:27433288

  8. A novel FoxM1-Caveolin signaling pathway promotes pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen; Qiu, Zhengjun; Wang, Liwei; Peng, Zhihai; Jia, Zhiliang; Logsdon, Craig; Le, Xiangdong; Wei, Daoyan; Huang, Suyun; Xie, Keping

    2011-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a principal structural component of caveolar membrane domains, contributes to cancer development but its precise functional roles and regulation remain unclear. In this study, we determined the oncogenic function of Cav-1 in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer and in human tissue specimens. Cav-1 expression levels correlated with metastatic potential and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both mouse and human pancreatic cancer cells. Elevated levels in cells promoted EMT, migration, invasion and metastasis in animal models, whereas RNAi-mediated knockdown inhibited these processes. We determined that levels of Cav-1 and the Forkhead transcription factor FoxM1 correlated directly in pancreatic cancer cells and tumor tissues. Enforced expression of FoxM1 increased Cav-1 levels, whereas RNAi-mediated knockdown of FoxM1 had the opposite effect. FoxM1 directly bound to the promoter region of Cav-1 gene and positively transactivated its activity. Collectively, our findings defined Cav-1 as an important downstream oncogenic target of FoxM1, suggesting that dysregulated signaling of this novel FoxM1-Cav-1 pathway promotes pancreatic cancer development and progression. PMID:22194465

  9. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  10. Randomized Controlled Trial of Pancreaticojejunostomy versus Stapler Closure of the Pancreatic Stump During Distal Pancreatectomy to Reduce Pancreatic Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Manabu; Hirono, Seiko; Okada, Ken-ichi; Sho, Masayuki; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Nagano, Hiroaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Morimura, Ryou; Takeda, Yutaka; Nakahira, Shin; Suzumura, Kazuhiro; Fujimoto, Jiro; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate in a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) whether pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ) of pancreatic stump decreases the incidence of pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy (DP) compared with stapler closure. Background: Several studies reported that PJ of pancreatic stump reduces the incidence of pancreatic fistula after DP. However, no RCT has confirmed the efficacy of PJ of pancreatic stump. Methods: One hundred thirty-six patients scheduled for DP were enrolled in this study between June 2011 and March 2014 at 6 high-volume surgical centers in Japan. Enrolled patients were randomized to either stapler closure or PJ. The primary endpoint was the incidence of pancreatic fistula based on the International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula criteria. This RCT was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01384617). Results: Sixty-one patients randomized to stapler and 62 patients randomized to PJ were analyzed by intention-to-treat. Pancreatic fistula occurred in 23 patients (37.7%) in the stapler closure group and 24 (38.7%) in the PJ group (P = 0.332) in intention-to-treat analysis. The incidence of clinically relevant pancreatic fistula (grade B or C) was 16.4% for stapler closure and 9.7% for PJ (P = 0.201). Mortality was zero in both groups. In a subgroup analysis for thickness of pancreas greater than 12 mm, the incidence of clinically relevant pancreatic fistula occurred in 22.2% of the patients in the stapler closure group and in 6.2% of the PJ group (P = 0.080). Conclusions: PJ of the pancreatic stump during DP does not reduce pancreatic fistula compared with stapler closure. PMID:26473652

  11. IL17 Functions through the Novel REG3β-JAK2-STAT3 Inflammatory Pathway to Promote the Transition from Chronic Pancreatitis to Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Loncle, Celine; Bonjoch, Laia; Folch-Puy, Emma; Lopez-Millan, Maria Belen; Lac, Sophie; Molejon, Maria Inés; Chuluyan, Eduardo; Cordelier, Pierre; Dubus, Pierre; Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul; Closa, Daniel; Iovanna, Juan L

    2015-11-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) offers an optimal model for discovering "druggable" molecular pathways that participate in inflammation-associated cancer development. Chronic pancreatitis, a common prolonged inflammatory disease, behaves as a well-known premalignant condition that contributes to PDAC development. Although the mechanisms underlying the pancreatitis-to-cancer transition remain to be fully elucidated, emerging evidence supports the hypothesis that the actions of proinflammatory mediators on cells harboring Kras mutations promote neoplastic transformation. Recent elegant studies demonstrated that the IL17 pathway mediates this phenomenon and can be targeted with antibodies, but the downstream mechanisms by which IL17 functions during this transition are currently unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that IL17 induces the expression of REG3β, a well-known mediator of pancreatitis, during acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and in early pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions. Furthermore, we found that REG3β promotes cell growth and decreases sensitivity to cell death through activation of the gp130-JAK2-STAT3-dependent pathway. Genetic inactivation of REG3β in the context of oncogenic Kras-driven PDAC resulted in reduced PanIN formation, an effect that could be rescued by administration of exogenous REG3β. Taken together, our findings provide mechanistic insight into the pathways underlying inflammation-associated pancreatic cancer, revealing a dual and contextual pathophysiologic role for REG3β during pancreatitis and PDAC initiation. PMID:26404002

  12. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... open. Balloon dilatation. Some endoscopes have a small balloon that the doctor uses to dilate, or stretch, a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  13. Restricted Heterochromatin Formation Links NFATc2 Repressor Activity With Growth Promotion in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    BAUMGART, SANDRA; GLESEL, ELISABETH; SINGH, GARIMA; CHEN, NAI-MING; REUTLINGER, KRISTINA; ZHANG, JINSAN; BILLADEAU, DANIEL D.; FERNANDEZ-ZAPICO, MARTIN E.; GRESS, THOMAS M.; SINGH, SHIV K.; ELLENRIEDER, VOLKER

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Transcriptional silencing of the p15INK4b tumor suppressor pathway overcomes cellular protection against unrestrained proliferation in cancer. Here we show a novel pathway involving the oncogenic transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c2 targeting a p15INK4b-mediated failsafe mechanism to promote pancreatic cancer tumor growth. METHODS Immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy were used for expression studies. Cancer growth was assessed in vitro by [3H]thymidine incorporation, colony formation assays, and in vivo using xenograft tumor models. Protein-protein interactions, promoter regulation, and local histone modifications were analyzed by immunoprecipitation, DNA pull-down, reporter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. RESULTS Our study uncovered induction of NFATc2 in late-stage pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions with increased expression in tumor cell nuclei of advanced cancers. In the nucleus, NFATc2 targets the p15INK4b promoter for inducible heterochromatin formation and silencing. NFATc2 binding to its cognate promoter site induces stepwise recruitment of the histone methyltransferase Suv39H1, causes local H3K9 trimethylation, and allows docking of heterochromatin protein HP1γ to the repressor complex. Conversely, inactivation of NFATc2 disrupts this repressor complex assembly and local heterochromatin formation, resulting in restoration of p15INK4b expression and inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Here we describe a novel mechanism for NFATc2-mediated gene regulation and identify a functional link among its repressor activity, the silencing of the suppressor pathway p15INK4b, and its pancreatic cancer growth regulatory functions. Thus, we provide evidence that inactivation of oncogenic NFATc2 might be an attractive strategy in treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22079596

  14. Mutant K-RAS Promotes Invasion and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Through GTPase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Padavano, Julianna; Henkhaus, Rebecca S; Chen, Hwudaurw; Skovan, Bethany A; Cui, Haiyan; Ignatenko, Natalia A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies, characterized by the local invasion into surrounding tissues and early metastasis to distant organs. Oncogenic mutations of the K-RAS gene occur in more than 90% of human pancreatic cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional significance and downstream effectors of mutant K-RAS oncogene in the pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis. We applied the homologous recombination technique to stably disrupt K-RAS oncogene in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2, which carries the mutant K-RASG12C oncogene in both alleles. Using in vitro assays, we found that clones with disrupted mutant K-RAS gene exhibited low RAS activity, reduced growth rates, increased sensitivity to the apoptosis inducing agents, and suppressed motility and invasiveness. In vivo assays showed that clones with decreased RAS activity had reduced tumor formation ability in mouse xenograft model and increased survival rates in the mouse orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. We further examined molecular pathways downstream of mutant K-RAS and identified RhoA GTP activating protein 5, caveolin-1, and RAS-like small GTPase A (RalA) as key effector molecules, which control mutant K-RAS-dependent migration and invasion in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Our study provides rational for targeting RhoA and RalA GTPase signaling pathways for inhibition of pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26512205

  15. The pancreatitis-associated protein VMP1, a key regulator of inducible autophagy, promotes KrasG12D-mediated pancreatic cancer initiation

    PubMed Central

    Loncle, C; Molejon, M I; Lac, S; Tellechea, J I; Lomberk, G; Gramatica, L; Fernandez Zapico, M F; Dusetti, N; Urrutia, R; Iovanna, J L

    2016-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental evidence have firmly established that chronic pancreatitis, in particular in the context of Kras oncogenic mutations, predisposes to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the repertoire of molecular mediators of pancreatitis involved in Kras-mediated initiation of pancreatic carcinogenesis remains to be fully defined. In this study we demonstrate a novel role for vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1), a pancreatitis-associated protein critical for inducible autophagy, in the regulation of Kras-induced PDAC initiation. Using a newly developed genetically engineered model, we demonstrate that VMP1 increases the ability of Kras to give rise to preneoplastic lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). This promoting effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation is due, at least in part, by an increase in cell proliferation combined with a decrease in apoptosis. Using chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, we show that this drug antagonizes the effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation. Thus, we conclude that VMP1-mediated autophagy cooperate with Kras to promote PDAC initiation. These findings are of significant medical relevance, molecules targeting autophagy are currently being tested along chemotherapeutic agents to treat PDAC and other tumors in human trials. PMID:27415425

  16. The pancreatitis-associated protein VMP1, a key regulator of inducible autophagy, promotes Kras(G12D)-mediated pancreatic cancer initiation.

    PubMed

    Loncle, C; Molejon, M I; Lac, S; Tellechea, J I; Lomberk, G; Gramatica, L; Fernandez Zapico, M F; Dusetti, N; Urrutia, R; Iovanna, J L

    2016-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental evidence have firmly established that chronic pancreatitis, in particular in the context of Kras oncogenic mutations, predisposes to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the repertoire of molecular mediators of pancreatitis involved in Kras-mediated initiation of pancreatic carcinogenesis remains to be fully defined. In this study we demonstrate a novel role for vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1), a pancreatitis-associated protein critical for inducible autophagy, in the regulation of Kras-induced PDAC initiation. Using a newly developed genetically engineered model, we demonstrate that VMP1 increases the ability of Kras to give rise to preneoplastic lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). This promoting effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation is due, at least in part, by an increase in cell proliferation combined with a decrease in apoptosis. Using chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, we show that this drug antagonizes the effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation. Thus, we conclude that VMP1-mediated autophagy cooperate with Kras to promote PDAC initiation. These findings are of significant medical relevance, molecules targeting autophagy are currently being tested along chemotherapeutic agents to treat PDAC and other tumors in human trials. PMID:27415425

  17. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells. PMID:26235267

  18. Dual role of Ski in pancreatic cancer cells: tumor-promoting versus metastasis-suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhen; Meng, Zhi-Qiang; Fan, Jie; Luo, Jian-Min; Liang, Wang; Lin, Jun-Hua; Zhou, Zhen-Hua; Chen, Hao; Wang, Kun; Shen, Ye-Hua; Xu, Zu-De; Liu, Lu-Ming

    2009-09-01

    Ski used to be defined as an oncogene that contributes to the resistance of tumor cells to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)-induced growth arrest. As TGF-beta has a dual effect on tumor growth with both tumor-suppressing and -promoting activity depending on the stage of carcinogenesis and the cell type, the precise role of Ski in carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we show that downregulation of Ski through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference decreases tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo, yet promotes cell invasiveness in vitro, and lung metastasis in vivo in the pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990, which contain wild-type Smad4 expression, and the BxPC3 cell line, which is Smad4 deficient. We also show that the downregulation of Ski increases TGF-beta-induced transcriptional activity, which is associated with increased TGF-beta-dependent Smad2/3 phosphorylation, and results in an altered expression profile of TGF-beta-inducible genes involved in metastasis, angiogenesis and cell proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Immunohistochemical analysis of specimens from 71 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma showed a significant association between overexpression of Ski and decreased patient survival time (P = 0.0024). Our results suggest that Ski may act as a tumor proliferation-promoting factor or as a metastatic suppressor in human pancreatic cancer. PMID:19546161

  19. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  20. Transplantation of bone marrow derived cells promotes pancreatic islet repair in diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xiaodong; Song Lujun; Shen Kuntang; Wang Hongshan; Niu Weixin Qin Xinyu

    2008-06-20

    The transplantation of bone marrow (BM) derived cells to initiate pancreatic regeneration is an attractive but as-yet unrealized strategy. Presently, BM derived cells from green fluorescent protein transgenic mice were transplanted into diabetic mice. Repair of diabetic islets was evidenced by reduction of hyperglycemia, increase in number of islets, and altered pancreatic histology. Cells in the pancreata of recipient mice co-expressed BrdU and insulin. Double staining revealed {beta} cells were in the process of proliferation. BrdU{sup +} insulin{sup -} PDX-1{sup +} cells, Ngn3{sup +} cells and insulin{sup +} glucagon{sup +} cells, which showed stem cells, were also found during {beta}-cell regeneration. The majority of transplanted cells were mobilized to the islet and ductal regions. In recipient pancreas, transplanted cells simultaneously expressed CD34 but did not express insulin, PDX-1, Ngn3, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, Pax4, Pax6, and CD45. It is concluded that BM derived cells especially CD34{sup +} cells can promote repair of pancreatic islets. Moreover, both proliferation of {beta} cells and differentiation of pancreatic stem cells contribute to the regeneration of {beta} cells.

  1. Leptin promotes K(ATP) channel trafficking by AMPK signaling in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Hyun; Ryu, Shin-Young; Yu, Weon-Jin; Han, Young Eun; Ji, Young-Sun; Oh, Keunhee; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Lim, Ajin; Jeon, Jae-Pyo; Lee, Hyunsu; Lee, Kyu-Hee; Lee, Suk-Ho; Berggren, Per-Olof; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Ho, Won-Kyung

    2013-07-30

    Leptin is a pivotal regulator of energy and glucose homeostasis, and defects in leptin signaling result in obesity and diabetes. The ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels couple glucose metabolism to insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we provide evidence that leptin modulates pancreatic β-cell functions by promoting K(ATP) channel translocation to the plasma membrane via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. K(ATP) channels were localized mostly to intracellular compartments of pancreatic β-cells in the fed state and translocated to the plasma membrane in the fasted state. This process was defective in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, but restored by leptin treatment. We discovered that the molecular mechanism of leptin-induced AMPK activation involves canonical transient receptor potential 4 and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β. AMPK activation was dependent on both leptin and glucose concentrations, so at optimal concentrations of leptin, AMPK was activated sufficiently to induce K(ATP) channel trafficking and hyperpolarization of pancreatic β-cells in a physiological range of fasting glucose levels. There was a close correlation between phospho-AMPK levels and β-cell membrane potentials, suggesting that AMPK-dependent K(ATP) channel trafficking is a key mechanism for regulating β-cell membrane potentials. Our results present a signaling pathway whereby leptin regulates glucose homeostasis by modulating β-cell excitability. PMID:23858470

  2. Leptin signaling enhances cell invasion and promotes the metastasis of human pancreatic cancer via increasing MMP-13 production

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuling; Cai, Xiaojin; Song, Yanfang; Zhao, Fangyu; Yao, Ming; Gu, Jianren; Tu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested that leptin, an adipokine related to energy homeostasis, plays a role in cancer growth and metastasis. However, its impact on pancreatic cancer is rarely studied. In this study, we found that leptin's functional receptor Ob-Rb was expressed in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Treatment with leptin enhanced the migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells but did not affect the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells. Leptin up-regulated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) via the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. The overexpression of leptin was shown to significantly promote tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in a subcutaneous model and an orthotopic model of human pancreatic cancer, respectively. Furthermore, in human pancreatic cancer tissues, the expression of Ob-Rb was positively correlated with the MMP-13 level. The increased expression of either Ob-Rb or MMP-13 was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and tended to be associated with the TNM stage in patients with pancreatic cancer. Our findings suggest that leptin enhances the invasion of pancreatic cancer through the increase in MMP-13 production, and targeting the leptin/MMP-13 axis could be an attractive therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25948792

  3. PanScan, the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium, and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium consists of more than a dozen prospective epidemiologic cohort studies within the NCI Cohort Consortium, whose leaders work together to investigate the etiology and natural history of pancreatic cancer.

  4. TGF-β1 promotes acinar to ductal metaplasia of human pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Halff, Glenn A.; Washburn, William K.; Sun, Luzhe; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a key event for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation. However, there has not been an adequate system to explore the mechanisms of human ADM induction. We have developed a flow cytometry-based, high resolution lineage tracing method and 3D culture system to analyse ADM in human cells. In this system, well-known mouse ADM inducers did not promote ADM in human cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 efficiently converted human acinar cells to duct-like cells (AD) in a SMAD-dependent manner, highlighting fundamental differences between the species. Functionally, AD cells gained transient proliferative capacity. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS did not induce acinar cell proliferation, but did sustain the proliferation of AD cells, suggesting that oncogenic KRAS requires ADM-associated-changes to promote PDAC initiation. This ADM model provides a novel platform to explore the mechanisms involved in the development of human pancreatic diseases. PMID:27485764

  5. TGF-β1 promotes acinar to ductal metaplasia of human pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Halff, Glenn A; Washburn, William K; Sun, Luzhe; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a key event for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation. However, there has not been an adequate system to explore the mechanisms of human ADM induction. We have developed a flow cytometry-based, high resolution lineage tracing method and 3D culture system to analyse ADM in human cells. In this system, well-known mouse ADM inducers did not promote ADM in human cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 efficiently converted human acinar cells to duct-like cells (AD) in a SMAD-dependent manner, highlighting fundamental differences between the species. Functionally, AD cells gained transient proliferative capacity. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS did not induce acinar cell proliferation, but did sustain the proliferation of AD cells, suggesting that oncogenic KRAS requires ADM-associated-changes to promote PDAC initiation. This ADM model provides a novel platform to explore the mechanisms involved in the development of human pancreatic diseases. PMID:27485764

  6. CLPTM1L promotes growth and enhances aneuploidy in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jinping; Bosley, Allen D.; Thompson, Abbey; Hoskins, Jason W.; Cheuk, Adam; Collins, Irene; Parikh, Hemang; Xiao, Zhen; Ylaya, Kris; Dzyadyk, Marta; Cozen, Wendy; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Lynch, Charles F.; Loncarek, Jadranka; Altekruse, Sean F.; Zhang, Lizhi; Westlake, Christopher J.; Factor, Valentina M.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri; Bamlet, William R.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Andresson, Thorkell; Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2014-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) of ten different cancers have identified pleiotropic cancer predisposition loci across a region of chromosome 5p15.33 that includes the TERT and CLPTM1L genes. Of these, susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer have mapped to the CLPTM1L gene, thus prompting an investigation of the function of CLPTM1L in the pancreas. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that CLPTM1L localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it is likely embedded in the membrane, in accord with multiple predicted trans-membrane domains. Overexpression of CLPTM1L enhanced growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro (1.3–1.5 fold, PDAY7<0.003) and in vivo (3.46 fold, PDAY68=0.039), suggesting a role in tumor growth; this effect was abrogated by deletion of two hydrophilic domains. Affinity purification followed by mass-spectrometry identified an interaction between CLPTM1L and non-muscle myosin II (NMM-II), a protein involved in maintaining cell shape, migration, and cytokinesis. The two proteins co-localized in the cytoplasm and, after treatment with a DNA damaging agent, at the centrosomes. Overexpression of CLPTM1L and depletion of NMM-II induced aneuploidy, indicating that CLPTM1L may interfere with normal NMM-II function in regulating cytokinesis. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed enhanced staining of CLPTM1L in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n=378) as compared to normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=17) (P=1.7×10−4). Our results suggest that CLPTM1L functions as a growth promoting gene in the pancreas and that overexpression may lead to an abrogation of normal cytokinesis, indicating that it should be considered as a plausible candidate gene that could explain the effect of pancreatic cancer susceptibility alleles on chr5p15.33. PMID:24648346

  7. Coordination of stress signals by the lysine methyltransferase SMYD2 promotes pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reynoird, Nicolas; Mazur, Pawel K.; Stellfeld, Timo; Flores, Natasha M.; Lofgren, Shane M.; Carlson, Scott M.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Hainaut, Pierre; Kaznowska, Ewa B.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Khatri, Purvesh; Stresemann, Carlo; Gozani, Or; Sage, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal form of cancer with few therapeutic options. We found that levels of the lysine methyltransferase SMYD2 (SET and MYND domain 2) are elevated in PDAC and that genetic and pharmacological inhibition of SMYD2 restricts PDAC growth. We further identified the stress response kinase MAPKAPK3 (MK3) as a new physiologic substrate of SMYD2 in PDAC cells. Inhibition of MAPKAPK3 impedes PDAC growth, identifying a potential new kinase target in PDAC. Finally, we show that inhibition of SMYD2 cooperates with standard chemotherapy to treat PDAC cells and tumors. These findings uncover a pivotal role for SMYD2 in promoting pancreatic cancer. PMID:26988419

  8. Coordination of stress signals by the lysine methyltransferase SMYD2 promotes pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Reynoird, Nicolas; Mazur, Pawel K; Stellfeld, Timo; Flores, Natasha M; Lofgren, Shane M; Carlson, Scott M; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Hainaut, Pierre; Kaznowska, Ewa B; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Khatri, Purvesh; Stresemann, Carlo; Gozani, Or; Sage, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal form of cancer with few therapeutic options. We found that levels of the lysine methyltransferase SMYD2 (SET and MYND domain 2) are elevated in PDAC and that genetic and pharmacological inhibition of SMYD2 restricts PDAC growth. We further identified the stress response kinase MAPKAPK3 (MK3) as a new physiologic substrate of SMYD2 in PDAC cells. Inhibition of MAPKAPK3 impedes PDAC growth, identifying a potential new kinase target in PDAC. Finally, we show that inhibition of SMYD2 cooperates with standard chemotherapy to treat PDAC cells and tumors. These findings uncover a pivotal role for SMYD2 in promoting pancreatic cancer. PMID:26988419

  9. Case-control study on risk factors associated with fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vannasaeng, S; Nitiyanant, W; Vichayanrat, A

    1988-12-01

    We investigated the relation between fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes and cassava consumption in a case-control study, in which 31 cases of pancreatic diabetes were compared with 45 non-diabetic control subjects who had no pancreatic calcification. Risk of diabetes was not related to cassava consumption. We also observed no increased risk of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes associated with alcohol consumption, history of gallbladder and biliary tract diseases, ascariasis, and family history of diabetes. Lower monthly income, farmer occupation, rural residence, and low BMI were significantly (p less than 0.05) related to pancreatic diabetes. Our data suggest that consumption of cassava may not be an important risk factor for pancreatic diabetes. With limited sample size, however, cassava consumption could not be excluded as one possible cause of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes. PMID:2976643

  10. A Chinese Herbal Decoction, Huoxue Qingyi Decoction, Promotes Rehabilitation of Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Chao Hui; Tang, Cheng Wu; Feng, Wen Ming; Bao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) still remains an important surgical problem with high morbidity and mortality. The utilization of Traditional Chinese Medicine shows good prospects in therapy of SAP since it has advantages of more extensive pharmacological effects and fewer adverse effects. In this retrospective study, 38 patients received standardized treatment (control group) and 37 patients received Chinese herbal decoction, Huoxue Qingyi Decoction (HQD group), in addition to standard treatment for SAP. We found that the HQD group had a shorter hospital stay and lower initial expense than the control group (P < 0.05). The duration of hyperamylasemia and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) were significantly shorter in HQD group (P < 0.05). The percentage of patients having any complication was much lower in HQD group than control group (27/38 versus 17/37, P < 0.05), especially pancreatic pseudocyst (10/38 versus 2/37, P < 0.05). No adverse effect induced by HQD was found. We concluded that the HQD was effective, safe, and economic for reduction of complication, for early recovery from systemic inflammation, and for promoting earlier rehabilitation from SAP. PMID:27110265

  11. USP22 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition via the FAK pathway in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, Zhen; Wang, Aman; Liang, Jinxiao; Xie, Yunpeng; Liu, Jiwei; Yan, Qiu; Wang, Zhongyu

    2014-10-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) contributes to the occurrence and development of tumors, particularly to the promotion of tumor invasion and metastasis. As a newly discovered ubiquitin hydrolase family member, USP22 plays a key role in the malignant transformation of tumors and the regulation of the cell cycle. However, recent studies on USP22 have primarily focused on its role in cell cycle regulation, and the potential mechanism underlying the promotion of tumor invasion and metastasis by abnormal USP22 expression has not been reported. Our studies revealed that the overexpression of USP22 in PANC-1 cells promoted Ezrin redistribution and phosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling, upregulated expression of the transcription factors Snail and ZEB1 to promote EMT, and increased cellular invasion and migration. In contrast, blockade of USP22 expression resulted in the opposite effects. In addition, the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway was shown to play a key role in the process of EMT induction in PANC-1 cells by USP22. Thus, the present study suggests that USP22 acts as a regulatory protein for EMT in pancreatic cancer, which may provide a new approach for the targeted therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25070659

  12. Pancreatitis promotes oncogenic KrasG12D-induced pancreatic transformation through activation of Nupr1

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Daniel; Garcia, Maria Noé; Hamidi, Tewfik; Cano, Carla; Calvo, Ezequiel; Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L

    2014-01-01

    During the initiation stage of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced by oncogenic Kras, pancreatic cells are exposed to both a protumoral effect and an opposing tumor suppressive process known as oncogene-induced senescence. Pancreatitis disrupts this balance in favor of the transforming effect of oncogenes by lowering the tumor suppressive threshold of oncogene-induced senescence through expression of the stress protein Nupr1. PMID:27308320

  13. TM4SF1 Promotes Gemcitabine Resistance of Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Vijaya; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Deng, Defeng; Li, Zhaoshen; Xu, Leiming; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    Background TM4SF1 is overexpressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and affects the development of this cancer. Also, multidrug resistance (MDR) is generally associated with tumor chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. However, the correlation between TM4SF1 and MDR remains unknown. This research aims to investigate the effect of TM4SF1 on gemcitabine resistance in PDAC and explore the possible molecular mechanism between TM4SF1 and MDR. Methods The expression of TM4SF1 was evaluated in pancreatic cancer cell lines and human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cell lines by quantitative RT-PCR. TM4SF1 siRNA transfection was carried out using Hiperfect transfection reagent to knock down TM4SF1. The transcripts were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, RT-PCR and western blotting for further study. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were obtained to investigate the sensitivity to gemcitabine of pancreatic cancer cells after silencing TM4SF1 in vitro. We demonstrated that cell signaling of TM4SF1 mediated chemoresistance in cancer cells by assessing the expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) genes using quantitative RT-PCR. In vivo, we used orthotopic pancreatic tumor models to investigate the effect of proliferation after silencing TM4SF1 by a lentivirus-mediated shRNA in MIA PaCa-2 cell lines. Results The mRNA expression of TM4SF1 was higher in seven pancreatic cancer cell lines than in HPDE cell lines. In three gemcitabine-sensitive cell lines (L3.6pl, BxPC-3, SU86.86), the expression of TM4SF1 was lower than that in four gemcitabine-resistant cell lines (MIA PaCa-2, PANC-1, Hs766T, AsPC-1). We evaluated that TM4SF1 was a putative target for gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells. Using AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1, we investigated that TM4SF1 silencing affected cell proliferation and increased the percentages of cell apoptosis mediated by treatment with gemcitabine compared with cells which were treated with negative control. This resistance was

  14. Effect of glycemic control on the risk of pancreatic cancer: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Er, Kian-Ching; Hsu, Chen-Yang; Lee, Yi-Kung; Huang, Ming-Yuan; Su, Yung-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Although the relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer has been studied, the effects of glycemic control on pancreatic cancer have never been evaluated. This study investigates the relationship between glycemic control and pancreatic cancer.Data from 1 million National Health Insurance beneficiaries were screened. The study cohort consisted of 46,973 diabetic patients and 652,142 nondiabetic subjects. Of the patients with diabetes, 1114 who had been admitted for hyperglycemic crisis episodes were defined as having poorly controlled diabetes. All adult beneficiaries were followed from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2013, to determine whether pancreatic cancer was diagnosed. The Cox regression model was applied to compare the adjusted hazards for potential confounders.After controlling for age, sex, urbanization level, socioeconomic status, chronic liver disease, hypertension, coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, malignancies, smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, obesity, history of alcohol intoxication, chronic renal insufficiency, biliary tract disease, chronic pancreatitis, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, and high-dimensional propensity score, the adjusted hazard ratio of pancreatic cancer was 2.53 (95% confidence interval 1.96-3.26) in patients with diabetes. In diabetic patients with poor glycemic control, the hazard ratio of pancreatic cancer was significantly higher (hazard ratio 3.61, 95% confidence interval 1.34-9.78).This cohort study reveals a possible relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Moreover, poorly controlled diabetes may be associated with a higher possibility of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27311001

  15. Targeted tumor delivery and controlled release of neuronal drugs with ferritin nanoparticles to regulate pancreatic cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yifeng; Hamada, Yoh; Li, Jun; Cong, Liman; Wang, Nuoxin; Li, Ying; Zheng, Wenfu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-06-28

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal malignancy whose progression is highly dependent on the nervous microenvironment. This study develops neural drug-loaded ferritin nanoparticles (Ft NPs) to regulate the nervous microenvironment, in order to control the pancreatic cancer progression. The drug-loaded Ft NPs can target pancreatic tumors via passive targeting of EPR effects of tumors and active targeting via transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) binding on cancer cells, with a triggered drug release in acidic tumor environment. Two drugs, one activates neural activity (carbachol), the other impairs neural activity (atropine), are encapsulated into the Ft NPs to form two kinds of nano drugs, Nano-Cab NPs and Nano-Ato NPs, respectively. The activation of the nervous microenvironment by Nano-Cab NPs significantly promotes the pancreatic tumor progression, whereas the blockage of neural niche by Nano-Ato NPs remarkably impairs the neurogenesis in tumors and the progression of pancreatic cancer. The Ft-based nanoparticles thus comprise an effective and safe route of delivery of neural drugs for novel anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27046157

  16. RFamide peptides 43RFa and 26RFa both promote survival of pancreatic β-cells and human pancreatic islets but exert opposite effects on insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Granata, Riccarda; Settanni, Fabio; Trovato, Letizia; Gallo, Davide; Gesmundo, Iacopo; Nano, Rita; Gallo, Maria Pia; Bergandi, Loredana; Volante, Marco; Alloatti, Giuseppe; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Leprince, Jérôme; Papotti, Mauro; Vaudry, Hubert; Ong, Huy; Ghigo, Ezio

    2014-07-01

    RFamide peptides 43RFa and 26RFa have been shown to promote food intake and to exert different peripheral actions through G-protein-coupled receptor 103 (GPR103) binding. Moreover, 26RFa was found to inhibit pancreatic insulin secretion, whereas the role of 43RFa on β-cell function is unknown, as well as the effects of both peptides on β-cell survival. Herein, we investigated the effects of 43RFa and 26RFa on survival and apoptosis of pancreatic β-cells and human pancreatic islets. In addition, we explored the role of these peptides on insulin secretion and the underlying signaling mechanisms. Our results show that in INS-1E β-cells and human pancreatic islets both 43RFa and 26RFa prevented cell death and apoptosis induced by serum starvation, cytokine synergism, and glucolipotoxicity, through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt- and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2-mediated signaling. Moreover, 43RFa promoted, whereas 26RFa inhibited, glucose- and exendin-4-induced insulin secretion, through Gαs and Gαi/o proteins, respectively. Inhibition of GPR103 expression by small interfering RNA blocked 43RFa insulinotropic effect, but not the insulinostatic action of 26RFa. Finally, 43RFa, but not 26RFa, induced cAMP increase and glucose uptake. In conclusion, because of their survival effects along with the effects on insulin secretion, these findings suggest potential for 43RFa and 26RFa as therapeutic targets in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:24622796

  17. Overexpressed EDIL3 predicts poor prognosis and promotes anchorage-independent tumor growth in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ming-Xuan; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Mei; He, Ping; Tian, Guang-Ang; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Li, Qing; Cao, Xiao-Yan; Huo, Yan-Miao; Yang, Min-Wei; Fu, Xue-Liang; Li, Jiao; Liu, De-Jun; Dai, Miao; Wen, Shan-Yun; Gu, Jian-Ren; Hong, Jie; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Sun, Yong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor-like repeats and Discoidin I-Like Domains 3 (EDIL3), an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein associated with vascular morphogenesis and remodeling, is commonly upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and correlates with tumor progression. However, its expression pattern and underlying cellular functions in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remain largely unexplored. In current study, we observed that expression of EDIL3 was significantly up-regulated in PDAC compared with normal controls in both cell lines and clinical specimens. In addition, elevated EDIL3 expression was positively correlated with patients’ TNM stage and T classification. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that high EDIL3 expression was significantly associated with shorter overall survival times in PDAC patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed EDIL3 expression, age, lymph node metastasis and histological differentiation as independent prognostic factors in PDAC. Knockdown of EDIL3 showed no significant influence on cell viability, migration, invasion and starvation-induced apoptosis, but compromised anoikis resistance and anchorage independent tumor growth of PDAC cells. Meanwhile, treatment with recombinant EDIL3 protein markedly promoted anoikis resistance and anchorage independent tumor growth. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that altered protein expression of Bcl-2 family might contribute to the oncogenic activities of EDIL3. In conclusion, this study provides evidences that EDIL3 is a potential predictor and plays an important role in anchorage independent tumor growth of PDAC and EDIL3-related pathways might represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26735172

  18. Warburg metabolism in tumor-conditioned macrophages promotes metastasis in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Penny, Hweixian Leong; Sieow, Je Lin; Adriani, Giulia; Yeap, Wei Hseun; See Chi Ee, Peter; San Luis, Boris; Lee, Bernett; Lee, Terence; Mak, Shi Ya; Ho, Ying Swan; Lam, Kong Peng; Ong, Choon Kiat; Huang, Ruby Y J; Ginhoux, Florent; Rotzschke, Olaf; Kamm, Roger D; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) face a clinically intractable disease with poor survival rates, attributed to exceptionally high levels of metastasis. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is pronounced at inflammatory foci within the tumor; however, the immunological mechanisms promoting tumor dissemination remain unclear. It is well established that tumors exhibit the Warburg effect, a preferential use of glycolysis for energy production, even in the presence of oxygen, to support rapid growth. We hypothesized that the metabolic pathways utilized by tumor-infiltrating macrophages are altered in PDAC, conferring a pro-metastatic phenotype. We generated tumor-conditioned macrophages in vitro, in which human peripheral blood monocytes were cultured with conditioned media generated from normal pancreatic or PDAC cell lines to obtain steady-state and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), respectively. Compared with steady-state macrophages, TAMs promoted vascular network formation, augmented extravasation of tumor cells out of blood vessels, and induced higher levels of EMT. TAMs exhibited a pronounced glycolytic signature in a metabolic flux assay, corresponding with elevated glycolytic gene transcript levels. Inhibiting glycolysis in TAMs with a competitive inhibitor to Hexokinase II (HK2), 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), was sufficient to disrupt this pro-metastatic phenotype, reversing the observed increases in TAM-supported angiogenesis, extravasation, and EMT. Our results indicate a key role for metabolic reprogramming of tumor-infiltrating macrophages in PDAC metastasis, and highlight the therapeutic potential of using pharmacologics to modulate these metabolic pathways. PMID:27622062

  19. miR-30 family promotes migratory and invasive abilities in CD133(+) pancreatic cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukasa, Koichiro; Ding, Qiang; Miyazaki, Yumi; Matsubara, Shyuichiro; Natsugoe, Shoji; Takao, Sonshin

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease with a poor prognosis. Recently, miRNAs have been reported to be abnormally expressed in several cancers and play a role in cancer development and progression. However, the role of miRNA in cancer stem cells remains unclear. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the role of miRNA in the CD133(+) pancreatic cancer cell line Capan-1M9 because CD133 is a putative marker of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Using miRNA microarray, we found that the expression level of the miR-30 family decreased in CD133 genetic knockdown shCD133 Capan-1M9 cells. We focused on miR-30a, -30b, and -30c in the miR-30 family and created pancreatic cancer cell sublines, each transfected with these miRNAs. High expression of miR-30a, -30b, or -30c had no effect on cell proliferation and sphere forming. In contrast, these sublines were resistant to gemcitabine, which is a standard anticancer drug for pancreatic cancer, and in addition, promoted migration and invasion. Moreover, mesenchymal markers were up-regulated by these miRNAs, suggesting that mesenchymal phenotype is associated with an increase in migration and invasion. Thus, our study demonstrated that high expression of the miR-30 family modulated by CD133 promotes migratory and invasive abilities in CD133(+) pancreatic cancer cells. These findings suggest that targeted therapies to the miR-30 family contribute to the development of novel therapies for CD133(+) pancreatic cancer stem cells. PMID:26965588

  20. Inflammation induced NFATc1-STAT3 Transcription Complex Promotes Pancreatic Cancer initiation by KrasG12D

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Sandra; Chen, Nai-ming; Siveke, Jens T.; König, Alexander; Zhang, Jin-San; Singh, Shiv K.; Wolf, Elmar; Bartkuhn, Marek; Esposito, Irene; Heßmann, Elisabeth; Reinecke, Johanna; Nikorowitsch, Julius; Brunner, Marius; Singh, Garima; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Smyrk, Thomas; Bamlet, William R.; Eilers, Martin; Neesse, Albrecht; Gress, Thomas M.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Tuveson, David; Urrutia, Raul; Ellenrieder, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cancer-associated inflammation is a molecular key feature in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Oncogenic KRAS in conjunction with persistent inflammation is known to accelerate carcinogenesis, although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we outline a novel pathway whereby the transcription factors NFATc1 and STAT3 cooperate in pancreatic epithelial cells to promote KrasG12D-driven carcinogenesis. NFATc1 activation is induced by inflammation and itself accelerates inflammation-induced carcinogenesis in KrasG12D mice, whereas genetic or pharmacological ablation of NFATc1 attenuates this effect. Mechanistically, NFATc1 complexes with STAT3 for enhancer-promoter communications at jointly regulated genes involved in oncogenesis, e.g. Cyclin, EGFR and WNT family members. The NFATc1-STAT3 cooperativity is operative in pancreatitis-mediated carcinogenesis as well as in established human pancreatic cancer. Together, these studies unravel new mechanisms of inflammatory driven pancreatic carcinogenesis and suggest beneficial effects of chemopreventive strategies using drugs which are currently available for targeting these factors in clinical trials. PMID:24694735

  1. Pancreatic Stenting Reduces Post-ERCP Pancreatitis and Biliary Sepsis in High-Risk Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hai-En; Li, Qi-Xiang; Wang, Wei; Ou, Wei-Lin; Xia, Harry Hua-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is an established treatment modality for bile duct disorders, but patients have a risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) and biliary sepsis. Aim. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of pancreatic stent for prophylaxis of PEP and biliary sepsis in high-risk patients with complicating common bile duct (CBD) disorders. Methods. Two hundred and six patients with complicating confirmed or suspected CBD disorders were randomly assigned to receive ERCP with pancreatic stenting (experimental group) or without stenting (control group). Primary outcome measure was frequency of PEP, and secondary outcome measures included operative time, blood loss, postoperative recovery times, and other ERCP-associated morbidities. Results. Baseline age, sex, CBD etiology, concomitant medical/surgical conditions, cannulation difficulty, and ERCP success were comparable between the two groups (all P > 0.05). Compared to the control group, the experimental group had a significantly lower frequency of PEP (7.7% versus 17.7%, P < 0.05) and positive bile microbial culture (40.4% versus 62.7%, P < 0.05). However, the two groups were similar in operative time, blood loss, postoperative recovery times, and other ERCP-associated morbidities (all P > 0.05). Conclusions. Pancreatic stenting can reduce the occurrence of PEP and biliary sepsis in high-risk patients with complicating CBD disorders but does not increase other ERCP-associated morbidities. This trial is registered with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (registration identifier ChiCTR-OCH-14005134). PMID:27057161

  2. Oncogenic Kras-induced GM-CSF production promotes the development of pancreatic neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pylayeva-Gupta, Yuliya; Lee, Kyoung Eun; Hajdu, Cristina H.; Miller, George; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2013-01-01

    Summary Stromal responses elicited by early stage neoplastic lesions can promote tumor growth. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the early recruitment of stromal cells to sites of neoplasia remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate an oncogenic KrasG12D-dependent upregulation of GM-CSF in mouse pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDEC). An enhanced GM-CSF production is also observed in human PanIN lesions. KrasG12D-dependent production of GM-CSF in vivo is required for the recruitment of Gr1+CD11b+ myeloid cells. The suppression of GM-CSF production inhibits the in vivo growth of KrasG12D-PDECs and, consistent with the role of GM-CSF in Gr1+CD11b+ mobilization, this effect is mediated by CD8+ T cells. These results identify a pathway that links oncogenic activation to the evasion of anti-tumor immunity. PMID:22698407

  3. The necrosome promotes pancreatic oncogenesis via CXCL1 and Mincle-induced immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Pergamo, Matthew; Ochi, Atsuo; Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Pansari, Mridul; Rendon, Mauricio; Tippens, Daniel; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle; Miller, George

    2016-04-14

    Neoplastic pancreatic epithelial cells are believed to die through caspase 8-dependent apoptotic cell death, and chemotherapy is thought to promote tumour apoptosis. Conversely, cancer cells often disrupt apoptosis to survive. Another type of programmed cell death is necroptosis (programmed necrosis), but its role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is unclear. There are many potential inducers of necroptosis in PDA, including ligation of tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), CD95, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, Toll-like receptors, reactive oxygen species, and chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we report that the principal components of the necrosome, receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 and RIP3, are highly expressed in PDA and are further upregulated by the chemotherapy drug gemcitabine. Blockade of the necrosome in vitro promoted cancer cell proliferation and induced an aggressive oncogenic phenotype. By contrast, in vivo deletion of RIP3 or inhibition of RIP1 protected against oncogenic progression in mice and was associated with the development of a highly immunogenic myeloid and T cell infiltrate. The immune-suppressive tumour microenvironment associated with intact RIP1/RIP3 signalling depended in part on necroptosis-induced expression of the chemokine attractant CXCL1, and CXCL1 blockade protected against PDA. Moreover, cytoplasmic SAP130 (a subunit of the histone deacetylase complex) was expressed in PDA in a RIP1/RIP3-dependent manner, and Mincle--its cognate receptor--was upregulated in tumour-infiltrating myeloid cells. Ligation of Mincle by SAP130 promoted oncogenesis, whereas deletion of Mincle protected against oncogenesis and phenocopied the immunogenic reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment that was induced by RIP3 deletion. Cellular depletion suggested that whereas inhibitory macrophages promote tumorigenesis in PDA, they lose their immune-suppressive effects when RIP3 or Mincle is deleted. Accordingly, T cells

  4. Risk Factors for Pancreatic Cancer in China: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaoxu; Zheng, Rongshou; He, Yutong; Sun, Xibin; Wang, Ning; Chen, Tianhui; Chen, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite having one of the highest mortality rates of all cancers, the risk factors of pancreatic cancer remain unclear. We assessed risk factors of pancreatic cancer in China. Methods A case-control study design was conducted using data from four hospital-based cancer registries (Henan Provincial Cancer Hospital, Beijing Cancer Hospital, Hebei Provincial Cancer Hospital, and Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences). Controls were equally matched and selected from family members of non-pancreatic cancer patients in the same hospitals. Face-to-face interviews were conducted by trained staff using questionnaires. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess odd ratios (ORs) and 95% confident intervals (CIs). Results Among 646 recruited participants, 323 were pancreatic cancer patients and 323 were controls. Multivariate logistic analysis suggested that pancreatic cancer family history (adjusted OR 1.23; 95% CI, 1.11–3.70), obesity (adjusted OR 1.77; 95% CI, 1.22–2.57), diabetes (adjusted OR 2.96; 95% CI, 1.48–5.92) and smoking (adjusted OR 1.78; 95% CI, 1.02–3.10) were risk factors for pancreatic cancer, but that drinking tea (adjusted OR 0.49; 95% CI, 0.25–0.84) was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Conclusions Cigarette smoking, family history, obesity, and diabetes are risk factors of pancreatic cancer, which is important information for designing early intervention and preventive strategies for pancreatic cancer and may be beneficial to pancreatic cancer control in China. PMID:26441209

  5. Inhibition of TGF-β Signaling Promotes Human Pancreatic β-Cell Replication.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Sangeeta; Dirice, Ercument; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Bhushan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes is associated with loss of functional pancreatic β-cells, and restoration of β-cells is a major goal for regenerative therapies. Endogenous regeneration of β-cells via β-cell replication has the potential to restore cellular mass; however, pharmacological agents that promote regeneration or expansion of endogenous β-cells have been elusive. The regenerative capacity of β-cells declines rapidly with age, due to accumulation of p16(INK4a), resulting in limited capacity for adult endocrine pancreas regeneration. Here, we show that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling via Smad3 integrates with the trithorax complex to activate and maintain Ink4a expression to prevent β-cell replication. Importantly, inhibition of TGF-β signaling can result in repression of the Ink4a/Arf locus, resulting in increased β-cell replication in adult mice. Furthermore, small molecule inhibitors of the TGF-β pathway promote β-cell replication in human islets transplanted into NOD-scid IL-2Rg(null) mice. These data reveal a novel role for TGF-β signaling in the regulation of the Ink4a/Arf locus and highlight the potential of using small molecule inhibitors of TGF-β signaling to promote human β-cell replication. PMID:26936960

  6. RUNX3 Controls a Metastatic Switch in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Martin C; Izeradjene, Kamel; Rani, P Geetha; Feng, Libing; Carlson, Markus A; DelGiorno, Kathleen E; Wood, Laura D; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H; Chang, Amy E; Calses, Philamer; Thorsen, Shelley M; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2015-06-01

    For the majority of patients with pancreas cancer, the high metastatic proclivity is life limiting. Some patients, however, present with and succumb to locally destructive disease. A molecular understanding of these distinct disease manifestations can critically inform patient management. Using genetically engineered mouse models, we show that heterozygous mutation of Dpc4/Smad4 attenuates the metastatic potential of Kras(G12D/+);Trp53(R172H/+) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas while increasing their proliferation. Subsequent loss of heterozygosity of Dpc4 restores metastatic competency while further unleashing proliferation, creating a highly lethal combination. Expression levels of Runx3 respond to and combine with Dpc4 status to coordinately regulate the balance between cancer cell division and dissemination. Thus, Runx3 serves as both a tumor suppressor and promoter in slowing proliferation while orchestrating a metastatic program to stimulate cell migration, invasion, and secretion of proteins that favor distant colonization. These findings suggest a model to anticipate likely disease behaviors in patients and tailor treatment strategies accordingly. PMID:26004068

  7. Paclitaxel tumor priming promotes delivery and transfection of intravenous lipid-siRNA in pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Lu, Ze; Wang, Junfeng; Cui, Minjian; Yeung, Bertrand Z; Cole, David J; Wientjes, M Guillaume; Au, Jessie L-S

    2015-10-28

    The major barrier for using small interfering RNA (siRNA) as cancer therapeutics is the inadequate delivery and transfection in solid tumors. We have previously shown that paclitaxel tumor priming, by inducing apoptosis, expands the tumor interstitial space, improves the penetration and dispersion of nanoparticles and siRNA-lipoplexes in 3-dimensional tumor histocultures, and promotes the delivery and transfection efficiency of siRNA-lipoplexes under the locoregional setting in vivo (i.e., intraperitoneal treatment of intraperitoneal tumors). The current study evaluated whether tumor priming is functional for systemically delivered siRNA via intravenous injection, which would subject siRNA to several additional delivery barriers and elimination processes. We used the same pegylated cationic (PCat)-siRNA lipoplexes as in the intraperitoneal study to treat mice bearing subcutaneous human pancreatic Hs766T xenograft tumors. The target gene was survivin, an inducible chemoresistance gene. The results show single agent paclitaxel delayed tumor growth but also significantly induced the survivin protein level in residual tumors, whereas addition of PCat-siSurvivin completely reversed the paclitaxel-induced survivin and enhanced the paclitaxel activity (p<0.05). In comparison, PCat-siSurvivin alone did not yield survivin knockdown or antitumor activity, indicating the in vivo effectiveness of intravenous siRNA-mediated gene silencing requires paclitaxel cotreatment. Additional in vitro studies showed that paclitaxel promoted the cytoplasmic release of siGLO, a 22 nucleotide double-stranded RNA that has no mRNA targets, from its PCat lipoplex and/or endosomes/lysosomes. Taken together, our earlier and current data show paclitaxel tumor priming, by promoting the interstitial transport and cytoplasmic release, is critical to promote the delivery and transfection of siRNA in vivo. In addition, because paclitaxel has broad spectrum activity and is used to treat multiple types

  8. Stromal-derived factor-1α/CXCL12-CXCR4 chemotactic pathway promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qinhong; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Xin; Duan, Wanxing; Lei, Jianjun; Zong, Liang; Li, Xuqi; Sheng, Liang; Ma, Jiguang; Han, Liang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lun; Guo, Kun; Ma, Zhenhua; Wu, Zheng; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong

    2015-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is considered as an alternative route for the metastatic spread of pancreatic cancer cells; however, the molecular changes leading to PNI are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis plays a pivotal role in the neurotropism of pancreatic cancer cells to local peripheral nerves. Immunohistochemical staining results revealed that CXCR4 elevation correlated with PNI in 78 pancreatic cancer samples. Both in vitro and in vivo PNI models were applied to investigate the function of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in PNI progression and pathogenesis. The results showed that the activation of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis significantly increased pancreatic cancer cells invasion and promoted the outgrowth of the dorsal root ganglia. CXCL12 derived from the peripheral nerves stimulated the invasion and chemotactic migration of CXCR4-positive cancer cells in a paracrine manner, eventually leading to PNI. In vivo analyses revealed that the abrogation of the activated signaling inhibited tumor growth and invasion of the sciatic nerve toward the spinal cord. These data indicate that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis may be a novel therapeutic target to prevent the perineural dissemination of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25605248

  9. Soluble B7-H3 promotes the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic carcinoma cells through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao; Liu, Danqing; Chen, Qijun; Yang, Chong; Wang, Bo; Wu, Heshui

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a relationship between soluble B7-H3 (sB7-H3) and the poor prognosis of patients with malignant tumors, and increasing evidence has shown a connection between sB7-H3 and NF-κB in tumor progression. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time that sB7-H3 promotes the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic carcinoma cells through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway. In this study, we observed that sB7-H3 was highly expressed in mB7-H3-positive pancreatic carcinoma (PCa) cells. Exogenous sB7-H3 significantly increased NF-κB activity and promoted the migration and invasion of PCa cells. Further studies proved that sB7-H3 first up-regulated TLR4 expression, then activated NF-κB signaling and finally promoted IL-8 and VEGF expression. In contrast, the silencing of TLR4 using a stable short hairpin RNA significantly decreased the sB7-H3-induced activity of NF-κB and the expression of IL-8 and VEGF in PCa cells. In vivo animal experiments further demonstrated that TLR4-knock-down tumor cells displayed a decreased ability to metastasize compared with the control tumor cells after being induced by sB7-H3. Collectively, these results demonstrate that sB7-H3 promotes invasion and metastasis through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway in pancreatic carcinoma cells. PMID:27273624

  10. Soluble B7-H3 promotes the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic carcinoma cells through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chao; Liu, Danqing; Chen, Qijun; Yang, Chong; Wang, Bo; Wu, Heshui

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a relationship between soluble B7-H3 (sB7-H3) and the poor prognosis of patients with malignant tumors, and increasing evidence has shown a connection between sB7-H3 and NF-κB in tumor progression. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time that sB7-H3 promotes the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic carcinoma cells through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway. In this study, we observed that sB7-H3 was highly expressed in mB7-H3-positive pancreatic carcinoma (PCa) cells. Exogenous sB7-H3 significantly increased NF-κB activity and promoted the migration and invasion of PCa cells. Further studies proved that sB7-H3 first up-regulated TLR4 expression, then activated NF-κB signaling and finally promoted IL-8 and VEGF expression. In contrast, the silencing of TLR4 using a stable short hairpin RNA significantly decreased the sB7-H3-induced activity of NF-κB and the expression of IL-8 and VEGF in PCa cells. In vivo animal experiments further demonstrated that TLR4-knock-down tumor cells displayed a decreased ability to metastasize compared with the control tumor cells after being induced by sB7-H3. Collectively, these results demonstrate that sB7-H3 promotes invasion and metastasis through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway in pancreatic carcinoma cells. PMID:27273624

  11. Splenectomy Correlates With Increased Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Case-Control Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to investigate the association between splenectomy and acute pancreatitis. Methods We conducted a case-control study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. We included 7666 subjects aged 20–84 years with first-time acute pancreatitis during the period of 1998–2011 as cases and 30 664 randomly selected subjects without acute pancreatitis as controls. Both cases and controls were matched for sex, age, and index year of acute pancreatitis diagnosis. The association of acute pancreatitis with splenectomy was examined using a multivariable unconditional logistic regression model and reported as an odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval (CI). Results After adjustment for covariables, the adjusted odds ratio of acute pancreatitis was 2.90 for subjects with splenectomy (95% CI, 1.39–6.05) compared with subjects without splenectomy. Conclusions Splenectomy is associated with acute pancreatitis. Further studies are necessary to clarify the underlying mechanism. PMID:27087607

  12. Pancreatic Islet Survival and Engraftment Is Promoted by Culture on Functionalized Spider Silk Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ulrika; Dekki Shalaly, Nancy; Zaitsev, Sergei V.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Hedhammar, My

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets is one approach for treatment of diabetes, however, hampered by the low availability of viable islets. Islet isolation leads to disruption of the environment surrounding the endocrine cells, which contributes to eventual cell death. The reestablishment of this environment is vital, why we herein investigated the possibility of using recombinant spider silk to support islets in vitro after isolation. The spider silk protein 4RepCT was formulated into three different formats; 2D-film, fiber mesh and 3D-foam, in order to provide a matrix that can give the islets physical support in vitro. Moreover, cell-binding motifs from laminin were incorporated into the silk protein in order to create matrices that mimic the natural cell environment. Pancreatic mouse islets were thoroughly analyzed for adherence, necrosis and function after in vitro maintenance on the silk matrices. To investigate their suitability for transplantation, we utilized an eye model which allows in vivo imaging of engraftment. Interestingly, islets that had been maintained on silk foam during in vitro culture showed improved revascularization. This coincided with the observation of preserved islet architecture with endothelial cells present after in vitro culture on silk foam. Selected matrices were further evaluated for long-term preservation of human islets. Matrices with the cell-binding motif RGD improved human islet maintenance (from 36% to 79%) with preserved islets architecture and function for over 3 months in vitro. The islets established cell-matrix contacts and formed vessel-like structures along the silk. Moreover, RGD matrices promoted formation of new, insulin-positive islet-like clusters that were connected to the original islets via endothelial cells. On silk matrices with islets from younger donors (<35 year), the amount of newly formed islet-like clusters found after 1 month in culture were almost double compared to the initial number of islets

  13. Insights into the Epigenetic Mechanisms Controlling Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McCleary-Wheeler, Angela L.; Lomberk, Gwen A.; Weiss, Frank U.; Schneider, Günter; Fabbri, Muller; Poshusta, Tara L.; Dusetti, Nelson J.; Baumgart, Sandra; Iovanna, Juan L.; Ellenrieder, Volker; Urrutia, Raul; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.

    2012-01-01

    During the last couple decades, we have significantly advanced our understanding of mechanisms underlying the development of pancreatic ductural adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In the late 1990s into the early 2000s, a model of PDAC development and progression was developed as a multi-step process associated with the accumulation of somatic mutations. The correlation and association of these particular genetic aberrations with the establishment and progression of PDAC has revolutionized our understanding of this process. However, this model leaves out other molecular events involved in PDAC pathogenesis that contribute to its development and maintenance, specifically those being epigenetic events. Thus, a new model considering the new scientific paradigms of epigenetics will provide a more comprehensive and useful framework for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disease. Epigenetics is defined as the type of inheritance not based on a particular DNA sequence but rather traits that are passed to the next generation via DNA and histone modifications as well as microRNA-dependent mechanisms. Key tumor suppressors that are well established to play a role in PDAC may be altered through hypermethylation, and oncogenes can be upregulated secondary to permissive histone modifications. Factors involved in tumor invasiveness can be aberrantly expressed through dysregulated microRNAs. A noteworthy characteristic of epigenetic-based inheritance is its reversibility, which is in contrast to the stable nature of DNA sequence-based alterations. Given this nature of epigenetic alterations, it becomes imperative that our understanding of epigenetic-based events promoting and maintain PDAC continues to grow. PMID:23073473

  14. SCF, Regulated by HIF-1α, Promotes Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Ren, He; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Xiuchao; Lang, Mingxiao; Liu, Jingcheng; Gao, Song; Zhao, Xiao; Sheng, Jun; Yuan, Zhanna; Hao, Jihui

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) both have important functions in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This study aims to analyze the expression and clinicopathological significance of SCF and HIF-1α in PDAC specimens and explore the molecular mechanism at PDAC cells in vitro and in vivo. We showed that the expression of SCF was significantly correlated with HIF-1α expression via Western blot, PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, and luciferase assay analysis. The SCF level was also correlated with lymph node metastasis and the pathological tumor node metastasis (pTNM) stage in PDAC samples. The SCF higher-expression group had significantly lower survival rates than the SCF lower-expression group (p<0.05). Hypoxia up-regulated the expression of SCF through the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in PDAC cells at the protein and RNA levels. When HIF-1α was knocked down by RNA interference, the SCF level decreased significantly. Additionally, ChIP and luciferase results demonstrated that HIF-1α can directly bind to the hypoxia response element (HRE) region of the SCF promoter and activate the SCF transcription under hypoxia. The results of colony formation, cell scratch, and transwell migration assay showed that SCF promoted the proliferation and invasion of PANC-1 cells under hypoxia. Furthermore, the down-regulated ability of cell proliferation and invasion following HIF-1α knockdown was rescued by adding exogenous SCF under hypoxia in vitro. Finally, when the HIF-1α expression was inhibited by digoxin, the tumor volume and the SCF level decreased, thereby proving the relationship between HIF-1α and SCF in vivo. In conclusion, SCF is an important factor for the growth of PDAC. In our experiments, we proved that SCF, a downstream gene of HIF-1α, can promote the development of PDAC under hypoxia. Thus, SCF might be a potential therapeutic target for PDAC. PMID:25799412

  15. Dclk1 Defines Quiescent Pancreatic Progenitors that Promote Injury-Induced Regeneration and Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Westphalen, C Benedikt; Takemoto, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Takayuki; Macchini, Marina; Jiang, Zhengyu; Renz, Bernhard W; Chen, Xiaowei; Ormanns, Steffen; Nagar, Karan; Tailor, Yagnesh; May, Randal; Cho, Youngjin; Asfaha, Samuel; Worthley, Daniel L; Hayakawa, Yoku; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Quante, Michael; Reichert, Maximilian; Broyde, Joshua; Subramaniam, Prem S; Remotti, Helen; Su, Gloria H; Rustgi, Anil K; Friedman, Richard A; Honig, Barry; Califano, Andrea; Houchen, Courtney W; Olive, Kenneth P; Wang, Timothy C

    2016-04-01

    The existence of adult pancreatic progenitor cells has been debated. While some favor the concept of facultative progenitors involved in homeostasis and repair, neither a location nor markers for such cells have been defined. Using genetic lineage tracing, we show that Doublecortin-like kinase-1 (Dclk1) labels a rare population of long-lived, quiescent pancreatic cells. In vitro, Dclk1+ cells proliferate readily and sustain pancreatic organoid growth. In vivo, Dclk1+ cells are necessary for pancreatic regeneration following injury and chronic inflammation. Accordingly, their loss has detrimental effects after cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Expression of mutant Kras in Dclk1+ cells does not affect their quiescence or longevity. However, experimental pancreatitis converts Kras mutant Dclk1+ cells into potent cancer-initiating cells. As a potential effector of Kras, Dclk1 contributes functionally to the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. Taken together, these observations indicate that Dclk1 marks quiescent pancreatic progenitors that are candidates for the origin of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27058937

  16. PREX2 promotes the proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells by modulating the PI3K signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianyi; Gong, Xuejun; Ouyang, Lu; He, Wen; Xiao, Rou; Tan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Rac exchanger factor 2 (PREX2) is a novel regulator of the small guanosine triphosphatase Rac, and has been observed to be implicated in human cancer by inhibiting the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), thus upregulating the activity of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. However, the exact role of PREX2 in pancreatic cancer has not been reported to date. In the present study, the expression levels of PREX2 were observed to be frequently increased in pancreatic cancer specimens compared with those in their matched adjacent normal tissues. In addition, PREX2 expression was also frequently upregulated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines, including AsPC-1, BxPC-3, PANC-1 and CFAPC-1, compared with that in the normal pancreatic epithelial cell line HPC-Y5. Overexpression of PREX2 significantly promoted the proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells, while small interfering RNA-induced knockdown of PREX2 expression significantly inhibited the proliferation, invasion and migration of these cells. Investigation of the molecular mechanism revealed that the overexpression of PREX2 upregulated the phosphorylation levels of PTEN, indicating that the activity of PTEN was reduced, which further increased the phosphorylation levels of AKT, which indicated that the activity of the PI3K signaling pathway was upregulated. By contrast, knockdown of PREX2 upregulated the activity of PTEN and inhibited the activity of the PI3K signaling pathway. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that PREX2 regulates the proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells, probably at least via modulation of the activity of PTEN and the PI3K signaling pathway. PMID:27446408

  17. Use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis: A case–control study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Some cases of acute pancreatitis have been reported to be associated with use of methimazole. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of a systematic analysis. Methods: This was a population-based case–control study analyzing the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 5764 individuals aged 20–84 years with a first attack of acute pancreatitis from 1998 to 2011 as the cases and 23,056 randomly selected sex- and age-matched individuals without acute pancreatitis as the controls. Use of methimazole was categorized as “never use” and “ever use.” We estimated the relative risk of acute pancreatitis associated with the use of methimazole by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using a multivariable logistic regression model. Results: After adjustment for confounding factors, the OR of acute pancreatitis was 0.91 in individuals with ever use of methimazole, when compared with individuals with never use of methimazole (95% CI, 0.60–1.38). Unlike methimazole use, alcohol-related disease, biliary stone, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and hypertriglyceridemia were factors significantly associated with acute pancreatitis. Conclusions: Our study does not detect a substantial association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of systematic analysis. There appears to be a discrepancy between case reports and our systematic analysis about the association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis. PMID:27127323

  18. Tetraspanin-2 promotes glucotoxic apoptosis by regulating the JNK/β-catenin signaling pathway in human pancreatic β cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In-Hu; Park, Junsoo; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Seung Il; Choi, Jong-Soon; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Yun, Sung Ho; Lee, Min-Goo; Park, Soo Jung; Jang, Ik-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex and heterogeneous disease, which has β-cell dysfunction at its core. Glucotoxicity affects pancreatic islets, causing β-cell apoptosis. However, the role of JNK/β-catenin signaling in glucotoxic β-cell apoptosis is not well understood. Recently, we identified tetraspanin-2 (TSPAN2) protein as a proapoptotic β-cell factor induced by glucose, suggesting that TSPAN2 might contribute to pancreatic β-cell glucotoxicity. To investigate the effects of glucose concentration on TSPAN2 expression and apoptosis, we used reverted immortalized RNAKT-15 human pancreatic β cells. High TSPAN2 levels up-regulated phosphorylated (p) JNK and induced apoptosis. p-JNK enhanced the phosphorylation of β-catenin and Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1). Dkk1 knockdown by small interfering (si)RNA up-regulated nuclear β-catenin, suggesting that it is a JNK/β-catenin-dependent pathway. siRNA-mediated TSPAN2 depletion in RNAKT-15 cells increased nuclear β-catenin. This decreased BCL2-associated X protein (Bax) activation, leading to marked protection against high glucose–induced apoptosis. Bax subfamily proteins induced apoptosis through caspase-3. Thus, TSPAN2 might have induced Bax translocation and caspase-3 activation in pancreatic β cells, thereby promoting the apoptosis of RNAKT-15 cells by regulating the JNK/β-catenin pathway in response to high glucose concentrations. Targeting TSPAN2 could be a potential therapeutic strategy to treat glucose toxicity-induced β-cell failure.—Hwang, I.-H., Park, J., Kim, J. M., Kim, S. I., Choi, J.-S., Lee, K.-B., Yun, S. H., Lee, M.-G., Park, S. J., Jang, I.-S. Tetraspanin-2 promotes glucotoxic apoptosis by regulating the JNK/β-catenin signaling pathway in human pancreatic β cells. PMID:27247127

  19. Tighter Control by Chymotrypsin C (CTRC) Explains Lack of Association between Human Anionic Trypsinogen and Hereditary Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jancsó, Zsanett; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2016-06-17

    The human pancreas expresses two major trypsinogen isoforms, cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) and anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2). Mutations in PRSS1 cause hereditary pancreatitis by altering cleavage of regulatory nick sites by chymotrypsin C (CTRC) resulting in reduced trypsinogen degradation and increased autoactivation. Despite 90% identity with PRSS1 and a strong propensity for autoactivation, mutations in PRSS2 are not found in hereditary pancreatitis suggesting that activation of this isoform is more tightly regulated. Here, we demonstrated that CTRC promoted degradation and thereby markedly suppressed autoactivation of human anionic trypsinogen more effectively than previously observed with cationic trypsinogen. Increased sensitivity of anionic trypsinogen to CTRC-mediated degradation was due to an additional cleavage site at Leu-148 in the autolysis loop and the lack of the conserved Cys-139-Cys-206 disulfide bond. Significant stabilization of anionic trypsinogen against degradation was achieved by simultaneous mutations of CTRC cleavage sites Leu-81 and Leu-148, autolytic cleavage site Arg-122, and restoration of the missing disulfide bridge. This stands in stark contrast to cationic trypsinogen where single mutations of either Leu-81 or Arg-122 resulted in almost complete resistance to CTRC-mediated degradation. Finally, processing of the trypsinogen activation peptide at Phe-18 by CTRC inhibited autoactivation of anionic trypsinogen, although cationic trypsinogen was strongly stimulated. Taken together, the observations indicate that human anionic trypsinogen is controlled by CTRC in a manner that individual natural mutations are unlikely to increase stability enough to promote intra-pancreatic activation. This unique biochemical property of anionic trypsinogen explains the lack of association of PRSS2 mutations with hereditary pancreatitis. PMID:27129265

  20. Controlled clinical trial of selective decontamination for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Luiten, E J; Hop, W C; Lange, J F; Bruining, H A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A randomized, controlled, multicenter trial was undertaken in 102 patients with objective evidence of severe acute pancreatitis to evaluate whether selective decontamination reduces mortality. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Secondary pancreatic infection is the major cause of death in patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Controlled clinical trials to study the effect of selective decontamination in such patients are not available. METHODS: Between April 22, 1990 and April 19, 1993, 102 patients with severe acute pancreatitis were admitted to 16 participating hospitals. Patients were entered into the study if severe acute pancreatitis was indicated, on admission, by multiple laboratory criteria (Imrie score > or = 3) and/or computed tomography criteria (Balthazar grade D or E). Patients were randomly assigned to receive standard treatment (control group) or standard treatment plus selective decontamination (norfloxacin, colistin, amphotericin; selective decontamination group). All patients received full supportive treatment, and surveillance cultures were taken in both groups. RESULTS: Fifty patients were assigned to the selective decontamination group and 52 were assigned to the control group. There were 18 deaths in the control group (35%), compared with 11 deaths (22%) in the selective decontamination group (adjusted for Imrie score and Balthazar grade: p = 0.048). This difference was mainly caused by a reduction of late mortality (> 2 weeks) due to significant reduction of gram-negative pancreatic infection (p = 0.003). The average number of laparotomies per patient was reduced in patients treated with selective decontamination (p < 0.05). Failure of selective decontamination to prevent secondary gram-negative pancreatic infection with subsequent death was seen in only three patients (6%) and transient gram-negative pancreatic infection was seen in one (2%). In both groups of patients, all gram-negative aerobic pancreatic infection was preceded by

  1. A Novel TGR5 Activator WB403 Promotes GLP-1 Secretion and Preserves Pancreatic β-Cells in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongtong; You, Panpan; Zhao, Yongliang; Yang, Yiqing; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jian; Chen, Yihua; Liu, Mingyao; Chen, Huaqing

    2015-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor TGR5 is a membrane receptor for bile acids. Its agonism increases energy expenditure and controls blood glucose through secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 in enteroendocrine cells. In this study, we explored the therapeutic potential of WB403, a small compound activating TGR5 which was identified by combining TGR5 targeted luciferase assay and active GLP-1 assay, in treating type 2 diabetes. After confirmation of TGR5 and GLP-1 stimulating activities in various cell systems, WB403 was examined in oral glucose tolerance test, and tested on different mouse models of type 2 diabetes for glycemic control and pancreatic β-cell protection effect. As a result, WB403 exhibited a moderate TGR5 activation effect while promoting GLP-1 secretion efficiently. Interestingly, gallbladder filling effect, which was reported for some known TGR5 agonists, was not detected in this novel compound. In vivo results showed that WB403 significantly improved glucose tolerance and decreased fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose and HbA1c in type 2 diabetic mice. Further analysis revealed that WB403 increased pancreatic β-cells and restored the normal distribution pattern of α-cell and β-cell in islets. These findings demonstrated that TGR5 activator WB403 effectively promoted GLP-1 release, improved hyperglycemia and preserved the mass and function of pancreatic β-cells, whereas it did not show a significant side effect on gallbladder. It may represent a promising approach for future type 2 diabetes mellitus drug development. PMID:26208278

  2. GNAS(R201H) and Kras(G12D) cooperate to promote murine pancreatic tumorigenesis recapitulating human intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Taki, K; Ohmuraya, M; Tanji, E; Komatsu, H; Hashimoto, D; Semba, K; Araki, K; Kawaguchi, Y; Baba, H; Furukawa, T

    2016-05-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), the most common pancreatic cystic neoplasm, is known to progress to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma. IPMNs commonly harbor activating somatic mutations in GNAS and KRAS, primarily GNAS(R201H) and KRAS(G12D). GNAS encodes the stimulatory G-protein α subunit (Gsα) that mediates a stimulatory signal to adenylyl cyclase to produce cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), subsequently activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. The GNAS(R201H) mutation results in constitutive activation of Gsα. To study the potential role of GNAS in pancreatic tumorigenesis in vivo, we generated lines of transgenic mice in which the transgene consisted of Lox-STOP-Lox (LSL)-GNAS(R201H) under the control of the CAG promoter (Tg(CAG-LSL-GNAS)). These mice were crossed with pancreatic transcription factor 1a (Ptf1a)-Cre mice (Ptf1a(Cre/+)), generating Tg(CAG-LSL-GNAS);Ptf1a(Cre/+) mice. This mouse line showed elevated cAMP levels, small dilated tubular complex formation, loss of acinar cells and fibrosis in the pancreas; however, no macroscopic tumorigenesis was apparent by 2 months of age. We then crossed Tg(CAG-LSL-GNAS);Ptf1a(Cre/+) mice with LSL-Kras(G12D) mice, generating Tg(CAG-LSL-GNAS);LSL-Kras(G12D);Ptf1a(Cre/+) mice. We used these mice to investigate a possible cooperative effect of GNAS(R201H) and Kras(G12D) in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Within 5 weeks, Tg(CAG-LSL-GNAS);LSL-Kras(G12D);Ptf1a(Cre/+) mice developed a cystic tumor consisting of marked dilated ducts lined with papillary dysplastic epithelia in the pancreas, which closely mimicked the human IPMN. Our data strongly suggest that activating mutations in GNAS and Kras cooperatively promote murine pancreatic tumorigenesis, which recapitulates IPMN. Our mouse model may serve as a unique in vivo platform to find biomarkers and effective drugs for diseases associated with GNAS mutations. PMID:26257060

  3. Modulation of PKM alternative splicing by PTBP1 promotes gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabretta, Sara; Bielli, Pamela; Passacantilli, Ilaria; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Fendrich, Volker; Capurso, Gabriele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Sette, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive and incurable disease. Poor prognosis is due to multiple reasons, including acquisition of resistance to gemcitabine, the first line chemotherapeutic approach. Thus, there is a strong need for novel therapies, targeting more directly the molecular aberrations of this disease. We found that chronic exposure of PDAC cells to gemcitabine selected a subpopulation of cells that are drug-resistant (DR-PDAC cells). Importantly, alternative splicing of the pyruvate kinase gene (PKM) was differentially modulated in DR-PDAC cells, resulting in promotion of the cancer-related PKM2 isoform, whose high expression also correlated with shorter recurrence free survival in PDAC patients. Switching PKM splicing by antisense oligonucleotides to favour the alternative PKM1 variant rescued sensitivity of DR-PDAC cells to gemcitabine and cisplatin, suggesting that PKM2 expression is required to withstand drug-induced genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, up-regulation of the polypyrimidine-tract binding protein (PTBP1), a key modulator of PKM splicing, correlated with PKM2 expression in DR-PDAC cell lines. PTBP1 was recruited more efficiently to PKM pre-mRNA in DR- than in parental PDAC cells. Accordingly, knockdown of PTBP1 in DR-PDAC cells reduced its recruitment to the PKM pre-mRNA, promoted splicing of the PKM1 variant and abolished drug resistance. Thus, chronic exposure to gemcitabine leads to up-regulation of PTBP1 and modulation of PKM alternative splicing in PDAC cells, conferring resistance to the drug. These findings point to PKM2 and PTBP1 as new potential therapeutic targets to improve response of PDAC to chemotherapy. PMID:26234680

  4. Modulation of PKM alternative splicing by PTBP1 promotes gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Calabretta, S; Bielli, P; Passacantilli, I; Pilozzi, E; Fendrich, V; Capurso, G; Fave, G Delle; Sette, C

    2016-04-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive and incurable disease. Poor prognosis is due to multiple reasons, including acquisition of resistance to gemcitabine, the first-line chemotherapeutic approach. Thus, there is a strong need for novel therapies, targeting more directly the molecular aberrations of this disease. We found that chronic exposure of PDAC cells to gemcitabine selected a subpopulation of cells that are drug-resistant (DR-PDAC cells). Importantly, alternative splicing (AS) of the pyruvate kinase gene (PKM) was differentially modulated in DR-PDAC cells, resulting in promotion of the cancer-related PKM2 isoform, whose high expression also correlated with shorter recurrence-free survival in PDAC patients. Switching PKM splicing by antisense oligonucleotides to favor the alternative PKM1 variant rescued sensitivity of DR-PDAC cells to gemcitabine and cisplatin, suggesting that PKM2 expression is required to withstand drug-induced genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, upregulation of the polypyrimidine-tract binding protein (PTBP1), a key modulator of PKM splicing, correlated with PKM2 expression in DR-PDAC cell lines. PTBP1 was recruited more efficiently to PKM pre-mRNA in DR- than in parental PDAC cells. Accordingly, knockdown of PTBP1 in DR-PDAC cells reduced its recruitment to the PKM pre-mRNA, promoted splicing of the PKM1 variant and abolished drug resistance. Thus, chronic exposure to gemcitabine leads to upregulation of PTBP1 and modulation of PKM AS in PDAC cells, conferring resistance to the drug. These findings point to PKM2 and PTBP1 as new potential therapeutic targets to improve response of PDAC to chemotherapy. PMID:26234680

  5. Pancreatic cancer control: is vitamin D the answer?

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Sarah; Naseem, Imrana

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by late detection, resistance to therapy, poor prognosis, and an exceptionally high mortality rate. Epidemiology ascribes a chemopreventive role to vitamin D in several cancers including pancreatic cancer. Vitamin D therapy has been ascribed a role previously in tumor inhibition and differentiation in addition to reduction of inflammation and angiogenesis. However, the role of vitamin D in pancreatic cancer prevention or therapy remains elusive to date. Studies have shown a negative correlation between the risk of pancreatic cancer and serum vitamin D levels. It is believed that vitamin D binding to certain conserved sequences called vitamin D response elements in the DNA can alter the expression of genes involved in tumorigenesis. Recent research has elucidated the role of zinc in carcinogenesis, which in turn is found to be affected by vitamin D supplementation. In the light of numerous new-found roles for vitamin D, we review and evaluate the potential actions of the sunshine vitamin with respect to pancreatic cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:25946657

  6. Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes complicated by an episode of severe hypertriglyceridaemia-induced pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Denecker, Nathalie; Decochez, Katelijn

    2013-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman with a history of type 2 diabetes and non-compliance presented to the emergency department with abdominal epigastric pain and nausea. Laboratory examination revealed a mild ketoacidosis while an abdominal CT scan performed the following day demonstrated a severe acute pancreatitis of the body and tail (Balthazar grade E) despite normal amylase serum levels on admission. The presence of a lactescent serum was the clue to an extremely high triglyceride level (>10 000 mg/dl) causing the pancreatitis. The hypertriglyceridaemia itself was attributed mainly to the diabetic ketoacidosis. There was no family history of hypertriglyceridaemia. The triad consisting of diabetic ketoacidosis, hypertriglyceridaemia and acute pancreatitis is an unusual presentation of poorly controlled diabetes which can occur in type 1 as well as type 2 diabetic adults and children. Treatment with intravenous insulin and hydration successfully resolved the ketoacidosis and hypertriglyceridaemia and reversed the episode of acute pancreatitis. PMID:23632173

  7. Pancreatic PYY Is Critical in the Control of Insulin Secretion and Glucose Homeostasis in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-Chuan; Loh, Kim; Bensellam, Mohammed; Lee, Kailun; Zhai, Lei; Lau, Jackie; Cantley, James; Luzuriaga, Jude; Laybutt, D Ross; Herzog, Herbert

    2015-09-01

    Insulin secretion is tightly controlled through coordinated actions of a number of systemic and local factors. Peptide YY (PYY) is expressed in α-cells of the islet, but its role in control of islet function such as insulin release is not clear. In this study, we generated a transgenic mouse model (Pyy(tg/+)/Rip-Cre) overexpressing the Pyy gene under the control of the rat insulin 2 gene promoter and assessed the impact of islet-released PYY on β-cell function, insulin release, and glucose homeostasis in mice. Our results show that up-regulation of PYY in islet β-cells leads to an increase in serum insulin levels as well as improved glucose tolerance. Interestingly, PYY-overproducing mice show increased lean mass and reduced fat mass with no significant changes in food intake or body weight. Energy expenditure is also increased accompanied by increased respiratory exchange ratio. Mechanistically, the enhanced insulin levels and improved glucose tolerance are primarily due to increased β-cell mass and secretion. This is associated with alterations in the expression of genes important for β-cell proliferation and function as well as the maintenance of the β-cell phenotype. Taken together, these data demonstrate that pancreatic islet-derived PYY plays an important role in controlling glucose homeostasis through the modulation of β-cell mass and function. PMID:26125465

  8. PD2/Paf1 depletion in pancreatic acinar cells promotes acinar-to-ductal metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Parama; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Vaz, Arokia P.; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic differentiation 2 (PD2), a PAF (RNA Polymerase II Associated Factor) complex subunit, is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells and has demonstrated potential oncogenic property. Here, we report that PD2/Paf1 expression was restricted to acinar cells in the normal murine pancreas, but its expression increased in the ductal cells of Pdx1Cre; KrasG12D (KC) mouse model of pancreatic cancer with increasing age, showing highest expression in neoplastic ductal cells of 50 weeks old mice. PD2/Paf1 was specifically expressed in amylase and CK19 double positive metaplastic ducts, representing intermediate structures during pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM). Similar PD2/Paf1 expression was observed in murine pancreas that exhibited ADM-like histology upon cerulein challenge. In normal mice, cerulein-mediated inflammation induced a decrease in PD2/Paf1 expression, which was later restored upon recovery of the pancreatic parenchyma. In KC mice, however, PD2/Paf1 mRNA level continued to decrease with progressive dysplasia and subsequent neoplastic transformation. Additionally, knockdown of PD2/Paf1 in pancreatic acinar cells resulted in the abrogation of Amylase, Elastase and Lipase (acinar marker) mRNA levels with simultaneous increase in CK19 and CAII (ductal marker) transcripts. In conclusion, our studies indicate loss of PD2/Paf1 expression during acinar transdifferentiation in pancreatic cancer initiation and PD2/Paf1 mediated regulation of lineage specific markers. PMID:24947474

  9. PD2/Paf1 depletion in pancreatic acinar cells promotes acinar-to-ductal metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Dey, Parama; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Vaz, Arokia P; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P; Batra, Surinder K

    2014-06-30

    Pancreatic differentiation 2 (PD2), a PAF (RNA Polymerase II Associated Factor) complex subunit, is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells and has demonstrated potential oncogenic property. Here, we report that PD2/Paf1 expression was restricted to acinar cells in the normal murine pancreas, but its expression increased in the ductal cells of KrasG12D/Pdx1Cre (KC) mouse model of pancreatic cancer with increasing age, showing highest expression in neoplastic ductal cells of 50 weeks old mice. PD2/Paf1 was specifically expressed in amylase and CK19 double positive metaplastic ducts, representing intermediate structures during pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM). Similar PD2/Paf1 expression was observed in murine pancreas that exhibited ADM-like histology upon cerulein challenge. In normal mice, cerulein-mediated inflammation induced a decrease in PD2/Paf1 expression, which was later restored upon recovery of the pancreatic parenchyma. In KC mice, however, PD2/Paf1 mRNA level continued to decrease with progressive dysplasia and subsequent neoplastic transformation. Additionally, knockdown of PD2/Paf1 in pancreatic acinar cells resulted in the abrogation of Amylase, Elastase and Lipase (acinar marker) mRNA levels with simultaneous increase in CK19 and CAII (ductal marker) transcripts. In conclusion, our studies indicate loss of PD2/Paf1 expression during acinar transdifferentiation in pancreatic cancer initiation and PD2/Paf1 mediated regulation of lineage specific markers. PMID:24947474

  10. p53 mutations cooperate with oncogenic Kras to promote adenocarcinoma from pancreatic ductal cells.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J M; Hendley, A M; Lafaro, K J; Pruski, M A; Jones, N C; Alsina, J; Younes, M; Maitra, A; McAllister, F; Iacobuzio-Donahue, C A; Leach, S D

    2016-08-11

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies, with virtually all patients eventually succumbing to their disease. Mutations in p53 have been documented in >50% of pancreatic cancers. Owing to the high incidence of p53 mutations in PanIN 3 lesions and pancreatic tumors, we interrogated the comparative ability of adult pancreatic acinar and ductal cells to respond to oncogenic Kras and mutant Tp53(R172H) using Hnf1b:CreER(T2) and Mist1:CreER(T2) mice. These studies involved co-activation of a membrane-tethered GFP lineage label, allowing for direct visualization and isolation of cells undergoing Kras and mutant p53 activation. Kras activation in Mist1(+) adult acinar cells resulted in brisk PanIN formation, whereas no evidence of pancreatic neoplasia was observed for up to 6 months following Kras activation in Hnf1beta(+) adult ductal cells. In contrast to the lack of response to oncogenic Kras alone, simultaneous activation of Kras and mutant p53 in adult ductal epithelium generated invasive PDAC in 75% of mice as early as 2.5 months after tamoxifen administration. These data demonstrate that pancreatic ductal cells, whereas exhibiting relative resistance to oncogenic Kras alone, can serve as an effective cell of origin for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in the setting of gain-of-function mutations in p53. PMID:26592447

  11. MicroRNA-320a promotes 5-FU resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weibin; Zhao, Lijun; Wei, Xueju; Wang, Lanlan; Liu, Siqi; Yang, Yu; Wang, Fang; Sun, Guotao; Zhang, Junwu; Ma, Yanni; Zhao, Yupei; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The drug-resistance of pancreatic cancer cells results in poor therapeutic effect. To predict the therapeutic effect of the chemotherapy drugs to specific patients and to reverse the resistance of pancreatic cancer cells are critical for chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to play important roles in the genesis of drug-resistance of various cancer types. There are also many advantages of miRNAs in diagnosis and therapy of disease. Although several miRNAs regulating 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance in human pancreatic cancer have been reported, the detailed molecular mechanism remains to be determined. In this study, we found that miR-320a was significantly up-regulated in 5-FU resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Over-expression of miR-320a strongly contributed to pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, which was represented by the increased proliferation, invasion, metastasis, drug-resistance characteristics and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-320a was able to bind to 3′UTR of PDCD4 mRNA, and mediated its down-regulation in 5-FU resistance of human pancreatic cancer cells. Whereas restoration of PDCD4 expression could partially attenuate the function of miR-320a in pancreatic cancer. Taken together, our study demonstrated that miR-320a played important role in regulating 5-FU resistance by targeting PDCD4 and might be developed as new therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. PMID:27279541

  12. MicroRNA-320a promotes 5-FU resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weibin; Zhao, Lijun; Wei, Xueju; Wang, Lanlan; Liu, Siqi; Yang, Yu; Wang, Fang; Sun, Guotao; Zhang, Junwu; Ma, Yanni; Zhao, Yupei; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The drug-resistance of pancreatic cancer cells results in poor therapeutic effect. To predict the therapeutic effect of the chemotherapy drugs to specific patients and to reverse the resistance of pancreatic cancer cells are critical for chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to play important roles in the genesis of drug-resistance of various cancer types. There are also many advantages of miRNAs in diagnosis and therapy of disease. Although several miRNAs regulating 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance in human pancreatic cancer have been reported, the detailed molecular mechanism remains to be determined. In this study, we found that miR-320a was significantly up-regulated in 5-FU resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Over-expression of miR-320a strongly contributed to pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, which was represented by the increased proliferation, invasion, metastasis, drug-resistance characteristics and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-320a was able to bind to 3'UTR of PDCD4 mRNA, and mediated its down-regulation in 5-FU resistance of human pancreatic cancer cells. Whereas restoration of PDCD4 expression could partially attenuate the function of miR-320a in pancreatic cancer. Taken together, our study demonstrated that miR-320a played important role in regulating 5-FU resistance by targeting PDCD4 and might be developed as new therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. PMID:27279541

  13. Loss of acinar cell IKKα triggers spontaneous pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Wu, Xuefeng; Holzer, Ryan G.; Lee, Jun-Hee; Todoric, Jelena; Park, Eek-Joong; Ogata, Hisanobu; Gukovskaya, Anna S.; Gukovsky, Ilya; Pizzo, Donald P.; VandenBerg, Scott; Tarin, David; Atay, Çiǧdem; Arkan, Melek C.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria; Dawson, David; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease that causes progressive destruction of pancreatic acinar cells and, ultimately, loss of pancreatic function. We investigated the role of IκB kinase α (IKKα) in pancreatic homeostasis. Pancreas-specific ablation of IKKα (IkkαΔpan) caused spontaneous and progressive acinar cell vacuolization and death, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, and circulatory release of pancreatic enzymes, clinical signs resembling those of human chronic pancreatitis. Loss of pancreatic IKKα causes defective autophagic protein degradation, leading to accumulation of p62-mediated protein aggregates and enhanced oxidative and ER stress in acinar cells, but none of these effects is related to NF-κB. Pancreas-specific p62 ablation prevented ER and oxidative stresses and attenuated pancreatitis in IkkαΔpan mice, suggesting that cellular stress induced by p62 aggregates promotes development of pancreatitis. Importantly, downregulation of IKKα and accumulation of p62 aggregates were also observed in chronic human pancreatitis. Our studies demonstrate that IKKα, which may control autophagic protein degradation through its interaction with ATG16L2, plays a critical role in maintaining pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis, whose dysregulation promotes pancreatitis through p62 aggregate accumulation. PMID:23563314

  14. MYB Promotes Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer through Direct Transcriptional Up-regulation and Cooperative Action of Sonic Hedgehog and Adrenomedullin.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Arun; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Singh, Seema; Tyagi, Nikhil; Arora, Sumit; Carter, James E; Khushman, Moh'd; Singh, Ajay P

    2016-07-29

    Extensive desmoplasia is a prominent pathological characteristic of pancreatic cancer (PC) that not only impacts tumor development, but therapeutic outcome as well. Recently, we demonstrated a novel role of MYB, an oncogenic transcription factor, in PC growth and metastasis. Here we studied its effect on pancreatic tumor histopathology and associated molecular and biological mechanisms. Tumor-xenografts derived from orthotopic-inoculation of MYB-overexpressing PC cells exhibited far-greater desmoplasia in histological analyses compared with those derived from MYB-silenced PC cells. These findings were further confirmed by immunostaining of tumor-xenograft sections with collagen-I, fibronectin (major extracellular-matrix proteins), and α-SMA (well-characterized marker of myofibroblasts or activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs)). Likewise, MYB-overexpressing PC cells provided significantly greater growth benefit to PSCs in a co-culture system as compared with the MYB-silenced cells. Interrogation of deep-sequencing data from MYB-overexpressing versus -silenced PC cells identified Sonic-hedgehog (SHH) and Adrenomedullin (ADM) as two differentially-expressed genes among others, which encode for secretory ligands involved in tumor-stromal cross-talk. In-silico analyses predicted putative MYB-binding sites in SHH and ADM promoters, which was later confirmed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation. A cooperative role of SHH and ADM in growth promotion of PSCs was confirmed in co-culture by using their specific-inhibitors and exogenous recombinant-proteins. Importantly, while SHH acted exclusively in a paracrine fashion on PSCs and influenced the growth of PC cells only indirectly, ADM could directly impact the growth of both PC cells and PSCs. In summary, we identified MYB as novel regulator of pancreatic tumor desmoplasia, which is suggestive of its diverse roles in PC pathobiology. PMID:27246849

  15. ISL-1 promotes pancreatic islet cell proliferation by forming an ISL-1/Set7/9/PDX-1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Zhang, Qiao; Lu, Qin; Jia, Zhuqing; Chen, Ping; Ma, Kangtao; Wang, Weiping; Zhou, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    Islet-1 (ISL-1), a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, has been recently found to be essential for promoting postnatal pancreatic islet proliferation. However, the detailed mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which ISL-1 promotes β-cell proliferation through regulation of CyclinD1 in HIT-T15 and NIT-1 cells, as well in rat islet mass. Our results provide the evidence that ISL-1 promotes adult pancreatic islet β-cell proliferation by activating CyclinD1 transcription through cooperation with Set7/9 and PDX-1 to form an ISL-1/Set7/9/PDX-1 complex. This complex functions in an ISL-1-dependent manner, with Set7/9 functioning not only as a histone methyltransferase, which increases the histone H3K4 tri-methylation of the CyclinD1 promoter region, but also an adaptor to bridge ISL-1 and PDX-1, while PDX-1 functions as a RNA pol II binding modulator. Furthermore, the formation of the ISL-1/Set7/9/PDX-1 complex is positively associated with insulin-like growth factor-1 treatment in NIT and HIT-T15 cells in vitro, while may be negatively correlated with age in vivo. PMID:26176407

  16. Mast Cell Tryptase Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Growth through Promoting Angiogenesis via Activation of Angiopoietin-1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiangjie; Zhai, Liqin; Xue, Ruobing; Shi, Jieru; Zeng, Qiang; Gao, Cairong

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. During the development and progression of cancer, tumor angiogenesis plays a crucial role. A great deal of evidence has revealed that human mast cells (MCs) contributed to tumor angiogenesis through releasing several pro-angiogenetic factors, among which tryptase is one of the most active. However, the role of mast cell tryptase (MCT) in human pancreatic cancer angiogenesis is still not well documented. In this study, we examined the MCT levels in serum from pancreatic cancer patients and evaluated the correlationship of the MCT level and tumor angiogenesis. In addition, the effect of MCT on endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation was investigated both in vitro and in nude mice bearing pancreatic tumor. It was found that MCT contributes to endothelial cell growth and tube formation via up-regulation of angiopoietin-1 expression. Moreover, using the MCT inhibitor nafamostat, tryptase-induced angiogenesis was obviously suppressed both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest that MCT plays an important role in pancreatic cancer angiogenesis and tumor growth via activating the angiopoietin-1 pathway, and tryptase inhibitors may be evaluated as an effective anti-angiogenetic approach in pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:27240355

  17. KPNA7, a nuclear transport receptor, promotes malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Laurila, Eeva; Vuorinen, Elisa; Savinainen, Kimmo; Rauhala, Hanna; Kallioniemi, Anne

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. The high mortality rate is mostly due to the lack of appropriate tools for early detection of the disease and a shortage of effective therapies. We have previously shown that karyopherin alpha 7 (KPNA7), the newest member of the alpha karyopherin family of nuclear import receptors, is frequently amplified and overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that KPNA7 expression is absent in practically all normal human adult tissues but elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of KPNA7 expression in AsPC-1 and Hs700T pancreatic cancer cells led to a reduction in cell growth and decreased anchorage independent growth, as well as increased autophagy. The cell growth effects were accompanied by an induction of the cell cycle regulator p21 and a G1 arrest of the cell cycle. Interestingly, the p21 induction was caused by increased mRNA synthesis and not defective nuclear transport. These data strongly demonstrate that KPNA7 silencing inhibits the malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and thereby provide the first evidence on the functional role for KPNA7 in human cancer. - Highlights: • KPNA7 expression is elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. • KPNA7 silencing in high expressing cancer cells leads to growth inhibition. • The cell growth reduction is associated with p21 induction and G1 arrest. • KPNA7 silencing is also accompanied with increased autophagy.

  18. PTK6 Promotes Cancer Migration and Invasion in Pancreatic Cancer Cells Dependent on ERK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Hiroaki; Basson, Marc D.; Ito, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Kinase 6 (PTK6) is a non-receptor type tyrosine kinase that may be involved in some cancers. However, the biological role and expression status of PTK6 in pancreatic cancer is unknown. Therefore in this study, we evaluated the functional role of PTK6 on pancreatic cancer invasion. Five pancreatic cancer cell lines expressed PTK6 at varying levels. PTK6 expression was also observed in human pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PTK6 suppression by siRNA significantly reduced both cellular migration and invasion (0.59/0.49 fold for BxPC3, 0.61/0.62 for Panc1, 0.42/0.39 for MIAPaCa2, respectively, p<0.05 for each). In contrast, forced overexpression of PTK6 by transfection of a PTK6 expression vector in Panc1 and MIAPaCa2 cells increased cellular migration and invasion (1.57/1.67 fold for Panc1, 1.44/1.57 for MIAPaCa2, respectively, p<0.05). Silencing PTK6 reduced ERK1/2 activation, but not AKT or STAT3 activation, while PTK6 overexpression increased ERK1/2 activation. U0126, a specific inhibitor of ERK1/2, completely abolished the effect of PTK6 overexpression on cellular migration and invasion. These results suggest that PTK6 regulates cellular migration and invasion in pancreatic cancer via ERK signaling. PTK6 may be a novel therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. PMID:24788754

  19. Mast Cell Tryptase Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Growth through Promoting Angiogenesis via Activation of Angiopoietin-1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiangjie; Zhai, Liqin; Xue, Ruobing; Shi, Jieru; Zeng, Qiang; Gao, Cairong

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. During the development and progression of cancer, tumor angiogenesis plays a crucial role. A great deal of evidence has revealed that human mast cells (MCs) contributed to tumor angiogenesis through releasing several pro-angiogenetic factors, among which tryptase is one of the most active. However, the role of mast cell tryptase (MCT) in human pancreatic cancer angiogenesis is still not well documented. In this study, we examined the MCT levels in serum from pancreatic cancer patients and evaluated the correlationship of the MCT level and tumor angiogenesis. In addition, the effect of MCT on endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation was investigated both in vitro and in nude mice bearing pancreatic tumor. It was found that MCT contributes to endothelial cell growth and tube formation via up-regulation of angiopoietin-1 expression. Moreover, using the MCT inhibitor nafamostat, tryptase-induced angiogenesis was obviously suppressed both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest that MCT plays an important role in pancreatic cancer angiogenesis and tumor growth via activating the angiopoietin-1 pathway, and tryptase inhibitors may be evaluated as an effective anti-angiogenetic approach in pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:27240355

  20. Control of Apoptosis in Treatment and Biology of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Modi, Shrey; Kir, Devika; Banerjee, Sulagna; Saluja, Ashok

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is estimated to be the 12th most common cancer in the United States in 2014 and yet this malignancy is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Late detection and resistance to therapy are the major causes for its dismal prognosis. Apoptosis is an actively orchestrated cell death mechanism that serves to maintain tissue homoeostasis. Cancer develops from normal cells by accruing significant changes through one or more mechanisms, leading to DNA damage and mutations, which in a normal cell would induce this programmed cell death pathway. As a result, evasion of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. PDAC is notoriously resistant to apoptosis, thereby explaining its aggressive nature and resistance to conventional treatment modalities. The current review is focus on understanding different intrinsic and extrinsic pathways in pancreatic cancer that may affect apoptosis in this disease. PMID:26206252

  1. Brg1 promotes both tumor-suppressive and oncogenic activities at distinct stages of pancreatic cancer formation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nilotpal; Malik, Shivani; Villanueva, Karina E.; Urano, Atsushi; Lu, Xinyuan; Von Figura, Guido; Seeley, E. Scott; Dawson, David W.; Collisson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) develops predominantly through pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) precursor lesions. Pancreatic acinar cells are reprogrammed to a “ductal-like” state during PanIN-PDA formation. Here, we demonstrate a parallel mechanism operative in mature duct cells during which functional cells undergo “ductal retrogression” to form IPMN-PDA. We further identify critical antagonistic roles for Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1), a catalytic subunit of the SWI/SNF complexes, during IPMN-PDA development. In mature duct cells, Brg1 inhibits the dedifferentiation that precedes neoplastic transformation, thus attenuating tumor initiation. In contrast, Brg1 promotes tumorigenesis in full-blown PDA by supporting a mesenchymal-like transcriptional landscape. We further show that JQ1, a drug that is currently being tested in clinical trials for hematological malignancies, impairs PDA tumorigenesis by both mimicking some and inhibiting other Brg1-mediated functions. In summary, our study demonstrates the context-dependent roles of Brg1 and points to potential therapeutic treatment options based on epigenetic regulation in PDA. PMID:25792600

  2. eIF4E-phosphorylation-mediated Sox2 upregulation promotes pancreatic tumor cell repopulation after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Tian, Ling; Feng, Xiao; Cheng, Jin; Gong, Yanping; Liu, Xinjian; Zhang, Zhengxiang; Yang, Xuguang; He, Sijia; Li, Chuan-Yuan; Huang, Qian

    2016-05-28

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease characterized by treatment resistance and high recurrence rate. Repopulation of surviving tumor cells undergoing radiotherapy is one of the most common reasons for recurrence. Our previous studies have discovered a novel mechanism for repopulation after irradiation that activation of caspase-3 in irradiated tumor cells activates PKCδ/p38 axis to transmit proliferation signals promoting repopulation of surviving tumor cells. Here we found Sox2 expression is up-regulated in irradiated pancreatic cancer cells, which played a major role in tumor cell repopulation after irradiation. Over-expression of Sox2 strongly enhanced the growth-stimulating effect of irradiated dying tumor cells on living tumor cells through a paracrine modality. Furthermore, we identified activated eIF4E, which is phosphorylated by MNK1, as a regulator of Sox2 expression after irradiation, and pharmacologic inhibition of eIF4E with CGP57380 and Ribavirin significantly weakened Sox2-mediated tumor cell repopulation. Finally, we showed the activation of caspase 3/PKCδ/p38/MNK1 signal pathway in irradiated pancreatic tumor cells. Together, we showed a novel pathway regulating Sox2 expression and Sox2 may be a promising target to reduce recurrence due to repopulation of surviving tumor cells after radiotherapy. PMID:26945967

  3. Urinary Prostaglandin E2 Metabolite and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: Case-Control Study in Urban Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Jing; Du, Jinfeng; Xu, Hongli; Zhang, Wei; Ni, Quan-Xing; Yu, Herbert; Risch, Harvey A.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been increasing in importance in Shanghai over the last four decades. The etiology of the disease is still unclear. Evidence suggests that the COX-2 pathway, an important component of inflammation, may be involved in the disease. We aimed to evaluate the association between urinary prostaglandin E2 metabolite (PGE-M) level and risk of pancreatic cancer. From a recent population-based case-control study in Shanghai, 200 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases and 200 gender- and age- frequency matched controls were selected for the present analysis. Urinary PGE-M was measured with a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assay. Adjusted unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A positive association was observed between PGE-M leve and pancreatic cancer risk: OR = 1.63 (95% CI 1.01–2.63) for the third tertile compared to the first. Though the interactions were not statistically significant, the associations tended to be stronger among subjects with diabetes history (OR = 3.32; 95% CI 1.20–9.19) and higher meat intake (OR = 2.12; 95% CI 1.10–4.06). The result suggests that higher urinary PGE-M level may be associated with increased risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:25679523

  4. Case-control study of diabetes-related genetic variants and pancreatic cancer risk in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kuruma, Sawako; Egawa, Naoto; Kurata, Masanao; Honda, Goro; Kamisawa, Terumi; Ueda, Junko; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ueno, Makoto; Nakao, Haruhisa; Mori, Mitsuru; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Wakai, Kenji; Nakamura, Kozue; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Nojima, Masanori; Takahashi, Mami; Shimada, Kazuaki; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Shogo; Lin, Yingsong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether diabetes-related genetic variants are associated with pancreatic cancer risk. METHODS: We genotyped 7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in PPARG2 (rs1801282), ADIPOQ (rs1501299), ADRB3 (rs4994), KCNQ1 (rs2237895), KCNJ11 (rs5219), TCF7L2 (rs7903146), and CDKAL1 (rs2206734), and examined their associations with pancreatic cancer risk in a multi-institute case-control study including 360 cases and 400 controls in Japan. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect detailed information on lifestyle factors. Genotyping was performed using Fluidigm SNPtype assays. Unconditional logistic regression methods were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between these diabetes-associated variants and pancreatic cancer risk. RESULTS: With the exception of rs1501299 in the ADIPOQ gene (P = 0.09), no apparent differences in genotype frequencies were observed between cases and controls. Rs1501299 in the ADPIOQ gene was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk; compared with individuals with the AA genotype, the age- and sex-adjusted OR was 1.79 (95%CI: 0.98-3.25) among those with the AC genotype and 1.86 (95%CI: 1.03-3.38) among those with the CC genotype. The ORs remained similar after additional adjustment for body mass index and cigarette smoking. In contrast, rs2237895 in the KCNQ1 gene was inversely related to pancreatic cancer risk, with a multivariable-adjusted OR of 0.62 (0.37-1.04) among individuals with the CC genotype compared with the AA genotype. No significant associations were noted for other 5 SNPs. CONCLUSION: Our case-control study indicates that rs1501299 in the ADIPOQ gene may be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. These findings should be replicated in additional studies. PMID:25516658

  5. EZH2 promotes cell migration and invasion but not alters cell proliferation by suppressing E-cadherin, partly through association with MALAT-1 in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ting; Jiao, Feng; Hu, Hai; Yuan, Cuncun; Wang, Lei; Jin, Zi-Liang; Song, Wei-feng; Wang, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is an essential component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which is required for epigenetic silencing of target genes, including those affecting cancer progression. Its role in pancreatic cancer remains to be clarified; therefore, we investigated the effects of aberrantly expressed EZH2 on pancreatic cancer. We found that EZH2 expression is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis and advanced clinical stage in pancreatic cancer patients. EZH2 knockdown in pancreatic cancer cell lines inhibited cell migration and invasion, but did not alter cell proliferation. Silencing of EZH2 also increased E-cadherin expression in vitro, and E-cadherin expression was inversely correlated with EZH2 expression in pancreatic cancer tissue samples. Patients with high EZH2 and low E-cadherin expression had the worst prognosis. RIP and ChIP assays suggest that EZH2 is recruited to the E-cadherin promoter by the long non-coding RNA, MALAT-1 (metastasis associated in lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1), where it represses E-cadherin expression. Our results show that EZH2-based therapies may be an option for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26848980

  6. Multirepressor Control Systems For Efficient Promoter Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, James E.; Chen, Wilfred

    1995-01-01

    Report presents numerical-simulation study, based on molecular-level mathematical models, to evaluate effectiveness of eight different configurations of repressor synthesis control of cloned-product-gene expression initiated from promoter/operator genetic sequence. In study, both single- and dual-repressor situations considered, using genetically structured molecules for lac and IPR promotor/operator in example calculations.

  7. Successful Control of Liver Metastases From Pancreatic Solid-Pseudopapillary Neoplasm (SPN) Using Hepatic Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Violari, Elena G. Brody, Lynn A.; Covey, Anne M.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Getrajdman, George I.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Reidy, Diane L.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brown, Karen T.

    2015-04-15

    No systemic agents that are known to be effective for the treatment of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) are available. We report the prolonged and sustained control of metastatic pancreatic SPN to the liver using hepatic arterial embolization (HAE), where a total of 13 HAE sessions were performed over a 6-year period.

  8. Low tristetraprolin expression promotes cell proliferation and predicts poor patients outcome in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ya-Jun; Wang, Wei-Min; Yang, De-Jun; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Cai, Qing-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (also known as TTP, TIS11, ZFP36, and Nup475) is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that is down-regulated in several tumor types. In the current study, we found that TTP expression was markedly reduced in pancreatic cancer samples as compared to matched normal tissues. Low TTP level was associated with age (P=0.037), tumor size (P=0.008), tumor differentiation (P=0.004), postoperative T stage (pT stage, P<0.001), postoperative N stage (pN stage, P=0.008) and TNM stage (P<0.001). Moreover, low TTP expression predicted reduced survival rates and poor patient outcome. We also found that TTP impairs pancreatic cancer cell proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) assay showed that TTP over-expression both increases apoptosis and decreases proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells. RNA-sequencing analysis showed that TTP over-expression downregulates several tumor-related factors, including Pim-1 and IL-6. Our findings indicate that TTP could serve as a potential prognostic indicator in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26894969

  9. Calcitriol enhances gemcitabine antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo by promoting apoptosis in a human pancreatic carcinoma model system

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei-Dong; Ma, Yingyu; Flynn, Geraldine; Muindi, Josephia R; Kong, Rui-Xian; Trump, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    Gemcitabine is the standard care chemotherapeutic agent to treat pancreatic cancer. Previously we demonstrated that calcitriol (1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol) has significant anti-proliferative effects in vitro and in vivo in multiple tumor models and enhances the activity of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. We therefore investigated whether calcitriol could potentiate the cytotoxic activity of gemcitabine in the human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 model system. Isobologram analysis revealed that calcitriol and gemcitabine had synergistic antiproliferative effect over a wide range of drug concentrations. Calcitriol did not reduce the cytidine deaminase activity in Capan-1 tumors nor in the livers of Capan-1 tumor bearing mice. Calcitriol and gemcitabine combination promoted apoptosis in Capan-1 cells compared with either agent alone. The combination treatment also increased the activation of caspases-8, -9, -6 and -3 in Capan-1 cells. This result was confirmed by substrate-based caspase activity assay. Akt phosphorylation was reduced by calcitriol and gemcitabine combination treatment compared to single agent treatment. However, ERK1/2 phosphorylation was not modulated by either agent alone or by the combination. Tumor regrowth delay studies showed that calcitriol in combination with gemcitabine resulted in a significant reduction of Capan-1 tumor volume compared to single agent treatment. Our study suggests that calcitriol and gemcitabine in combination promotes caspase-dependent apoptosis, which may contribute to increased anti-tumor activity compared to either agent alone. PMID:20699664

  10. microRNA-218 suppresses the proliferation, invasion and promotes apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells by targeting HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jin; Guo, Kejian; Ge, Chunlin; Du, Ruixia

    2015-01-01

    Objective To detect the expression profiles of microRNA-218 (miR-218) in human pancreatic cancer tissue (PCT) and cells and their effects on the biological features of human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 and observe the effect of miR-218 on the expression of the target gene high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), with an attempt to provide new treatment methods and strategies for pancreatic cancer. Methods The expressions of miR-218 in PCT and normal pancreas tissue as well as in various pancreatic cancer cell lines including AsPC-1, BxPC-3, and PANC-1 were determined with quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The change of miR-218 expression in PANC-1 cells was detected using qRT-PCT after the transfection of miR-218 mimic for 48 h. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) was applied for detecting the effect of miR-218 on the activity of PANC-1 cells. The effects of miR-218 on the proliferation and apoptosis of PANC-1 cells were analyzed using the flow cytometry. The effect of miR-218 on the migration of PANC-1 cells was detected using the Trans-well migration assay. The HMGB1 was found to be a target gene of miR-218 by luciferase reporter assay, and the effect of miR-218 on the expression of HMGB1 protein in cells were determined using Western blotting. Results As shown by qRT-PCR, the expressions of miR-218 in PCT and in pancreatic cancer cell line significantly decreased when compared with the normal pancreatic tissue (NPT) (P<0.01). Compared with the control group, the miR-218 expression significantly increased in the PANC-1 group after the transfection of miR-218 mimic for 48 h (P<0.01). Growth curve showed that the cell viability significantly dropped after the overexpression of miR-218 in the PANC-1 cells for two days (P<0.05). Flow cytometry showed that the S-phase fraction significantly dropped after the overexpression of miR-218 (P<0.01) and the percentage of apoptotic cells significantly increased (P<0.01). As shown by

  11. Case-control study of decaffeinated coffee consumption and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wynder, E L; Dieck, G S; Hall, N E

    1986-10-01

    The relationship between decaffeinated coffee consumption and pancreatic cancer was examined using data from a hospital-based case-control study of individuals aged 20-80 years in 18 hospitals in 6 United States cities, from January 1981 to December 1984. Among the males, 127 cases and 371 controls were examined, while for females, the figures were 111 and 325 for cases and controls, respectively. Decaffeinated coffee use was not associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in males (odds ratio = 0.7 for 3 or more cups/day; 95% confidence interval = 0.4-1.4). For females, an elevated risk was seen for drinkers of 1-2 cups/day (odds ratio = 1.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.0-2.7), but this finding was of borderline significance and elevation in risk was not found for drinkers of 3 or more cups/day (odds ratio = 0.9; 95% confidence interval = 0.4-1.9). Cigarette smoking was significantly associated with pancreatic cancer in both males and females. Factors examined and not found to be related to pancreatic cancer included education, occupation, religion, marital status, alcohol drinking, saccharin use, height, weight 5 years before hospitalization, history of previous diseases, and residence. PMID:3756885

  12. ABO Blood Group, Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity, and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Herbert; Lu, Lingeng; Kidd, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Carriage of a non–O ABO blood group and colonization by Helicobacter pylori are thought to be risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We examined these associations in a population-based case–control study of 373 case patients and 690 control subjects frequency matched on sex and age. Control subjects were selected by random-digit dialing. Seropositivity for H pylori and its virulence protein CagA was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was associated with non–O blood group (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.83, P = .034) and CagA-negative H pylori seropositivity (OR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.07 to 2.66, P = .025), but no association was observed for CagA seropositivity (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.52 to 1.16). An association between pancreatic cancer risk and CagA-negative H pylori seropositivity was found among individuals with non–O blood type but not among those with O blood type (OR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.49 to 5.20, P = .0014; OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.62 to 2.64, P = .51, respectively). This study demonstrates an association between pancreatic cancer and H pylori colonization, particularly for individuals with non–O blood types. PMID:20181960

  13. IL-13 promotes the proliferation of rat pancreatic stellate cells through the suppression of NF-{kappa}B/TGF-{beta}{sub 1} pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozaki, Satoshi; Mashima, Hirosato; Ohnishi, Hirohide; Sugano, Kentaro

    2010-02-26

    In chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a central role in tissue fibrogenesis. Transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and the Th2 lymphokines such as interleukin (IL)-13 are major profibrogenic cytokines in many organs. Activated PSCs produce various inflammatory cytokines including TGF-{beta}{sub 1}. In this study, we investigated whether IL-13 affects pancreatic fibrogenesis by modulating the functions of PSCs. IL-13 promoted PSCs proliferation without activation through the suppression of autocrine TGF-{beta}{sub 1}. IL-13 enhanced Stat6 phosphorylation in PSCs but Stat6 was not involved in the suppression of TGF-{beta}{sub 1}. IL-13 inhibited the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B, and the expression of mutant I-{kappa}B reproduced the suppression of autocrine TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and promoted PSCs proliferation. Taken together, we demonstrated that IL-13 promotes PSCs proliferation through the suppression of the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B, resulting in the decrease of autocrine TGF-{beta}{sub 1}. This finding provides an unequivocal evidence of IL-13 participation in pancreatic fibrosis, illustrating a new strategy for chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  15. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality. PMID:20016434

  16. Activation of Transmembrane Bile Acid Receptor TGR5 Modulates Pancreatic Islet α Cells to Promote Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Divya P; Asgharpour, Amon; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Park, So Hyun; Liu, Sichen; Imai, Yumi; Nadler, Jerry L; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S; Sanyal, Arun J

    2016-03-25

    The physiological role of the TGR5 receptor in the pancreas is not fully understood. We previously showed that activation of TGR5 in pancreatic β cells by bile acids induces insulin secretion. Glucagon released from pancreatic α cells and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) released from intestinal L cells regulate insulin secretion. Both glucagon and GLP-1 are derived from alternate splicing of a common precursor, proglucagon by PC2 and PC1, respectively. We investigated whether TGR5 activation in pancreatic α cells enhances hyperglycemia-induced PC1 expression thereby releasing GLP-1, which in turn increases β cell mass and function in a paracrine manner. TGR5 activation augmented a hyperglycemia-induced switch from glucagon to GLP-1 synthesis in human and mouse islet α cells by GS/cAMP/PKA/cAMP-response element-binding protein-dependent activation of PC1. Furthermore, TGR5-induced GLP-1 release from α cells was via an Epac-mediated PKA-independent mechanism. Administration of the TGR5 agonist, INT-777, to db/db mice attenuated the increase in body weight and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. INT-777 augmented PC1 expression in α cells and stimulated GLP-1 release from islets of db/db mice compared with control. INT-777 also increased pancreatic β cell proliferation and insulin synthesis. The effect of TGR5-mediated GLP-1 from α cells on insulin release from islets could be blocked by GLP-1 receptor antagonist. These results suggest that TGR5 activation mediates cross-talk between α and β cells by switching from glucagon to GLP-1 to restore β cell mass and function under hyperglycemic conditions. Thus, INT-777-mediated TGR5 activation could be leveraged as a novel way to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26757816

  17. Pancreatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and in front of your spine. It produces juices that help break down food and hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Problems with the pancreas can lead to many health problems. These include Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the ...

  18. Suppository naproxen reduces incidence and severity of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: Randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Joukar, Farahnaz; Taherzadeh, Zahra; Sokhanvar, Homayoon; Hasandokht, Tolou

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy of rectally administered naproxen for the prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP). METHODS: This double-blind randomized control trial conducted from January 2013 to April 2014 at the Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases Research Center in Rasht, Iran. A total of 324 patients were selected from candidates for diagnostic or therapeutic ERCP by using the simple sampling method. Patients received a single dose of Naproxen (500 mg; n = 162) or a placebo (n = 162) per rectum immediately before ERCP. The overall incidence of PEP, incidence of mild to severe PEP, serum amylase levels and adverse effects were measured. The primary outcome measure was the development of pancreatitis onset of pain in the upper abdomen and elevation of the serum amylase level to > 3 × the upper normal limit (60-100 IU/L) within 24 h after ERCP. The severity of PEP was classified according to the duration of therapeutic intervention for PEP: mild, 2-3 d; moderate 4-10 d; and severe, > 10 d and/or necessitated surgical or intensive treatment, or contributed to death. RESULTS: PEP occurred in 12% (40/324) of participants, and was significantly more frequent in the placebo group compared to the naproxen group (P < 0.01). Of the participants, 25.9% (84/324) developed hyperamylasemia within 2 h of procedure completion, among whom only 35 cases belonged to the naproxen group (P < 0.01). The incidence of PEP was significantly higher in female sex, in patients receiving pancreatic duct injection, more than 3 times pancreatic duct cannulations, and ERCP duration more than 40 min (Ps < 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding the procedures or factors that might increase the risk of PEP, sphincterotomy, precut requirement, biliary duct injection and number of pancreatic duct cannulations. In the subgroup of patients with pancreatic duct injection, the rate of pancreatitis in

  19. Overview on how oncogenic Kras promotes pancreatic carcinogenesis by inducing low intracellular ROS levels.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Qia, Chengjia; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating disease without clearly known disease causes. Recent epidemiological and animal studies suggest that the supplementation of dietary antioxidants (e.g., vitamins C and E) decreases cancer risk, implying that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. However, oncogenic Kras mutations (e.g., Kras(G12D)), which are present in more than 90% of PDAC, have been proven to foster low intracellular ROS levels. Here, oncogenic Kras activates expression of a series of anti-oxidant genes via Nrf2 (nuclear factor, erythroid derived 2, like 2) and also mediates an unusual metabolic pathway of glutamine to generate NADPH. This can then be used as the reducing power for ROS detoxification, leading collectively to low ROS levels in pancreatic pre-neoplastic cells and in cancer cells. In adult stem cells and cancer stem cells, low ROS levels have been associated with the formation of a proliferation-permissive intracellular environment and with perseverance of self-renewal capacities. Therefore, it is conceivable that low intracellular ROS levels may contribute significantly to oncogenic Kras-mediated PDAC formation. PMID:24062691

  20. SIRT 1 Overexpression is Associated with Metastasis of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and Promotes Migration and Growth of PDAC Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Siqin; Hong, Hua; Lv, Huicheng; Wu, Guozhu; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND SIRT 1, as a class III histone deacetylase (HDAC), is implicated in the initiation and progression of malignancies. However, the association of SIRT 1 with tumorigenesis or progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is not clear. MATERIAL AND METHODS In our study we investigated SIRT 1 expression in PDAC samples and evaluated the association of SIRT 1 level with the clinical and pathological characteristics of PDAC patients. We investigated the role of SIRT 1 in the migration and growth of PDAC PANC-1 or BxPC-3 cells using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approach. RESULTS We demonstrated that SIRT 1 mRNA level was significantly promoted in intra-tumor tissues compared to peri-tumor tissues of PDAC; and SIRT 1 overexpression was markedly associated with distant or lymph node (LN) metastasis of these PDAC tissues. Moreover, the in vitro wound healing assay demonstrated that SIRT 1 overexpression with lentivirus vector markedly promoted the migration of PANC-1 or BxPC-3 cells, whereas SIRT 1 knockdown using SIRT 1 specific siRNA transfection significantly inhibited the migration of PDAC cells. The colony forming assay confirmed SIRT 1 promotion of the growth of PANC-1 or BxPC-3 cells. CONCLUSIONS In summary, SIRT 1 overexpression is significantly associated with metastasis of PDAC, and overexpressed SIRT 1 plays an important role in pancreatic cancer cell migration and growth. Our data warrants further studies on SIRT 1 as a novel chemotherapeutic target in PDAC. PMID:27170223

  1. Convergence of bone morphogenetic protein and laminin-1 signaling pathways promotes proliferation and colony formation by fetal mouse pancreatic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Fangxu . E-mail: jiang@wehi.edu.au; Harrison, Leonard C.

    2005-08-01

    We previously reported that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), members of the transforming growth factor superfamily, together with the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin-1 (Ln-1), promote proliferation of fetal pancreatic cells and formation of colonies containing peripheral insulin-positive cells. Here, we further investigate the cross-talk between BMP and Ln-1 signals. By RT-PCR, receptors for BMP (BMPR) (excepting BMPR-1B) and Ln-1 were expressed in the fetal pancreas between E13.5 and E17.5. Specific blocking antibodies to BMP-4 and -6 and selective BMP antagonists partially inhibited colony formation by fetal pancreas cells. Colony formation induced by BMP-6 and Ln-1 was completely abolished in a dose-dependent manner by blocking Ln-1 binding to its {alpha}{sub 6} integrin and {alpha}-dystroglycan receptors or by blocking the Ln-1 signaling molecules, phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (P13K) and MAP kinase kinase-1. These results demonstrate a convergence of BMP and Ln-1 signaling through P13K and MAP kinase pathways to induce proliferation and colony formation in E15.5 fetal mouse pancreatic cells.

  2. Hypoxia but not normoxia promotes Smoothened transcription through upregulation of RBPJ and Mastermind-like 3 in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideya; Yamasaki, Akio; Kawamoto, Makoto; Imaizumi, Akira; Katano, Mitsuo

    2016-02-28

    We previously demonstrated that Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is activated under hypoxia through upregulation of transcription of Smoothened (SMO) gene. However, the mechanism of hypoxia-induced activation of SMO transcription remains unclear. In the analysis of altered expressions of genes related to Hh signaling between under normoxia and hypoxia by DNA microarray analysis, we picked up 2 genes, a transcriptional regulator, recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin-kappa-J region (RBPJ) and a transcriptional co-activator, Mastermind-like 3 (MAML3). Expressions of SMO, MAML3 and RBPJ were increased under hypoxia in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells (PDAC). RBPJ and MAML3 inhibition under hypoxia led to decreased SMO and GLI1 expressions, whereas SMO expression in MAML3-inhibited and RBPJ-inhibited cells under normoxia showed no change. However, overexpression of RBPJ under normoxia led to increased SMO expression. Additionally, cells knocked down for MAML3 and RBPJ inhibition under hypoxia showed decreased invasiveness through matrix metalloproteinase-2 suppression and decreased proliferation. Xenograft mouse models showed that MAML3 and RBPJ knockdown inhibited tumorigenicity and tumor volume. Our results suggest that hypoxia promotes SMO transcription through upregulation of MAML3 and RBPJ to induce proliferation, invasiveness and tumorigenesis in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26655998

  3. TERT promoter mutations in pancreatic endocrine tumours are rare and mainly found in tumours from patients with hereditary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, João; Nabais, Joana; Pinheiro, Jorge; Batista, Rui; Oliveira, Rui Caetano; Gonçalves, António Pedro; Pestana, Ana; Reis, Marta; Mesquita, Bárbara; Pinto, Vasco; Lyra, Joana; Cipriano, Maria Augusta; Ferreira, Miguel Godinho; Lopes, José Manuel; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is its unlimited replicative potential that needs a compensatory mechanism for the consequential telomere erosion. Telomerase promoter (TERTp) mutations were recently reported as a novel mechanism for telomerase re-activation/expression in order to maintain telomere length. Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) were so far recognized to rely mainly on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism. It was our objective to study if TERTp mutations were present in pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) and could represent an alternative mechanism to ALT. TERTp mutations were detected in 7% of the cases studied and were mainly associated to patients harbouring hereditary syndromes. In vitro, using PET-derived cell lines and by luciferase reporter assay, these mutations confer a 2 to 4-fold increase in telomerase transcription activity. These novel alterations are able to recruit ETS transcription factor members, in particular GABP-α and ETV1, to the newly generated binding sites. We report for the first time TERTp mutations in PETs and PET-derived cell lines. Additionally, our data indicate that these mutations serve as an alternative mechanism and in an exclusive manner to ALT, in particular in patients with hereditary syndromes. PMID:27411289

  4. TERT promoter mutations in pancreatic endocrine tumours are rare and mainly found in tumours from patients with hereditary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Vinagre, João; Nabais, Joana; Pinheiro, Jorge; Batista, Rui; Oliveira, Rui Caetano; Gonçalves, António Pedro; Pestana, Ana; Reis, Marta; Mesquita, Bárbara; Pinto, Vasco; Lyra, Joana; Cipriano, Maria Augusta; Ferreira, Miguel Godinho; Lopes, José Manuel; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is its unlimited replicative potential that needs a compensatory mechanism for the consequential telomere erosion. Telomerase promoter (TERTp) mutations were recently reported as a novel mechanism for telomerase re-activation/expression in order to maintain telomere length. Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) were so far recognized to rely mainly on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism. It was our objective to study if TERTp mutations were present in pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) and could represent an alternative mechanism to ALT. TERTp mutations were detected in 7% of the cases studied and were mainly associated to patients harbouring hereditary syndromes. In vitro, using PET-derived cell lines and by luciferase reporter assay, these mutations confer a 2 to 4-fold increase in telomerase transcription activity. These novel alterations are able to recruit ETS transcription factor members, in particular GABP-α and ETV1, to the newly generated binding sites. We report for the first time TERTp mutations in PETs and PET-derived cell lines. Additionally, our data indicate that these mutations serve as an alternative mechanism and in an exclusive manner to ALT, in particular in patients with hereditary syndromes. PMID:27411289

  5. Vitamin D–binding protein and pancreatic cancer: a nested case-control study12345

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Marina R; Freedman, D Michal; Robien, Kim; Kopp, William; Rager, Helen; Horst, Ronald L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D–binding protein (DBP) is the primary carrier of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in the circulation. One prospective study in male smokers found a protective association between DBP and pancreatic cancer, particularly among men with higher 25(OH)D concentrations. Objective: The objective was to examine the association between DBP and pancreatic cancer risk in an American population. Design: We conducted a nested case-control study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer screening trial cohort of men and women aged 55–74 y at baseline. Between 1993 and 2010, 295 incident pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases were reported (follow-up to 15.1 y). Two controls (n = 590) were matched to each case by age, race, sex, and month of blood draw. We calculated smoking- and diabetes-adjusted ORs and 95% CIs with the use of conditional logistic regression. Results: DBP concentration was not significantly associated with pancreatic cancer overall [highest (≥7149.4 nmol/L) vs. lowest (<3670.4 nmol/L) quintile; OR: 1.75; 95% CI: 0.91, 3.37; P-trend = 0.25]. For serum 25(OH)D compared with the referent (50 to <75 nmol/L), individuals in the highest group had a significantly higher risk (≥100 nmol/L; OR: 3.23; 95% CI: 1.24, 8.44), whereas those in the lowest group had no significant association (<25 nmol/L; OR: 2.50; 95% CI: 0.92, 6.81). Further adjustment for DBP did not alter this association. Conclusion: Our results do not support the hypothesis that serum DBP or 25(OH)D plays a protective role in pancreatic cancer. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00339495. PMID:25904602

  6. Dietary inflammatory index and risk of pancreatic cancer in an Italian case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Shivappa, Nitin; Bosetti, Cristina; Zucchetto, Antonella; Serraino, Diego; La Vecchia, Carlo; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that various dietary components may be implicated in the aetiology of pancreatic cancer. However, the possible relationship between diet-related inflammation and the risk of pancreatic cancer has not yet been investigated. We examined the ability of a newly developed literature-derived dietary inflammatory index (DII) to predict the risk of pancreatic cancer in a case–control study conducted in Italy between 1991 and 2008. This included 326 incident cases and 652 controls admitted to the major teaching and general hospitals for non-neoplastic diseases, frequency-matched to cases by study centre, sex and age. The DII was computed based on dietary intake assessed using a validated and reproducible seventy-eight-item FFQ. Logistic regression models were used to estimate multivariable OR adjusted for age, sex, study centre, education, BMI, smoking status, alcohol drinking and history of diabetes. Energy adjustment was performed using the residual method. Subjects with higher DII scores (i.e. representing a more pro-inflammatory diet) had a higher risk of pancreatic cancer, with the DII being used as both a continuous variable (ORcontinuous 1·24, 95 % CI 1·11, 1·38) and a categorical variable (i.e. compared with the subjects in the lowest quintile of the DII, those in the second, third, fourth and fifth quintiles had, respectively, ORquintile2 v. 1 1·70, 95 % CI 1·02, 2·80; ORquintile3 v. 1 1·91, 95 % CI 1·16, 3·16; ORquintile4 v. 1 1·98, 95 % CI 1·20, 3·27; ORquintile5 v. 1 2·48, 95 % CI 1·50, 4·10; Ptrend = 0·0015). These data suggest that a pro-inflammatory diet increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25515552

  7. Hereditary Pancreatitis Associated With the N29T Mutation of the PRSS1 Gene in a Brazilian Family: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Dytz, Marcio Garrison; Mendes de Melo, Julia; de Castro Santos, Olga; da Silva Santos, Isabel Durso; Rodacki, Melanie; Conceição, Flavia Lucia; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania Maria

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is an autosomal-dominant disease with incomplete penetrance manifesting as early-onset chronic relapsing pancreatitis. A mutation in the PRSS1 gene is present in greater than 70% of HP kindreds and leads to a gain-of-function characterized by the increased autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, promoting autodigestion and damage to acinar cells. Other genetic defects observed in the pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis include mutations in the genes encoding SPINK1, CTRC, and CPA1. There are few reports of HP in Latin America, and no families have been investigated in Brazil. A case-control observational study was conducted at Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital in Brazil. Patients with suspected HP and healthy controls were enrolled in this study, and a detailed questionnaire was administered to patients with HP. PRSS1 and SPINK1 genes were analyzed by DNA sequencing, and a family that fit the HP diagnostic criteria was identified. The neutral polymorphism c.88-352A > G in the SPINK1 gene was found to be prevalent in the individuals studied, but no important alterations were found in this gene. Ten out of 16 individuals in this family carried the N29T mutation in the PRSS1 gene, with 2 clinically unaffected mutation carriers. The median age of HP onset was 6 years. Pancreatic exocrine failure occurred in 6 patients, 5 of whom also had diabetes mellitus. Surgical procedures were performed on 3 affected members, and no cases of pancreatic cancer have been reported thus far. This study identified the first PRSS1 gene mutation in a Brazilian family with HP. PMID:26376395

  8. Smoking accelerates pancreatic cancer progression by promoting differentiation of MDSCs and inducing HB-EGF expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Torres, M P; Kaur, S; Rachagani, S; Joshi, S; Johansson, S L; Momi, N; Baine, M J; Gilling, C E; Smith, L M; Wyatt, T A; Jain, M; Joshi, S S; Batra, S K

    2015-04-16

    Smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic cancer (PC), but late diagnosis limits the evaluation of its mechanistic role in the progression of PC. We used a well-established genetically engineered mouse model (LSL-K-ras(G12D)) of PC to elucidate the role of smoking during initiation and development of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN). The 10-week-old floxed mice (K-ras(G12D); Pdx-1cre) and their control unfloxed (LSL-K-ras(G12D)) littermates were exposed to cigarette smoke (total suspended particles: 150 mg/m(3)) for 20 weeks. Smoke exposure significantly accelerated the development of PanIN lesions in the floxed mice, which correlated with tenfold increase in the expression of cytokeratin19. The systemic accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) decreased significantly in floxed mice compared with unfloxed controls (P<0.01) after the smoke exposure with the concurrent increase in the macrophage (P<0.05) and dendritic cell (DCs) (P<0.01) population. Further, smoking-induced inflammation (IFN-γ, CXCL2; P<0.05) was accompanied by enhanced activation of pancreatic stellate cells and elevated levels of serum retinoic acid-binding protein 4, indicating increased bioavailability of retinoic acid which contributes to differentiation of MDSCs to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and DCs. TAMs predominantly contribute to the increased expression of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (EGFR ligand) in pre-neoplastic lesions in smoke-exposed floxed mice that facilitate acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM). Further, smoke exposure also resulted in partial suppression of the immune system early during PC progression. Overall, the present study provides a novel mechanism of smoking-induced increase in ADM in the presence of constitutively active K-ras mutation. PMID:24909166

  9. Controlled induction of human pancreatic progenitors produces functional beta-like cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Holger A; Parent, Audrey V; Ringler, Jennifer J; Hennings, Thomas G; Nair, Gopika G; Shveygert, Mayya; Guo, Tingxia; Puri, Sapna; Haataja, Leena; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Blelloch, Robert; Szot, Greg L; Arvan, Peter; Hebrok, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into functional insulin-producing beta-like cells holds great promise for cell replacement therapy for patients suffering from diabetes. This approach also offers the unique opportunity to study otherwise inaccessible aspects of human beta cell development and function in vitro. Here, we show that current pancreatic progenitor differentiation protocols promote precocious endocrine commitment, ultimately resulting in the generation of non-functional polyhormonal cells. Omission of commonly used BMP inhibitors during pancreatic specification prevents precocious endocrine formation while treatment with retinoic acid followed by combined EGF/KGF efficiently generates both PDX1+ and subsequent PDX1+/NKX6.1+ pancreatic progenitor populations, respectively. Precise temporal activation of endocrine differentiation in PDX1+/NKX6.1+ progenitors produces glucose-responsive beta-like cells in vitro that exhibit key features of bona fide human beta cells, remain functional after short-term transplantation, and reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic mice. Thus, our simplified and scalable system accurately recapitulates key steps of human pancreas development and provides a fast and reproducible supply of functional human beta-like cells. PMID:25908839

  10. Risk Factors for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (PNETs): A Clinic-Based Case-Control study

    PubMed Central

    Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Bamlet, William R.; McWilliams, Robert R; Hobday, Timothy J.; Burch, Patrick A.; Rabe, Kari G.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are uncommon, and little is known about their risk factors and association with other cancers. We evaluated whether risk factors known to be associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma are also associated with PNETs: smoking, alcohol use, family history of PNET and other cancers, and personal history of diabetes as potential risk factors. Methods Patients with PNETs seen at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 2000 and 2011 were compared to controls seen for a general medical evaluation. Patients and controls completed the same questionnaires. After excluding insulinoma and high-grade PNETs, 355 cases were evaluated, and 309 were matched to 602 controls (2:1) on age, sex, and region of residence. Results Personal smoking history was not associated with PNETs. Alcohol use was less common among cases (54% vs. 67%, p<0.001). Cases were more likely to report a family member with sarcoma (p=0.02), PNET (p=0.02), gall bladder cancer (p=0.02), ovarian cancer (p=0.04) and gastric cancer (p=0.01). There was no association with other cancers in family members. Diabetes was more commonly reported by cases than controls (19% vs. 11%, p<0.001). Conclusions With the exception of diabetes, risk factors that are associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma are not risk factors for PNETs. PMID:25291526

  11. Trimeprazine increases IRS2 in human islets and promotes pancreatic β cell growth and function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Yu, Yue; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Opare-Addo, Lynn; Rozzo, Aldo; Sadagurski, Marianna; Norquay, Lisa; Reed, Jessica E.; El Khattabi, Ilham; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C.; Sharma, Arun; White, Morris F.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of pancreatic β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis during chronic physiologic and immunologic stress is important for cellular and metabolic homeostasis. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) is a regulated adapter protein that links the insulin and IGF1 receptors to downstream signaling cascades. Since strategies to maintain or increase IRS2 expression can promote β cell growth, function, and survival, we conducted a screen to find small molecules that can increase IRS2 mRNA in isolated human pancreatic islets. We identified 77 compounds, including 15 that contained a tricyclic core. To establish the efficacy of our approach, one of the tricyclic compounds, trimeprazine tartrate, was investigated in isolated human islets and in mouse models. Trimeprazine is a first-generation antihistamine that acts as a partial agonist against the histamine H1 receptor (H1R) and other GPCRs, some of which are expressed on human islets. Trimeprazine promoted CREB phosphorylation and increased the concentration of IRS2 in islets. IRS2 was required for trimeprazine to increase nuclear Pdx1, islet mass, β cell replication and function, and glucose tolerance in mice. Moreover, trimeprazine synergized with anti-CD3 Abs to reduce the progression of diabetes in NOD mice. Finally, it increased the function of human islet transplants in streptozotocin-induced (STZ-induced) diabetic mice. Thus, trimeprazine, its analogs, or possibly other compounds that increase IRS2 in islets and β cells without adverse systemic effects might provide mechanism-based strategies to prevent the progression of diabetes. PMID:27152363

  12. LincRNA-ROR promotes invasion, metastasis and tumor growth in pancreatic cancer through activating ZEB1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Han-Xiang; Wang, Yao; Li, Ce; Xu, Jian-Wei; Zhou, Bin; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Han, Hai-Feng; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yun-Shan; Hu, San-Yuan

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the most lethal malignant tumors; early distant metastasis commonly results in poor prognosis. Recent studies confirmed the pivotal role of the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in tumorigenesis and metastasis of malignant tumors, including PC. However, little is known about the role of LincRNA-ROR (linc-ROR) in PC. In the present study, we found that linc-ROR was upregulated in PC tissues. Overexpression of linc-ROR promoted cells proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis both in vitro and in a mouse model. Contrarily, knockdown of linc-ROR attenuated proliferation, invasion and distant metastasis. Mechanistically, we confirmed that linc-ROR up-regulates ZEB1 and then induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which promotes the aggressive biological behaviors of PC. Together, these results indicate that linc-ROR acts as an important regulator of ZEB1, can promote invasion and metastasis in PC, and may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:26898939

  13. IL-6 trans-signaling promotes pancreatitis-associated lung injury and lethality

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Neuhöfer, Patrick; Song, Liang; Rabe, Björn; Lesina, Marina; Kurkowski, Magdalena U.; Treiber, Matthias; Wartmann, Thomas; Regnér, Sara; Thorlacius, Henrik; Saur, Dieter; Weirich, Gregor; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Halangk, Walter; Mizgerd, Joseph P.; Schmid, Roland M.; Rose-John, Stefan; Algül, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory disease with a high mortality rate. Although typically seen in individuals with sepsis, ALI is also a major complication in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The pathophysiology of SAP-associated ALI is poorly understood, but elevated serum levels of IL-6 is a reliable marker for disease severity. Here, we used a mouse model of acute pancreatitis–associated (AP-associated) ALI to determine the role of IL-6 in ALI lethality. Il6-deficient mice had a lower death rate compared with wild-type mice with AP, while mice injected with IL-6 were more likely to develop lethal ALI. We found that inflammation-associated NF-κB induced myeloid cell secretion of IL-6, and the effects of secreted IL-6 were mediated by complexation with soluble IL-6 receptor, a process known as trans-signaling. IL-6 trans-signaling stimulated phosphorylation of STAT3 and production of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in pancreatic acinar cells. Examination of human samples revealed expression of IL-6 in combination with soluble IL-6 receptor was a reliable predictor of ALI in SAP. These results demonstrate that IL-6 trans-signaling is an essential mediator of ALI in SAP across species and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of IL-6 may prevent SAP-associated ALI. PMID:23426178

  14. SRPX2 promotes cell migration and invasion via FAK dependent pathway in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Jingjing; Bi, Minghong; Han, Xiao; Han, Zhengquan; Wang, Hongya; Ou, Yimei

    2015-01-01

    Sushi repeat-containing protein, X-linked 2, abbreviated as SRPX2, is a candidate downstream target protein for E2A-HLF and involved in disorders of language cortex and cognition. Recent studies have demonstrated that elevated SRPX2 exhibits crucial roles in gastric cancer, however, underlying clinical significance and biological function of SRPX2 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), remains unclear. Data from Oncomine database showed that higher SRPX2 expression is more commonly observed in PDAC compared with normal pancreatic duct, similar results were also found in 12 matched PDAC tissue samples, 7 PDAC cell lines and a tissue microarray containing 81 PDAC specimens as demonstrated by real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Besides, higher SRPX2 expression was closely correlated with advanced TNM stage. Silencing of endogenous SRPX2 expression reduced abilities of cell migration and invasion of PDAC cells. Further studies revealed that SRPX2 expression in PDAC tissues significantly correlated with the phosphorylation levels of FAK, indicating that FAK dependent pathway may be account for the effect of SRPX2 on cell migration and invasion in PDAC. Collectively, this study reveals that frequently elevated SRPX2 contributes to cell migration and invasion in PDAC and SRPX2-related pathways might be a potential therapeutic target for PDAC. PMID:26191169

  15. Trophoblast glycoprotein promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell metastasis through Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Jiang, Shuheng; Ma, Mingze; Wang, Yang; Li, Rongkun; Fang, Fang; Tian, Guangang; Zhang, Zhigang

    2015-07-01

    Trophoblast glycoprotein (TPBG), a 72 kDa glycoprotein was identified using a monoclonal antibody, which specifically binds human trophoblast. The expression of TPBG in normal tissues is limited; however, it is upregulated in numerous types of cancer. When TPBG is expressed at a high level, this usually indicates a poor clinical outcome. In the present study, it was demonstrated that TPBG was more commonly observed in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) compared with normal pancreatic tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis of PDAC tissue microarrays indicated that the expression of TPBG in PDAC tissues was closely correlated with the tumor-node-metastasis stage of the tumor. Silencing of TPBG in PDAC cell lines resulted in a decreased ability of cancer cell migration and invasion. Further investigation demonstrated that the Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling pathway was suppressed, as the expression of Wnt5a and the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase was inhibited following TPBG knockdown. In conclusion, the present study provided evidence that TPBG is involved in PDAC metastasis, and that TPBG and its associated signaling pathways may be a suitable target for PDAC therapy. PMID:25738465

  16. CD95 promotes metastatic spread via Sck in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Teodorczyk, M; Kleber, S; Wollny, D; Sefrin, J P; Aykut, B; Mateos, A; Herhaus, P; Sancho-Martinez, I; Hill, O; Gieffers, C; Sykora, J; Weichert, W; Eisen, C; Trumpp, A; Sprick, M R; Bergmann, F; Welsch, T; Martin-Villalba, A

    2015-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been implicated in the initiation and maintenance of tumour growth as well as metastasis. Recent reports link stemness to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer. However, there is still little knowledge about the molecular markers of those events. In silico analysis of RNA profiles of 36 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) reveals an association of the expression of CD95 with EMT and stemness that was validated in CSCs isolated from PDAC surgical specimens. CD95 expression was also higher in metastatic pancreatic cells than in primary PDAC. Pharmacological inhibition of CD95 activity reduced PDAC growth and metastasis in CSC-derived xenografts and in a murine syngeneic model. On the mechanistic level, Sck was identified as a novel molecule indispensable for CD95's induction of cell cycle progression. This study uncovers CD95 as a marker of EMT and stemness in PDAC. It also addresses the molecular mechanism by which CD95 drives tumour growth and opens tantalizing therapeutic possibilities in PDAC. PMID:25613377

  17. Optogenetic control of insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, T; Okawa, S; Hirasawa, T; Ishihara, M

    2015-07-01

    The present study assessed the ability of optogenetics techniques to provide a better understanding of the control of insulin secretion, particularly regarding pancreatic β-cell function in homeostasis and pathological conditions such as diabetes mellitus (DM). We used optogenetics to investigate whether insulin secretion and blood glucose homeostasis could be controlled by regulating intracellular calcium ion concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) in a mouse pancreatic β-cell line (MIN6) transfected with the optogenetic protein channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). The ChR2-transfected MIN6 (ChR2-MIN6) cells secreted insulin following irradiation with a laser (470 nm). The increase in [Ca(2+)]i was accompanied by elevated levels of messenger RNAs that encode calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta and adenylate cyclase 1. ChR2-MIN6 cells suspended in matrigel were inoculated into streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice that were then subjected to a glucose tolerance test. Laser irradiation of these mice caused a significant decrease in blood glucose, and the irradiated implanted cells expressed insulin. These findings demonstrate the power of optogenetics to precisely and efficiently controlled insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cells 'on demand', in contrast to techniques using growth factors or chemical inducers. Optogenetic technology shows great promise for understanding the mechanisms of glucose homeostasis and for developing treatments for metabolic diseases such as DM. PMID:25809465

  18. Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth among Chronic Pancreatitis Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Simon; Sidani, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) exhibit numerous risk factors for the development of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Objective. To determine the prevalence of SIBO in patients with CP. Methods. Prospective, single-centre case-control study conducted between January and September 2013. Inclusion criteria were age 18 to 75 years and clinical and radiological diagnosis of CP. Exclusion criteria included history of gastric, pancreatic, or intestinal surgery or significant clinical gastroparesis. SIBO was detected using a standard lactulose breath test (LBT). A healthy control group also underwent LBT. Results. Thirty-one patients and 40 controls were included. The patient group was significantly older (53.8 versus 38.7 years; P < 0.01). The proportion of positive LBTs was significantly higher in CP patients (38.7 versus 2.5%: P < 0.01). A trend toward a higher proportion of positive LBTs in women compared with men was observed (66.6 versus 27.3%; P = 0.056). The subgroups with positive and negative LBTs were comparable in demographic and clinical characteristics, use of opiates, pancreatic enzymes replacement therapy (PERT), and severity of symptoms. Conclusion. The prevalence of SIBO detected using LBT was high among patients with CP. There was no association between clinical features and the risk for SIBO. PMID:27446865

  19. Insulin secretion as a determinant of pancreatic cancer risk.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2001-08-01

    New epidemiology confirms that glucose intolerance is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, and that this association cannot be accounted for by an adverse impact of early pancreatic cancer on beta cell function. Previous reports indicate that risk for pancreatic cancer is increased in adult-onset diabetics. Since streptozotocin diabetes inhibits carcinogen-mediated induction of pancreatic cancer in hamsters, the most reasonable interpretation of these findings is that insulin (or some other beta cell product) acts as a promoter for pancreatic carcinogenesis. This view is consistent with a report that human pancreatic adenocarcinomas express insulin receptors that can stimulate mitosis; an additional possibility is that high insulin levels indirectly promote pancreatic carcinogenesis by boosting effective IGF-I activity via hepatic actions. In international ecologic epidemiology, pancreatic cancer rates correlate tightly with dietary intake of animal products; this may reflect the fact that vegan diets are associated with low diurnal insulin secretion. There is also suggestive evidence that macrobiotic vegan diets, which are low in glycemic index, may increase mean survival time in pancreatic cancer. However, other types of diets associated with decreased postprandial insulin response, such as high-protein diets or 'Mediterranean' diets high in oleic acid, may also have the potential for pancreatic cancer prevention. The huge increases of age-adjusted pancreatic cancer mortality in Japan and among African-Americans during the last century imply that pancreatic cancer is substantially preventable; a low-insulin-response diet coupled with exercise training, weight control, and smoking avoidance, commendable for a great many other reasons, may slash pancreatic cancer mortality dramatically. PMID:11461162

  20. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  1. The transcription factors Nkx6.1 and Nkx6.2 possess equivalent activities in promoting beta-cell fate specification in Pdx1+ pancreatic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Shelley B; Schaffer, Ashleigh E; Sander, Maike

    2007-07-01

    Despite much progress in identifying transcriptional regulators that control the specification of the different pancreatic endocrine cell types, the spatiotemporal aspects of endocrine subtype specification have remained largely elusive. Here, we address the mechanism by which the transcription factors Nkx6.1 (Nkx6-1) and Nkx6.2 (Nkx6-2) orchestrate development of the endocrine alpha- and beta-cell lineages. Specifically, we assayed for the rescue of insulin-producing beta-cells in Nkx6.1 mutant mice upon restoring Nkx6 activity in select progenitor cell populations with different Nkx6-expressing transgenes. Beta-cell formation and maturation was restored when Nkx6.1 was expressed in multipotential Pdx1(+) pancreatic progenitors, whereas no rescue was observed upon expression in committed Ngn3(+) (Neurog3(+)) endocrine progenitors. Although not excluding additional roles downstream of Ngn3, this finding suggests a first requirement for Nkx6.1 in specifying beta-cell progenitors prior to Ngn3 activation. Surprisingly, although Nkx6.2 only compensates for Nkx6.1 in alpha-but not in beta-cell development in Nkx6.1(-/-) mice, a Pdx1-promoter-driven Nkx6.2 transgene had the same ability to rescue beta-cells as the Pdx1-Nkx6.1 transgene. This demonstrates that the distinct requirements for Nkx6.1 and Nkx6.2 in endocrine differentiation are a consequence of their divergent spatiotemporal expression domains rather than their biochemical activities and implies that both Nkx6.1 and Nkx6.2 possess alpha- and beta-cell-specifying activities. PMID:17537793

  2. Pancreatitis of biliary origin, optimal timing of cholecystectomy (PONCHO trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background After an initial attack of biliary pancreatitis, cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis and other gallstone-related complications. Guidelines advocate performing cholecystectomy within 2 to 4 weeks after discharge for mild biliary pancreatitis. During this waiting period, the patient is at risk of recurrent biliary events. In current clinical practice, surgeons usually postpone cholecystectomy for 6 weeks due to a perceived risk of a more difficult dissection in the early days following pancreatitis and for logistical reasons. We hypothesize that early laparoscopic cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis or other complications of gallstone disease in patients with mild biliary pancreatitis without increasing the difficulty of dissection and the surgical complication rate compared with interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods/Design PONCHO is a randomized controlled, parallel-group, assessor-blinded, superiority multicenter trial. Patients are randomly allocated to undergo early laparoscopic cholecystectomy, within 72 hours after randomization, or interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 25 to 30 days after randomization. During a 30-month period, 266 patients will be enrolled from 18 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. The primary endpoint is a composite endpoint of mortality and acute re-admissions for biliary events (that is, recurrent biliary pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, symptomatic/obstructive choledocholithiasis requiring endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography including cholangitis (with/without endoscopic sphincterotomy), and uncomplicated biliary colics) occurring within 6 months following randomization. Secondary endpoints include the individual endpoints of the composite endpoint, surgical and other complications, technical difficulty of cholecystectomy and costs. Discussion The PONCHO trial is designed to show that early laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  3. TrkBT1 Induces Liver Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer Cells by Sequestering Rho GDP Dissociation Inhibitor and Promoting RhoA Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongkui; Chang, Zhe; Chiao, Lucia J.; Kang, Ya’an; Xia, Qianghua; Zhu, Cihui; Fleming, Jason B.; Evans, Douglas B.; Chiao, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Many genetic and molecular alterations, such as K-ras mutation and NF-κB activation, have been identified in pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanisms by which pancreatic cancer metastasizes still remain to be determined. Although we previously showed that the tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) was significantly correlated with the development of liver metastasis, its function in pancreatic cancer metastasis remained unresolved. In the present study, we showed that overexpressed TrkB is an alternatively spliced transcript variant of TrkB (TrkBT1) with a unique COOH-terminal 12–amino acid sequence and is mainly localized in the cytoplasm. Our results showed that overexpression of Flag-tagged TrkBT1 but not a Flag-tagged TrkBT1 COOH-terminal deletion mutant (Flag-TrkBT1ΔC) in nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer cells enhanced cell proliferation, promoted formation of colonies in soft agar, stimulated tumor cell invasion, and induced liver metastasis in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model of pancreatic cancer. TrkBT1 interacted with Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) in vivo, but Flag-TrkBT1ΔC did not. Furthermore, overexpression of Flag-TrkBT1 and knockdown of RhoGDI expression by RhoGDI short hairpin RNAs promoted RhoA activation, but Flag-TrkBT1ΔC overexpression did not. Therefore, our results showed that TrkBT1 overexpression induces liver metastasis of pancreatic cancer and uncovered a unique signaling mechanism by which TrkBT1 sequesters GDI and activates RhoA signaling. PMID:19773448

  4. A novel nuclear Src and p300 signaling axis controls migratory and invasive behavior in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paladino, David; Yue, Peibin; Furuya, Hideki; Acoba, Jared; Rosser, Charles J.; Turkson, James

    2016-01-01

    The presence of Src in the nuclear compartment has been previously reported, although its significance has remained largely unknown. We sought to delineate the functions of the nuclear pool of Src within the context of malignant progression. Active Src is localized within the nuclei of human pancreatic cancer cells and mouse fibroblasts over-expressing c-Src where it is associated with p300. Nuclear Src additionally promotes the tyrosine phosphorylation of p300 in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells. Src, together with p300, is associated with the high-mobility group AT-hook (HMGA)2 and SET and MYND domain-containing protein (SMYD)3 gene promoters and regulates their expression in a Src-dependent manner. These nuclear Src-dependent events correlate with anchorage-independent soft-agar growth and the migratory properties in both pancreatic Panc-1 cells and mouse fibroblasts over-expressing Src. Moreover, analyses of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tumor tissues detected the association of nuclear Src with the HMGA2 and SMYD3 gene promoters. Our findings for the first time show the critical importance of nuclear Src and p300 function in the migratory properties of pancreatic cancer cells. Further, data together identify a previously unknown role of nuclear Src in the regulation of gene expression in association with p300 within the context of cells harboring activated or over-expressing Src. This novel mechanism of nuclear Src-p300 axis in PDAC invasiveness and metastasis may provide an opportunity for developing more effective early clinical interventions for this lethal disease. Active Src is complexed with and phosphorylates p300 in the nucleus, and the complex is bound to HMGA2 and SMYD3 genes, thereby regulating their expression to promote pancreatic tumor cell migration and invasiveness. PMID:26695438

  5. BAG3 promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma growth by activating stromal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, Alessandra; Basile, Anna; D'Auria, Raffaella; d'Avenia, Morena; De Marco, Margot; Falco, Antonia; Festa, Michelina; Guerriero, Luana; Iorio, Vittoria; Parente, Roberto; Pascale, Maria; Marzullo, Liberato; Franco, Renato; Arra, Claudio; Barbieri, Antonio; Rea, Domenica; Menichini, Giulio; Hahne, Michael; Bijlsma, Maarten; Barcaroli, Daniela; Sala, Gianluca; di Mola, Fabio Francesco; di Sebastiano, Pierluigi; Todoric, Jelena; Antonucci, Laura; Corvest, Vincent; Jawhari, Anass; Firpo, Matthew A; Tuveson, David A; Capunzo, Mario; Karin, Michael; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Turco, Maria Caterina

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and death rate of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have increased in recent years, therefore the identification of novel targets for treatment is extremely important. Interactions between cancer and stromal cells are critically involved in tumour formation and development of metastasis. Here we report that PDAC cells secrete BAG3, which binds and activates macrophages, inducing their activation and the secretion of PDAC supporting factors. We also identify IFITM-2 as a BAG3 receptor and show that it signals through PI3K and the p38 MAPK pathways. Finally, we show that the use of an anti-BAG3 antibody results in reduced tumour growth and prevents metastasis formation in three different mouse models. In conclusion, we identify a paracrine loop involved in PDAC growth and metastatic spreading, and show that an anti-BAG3 antibody has therapeutic potential. PMID:26522614

  6. BAG3 promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma growth by activating stromal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Alessandra; Basile, Anna; D'Auria, Raffaella; d'Avenia, Morena; De Marco, Margot; Falco, Antonia; Festa, Michelina; Guerriero, Luana; Iorio, Vittoria; Parente, Roberto; Pascale, Maria; Marzullo, Liberato; Franco, Renato; Arra, Claudio; Barbieri, Antonio; Rea, Domenica; Menichini, Giulio; Hahne, Michael; Bijlsma, Maarten; Barcaroli, Daniela; Sala, Gianluca; di Mola, Fabio Francesco; di Sebastiano, Pierluigi; Todoric, Jelena; Antonucci, Laura; Corvest, Vincent; Jawhari, Anass; Firpo, Matthew A; Tuveson, David A; Capunzo, Mario; Karin, Michael; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Turco, Maria Caterina

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and death rate of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have increased in recent years, therefore the identification of novel targets for treatment is extremely important. Interactions between cancer and stromal cells are critically involved in tumour formation and development of metastasis. Here we report that PDAC cells secrete BAG3, which binds and activates macrophages, inducing their activation and the secretion of PDAC supporting factors. We also identify IFITM-2 as a BAG3 receptor and show that it signals through PI3K and the p38 MAPK pathways. Finally, we show that the use of an anti-BAG3 antibody results in reduced tumour growth and prevents metastasis formation in three different mouse models. In conclusion, we identify a paracrine loop involved in PDAC growth and metastatic spreading, and show that an anti-BAG3 antibody has therapeutic potential. PMID:26522614

  7. Allergies and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis From the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Sara H.; Hsu, Meier; Satagopan, Jaya M.; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Silverman, Debra T.; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Anderson, Kristin E.; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dai, Qi; Duell, Eric J.; Fontham, Elizabeth H.; Gallinger, Steven; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Ji, Bu-Tian; Kurtz, Robert C.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lowenfels, Albert B.; Luckett, Brian; Ludwig, Emmy; Petersen, Gloria M.; Polesel, Jerry; Seminara, Daniela; Strayer, Lori; Talamini, Renato

    2013-01-01

    In order to quantify the risk of pancreatic cancer associated with history of any allergy and specific allergies, to investigate differences in the association with risk according to age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index, and to study the influence of age at onset, we pooled data from 10 case-control studies. In total, there were 3,567 cases and 9,145 controls. Study-specific odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, and body mass index. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed by using the Cochran Q statistic. Study-specific odds ratios were pooled by using a random-effects model. The odds ratio for any allergy was 0.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62, 1.00) with heterogeneity among studies (P < 0.001). Heterogeneity was attributable to one study; with that study excluded, the pooled odds ratio was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.84) (Pheterogeneity = 0.23). Hay fever (odds ratio = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.96) and allergy to animals (odds ratio = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.94) were related to lower risk, while there was no statistically significant association with other allergies or asthma. There were no major differences among subgroups defined by age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index. Older age at onset of allergies was slightly more protective than earlier age. PMID:23820785

  8. Rap1 promotes multiple pancreatic islet cell functions and signals through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 to enhance proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick; Bailey, Candice L; Fueger, Patrick T; Newgard, Christopher B; Casey, Patrick J; Kimple, Michelle E

    2010-05-21

    Recent studies have implicated Epac2, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for the Rap subfamily of monomeric G proteins, as an important regulator of insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells. Although the Epac proteins were originally identified as cAMP-responsive activators of Rap1 GTPases, the role of Rap1 in beta-cell biology has not yet been defined. In this study, we examined the direct effects of Rap1 signaling on beta-cell biology. Using the Ins-1 rat insulinoma line, we demonstrate that activated Rap1A, but not related monomeric G proteins, promotes ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation. Using isolated rat islets, we show that this signaling event is rapamycin-sensitive, indicating that it is mediated by the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1-p70 S6 kinase pathway, a known growth regulatory pathway. This newly defined beta-cell signaling pathway acts downstream of cAMP, in parallel with the stimulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, to drive ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation. Activated Rap1A promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, islet cell hypertrophy, and islet cell proliferation, the latter exclusively through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, suggesting that Rap1 is an important regulator of beta-cell function. This newly defined signaling pathway may yield unique targets for the treatment of beta-cell dysfunction in diabetes. PMID:20339002

  9. Pancreatic Islet Responses to Metabolic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Burke, Susan J; Karlstad, Michael D; Collier, J Jason

    2016-09-01

    Carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism are largely controlled by the interplay of various hormones, which includes those secreted by the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. While typically representing only 1% to 2% of the total pancreatic mass, the islets have a remarkable ability to adapt to disparate situations demanding a change in hormone release, such as peripheral insulin resistance. There are many different routes to the onset of insulin resistance, including obesity, lipodystrophy, glucocorticoid excess, and the chronic usage of atypical antipsychotic drugs. All of these situations are coupled to an increase in pancreatic islet size, often with a corresponding increase in insulin production. These adaptive responses within the islets are ultimately intended to maintain glycemic control and to promote macronutrient homeostasis during times of stress. Herein, we review the consequences of specific metabolic trauma that lead to insulin resistance and the corresponding adaptive alterations within the pancreatic islets. PMID:26974425

  10. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, C; Hofmann, B T; Wolters-Eisfeld, G; Bockhorn, M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that the current standard therapeutic options for pancreatic cancer are not adequate and still do not meet the criteria to cure patients suffering from this lethal disease. Although research over the past decade has shown very interesting and promising new therapeutic options for these patients, only minor clinical success was achieved. Therefore, there is still an urgent need for new approaches that deal with early detection and new therapeutic options in pancreatic cancer. To provide optimal care for patients with pancreatic cancer, we need to understand better its complex molecular biology and thus to identify new target molecules that promote the proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer cells. In spite of significant progress in curing cancers with chemotherapy, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most resistant solid tumour cancers and many studies suggest that drug-resistant cancer cells are the most aggressive with the highest relapse and metastatic rates. In this context, activated Notch signalling is strongly linked with chemoresistance and therefore reflects a rational new target to circumvent resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Here, we have focused our discussion on the latest research, current therapy options and recently identified target molecules such as Notch-2 and the heparin-binding growth factor midkine, which exhibit a wide range of cancer-relevant functions and therefore provide attractive new therapeutic target molecules, in terms of pancreatic cancer and other cancers also. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24024905

  11. Inflammatory stimuli promote growth and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through NF-κB pathway dependent repression of PP2Ac.

    PubMed

    Tao, Min; Liu, Lu; Shen, Meng; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gong, Fei-Ran; Zhou, Binhua P; Wu, Yadi; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Kai; Shen, Bairong; Wu, Meng-Yao; Shou, Liu-Mei; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that inflammatory stimulation represses protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a well-known tumor suppressor. However, whether PP2A repression participates in pancreatic cancer progression has not been verified. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and macrophage-conditioned medium (MCM) to establish in vitro inflammation models, and investigated whether inflammatory stimuli affect pancreatic cancer cell growth and invasion PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac)-dependently. Via nude mouse models of orthotopic tumor xenografts and dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC)-induced chronic pancreatitis, we evaluated the effect of an inflammatory microenvironment on PP2Ac expression in vivo. We cloned the PP2Acα and PP2Acβ isoform promoters to investigate the PP2Ac transcriptional regulation mechanisms. MCM accelerated pancreatic cancer cell growth; MCM and LPS promoted cell invasion. DBTC promoted xenograft growth and metastasis, induced tumor-associated macrophage infiltration, promoted angiogenesis, activated the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway, and repressed PP2Ac expression. In vitro, LPS and MCM downregulated PP2Ac mRNA and protein. PP2Acα overexpression attenuated JNK, ERK, PKC, and IKK phosphorylation, and impaired LPS/MCM-stimulated cell invasion and MCM-promoted cell growth. LPS and MCM activated the NF-κB pathway in vitro. LPS and MCM induced IKK and IκB phosphorylation, leading to p65/RelA nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation. Overexpression of the dominant negative forms of IKKα attenuated LPS and MCM downregulation of PP2Ac, suggesting inflammatory stimuli repress PP2Ac expression NF-κB pathway-dependently. Luciferase reporter gene assay verified that LPS and MCM downregulated PP2Ac transcription through an NF-κB-dependent pathway. Our study presents a new mechanism in inflammation-driven cancer progression through NF-κB pathway-dependent PP2Ac repression. PMID:26761431

  12. RHOA and PRKCZ control different aspects of cell motility in pancreatic cancer metastatic clones

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Our understanding of the mechanism regulating pancreatic cancer metastatic phenotype is limited. We analyzed the role of RHOA and PRKCZ in the motility attitude of two subclones of the pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line SUIT-2 (S2), with different in vivo metastatic potential in nude mice: S2-m with a low metastatic potential and highly metastatic S2-CP9 using RHOA and PRKCZ cell-permeable inhibitory peptides. Methods Adhesion assays, cell permeable peptides, RHOA activity assay, western blotting Results When used in combination cell-permeable inhibitory peptides partially inhibited cell adhesion by about 50% in clone S2-CP9. In clone S2-m, the effect was limited to 15% inhibition. In a wound healing assay, S2-CP9 was sensitive only to treatment with the combination of both RHOA and PRKCZ inhibitory peptides. Conversely, S2-m was unable to migrate toward both ends of the wound in basal conditions. Migration of cells through a membrane with 8 μm pores was completely abolished in both clones by individual treatment with RHOA and PRKCZ inhibitory peptides. Conclusion Herein, we demonstrate a critical role for RHOA and PRKCZ in the regulation of different aspects of cell motility of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and demonstrate the need to inhibit both pathways to obtain a functionally relevant effect in most assays. These results indicate that RHOA and PRKCZ, and their downstream effectors, can represent important pharmacological targets that could potentially control the highly metastatic attitude of PDAC. PMID:20236512

  13. Dclk1 Defines Quiescent Pancreatic Progenitors that Promote Injury-Induced Regeneration and Tumorigenesis | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The existence of adult pancreatic progenitor cells has been debated. While some favor the concept of facultative progenitors involved in homeostasis and repair, neither a location nor markers for such cells have been defined. Using genetic lineage tracing, we show that Doublecortin-like kinase-1 (Dclk1) labels a rare population of long-lived, quiescent pancreatic cells. In vitro, Dclk1+ cells proliferate readily and sustain pancreatic organoid growth. In vivo, Dclk1+ cells are necessary for pancreatic regeneration following injury and chronic inflammation.

  14. COUP-TFII Controls Mouse Pancreatic β-Cell Mass through GLP-1-β-Catenin Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Boutant, Marie; Ramos, Oscar Henrique Pereira; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Movassat, Jamileh; Ilias, Anissa; Vallois, David; Planchais, Julien; Pégorier, Jean-Paul; Schuit, Frans; Petit, Patrice X.; Bossard, Pascale; Maedler, Kathrin; Grapin-Botton, Anne; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Background The control of the functional pancreatic β-cell mass serves the key homeostatic function of releasing the right amount of insulin to keep blood sugar in the normal range. It is not fully understood though how β-cell mass is determined. Methodology/Principal Findings Conditional chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII)-deficient mice were generated and crossed with mice expressing Cre under the control of pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (pdx1) gene promoter. Ablation of COUP-TFII in pancreas resulted in glucose intolerance. Beta-cell number was reduced at 1 day and 3 weeks postnatal. Together with a reduced number of insulin-containing cells in the ductal epithelium and normal β-cell proliferation and apoptosis, this suggests decreased β-cell differentiation in the neonatal period. By testing islets isolated from these mice and cultured β-cells with loss and gain of COUP-TFII function, we found that COUP-TFII induces the expression of the β-catenin gene and its target genes such as cyclin D1 and axin 2. Moreover, induction of these genes by glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) via β-catenin was impaired in absence of COUP-TFII. The expression of two other target genes of GLP-1 signaling, GLP-1R and PDX-1 was significantly lower in mutant islets compared to control islets, possibly contributing to reduced β-cell mass. Finally, we demonstrated that COUP-TFII expression was activated by the Wnt signaling-associated transcription factor TCF7L2 (T-cell factor 7-like 2) in human islets and rat β-cells providing a feedback loop. Conclusions/Significance Our findings show that COUP-TFII is a novel component of the GLP-1 signaling cascade that increases β-cell number during the neonatal period. COUP-TFII is required for GLP-1 activation of the β-catenin-dependent pathway and its expression is under the control of TCF7L2. PMID:22292058

  15. Alcohol Disrupts Levels and Function of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to Promote Development of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Maléth, József; Balázs, Anita; Pallagi, Petra; Balla, Zsolt; Kui, Balázs; Katona, Máté; Judák, Linda; Németh, István; Kemény, Lajos V.; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Venglovecz, Viktória; Földesi, Imre; Pető, Zoltán; Somorácz, Áron; Borka, Katalin; Perdomo, Doranda; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Gray, Mike A.; Monterisi, Stefania; Zaccolo, Manuela; Sendler, Matthias; Mayerle, Julia; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Lerch, Markus M.; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Hegyi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Excessive consumption of ethanol is one of the most common causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Alterations to the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) also cause pancreatitis. However, little is known about the role of CFTR in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced pancreatitis. METHODS We measured CFTR activity based on chloride concentrations in sweat from patients with cystic fibrosis, patients admitted to the emergency department because of excessive alcohol consumption, and healthy volunteers. We measured CFTR levels and localization in pancreatic tissues and in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis induced by alcohol. We studied the effects of ethanol, fatty acids, and fatty acid ethyl esters on secretion of pancreatic fluid and HCO3− , levels and function of CFTR, and exchange of Cl− for HCO3− in pancreatic cell lines as well as in tissues from guinea pigs and CFTR knockout mice after administration of alcohol. RESULTS Chloride concentrations increased in sweat samples from patients who acutely abused alcohol but not in samples from healthy volunteers, indicating that alcohol affects CFTR function. Pancreatic tissues from patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis had lower levels of CFTR than tissues from healthy volunteers. Alcohol and fatty acids inhibited secretion of fluid and HCO3− , as well as CFTR activity, in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. These effects were mediated by sustained increases in concentrations of intracellular calcium and adenosine 3’,5’-cyclic monophosphate, depletion of adenosine triphosphate, and depolarization of mitochondrial membranes. In pancreatic cell lines and pancreatic tissues of mice and guinea pigs, administration of ethanol reduced expression of CFTR messenger RNA, reduced the stability of CFTR at the cell surface, and disrupted folding of CFTR at the endoplasmic reticulum. CFTR knockout mice given ethanol or fatty acids developed more

  16. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor promotes metastasis by regulating TLR/CXCR4 activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, HD; Lee, Y; Oh, YK; Jung, JG; Park, YW; Myung, K; Kim, K-H; Koh, SS; Lim, D-S

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) is overproduced in certain types of cancer. However, little is known of the tumorigenic function of PAUF. In this study, we report the X-ray crystal structure of PAUF and reveal that PAUF is a mammalian lectin normally found in plant lectins. We also identify PAUF as an endogenous ligand of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 by screening extracellular domain receptor pools.We further confirmed the specificity of the PAUF–TLR2 interaction. PAUF induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and activates the IKK-β-mediated TPL2/MEK/ERK signaling pathway through TLR2. In agreement with the result of TLR2-mediated ERK activation by PAUF, PAUF induces increased expression of the protumorigenic cytokines RANTES and MIF in THP-1 cells. However, PAUF does not fully activate Iκ-B-α signaling pathways in THP-1 cells, and fails to translocate the p65 subunit of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) complex into the nucleus, resulting in no NF-κB activation. Surprisingly, we found that PAUF also associated with the CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR4)–TLR2 complex and inhibited CXCR4-dependent, TLR2-mediated NF-κB activation. Together, these findings suggest that the new cancer-associated ligand, PAUF, may activate TLR-mediated ERK signaling to produce the protumorigenic cytokines, but inhibits TLR-mediated NF-κB signaling, thereby facilitating tumor growth and escape from innate immune surveillance. PMID:20802527

  17. Insights into the control of geminiviral promoters.

    PubMed

    Borah, B K; Zarreen, F; Baruah, G; Dasgupta, I

    2016-08-01

    Geminiviruses constitute one of the largest groups of plant viruses, having characteristic twinned geminate particles encapsidating small circular single-stranded DNA molecules. Geminiviral promoters are generally located within the intergenic region, although promoters have also been detected within the genes. Similarly, the geminivirus-associated betasatellite also harbours a promoter element for driving the expression of its only ORF. These regulatory elements of geminiviral and satellite origins have been subject of great interest to develop heterologous gene expression modules. Geminiviral promoter and regulatory elements show a complex regulation that is mediated by several host as well as viral proteins. Here, the structural and functional features of geminiviral and satellite promoters are discussed along with their regulation by plant and viral proteins. Although generalization in many cases is difficult and demands further studies, a pattern is seen to emerge on the regulation of the promoters. PMID:27183330

  18. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P.; Falls, Kelly; Reed, Sara M.; Taghiyev, Agshin F.; Quelle, Frederick W.; Gourronc, Francoise; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Major, Heather J.; Askeland, Ryan; Sherman, Scott K.; O'Dorisio, Thomas M.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Howe, James R.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs(PNETs) that correlated with high level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A knockdown cells although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients. PMID:25273089

  19. [Knockdown of dachshund homolog 1 (DACH1) promotes cell apoptosis and inhibits the invasion and migration abilities of Capan-1 pancreatic cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Bu, Xiaona; Wang, Chuan; Jiang, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of the decreased expression of dachshund homolog 1 (DACH1) on cell cycle, apoptosis, invasion and migration of Capan-1 pancreatic cancer cells. Methods After four pairs of DACH1 siRNA were designed and synthesized, double-stranded short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were annealed and inserted into pGenesil-1 vector. The product was then confirmed by enzyme digestion and sequencing analysis. The recombinant plasmids were transfected into Capan-1 cells via Lipofectamine(TM) 2000. Fluorescence microscopy, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were used to detect the transfection efficiency. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle were tested by flow cytometry. Transwell(TM) assay was used to monitor the invasion and migration abilities of Capan-1 cells. Results Recombinant plasmid pshRNA-DACH1 was successfully constructed and transfected into Capan-1 cells. After transfection, the expression of DACH1 was reduced to some extent. Flow cytometry revealed that cell apoptosis was promoted in the pshRNA-DACH1 transfected group compared with control groups, whereas cell cycle had no significant differences among the groups. Transwell(TM) assay validated that the abilities of migration and invasion were inhibited in the pshRNA-DACH1 transfected group. Conclusion Knockdown of DACH1 expression can remarkably enhance the cell apoptosis, restrain the proliferation, migration and invasion of Capan-1 cells. PMID:27609579

  20. Retinoic Acid Promotes the Generation of Pancreatic Endocrine Progenitor Cells and Their Further Differentiation into β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Öström, Maria; Loffler, Kelly A.; Edfalk, Sara; Selander, Lars; Dahl, Ulf; Ricordi, Camillo; Jeon, Jongmin; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Diez, Juan; Edlund, Helena

    2008-01-01

    The identification of secreted factors that can selectively stimulate the generation of insulin producing β-cells from stem and/or progenitor cells represent a significant step in the development of stem cell-based β-cell replacement therapy. By elucidating the molecular mechanisms that regulate the generation of β-cells during normal pancreatic development such putative factors may be identified. In the mouse, β-cells increase markedly in numbers from embryonic day (e) 14.5 and onwards, but the extra-cellular signal(s) that promotes the selective generation of β-cells at these stages remains to be identified. Here we show that the retinoic acid (RA) synthesizing enzyme Raldh1 is expressed in developing mouse and human pancreas at stages when β-cells are generated. We also provide evidence that RA induces the generation of Ngn3+ endocrine progenitor cells and stimulates their further differentiation into β-cells by activating a program of cell differentiation that recapitulates the normal temporal program of β-cell differentiation. PMID:18665267

  1. Fibrin gels engineered with pro-angiogenic growth factors promote engraftment of pancreatic islets in extrahepatic sites in mice.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Mejdi; Manzoli, Vita; Abreu, Maria; Villa, Chiara; Martino, Mikaël M; Molano, R Damaris; Torrente, Yvan; Pileggi, Antonello; Inverardi, Luca; Ricordi, Camillo; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Tomei, Alice A

    2015-09-01

    With a view toward reduction of graft loss, we explored pancreatic islet transplantation within fibrin matrices rendered pro-angiogenic by incorporation of minimal doses of vascular endothelial growth factor-A165 and platelet-derived growth factor-BB presented complexed to a fibrin-bound integrin-binding fibronectin domain. Engineered matrices allowed for extended release of pro-angiogenic factors and for their synergistic signaling with extracellular matrix-binding domains in the post-transplant period. Aprotinin addition delayed matrix degradation and prolonged pro-angiogenic factor availability within the graft. Both subcutaneous (SC) and epididymal fat pad (EFP) sites were evaluated. We show that in the SC site, diabetes reversal in mice transplanted with 1,000 IEQ of syngeneic islets was not observed for islets transplanted alone, while engineered matrices resulted in a diabetes median reversal time (MDRT) of 38 days. In the EFP site, the MDRT with 250 IEQ of syngeneic islets within the engineered matrices was 24 days versus 86 days for islets transplanted alone. Improved function of engineered grafts was associated with enhanced and earlier (by day 7) angiogenesis. Our findings show that by engineering the transplant site to promote prompt re-vascularization, engraftment and long-term function of islet grafts can be improved in relevant extrahepatic sites. PMID:25786390

  2. Shikonin promotes autophagy in BXPC-3 human pancreatic cancer cells through the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    SHI, SHUQING; CAO, HAIMEI

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of shikonin on autophagy in BXPC-3 human pancreatic cancer cells and its underlying mechanism. Cell viability was assessed using the Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and the expression of light chain (LC) 3, p62, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, phosphorylated (p)-PI3K and p-Akt was analyzed using western blot analysis. Following treatment with 1 μmol/l shikonin for 48 h and 2.5 and 5 μmol/l shikonin for 24 and 48 h, the viability of the BXPC-3 cells was found to be significantly reduced and the protein expression of LC3-II/LC3-I was observed to be increased, while the protein expression of p62, PI3K, Akt, p-PI3K and p-Akt was decreased. These findings suggest that shikonin promotes autophagy in BXPC-3 cells and that the underlying mechanism may be associated with the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:25120662

  3. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 3a (eIF3a) Promotes Cell Proliferation and Motility in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu Qian; Liu, Yu; Yao, Min Ya; Jin, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Identifying a target molecule that is crucially involved in pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis is necessary in developing an effective treatment. The study aimed to investigate the role of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3a (eIF3a) in the cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic cancer. Our data showed that the expression of eIF3a was upregulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as compared with its expression in normal pancreatic tissues. Knockdown of eIF3a by a specific shRNA caused significant decreases in cell proliferation and clonogenic abilities in pancreatic cancer SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Consistently, the pancreatic cancer cell growth rates were also impaired in xenotransplanted mice. Moreover, wound-healing assay showed that depletion of eIF3a significantly slowed down the wound recovery processes in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Transwell migration and invasion assays further showed that cell migration and invasion abilities were significantly inhibited by knockdown of eIF3a in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Statistical analysis of eIF3a expression in 140 cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma samples revealed that eIF3a expression was significantly associated with tumor metastasis and TNM staging. These analyses suggest that eIF3a contributes to cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27550487

  4. Pancreatic signals controlling food intake; insulin, glucagon and amylin

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Stephen C; Lutz, Thomas A; Geary, Nori; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The control of food intake and body weight by the brain relies upon the detection and integration of signals reflecting energy stores and fluxes, and their interaction with many different inputs related to food palatability and gastrointestinal handling as well as social, emotional, circadian, habitual and other situational factors. This review focuses upon the role of hormones secreted by the endocrine pancreas: hormones, which individually and collectively influence food intake, with an emphasis upon insulin, glucagon and amylin. Insulin and amylin are co-secreted by B-cells and provide a signal that reflects both circulating energy in the form of glucose and stored energy in the form of visceral adipose tissue. Insulin acts directly at the liver to suppress the synthesis and secretion of glucose, and some plasma insulin is transported into the brain and especially the mediobasal hypothalamus where it elicits a net catabolic response, particularly reduced food intake and loss of body weight. Amylin reduces meal size by stimulating neurons in the hindbrain, and there is evidence that amylin additionally functions as an adiposity signal controlling body weight as well as meal size. Glucagon is secreted from A-cells and increases glucose secretion from the liver. Glucagon acts in the liver to reduce meal size, the signal being relayed to the brain via the vagus nerves. To summarize, hormones of the endocrine pancreas are collectively at the crossroads of many aspects of energy homeostasis. Glucagon and amylin act in the short term to reduce meal size, and insulin sensitizes the brain to short-term meal-generated satiety signals; and insulin and perhaps amylin as well act over longer intervals to modulate the amount of fat maintained and defended by the brain. Hormones of the endocrine pancreas interact with receptors at many points along the gut–brain axis, from the liver to the sensory vagus nerve to the hindbrain to the hypothalamus; and their signals are

  5. Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 promotes cell invasion and angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaochun; Han, Ye; Xue, Xiaofeng; Li, Wei; Guo, Xiaobo; Li, Pu; Wang, Yunliang; Li, Dechun; Zhou, Jin; Zhi, Qiaoming

    2016-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7), also known as vascular endothelial stain, was firstly identified as a modulator of smooth muscle cell migration. Though the expression of EGFL7 was reported to be up-regulated during tumorigenesis, the clinical and biological functions of EGFL7 in pancreatic carcinoma (PC) were still not fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the serum EGFL7 level in PC tissues was statistically higher than that in normal subjects (p<0.001), and its level in non-resectable patients was also higher than that in resectable ones (p=0.013). Among these resectable PC patients, the postoperative EGFL7 expression was significantly down-regulated when tumors were resected (p=0.018). Using the immunohistochemistry method, our results demonstrated that the positive expression of EGFL7 was significantly associated with the TNM stage (p=0.024), lymph node metastasis (p=0.003) and local invasion (p=0.022), and the EGFL7 expression closely correlated to the micro-vessel density (MVD) in PC tissues by Spearman analysis (r=0.941, p=0.000). In vitro, EGFL7 was silenced by the small interference RNA in PC cells, and our data indicated that down-regulation of EGFL7 did not influence the cycle progression, proliferation, colony formation and apoptosis of PC cells (p>0.05), whereas inhibition of EGFL7 expression could decrease PaCa-2 cell invasion (p<0.05). More interestingly, by tubular formation, Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and ELISA assays, our results revealed that silencing EGFL7 expression represented a strong inhibiting effect on tubular formation of micro-vessels through down-regulating the protein levels of VEGF and Ang-2 (p<0.05). Our results raised the possibility of using EGFL7as a potential prognostic biomarker and therapy target of PC, and down-regulation of EGFL7 might be considered to be a potentially important molecular treatment strategy for patients with PC. PMID:26796281

  6. Early pancreatic islet fate and maturation is controlled through RBP-Jκ.

    PubMed

    Cras-Méneur, Corentin; Conlon, Megan; Zhang, Yaqing; Pasca Di Magliano, Marina; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling is known to control early pancreatic differentiation through Ngn3 repression. In later stages, downstream of Notch, the Presenilins are still required to maintain the endocrine fate allocation. Amongst their multiple targets, it remains unclear which one actually controls the maintenance of the fate of the early islets. Conditional deletions of the Notch effector RBP-Jκ with lineage tracing in Presenilin-deficient endocrine progenitors, demonstrated that this factor is central to the control of the fate through a non-canonical Notch mechanism. RBP-Jκ mice exhibit normal islet morphogenesis and function, however, a fraction of the progenitors fails to differentiate and develop into disorganized masses resembling acinar to ductal metaplasia and chronic pancreatitis. A subsequent deletion of RBP-Jκ in forming β-cells led to the transdifferentiation into the other endocrine cells types, indicating that this factor still mediates the maintenance of the fate within the endocrine lineage itself. These results highlight the dual importance of Notch signaling for the endocrine lineage. Even after Ngn3 expression, Notch activity is required to maintain both fate and maturation of the Ngn3 progenitors. In a subset of the cells, these alterations of Notch signaling halt their differentiation and leads to acinar to ductal metaplasia. PMID:27240887

  7. Early pancreatic islet fate and maturation is controlled through RBP-Jκ

    PubMed Central

    Cras-Méneur, Corentin; Conlon, Megan; Zhang, Yaqing; Pasca Di Magliano, Marina; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling is known to control early pancreatic differentiation through Ngn3 repression. In later stages, downstream of Notch, the Presenilins are still required to maintain the endocrine fate allocation. Amongst their multiple targets, it remains unclear which one actually controls the maintenance of the fate of the early islets. Conditional deletions of the Notch effector RBP-Jκ with lineage tracing in Presenilin-deficient endocrine progenitors, demonstrated that this factor is central to the control of the fate through a non-canonical Notch mechanism. RBP-Jκ mice exhibit normal islet morphogenesis and function, however, a fraction of the progenitors fails to differentiate and develop into disorganized masses resembling acinar to ductal metaplasia and chronic pancreatitis. A subsequent deletion of RBP-Jκ in forming β-cells led to the transdifferentiation into the other endocrine cells types, indicating that this factor still mediates the maintenance of the fate within the endocrine lineage itself. These results highlight the dual importance of Notch signaling for the endocrine lineage. Even after Ngn3 expression, Notch activity is required to maintain both fate and maturation of the Ngn3 progenitors. In a subset of the cells, these alterations of Notch signaling halt their differentiation and leads to acinar to ductal metaplasia. PMID:27240887

  8. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Arnt mRNA expressed in a circadian manner in mouse pancreatic islets. •Expressions of Dbp and Arnt damped in the islets of a diabetic model mouse. •DBP and E4BP4 regulate Arnt promoter activity by direct binding. •Arnt may have a role in connecting circadian rhythm and metabolism. -- Abstract: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1{sup −/−} A{sup y}/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the

  9. Pancreatic β-cell Enhancers Regulate Rhythmic Transcription of Genes Controlling Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Perelis, Mark; Marcheva, Biliana; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Schipma, Matthew J.; Hutchison, Alan L.; Taguchi, Akihiko; Peek, Clara Bien; Hong, Heekyung; Huang, Wenyu; Omura, Chiaki; Allred, Amanda L.; Bradfield, Christopher A.; Dinner, Aaron R.; Barish, Grant D.; Bass, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1 are essential components of the molecular clock that coordinate behavior and metabolism with the solar cycle. Genetic or environmental perturbation of circadian cycles contributes to metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes. To study the impact of the cell-autonomous clock on pancreatic β-cell function, we examined islets from mice with either intact or disrupted BMAL1 expression both throughout life and limited to adulthood. We found pronounced oscillation of insulin secretion that was synchronized with the expression of genes encoding secretory machinery and signaling factors that regulate insulin release. CLOCK/BMAL1 co-localized with the pancreatic transcription factor PDX1 within active enhancers distinct from those controlling rhythmic metabolic gene networks in liver. β-cell clock ablation in adult mice caused severe glucose intolerance. Thus cell-type specific enhancers underlie the circadian control of peripheral metabolism throughout life and may help explain its deregulation in diabetes. PMID:26542580

  10. Genetic Variability in Energy Balance and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in a Population-Based Case-Control Study in Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianjun; Dhakal, Ishwori B.; Zhang, Xuemei; Prizment, Anna E.; Anderson, Kristin E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Accumulating evidence suggests that energy imbalance plays a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. However, it remains unclear whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes regulating energy homeostasis influence pancreatic cancer risk. We investigated this question in a case-control study conducted from 1994 to 1998. Methods Cases (n=173) were ascertained from hospitals in the Twin Cities and Mayo Clinic, Minnesota. Controls (n=476) were identified from the general population and frequency matched to cases by age and sex. Seven SNPs were evaluated in relation to pancreatic cancer using unconditional logistic regression. Results After adjustment for confounders, the leucine/proline or proline/proline genotype of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene rs16139 was associated with a lower risk than the leucine/leucine genotype [odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval) (95% CI): 0.40 (0.15, 0.91)]. Conversely, an increased risk was observed for the glycine/arginine or arginine/arginine genotype of the adrenoceptor beta 2, surface (ADRB2) gene rs1042713 as compared with the glycine/glycine genotype [OR (95% CI): 1.52 (1.01, 2.31)]. Conclusions This study first reveals that SNPs in genes modulating energy intake (NPY) and energy expenditure (ADRB2) altered pancreatic cancer risk. If confirmed by other studies, our findings may shed new light on the etiology and prevention of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24201779

  11. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body's immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli—like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells—and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. HP often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of HP patients to develop pancreatic cancer. PMID:24600409

  12. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomaszewska, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8nmol/kg/dose) was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula. Results Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food

  13. Gabapentin-induced mitogenic activity in rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Dethloff, L; Barr, B; Bestervelt, L; Bulera, S; Sigler, R; LaGattuta, M; de La Iglesia, F

    2000-05-01

    Gabapentin induces pancreatic acinar cell tumors in rats through unknown, yet apparently nongenotoxic mechanisms. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether gabapentin acts as a tumor promoter by stimulating acinar cell proliferation in rat pancreas. To this end, indices of pancreatic growth, including increased pancreatic weight, stimulation of acinar cell proliferation, and/or enhanced expression of immediate-early oncogenes were monitored in rats given gabapentin in the diet at 2 g/kg/day for up to 12 months. Rats fed raw soy flour (RSF), a known inducer of pancreatic acinar cell tumors through cholecystokinin-mediated mitogenic stimulation, were used throughout as positive controls. In addition, recent data suggests that gabapentin binds to the alpha(2)delta subunit of a voltage-gated, L-type calcium channel. Because signaling pathways for proliferative processes in pancreatic acinar cells involve intracellular calcium mobilization, the effects of gabapentin on intracellular calcium mobilization ([Ca(2+)](i)) and (3)H-thymidine incorporation were investigated in pancreatic acinar cells isolated from normal rat pancreas and in the AR42J rat pancreatic tumor cell line. As indicated by BrdU labeling indices, acinar cell proliferation increased 3-fold by Day 3 of RSF treatment and remained slightly greater than controls throughout the experiment. Pancreatic weights of RSF-fed rats were 32 to 56% greater than controls throughout the experiment. In contrast, gabapentin had no effect on pancreatic weight or acinar cell labeling index, and therefore had no apparent effect on pancreatic growth. In isolated pancreatic acinar cells, however, gabapentin induced mobilization of intracellular calcium and caused a slight increase in (3)H-thymidine incorporation. The data suggest that gabapentin may possess low level mitogenic activity, which is not easily detectable in in vivo assays. PMID:10788559

  14. Polycomb complex protein BMI-1 promotes invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer stem cells by activating PI3K/AKT signaling, an ex vivo, in vitro, and in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min-Cong; Jiao, Min; Wu, Tao; Jing, Li; Cui, Jie; Guo, Hui; Tian, Tao; Ruan, Zhi-ping; Wei, Yong-Chang; Jiang, Li-Li; Sun, Hai-Feng; Huang, Lan-Xuan; Nan, Ke-Jun; Li, Chun-Li

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory indicates cancer stem cells are the key to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Studies showed that BMI-1 could promote self-renew, differentiation and tumor formation of CSCs and invasion/metastasis of human cancer. However, whether BMI-1 could regulate invasion and metastasis ability of CSCs is still unclear. In our study, we found that up-regulated expression of BMI-1 was associated with tumor invasion, metastasis and poor survival of pancreatic cancer patients. CD133+ cells were obtained by using magnetic cell sorting and identified of CSCs properties such as self-renew, multi-differentiation and tumor formation ability. Then, we found that BMI-1 expression was up-regulated in pancreatic cancer stem cells. Knockdown of BMI-1 expression attenuated invasion ability of pancreatic cancer stem cells in Transwell system and liver metastasis capacity in nude mice which were injected CSCs through the caudal vein. We are the first to reveal that BMI-1 could promote invasion and metastasis ability of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Finally, we identified that BMI-1 expression activating PI3K/AKT singing pathway by negative regulating PTEN was the main mechanism of promoting invasion and metastasis ability of pancreatic CSCs. In summary, our findings indicate that BMI-1 could be used as the therapeutic target to inhibiting CSCs-mediated pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26840020

  15. General control nonderepressible 2 deletion predisposes to asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Phillipson-Weiner, Lindsey; Mirek, Emily T; Wang, Yongping; McAuliffe, W Geoffrey; Wek, Ronald C; Anthony, Tracy G

    2016-06-01

    Treatment with the antileukemic agent asparaginase can induce acute pancreatitis, but the pathophysiology remains obscure. In the liver of mice, eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) kinase general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) is essential for mitigating metabolic stress caused by asparaginase. We determined the consequences of asparaginase treatment on the pancreata of wild-type (WT, GCN2-intact) and GCN2-deleted (ΔGcn2) mice. Mean pancreas weights in ΔGcn2 mice treated with asparaginase for 8 days were increased (P < 0.05) above all other groups. Histological examination revealed acinar cell swelling and altered staining of zymogen granules in ΔGcn2, but not WT, mice. Oil Red O staining and measurement of pancreas triglycerides excluded lipid accumulation as a contributor to acini appearance. Instead, transmission electron microscopy revealed dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and accumulation of autophagic vacuoles in the pancreas of ΔGcn2 mice treated with asparaginase. Consistent with the idea that loss of GCN2 in a pancreas exposed to asparaginase induced ER stress, phosphorylation of protein kinase R-like ER kinase (PERK) and its substrate eIF2 was increased in the pancreas of asparaginase-treated ΔGcn2 mice. In addition, mRNA expression of PERK target genes, activating transcription factors 4, 3, and 6 (Atf4, Atf3, and Atf6), fibroblast growth factor 21 (Fgf21), heat shock 70-kDa protein 5 (Hspa5), and spliced Xbp1 (sXbp1), as well as pancreas mass, was elevated in the pancreas of asparaginase-treated ΔGcn2 mice. Furthermore, genetic markers of oxidative stress [sirtuin (Sirt1)], inflammation [tumor necrosis factor-α (Tnfα)], and pancreatic injury [pancreatitis-associated protein (Pap)] were elevated in asparaginase-treated ΔGcn2, but not WT, mice. These data indicate that loss of GCN2 predisposes the exocrine pancreas to a maladaptive ER stress response and autophagy during asparaginase treatment and represent a genetic basis for

  16. Smoking in Malaysia: promotion and control.

    PubMed

    Soon Kee Teoh

    1984-01-01

    This discussion of the promotion and control of smoking in Malaysia covers: tobacco cultivation; cigarette manufacture, advertising, and smoking; action against smoking; smoking in public; price increases; and future targets. About 62,000 families (120,000 people) of Malaysia's 14 million population are involved in tobacco farming, and 360 independent curers employ about 25,000 workers. Tobacco output has increased from 1.82 million kilograms in 1970 to a peak of 9.4 million kilograms in 1982, worth $38 million. Tobacco manufacturers have direct interest in tobacco growing. 60% of the tobacco required for cigarette manufacturing is locally produced and is expected to increase to 65-70% by 1985. The industry, unable to deny the harmful effects of cigarette smoking, is now exploiting the economy of the tobacco farmers to justify their business and to influence the government from taking any action against smoking. The government still provides technical expertise, guarantees purchase of tobacco, and provides almost 75% of the fertilizers used. There are 7 cigarette manufacturing companies. Cigarette sales in 1982 totaled nearly $460 million. The government received over $210 million or 47% of the total sales in various forms of taxes, a factor which influenced government handling of the smoking issue. Cigarettes were the most advertised product in 1981 when $9 million was spent. In 1982, all cigarette ads were banned from television and radio and in all government publications. The government stated that the revenue could be replaced. The number of cigarette smokers increased from 5 to 7% over the last decade. Recent studies of secondary school children showed a smoking incidence of about 20%; about half were habitual smokers and about 1% had smoked for over 3 years. Except for elderly villagers, few women smoke. After 7 years of lobbying by the Malaysian Medical Association and the Ministry of Health, the Cabinet approved legislation in 1977 requiring all cigarette

  17. Interleukin 6 Is Required for Pancreatic Cancer Progression by Promoting MAPK Signaling Activation and Oxidative Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaqing; Yan, Wei; Collins, Meredith A.; Bednar, Filip; Rakshit, Sabita; Zetter, Bruce R.; Stanger, Ben Z.; Chung, Ivy; Rhim, Andrew D.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest human malignancies, is almost invariably associated with the presence of an oncogenic form of Kras. Mice expressing oncogenic Kras in the pancreas recapitulate the step-wise progression of the human disease. The inflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL6) is often expressed by multiple cell types within the tumor microenvironment. Here, we show that IL6 is required for the maintenance and progression of pancreatic cancer precursor lesions. In fact, the lack of IL6 completely ablates cancer progression even in presence of oncogenic Kras. Mechanistically, we show that IL6 synergizes with oncogenic Kras to activate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification program downstream of the MAPK/ERK signaling cascade. In addition, IL6 regulates the inflammatory microenvironment of pancreatic cancer throughout its progression, providing several signals that are essential for carcinogenesis. Thus, IL6 emerges as a key player at all stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis, and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24097820

  18. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  19. Pancreatic α-Amylase Controls Glucose Assimilation by Duodenal Retrieval through N-Glycan-specific Binding, Endocytosis, and Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Date, Kimie; Satoh, Ayano; Iida, Kaoruko; Ogawa, Haruko

    2015-01-01

    α-Amylase, a major pancreatic protein and starch hydrolase, is essential for energy acquisition. Mammalian pancreatic α-amylase binds specifically to glycoprotein N-glycans in the brush-border membrane to activate starch digestion, whereas it significantly inhibits glucose uptake by Na+/glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) at high concentrations (Asanuma-Date, K., Hirano, Y., Le, N., Sano, K., Kawasaki, N., Hashii, N., Hiruta, Y., Nakayama, K., Umemura, M., Ishikawa, K., Sakagami, H., and Ogawa, H. (2012) Functional regulation of sugar assimilation by N-glycan-specific interaction of pancreatic α-amylase with glycoproteins of duodenal brush border membrane. J. Biol. Chem. 287, 23104–23118). However, how the inhibition is stopped was unknown. Here, we show a new mechanism for the regulation of intestinal glucose absorption. Immunohistochemistry revealed that α-amylase in the duodena of non-fasted, but not fasted, pigs was internalized from the pancreatic fluid and immunostained. We demonstrated that after N-glycan binding, pancreatic α-amylase underwent internalization into lysosomes in a process that was inhibited by α-mannoside. The internalized α-amylase was degraded, showing low enzymatic activity and molecular weight at the basolateral membrane. In a human intestinal Caco-2 cell line, Alexa Fluor 488-labeled pancreatic α-amylase bound to the cytomembrane was transported to lysosomes through the endocytic pathway and then disappeared, suggesting degradation. Our findings indicate that N-glycan recognition by α-amylase protects enterocytes against a sudden increase in glucose concentration and restores glucose uptake by gradual internalization, which homeostatically controls the postprandial blood glucose level. The internalization of α-amylase may also enhance the supply of amino acids required for the high turnover of small intestine epithelial cells. This study provides novel and significant insights into the control of blood sugar during the absorption

  20. HAb18G/CD147 Promotes pSTAT3-Mediated Pancreatic Cancer Development via CD44s †, ‡

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Tang, Wenhua; Wu, Xiaoqing; Karnak, David; Meng, Xiaojie; Thompson, Rachel; Hao, Xinbao; Li, Yongmin; Qiao, Xiaotan T.; Lin, Jiayuh; Fuchs, James; Simeone, Diane M.; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Xu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose STAT3 plays a critical role in initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer. However, therapeutically targeting STAT3 is failure in clinic. We previously identified HAb18G/CD147 as an effective target for cancer treatment. In this study, we aimed to investigate potential role of HAb18G/CD147 in STAT3-involved pancreatic tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design The expression of HAb18G/CD147, pSTAT3 and CD44s were determined in tissue microarrays. The tumorigenic function and molecular signaling mechanism of HAb18G/CD147 was assessed by in vitro cellular and clonogenic growth, reporter assay, immunoblot, immunofluorescence staining, immunoprecipitation, and in vivo tumor formationusing loss or gain-of-function strategies. Results Highly expressed HAb18G/CD147 promoted cellular and clonogenic growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. CyPA, a ligand of CD147, stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation and its downstream genes cyclin D1/survivin through HAb18G/CD147 dependent mechanisms. HAb18G/CD147 was associated and co-localized with cancer stem cell marker CD44s in lipid rafts. The inhibitors of STAT3 and survivin, as well as CD44s neutralizing antibodies suppressed the HAb18G/CD147-induced cell growth. High HAb18G/CD147 expression in pancreatic cancer was significantly correlated with the poor tumor differentiation, and the high co-expression of HAb18G/CD147-CD44s-STAT3 associated with poor survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. Conclusions We identified HAb18G/CD147 as a novel upstream activator of STAT3 via interacts with CD44s and plays a critical role in the development of pancreatic cancer. The data suggest HAb18G/CD147 could be a promising therapeutic target for highly aggressive pancreatic cancer and a surrogate marker in the STAT3-targeted molecular therapies. PMID:24132924

  1. Par3 regulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells via interaction with Tiam1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xingjun; Wang, Min; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xin; Shen, Ming; Zhu, Feng; Shi, Chengjian; Xu, Meng; Li, Xu; Peng, Feng; Zhang, Hang; Feng, Yechen; Xie, Yu; Xu, Xiaodong; Jia, Wei; He, Ruizhi; Jiang, Jianxin; Hu, Jun; Tian, Rui; Qin, Renyi

    2016-08-01

    The conserved polarity complex, which comprises partitioning-defective proteins Par3, Par6, and the atypical protein kinase C, affects various cell-polarization events, including assembly of tight junctions. Control of tight junction assembly is closely related to invasion and migration potential. However, as the importance of conserved polarity complexes in regulating pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis is unclear, we investigated their role and mechanism in pancreatic cancers. We first detect that the key protein of the conserved polarity complex finds that only Par3 is down-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues while Par6 and aPKC show no difference. What is more, Par3 tissues level was significantly and positively associated with patient overall survival. Knocking-down Par3 promotes pancreatic cancer cells invasion and migration. And Par3 requires interaction with Tiam1 to affect tight junction assembly, and then affect invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Then, we find that tight junction marker protein ZO-1 and claudin-1 are down-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues. And the relationship of the expression of Par3 and ZO-1 in pancreatic cancer tissue is linear correlation. We establish liver metastasis model of human pancreatic cancer cells in Balb/c nude mice and find that knocking down Par3 promotes invasion and metastasis and disturbs tight junction assembly in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that the Par3 regulates invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancers by controlling tight junction assembly. PMID:26084985

  2. Accumulation of Extracellular Hyaluronan by Hyaluronan Synthase 3 Promotes Tumor Growth and Modulates the Pancreatic Cancer Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunmei; Singha, Netai C.; Osgood, Ryan J.; Symons, Rebecca; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiaoming; Thompson, Curtis B.; Infante, Jeffrey R.; Jacobetz, Michael A.; Tuveson, David A.; Frost, Gregory I.; Shepard, H. Michael; Huang, Zhongdong

    2014-01-01

    Extensive accumulation of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan is found in pancreatic cancer. The role of hyaluronan synthases 2 and 3 (HAS2, 3) was investigated in pancreatic cancer growth and the tumor microenvironment. Overexpression of HAS3 increased hyaluronan synthesis in BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells. In vivo, overexpression of HAS3 led to faster growing xenograft tumors with abundant extracellular hyaluronan accumulation. Treatment with pegylated human recombinant hyaluronidase (PEGPH20) removed extracellular hyaluronan and dramatically decreased the growth rate of BxPC-3 HAS3 tumors compared to parental tumors. PEGPH20 had a weaker effect on HAS2-overexpressing tumors which grew more slowly and contained both extracellular and intracellular hyaluronan. Accumulation of hyaluronan was associated with loss of plasma membrane E-cadherin and accumulation of cytoplasmic β-catenin, suggesting disruption of adherens junctions. PEGPH20 decreased the amount of nuclear hypoxia-related proteins and induced translocation of E-cadherin and β-catenin to the plasma membrane. Translocation of E-cadherin was also seen in tumors from a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer and in a human non-small cell lung cancer sample from a patient treated with PEGPH20. In conclusion, hyaluronan accumulation by HAS3 favors pancreatic cancer growth, at least in part by decreasing epithelial cell adhesion, and PEGPH20 inhibits these changes and suppresses tumor growth. PMID:25147816

  3. Accumulation of extracellular hyaluronan by hyaluronan synthase 3 promotes tumor growth and modulates the pancreatic cancer microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kultti, Anne; Zhao, Chunmei; Singha, Netai C; Zimmerman, Susan; Osgood, Ryan J; Symons, Rebecca; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiaoming; Thompson, Curtis B; Infante, Jeffrey R; Jacobetz, Michael A; Tuveson, David A; Frost, Gregory I; Shepard, H Michael; Huang, Zhongdong

    2014-01-01

    Extensive accumulation of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan is found in pancreatic cancer. The role of hyaluronan synthases 2 and 3 (HAS2, 3) was investigated in pancreatic cancer growth and the tumor microenvironment. Overexpression of HAS3 increased hyaluronan synthesis in BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells. In vivo, overexpression of HAS3 led to faster growing xenograft tumors with abundant extracellular hyaluronan accumulation. Treatment with pegylated human recombinant hyaluronidase (PEGPH20) removed extracellular hyaluronan and dramatically decreased the growth rate of BxPC-3 HAS3 tumors compared to parental tumors. PEGPH20 had a weaker effect on HAS2-overexpressing tumors which grew more slowly and contained both extracellular and intracellular hyaluronan. Accumulation of hyaluronan was associated with loss of plasma membrane E-cadherin and accumulation of cytoplasmic β-catenin, suggesting disruption of adherens junctions. PEGPH20 decreased the amount of nuclear hypoxia-related proteins and induced translocation of E-cadherin and β-catenin to the plasma membrane. Translocation of E-cadherin was also seen in tumors from a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer and in a human non-small cell lung cancer sample from a patient treated with PEGPH20. In conclusion, hyaluronan accumulation by HAS3 favors pancreatic cancer growth, at least in part by decreasing epithelial cell adhesion, and PEGPH20 inhibits these changes and suppresses tumor growth. PMID:25147816

  4. Promoter control of translation in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gunkel, N; Braddock, M; Thorburn, A M; Muckenthaler, M; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1995-02-11

    The HIV-1 promoter directs the high level production of transcripts in Xenopus oocytes. However, despite being exported to the cytoplasm, the transcripts are not translated [M. Braddock, A. M. Thorburn, A. Chambers, G. D. Elliott, G. J. Anderson, A. J. Kingsman and S. M. Kingsman (1990) Cell, 62, 1123-1133]. We have shown previously that this is a function of promoter sequences and is independent of the TAR RNA element that is normally located at the 5' end of all HIV mRNAs. We now show that a three nucleotide substitution at position -340, upstream of the RNA start site, reverses the translation inhibition. This site coincides with a sequence that can bind the haematopoietic transcription factor GATA. The inhibition of translation can also be reversed by treatment with inhibitors of casein kinase II or by injection into the nucleus of antibodies specific for the FRGY2 family of RNP proteins. We suggest that the -340 site influences the quality of the transcription complex such that transcripts are diverted to a nucleus-dependent translation inhibition pathway. PMID:7885836

  5. Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Lin; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming; Guo, Xuegang

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3.

  6. Predator control promotes invasive dominated ecological states.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Arian D; Johnson, Christopher N; Ritchie, Euan G; O'Neill, Adam J

    2010-08-01

    Invasive species are regarded as one of the top five drivers of the global extinction crisis. In response, extreme measures have been applied in an attempt to control or eradicate invasives, with little success overall. We tested the idea that state shifts to invasive dominance are symptomatic of losses in ecosystem resilience, due to the suppression of apex predators. This concept was investigated in Australia where the high rate of mammalian extinctions is largely attributed to the destructive influence of invasive species. Intensive pest control is widely applied across the continent, simultaneously eliminating Australia's apex predator, the dingo (Canis lupus dingo). We show that predator management accounts for shifts between two main ecosystem states. Lethal control fractures dingo social structure and leads to bottom-up driven increases in invasive mesopredators and herbivores. Where control is relaxed, dingoes re-establish top-down regulation of ecosystems, allowing for the recovery of biodiversity and productivity. PMID:20545732

  7. Incretin-based drugs and risk of acute pancreatitis: A nested-case control study within a healthcare database.

    PubMed

    Soranna, Davide; Bosetti, Cristina; Casula, Manuela; Tragni, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L; Vecchia, Carlo L A; Merlino, Luca; Corrao, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    To assess the association between use of incretin-based drugs for diabetes mellitus and the occurrence of acute pancreatitis. A population-based, nested case-control study was performed within a cohort of 166,591 patients from the Lombardy region (Italy) aged 40 years or older who were newly treated with oral antihyperglycaemic agents between 2004 and 2007. Cases were 666 patients who experienced acute pancreatitis from April 1, 2008 until December 31, 2012. For each case patient, up to 20 controls were randomly selected from the cohort and matched on gender, age at cohort entry, and date of index prescription. Conditional logistic regression was used to model the risk of acute pancreatitis associated with use of incretin-based drugs within 30 days before hospitalization, after adjustment for several risk factors, including the use of other antihyperglycaemic agents. Sensitivity analyses were performed in order to account for possible sources of systematic uncertainty. Use of incretin-based drugs within 30 days was reported by 17 (2.6%) cases of acute pancreatitis versus 193 (1.5%) controls. The corresponding multivariate odds ratio was 1.75 (95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 2.99). Slightly lower and no significant excess risks were observed by shortening (15 days) and increasing (60 and 90 days) the time-window at risk. This study supports a possible increased risk of acute pancreatitis in relation to use of incretin-based drugs reported in a few previous studies. However, given the potential for bias and the inconsistency with other studies, additional investigations are needed to clarify the safety of incretin-based-drugs. PMID:25748827

  8. [The basic plan to promote cancer control in Japan].

    PubMed

    Monden, Morito

    2013-05-01

    Cancer has been the leading cause of death in Japan since 1981. The Japanese government implemented the Comprehensive 10-year Strategy for Cancer Control in 1984, following which the Second- and Third-term Comprehensive 10-year Strategy for Cancer Control have been implemented every 10years to promote cancer research and disseminate high-quality cancer medical services. The Cancer Control Act was approved in June 2006, and the law has been implemented since April 2007. Based on this law, the Basic Plan to Promote Cancer Control program was discussed by the Cancer Control Promotion Council and approved by the Cabinet of Japan in June 2007. This plan was launched in June 2007, and covered 5 fiscal years from 2007 to 2011. It also provides a model for developing the Prefectural Plan to Promote Cancer Control. The Basic Plan needs to be updated at least every 5 years under the Cancer Control Act; therefore, the Phase Two Basic Plan was approved by the Japanese Cabinet in June 2012. Although the first plan was limited to medicine or medical care, the second plan was broadened to include social undertakings such as patient support in terms of job acquisition or student education for an indepth understanding of cancer. This paper includes the history of cancer control promotion in Japan and viewpoints on the basic plan for cancer control. PMID:23863577

  9. Prominent pancreatic endocrinopathy and altered control of food intake disrupt energy homeostasis in prion diseases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, J.D.; Berardinelli, J.G.; Rocke, T.E.; Bessen, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that can induce endocrinopathies. The basis of altered endocrine function in prion diseases is not well understood, and the purpose of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal relationship between energy homeostasis and prion infection in hamsters inoculated with either the 139H strain of scrapie agent, which induces preclinical weight gain, or the HY strain of transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), which induces clinical weight loss. Temporal changes in body weight, feed, and water intake were measured as well as both non-fasted and fasted concentrations of serum glucose, insulin, glucagon, ??-ketones, and leptin. In 139H scrapie-infected hamsters, polydipsia, hyperphagia, non-fasted hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia, and fasted hyperleptinemia were found at preclinical stages and are consistent with an anabolic syndrome that has similarities to type II diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome X. In HY TME-infected hamsters, hypodipsia, hypersecretion of glucagon (in both non-fasted and fasted states), increased fasted ??-ketones, fasted hypoglycemia, and suppressed non-fasted leptin concentrations were found while feed intake was normal. These findings suggest a severe catabolic syndrome in HY TME infection mediated by chronic increases in glucagon secretion. In both models, alterations of pancreatic endocrine function were not associated with PrPSc deposition in the pancreas. The results indicate that prominent endocrinopathy underlies alterations in body weight, pancreatic endocrine function, and intake of food. The prion-induced alterations of energy homeostasis in 139H scrapie- or HY TME-infected hamsters could occur within areas of the hypothalamus that control food satiety and/or within autonomic centers that provide neural outflow to the pancreas. ?? 2008 Society for Endocrinology.

  10. Controlled Film Architectures to Detect a Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer Using Impedance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Soares, Andrey C; Soares, Juliana C; Shimizu, Flavio M; Melendez, Matias E; Carvalho, André L; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2015-11-25

    The need for analytical devices for detecting cancer at early stages has motivated research into nanomaterials where synergy is sought to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity in low-cost biosensors. In this study, we developed a film architecture combining self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and layer-by-layer (LbL) films of polysaccharide chitosan and the protein concanavalin A, on which a layer of anti-CA19-9 antibody was adsorbed. Using impedance spectroscopy with this biosensor, we were capable of detecting low concentrations of the antigen CA19-9, an important biomarker for pancreatic cancer. The limit of detection of 0.69U/mL reached is sufficient for detecting pancreatic cancer at very early stages. The selectivity of the biosensor was inferred from a series of control experiments with samples of cell lines that were tested positive (HT29) and negative (SW620) for the biomarker CA19-9, in addition to the lack of changes in the capacitance value for other analytes and antigen that are not related to this type of cancer. The high sensitivity and selectivity are ascribed to the very specific antigen-antibody interaction, which was confirmed with PM-IRRAS and atomic force microscopy. Also significant is that used information visualization methods to show that different cell lines and commercial samples containing distinct concentrations of CA19-9 and other analytes can be easily distinguished from each other. These computational methods are generic and may be used in optimization procedures to tailor biosensors for specific purposes, as we demonstrated here by comparing the performance of two film architectures in which the concentration of chitosan was varied. PMID:26539972

  11. Down-regulation of zinc transporter 8 (SLC30A8) in pancreatic beta-cells promotes cell survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pancreatic islet contains high levels of zinc in granular vesicles of beta-cells where insulin is matured, crystallized, and stored before secretion. Zinc is an essential co-factor for insulin crystallization forming dense core in secretory granules. In insulin-containing secretory granules, zin...

  12. Down-regulation of zinc transporter 8 (SLC30A8) in pancreatic beta-cells promotes cell survival.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pancreatic islet contains high levels of zinc in granular vesicles of ß-cells where insulin is matured, crystallized, and stored before secretion. Zinc is an essential co-factor for insulin crystallization forming dense cores in secretory granules. In insulin-containing secretory granules, zinc ...

  13. Controlled aggregation of primary human pancreatic islet cells leads to glucose-responsive pseudoislets comparable to native islets

    PubMed Central

    Hilderink, Janneke; Spijker, Siebe; Carlotti, Françoise; Lange, Lydia; Engelse, Marten; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Koning, Eelco; Karperien, Marcel; van Apeldoorn, Aart

    2015-01-01

    Clinical islet transplantation is a promising treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes. However, pancreatic islets vary in size and shape affecting their survival and function after transplantation because of mass transport limitations. To reduce diffusion restrictions and improve islet cell survival, the generation of islets with optimal dimensions by dispersion followed by reassembly of islet cells, can help limit the length of diffusion pathways. This study describes a microwell platform that supports the controlled and reproducible production of three-dimensional pancreatic cell clusters of human donor islets. We observed that primary human islet cell aggregates with a diameter of 100–150 μm consisting of about 1000 cells best resembled intact pancreatic islets as they showed low apoptotic cell death (<2%), comparable glucose-responsiveness and increasing PDX1, MAFA and INSULIN gene expression with increasing aggregate size. The re-associated human islet cells showed an a-typical core shell configuration with beta cells predominantly on the outside unlike human islets, which became more randomized after implantation similar to native human islets. After transplantation of these islet cell aggregates under the kidney capsule of immunodeficient mice, human C-peptide was detected in the serum indicating that beta cells retained their endocrine function similar to human islets. The agarose microwell platform was shown to be an easy and very reproducible method to aggregate pancreatic islet cells with high accuracy providing a reliable tool to study cell–cell interactions between insuloma and/or primary islet cells. PMID:25782016

  14. Controlled aggregation of primary human pancreatic islet cells leads to glucose-responsive pseudoislets comparable to native islets.

    PubMed

    Hilderink, Janneke; Spijker, Siebe; Carlotti, Françoise; Lange, Lydia; Engelse, Marten; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Koning, Eelco; Karperien, Marcel; van Apeldoorn, Aart

    2015-08-01

    Clinical islet transplantation is a promising treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes. However, pancreatic islets vary in size and shape affecting their survival and function after transplantation because of mass transport limitations. To reduce diffusion restrictions and improve islet cell survival, the generation of islets with optimal dimensions by dispersion followed by reassembly of islet cells, can help limit the length of diffusion pathways. This study describes a microwell platform that supports the controlled and reproducible production of three-dimensional pancreatic cell clusters of human donor islets. We observed that primary human islet cell aggregates with a diameter of 100-150 μm consisting of about 1000 cells best resembled intact pancreatic islets as they showed low apoptotic cell death (<2%), comparable glucose-responsiveness and increasing PDX1, MAFA and INSULIN gene expression with increasing aggregate size. The re-associated human islet cells showed an a-typical core shell configuration with beta cells predominantly on the outside unlike human islets, which became more randomized after implantation similar to native human islets. After transplantation of these islet cell aggregates under the kidney capsule of immunodeficient mice, human C-peptide was detected in the serum indicating that beta cells retained their endocrine function similar to human islets. The agarose microwell platform was shown to be an easy and very reproducible method to aggregate pancreatic islet cells with high accuracy providing a reliable tool to study cell-cell interactions between insuloma and/or primary islet cells. PMID:25782016

  15. Vitamin C Intake and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Published Case-Control and Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yong-Fei; Wang, Gao-Qing; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Chen, Guo-Chong; Lu, Cai-De

    2016-01-01

    Background Observational studies inconsistently reported the relationship between vitamin C intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis of published case-control and cohort studies to quantify the association. Methods Potentially eligible studies were found on PubMed and EMBASE databases through May 31, 2015. A random-effects model was assigned to compute summary point estimates with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were also performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. Results Our final analyses included 20 observational studies comprising nearly 5 thousand cases of pancreatic cancer. When comparing the highest with the lowest categories of vitamin C intake, the summary odds ratio/relative risk for case-control studies (14 studies), cohort studies (6 studies) and all studies combined was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.52–0.66), 0.93 (95% CI: 0.78–1.11) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.58–0.75), respectively. The difference in the findings between case-control and cohort studies was statistically significant (P < .001). Possible publication bias was shown in the meta-analysis of case-control studies. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence to conclude any relationship between vitamin C intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. The strong inverse association observed in case-control studies may be affected by biases (eg, recall and selection biases) that particularly affect case-control studies and/or potential publication bias. Future prospective studies of vitamin C intake and pancreatic cancer are needed. PMID:26859881

  16. Ice skating promotes postural control in children.

    PubMed

    Keller, M; Röttger, K; Taube, W

    2014-12-01

    High fall rates causing injury and enormous financial costs are reported for children. However, only few studies investigated the effects of balance training in children and these studies did not find enhanced balance performance in postural (transfer) tests. Consequently, it was previously speculated that classical balance training might not be stimulating enough for children to adequately perform these exercises. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of ice skating as an alternative form of balance training. Volunteers of an intervention (n = 17; INT: 13.1 ± 0.4 years) and a control group (n = 13; CON: 13.2 ± 0.3 years) were tested before and after training in static and dynamic postural transfer tests. INT participated in eight sessions of ice skating during education lessons, whereas CON participated in normal physical education. Enhanced balance performance was observed in INT but not in CON when tested on an unstable free-swinging platform (P < 0.05) or when performing a functional reach test (P < 0.001). This is the first study showing significantly enhanced balance performance after ice skating in children. More importantly, participating children improved static and dynamic balance control in postural tasks that were not part of the training. PMID:24739083

  17. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2013-05-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1(-/-) A(y)/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the Arnt promoter in MIN6 cells. These results suggest that in mouse pancreatic islets mRNA expression of Arnt fluctuates significantly in a circadian manner and that the down-regulation of Dbp and up-regulation E4bp4 contribute to direct suppression of Arnt expression in diabetes. PMID:23567972

  18. MicroRNA-183-5p promotes the proliferation, invasion and metastasis of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    MIAO, FEI; ZHU, JINHAI; CHEN, YANLIN; TANG, NANHONG; WANG, XIAOQIAN; LI, XIUJIN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the potential role of microRNA-183-5p (miR-183-5p) in the proliferation, invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer, and to identify promising target genes of oncogenic miR-183-5p. Western blotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were used to investigate whether these oncogenic microRNAs may be useful as biomarkers in pancreatic carcinoma (PaCa). Potential target genes were verified using miRDB, PicTar and TargetSCAN, and qPCR was used to detect the expression of miR-183 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 6 (SOCS-6; a potential target of miR-183) in PANC-1 PaCa cells and in the HPDE6-C7 pancreatic ductal cell line for comparison. The function of miR-183 in cell proliferation, wound healing, invasion and migration was also investigated using a miR-183 inhibitor. Western blot analysis was used to confirm SOCS-6 as a tumor suppressor and qPCR was used to detect and confirm that this potential target gene is directly regulated by miR-183. The results indicated that the expression of miR-183 in PANC-1 cells was upregulated compared with that in HPDE6-C7 cells, whilst the expression of SOCS-6 was downregulated. SOCS-6 expression was also significantly lower in PaCa tissues compared with that in matched normal pancreatic tissues from PaCa patients. Furthermore, expression of miR-183 was inversely correlated with that of SOCS-6. miR-183 knockdown decreased cell growth and motility in pancreatic cancer cells and significantly increased the expression of SOCS-6. These data suggest that oncogenic miR-183 may be useful as a pancreatic cancer biomarker. In addition, inhibition of miR-183 expression may be beneficial as PaCa treatment. SOCS-6 is a potential target gene of miR-183. PMID:26870180

  19. Replacement of Rbpj with Rbpjl in the PTF1 complex controls the final maturation of pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Masui, Toshihiko; Swift, Galvin H.; Deering, Tye; Shen, Chengcheng; Coats, Ward S.; Long, Qiaoming; Elsässer, Hans-Peter; Magnuson, Mark A.; MacDonald, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims The mature pancreatic acinar cell is dedicated to the production of very large amounts of digestive enzymes. The early stages of pancreatic development require the Rbpj-form of the trimeric transcription factor complex PTF1 (PTF1-J). As acinar development commences, Rbpjl gradually replaces Rbpj; in the mature pancreas, PTF1 contains Rbpjl (PTF1-L). We investigated whether PTF1-L controls the expression of genes that complete the final stage of acinar differentiation. Methods We analyzed acinar development and transcription in mice with disrupted Rbpjl (Rbpjlko/ko mice). We performed comprehensive analyses of the mRNA population and PTF1 target genes in pancreatic acinar cells from these and wild-type mice. Results In Rbpjlko/ko mice, acinar differentiation was incomplete and characterized by decreased expression (as much as 99%) of genes that encode digestive enzymes or proteins of regulated exocytosis and mitochondrial metabolism. Whereas PTF1-L bound regulatory sites of genes in normal adult pancreatic cells, the embryonic form (PTF1-J) persisted in the absence of Rbpjl and replaced PTF1-L; the extent of replacement determined gene expression levels. Loss of PTF1-L reduced expression (>2-fold) of only about 50 genes, 90% of which were direct targets of PTF1-L. The magnitude of the effects on individual digestive enzyme genes correlated with the developmental timing of gene activation. Absence of Rbpjl increased pancreatic expression of liver-restricted mRNAs. Conclusions Replacement of Rbpj by Rbpjl in the PTF1 complex drives acinar differentiation by maximizing secretory protein synthesis, stimulating mitochondrial metabolism and cytoplasmic creatine-phosphate energy stores, completing the packaging and secretory apparatus, and maintaining acinar-cell homeostasis. PMID:20398665

  20. Corticosteroid therapy for severe acute pancreatitis: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhong-Min; Wang, Shi-Ji; Zhao, Shu-Jie; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Yu-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent reports about the benefits of corticosteroid therapy in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have shown conflicting results. We aimed to explore the effects of corticosteroid therapy in SAP patients on patient outcomes by performing a meta-analysis. Methods: Databases (Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedicine Database, and China Academic Journal Full-Text Database) were queried for all relevant, randomized, controlled trials investigating corticosteroid therapy in patients with SAP. Results: Six randomized, controlled trials including 430 SAP patients were identified. Corticosteroid therapy for SAP was associated with reductions in the length of hospital stay, the need for surgical intervention, and the mortality rate (weighted mean difference [WMD]: -9.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -16.91 to -2.04, P = 0.01; odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.18-0.67, P = 0.002; OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.94, P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in the complication rates or Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores in patients with or without corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion: Corticosteroid therapy may improve outcomes in patients with SAP. PMID:26339332

  1. Control of the chemical step by leucine-31 of pancreatic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Yu, B Z; Janssen, M J; Verheij, H M; Jain, M K

    2000-05-16

    A well-defined region of pancreatic and other secreted phospholipase A2 (PLA2), which we call the i-face, makes a molecular contact with the interface to facilitate and control the events and processivity of the interfacial catalytic turnover cycles. The structural features of the i-face and its allosteric relationship to the active site remain to be identified. As a part of the calcium binding (26-34) loop, Leu-31 is located on the surface near the substrate binding slot of PLA2. Analysis of the primary rate and equilibrium parameters of the Leu-31 substitution mutants of the pig pancreatic PLA2 shows that the only significant effect of the substitution is to impair the chemical step at the zwitterionic interface in the presence of added NaCl, and only a modest effect is seen on kcat at the anionic interface. Leu-31 substitutions have little effect on the binding of the enzyme to the interface; the affinity for certain substrate mimics is modestly influenced in W3F, L31W double mutant. The fluorescence emission results with the double mutant show that the microenvironment of Trp-31 is qualitatively different at the zwitterionic versus anionic interfaces. At both of the interfaces Trp-31 is not shielded from the bulk aqueous environment as it remains readily accessible to acrylamide and water. The NaCl-induced change in the Trp-31 emission spectrum of the double mutant on the zwitterionic interface is similar to that seen on the binding to the anionic interface. Together, the kinetic and spectroscopic results show that the form of PLA2 at the zwitterionic interface (Ez) is distinguishably different from the catalytically more efficient form at the anionic interface (Ea). This finding provides a structural basis for the two-state model for kcat activation by the anionic interface. In conjunction with earlier results we suggest that neutralization of certain cationic residues of PLA2 exerts a control on the calcium loop through residue 31. PMID:10801320

  2. Insulin exerts metabolic and growth-promoting effects by a direct action on the liver in vivo: clarification of the functional significance of the portal vascular link between the beta cells of the pancreatic islets and the liver.

    PubMed Central

    Griffen, S C; Russell, S M; Katz, L S; Nicoll, C S

    1987-01-01

    The functional significance of the portal vascular link between the beta cells of the pancreatic islets and the liver has not been established. Previous studies indicated that insulin does not acutely regulate glucose metabolism by a direct hepatic effect. More recent observations suggest that the role of insulin in regulating body growth may be mediated, at least in part, by the liver. Our experiments were designed to test whether insulin can promote body growth and regulate glucose metabolism by a direct hepatic action in vivo. Rats were made diabetic by injections of streptozotocin, and insulin or solvent was infused into the jugular vein (JV) or the hepatic portal vein (HPV) for 14 days using catheters that were attached to osmotic minipumps. Infusion of a low dose of insulin (2 units per kg per day) into the JV had no effects on the hyperglycemia, body weight gain, tail growth, tibial epiphysial cartilage plate thickness, or serum levels of somatomedin C in the diabetic rats. However, the same dose given into the HPV caused a 30% reduction of blood glucose and stimulated a significant degree of growth, as determined by all indices. Infusion of a higher dose of insulin (5 units per kg per day) into either vein caused full restoration of body weight gain and tail growth and it restored the glycemic status almost to normal. However, it did not increase the tibial epiphysial plate width or serum somatomedin C levels above those of the rats given the low dose of the hormone into the HPV. These results indicate that insulin can act directly on the liver to promote body growth and to regulate glucose metabolism. The significance of direct delivery of insulin from the pancreatic beta cells to the liver may be as much for growth control as for glucose homeostasis. Images PMID:3313390

  3. Analysis of Local Control in Patients Receiving IMRT for Resected Pancreatic Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Yovino, Susannah; Maidment, Bert W.; Herman, Joseph M.; Pandya, Naimish; Goloubeva, Olga; Wolfgang, Chris; Schulick, Richard; Laheru, Daniel; Hanna, Nader; Alexander, Richard; Regine, William F.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is increasingly incorporated into therapy for pancreatic cancer. A concern regarding this technique is the potential for geographic miss and decreased local control. We analyzed patterns of first failure among patients treated with IMRT for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-one patients who underwent resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for pancreas cancer are included in this report. IMRT was used for all to a median dose of 50.4 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-FU-based in 72% of patients and gemcitabine-based in 28%. Results: At median follow-up of 24 months, 49/71 patients (69%) had failed. The predominant failure pattern was distant metastases in 35/71 patients (49%). The most common site of metastases was the liver. Fourteen patients (19%) developed locoregional failure in the tumor bed alone in 5 patients, regional nodes in 4 patients, and concurrently with metastases in 5 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was 25 months. On univariate analysis, nodal status, margin status, postoperative CA 19-9 level, and weight loss during treatment were predictive for OS. On multivariate analysis, higher postoperative CA19-9 levels predicted for worse OS on a continuous basis (p < 0.01). A trend to worse OS was seen among patients with more weight loss during therapy (p = 0.06). Patients with positive nodes and positive margins also had significantly worse OS (HR for death 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.5; HR for death 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.2, respectively). Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting was seen in 8% of patients. Late complication of small bowel obstruction occurred in 4 (6%) patients. Conclusions: This is the first comprehensive report of patterns of failure among patients treated with adjuvant IMRT for pancreas cancer. IMRT was not associated with an increase in local recurrences in our cohort. These data support the use of IMRT in the recently activated EORTC/US Intergroup/RTOG 0848 adjuvant pancreas

  4. Analysis of Local Control in Patients Receiving IMRT for Resected Pancreatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yovino, Susannah; Maidment, Bert W.; Herman, Joseph M.; Pandya, Naimish; Goloubeva, Olga; Wolfgang, Chris; Schulick, Richard; Laheru, Daniel; Hanna, Nader; Alexander, Richard; Regine, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is increasingly incorporated into therapy for pancreatic cancer. A concern regarding this technique is the potential for geographic miss and decreased local control. We analyzed patterns of first failure among patients treated with IMRT for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials Seventy-one patients who underwent resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for pancreas cancer are included in this report. IMRT was used for all to a median dose of 50.4 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-FU–based in 72% of patients and gemcitabine-based in 28%. Results At median follow-up of 24 months, 49/71 patients (69%) had failed. The predominant failure pattern was distant metastases in 35/71 patients (49%). The most common site of metastases was the liver. Fourteen patients (19%) developed locoregional failure in the tumor bed alone in 5 patients, regional nodes in 4 patients, and concurrently with metastases in 5 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was 25 months. On univariate analysis, nodal status, margin status, postoperative CA 19-9 level, and weight loss during treatment were predictive for OS. On multivariate analysis, higher postoperative CA19-9 levels predicted for worse OS on a continuous basis (p < 0.01). A trend to worse OS was seen among patients with more weight loss during therapy (p = 0.06). Patients with positive nodes and positive margins also had significantly worse OS (HR for death 2.8, 95% CI 1.1–7.5; HR for death 2.6, 95% CI 1.1–6.2, respectively). Grade 3–4 nausea and vomiting was seen in 8% of patients. Late complication of small bowel obstruction occurred in 4 (6%) patients. Conclusions This is the first comprehensive report of patterns of failure among patients treated with adjuvant IMRT for pancreas cancer. IMRT was not associated with an increase in local recurrences in our cohort. These data support the use of IMRT in the recently activated EORTC/US Intergroup/RTOG 0848 adjuvant pancreas

  5. Autoregulation of Free Radicals via Uncoupling Protein Control in Pancreatic β-Cell Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Heuett, William J.; Periwal, Vipul

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cells sense the ambient blood-glucose concentration and secrete insulin to signal other tissues to take up glucose. Mitochondria play a key role in this response as they metabolize nutrients to produce ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS), both of which are involved in insulin secretion signaling. Based on data available in the literature and previously developed mathematical models, we present a model of glucose-stimulated mitochondrial respiration, ATP synthesis, and ROS production and control in β-cells. The model is consistent with a number of experimental observations reported in the literature. Most notably, it captures the nonlinear rise in the proton leak rate at high membrane potential and the increase in this leak due to uncoupling protein (UCP) activation by ROS. The functional forms used to model ROS production and UCP regulation yield insight into these mechanisms, as many details have not yet been unraveled in the experimental literature. We examine short- and long-term effects of UCP activation inhibition and changes in the mitochondrial density on mitochondrial responses to glucose. Results suggest increasing mitochondrial density while decreasing UCP activity may be an effective way to increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion while decreasing oxidative stress. PMID:20338842

  6. Polymorphic genetic control of tumor invasion in a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chun, Matthew G H; Mao, Jian-Hua; Chiu, Christopher W; Balmain, Allan; Hanahan, Douglas

    2010-10-01

    Cancer is a disease subject to both genetic and environmental influences. In this study, we used the RIP1-Tag2 (RT2) mouse model of islet cell carcinogenesis to identify a genetic locus that influences tumor progression to an invasive growth state. RT2 mice inbred into the C57BL/6 (B6) background develop both noninvasive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) and invasive carcinomas with varying degrees of aggressiveness. In contrast, RT2 mice inbred into the C3HeB/Fe (C3H) background are comparatively resistant to the development of invasive tumors, as are RT2 C3HB6(F1) hybrid mice. Using linkage analysis, we identified a 13-Mb locus on mouse chromosome 17 with significant linkage to the development of highly invasive PNETs. A gene residing in this locus, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk), was expressed at significantly lower levels in PNETs from invasion-resistant C3H mice compared with invasion-susceptible B6 mice, and pharmacological inhibition of Alk led to reduced tumor invasiveness in RT2 B6 mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate that tumor invasion is subject to polymorphic genetic control and identify Alk as a genetic modifier of invasive tumor growth. PMID:20855625

  7. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  8. Constitutive IKK2 activation in acinar cells is sufficient to induce pancreatitis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Bernd; Wagner, Martin; Aleksic, Tamara; von Wichert, Götz; Weber, Christoph K; Adler, Guido; Wirth, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    Activation of the inhibitor of NF-kappaB kinase/NF-kappaB (IKK/NF-kappaB) system and expression of proinflammatory mediators are major events in acute pancreatitis. However, the in vivo consequences of IKK activation on the onset and progression of acute pancreatitis remain unclear. Therefore, we modulated IKK activity conditionally in pancreatic acinar cells. Transgenic mice expressing the reverse tetracycline-responsive transactivator (rtTA) gene under the control of the rat elastase promoter were generated to mediate acinar cell-specific expression of IKK2 alleles. Expression of dominant-negative IKK2 ameliorated cerulein-induced pancreatitis but did not affect activation of trypsin, an initial event in experimental pancreatitis. Notably, expression of constitutively active IKK2 was sufficient to induce acute pancreatitis. This acinar cell-specific phenotype included edema, cellular infiltrates, necrosis, and elevation of serum lipase levels as well as pancreatic fibrosis. IKK2 activation caused increased expression of known NF-kappaB target genes, including mediators of the inflammatory response such as TNF-alpha and ICAM-1. Indeed, inhibition of TNF-alpha activity identified this cytokine as an important effector of IKK2-induced pancreatitis. Our data identify the IKK/NF-kappaB pathway in acinar cells as being key to the development of experimental pancreatitis and the major factor in the inflammatory response typical of this disease. PMID:17525799

  9. Folding, Quality Control, and Secretion of Pancreatic Ribonuclease in Live Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Roger; Gautschi, Matthias; Thor, Friederike; Hayer, Arnold; Helenius, Ari

    2011-01-01

    Although bovine pancreatic RNase is one of the best characterized proteins in respect to structure and in vitro refolding, little is known about its synthesis and maturation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of live cells. We expressed the RNase in live cells and analyzed its folding, quality control, and secretion using pulse-chase analysis and other cell biological techniques. In contrast to the slow in vitro refolding, the protein folded almost instantly after translation and translocation into the ER lumen (t½ < 3 min). Despite high stability of the native protein, only about half of the RNase reached a secretion competent, monomeric form and was rapidly transported from the rough ER via the Golgi complex (t½ = 16 min) to the extracellular space (t½ = 35 min). The rest remained in the ER mainly in the form of dimers and was slowly degraded. The dimers were most likely formed by C-terminal domain swapping since mutation of Asn113, a residue that stabilizes such dimers, to Ser increased the efficiency of secretion from 59 to 75%. Consistent with stringent ER quality control in vivo, the secreted RNase in the bovine pancreas was mainly monomeric, whereas the enzyme present in the cells also contained 20% dimers. These results suggest that the efficiency of secretion is not only determined by the stability of the native protein but by multiple factors including the stability of secretion-incompetent side products of folding. The presence of N-glycans had little effect on the folding and secretion process. PMID:21156800

  10. Plasma carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols levels and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition: a nested case-control study: plasma micronutrients and pancreatic cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Jeurnink, Suzanne M; Ros, Martine M; Leenders, Max; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J B; Siersema, Peter D; Jansen, Eugene H J M; van Gils, Carla H; Bakker, Marije F; Overvad, Kim; Roswall, Nina; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Racine, Antoine; Cadeau, Claire; Grote, Verena; Kaaks, Rudolf; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Benetou, Vasiliki; Valanou, Elisavet; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Vineis, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Mattiello, Amalia; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Castaño, José María Huerta; Duell, Eric J; Barricarte, Aurelio; Molina-Montes, Esther; Argüelles, Marcial; Dorronsoro, Mire; Johansen, Dorthe; Lindkvist, Björn; Sund, Malin; Crowe, Francesca L; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Jenab, Mazda; Fedirko, Veronika; Riboli, E; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B

    2015-03-15

    Evidence of a protective effect of several antioxidants and other nutrients on pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association for prediagnostic plasma levels of carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols with risk of pancreatic cancer in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 446 incident exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were matched to 446 controls by age at blood collection, study center, sex, date and time of blood collection, fasting status and hormone use. Plasma carotenoids (α- and β-carotene, lycopene, β-cryptoxanthin, canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein), α- and γ-tocopherol and retinol were measured by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography and plasma vitamin C by a colorimetric assay. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for pancreatic cancer risk were estimated using a conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for smoking status, smoking duration and intensity, waist circumference, cotinine levels and diabetes status. Inverse associations with pancreatic cancer risk were found for plasma β-carotene (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.52, 95%CI 0.31-0.88, p for trend = 0.02), zeaxanthin (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.53, 95%CI 0.30-0.94, p for trend = 0.06) and α-tocopherol (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.62, 95%CI 0.39-0.99, p for trend = 0.08. For α- and β-carotene, lutein, sum of carotenoids and γ-tocopherol, heterogeneity between geographical regions was observed. In conclusion, our results show that higher plasma concentrations of β-carotene, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol may be inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, but further studies are warranted. PMID:25175624

  11. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca2+ signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca2+ elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca2+ signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5–10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca2+ release followed by Ca2+ entry and also substantially reduced Ca2+ extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca2+ signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca2+ signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ entry by the Ca2+ channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca2+ entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377732

  12. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Petersen, Ole H; Gerasimenko, Oleg V

    2016-08-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca(2+) signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca(2+) signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5-10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca(2+) release followed by Ca(2+) entry and also substantially reduced Ca(2+) extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca(2+) signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca(2+) signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) entry by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca(2+) entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377732

  13. β2-adrenergic receptor signaling promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) progression through facilitating PCBP2-dependent c-myc expression.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunhua; Gong, Chen; Zhang, Haifeng; Hua, Lu; Li, Xiaohong; Chen, Xudong; Chen, Yinji; Ding, Xiaoling; He, Song; Cao, Wei; Wang, Yingying; Fan, Shaoqing; Xiao, Ying; Zhou, Guoxiong; Shen, Aiguo

    2016-04-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) plays a crucial role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) progression. In this report, we identified poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as a novel binding partner for β2-AR using immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry (IP-MS) approach. The association between β2-AR and PCBP2 was verified using reciprocal immunoprecipitation. Importantly, we found significant interaction and co-localization of the two proteins in the presence of β2-AR agonist in Panc-1 and Bxpc3 PDAC cells. β2-AR-induced recruitment of PCBP2 led to augmented protein level of c-myc in PDAC cells, likely as a result of enhanced internal ribosome entry segment (IRES)-mediated translation of c-myc. The activation of β2-AR accelerated cell proliferation and colony formation, while knockdown of PCBP2 or c-myc restrained the effect. Furthermore, overexpression of PCBP2 was observed in human PDAC cell lines and tissue specimens compared to the normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells and the non-cancerous tissues respectively. Overexpression of β2-AR and PCBP2 was associated with advanced tumor stage and significantly worsened prognosis in patients with PDAC. Our results elucidate a new molecular mechanism by which β2-AR signaling facilitates PDAC progression through triggering PCBP2-dependent c-myc expression. PMID:26803058

  14. Long-term disease control of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with lanreotide autogel(®): a case report.

    PubMed

    Lybaert, Willem; Van Hul, Erik; Woestenborghs, Heidi

    2014-09-01

    The CLARINET study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00353496) showed that somatostatin analogs are able to stabilize tumor growth in patients with intestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Here, we present a case of NET originating from the pancreatic tail that was treated with lanreotide Autogel(®). A 60-year-old patient underwent resection of a pancreatic NET with splenectomy and distal pancreatectomy. Four months after surgery, there was an increase in chromogranin A levels, along with a hypercaptating lesion of approximately 3.5 cm at the residual part of the pancreatic corpus. Treatment with 30 mg monthly-administered octreotide long-acting release (LAR) was initiated. After 3 months of treatment, a control CT scan revealed diffuse metastases in the liver, although the patient presented no symptoms and liver tests were normal. Due to difficulties with the administration of octreotide LAR, treatment was switched to lanreotide Autogel(®) 120 mg, administered as monthly deep-subcutaneous injections. Progression-free survival, as shown by 3-monthly CT scans, was obtained for 2 years without the need to increase the lanreotide Autogel(®) dose, and the patient reported no side effects. After these 2 years, deterioration of the patient's clinical status and weight loss were observed, along with increased size of the liver lesions and appearance of peritoneal metastases. Chemotherapy treatment with cisplatinum-etoposide was initiated, while the lanreotide Autogel(®) injections were continued. After three chemotherapy cycles, a rapid decline in the patient's quality of life was noted, and she requested discontinuation of the chemotherapy and lanreotide injections. One month later, the patient died due to clinical progressive disease. PMID:25408662

  15. Long-Term Disease Control of a Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor with Lanreotide Autogel®: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lybaert, Willem; Van Hul, Erik; Woestenborghs, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The CLARINET study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00353496) showed that somatostatin analogs are able to stabilize tumor growth in patients with intestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Here, we present a case of NET originating from the pancreatic tail that was treated with lanreotide Autogel®. A 60-year-old patient underwent resection of a pancreatic NET with splenectomy and distal pancreatectomy. Four months after surgery, there was an increase in chromogranin A levels, along with a hypercaptating lesion of approximately 3.5 cm at the residual part of the pancreatic corpus. Treatment with 30 mg monthly-administered octreotide long-acting release (LAR) was initiated. After 3 months of treatment, a control CT scan revealed diffuse metastases in the liver, although the patient presented no symptoms and liver tests were normal. Due to difficulties with the administration of octreotide LAR, treatment was switched to lanreotide Autogel® 120 mg, administered as monthly deep-subcutaneous injections. Progression-free survival, as shown by 3-monthly CT scans, was obtained for 2 years without the need to increase the lanreotide Autogel® dose, and the patient reported no side effects. After these 2 years, deterioration of the patient's clinical status and weight loss were observed, along with increased size of the liver lesions and appearance of peritoneal metastases. Chemotherapy treatment with cisplatinum-etoposide was initiated, while the lanreotide Autogel® injections were continued. After three chemotherapy cycles, a rapid decline in the patient's quality of life was noted, and she requested discontinuation of the chemotherapy and lanreotide injections. One month later, the patient died due to clinical progressive disease. PMID:25408662

  16. A blinded randomised controlled trial to determine the effect of enteric coating on enzyme treatment for canine exocrine pancreatic efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Enzyme treatment is the mainstay for management of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) in dogs. ‘Enteric-coated’ preparations have been developed to protect the enzyme from degradation in the stomach, but their efficacy has not been critically evaluated. The hypothesis of the current study was that enteric coating would have no effect on the efficacy of pancreatic enzyme treatment for dogs with EPI. Thirty-eight client-owned dogs with naturally occurring EPI were included in this multicentre, blinded, randomised controlled trial. Dogs received either an enteric-coated enzyme preparation (test treatment) or an identical preparation without the enteric coating (control treatment) over a period of 56 days. Results There were no significant differences in either signalment or cobalamin status (where cobalamin deficient or not) between the dogs on the test and control treatments. Body weight and body condition score increased in both groups during the trial (P<0.001) but the magnitude of increase was greater for the test treatment compared with the control treatment (P<0.001). By day 56, mean body weight increase was 17% (95% confidence interval 11-23%) in the test treatment group and 9% (95% confidence interval 4-15%) in the control treatment group. The dose of enzyme required increased over time (P<0.001) but there was no significant difference between treatments at any time point (P=0.225). Clinical disease severity score decreased over time for both groups (P=0.011) and no difference was noted between groups (P=0.869). No significant adverse effects were reported, for either treatment, for the duration of the trial. Conclusions Enteric coating a pancreatic enzyme treatment improves response in canine EPI. PMID:22839732

  17. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

  18. Activin, BMP and FGF pathways cooperate to promote endoderm and pancreatic lineage cell differentiation from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaofang; Browning, Victoria L; Odorico, Jon S

    2011-01-01

    The study of how human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) differentiate into insulin-producing beta cells has twofold significance: first, it provides an in vitro model system for the study of human pancreatic development, and second, it serves as a platform for the ultimate production of beta cells for transplantation into patients with diabetes. The delineation of growth factor interactions regulating pancreas specification from hESCs in vitro is critical to achieving these goals. In this study, we describe the roles of growth factors bFGF, BMP4 and Activin A in early hESC fate determination. The entire differentiation process is carried out in serum-free chemically-defined media (CDM) and results in reliable and robust induction of pancreatic endoderm cells, marked by PDX1, and cell clusters co-expressing markers characteristic of beta cells, including PDX1 and insulin/C-peptide. Varying the combinations of growth factors, we found that treatment of hESCs with bFGF, Activin A and BMP4 (FAB) together for 3-4days resulted in strong induction of primitive-streak and definitive endoderm-associated genes, including MIXL1, GSC, SOX17 and FOXA2. Early proliferative foregut endoderm and pancreatic lineage cells marked by PDX1, FOXA2 and SOX9 expression are specified in EBs made from FAB-treated hESCs, but not from Activin A alone treated cells. Our results suggest that important tissue interactions occur in EB-based suspension culture that contribute to the complete induction of definitive endoderm and pancreas progenitors. Further differentiation occurs after EBs are embedded in Matrigel and cultured in serum-free media containing insulin, transferrin, selenium, FGF7, nicotinamide, islet neogenesis associated peptide (INGAP) and exendin-4, a long acting GLP-1 agonist. 21-28days after embedding, PDX1 gene expression levels are comparable to those of human islets used for transplantation, and many PDX1(+) clusters are formed. Almost all cells in PDX1(+) clusters co

  19. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may also contain tissue from the pancreas, pancreatic enzymes, and blood. ... located behind the stomach. It produces chemicals (called enzymes) ... Pancreatic pseudocysts most often develop after an episode of ...

  20. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Most people with pancreatic abscesses have had pancreatitis. However, the complication often takes 7 or more days to develop. Signs of an abscess can be seen on: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of the abdomen Ultrasound of the abdomen

  1. Pancreatitis - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100149.htm Pancreatitis - series To use the sharing features on this ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatitis A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  2. Secure attachment promotes the development of effortful control in boys.

    PubMed

    Viddal, Kristine Rensvik; Berg-Nielsen, Turid Suzanne; Wan, Ming Wai; Green, Jonathan; Hygen, Beate Wold; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Although effortful control (EC), a regulatory aspect of temperament, is associated with a wide range of developmental outcomes, knowledge about EC promoters is scarce. This study explored whether secure attachment promoted the development of EC from preschool to school age in a community sample of 903 Norwegian children. EC was measured using the parent-reported Children's Behavior Questionnaire at four (T1) and six (T2) years of age, and attachment was measured using the Manchester Child Attachment Story Task at T1. Previous research has indicated that a child's gender and socioeconomic status are possible covariates of EC; hence, these factors were included in the analyses. Despite considerable rank-order stability in EC, secure attachment contributed to an increase in EC. Furthermore, gender moderated the effect of attachment: secure attachment promoted EC in boys only. These findings emphasize preschool boys' need for emotional security to facilitate effortful capacities in their transition to school. PMID:25659572

  3. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Goess, Ruediger; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Friess, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an often-underestimated complication following pancreatic surgery. After recent advances in managing acute postoperative complications the focus of current research is now shifting onto the long-term complications following pancreatectomy. Weight loss and steatorrhea as typical symptoms have high influence on the quality of life in the postoperative period. Malnutrition-related symptoms occur late and are often misinterpreted. Enzyme replacement therapy is more or less the only possible treatment option, even though not many controlled trials have been performed in this field. In this review we summarized the pathophysiology, diagnosis, risk factors and treatment options of exocrine insufficiency and focus mainly on patients with pancreaticoduodenectomy (classical Whipple), pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (ppWhipple) or distal pancreatectomy. Incidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after surgery depends mainly on the initial diagnosis, the preoperative exocrine function and is associated with the extent of parenchyma resection. Diagnosing exocrine failure after surgery can be difficult and specific function tests are commonly not routinely performed. Starting and monitoring of enzyme replacement treatment is more based on clinical symptoms, than on objective markers. To improve the performance status of postsurgical patients it is important to consider pancreatic exocrine function as one aspect of quality of life. Further clinical trials should be initiated to gain more specific knowledge about the influence of the different pancreatic resections on pancreatic exocrine function to initialize proper treatment even before major clinical symptoms occur. PMID:27058237

  4. High Intensity Interval Training Improves Glycaemic Control and Pancreatic β Cell Function of Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Søren Møller; Thorup, Anne Cathrine; Overgaard, Kristian; Jeppesen, Per Bendix

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity improves the regulation of glucose homeostasis in both type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients and healthy individuals, but the effect on pancreatic β cell function is unknown. We investigated glycaemic control, pancreatic function and total fat mass before and after 8 weeks of low volume high intensity interval training (HIIT) on cycle ergometer in T2D patients and matched healthy control individuals. Study design/method: Elderly (56 yrs±2), non-active T2D patients (n = 10) and matched (52 yrs±2) healthy controls (CON) (n = 13) exercised 3 times (10×60 sec. HIIT) a week over an 8 week period on a cycle ergometer. Participants underwent a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). On a separate day, resting blood pressure measurement was conducted followed by an incremental maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) cycle ergometer test. Finally, a whole body dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed. After 8 weeks of training, the same measurements were performed. Results: in the T2D-group, glycaemic control as determined by average fasting venous glucose concentration (p = 0.01), end point 2-hour OGTT (p = 0.04) and glycosylated haemoglobin (p = 0.04) were significantly reduced. Pancreatic homeostasis as determined by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and HOMA β cell function (HOMA-%β) were both significantly ameliorated (p = 0.03 and p = 0.03, respectively). Whole body insulin sensitivity as determined by the disposition index (DI) was significantly increased (p = 0.03). During OGTT, the glucose continuum was significantly reduced at -15 (p = 0.03), 30 (p = 0.03) and 120 min (p = 0.03) and at -10 (p = 0.003) and 0 min (p = 0.003) with an additional improvement (p = 0.03) of its 1st phase (30 min) area under curve (AUC). Significant abdominal fat mass losses were seen in both groups (T2D: p = 0.004 and CON: p = 0.02) corresponding to a percentage change of -17.84%±5.02 and -9.66%±3.07, respectively. Conclusion: these results

  5. The hepatitis B virus X protein promotes pancreatic cancer through modulation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiwen; Bai, Xueli; Zhang, Qi; Wen, Liang; Su, Wei; Fu, Qihan; Sun, Xu; Lou, Yu; Yang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Jingying; Chen, Qi; Wang, Jianxin; Liang, Tingbo

    2016-09-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive and lethal cancer, with poor outcomes. Infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) may be associated as a worse prognosis for PDAC patients; however, the mechanisms involved in this process are unclear. We evaluated whether HBV infection leads to PDAC with a more aggressive phenotype, and attempted to elucidate the mechanisms involved. Clinicopathological data and outcomes from 64 patients with PDAC were collected and compared between serum HBsAg+ and HBsAg- patients. Furthermore, we examined the effects of the HBV X protein (HBx) on proliferation and migration of the pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and SW1990. We investigated expression changes of over 500 proteins by protein array analysis and identified several HBV- and PDAC-related candidates, which were further validated by immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. No differences in clinicopathological features were observed between HBsAg+ and HBsAg- patients; however, HBsAg+ patients had a shorter median survival time (8 vs. 13 months), although the differences were not significant. HBV DNA was detected in clinical specimens, even in PDAC patients considered "HBV-free", potentially due to occult infection. HBx expression significantly enhanced cellular proliferation and migration and induced an epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype. Expression of ErbB4 and TGF-α was increased in parallel with HBx expression, and several downstream pathways including PI3K/AKT, MAPK, and ERK were upregulated. Inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway reversed the effects of HBx in PDAC cell lines. HBx may, therefore, contribute to the progression of PDAC through modulation of these pathways. PMID:27339327

  6. Post-ERCP pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Arata, Shinju; Takada, Tadahiro; Hirata, Koichi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Hirota, Morihisa; Yokoe, Masamichi; Hirota, Masahiko; Kiriyama, Seiki; Sekimoto, Miho; Amano, Hodaka; Wada, Keita; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Gabata, Toshifumi; Takeda, Kazunori; Kataoka, Keisho; Ito, Tetsuhide; Tanaka, Masao

    2010-01-01

    development of pancreatitis in both the low-risk group (RR 0.29, 95% CI 0.12-0.71) and the high-risk group (RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.23-0.72) of post-ERCP pancreatitis. As for somatostatin, a bolus injection may be most useful compared with short- or long-term infusion (OR 0.271, 95% CI 0.138-0.536, risk difference 8.2%, 95% CI 4.4-12.0%). The usefulness of gabexate mesilate was not apparent in any of the following conditions: acute pancreatitis (control 5.7 vs. 4.8% for gabexate mesilate), hyperamylasemia (40.6 vs. 36.9%), and abdominal pain (1.7 vs. 8.9%). Formulation of diagnostic criteria for post-ERCP pancreatitis is needed. Temporary prophylactic placement of pancreatic stents in the high-risk group offers the most promise as a means of preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis. As for pharmacological attempts, there are high expectations concerning NSAIDs because they are excellent in terms of cost-effectiveness, ease of use, and safety. There was no evidence of effective prophylaxis with the use of protease inhibitors, especially gabexate mesilate. PMID:20012323

  7. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Wood, Laura D; Itoi, Takao; Takaori, Kyoichi

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease, for which mortality closely parallels incidence. Most patients with pancreatic cancer remain asymptomatic until the disease reaches an advanced stage. There is no standard programme for screening patients at high risk of pancreatic cancer (eg, those with a family history of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis). Most pancreatic cancers arise from microscopic non-invasive epithelial proliferations within the pancreatic ducts, referred to as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias. There are four major driver genes for pancreatic cancer: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4. KRAS mutation and alterations in CDKN2A are early events in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Endoscopic ultrasonography and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration offer high diagnostic ability for pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection is regarded as the only potentially curative treatment, and adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine or S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, is given after surgery. FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, folinic acid [leucovorin], irinotecan, and oxaliplatin) and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) are the treatments of choice for patients who are not surgical candidates but have good performance status. PMID:26830752

  8. Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of pancreatic cancer, and it is now clear that pancreatic cancer is a disease of inherited (germ-line) and somatic gene mutations. The genes mutated in pancreatic cancer include KRAS2, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, and these are accompanied by a substantial compendium of genomic and transcriptomic alterations that facilitate cell cycle deregulation, cell survival, invasion, and metastases. Pancreatic cancers do not arise de novo, and three distinct precursor lesions have been identified. Experimental models of pancreatic cancer have been developed in genetically engineered mice, which recapitulate the multistep progression of the cognate human disease. Although the putative cell of origin for pancreatic cancer remains elusive, minor populations of cells with stem-like properties have been identified that appear responsible for tumor initiation, metastases, and resistance of pancreatic cancer to conventional therapies. PMID:18039136

  9. Pre-Study protocol MagPEP: a multicentre randomized controlled trial of magnesium sulphate in the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is the most common complication of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In spite of continuing research, no pharmacologic agent capable of effectively reducing the incidence of ERCP-induced pancreatitis has found its way into clinical practise. A number of experimental studies suggest that intrapancreatic calcium concentrations play an important role in the initiation of intracellular protease activation, an initiating step in the course of acute pancreatitis. Magnesium can act as a calcium-antagonist and counteracts effects in calcium signalling. It can thereby attenuate the intracellular activation of proteolytic digestive enzymes in the pancreas and reduces the severity of experimental pancreatitis when administered either intravenously or as a food supplement. Methods We designed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study to test whether the administration of intravenous magnesium sulphate before and after ERCP reduces the incidence and the severity of post-ERCP pancreatitis. A total of 502 adult patients with a medical indication for ERCP are to be randomized to receive either 4930 mg magnesium sulphate (= 20 mmol magnesium) or placebo 60 min before and 6 hours after ERCP. The incidence of clinical post-ERCP pancreatitis, hyperlipasemia, pain levels, use of analgetics and length of hospital stay will be evaluated. Conclusions If magnesium sulphate is found to be effective in preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis, this inexpensive agent with limited adverse effects could be used as a routine pharmacological prophylaxis. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN46556454 PMID:23320650

  10. Loss of Periostin Results in Impaired Regeneration and Pancreatic Atrophy after Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Steiger, Katja; Wagner, Nadine; Thorwirth, Manja; Schlitter, Anna M; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule periostin (POSTN, encoded by POSTN), which is secreted by activated pancreatic stellate cells, has important functions in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the role of POSTN in acute pancreatitis and subsequent regeneration processes has not been addressed so far. We analyzed the function of POSTN in pancreatic exocrine regeneration after the induction of a severe acute pancreatitis. Postn-deficient mice and wild-type control animals received repetitive cerulein injections, and a detailed histologic analysis of pancreatic tissues was performed. Although there was no difference in pancreatitis severity in the acute inflammatory phase, the recovery of the exocrine pancreas was massively impaired in Postn-deficient mice. Loss of Postn expression was accompanied by strong pancreatic atrophy and acinar-to-adipocyte differentiation, which was also reflected in gene expression patterns. Our data suggest that POSTN is a crucial factor for proper exocrine lineage-specific regeneration after severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26632158

  11. Small Molecule Kaempferol Promotes Insulin Sensitivity and Preserved Pancreatic β-Cell Mass in Middle-Aged Obese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalidy, Hana; Moore, William; Zhang, Yanling; Wang, Aihua; Ali, Mostafa; Suh, Kyung-Shin; Zhen, Wei; Cheng, Zhiyong; Jia, Zhenquan; Hulver, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance and a progressive decline in functional β-cell mass are hallmarks of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thus, searching for natural, low-cost compounds to target these two defects could be a promising strategy to prevent the pathogenesis of T2D. Here, we show that dietary intake of flavonol kaempferol (0.05% in the diet) significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and circulating lipid profile, which were associated with the improved peripheral insulin sensitivity in middle-aged obese mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Kaempferol treatment reversed HF diet impaired glucose transport-4 (Glut4) and AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) expression in both muscle and adipose tissues from obese mice. In vitro, kaempferol increased lipolysis and prevented high fatty acid-impaired glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, AMPK activity, and Glut4 expression in skeletal muscle cells. Using another mouse model of T2D generated by HF diet feeding and low doses of streptozotocin injection, we found that kaempferol treatment significantly improved hyperglycemia, glucose tolerance, and blood insulin levels in obese diabetic mice, which are associated with the improved islet β-cell mass. These results demonstrate that kaempferol may be a naturally occurring anti-diabetic agent by improving peripheral insulin sensitivity and protecting against pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. PMID:26064984

  12. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase induced by EGFR/ERK activation promotes tumor growth in pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Yong; Yu, Yun; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Lin

    2015-08-07

    Lipid metabolism is dysregulated in many human diseases including atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key lipogenic enzyme involved in de novo lipid biosynthesis, is significantly upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and associates with tumor progression. However, limited data is available to understand underlying biological functions and clinical significance of overexpressed FASN in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here, upregulated FASN was more frequently observed in PDAC tissues compared with normal pancreas in a tissue microarray. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis revealed that high expression level of FASN resulted in a significantly poor prognosis of PDAC patients. Knockdown or inhibition of endogenous FASN decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in HPAC and AsPC-1 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that EGFR/ERK signaling accounts for elevated FASN expression in PDAC as ascertained by performing siRNA assays and using specific pharmacological inhibitors. Collectively, our results indicate that FASN exhibits important roles in tumor growth and EGFR/ERK pathway is responsible for upregulated expression of FASN in PDAC. - Highlights: • Increased expression of FASN indicates a poor prognosis in PDAC. • Elevated FASN favors tumor growth in PDAC in vitro. • Activation of EGFR signaling contributes to elevated FASN expression.

  13. Pancreatic GLP-1 receptor activation is sufficient for incretin control of glucose metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Benjamin J.; Li, Yazhou; Kwan, Edwin; Brown, Theodore J.; Gaisano, Herbert; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) circulates at low levels and acts as an incretin hormone, potentiating glucose-dependent insulin secretion from islet β cells. GLP-1 also modulates gastric emptying and engages neural circuits in the portal region and CNS that contribute to GLP-1 receptor–dependent (GLP-1R–dependent) regulation of glucose homeostasis. To elucidate the importance of pancreatic GLP-1R signaling for glucose homeostasis, we generated transgenic mice that expressed the human GLP-1R in islets and pancreatic ductal cells (Pdx1-hGLP1R:Glp1r–/– mice). Transgene expression restored GLP-1R–dependent stimulation of cAMP and Akt phosphorylation in isolated islets, conferred GLP-1R–dependent stimulation of β cell proliferation, and was sufficient for restoration of GLP-1–stimulated insulin secretion in perifused islets. Systemic GLP-1R activation with the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 had no effect on food intake, hindbrain c-fos expression, or gastric emptying but improved glucose tolerance and stimulated insulin secretion in Pdx1-hGLP1R:Glp1r–/– mice. i.c.v. GLP-1R blockade with the antagonist exendin(9–39) impaired glucose tolerance in WT mice but had no effect in Pdx1-hGLP1R:Glp1r–/– mice. Nevertheless, transgenic expression of the pancreatic GLP-1R was sufficient to normalize both oral and i.p. glucose tolerance in Glp1r–/– mice. These findings illustrate that low levels of endogenous GLP-1 secreted from gut endocrine cells are capable of augmenting glucoregulatory activity via pancreatic GLP-1Rs independent of communication with neural pathways. PMID:22182839

  14. Cellular reprogramming for pancreatic β-cell regeneration: clinical potential of small molecule control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent scientific breakthroughs in stem cell biology suggest that a sustainable treatment approach to cure diabetes mellitus (DM) can be achieved in the near future. However, the transplantation complexities and the difficulty in obtaining the stem cells from adult cells of pancreas, liver, bone morrow and other cells is a major concern. The epoch-making strategy of transcription-factor based cellular reprogramming suggest that these barriers could be overcome, and it is possible to reprogram any cells into functional β cells. Contemporary biological and analytical techniques help us to predict the key transcription factors needed for β-cell regeneration. These β cell-specific transcription factors could be modulated with diverse reprogramming protocols. Among cellular reprogramming strategies, small molecule approach gets proclaimed to have better clinical prospects because it does not involve genetic manipulation. Several small molecules targeting certain epigenetic enzymes and/or signaling pathways have been successful in helping to induce pancreatic β-cell specification. Recently, a synthetic DNA-based small molecule triggered targeted transcriptional activation of pancreas-related genes to suggest the possibility of achieving desired cellular phenotype in a precise mode. Here, we give a brief overview of treating DM by regenerating pancreatic β-cells from various cell sources. Through a comprehensive overview of the available transcription factors, small molecules and reprogramming strategies available for pancreatic β-cell regeneration, this review compiles the current progress made towards the generation of clinically relevant insulin-producing β-cells. PMID:24679123

  15. Total pancreatectomy with islet cell transplantation vs intrathecal narcotic pump infusion for pain control in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mokadem, Mohamad; Noureddine, Lama; Howard, Thomas; McHenry, Lee; Sherman, Stuart; Fogel, Evan L; Watkins, James L; Lehman, Glen A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate pain control in chronic pancreatitis patients who underwent total pancreatectomy with islet cell transplantation or intrathecal narcotic pump infusion. METHODS: We recognized 13 patients who underwent intrathecal narcotic pump (ITNP) infusion and 57 patients who underwent total pancreatectomy with autologous islet cell transplantation (TP + ICT) for chronic pancreatitis (CP) pain control between 1998 and 2008 at Indiana University Hospital. All patients had already failed multiple other modalities for pain control and the decision to proceed with either intervention was made at the discretion of the patients and their treating physicians. All patients were evaluated retrospectively using a questionnaire inquiring about their pain control (using a 0-10 pain scale), daily narcotic dose usage, and hospital admission days for pain control before each intervention and during their last follow-up. RESULTS: All 13 ITNP patients and 30 available TP + ICT patients were evaluated. The mean age was approximately 40 years in both groups. The median duration of pain before intervention was 6 years and 7 years in the ITNP and TP + ICT groups, respectively. The median pain score dropped from 8 to 2.5 (on a scale of 0-10) in both groups on their last follow up. The median daily dose of narcotics also decreased from 393 mg equivalent of morphine sulfate to 8 mg in the ITNP group and from 300 mg to 40 mg in the TP + ICT group. No patient had diabetes mellitus (DM) before either procedure whereas 85% of those who underwent pancreatectomy were insulin dependent on their last evaluation despite ICT. CONCLUSION: ITNP and TP + ICT are comparable for pain control in patients with CP however with high incidence of DM among those who underwent TP + ICT. Prospective comparative studies and longer follow up are needed to better define treatment outcomes. PMID:27122666

  16. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Beiderwellen, K; Sabet, A; Lauenstein, T C; Lahner, H; Poeppel, T D

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. PMID:27003413

  17. Body Fat Patterning, Hepatic Fat and Pancreatic Volume of Non-Obese Asian Indians with Type 2 Diabetes in North India: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Anoop; Anoop, Shajith; Gulati, Seema; Mani, Kalaivani; Bhatt, Surya Prakash; Pandey, Ravindra Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate body fat patterning and phenotype including hepatic fat and pancreatic volume of non-obese (BMI: < 25 kg/m2) Asian Indians with type 2 diabetes residing in North India. Methods Non-obese patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 93) and non-obese, normo-glycemic subjects (n = 40) were recruited. BMI, waist & hip circumferences, skinfold thickness at 8 sites, body fat, lean mass and detailed abdominal fat evaluation [total abdominal fat, total subcutaneous fat (superficial, deep, anterior, and posterior), total intra-abdominal fat (intra-peritoneal, retroperitoneal)], liver span, grades of fatty liver and pancreatic volume were compared. Results Waist circumference, subscapular skinfolds and total truncal fat (on DEXA) were higher whereas calf, total peripheral skinfolds and total leg fat (on DEXA) lower in patients. Specifically, the following volumes were higher in cases as compared to controls; total abdominal fat (19.4%), total intra-abdominal fat (49.7%), intra-peritoneal fat (47.7%), retroperitoneal fat (70.7%), pancreatic volume (26.6%), pancreatic volume index (21.3%) and liver span (10.8%). In cases, significant positive correlations were observed for pancreatic volume with BMI, waist and hip circumferences, W-HR, subscapular, abdominal and total truncal skinfolds, truncal, total subcutaneous, total intra-abdominal, intra-peritoneal, retroperitoneal fat depots, liver span and fatty liver. Conclusions In non-obese Asian Indians with type 2 diabetes, subcutaneous and intra-abdominal obesity, including fatty liver, and pancreatic volume were higher and peripheral subcutaneous adiposity was lower than BMI matched non-diabetic subjects. Importantly, increased pancreatic volume in patients was highly correlated with multiple measures of abdominal obesity and liver fat. PMID:26474415

  18. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  19. [New model of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Cherkezova-Kinova, E; Lateva, E

    1981-01-01

    The authors propose a new model of acute pancreatitis by infusing duodenal content, obtained both from animals with experimental pancreatitis and from patients with pancreatitis, hepatitis and cholecystitis, into the duodenum of experimental animals without pressure for a period of several days. Pancreatitis was established functionally and histomorphologically. The control group of animals did not reveal deviations from the norm after infusion of duodenal content. The authors suggested the presence of pathogenic substances in the duodenal content of animals and sick persons, and these components damaged the pancreas, liver and kidneys by means of blood and lymph ways. PMID:7227280

  20. ASF-4-1 fibroblast-rich culture increases chemoresistance and mTOR expression of pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 cells at the invasive front in vitro, and promotes tumor growth and invasion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    FUJIWARA, MASAYA; KANAYAMA, KAZUKI; HIROKAWA, YOSHIFUMI S.; SHIRAISHI, TAIZO

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer develops dense stromal tissue through the desmoplastic reaction. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of a fibroblast-rich environment on the malignant potential of pancreatic cancer. Cells from the human pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3 were mixed at a ratio of 1:3 (fibroblast-rich) or 1:1 (fibroblast-poor) with cells from the human skin fibroblast line ASF-4-1. In the fibroblast-rich co-culture, tumor budding was observed and BxPC-3 cells were found to be more resistant to gemcitabine than those in the fibroblast-poor co-culture. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin was increased at the invasive front of fibroblast-rich co-cultures. In addition, in mouse xenografts of fibroblast-rich co-cultures, tumors were larger and had a higher Ki-67 index compared with that of the fibroblast-poor co-culture xenografts. These results indicate that fibroblast-rich co-cultures may promote the malignant potential of the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27073551

  1. Pancreatitis, very early compared with normal start of enteral feeding (PYTHON trial): design and rationale of a randomised controlled multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In predicted severe acute pancreatitis, infections have a negative effect on clinical outcome. A start of enteral nutrition (EN) within 24 hours of onset may reduce the number of infections as compared to the current practice of starting an oral diet and EN if necessary at 3-4 days after admission. Methods/Design The PYTHON trial is a randomised controlled, parallel-group, superiority multicenter trial. Patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis (Imrie-score ≥ 3 or APACHE-II score ≥ 8 or CRP > 150 mg/L) will be randomised to EN within 24 hours or an oral diet and EN if necessary, after 72 hours after hospital admission. During a 3-year period, 208 patients will be enrolled from 20 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. The primary endpoint is a composite of mortality or infections (bacteraemia, infected pancreatic or peripancreatic necrosis, pneumonia) during hospital stay or within 6 months following randomisation. Secondary endpoints include other major morbidity (e.g. new onset organ failure, need for intervention), intolerance of enteral feeding and total costs from a societal perspective. Discussion The PYTHON trial is designed to show that a very early (< 24 h) start of EN reduces the combined endpoint of mortality or infections as compared to the current practice of an oral diet and EN if necessary at around 72 hours after admission for predicted severe acute pancreatitis. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN18170985 PMID:21392395

  2. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) made in the past year. Recent findings Tropical pancreatitis associates with SPINK1 and/or CFTR gene mutations in approximately 50% of patients, similar to the frequency in idiopathic CP. Corticosteroids increase secretin-stimulated pancreatic bicarbonate concentrations in AIP by restoring mislocalized CFTR protein to the apical ductal membrane. Most patients with asymptomatic hyperenzymemia have pancreatic lesions of unclear significance or no pancreatic lesions. Common pitfalls in the use of diagnostic tests for EPI confound interpretation of findings in IBS and severe renal insufficiency. Further study is needed to improve the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) to diagnose CP. Celiac plexus block provides short term pain relief in a subset of patients. Summary Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the genetic associations of tropical pancreatitis, a reversible mislocalization of ductal CFTR in AIP, the association of asymptomatic pancreatic hyperenzymemia with pancreatic disorders, limitations of diagnostic tests for EPI, diagnosis of CP by EUS and endoscopic pancreatic function testing and treatment of pain. PMID:21844753

  3. Intraoperative Fluid Restriction in Pancreatic Surgery: A Double Blinded Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    van Samkar, Ganapathy; Eshuis, Wietse J.; Bennink, Roelof J.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Preckel, Benedikt; de Hert, Stefan; Gouma, Dirk J.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Busch, Olivier R. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Perioperative fluid restriction in a variety of operations has shown improvement of: complications, recovery of gastrointestinal function and length of stay (LOS). We investigated effects of crystalloid fluid restriction in pancreatic surgery. Our hypothesis: enhanced recovery of gastrointestinal function. Methods In this double-blinded randomized trial, patients scheduled to undergo pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) were randomized: standard (S:10ml/kg/hr) or restricted (R:5ml/kg/hr) fluid protocols. Primary endpoint: gastric emptying scintigraphically assessed on postoperative day 7. Results In 66 randomized patients, complications and 6-year survival were analyzed. 54 patients were analyzed in intention to treat: 24 S-group and 30 R-group. 32 patients actually underwent a PD and 16 patients had a palliative gastrojejunostomy bypass operation in the full protocol analysis. The median gastric emptying time (T½) was 104 minutes (S-group, 95% confidence interval: 74–369) versus 159 minutes (R-group, 95% confidence interval: 61–204) (P = 0.893, NS). Delayed gastric emptying occurred in 10 patients in the S-group and in 13 patients in the R-group (45% and 50%, P = 0.779, NS). The primary outcome parameter, gastric emptying time, did not show a statistically significant difference between groups. Conclusion A fluid regimen of 10ml/kg/hr or 5ml/kg/hr during pancreatic surgery did not lead to statistically significant differences in gastric emptying. A larger study would be needed to draw definite conclusions about fluid restriction in pancreatic surgery. Trial registration ISRCTN62621488 PMID:26465290

  4. Cortactin promotes exosome secretion by controlling branched actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Seema; Hoshino, Daisuke; Hong, Nan Hyung; Kirkbride, Kellye C; Grega-Larson, Nathan E; Seiki, Motoharu; Tyska, Matthew J; Weaver, Alissa M

    2016-07-18

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that influence cellular behavior and enhance cancer aggressiveness by carrying bioactive molecules. The mechanisms that regulate exosome secretion are poorly understood. Here, we show that the actin cytoskeletal regulatory protein cortactin promotes exosome secretion. Knockdown or overexpression of cortactin in cancer cells leads to a respective decrease or increase in exosome secretion, without altering exosome cargo content. Live-cell imaging revealed that cortactin controls both trafficking and plasma membrane docking of multivesicular late endosomes (MVEs). Regulation of exosome secretion by cortactin requires binding to the branched actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex and to actin filaments. Furthermore, cortactin, Rab27a, and coronin 1b coordinately control stability of cortical actin MVE docking sites and exosome secretion. Functionally, the addition of purified exosomes to cortactin-knockdown cells rescued defects of those cells in serum-independent growth and invasion. These data suggest a model in which cortactin promotes exosome secretion by stabilizing cortical actin-rich MVE docking sites. PMID:27402952

  5. Tropical chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

    2003-01-01

    Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients. PMID:14654569

  6. Growth hormone receptor inhibition decreases the growth and metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Subramani, Ramadevi; Lopez-Valdez, Rebecca; Salcido, Alyssa; Boopalan, Thiyagarajan; Arumugam, Arunkumar; Nandy, Sushmita; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the only major cancer with very low survival rates (1%). It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death. Hyperactivated growth hormone receptor (GHR) levels have been shown to increase the risk of cancer in general and this pathway is a master regulator of key cellular functions like proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, metastasis, etc. However, to date there is no available data on how GHR promotes pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. Here, we used an RNA interference approach targeted to GHR to determine whether targeting GHR is an effective method for controlling pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis. For this, we used an in vitro model system consisting of HPAC and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells lines. GHR is upregulated in both of these cell lines and silencing GHR significantly reduced cell proliferation and viability. Inhibition of GHR also reduced the metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer cells, which was aided through decreased colony-forming ability and reduced invasiveness. Flow cytometric and western blot analyses revealed the induction of apoptosis in GHR silenced cells. GHR silencing affected phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/AKT, mitogen extracellular signal-regulated kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, as well as, epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Interestingly, silencing GHR also suppressed the expression of insulin receptor-β and cyclo-oxygenease-2. Altogether, GHR silencing controls the growth and metastasis of pancreatic cancer and reveals its importance in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25301264

  7. Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein in pancreatic progenitors controls α- and β-cell fate.

    PubMed

    Cai, Erica P; Wu, Xiaohong; Schroer, Stephanie A; Elia, Andrew J; Nostro, M Cristina; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Woo, Minna

    2013-09-01

    Pancreatic endocrine cells expand rapidly during embryogenesis by neogenesis and proliferation, but during adulthood, islet cells have a very slow turnover. Disruption of murine retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) in mature pancreatic β-cells has a limited effect on cell proliferation. Here we show that deletion of Rb during embryogenesis in islet progenitors leads to an increase in the neurogenin 3-expressing precursor cell population, which persists in the postnatal period and is associated with increased β-cell mass in adults. In contrast, Rb-deficient islet precursors, through repression of the cell fate factor aristaless related homeobox, result in decreased α-cell mass. The opposing effect on survival of Rb-deficient α- and β-cells was a result of opposing effects on p53 in these cell types. As a consequence, loss of Rb in islet precursors led to a reduced α- to β-cell ratio, leading to improved glucose homeostasis and protection against diabetes. PMID:23946427

  8. Towards Evidence-Based, Quality-Controlled Health Promotion: The Dutch Recognition System for Health Promotion Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brug, Johannes; van Dale, Djoeke; Lanting, Loes; Kremers, Stef; Veenhof, Cindy; Leurs, Mariken; van Yperen, Tom; Kok, Gerjo

    2010-01-01

    Registration or recognition systems for best-practice health promotion interventions may contribute to better quality assurance and control in health promotion practice. In the Netherlands, such a system has been developed and is being implemented aiming to provide policy makers and professionals with more information on the quality and…

  9. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  10. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  11. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  12. Pancreatic Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Poras; Bhadana, Utsav; Arora, Mohinder P

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the pancreas is extremely rare and in most of the cases mimics pancreatic carcinoma. There are a number of case reports on pancreatic tuberculosis with various different presentations, but only a few case series have been published, and most of our knowledge about this disease comes from individual case reports. Patients of pancreatic tuberculosis may remain asymptomatic initially and manifest as an abscess or a mass involving local lymph nodes and usually present with non-specific features. Pancreatic tuberculosis may present with a wide range of imaging findings. It is difficult to diagnose tuberculosis of pancreas on imaging studies as they may present with masses, cystic lesions or abscesses and mass lesions in most of the cases mimic pancreatic carcinoma. As it is a rare entity, it cannot be recommended but suggested that pancreatic tuberculosis should be considered in cases with a large space occupying lesions associated with necrotic peripancreatic lymph nodes and constitutional symptoms. Ultrasonography/computed tomography/endosonography-guided biopsy is the recommended diagnostic technique. Most patients achieve complete cure with standard antituberculous therapy. The aims of this study are to review clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, and management of pancreatic tuberculosis and to present our experience of 5 cases of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:26884661

  13. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  14. MicroRNA-222 Controls Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line Capan-2 Proliferation by P57 Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yingying; Wang, Yuqiong; Yang, Yuefeng; Liu, Jingqi; Song, Yang; Cao, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Wenzhuo; Wang, Fei; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhaoshen; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers and has a poor prognosis due to late diagnosis and ineffective therapeutic multimodality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) are a group of non-coding, small RNAs with active biological activities. In our investigation, human pancreatic cancer cell line Capan-2 were transfected with miR-222 mimics, inhibitors or their negative controls. Cell proliferation was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), EdU incorporation assay and cell cycle determination by flow cytometry. MiR-222 and putative target gene expression levels including p27, p57 and PTEN were determined using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions and Western blotting. Our results showed that miR-222 could lead to increased vitality and proliferative rate of Capan-2 cells, and also higher S-phase and lower G1-phase of cell cycle. Further, we found p57 at protein level, but not p27 nor PTEN, was regulated by miR-222 in Capan-2 cells. Finally, we co-transfected miR-222 inhibitor and p57 si-RNA into Capan-2 cells, and found that proliferation-suppressing effects of miR-222 inhibitor on Capan-2 cells could be partially reversed by silencing p57. Our results indicate that miR-222 controls Capan-2 cell proliferation by targeting p57. This study provides a novel idea for developing effective therapeutic strategy for PC patients through inhibiting miR-222. PMID:26535064

  15. MiR-1178 promotes the proliferation, G1/S transition, migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells by targeting CHIP.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhe; Xu, Jianwei; Huang, Hua; Shen, Peng; You, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zheng, Lianfang; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2015-01-01

    CHIP, a co-chaperone protein that interacts with Hsc/Hsp70, has been shown to be under-expressed in pancreatic cancer cells and has demonstrated a potential tumor suppressor property. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms of CHIP regulation in pancreatic cancer cells remain unknown. In this study, we found that miR-1178 decreased the translation of the CHIP protein by targeting the 3'-UTR region. We observed that over-expression of miR-1178 facilitated the proliferation, G1/S transition, migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. Conversely, the inhibition of miR-1178 expression significantly suppressed these phenotypes. Furthermore, CHIP over-expression abrogated miR-1178-induced cell proliferation and invasion. Our data suggest that miR-1178 acts as an oncomiR in pancreatic cancer cells by inhibiting CHIP expression. PMID:25635996

  16. Mouse Muscle As an Ectopic Permissive Site for Human Pancreatic Development

    PubMed Central

    Capito, Carmen; Simon, Marie-Thérèse; Aiello, Virginie; Clark, Anne; Aigrain, Yves; Ravassard, Philippe; Scharfmann, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    While sporadic human genetic studies have permitted some comparisons between rodent and human pancreatic development, the lack of a robust experimental system has not permitted detailed examination of human pancreatic development. We previously developed a xenograft model of immature human fetal pancreas grafted under the kidney capsule of immune-incompetent mice, which allowed the development of human pancreatic β-cells. Here, we compared the development of human and murine fetal pancreatic grafts either under skeletal muscle epimysium or under the renal capsule. We demonstrated that human pancreatic β-cell development occurs more slowly (weeks) than murine pancreas (days) both by differentiation of pancreatic progenitors and by proliferation of developing β-cells. The superficial location of the skeletal muscle graft and its easier access permitted in vivo lentivirus-mediated gene transfer with a green fluorescent protein-labeled construct under control of the insulin or elastase gene promoter, which targeted β-cells and nonendocrine cells, respectively. This model of engraftment under the skeletal muscle epimysium is a new approach for longitudinal studies, which allows localized manipulation to determine the regulation of human pancreatic development. PMID:23835344

  17. Thyroid Hormone Promotes Postnatal Rat Pancreatic β-Cell Development and Glucose-Responsive Insulin Secretion Through MAFA

    PubMed Central

    Aguayo-Mazzucato, Cristina; Zavacki, Ann Marie; Marinelarena, Alejandra; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; El Khattabi, Ilham; Marsili, Alessandro; Weir, Gordon C.; Sharma, Arun; Larsen, P. Reed; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal β cells do not secrete glucose-responsive insulin and are considered immature. We previously showed the transcription factor MAFA is key for the functional maturation of β cells, but the physiological regulators of this process are unknown. Here we show that postnatal rat β cells express thyroid hormone (TH) receptor isoforms and deiodinases in an age-dependent pattern as glucose responsiveness develops. In vivo neonatal triiodothyronine supplementation and TH inhibition, respectively, accelerated and delayed metabolic development. In vitro exposure of immature islets to triiodothyronine enhanced the expression of Mafa, the secretion of glucose-responsive insulin, and the proportion of responsive cells, all of which are effects that were abolished in the presence of dominant-negative Mafa. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we show that TH has a direct receptor-ligand interaction with the Mafa promoter and, using a luciferase reporter, that this interaction was functional. Thus, TH can be considered a physiological regulator of functional maturation of β cells via its induction of Mafa. PMID:23305647

  18. Thyroid hormone promotes postnatal rat pancreatic β-cell development and glucose-responsive insulin secretion through MAFA.

    PubMed

    Aguayo-Mazzucato, Cristina; Zavacki, Ann Marie; Marinelarena, Alejandra; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; El Khattabi, Ilham; Marsili, Alessandro; Weir, Gordon C; Sharma, Arun; Larsen, P Reed; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    2013-05-01

    Neonatal β cells do not secrete glucose-responsive insulin and are considered immature. We previously showed the transcription factor MAFA is key for the functional maturation of β cells, but the physiological regulators of this process are unknown. Here we show that postnatal rat β cells express thyroid hormone (TH) receptor isoforms and deiodinases in an age-dependent pattern as glucose responsiveness develops. In vivo neonatal triiodothyronine supplementation and TH inhibition, respectively, accelerated and delayed metabolic development. In vitro exposure of immature islets to triiodothyronine enhanced the expression of Mafa, the secretion of glucose-responsive insulin, and the proportion of responsive cells, all of which are effects that were abolished in the presence of dominant-negative Mafa. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we show that TH has a direct receptor-ligand interaction with the Mafa promoter and, using a luciferase reporter, that this interaction was functional. Thus, TH can be considered a physiological regulator of functional maturation of β cells via its induction of Mafa. PMID:23305647

  19. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  20. Organic agriculture promotes evenness and natural pest control.

    PubMed

    Crowder, David W; Northfield, Tobin D; Strand, Michael R; Snyder, William E

    2010-07-01

    Human activity can degrade ecosystem function by reducing species number (richness) and by skewing the relative abundance of species (evenness). Conservation efforts often focus on restoring or maintaining species number, reflecting the well-known impacts of richness on many ecological processes. In contrast, the ecological effects of disrupted evenness have received far less attention, and developing strategies for restoring evenness remains a conceptual challenge. In farmlands, agricultural pest-management practices often lead to altered food web structure and communities dominated by a few common species, which together contribute to pest outbreaks. Here we show that organic farming methods mitigate this ecological damage by promoting evenness among natural enemies. In field enclosures, very even communities of predator and pathogen biological control agents, typical of organic farms, exerted the strongest pest control and yielded the largest plants. In contrast, pest densities were high and plant biomass was low when enemy evenness was disrupted, as is typical under conventional management. Our results were independent of the numerically dominant predator or pathogen species, and so resulted from evenness itself. Moreover, evenness effects among natural enemy groups were independent and complementary. Our results strengthen the argument that rejuvenation of ecosystem function requires restoration of species evenness, rather than just richness. Organic farming potentially offers a means of returning functional evenness to ecosystems. PMID:20596021

  1. Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase regulates pancreatic ductal, but not β-cell, regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheng-Ho; Miller, Amber; Panopoulos, Andreas; Hao, Ergeng; Margolis, Robert; Terskikh, Alexey; Levine, Fred

    2014-09-01

    The maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) is expressed in stem/progenitor cells in some adult tissues, where it has been implicated in diverse biological processes, including the control of cell proliferation. Here, we described studies on its role in adult pancreatic regeneration in response to injury induced by duct ligation and β-cell ablation. MELK expression was studied using transgenic mice expressing GFP under the control of the MELK promoter, and the role of MELK was studied using transgenic mice deleted in the MELK kinase domain. Pancreatic damage was initiated using duct ligation and chemical beta-cell ablation. By tracing MELK expression using a MELK promoter-GFP transgene, we determined that expression was extremely low in the normal pancreas. However, following duct ligation and β-cell ablation, it became highly expressed in pancreatic ductal cells while remaining weakly expressed in α-cells and β- cells. In a mutant mouse in which the MELK kinase domain was deleted, there was no effect on pancreatic development. There was no apparent effect on islet regeneration, either. However, following duct ligation there was a dramatic increase in the number of small ducts, but no change in the total number of duct cells or duct cell proliferation. In vitro studies indicated that this was likely due to a defect in cell migration. These results implicate MELK in the control of the response of the pancreas to injury, specifically controlling cell migration in normal and transformed pancreatic duct cells. PMID:25194022

  2. PRSS1 mutations and the proteinase/antiproteinase imbalance in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yi, Qiang; Dong, Feng; Lin, Liqing; Liu, Qicai; Chen, Shu; Gao, Feng; He, Qingliang

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) and the imbalance between trypsin and α1-antitrypsin in patients with pancreatic cancer. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to amplify the sequences of PRSS1 from 65 patients with pancreatic cancer and 260 healthy controls, direct sequencing was performed, and the clinical features were analyzed. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to detect serum trypsin and α1-antitrypsin in pancreatic cancer patients and healthy controls in the same period. Mutations were found at the promoter and exon 3 of the PRSS1 in patients with pancreatic cancer. That is, five patients had c.410 C > T mutation causing p.Thr 137 Met, and three patients had c. -338 T > G mutation at the promoter of the PRSS1. In patients with PRSS1 mutations, serum trypsin was 34.5 ± 18.3 ng/mL, which was significantly higher than that in normal controls (10.65 ± 6.03 ng/mL) and other pancreatic cancer (28.61 ± 8.96 ng/mL). What is more, in pancreatic cancer patients, serum α1-antitrypsin was 1.69 ± 0.86 g/L, which was comparable to that in normal controls (1.55 ± 0.53 g/L), while the ratio of serum trypsin to α1-antitrypsin was 1.46-fold to normal controls. The results presented here have provided a greater insight into the PRSS1 mutations and proteinase-inhibitor interactions occurring in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26546433

  3. Vegetable and fruit intake and pancreatic cancer in a population-based case-control study in the San Francisco bay area.

    PubMed

    Chan, June M; Wang, Furong; Holly, Elizabeth A

    2005-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most devastating and rapidly fatal cancers, yet little is known about the primary cause and prevention of this disease. We conducted a population-based case-control study to investigate the association between vegetables and fruits and pancreatic cancer. Between 1995 and 1999, 532 cases and 1,701 age- and sex-matched controls completed direct interviews using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. No proxy interviews were conducted. We observed inverse associations between consumption of total and specific vegetables and fruits and the risk of pancreatic cancer. The odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for the highest versus the lowest quartile of total vegetable intake was 0.45 (0.32-0.62), trend P < 0.0001; and for total fruits and fruit juice was 0.72 (0.54-0.98), trend P = 0.06. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the highest versus the lowest quartile of specific vegetables and fruits were: 0.63 (0.47-0.83) for dark leafy vegetables, 0.76 (0.56-1.0) for cruciferous vegetables, 0.59 (0.43-0.81) for yellow vegetables, 0.56 (0.41-0.76) for carrots, 0.51 (0.38-0.70) for beans, 0.46 (0.33-0.63) for onions and garlic, and 0.78 (0.58-1.0) for citrus fruits and juice. Compared with less than five servings per day of total vegetables and fruits combined, the risk of pancreatic cancer was 0.49 (0.36-0.68) for more than nine servings per day. These results suggest that increasing vegetable and fruit consumption, already recommended for the prevention of several other chronic diseases, may impart some protection against developing pancreatic cancer. PMID:16172215

  4. Pancreatic Cancer, Inflammation and Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Pushalkar, Smruti; Saxena, Deepak; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Inflammatory conditions such as pancreatitis represent a well-known risk for pancreatic cancer development. Yet only in the past two decades has pancreatic cancer been recognized as an inflammation-driven cancer, and the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenic role of inflammation are beginning to be explored in detail. A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that bacteria are likely to influence this process by activating immune receptors and perpetuating cancer-associated inflammation. The recent explosion of investigations into the human microbiome have highlighted how perturbations of commensal bacterial populations can promote inflammation and promote disease processes, including carcinogenesis. The elucidation of the interplay between inflammation and microbiome in the context of pancreatic carcinogenesis will provide novel targets for intervention in order to both prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies towards this direction are urgently needed. PMID:24855007

  5. Nasogastric Nutrition versus Nasojejunal Nutrition in Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Youfeng; Yin, Haiyan; Zhang, Rui; Ye, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Previous studies have shown that the nasogastric (NG) route seems equivalent to the nasojejunal (NJ) route in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). However, these studies used a small sample size and old criteria for diagnosing SAP, which may include some patients with moderate SAP, according to the newly established SAP criteria (Atlanta 2012 classification). Based on the changes in the criteria for classifying SAP, we performed an up-to-date meta-analysis. Method. We reviewed the PubMed, EMbase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Database, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials electronic databases. We included randomized controlled trials comparing NG and NJ nutrition in patients with SAP. We performed the meta-analysis using the Cochrane Collaborations' RevMan 5.3 software. Results. We included four randomized controlled trials involving 237 patients with SAP. There were no significant differences in the incidence of mortality, infectious complications, digestive complications, achievement of energy balance, or length of hospital stay between the NG and NJ nutrition groups. Conclusions. NG nutrition was as safe and effective as NJ nutrition in patients with SAP. Further studies are needed to confirm our results. PMID:27340401

  6. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... include: Abdominal CT scan Abdominal MRI Abdominal ultrasound

  7. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... body Blockage of the tubes (ducts) that drain enzymes from the pancreas Cystic fibrosis High levels of a fat, called ... Limiting caffeine The health care provider may prescribe pancreatic enzymes. You must take these medicines with every meal. ...

  8. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure children receive vaccines to protect them against mumps and other childhood illnesses. Treat medical problems that ... Heart failure - overview Hemolytic-uremic syndrome Kawasaki disease Mumps Mycoplasma pneumonia Reye syndrome Patient Instructions Pancreatitis - discharge ...

  9. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for ... therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  10. Drug-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Claudia; Maertin, Sandrina; Scheiber, Jonas; Ritter, Christoph A; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia

    2012-04-01

    Drugs are thought to be a rare cause for acute pancreatitis; however 525 different drugs are listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) database suspected to cause acute pancreatitis as a side effect. Many of them are widely used to treat highly prevalent diseases. The true incidence is not entirely clear since only few systematic population based studies exist. The majority of the available data are derived from case reports or case control studies. Furthermore, the causality for many of these drugs remains elusive and for only 31 of these 525 dugs a definite causality was established. Definite proof for causality is defined by the WHO classification if symptoms reoccur upon rechallenge.In the actual algorithm the diagnosis is confirmed if no other cause of acute pancreatitis can be detected, and the patient is taking one of the suspected drugs. PMID:22314811

  11. Kinetic Control of Multiple Forms of Ca2+ Spikes by Inositol Trisphosphate in Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Koichi; Miyashita, Yasushi; Kasai, Haruo

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms of agonist-induced Ca2+ spikes have been investigated using a caged inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and a low-affinity Ca2+ indicator, BTC, in pancreatic acinar cells. Rapid photolysis of caged IP3 was able to reproduce acetylcholine (ACh)-induced three forms of Ca2+ spikes: local Ca2+ spikes and submicromolar (<1 μM) and micromolar (1–15 μM) global Ca2+ spikes (Ca2+ waves). These observations indicate that subcellular gradients of IP3 sensitivity underlie all forms of ACh-induced Ca2+ spikes, and that the amplitude and extent of Ca2+ spikes are determined by the concentration of IP3. IP3-induced local Ca2+ spikes exhibited similar time courses to those generated by ACh, supporting a role for Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in local Ca2+ spikes. In contrast, IP3- induced global Ca2+ spikes were consistently faster than those evoked with ACh at all concentrations of IP3 and ACh, suggesting that production of IP3 via phospholipase C was slow and limited the spread of the Ca2+ spikes. Indeed, gradual photolysis of caged IP3 reproduced ACh-induced slow Ca2+ spikes. Thus, local and global Ca2+ spikes involve distinct mechanisms, and the kinetics of global Ca2+ spikes depends on that of IP3 production particularly in those cells such as acinar cells where heterogeneity in IP3 sensitivity plays critical role. PMID:10427093

  12. Feedback control of growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of pancreatic endocrine progenitors in an epithelial plexus niche

    PubMed Central

    Bankaitis, Eric D.; Bechard, Matthew E.; Wright, Christopher V.E.

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian pancreas, endocrine cells undergo lineage allocation upon emergence from a bipotent duct/endocrine progenitor pool, which resides in the “trunk epithelium.” Major questions remain regarding how niche environments are organized within this epithelium to coordinate endocrine differentiation with programs of epithelial growth, maturation, and morphogenesis. We used EdU pulse-chase and tissue-reconstruction approaches to analyze how endocrine progenitors and their differentiating progeny are assembled within the trunk as it undergoes remodeling from an irregular plexus of tubules to form the eventual mature, branched ductal arbor. The bulk of endocrine progenitors is maintained in an epithelial “plexus state,” which is a transient intermediate during epithelial maturation within which endocrine cell differentiation is continually robust and surprisingly long-lived. Within the plexus, local feedback effects derived from the differentiating and delaminating endocrine cells nonautonomously regulate the flux of endocrine cell birth as well as proliferative growth of the bipotent cell population using Notch-dependent and Notch-independent influences, respectively. These feedback effects in turn maintain the plexus state to ensure prolonged allocation of endocrine cells late into gestation. These findings begin to define a niche-like environment guiding the genesis of the endocrine pancreas and advance current models for how differentiation is coordinated with the growth and morphogenesis of the developing pancreatic epithelium. PMID:26494792

  13. Prediction of pancreatic necrosis by dynamic pancreatography.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, E L; Murphy, F; Ferguson, C

    1989-01-01

    Parenchymal necrosis has recently been recognized as the principal determinant of the incidence of secondary infection in acute pancreatitis. Because secondary infection of pancreatic necrosis accounts for more than 80% of all deaths from acute pancreatitis, a method for determining the presence or absence of parenchymal necrosis would offer considerable prognostic and therapeutic information. Thirty seven patients with unequivocal acute pancreatitis and five normal controls were prospectively studied with intravenous bolus, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (dynamic pancreatography). In the absence of pancreatic necrosis, there were no significant differences in parenchymal enhancement between any of the following patient groups: controls (5), uncomplicated pancreatitis (20), pancreatic abscess (7), or peripancreatic necrosis (4)(p less than 0.05). On the other hand, pancreatic parenchymal enhancement was significantly reduced or absent in all six patients with segmental or diffuse pancreatic necrosis (p less than 0.05). Postcontrast pancreatic parenchymal enhancement was also found to be inversely correlated with the number of Ranson signs (p less than 0.001). Dynamic pancreatography offers prognostic information and is a safe and reliable technique for predicting the presence or absence of pancreatic parenchymal necrosis. Images Figs. 1A and B. Figs. 3A and B. Figs. 4A and B. Fig. 5. Figs. 6A and B. Fig. 7. PMID:2802834

  14. Treatment with Combination of Mithramycin A and Tolfenamic Acid Promotes Degradation of Sp1 Protein and Synergistic Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhiliang; Gao, Yong; Wang, Liwei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Jun; Le, Xiangdong; Wei, Daoyan; Yao, James C.; Chang, David Z.; Huang, Suyun; Xie, Keping

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed that both mithramycin (MIT) and tolfenamic acid (TA) inhibits the activity of the transcription factor Sp1. In the present study, we sought to determine whether treatment with a combination of these two compounds has a synergistic effect on Sp1 activity and pancreatic cancer growth and their underlying mechanisms. In xenograft mouse models of human pancreatic cancer, treatment with MIT and TA produced dose-dependent antitumor activity, and significant antitumor activity of either compound alone was directly associated with systemic side effects as determined according to overall weight loss. However, combination treatment with nontoxic doses of TA and MIT produced synergistic antitumor activity, whereas treatment with a nontoxic dose of either compound alone did not have a discernible antitumor effect. The synergistic therapeutic effects of MIT and TA correlated directly with synergistic antiproliferation and antiangiogenesis in vitro. Moreover, treatment with the combination of TA and MIT resulted in Sp1 protein degradation, leading to drastic downregulation of Sp1 and vascular endothelial growth factor protein expression. Our data demonstrated that Sp1 is a critical target of TA and MIT in human pancreatic cancer therapy. Further studies should be performed to determine the impact of existing pancreatic cancer therapy regimens on Sp1 signaling in tumors and normal pancreatic tissue and the ability of Sp1-targeting strategies to modify these responses and improve upon these regimens. PMID:20086170

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  18. Pterostilbene as treatment for severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y J; Ding, Y; Wu, J; Ning, B T

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) has a fast onset and progression, which lead to an unfavorable prognosis. Therefore, the development of novel drugs for its treatment is critical. As a homologous derivative of resveratrol, pterostilbene exerts a variety of effects including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor effects. This study investigated the potential of pterostilbene for treatment of severe AP (SAP) and related mechanisms. Effects of pterostilbene were evaluated in a Wistar rat model of AP. Serum levels of amylase (AMY), creatinine (Cr), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were quantified. Furthermore, serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a and interleukin (IL)-1b were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nuclear factor (NF)-kB expression in pancreatic tissues was quantified by real-time PCR and western blotting. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using a spectrometer, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was assayed. In the AP rat model, the expression of inflammatory markers TNF-a and IL-1b, expression of NF-kB, and serum indices (AMY, Cr, and ALT) increased compared to the corresponding levels in the control group (P < 0.05). Pterostilbene reduced serum levels of TNF-a and IL-1b; decreased NF-kB gene expression, serum indices, and ROS generation; and increased SOD activity in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, pterostilbene can alleviate SAP-induced tissue damage by decreasing the inflammatory response and by promoting antioxidation leading to the protection of pancreatic tissues. PMID:27525946

  19. Central Control of Circadian Phase in Arousal-Promoting Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Carrie E.; McKinley Brewer, Judy; Bittman, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Cells of the dorsomedial/lateral hypothalamus (DMH/LH) that produce hypocretin (HCRT) promote arousal in part by activation of cells of the locus coeruleus (LC) which express tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives endogenous daily rhythms, including those of sleep and wakefulness. These circadian oscillations are generated by a transcriptional-translational feedback loop in which the Period (Per) genes constitute critical components. This cell-autonomous molecular clock operates not only within the SCN but also in neurons of other brain regions. However, the phenotype of such neurons and the nature of the phase controlling signal from the pacemaker are largely unknown. We used dual fluorescent in situ hybridization to assess clock function in vasopressin, HCRT and TH cells of the SCN, DMH/LH and LC, respectively, of male Syrian hamsters. In the first experiment, we found that Per1 expression in HCRT and TH oscillated in animals held in constant darkness with a peak phase that lagged that in AVP cells of the SCN by several hours. In the second experiment, hamsters induced to split their locomotor rhythms by exposure to constant light had asymmetric Per1 expression within cells of the middle SCN at 6 h before activity onset (AO) and in HCRT cells 9 h before and at AO. We did not observe evidence of lateralization of Per1 expression in the LC. We conclude that the SCN communicates circadian phase to HCRT cells via lateralized neural projections, and suggests that Per1 expression in the LC may be regulated by signals of a global or bilateral nature. PMID:23826226

  20. Liraglutide-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jeyaraj, Santhosh; Shetty, Ananth Samith; Kumar, Champat Raj Roopesh; Nanditha, Arun; Krishnamoorthy, Satheesh; Raghavan, Arun; Raghavan, K; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2014-01-01

    An obese lady of 51 year with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus for 13 years was prescribed Liraglutide, a glucagon like peptide (GLP-1) analogue (Victoza) for glycaemic control and reduction of weight. She was on gliclazide and Insulin prior to initiation of Liraglutide. Eight weeks after initiation of GLP -1 analogue, she developed severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. She was admitted to a private hospital and evaluated. Biochemical tests and CT scan revealed presence of pancreatitis and she was treated for acute pancreatitis. Liraglutide was withdrawn and symptoms subsided. Subsequent follow-up showed that pancreatic enzyme levels were normal. PMID:25327099

  1. Hypovolemic shock, pancreatic blood flow, and pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Robert, J H; Toledano, A E; Toth, L S; Premus, G; Dreiling, D A

    1988-05-01

    Electromagnetic blood flow determinations were carried out on the superior pancreatic duodena (SPDA), the splenic (SA) and the superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries and compared to cardiac output (CO, thermodilution technique) in 12 anesthetized dogs submitted to hypovolemic shock of various duration: 5 dogs underwent a one-hour and 7 a three-hour period of shock. A 50 mm Hg level of mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was maintained throughout hypovolemia. Dogs were then reinfused. Control preshock values were 4.12 l/min for CO, 38.0 ml/min for SPDA, 405.9 ml/min for SA, and 963.6 ml/min for SMA. SPDA, SA and SMA flows expressed as % of CO amounted to 0.9, 9.8 and 23.4% respectively. No significant changes in SPDA and SMA flows were noted within the first hour of shock. However, from the end of the second hour on, both flows differed significantly (P less than 0.01), SMA increasing from -75.6% of its control value at the end of bleeding to -61.0%, and SPDA decreasing from -75.6 to -86.9%. Similar observations were made when respective flows were considered as % of CO. The SA behaved somewhat in an intermediate fashion. This relative spoliation in pancreatic blood supply as hypovolemia proceeds supports an ischemic etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), which could account for some of the so-called idiopathic cases of AP. PMID:3385221

  2. The Activation of β1-integrin by Type I Collagen Coupling with the Hedgehog Pathway Promotes the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wanxing; Ma, Jiguang; Ma, Qingyong; Xu, Qinhong; Lei, Jianjun; Han, Liang; Li, Xuqi; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Zheng; Lv, Shifang; Ma, Zhenhua; Liu, Mouzhu; Wang, Fengfei; Wu, Erxi

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), which is thought to contribute to this tumor's malignant behavior. However, the detailed mechanism and the contribution of excessive deposition of ECM in PDAC progression remain unclear. A better understanding of the mechanism involved in this process is essential for the design of new effective therapies. In this study, we demonstrated that pancreatic cancer cells exhibited increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis in response to type I collagen. In addition, PDAC cells exposed to type I collagen lost the expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of mesenchymal markers, including N-cadherin and vimentin. This epithelial- mesenchymal transition (EMT) was correlated with enhanced cell migration and invasiveness. Knockdown of β1-integrin abolished the effects induced by type I collagen, and further investigation revealed that type I collagen activates β1-integrin (marked by phosphorylation of β1 integrin downstream effectors, focal adhesion kinase [FAK], AKT, and ERK) accompanied by markedly up-regulation of Gli-1, a component of the Hedgehog (HH) pathway. Knockdown of Gli-1 reversed the effects of type I collagen on PDAC invasion and EMT. These results suggest that there is cross-talk between the β1-integrin signaling pathway and the HH pathway in pancreatic cancer and that activation of the HH pathway plays a key role in the type I collagen-induced effects on pancreatic cancer. PMID:24720337

  3. Src kinases play a novel dual role in acute pancreatitis affecting severity but no role in stimulated enzyme secretion.

    PubMed

    Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Ramos-Álvarez, Irene; Jensen, R T

    2016-06-01

    In pancreatic acinar cells, the Src family of kinases (SFK) is involved in the activation of several signaling cascades that are implicated in mediating cellular processes (growth, cytoskeletal changes, apoptosis). However, the role of SFKs in various physiological responses such as enzyme secretion or in pathophysiological processes such as acute pancreatitis is either controversial, unknown, or incompletely understood. To address this, in this study, we investigated the role/mechanisms of SFKs in acute pancreatitis and enzyme release. Enzyme secretion was studied in rat dispersed pancreatic acini, in vitro acute-pancreatitis-like changes induced by supramaximal COOH-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin (CCK). SFK involvement assessed using the chemical SFK inhibitor (PP2) with its inactive control, 4-amino-7-phenylpyrazol[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP3), under experimental conditions, markedly inhibiting SFK activation. In CCK-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells, activation occurred of trypsinogen, various MAP kinases (p42/44, JNK), transcription factors (signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, nuclear factor-κB, activator protein-1), caspases (3, 8, and 9) inducing apoptosis, LDH release reflective of necrosis, and various chemokines secreted (monocyte chemotactic protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted). All were inhibited by PP2, not by PP3, except caspase activation leading to apoptosis, which was increased, and trypsin activation, which was unaffected, as was CCK-induced amylase release. These results demonstrate SFK activation is playing a dual role in acute pancreatitis, inhibiting apoptosis and promoting necrosis as well as chemokine/cytokine release inducing inflammation, leading to more severe disease, as well as not affecting secretion. Thus, our studies indicate that SFK is a key mediator of inflammation and pancreatic acinar cell death in acute pancreatitis, suggesting it

  4. KAT2B Is Required for Pancreatic Beta Cell Adaptation to Metabolic Stress by Controlling the Unfolded Protein Response.

    PubMed

    Rabhi, Nabil; Denechaud, Pierre-Damien; Gromada, Xavier; Hannou, Sarah Anissa; Zhang, Hongbo; Rashid, Talha; Salas, Elisabet; Durand, Emmanuelle; Sand, Olivier; Bonnefond, Amélie; Yengo, Loic; Chavey, Carine; Bonner, Caroline; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Abderrahmani, Amar; Auwerx, Johan; Fajas, Lluis; Froguel, Philippe; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-05-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR(er)) pathway plays an important role in helping pancreatic β cells to adapt their cellular responses to environmental cues and metabolic stress. Although altered UPR(er) gene expression appears in rodent and human type 2 diabetic (T2D) islets, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We show here that germline and β cell-specific disruption of the lysine acetyltransferase 2B (Kat2b) gene in mice leads to impaired insulin secretion and glucose intolerance. Genome-wide analysis of Kat2b-regulated genes and functional assays reveal a critical role for Kat2b in maintaining UPR(er) gene expression and subsequent β cell function. Importantly, Kat2b expression is decreased in mouse and human diabetic β cells and correlates with UPR(er) gene expression in normal human islets. In conclusion, Kat2b is a crucial transcriptional regulator for adaptive β cell function during metabolic stress by controlling UPR(er) and represents a promising target for T2D prevention and treatment. PMID:27117420

  5. Whole grains and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area, California.

    PubMed

    Chan, June M; Wang, Furong; Holly, Elizabeth A

    2007-11-15

    Epidemiologic data suggest that consumption of whole-grain products may be inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. Grain intake was examined in a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer in the San Francisco Bay Area (1995-1999). A 131-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was administered to 532 cases and 1,701 controls. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed as estimates of relative risk. Persons who consumed > or =2 servings of whole grains daily had a lower risk of pancreatic cancer than persons who consumed <1 serving/day (odds ratio (OR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.31, 1.2; trend-p = 0.04). Similar results were observed for brown rice (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.44, 1.2; trend-p = 0.01) and tortillas (OR = 0.56, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.89; trend-p = 0.02). Consumption of doughnuts (> or =2 servings/week vs. <1 serving/month) conferred increased risk (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7; trend-p = 0.003). Consumption of cooked breakfast cereals (> or =2 servings/week vs. <1 serving/month) was positively associated with risk (for oatmeal/oat bran, OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.7; for other cooked breakfast cereals, OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.4, 3.3). Dietary fiber was inversely associated with risk (for highest quartile vs. lowest, OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.47, 0.89; trend-p = 0.02). These data provide some support for the hypothesis that consuming more whole-grain or high-fiber foods may reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Refined grains were not associated with risk. PMID:17881383

  6. Chronic Pancreatitis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Prevent Impact of Chemotherapy with Gemcitabine in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, Richard F.; Sparn, Moritz; Waldmann, Jens; Plassmeier, Lars; Bartsch, Detlef K.; Lauth, Matthias; Hudemann, Christoph; Fendrich, Volker

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS BACKGROUND AND AIMSGemcitabine is the standard therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer with metastatic disease. Patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer presenting with increased values of C-reactive protein do not respond to gemcitabine. So far, no studies have evaluated the correlation between chronic pancreatitis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and the loss of chemotherapeutic benefit. METHODS Pdx-1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D/+;LSL-Trp53R172H/+ mice were assigned into four groups: 1) Sixteen animals received a daily intraperitoneal injection of caerulein from their ninth week of life on. 2) Sixteen mice were additionally given gemcitabine. 3) Twelve animals received gemcitabine only. 4) Saline-treated control group. Furthermore, human Paca44 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells were seeded and cultured in 0.5% FBS containing growth medium plus/minus 1 μM gemcitabine plus/minus recombinant human interleukin (IL)-6. RESULTS Induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome and a mild chronic pancreatitis diminished the beneficial effects of gemcitabine upon median overall survival. In median, the monogemcitabine group survived 191 days, whereas the caerulein-mono group survived 114, the control group 121, and the caerulein gemcitabine group 127 days (P < .05). In vitro, the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation by recombinant human IL-6 promoted pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell survival during gemcitabine treatment. CONCLUSION We could demonstrate for the first time that an improvement in median overall survival with gemcitabine is significantly abolished by a persistent mild chronic pancreatitis and a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In particular, the inflammation biomarkers C-reactive protein, IL-6, and IL-1α could indicate the prognostic benefit of gemcitabine chemotherapy and should now be tested in prospective patient-controlled trials. PMID:24953430

  7. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26199449

  8. Tobacco control: National Action Plan for NCD Prevention, Control and Health Promotion in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Nishtar, Sania; Mirza, Zafar; Mohamud, Khalif Bile; Latif, Ehsan; Ahmed, Ashfaq; Jafarey, Naeem A

    2004-12-01

    Reliance on revenue generated from tobacco is one of the fundamental barriers to effective tobacco control in Pakistan. The tobacco control component of the National Action Plan for Non-Communicable Diseases Prevention, Control and Health Promotion in Pakistan (NAP-NCD) deems it critical to address this issue. A range of policy and environmental strategies are part of this comprehensive effort; these involve regulating access and limiting demand through restrictions on advertising, marketing, promotion and through price and taxation. The NAP-NCD also encompasses community and school interventions, enforcement of tobacco control policies, cessation programmes, mass media counter-marketing campaigns for both prevention and cessation, and surveillance and evaluation of efforts. As part of NAP-NCD, surveillance of tobacco use has been integrated with a population-based NCD surveillance system. Featuring tobacco prominently as part of an NCD behavioural change strategy and providing wide-ranging information relevant to all aspects of tobacco prevention and control and smoking cessation have been identified as priority area in NAP-NCD. Other priority areas include the gradual phasing out of all types of advertising and eventually a complete ban on advertising; allocation of resources for policy and operational research around tobacco and building capacity in the health system in support of tobacco control. NAP-NCD also stresses on the need to develop and enforce legislation on smuggling contrabands and counterfeiting and legislation to subject tobacco to stringent regulations governing pharmaceutical products. The adoption of measures to discourage tobacco cultivation and assist with crop diversification; integration of guidance on tobacco use cessation into health services and insuring the availability and access to nicotine replacement therapy are also part of NAP-NCD. PMID:15745325

  9. Sweating the Small Stuff: MicroRNAs and Genetic Changes Define Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Siuwah; Bonaroti, Jillian; Unlu, Sebnem; Liang, Xiaoyan; Tang, Daolin; Zeh, Herbert J.; Lotze, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 18- to 22-nucleotide-long, single-stranded, noncoding RNAs that regulate important biological processes including differentiation, proliferation, and response to cellular stressors such as hypoxia, nutrient depletion, and traversion of the cell cycle by controlling protein expression within the cell. Many investigators have profiled cancer tissue and serum miRNAs to identify potential therapeutic targets, understand the pathways involved in tumorigenesis, and identify diagnostic tumor signatures. In the setting of pancreatic cancer, obtaining pancreatic tissue is invasive and impractical for early diagnosis. Several groups have profiled miRNAs that are present in the blood as a means to diagnose tumor progression and predict prognosis/survival or drug resistance. Several miRNA signatures found in pancreatic tissue and the peripheral blood, as well as the pathways that are associated with pancreatic cancer, are reviewed here in detail. Three miRNA biomarkers (miR-21, miR-155, and miR-200) have been repetitively identified in both pancreatic cancer tissue and patients’ blood. Those miRNAs regulate and are regulated by the central genetic and epigenetic changes observed in pancreatic cancer including p53, transforming growth factor [beta], p16INK4A, BRCA1/2, and Kras. These miRNAs are involved in DNA repair, cell cycle, and cell invasion and also play important roles in promoting metastases. PMID:23774697

  10. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T; Jeon, Christie Y; Pandol, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy. PMID:25426078

  11. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A.; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T.; Jeon, Christie Y.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy. PMID:25426078

  12. Metformin use among type 2 diabetics and risk of pancreatic cancer in a clinic-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Walker, Evan J; Ko, Andrew H; Holly, Elizabeth A; Bracci, Paige M

    2015-03-15

    A better understanding of the association between diabetes and pancreatic cancer (PC) may inform prevention and/or early detection strategies. Metformin has been associated with reduced risk of certain cancers, including PC, in some observational clinical studies. We assessed whether metformin use was associated with PC risk among those with type 2 diabetes (DM2), and whether metformin use modulated the association between DM2 and risk of PC. In total, 536 PC cases and 869 frequency-matched controls were recruited predominantly from University of California San Francisco medical clinics from 2006 to 2011. Eligible participants completed direct interviews using a structured risk factor questionnaire. The association between metformin use and PC risk was assessed using propensity score-weighted unconditional logistic regression methods in analyses restricted to diabetics and adjusted multivariable logistic models in the total study population. Ever use of metformin was not associated with PC risk in analyses restricted to DM2 (N = 170) participants (adjusted OR: 1.01, 95% CI: 0.61-1.68). In the total study population (N = 1,405) using nondiabetics as the referent group, PC risk was inversely associated with diabetes duration (ptrend  < 0.001). Further, when DM2 participants were grouped by ever/never use of metformin and compared with nondiabetics, metformin use did not affect the association between DM2 and PC risk (never users: OR: 1.44, 95% CI: 0.78-2.67; ever users: OR: 1.19, 95% CI: 0.72-1.99). Results from our clinic-based case-control study suggest that metformin use is not associated with PC risk among those with DM2 and does not alter the association between DM2 and PC risk. PMID:25091126

  13. Health Promotion and Tobacco Control: Student Nurses' Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalmers, Karen; Seguire, Marilyn; Brown, Judy

    2003-01-01

    Interviews and surveys of 272 Manitoba nursing students yielded 5 themes related to health promotion and tobacco use: identity, central beliefs/attitudes, learning the facts, limited practice options, and role conflict. Students expressed considerable uncertainty about individual autonomy, themselves as role models, and their use of health…

  14. [Social urban development and poverty control as health promotion].

    PubMed

    Trojan, A

    2001-03-01

    The Salomon Neumann Medal of the German Society for Social Medicine and Prevention bears the inscription. "Medicine is a Social Science". This provocative statement is most topical. It compels us to actively promote health by healthier living and environmental conditions apart from medical prevention. A core of this sphere of action is the reduction of social inequalities. Several recent congresses and publications have clearly shown that this subject remains one of the biggest challenges facing health promotion. German law has set the signs for reducing socially rooted inequalities for chances of health. This article postulates the thesis that health promotion can find allies for a healthy public policy in programmes planning for healthy urban development and for combatting poverty. The specific approaches for combatting social inequalities in the health sphere are reported and examples are given how such a health promotion policy may be translated into reality on a communal level. Finally, spotlight is on the dilemma of combatting inequality of chance due to differences in social status. PMID:11329919

  15. Pancreatic panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahawish, Karim; Iyasere, Isoken T

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old Caucasian man presenting with polyarthritis, weight loss and multiple tender cutaneous nodules. Abnormal liver function tests prompted imaging of the liver which demonstrated liver metastases. Biopsy of the liver lesions confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:25150233

  16. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, Jorg; Korc, Murray; Apte, Minoti; La Vecchia, Carlo; Johnson, Colin D; Biankin, Andrew V; Neale, Rachel E; Tempero, Margaret; Tuveson, David A; Hruban, Ralph H; Neoptolemos, John P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a major cause of cancer-associated mortality, with a dismal overall prognosis that has remained virtually unchanged for many decades. Currently, prevention or early diagnosis at a curable stage is exceedingly difficult; patients rarely exhibit symptoms and tumours do not display sensitive and specific markers to aid detection. Pancreatic cancers also have few prevalent genetic mutations; the most commonly mutated genes are KRAS, CDKN2A (encoding p16), TP53 and SMAD4 - none of which are currently druggable. Indeed, therapeutic options are limited and progress in drug development is impeded because most pancreatic cancers are complex at the genomic, epigenetic and metabolic levels, with multiple activated pathways and crosstalk evident. Furthermore, the multilayered interplay between neoplastic and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment challenges medical treatment. Fewer than 20% of patients have surgically resectable disease; however, neoadjuvant therapies might shift tumours towards resectability. Although newer drug combinations and multimodal regimens in this setting, as well as the adjuvant setting, appreciably extend survival, ∼80% of patients will relapse after surgery and ultimately die of their disease. Thus, consideration of quality of life and overall survival is important. In this Primer, we summarize the current understanding of the salient pathophysiological, molecular, translational and clinical aspects of this disease. In addition, we present an outline of potential future directions for pancreatic cancer research and patient management. PMID:27158978

  17. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  18. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  19. LIN28B suppresses microRNA let-7b expression to promote CD44+/LIN28B+ human pancreatic cancer stem cell proliferation and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yebo; Zhang, Lei; Cui, Lei; Lou, Wenhui; Wang, Dansong; Lu, Weiqi; Jin, Dayong; Liu, Te

    2015-01-01

    Although the highly proliferative, migratory, and multi-drug resistant phenotype of human pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) is well characterized, knowledge of their biological mechanisms is limited. We used CD44 and LIN28B as markers to screen, isolate, and enrich CSCs from human primary pancreatic cancer. Using flow cytometry, we identified a human primary pancreatic cancer cell (PCC) subpopulation expressing high levels of both CD44 and LIN28B. CD44+/LIN28B+ PCSCs expressed high levels of stemness marker genes and possessed higher migratory and invasive ability than CD44-/LIN28B- PCCs. CD44+/LIN28B+ PCSCs were more resistant to growth inhibition induced by the chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin and gemcitabine hydrochloride, and readily established tumors in vivo in a relatively short time. Moreover, microarray analysis revealed significant differences between the cDNA expression patterns of CD44+/LIN28B+ PCSCs and CD44-/LIN28B- PCCs. Following siRNA interference of endogenous LIN28B gene expression in CD44+/LIN28B+ PCSCs, not only was their proliferation decreased, there was also cell cycle arrest due to suppression of cyclin D1 expression following the stimulation of miRNA let-7b expression. In conclusion, CD44+/LIN28B+ cells, which possess CSC characteristics, can be reliably sorted from human primary PCCs and represent a valuable model for studying cancer cell physiology and multi-drug resistance. PMID:26609473

  20. Endoscopic Therapy in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Damien Meng Yew

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a debilitating disease that can result in chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and other related complications. The main aims of treatment are to control symptoms, prevent disease progression, and correct any complications. A multidisciplinary approach involving medical, endoscopic, and surgical therapy is important. Endoscopic therapy plays a specific role in carefully selected patients as primary interventional therapy when medical measures fail or in patients who are not suitable for surgery. Endoscopic therapy is also used as a bridge to surgery or as a means to assess the potential response to pancreatic surgery. This review addresses the role of endoscopic therapy in relief of obstruction of the pancreatic duct (PD) and bile du ct, closure of PD leaks, and drainage of pseudocysts in CP. The role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block for pain in chronic pancreatitis is also discussed. PMID:22205838

  1. Notch Signaling in Pancreatic Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu-Yan; Zhai, Wen-Jun; Teng, Chun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a significant role in embryonic cell fate determination and adult tissue homeostasis. Various studies have demonstrated the deep involvement of Notch signaling in the development of the pancreas and the lateral inhibition of Notch signaling in pancreatic progenitor differentiation and maintenance. The targeted inactivation of the Notch pathway components promotes premature differentiation of the endocrine pancreas. However, there is still the contrary opinion that Notch signaling specifies the endocrine lineage. Here, we review the current knowledge of the Notch signaling pathway in pancreatic development and its crosstalk with the Wingless and INT-1 (Wnt) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathways. PMID:26729103

  2. Association of Mitotic Regulation Pathway Polymorphisms with Pancreatic Cancer Risk and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Bamlet, William R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Petersen, Gloria M.; McWilliams, Robert R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Mitosis is a highly regulated process that serves to ensure the fidelity of cell division. Disruption of mitotic regulators leading to aneuploidy and polyploidy is commonly observed in cancer cells. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in regulators of mitosis may promote chromosome mis-segregation and influence pancreatic cancer and/or survival. Methods Thirty four SNPs, previously associated with breast cancer risk, from 33 genes involved in regulation of mitosis, were investigated for associations with pancreatic cancer risk in 1,143 Caucasian patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 1,097 unaffected controls from the Mayo Clinic. Associations with survival from pancreatic cancer were also assessed using 1,030 pancreatic cancer cases with known outcome. Results Two SNPs in the APC (rs2431238) and NIN (rs10145182) loci, out of 34 examined, were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p=0.035 and p=0.038, respectively). Further analyses of individuals categorized by smoking and BMI identified several SNPs displaying significant associations (p<0.05) with pancreatic cancer risk, including APC rs2431238 in individuals with high body mass index (BMI≥30) (p=0.031) and NIN rs10145182 in ever smokers (p=0.01). In addition, survival analyses detected significant associations between SNPs in EIF3S10 and overall survival (p=0.009), SNPs from five genes and survival in resected cancer cases (p<0.05), and SNPs from two other genes (p<0.05) and survival of locally advanced cancer cases. Conclusion Common variation in genes encoding regulators of mitosis may independently influence pancreatic cancer susceptibility and survival. PMID:20056645

  3. Impact of Circulating Vitamin D Binding Protein Levels on the Association Between 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Kopp, William; Rager, Helen; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius

    2012-01-01

    High concentrations of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] have been associated with elevated pancreatic cancer risk. As this is contrary to an expected inverse association between vitamin D status and cancer, we examined whether vitamin D binding protein (DBP), the primary carrier of vitamin D compounds in circulation, plays a role in this relationship. Prediagnostic serum DBP and 25(OH)D were studied in relation to risk of pancreatic cancer in a nested case-control study of 234 pancreatic cancer cases and 234 controls in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study of Finnish men. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression, and statistical tests were two-sided. We found that DBP and 25(OH)D were correlated (r=0.27; p<0.0001), and DBP was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk (OR=0.66, 95% CI=0.39–1.12, for the highest vs. lowest quartile; p-trend=0.02). Importantly, this association appeared to have a threshold between quartiles 2–4 and quartile 1, and was primarily evident among men with concurrent high 25(OH)D concentrations (OR=0.33, 95% CI=0.16–0.70 for highest vs. lowest quartile; p-trend=0.002), with no association in men with lower serum 25(OH)D (OR=1.28, 95% CI=0.62–2.61 for highest vs. lowest quartile, p-trend 0.63, p-interaction= 0.01). Men with higher 25(OH)D concentrations and serum DBP below the median showed greatly elevated risk of pancreatic cancer (OR=5.01, 95% CI 2.33–10.78, for highest vs. lowest quartile; p-trend < 0.0001), while risk was weakly inversely associated with serum 25(OH)D when DBP concentrations were higher (p-interaction = 0.001). Taken together, our findings indicate that higher DBP concentrations may sequester more 25(OH)D and reduce free 25(OH)D bioavailability. Simultaneous examination of DBP and 25(OH)D may be important in determining the association of vitamin D with cancer risk. PMID:22232734

  4. Physical and Mental Quality of Life (QOL) in Chronic Pancreatitis(CP): A Case-Control Study from the NAPS2 cohort

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Stephen T.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Barmada, M. Micheal; O’Connell, Michael; Kennard, Elizabeth D.; Anderson, Michelle; Baillie, John; Sherman, Stuart; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Hawes, Robert H.; AlKaade, Samer; Brand, Randall E.; Lewis, Michele D.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Money, Mary E.; Banks, Peter A.; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Define the Quality of Life (QOL) in chronic pancreatitis (CP) subjects Methods We studied 443 well phenotyped CP subjects and 611 controls prospectively enrolled from 20 US centers between 2000–2006 in the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 (NAPS2). Responses to the SF-12 questionnaire were used to calculate the Mental (MCS) and Physical component summary scores (PCS) with norm based scoring (normal ≥50). QOL in CP subjects was compared with controls after controlling for demographic factors, drinking history, smoking and medical conditions. QOL in CP was also compared with known scores for several chronic conditions. Results Both PCS (38±11.5 vs. 52±9.4) and MCS (44±11.5 vs. 51±9.2) were significantly lower in CP compared with controls (p<0.001). On multivariable analyses, compared to controls, a profound decrease in physical QOL (PCS 12.02 points lower) and a clinically significant decrease in mental QOL (MCS 4.24 points lower) was seen due to CP. QOL in CP was similar to (heart, kidney, liver, lung disease) or worse than (non-skin cancers, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, rheumatoid arthritis) other chronic conditions. Conclusions The impact of CP on QOL appears substantial. The QOL in CP subjects appears to be worse or similar to the QOL of many other chronic conditions. PMID:23357924

  5. Pancreatic regeneration: basic research and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Okita, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Toru; Shigenori, Ota; Ishii, Masayuki; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Ueki, Tomomi; Meguro, Makoto; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kojima, Takashi; Mitaka, Toshihiro; Sato, Noriyuki; Sawada, Norimasa; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic regeneration (PR) is an interesting phenomenon that could provide clues as to how the control of diabetes mellitus might be achieved. Due to the different regenerative abilities of the pancreas and liver, the molecular mechanism responsible for PR is largely unknown. In this review, we describe five representative murine models of PR and thirteen humoral mitogens that stimulate β-cell proliferation. We also describe pancreatic ontogenesis, including the molecular transcriptional differences between α-cells and β-cells. Furthermore, we review 14 murine models which carry defects in genes related to key transcription factors for pancreatic ontogenesis to gain further insight into pancreatic development. PMID:26148809

  6. Retraction: "Activated K-Ras and INK4a/Arf Deficiency Promote Aggressiveness of Pancreatic Cancer by Induction of EMT Consistent With Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype" by Wang et al.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    The above article, published online on November 23, 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 4B and C to be inappropriately manipulated and re-labeled. Literature Cited Wang Z, Ali S, Banerjee S, Bao B, Li Y, Azmi AS, Korc M, Sarkar FH. 2013. Activated K-Ras and INK4a/Arf deficiency promote aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer by induction of EMT consistent with cancer stem cell phenotype. J Cell Physiol 228:556-562; doi: 10.1002/jcp.24162. PMID:27315162

  7. Nutrition support in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Orestis; Lavrentieva, Athina; Botsios, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    In the majority (80%) of patients with acute pancreatitis, the disease is self limiting and, after a few days of withholding feeding and intravenous administration of fluids, patients can again be normally fed orally. In a small percentage of patients, the disease progresses to severe necrotic pancreatitis, with an intense systemic inflammatory response and often with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. As mortality is high in patients with severe disease and as mortality and morbidity rates are directly related to the failure of establishing a positive nitrogen balance, it is assumed that feeding will improve survival in patients with severe disease. The aim of nutritional support is to cover the elevated metabolic demands as much as possible, without stimulating pancreatic secretion and maximizing self-digestion. The administration of either total parenteral nutrition or jejunal nutrition does not stimulate pancreatic secretion. Recently, a series of controlled clinical studies has been conducted in order to evaluate the effectiveness of enteral nutrition with jejunal administration of the nutritional solution. The results have shown that enteral nutrition, as compared to total parenteral nutrition, was cheaper, safer and more effective as regards the suppression of the immunoinflammatory response, the decrease of septic complications, the need for surgery for the management of the complications of acute pancreatitis and the reduction of the total hospitalization period. It did not seem to affect mortality or the rate of non-septic complications. In conclusion, enteral nutrition should be the preferred route of nutritional support in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:18648127

  8. Pilot study evaluating broccoli sprouts in advanced pancreatic cancer (POUDER trial) - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most aggressive malignancies with marked resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. PDA-cancer stem cells (CSCs) are not targeted by current therapies and may be a reason for poor prognosis. Studies indicate that diets rich in cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower offer cancer preventative and therapeutic benefits. Recent experimental studies have confirmed these findings and demonstrated that isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, and the polyphenol, quercetin, effectively reduced tumor growth and enhanced the sensitivity of the cancer cells to current chemotherapeutics. The aim of the present study is to test the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial on the application of freeze-dried broccoli sprouts in patients with advanced PDA. Methods and study design The study is designed as a prospective randomized, double-blinded pilot trial with a treatment and a placebo-controlled arm in a single center setting. A total number of forty patients (18 years or older) in two parallel groups with advanced, surgically non-resectable PDA under palliative chemotherapy are planned for recruitment. Patients in the treatment group will receive fifteen capsules of the study substance per day (90 mg of active sulforaphane) during the chemotherapy treatment course. Patients in the placebo group will receive the same capsule size and portion distribution with inactive substances (mainly methylcellulose). The follow-up duration is one year. Feasibility of the study substance, adverse effects, and patient compliance, as well as levels of serum tumor markers (CEA, CA 19-9), quality of life, and patient overall survival rates will be assessed at defined points of time. Discussion The POUDER trial is expected to transfer promising experimental and epidemiological data into a clinical pilot study to assess the effectiveness of broccoli sprout extracts in the treatment of advanced PDA. The study objectives will provide data on the

  9. Pancreatic and Pancreatic-Like Microbial Proteases Accelerate Gut Maturation in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prykhodko, Olena; Pierzynowski, Stefan G.; Nikpey, Elham; Arevalo Sureda, Ester; Fedkiv, Olexandr; Weström, Björn R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Postnatal gut maturation in neonatal mammals, either at natural weaning or after precocious inducement, is coinciding with enhanced enzymes production by exocrine pancreas. Since the involvement of enzymes in gut functional maturation was overlooked, the present study aimed to investigate the role of enzymes in gut functional maturation using neonatal rats. Methods Suckling rats (Rattus norvegicus) were instagastrically gavaged with porcine pancreatic enzymes (Creon), microbial-derived amylase, protease, lipase and mixture thereof, while controls received α-lactalbumin or water once per day during 14–16 d of age. At 17 d of age the animals were euthanized and visceral organs were dissected, weighed and analyzed for structural and functional properties. For some of the rats, gavage with the macromolecular markers such as bovine serum albumin and bovine IgG was performed 3 hours prior to blood collection to assess the intestinal permeability. Results Gavage with the pancreatic or pancreatic-like enzymes resulted in stimulated gut growth, increased gastric acid secretion and switched intestinal disaccharidases, with decreased lactase and increased maltase and sucrase activities. The fetal-type vacuolated enterocytes were replaced by the adult-type in the distal intestine, and macromolecular transfer to the blood was declined. Enzyme exposure also promoted pancreas growth with increased amylase and trypsin production. These effects were confined to the proteases in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion Feeding exogenous enzymes, containing proteases, induced precocious gut maturation in suckling rats. This suggests that luminal exposure to proteases by oral loading or, possibly, via enhanced pancreatic secretion involves in the gut maturation of young mammals. PMID:25658606

  10. RACK1-mediated translation control promotes liver fibrogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Min; Peng, Peike; Wang, Jiajun; Wang, Lan; Duan, Fangfang; Jia, Dongwei; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2015-07-31

    Activation of quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the central event of liver fibrosis. The translational machinery is an optimized molecular network that affects cellular homoeostasis and diseases, whereas the role of protein translation in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis is little defined. Our previous report suggests that up-regulation of receptor for activated C-kinase 1(RACK1) in HSCs is critical for liver fibrogenesis. In this study, we found that RACK1 promoted macrophage conditioned medium (MCM)-induced assembly of eIF4F and phosphorylation of eIF4E in primary HSCs. RACK1 enhanced the translation and expression of pro-fibrogenic factors collagen 1α1, snail and cyclin E1 induced by MCM. Administration of PP242 or knock-down of eIF4E suppressed RACK1-stimulated collagen 1α1 production, proliferation and migration in primary HSCs. In addition, depletion of eIF4E attenuated thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver fibrosis in vivo. Our data suggest that RACK1-mediated stimulation of cap-dependent translation plays crucial roles in HSCs activation and liver fibrogenesis, and targeting translation initiation could be a promising strategy for the treatment of liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • RACK1 induces the assembly of eIF4F and phosphorylation of eIF4E in primary HSCs. • RACK1 stimulates the translation of collagen 1α1, snail and cyclin E1 in HSCs. • RACK1 promotes HSCs activation via cap-mediated translation. • Depletion of eIF4E suppresses liver fibrogenesis in vivo.

  11. Duct Cells Contribute to Regeneration of Endocrine and Acinar Cells Following Pancreatic Damage in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    CRISCIMANNA, ANGELA; SPEICHER, JULIE A.; HOUSHMAND, GOLBAHAR; SHIOTA, CHIYO; PRASADAN, KRISHNA; Ji, BAOAN; LOGSDON, CRAIG D.; GITTES, GEORGE K.; ESNI, FARZAD

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS There have been conflicting results on a cell of origin in pancreatic regeneration. These discrepancies predominantly stem from lack of specific markers for the pancreatic precursors/stem cells, as well as differences in the targeted cells and severity of tissue injury in the experimental models so far proposed. We attempted to create a model that used diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) to ablate specific cell populations, control the extent of injury, and avoid induction of the inflammatory response. METHODS To target specific types of pancreatic cells, we crossed R26DTR or R26dtR/lacZ mice with transgenic mice that express the Cre recombinase in the pancreas, under control of the Pdx1 (global pancreatic) or elastase (acinar-specific) promoters. RESULTS Exposure of PdxCre;R26DTR mice to diphtheria toxin resulted in extensive ablation of acinar and endocrine tissues but not ductal cells. Surviving cells within the ductal compartment contributed to regeneration of endocrine and acinar cells via recapitulation of the embryonic pancreatic developmental program. However, following selective ablation of acinar tissue in ElaCre-ERT2;R26DTR mice, regeneration likely occurred by reprogramming of ductal cells to acinar lineage. CONCLUSIONS In the pancreas of adult mice, epithelial cells within the ductal compartment contribute to regeneration of endocrine and acinar cells. The severity of injury determines the regenerative mechanisms and cell types that contribute to this process. PMID:21763240

  12. Atorvastatin Use Associated With Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few data are present in the literature on the relationship between atorvastatin use and acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to explore this issue in Taiwan. Using representative claims data established from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, this case–control study consisted of 5810 cases aged 20 to 84 years with a first-time diagnosis of acute pancreatitis during the period 1998 to 2011and 5733 randomly selected controls without acute pancreatitis. Both cases and controls were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Subjects who at least received 1 prescription for other statins or nonstatin lipid-lowering drugs were excluded from the study. If subjects never had 1 prescription for atorvastatin, they were defined as never use of atorvastatin. Current use of atorvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining 1 tablet of atorvastatin was noted ≤7 days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Late use of atorvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining 1 tablet of atorvastatin was noted >7 days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. The odds ratio with 95% confidence interval of acute pancreatitis associated with atorvastatin use was calculated by using the logistic regression analysis. The logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio of acute pancreatitis was 1.67 for subjects with current use of atorvastatin (95% confidence interval 1.18, 2.38), when compared with subjects with never use of atorvastatin. The odds ratio decreased to 1.15 for those with late use of atorvastatin (95% confidence interval 0.87, 1.52), but without statistical significance. Current use of atorvastatin is associated with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Clinically, clinicians should consider the possibility of atorvastatin-associated acute pancreatitis when patients present with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis without a definite etiology but are taking

  13. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  14. Ruxolitinib Benefits Some with Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    A phase II trial found that the drug ruxolitinib extends the lives of some patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer who no longer responded to first-line therapy. Ruxolitinib, approved for treating myelofibrosis, blocks the JAK/STAT pathway, which promotes inflammation. Ruxolitinib increased median survival from 1.8 to 2.7 months in patients with pancreatic cancer who had high levels of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein in their blood. PMID:26463833

  15. D-dopachrome tautomerase is over-expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and acts cooperatively with macrophage migration inhibitory factor to promote cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dawei; Guo, Jinshuai; Yao, Junchao; Jiang, Kun; Hu, Jianhua; Wang, Bo; Liu, Haiyang; Lin, Lin; Sun, Wenyu; Jiang, Xiaofeng

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have established the important role of MIF in the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) for both therapeutic and diagnostic perspectives, but little is known about the expression and function of D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT), a functional homolog of MIF, in PDAC. In the present study, we demonstrated that DDT was over-expressed in PDAC tissues in a pattern correlated with MIF. In the pancreatic cancer cell lines, PANC-1, BXPC-3 and ASPC-1, both DDT and MIF were expressed and co-localized with each other in the endosomal compartments and plasma membrane. Knockdown of DDT and MIF in PANC-1 cells cooperatively inhibited ERK1/2 and AKT phosphorylation, increased p53 expression, and reduced cell proliferation, invasion and tumor formation. These effects were rescued by the re-expression of MIF or DDT, but not by the forced expression of the tautomerase-deficient mutants of DDT and MIF, P1G-DDT and P1G-MIF. Finally, we observed that 4-iodo-6-phenylpyrimidine (4-IPP), a covalent tautomerase inhibitor of both DDT and MIF, attenuated PANC-1 cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Thus, targeting the tautomerase sites of both MIF and DDT may offer more efficient therapeutic benefits to PDAC patients. PMID:27434219

  16. Antibiosis of Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Alexander; Erhart, Wiebke; Schafmayer, Clemens; Held, Hanns-Christoph; Hampe, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Necrotizing pancreatitis is a life-threatening presentation of acute pancreatitis. The mortality of 20-80% initially depends on the persistence of organ failure and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and, in the later course of the disease, on secondary infection of the necrosis. The questions whether prophylactic antibiotics aiming to prevent this infection should be administered and which antibiotic is the best to use, as well as the problem of fungal infection under antibiotic treatment are still intriguing and insufficiently solved. Methods A search of the literature using PubMed was carried out, supplemented by a review of the programmes of the Digestive Disease Week (DDW) and the United European Gastroenterology Week (UEGW). Results Despite the widely practised prophylactic antibiotic administration in severe pancreatitis, no evidence for the benefit of this strategy exists. One of the drawbacks might be a tendency for disastrous fungal infection under prophylactic antibiotics. Bacterial translocation from the gut in the second week after the onset of symptoms is the major source for infection of pancreatic necrosis and provides a clear indication for antibiotic treatment. However, routine fine-needle aspiration for a calculated antibiotic therapy cannot be recommended, and all other tests offer only indirect signs. Important factors such as enteral versus parenteral feeding and the method of necrosectomy are mostly neglected in the trials but seem to be essential for the outcome of the patient. Conclusions Even though most meta-analyses including the newer double-blind, placebo-controlled trials on prophylactic antibiotics showed no beneficial effects in the prevention of infection of necrosis and/or outcome of the patients, this strategy is still widely used in clinical routine. Since nearly all trials published so far show systematic problems (i.e. inaccurate definition of the severity of the disease, poor statistical testing

  17. RACK1-mediated translation control promotes liver fibrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Peng, Peike; Wang, Jiajun; Wang, Lan; Duan, Fangfang; Jia, Dongwei; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2015-07-31

    Activation of quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the central event of liver fibrosis. The translational machinery is an optimized molecular network that affects cellular homoeostasis and diseases, whereas the role of protein translation in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis is little defined. Our previous report suggests that up-regulation of receptor for activated C-kinase 1(RACK1) in HSCs is critical for liver fibrogenesis. In this study, we found that RACK1 promoted macrophage conditioned medium (MCM)-induced assembly of eIF4F and phosphorylation of eIF4E in primary HSCs. RACK1 enhanced the translation and expression of pro-fibrogenic factors collagen 1α1, snail and cyclin E1 induced by MCM. Administration of PP242 or knock-down of eIF4E suppressed RACK1-stimulated collagen 1α1 production, proliferation and migration in primary HSCs. In addition, depletion of eIF4E attenuated thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver fibrosis in vivo. Our data suggest that RACK1-mediated stimulation of cap-dependent translation plays crucial roles in HSCs activation and liver fibrogenesis, and targeting translation initiation could be a promising strategy for the treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:26002467

  18. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyu; Sun, Tao; Kong, Fanyang; Du, Yiqi; Li, Zhaoshen

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal diseases with an incidence rate almost equal to the rate of mortality. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology that affects the pancreas. Epidemiological studies have identified CP to be a major risk factor for PC. Summary A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking CP and PC has identified several common pathways that provide targets for future interventions. This article reviews those components in the CP-PC connection, including the role of macrophages, the maintenance of genome stability, cytokines, and other nodal factors such as nuclear factor kappa B, COX-2 and reactive oxygen species. Key Message The molecular mechanisms that underlie CP and PC provide novel targets for future therapies for PC. Practical Implications The stromal-desmoplastic reaction plays an important role in initiating and sustaining chronic inflammation and tumor progression. Recently, two targeted anti-tumor agents, erlotinib and nab-paclitaxel, have shown promising therapeutic efficacy. Notably, both these agents target components (EGFR and SPARC) within the inflammatory stroma surrounding malignant cells, underscoring the importance of inflammation in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Identifying the common pathways linking CP and PC may help uncover additional novel targets for future therapies. PMID:26674754

  19. Promoting cancer control training in resource limited environments: Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nwogu, C; Mahoney, M; George, S; Dy, G; Hartman, H; Animashaun, M; Popoola, A; Michalek, A

    2014-03-01

    In resource limited nations, cancer control is often a lower priority issue creating challenges for the prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. Training and education are vital components of efforts to tackle this problem. A 3-day cancer control workshop was conducted at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Nigeria, in 2013. The curriculum included didactic lectures, panel discussions, and interactive sessions on local cancer statistics, preventive strategies, cancer registries, screening and diagnostic options, and treatment approaches with limited resources (chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, and palliative care) and several site-specific (breast, lung, cervical, prostate, and colon) topics. Pre-workshop and post-workshop questionnaires were completed by participants. Eighty-six percent of the 50 workshop participants completed at least one questionnaire. Participants were mainly nurses and physicians (89% of responders), and 40% reported >25 years of practice experience. The more common local needs identified were professional education (65%) and increasing public cancer awareness (63%). The greatest interest for future programs was on research collaborations (70%). An immediate impact of the workshop was the commencement of monthly tumor board conferences and a review of the current cancer registry data. Capacity building is critical for the execution of effective cancer control strategies. Conducting collaborative workshops represents a cost-effective means of launching programs and energizing the medical community to pursue ongoing education and research addressing the anticipated cancer epidemic on the African continent. PMID:24243400

  20. Five promoters integrate control of the cob/pdu regulon in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Ailion, M; Bobik, T; Stormo, G; Roth, J

    1995-10-01

    Propanediol is degraded by a B12-dependent pathway in Salmonella typhimurium. The enzymes for this pathway are encoded in a small region (minute 41) that includes the pdu operon (controlling B12-dependent degradation of propanediol) and the divergent cob operon (controlling synthesis of cobalamin, B12). Expression of both operons is induced by propanediol and globally controlled by the ArcA and Crp systems. The region between the two operons encodes two proteins, PduF, a transporter of propanediol, and PocR, which mediates the induction of the regulon by propanediol. Insertion mutations between the pdu and cob operons have been characterized, and their exact positions have been correlated with mutant phenotypes. The region includes five promoters, four of which are controlled by the PocR protein and induced by propanediol. The cob and pdu operons each have one regulated promoter; the pduF gene is expressed from two regulated promoters (P1 and P2). The P1 and P2 transcripts extend beyond pduF to include the pocR gene; thus the PocR protein autoregulates its expression from these promoters. The fifth promoter, PPoc, is adjacent to the pocR gene and associated with a Crp binding site. We suggest that all global control of the regulon is exerted by regulating the level of PocR protein at the P1, P2, and PPoc promoters. A putative binding site for the PocR protein has been identified by computer analysis. Eight close matches to this proposed site were found in regions near the four promoters known to be regulated by PocR protein: PPdu, P1, P2, and PCob. A three-state model is proposed in which the regulon uses all five of its promoters to control expression. PMID:7559322

  1. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  2. Outcome of pancreatic ascites in patients with tropical calcific pancreatitis managed using a uniform treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Kurumboor, Prakash; Varma, Deepak; Rajan, Mahendra; Kamlesh, Naduthottam Palanisami; Paulose, Roshin; Narayanan, Ramesh Ganesh; Philip, Mathew

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic ascites or internal pancreatic fistula is a known complication of chronic pancreatitis. This condition is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The management approach of pancreatic ascites in tropical calcific pancreatitis is infrequently reported owing to the low incidence of this condition. Between December 2005 and June 2007, 11 patients with pancreatic ascites with tropical calcific pancreatitis (male:female 7:4, mean age 29.5 [14.2] years) were treated. A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent endotherapy and surgery for this condition based on an institutional protocol was performed. The end point was resolution of pancreatic ascites and relief of symptoms. All patients had pancreatic ascites, and one patient also had pancreatic pleural effusion. Endoscopic transpapillary stenting was possible in nine patients (81%). Identification of site of leak and placement of an endoscopic stent across the PD disruption was possible in five (45%) patients. All these patients had relief of ascites. Mean number of endotherapy sessions required before control of ascites was 1.8. Among the remaining four (36.6%) patients who had ERCP, placement of stent across the leak was unsuccessful; however stenting helped stabilize the general condition and nutritional status. These four patients and two patients who failed ERP underwent lateral pancreatojejunostomy surgery. Morbidity was observed in three patients who underwent surgery and one patient died due to sepsis and hemorrhage. All patients who had surgical drainage had complete relief of ascites and symptoms. In patients with pancreatic ascites in tropical calcific pancreatitis endotherapy and transpapillary stenting helps in resolution of ascites in nearly half of the patients. In the remaining patients preliminary conservative management followed by surgical pancreatic ductal drainage provides good relief of symptoms. PMID:19907961

  3. Tumor Restrictive Suicide Gene Therapy for Glioma Controlled by the FOS Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiliang; Song, Weijian; Luo, Jie; Jiang, Shan; Yan, Fei; Zhai, Baojin

    2015-01-01

    Effective suicide gene delivery and expression are crucial to achieving successful effects in gene therapy. An ideal tumor-specific promoter expresses therapeutic genes in tumor cells with minimal normal tissue expression. We compared the activity of the FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog) promoter with five alternative tumor-specific promoters in glioma cells and non-malignant astrocytes. The FOS promoter caused significantly higher transcriptional activity in glioma cell lines than all alternative promoters with the exception of CMV. The FOS promoter showed 13.9%, 32.4%, and 70.8% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in three glioma cell lines (U87, U251, and U373). Importantly, however, the FOS promoter showed only 1.6% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in normal astrocytes. We also tested the biologic activity of recombinant adenovirus containing the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) driven by the FOS promoter, including selective killing efficacy in vitro and tumor inhibition rate in vivo. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of the HSV-tk gene controlled by the FOS promoter conferred a cytotoxic effect on human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. This study suggests that use of the FOS-tk adenovirus system is a promising strategy for glioma-specific gene therapy but still much left for improvement. PMID:26571389

  4. Practice of Contemporary Dance Promotes Stochastic Postural Control in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ferrufino, Lena; Bril, Blandine; Dietrich, Gilles; Nonaka, Tetsushi; Coubard, Olivier A.

    2011-01-01

    As society ages and the frequency of falls increases, counteracting gait and posture decline is a challenging issue for countries of the developed world. Previous studies have shown that exercise and hazard management help to improve balance and/or decrease the risks for falling in normal aging. Motor activity based on motor-skill learning, particularly dance, can also benefit balance and decreases falls with age. Recent studies have suggested that older dancers have better balance, posture, or gait than non-dancers. Additionally, clinical or laboratory measures have shown improvements in some aspects of balance after dance interventions in elderly trainees. This study examined the impact of contemporary dance (CD) and of fall prevention (FP) programs on postural control of older adults. Posturography of quiet upright stance was performed in 41 participants aged 59–86 years before and after 4.4-month training in either CD or FP once a week. Though classical statistic scores failed to show any effect, dynamic analyses of the center-of-pressure displacements revealed significant changes after training. Specifically, practice of CD enhanced the critical time interval in diffusion analysis, and reduced recurrence and mathematical stability in recurrence quantification analysis, whereas practice of FP induced or tended to induce the reverse patterns. Such effects were obtained only in the eyes open condition. We suggest that CD training based on motor improvisation favored stochastic posture inducing plasticity in motor control, while FP training based on more stereotyped behaviors did not. PMID:22232582

  5. Promoting tobacco control policies in northwest Indian tribes.

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, E; Glasgow, R E; Lopez, K; Hall, R; McRae, S G; Meyers, G B

    1995-01-01

    A culturally sensitive consultative process to facilitate adoption by tribal councils of more effective tobacco control policies was developed and evaluated. Thirty-nine Northwest Indian tribes were randomized to early intervention or late intervention conditions. Early intervention tribes received a policy workbook and consultation by means of meetings and telephone calls. Late intervention tribes were assessed but received no assistance or encouragement regarding tobacco use policies. The stringency of the policies was assessed via telephone at baseline and after intervention. At postintervention, there were consistent, and generally statistically significant, differences in adoption of more stringent and comprehensive smoking policies for early intervention tribes compared with late intervention tribes. The intervention could be used in other Indian settings. PMID:7604928

  6. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells express a restricted set of functionally active chemokine receptors capable of promoting migration to pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Sordi, Valeria; Malosio, Maria Luisa; Marchesi, Federica; Mercalli, Alessia; Melzi, Raffaella; Giordano, Tiziana; Belmonte, Nathalie; Ferrari, Giuliana; Leone, Biagio Eugenio; Bertuzzi, Federico; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Allavena, Paola; Bonifacio, Ezio; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2005-07-15

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are stromal cells with the ability to proliferate and differentiate into many tissues. Although they represent powerful tools for several therapeutic settings, mechanisms regulating their migration to peripheral tissues are still unknown. Here, we report chemokine receptor expression on human BM-MSCs and their role in mediating migration to tissues. A minority of BM-MSCs (2% to 25%) expressed a restricted set of chemokine receptors (CXC receptor 4 [CXCR4], CX3C receptor 1 [CX3CR1], CXCR6, CC chemokine receptor 1 [CCR1], CCR7) and, accordingly, showed appreciable chemotactic migration in response to the chemokines CXC ligand 12 (CXCL12), CX3CL1, CXCL16, CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3), and CCL19. Using human pancreatic islets as an in vitro model of peripheral tissue, we showed that islet supernatants released factors able to attract BM-MSCs in vitro, and this attraction was principally mediated by CX3CL1 and CXCL12. Moreover, cells with features of BM-MSCs were detected within the pancreatic islets of mice injected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive BM. A population of bona fide MSCs that also expressed CXCR4, CXCR6, CCR1, and CCR7 could be isolated from normal adult human pancreas. This study defines the chemokine receptor repertoire of human BM-MSCs that determines their migratory activity. Modulation of homing capacity may be instrumental for harnessing the therapeutic potential of BM-MSCs. PMID:15784733

  7. Control and choice in English prisons: developing health-promoting prisons.

    PubMed

    Woodall, James; Dixey, Rachael; South, Jane

    2014-09-01

    The 'health-promoting prison' has been informed by a broader settings-based philosophy to health promotion which conceptualizes health as the responsibility for all social settings. Though in its relative infancy, the notion of a health-promoting prison has gained political backing from international organizations like the World Health Organization, but the implementation of the policy rhetoric has not translated across all prison environments. The aim of this paper is to consider how key elements of health promotion discourse-choice, control and implicitly, empowerment-can apply in the context of imprisonment. These concepts were examined in three category-C (secure) prisons in England, through interviews with 36 male prisoners and 19 prison staff conducted by the first author. Analysis showed that prisoners negotiated the norms, structures and strictures of prison life by both relinquishing control and also by taking control, showing resistance and exercising some element of choice. The paradox is that, as most prisoners are expected to be released at some point they need to exercise some agency, control and choice, but these learning experiences may be constrained whilst 'inside'. The paper argues that if a settings approach in prison is truly to move forward, both conceptually and practically, then health promoters should seek to embed the key values of health promotion within the prison setting. PMID:23574692

  8. Control of Insulin Secretion by Production of Reactive Oxygen Species: Study Performed in Pancreatic Islets from Fed and 48-Hour Fasted Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Patrícia; Simões, Daniel; Curi, Rui; Carpinelli, Angelo Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria and NADPH oxidase are important sources of reactive oxygen species in particular the superoxide radical (ROS) in pancreatic islets. These molecules derived from molecular oxygen are involved in pancreatic β-cells signaling and control of insulin secretion. We examined the involvement of ROS produced through NADPH oxidase in the leucine- and/or glucose-induced insulin secretion by pancreatic islets from fed or 48-hour fasted rats. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in isolated islets was evaluated at low (2.8 mM) or high (16.7 mM) glucose concentrations in the presence or absence of leucine (20 mM) and/or NADPH oxidase inhibitors (VAS2870–20 μM or diphenylene iodonium—DPI—5 μM). ROS production was determined in islets treated with dihydroethidium (DHE) or MitoSOX Red reagent for 20 min and dispersed for fluorescence measurement by flow cytometry. NADPH content variation was examined in INS-1E cells (an insulin secreting cell line) after incubation in the presence of glucose (2.8 or 16.7 mM) and leucine (20 mM). At 2.8 mM glucose, VAS2870 and DPI reduced net ROS production (by 30%) and increased GSIS (by 70%) in a negative correlation manner (r = -0.93). At 16.7 mM glucose or 20 mM leucine, both NADPH oxidase inhibitors did not alter insulin secretion neither net ROS production. Pentose phosphate pathway inhibition by treatment with DHEA (75 μM) at low glucose led to an increase in net ROS production in pancreatic islets from fed rats (by 40%) and induced a marked increase (by 144%) in islets from 48-hour fasted rats. The NADPH/NADP+ ratio was increased when INS-1E cells were exposed to high glucose (by 4.3-fold) or leucine (by 3-fold). In conclusion, increased ROS production through NADPH oxidase prevents the occurrence of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions, however, in the presence of high glucose or high leucine levels, the increased production of NADPH and the consequent enhancement of the activity of the antioxidant defenses

  9. Intake of fatty acids and antioxidants and pancreatic cancer in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhihong; Holly, Elizabeth A; Wang, Furong; Chan, June M; Bracci, Paige M

    2010-10-15

    There are no well-established modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer except smoking. Some dietary factors have been associated with pancreatic cancer risk and require further study. We examined the associations among intake of specific fatty acids and antioxidants and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) as estimates of relative risk. Positive associations were observed for high levels of the 8 individual saturated fatty acids (4th vs. 1st quartile: ORs ranged from 1.6 to 2.6; all p(trend) < 0.01), monounsaturated palmitoleic and oleic fatty acids [OR = 1.6 (95% CI: 1.2-2.1) and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.9); both p(trend) < 0.01], and polyunsaturated linolenic acid [OR = 1.5 (95% CI: 1.1-2.0); p(trend) = 0.02]. Inverse associations were observed for high levels of gadolic acid [4th vs. 1st quartile: OR = 0.68 (95% CI: 0.50-0.92); p(trend) = 0.007] and omega-3 fatty acids [>or=0.85 g/day vs. 1st quartile: OR = 0.47 (95% CI: 0.25-0.90)]. An inverse association was also observed for high total intake of vitamin C [4th vs. 1st quartile: OR = 0.69 (95% CI: 0.51-0.94); p(trend) = 0.004] and of vitamin E [OR = 0.67 (95% CI: 0.49-0.92); p(trend) = 0.01]. Although similar decreased risks were also observed for high supplemental intake of these 2 vitamins (both p(trend) < 0.01), no association was observed for intake from food alone. These results support the hypotheses that a high intake of saturated and certain monounsaturated fatty acids may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas greater intake of omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins C and E may reduce the risk. PMID:20104522

  10. Control of Insulin Secretion by Production of Reactive Oxygen Species: Study Performed in Pancreatic Islets from Fed and 48-Hour Fasted Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Ana Cláudia; Riva, Patrícia; Simões, Daniel; Curi, Rui; Carpinelli, Angelo Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria and NADPH oxidase are important sources of reactive oxygen species in particular the superoxide radical (ROS) in pancreatic islets. These molecules derived from molecular oxygen are involved in pancreatic β-cells signaling and control of insulin secretion. We examined the involvement of ROS produced through NADPH oxidase in the leucine- and/or glucose-induced insulin secretion by pancreatic islets from fed or 48-hour fasted rats. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in isolated islets was evaluated at low (2.8 mM) or high (16.7 mM) glucose concentrations in the presence or absence of leucine (20 mM) and/or NADPH oxidase inhibitors (VAS2870-20 μM or diphenylene iodonium-DPI-5 μM). ROS production was determined in islets treated with dihydroethidium (DHE) or MitoSOX Red reagent for 20 min and dispersed for fluorescence measurement by flow cytometry. NADPH content variation was examined in INS-1E cells (an insulin secreting cell line) after incubation in the presence of glucose (2.8 or 16.7 mM) and leucine (20 mM). At 2.8 mM glucose, VAS2870 and DPI reduced net ROS production (by 30%) and increased GSIS (by 70%) in a negative correlation manner (r = -0.93). At 16.7 mM glucose or 20 mM leucine, both NADPH oxidase inhibitors did not alter insulin secretion neither net ROS production. Pentose phosphate pathway inhibition by treatment with DHEA (75 μM) at low glucose led to an increase in net ROS production in pancreatic islets from fed rats (by 40%) and induced a marked increase (by 144%) in islets from 48-hour fasted rats. The NADPH/NADP+ ratio was increased when INS-1E cells were exposed to high glucose (by 4.3-fold) or leucine (by 3-fold). In conclusion, increased ROS production through NADPH oxidase prevents the occurrence of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions, however, in the presence of high glucose or high leucine levels, the increased production of NADPH and the consequent enhancement of the activity of the antioxidant defenses mitigate

  11. 17 CFR 229.401 - (Item 401) Directors, executive officers, promoters and control persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., executive officers, promoters and control persons. 229.401 Section 229.401 Commodity and Securities... control persons. (a) Identification of directors. List the names and ages of all directors of the..., suspended or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization (as defined in Section 3(a)(26) of the...

  12. An Architecture to Promote the Commercialization of Space Mission Command and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a command and control architecture that encompasses space mission operations centers, ground terminals, and spacecraft. This architecture is intended to promote the growth of a lucrative space mission operations command and control market through a set of open standards used by both gevernment and profit-making space mission operators.

  13. Promoting Early Intervention Referral through a Randomized Controlled Home-Visiting Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Donald F.; O'Sullivan, Ann L.; Guinn, Judith; Mautone, Jennifer A.; Carlson, Elyse C.; Zhao, Huaqing; Zhang, Xuemei; Esposito, Tara L.; Askew, Megan; Radcliffe, Jerilynn

    2012-01-01

    The MOM Program is a randomized, controlled trial of an intervention to promote mothers' care for the health and development of their children, including accessing early intervention (EI) services. Study aims were to determine whether, relative to controls, this intervention increased receipt of and referral to EI services. Mothers (N = 302)…

  14. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Hirofumi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  15. Intraluminal gastric pH in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bovo, P; Cataudella, G; Di Francesco, V; Vaona, B; Filippini, M; Marcori, M; Montesi, G; Rigo, L; Frulloni, L; Brunori, M P

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the circadian variations of intragastric pH in 28 inpatients with chronic pancreatitis (mean (SD) age 46.8 (12.4) years) and in 14 controls (45.4 (9.8)). pH Metry was performed using a monocrystalline antimony electrode placed in the body of the stomach under fluoroscopic control and connected up to a recorder (MKII Digitrapper, Synectics). The evaluation parameters, expressed as median and interquartile range, were: total period, postprandial periods (P1 and P2), interdigestive, and nocturnal phases. Patients with chronic pancreatitis were subdivided into three groups on the basis of severity of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (secretin-caerulein test: lipase output at 60-90 min)--that is, those with severe insufficiency (chronic pancreatitis-SI: 13 patients, lipase output < 10% normal values and pancreolauryl test < 20%), those with only mild insufficiency (chronic pancreatitis-MI: seven patients), and those with normal secretion (chronic pancreatitis-NF: eight patients). The chronic pancreatitis-SI patients present significantly greater gastric acidification in the postprandial periods compared with controls (P1: p < 0.001; P2: p < 0.01), and with chronic pancreatitis-MI plus chronic pancreatitis-NF subjects (P1: p < 0.01; P2: p < 0.05), taken together. In conclusion, gastric acidity, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and impaired digestion are closely related during the course of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:7883232

  16. [Mitochondrial quality control: the target for exercise to promote health and prevent disease].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-Gang; Li, Can; Ding, Shu-Zhe; Zhang, Yong

    2014-10-01

    Regular exercise has been known to have many benefits, for example, improving physical performance, promoting health and preventing chronic diseases such as metabolic diseases. As a very important organelles in eukaryotic cells, mitochondria exhibit superb plasticity in response to exercise. Exercise may promote mitochondrial biogenesis and eliminate the dysfunctional mitochondria via mitophagy in order to maintain the normal function of the mitochondrial network. These dynamic changes keep mitochondria in health state and ensure the energy supply for cells. This review summarized the studies on the regulation of mitochondrial quality control by exercise, and provided a reasonable explanation for exercise to promote health and prevent diseases. PMID:25764790

  17. The supercoiling sensitivity of a bacterial tRNA promoter parallels its responsiveness to stringent control.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bossi, N; Guérin, M; Rahmouni, R; Leng, M; Bossi, L

    1998-01-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, expression of the hisR locus, a tRNA operon, decreases upon inhibiting DNA gyrase. Here, the hisR promoter dependence on negative DNA supercoiling was examined in vivo and in vitro. Mutant analysis showed the sequence determinants of this dependence to lie in the region between the -10 box and the transcription start site. As with most promoters subject to stringent control, this portion of the hisR promoter is C-G-rich. Replacing a C/G bp with T/A at position -7 partially relieves the supercoiling response while changing the sequence between -5 and + 1 (-CCCCCG-) for -GTTAA- abolishes the response in vitro and in vivo. The relief of the supercoiling dependence closely correlates with increased promoter susceptibility to melting in vivo and a lesser requirement for initiating nucleotides in the formation of stable initiation complexes in vitro. Studies in isoleucine-starved cells showed that such sequence changes mitigate and abolish the hisR promoter response to stringent control, respectively. The data presented suggest that the hisR promoter's sensitivity to stringent regulation arises from the same physical property that confers supercoiling sensitivity, i.e. resistance to melting. We propose that the stringent control mechanism acts by hampering the ability of RNA polymerase to melt the DNA helix. PMID:9550733

  18. The supercoiling sensitivity of a bacterial tRNA promoter parallels its responsiveness to stringent control.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Bossi, N; Guérin, M; Rahmouni, R; Leng, M; Bossi, L

    1998-04-15

    In Salmonella typhimurium, expression of the hisR locus, a tRNA operon, decreases upon inhibiting DNA gyrase. Here, the hisR promoter dependence on negative DNA supercoiling was examined in vivo and in vitro. Mutant analysis showed the sequence determinants of this dependence to lie in the region between the -10 box and the transcription start site. As with most promoters subject to stringent control, this portion of the hisR promoter is C-G-rich. Replacing a C/G bp with T/A at position -7 partially relieves the supercoiling response while changing the sequence between -5 and + 1 (-CCCCCG-) for -GTTAA- abolishes the response in vitro and in vivo. The relief of the supercoiling dependence closely correlates with increased promoter susceptibility to melting in vivo and a lesser requirement for initiating nucleotides in the formation of stable initiation complexes in vitro. Studies in isoleucine-starved cells showed that such sequence changes mitigate and abolish the hisR promoter response to stringent control, respectively. The data presented suggest that the hisR promoter's sensitivity to stringent regulation arises from the same physical property that confers supercoiling sensitivity, i.e. resistance to melting. We propose that the stringent control mechanism acts by hampering the ability of RNA polymerase to melt the DNA helix. PMID:9550733

  19. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  20. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Sala; Nikolopoulos, Ioannis; Kerwat, Rajab

    2016-01-01

    Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions. PMID:27274876

  1. A genetically engineered human pancreatic β cell line exhibiting glucose-inducible insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ravassard, Philippe; Hazhouz, Yasmine; Pechberty, Séverine; Bricout-Neveu, Emilie; Armanet, Mathieu; Czernichow, Paul; Scharfmann, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Despite intense efforts over the past 30 years, human pancreatic β cell lines have not been available. Here, we describe a robust technology for producing a functional human β cell line using targeted oncogenesis in human fetal tissue. Human fetal pancreatic buds were transduced with a lentiviral vector that expressed SV40LT under the control of the insulin promoter. The transduced buds were then grafted into SCID mice so that they could develop into mature pancreatic tissue. Upon differentiation, the newly formed SV40LT-expressing β cells proliferated and formed insulinomas. The resulting β cells were then transduced with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), grafted into other SCID mice, and finally expanded in vitro to generate cell lines. One of these cell lines, EndoC-βH1, expressed many β cell–specific markers without any substantial expression of markers of other pancreatic cell types. The cells secreted insulin when stimulated by glucose or other insulin secretagogues, and cell transplantation reversed chemically induced diabetes in mice. These cells represent a unique tool for large-scale drug discovery and provide a preclinical model for cell replacement therapy in diabetes. This technology could be generalized to generate other human cell lines when the cell type–specific promoter is available. PMID:21865645

  2. Protective effect of Mimosa pudica L. in an L-arginine model of acute necrotising pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Sidhu, Shabir; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Khan, M U

    2016-07-01

    Mimosa pudica is used in traditional medicine for treating various disorders such as inflammatory conditions, diarrhoea, insomnia, alopecia, urogenital infections and wounds. The present study investigated the effect of M. pudica extract (MPE) on L-arginine-induced acute necrotising pancreatitis in rats. The ethanolic extract of M. pudica leaves was studied for the presence of quercetin and gallic acid using high-performance liquid chromatography. Four groups were employed-normal control rats, L-arginine control rats (two intraperitoneal [i.p.] injections of 2 g/kg at an interval of 1 h), MPE-treated rats (400 mg/kg orally) and melatonin-treated rats (positive control 10 mg/kg i.p.), which were further divided into subgroups according to time points (24 h, 3 days and 14 days). Serum amylase, lipase, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), pancreatic amylase, nucleic acid content, protein, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), thiobarbituric reactive substances, glutathione, nitrite/nitrate, collagen content and histopathological examination were carried out. MPE significantly improved acute necrotising pancreatitis by modulating diagnostic markers of pancreatitis such as serum lipase and pancreatic amylase, inflammation (TNF-α), and oxidative and nitrosative stress. Moreover, MPE administration induced regenerative changes in the pancreas evidenced by increased levels of pancreatic proteins, nucleic acid content and histopathology report. In addition, MPE improved TGF-β1 and collagen levels thereby preventing fibrosis. The current investigation indicates the novel role of MPE in reducing the severity of acute necrotising pancreatitis by plausible mechanisms such as anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic activity and by promoting repair and regeneration of the pancreas. PMID:27164910

  3. RON is not a prognostic marker for resectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The receptor tyrosine kinase RON exhibits increased expression during pancreatic cancer progression and promotes migration, invasion and gemcitabine resistance of pancreatic cancer cells in experimental models. However, the prognostic significance of RON expression in pancreatic cancer is unknown. Methods RON expression was characterized in several large cohorts, including a prospective study, totaling 492 pancreatic cancer patients and relationships with patient outcome and clinico-pathologic variables were assessed. Results RON expression was associated with outcome in a training set, but this was not recapitulated in the validation set, nor was there any association with therapeutic responsiveness in the validation set or the prospective study. Conclusions Although RON is implicated in pancreatic cancer progression in experimental models, and may constitute a therapeutic target, RON expression is not associated with prognosis or therapeutic responsiveness in resected pancreatic cancer. PMID:22958871

  4. Conserved distal promoter of the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) gene controls sexual dichromatism in chickens.

    PubMed

    Oribe, Eri; Fukao, Ayaka; Yoshihara, Chihiro; Mendori, Misa; Rosal, Karen G; Takahashi, Sumio; Takeuchi, Sakae

    2012-06-01

    Brilliant plumage is typical of male birds, thus sexual plumage dichromatism is seen in many avian species; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this remains unclear. The agouti signaling protein (ASIP) is a paracrine factor that stimulates yellow/red pigment (pheomelanin) synthesis and inhibits black/brown pigment (eumelanin) synthesis in follicular melanocytes. In mammals, the distal promoter of the ASIP gene acts exclusively on the ventral side of the body to create a countershading pigmentation pattern by stimulating pheomelanin synthesis in the ventrum. Here, we examined the role of the distal ASIP promoter in controlling estrogen-dependent sexual dichromatism in chickens. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that ASIP class 1 mRNAs transcribed by the distal promoter were expressed exclusively on the ventral side of chicks and adult females displaying countershading. In showy adult males, the ASIP class 1 mRNAs were expressed in gold-colored ornamental feathers grown on the back. In the presence of estrogen, males molted into female-like plumage and ASIP class 1 mRNAs expression was altered to female patterns. These results suggest that the distal ASIP promoter produces countershading in chicks and adult females, similar to the ventral-specific ASIP promoter in mammals. In addition, the class 1 promoter plays an important role for creating sexual plumage dichromatism controlled by estrogen. This is the first evidence for a pigmentation gene having been modified in its expression during evolution to develop phenotypic diversity between individuals of different sexes. PMID:22554923

  5. Pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance controls pancreatic β-cell differentiation through the ERK1/2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hoarau, E; Chandra, V; Rustin, P; Scharfmann, R; Duvillie, B

    2014-01-01

    During embryogenesis, the intrauterine milieu affects cell proliferation, differentiation, and function by modifying gene expression in susceptible cells, such as the pancreatic β-cells. In this limited energy environment, mitochondrial dysfunction can lead to overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to a decline in β-cell function. In opposition to this toxicity, ROS are also required for insulin secretion. Here we investigated the role of ROS in β-cell development. Surprisingly, decreasing ROS production in vivo reduced β-cell differentiation. Moreover, in cultures of pancreatic explants, progenitors were highly sensitive to ROS stimulation and responded by generating β-cells. ROS enhanced β-cell differentiation through modulation of ERK1/2 signaling. Gene transfer and pharmacological manipulations, which diminish cellular ROS levels, also interfered with normal β-cell differentiation. This study highlights the role of the redox balance on β-cell development and provides information that will be useful for improving β-cell production from embryonic stem cells, a step in cell therapy for diabetes. PMID:25341041

  6. VAMP7 Regulates Autophagy to Maintain Mitochondrial Homeostasis and to Control Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Kyota; Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Itakura, Makoto; Torii, Seiji; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Nakamichi, Yoko; Kishimoto, Takuma; Kawakami, Hayato; Harada, Akihiro; Takahashi, Masami; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2016-06-01

    VAMP7 is a SNARE protein that mediates specific membrane fusions in intracellular trafficking and was recently reported to regulate autophagosome formation. However, its function in pancreatic β-cells is largely unknown. To elucidate the physiological role of VAMP7 in β-cells, we generated pancreatic β-cell-specific VAMP7 knockout (Vamp7(flox/Y);Cre) mice. VAMP7 deletion impaired glucose-stimulated ATP production and insulin secretion, though VAMP7 was not localized to insulin granules. VAMP7-deficient β-cells showed defective autophagosome formation and reduced mitochondrial function. p62/SQSTM1, a marker protein for defective autophagy, was selectively accumulated on mitochondria in VAMP7-deficient β-cells. These findings suggest that accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria that are degraded by autophagy caused impairment of glucose-stimulated ATP production and insulin secretion in Vamp7(flox/Y);Cre β-cells. Feeding a high-fat diet to Vamp7(flox/Y);Cre mice exacerbated mitochondrial dysfunction, further decreased ATP production and insulin secretion, and consequently induced glucose intolerance. Moreover, we found upregulated VAMP7 expression in wild-type mice fed a high-fat diet and in db/db mice, a model for diabetes. Thus our data indicate that VAMP7 regulates autophagy to maintain mitochondrial quality and insulin secretion in response to pathological stress in β-cells. PMID:26953164

  7. Improved Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Diagnosis in Jaundiced and Non-Jaundiced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Patients through the Combination of Routine Clinical Markers Associated to Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, María José; Saez, Marc; Figueras, Joan; Fort, Esther; Sabat, Miriam; López-Ben, Santiago; de Llorens, Rafael; Aleixandre, Rosa Núria; Peracaula, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Background There is still no reliable biomarker for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (CA 19–9) is a tumor marker only recommended for pancreatic adenocarcinoma follow-up. One of the clinical problems lies in distinguishing between this cancer and other benign pancreatic diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. In this study we will assess the value of panels of serum molecules related to pancreatic cancer physiopathology to determine whether alone or in combination could help to discriminate between these two pathologies. Methods CA 19–9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), C-reactive protein, albumin, insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein-3 were measured using routine clinical analyzers in a cohort of 47 pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 20 chronic pancreatitis and 15 healthy controls. Results The combination of CA 19–9, IGF-1 and albumin resulted in a combined area under the curve (AUC) of 0.959 with 93.6% sensitivity and 95% specificity, much higher than CA 19–9 alone. An algorithm was defined to classify the patients as chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer with the above specificity and sensitivity. In an independent validation group of 20 pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 13 chronic pancreatitis patients, the combination of the four molecules classified correctly all pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 12 out of 13 chronic pancreatitis patients. Conclusions Although this panel of markers should be validated in larger cohorts, the high sensitivity and specificity values and the convenience to measure these parameters in clinical laboratories shows great promise for improving pancreatic adenocarcinoma diagnosis. PMID:26808421

  8. Minireview: Thioredoxin-Interacting Protein: Regulation and Function in the Pancreatic β-Cell

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are responsible for insulin production, and loss of functional β-cell mass is now recognized as a critical step in the pathogenesis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However, the factors controlling the life and death of the pancreatic β-cell have only started to be elucidated. Discovered as the top glucose-induced gene in a human islet microarray study 12 years ago, thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) has now emerged as such a key player in pancreatic β-cell biology. Since then, β-cell expression of TXNIP has been found to be tightly regulated by multiple factors and to be dramatically increased in diabetic islets. Elevated TXNIP levels induce β-cell apoptosis, whereas TXNIP deficiency protects against type 1 and type 2 diabetes by promoting β-cell survival. TXNIP interacts with and inhibits thioredoxin and thereby controls the cellular redox state, but it also belongs to the α-arrestin family of proteins and regulates a variety of metabolic processes. Most recently, TXNIP has been discovered to control β-cell microRNA expression, β-cell function, and insulin production. In this review, the current state of knowledge regarding regulation and function of TXNIP in the pancreatic β-cell and the implications for drug development are discussed. PMID:24911120

  9. A Minimally Invasive Approach for Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Shintaro Kuramoto, Kenmei; Itoh, Yutaka; Watanabe, Yoshika; Ueda, Toshisada

    2003-11-15

    Pancreas fistula is a well-known and severe complication of pancreaticoduodenectomy. It is difficult to control with conservative therapy, inducing further complications and severe morbidity. Until now, re-operation has been the only way to resolve pancreatic fistula causing complete dehiscence of the pancreatic-enteric anastomosis (complete pancreatic fistula). Percutaneous transgastric fistula drainage is one of the treatments for pancreatic fistula. This procedure allows both pancreas juice drainage and anastomosis re-construction at the same time. This is effective and minimally invasive but difficult to adapt to a long or complicated fistula. In particular, dilatation of the main pancreatic duct is indispensable. This paper reports the successful resolution of a postoperative pancreatic fistula by a two-way-approach percutaneous transgastric fistula drainage procedure. Using a snare catheter from the fistula and a flexible guidewire from the transgastric puncture needle, it can be performed either with or without main pancreatic duct dilatation.

  10. The E.coli fis promoter is subject to stringent control and autoregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Ninnemann, O; Koch, C; Kahmann, R

    1992-01-01

    The DNA binding protein FIS is involved in processes like site specific DNA inversion, lambda excision and stimulation of stable RNA synthesis in Escherichia coli. The amount of FIS protein is subject to dramatic changes during growth. We demonstrate that fis is part of an operon with one ORF of unknown function preceding the fis gene. Regulation of fis synthesis occurs at the transcriptional level. Within 15 min after nutritional upshift a large burst of fis mRNA is produced which levels off when cells begin to grow. By mutational analysis using promoter-lacZ fusions we demonstrate that the fis promoter is autoregulated by FIS. Growth phase regulation of the fis promoter depends on the presence of a GC motif downstream of the -10 region. We show that the fis promoter is subject to stringent control and discuss this unusual feature with respect to the known and putative functions FIS serves in E. coli. Images PMID:1547773

  11. Protein alterations associated with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis found in human plasma using global quantitative proteomics profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Chen, Ru; Crispin, David A.; May, Damon; Stevens, Tyler; McIntosh, Martin; Bronner, Mary P.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease that is difficult to diagnose at early stages when curable treatments are effective. Biomarkers that can improve current pancreatic cancer detection would have great value in improving patient management and survival rate. A large scale quantitative proteomics study was performed to search for the plasma protein alterations associated with pancreatic cancer. The enormous complexity of the plasma proteome and the vast dynamic range of protein concentration therein present major challenges for quantitative global profiling of plasma. To address these challenges, multi-dimensional fractionation at both protein and peptide levels was applied to enhance the depth of proteomics analysis. Employing stringent criteria, more than thirteen hundred proteins total were identified in plasma across 8-orders of magnitude in protein concentration. Differential proteins associated with pancreatic cancer were identified, and their relationship with the proteome of pancreatic tissue and pancreatic juice from our previous studies was discussed. A subgroup of differentially expressed proteins was selected for biomarker testing using an independent cohort of plasma and serum samples from well-diagnosed patients with pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis and non-pancreatic disease controls. Using ELISA methodology, the performance of each of these protein candidates was benchmarked against CA19-9, the current gold standard for a pancreatic cancer blood test. A composite marker of TIMP1 and ICAM1 demonstrate significantly better performance than CA19-9 in distinguishing pancreatic cancer from the non-pancreatic disease controls and chronic pancreatitis controls. In addition, protein AZGP1 was identified as a biomarker candidate for chronic pancreatitis. The discovery and technical challenges associated with plasma-based quantitative proteomics are discussed and may benefit the development of plasma proteomics technology in general. The protein

  12. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  13. Cryosurgery for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kecheng; Yang, Daming

    2013-01-01

    The procedure of pancreatic cryosurgery is performed with intraoperative or percutaneous approaches. Based on current data and our initial experience, cryoablation appears to be a feasible, potentially safe and promising option in patients with locally advanced and unresectable pancreatic cancer. It is suggested that there are almost no known contraindications to the use of cryosurgery for pancreatic cancer. For most patients with pancreatic cancer, cryosurgery can substitute conventional surgery. PMID:25083453

  14. Current status and progress of pancreatic cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Quan-Jun; Yang, Feng; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is currently one of the most important public health problems in the world. Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with poor prognosis. As in most other countries, the health burden of pancreatic cancer in China is increasing, with annual mortality rates almost equal to incidence rates. The increasing trend of pancreatic cancer incidence is more significant in the rural areas than in the urban areas. Annual diagnoses and deaths of pancreatic cancer in China are now beyond the number of cases in the United States. GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates that cases in China account for 19.45% (65727/337872) of all newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer and 19.27% (63662/330391) of all deaths from pancreatic cancer worldwide. The population’s growing socioeconomic status contributes to the rapid increase of China’s proportional contribution to global rates. Here, we present an overview of control programs for pancreatic cancer in China focusing on prevention, early diagnosis and treatment. In addition, we describe key epidemiological, demographic, and socioeconomic differences between China and developed countries. Facts including no nationwide screening program for pancreatic cancer, delay in early detection resulting in a late stage at presentation, lack of awareness of pancreatic cancer in the Chinese population, and low investment compared with other cancer types by government have led to backwardness in China’s pancreatic cancer diagnosis and treatment. Finally, we suggest measures to improve health outcomes of pancreatic cancer patients in China. PMID:26185370

  15. Hedgehog Promotes Neovascularization in Pancreatic Cancers by Regulating Ang-1 and IGF-1 Expression in Bone-Marrow Derived Pro-Angiogenic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, Yusuke; Sugiyama, Yoshiaki; Yamazaki, Madoka; Fujii, Rie; Kawamoto, Toru; Koizumi, Kazuya; Sato, Kazuya; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Sasaki, Katsunori; Tanno, Satoshi; Okumura, Toshikatsu; Shimizu, Norihiko; Kawabe, Jun-ichi; Karasaki, Hidenori; Kono, Toru; Ii, Masaaki; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Chung, Daniel C.; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Background The hedgehog (Hh) pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Recent studies have suggested that the oncogenic function of Hh in PDAC involves signaling in the stromal cells rather than cell autonomous effects on the tumor cells. However, the origin and nature of the stromal cell type(s) that are responsive to Hh signaling remained unknown. Since Hh signaling plays a crucial role during embryonic and postnatal vasculogenesis, we speculated that Hh ligand may act on tumor vasculature specifically focusing on bone marrow (BM)-derived cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Cyclopamine was utilized to inhibit the Hh pathway in human PDAC cell lines and their xenografts. BM transplants, co-culture systems of tumor cells and BM-derived pro-angiogenic cells (BMPCs) were employed to assess the role of tumor-derived Hh in regulating the BM compartment and the contribution of BM-derived cells to angiogenesis in PDAC. Cyclopamine administration attenuated Hh signaling in the stroma rather than in the cancer cells as reflected by decreased expression of full length Gli2 protein and Gli1 mRNA specifically in the compartment. Cyclopamine inhibited the growth of PDAC xenografts in association with regression of the tumor vasculature and reduced homing of BM-derived cells to the tumor. Host-derived Ang-1 and IGF-1 mRNA levels were downregulated by cyclopamine in the tumor xenografts. In vitro co-culture and matrigel plug assays demonstrated that PDAC cell-derived Shh induced Ang-1 and IGF-1 production in BMPCs, resulting in their enhanced migration and capillary morphogenesis activity. Conclusions/Significance We identified the BMPCs as alternative stromal targets of Hh-ligand in PDAC suggesting that the tumor vasculature is an attractive therapeutic target of Hh blockade. Our data is consistent with the emerging concept that BM-derived cells make important contributions to epithelial tumorigenesis. PMID

  16. Effectiveness of Acupressure in Promoting Sleep Quality: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Hmwe, Nant Thin Thin; Subramaniam, Pathmawathi; Tan, Li Ping

    2016-01-01

    This review aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of acupressure in promoting sleep quality among adults. Study findings included in the review showed that acupressure significantly improved sleep quality compared with the control group, but no superior effect of acupressure was found compared with sham acupressure. PMID:27501211

  17. 17 CFR 229.401 - (Item 401) Directors, executive officers, promoters and control persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false (Item 401) Directors, executive officers, promoters and control persons. 229.401 Section 229.401 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION STANDARD INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING FORMS UNDER SECURITIES ACT OF 1933, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 AND...

  18. Parents' Promotion of Psychological Autonomy, Psychological Control, and Mexican-American Adolescents' Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sher-Censor, Efrat; Parke, Ross D.; Coltrane, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Mexican-American adolescents are at an elevated risk for adjustment difficulties. In an effort to identify parenting practices that can affect the adjustment of Mexican-American youth, the current study examined parents' promotion of psychological autonomy and parents' psychological control as perceived by Mexican-American early adolescents, and…

  19. The TATA-less promoter of VP1, a plant gene controlling seed germination.

    PubMed

    Carrari, F; Frankel, N; Lijavetzky, D; Benech-Arnold, R; Sánchez, R; Iusem, N D

    2001-01-01

    Vp1 is a seed-specific gene involved in the control of dormancy and germination. We here present the complete sequence of the sorghum vp1 promoter/enhancer region highlighting its main features, especially the lack of canonical TATA and CAAT boxes and the presence of elements responsive to abscisic acid and light. The region closest to the start of transcription is highly homologous to the partial proximal sequence reported for the maize vp1 promoter. This region is interrupted by a 57-nt stretch containing 14 CT microsatellite repeats. We observed a poor overall homology to the promoter from abi3 gene, the Arabidopsis counterpart bearing a similar coding sequence. However, there exists a high degree of homology (89%) between a TATA-rich 103-bp stretch of the sorghum vp1 promoter located about 700 nt upstream of the startpoint and miniature inverted transposable elements (MITEs) interspersed within the sorghum seed-specific kafirin cluster. This sorghum MITE-like element displays considerable homology (68%) to the TATA-less promoter from the sorghum NADP-malate dehydrogenase gene and lesser similarity to the Tourist, Pilgrim and Batuta MITEs previously identified within the promoter from the maize Abp1 (auxin-binding protein) gene. PMID:11761708

  20. Variations of oral microbiota are associated with pancreatic diseases including pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, James J; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Hui; Chia, David; Elashoff, David; Akin, David; Paster, Bruce J; Joshipura, Kaumudi; Wong, David T W

    2012-01-01

    Objective The associations between oral diseases and increased risk of pancreatic cancer have been reported in several prospective cohort studies. In this study, we measured variations of salivary microbiota and evaluated their potential associations with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. Methods This study was divided into three phases: (1) microbial profiling using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray to investigate salivary microbiota variation between 10 resectable patients with pancreatic cancer and 10 matched healthy controls, (2) identification and verification of bacterial candidates by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and (3) validation of bacterial candidates by qPCR on an independent cohort of 28 resectable pancreatic cancer, 28 matched healthy control and 27 chronic pancreatitis samples. Results Comprehensive comparison of the salivary microbiota between patients with pancreatic cancer and healthy control subjects revealed a significant variation of salivary microflora. Thirty-one bacterial species/clusters were increased in the saliva of patients with pancreatic cancer (n=10) in comparison to those of the healthy controls (n=10), whereas 25 bacterial species/clusters were decreased. Two out of six bacterial candidates (Neisseria elongata and Streptococcus mitis) were validated using the independent samples, showing significant variation (p<0.05, qPCR) between patients with pancreatic cancer and controls (n=56). Additionally, two bacteria (Granulicatella adiacens and S mitis) showed significant variation (p<0.05, qPCR) between chronic pancreatitis samples and controls (n=55). The combination of two bacterial biomarkers (N elongata and S mitis) yielded a receiver operating characteristic plot area under the curve value of 0.90 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.96, p<0.0001) with a 96.4% sensitivity and 82.1% specificity in distinguishing patients with pancreatic cancer from healthy subjects. Conclusions The authors observed associations between

  1. 25 CFR 543.12 - What are the minimum internal control standards for gaming promotions and player tracking systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... gaming promotions and player tracking systems? 543.12 Section 543.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING... § 543.12 What are the minimum internal control standards for gaming promotions and player tracking systems? (a) Supervision. Supervision must be provided as needed for gaming promotions and player...

  2. 25 CFR 543.12 - What are the minimum internal control standards for gaming promotions and player tracking systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... gaming promotions and player tracking systems? 543.12 Section 543.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING... § 543.12 What are the minimum internal control standards for gaming promotions and player tracking systems? (a) Supervision. Supervision must be provided as needed for gaming promotions and player...

  3. Protective effect of a microtubule stabilizer taxol on caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rat.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, T; Takeyama, Y; Kaneda, K; Adachi, M; Ohyanagi, H; Saitoh, Y

    1992-01-01

    The effect of taxol, which is a microtubule stabilizer, was examined in a model of acute edematous pancreatitis induced in rat by the administration of caerulein. Prophylactic administration of taxol ameliorated inhibition of pancreatic secretion, increased level of serum amylase, pancreatic edema, and histological alterations in this model. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that taxol stabilized the arrangement of microtubules by the action of promoting tubulin polymerization and prevented inhibition of pancreatic digestive enzyme secretion. In isolated rat pancreatic acini, taxol reversed the inhibition of amylase secretion induced by supramaximal concentrations of cholecystokinin octapeptide and did not affect the binding of cholecystokinin octapeptide to its receptor. The results obtained in this study suggest that microtubule disorganization is the initiating event in caerulein-induced pancreatitis and that the inhibition of pancreatic digestive enzyme secretion by interfering with intracellular vesicular transport due to microtubule disorganization causes caerulein-induced pancreatitis. Images PMID:1370296

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop: Meeting Report.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark Steven; Allen, Peter; Brentnall, Teresa A; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H; Petersen, Gloria M; Rao, Chinthalapally V; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E; Chari, Suresh T; Klein, Alison P; Lubman, David M; Rhim, Andrew D; Simeone, Diane M; Wolpin, Brian M; Umar, Asad; Srivastava, Sudhir; Steele, Vernon E; Rinaudo, Jo Ann S

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. The Division of Cancer Prevention of the National Cancer Institute sponsored the Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop on September 10 to 11, 2015. The goal of the workshop was to obtain information regarding the current state of the science and future scientific areas that should be prioritized for pancreatic cancer prevention research, including early detection and intervention for high-risk precancerous lesions. The workshop addressed the molecular/genetic landscape of pancreatic cancer and precursor lesions, high-risk populations and criteria to identify a high-risk population for potential chemoprevention trials, identification of chemopreventative/immunopreventative agents, and use of potential biomarkers and imaging for assessing short-term efficacy of a preventative agent. The field of chemoprevention for pancreatic cancer is emerging, and this workshop was organized to begin to address these important issues and promote multi-institutional efforts in this area. The meeting participants recommended the development of an National Cancer Institute working group to coordinate efforts, provide a framework, and identify opportunities for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27518363

  5. Biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, G J; Gillespie, J; Guillou, P J

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of death from malignant disease in Western society. Apart from the fortunate few patients who present with a resectable small pancreatic adenocarcinoma, conventional treatment offers no hope of cure and has little palliative value. Over the past two decades major steps have been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic growth and neoplasia. This review sets out to explore these advances, firstly in the regulation of normal pancreatic growth, and secondly the mechanism which may be involved in malignant change of the exocrine pancreas. From an understanding of this new biology, new treatment strategies may be possible for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:1855689

  6. The mRNA-binding protein HuR promotes hypoxia-induced chemoresistance through posttranscriptional regulation of the proto-oncogene PIM1 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Blanco, F F; Jimbo, M; Wulfkuhle, J; Gallagher, I; Deng, J; Enyenihi, L; Meisner-Kober, N; Londin, E; Rigoutsos, I; Sawicki, J A; Risbud, M V; Witkiewicz, A K; McCue, P A; Jiang, W; Rui, H; Yeo, C J; Petricoin, E; Winter, J M; Brody, J R

    2016-05-01

    Previously, it has been shown that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) tumors exhibit high levels of hypoxia, characterized by low oxygen pressure (pO2) and decreased O2 intracellular perfusion. Chronic hypoxia is strongly associated with resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy and chemoradiation in an understudied phenomenon known as hypoxia-induced chemoresistance. The hypoxia-inducible, pro-oncogenic, serine-threonine kinase PIM1 (Proviral Integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus 1) has emerged as a key regulator of hypoxia-induced chemoresistance in PDA and other cancers. Although its role in therapeutic resistance has been described previously, the molecular mechanism behind PIM1 overexpression in PDA is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that cis-acting AU-rich elements (ARE) present within a 38-base pair region of the PIM1 mRNA 3'-untranslated region mediate a regulatory interaction with the mRNA stability factor HuR (Hu antigen R) in the context of tumor hypoxia. Predominantly expressed in the nucleus in PDA cells, HuR translocates to the cytoplasm in response to hypoxic stress and stabilizes the PIM1 mRNA transcript, resulting in PIM1 protein overexpression. A reverse-phase protein array revealed that HuR-mediated regulation of PIM1 protects cells from hypoxic stress through phosphorylation and inactivation of the apoptotic effector BAD and activation of MEK1/2. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of HuR by MS-444 inhibits HuR homodimerization and its cytoplasmic translocation, abrogates hypoxia-induced PIM1 overexpression and markedly enhances PDA cell sensitivity to oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil under physiologic low oxygen conditions. Taken together, these results support the notion that HuR has prosurvival properties in PDA cells by enabling them with growth advantages in stressful tumor microenvironment niches. Accordingly, these studies provide evidence that therapeutic disruption of HuR's regulation of PIM1 may be a key strategy in

  7. Multiple control elements in the TRP1 promoter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S; Mellor, J; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1986-01-01

    The TRP1 promoter generates two groups of mRNAs, transcript I and transcript II. The difference in size between the largest and smallest mRNAs is about 200 base pairs. A series of one-sided and internal deletions were constructed in vitro throughout the TRP1 promoter, and the effect of each deletion on transcription was assessed by Northern blotting. We showed that 395 base pairs of the TRP1 promoter were sufficient for the normal transcription of all RNAs and that the promoter contained two control domains. The control domain for transcript I consisted of one positive element and one negative element, while the control domain for transcript II contained two positive elements. The negative element, mapped between -293 and -318, expression of transcript I. Two regions of transcript I. Two regions (-280 to -236 and -235 to -209) were required for accurate initiation of transcript I. Each region contained sequences homologous to known consensus sequences of the TATA box. Images PMID:3025648

  8. Conserved POU-binding site linked to SP1-binding site within FZD5 promoter: Transcriptional mechanisms of FZD5 in undifferentiated human ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, adult colon, pancreatic islet, and diffuse-type gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-03-01

    Canonical WNT signals are transduced through Frizzled (FZD) family receptor and LRP5/LRP6 co-receptor to upregulate FGF20, JAG1, DKK1, WISP1, CCND1 and MYC genes for cell-fate determination, while non-canonical WNT signals are transduced through FZD family receptor and ROR2/PTK7/RYK co-receptor to activate RHOA/RHOU/RAC/CDC42, JNK, PKC, NLK and NFAT signaling cascades for the regulation of tissue polarity, cell movement, and adhesion. We previously reported molecular cloning and characterization of human FZD5, which showed six amino-acid substitutions with human Hfz5. FZD5, functioning as WNT5A receptor, is the key molecule in the fields of oncology, regenerative medicine, cardiology, rheumatology, diabetology, and gastroenterology. Here, comparative integromics analyses on FZD5 orthologs were performed by using bioinformatics (Techint) and human intelligence (Humint). Chimpanzee FZD5 and cow Fzd5 genes were identified within NW_104292.1 and AC166656.2 genome sequences, respectively. FZD5 orthologs were seven-transmembrane proteins with extracellular Frizzled domain, leucine zipper motif around the 5th transmembrane domain, and cytoplasmic DVL- and PDZ-binding motifs. Ser523 and Ser529 around the DVL-binding motif of FZD5 orthologs were putative aPKC phosphorylation sites. POU5F1 (OCT4)-binding site linked to SP1-binding site within the 5'-promoter region of human FZD5 gene was evolutionarily conserved among mammalian FZD5 orthologs. POU5F1 was more related to POU2F and POU3F subfamily members. POU5F1 was preferentially expressed in undifferentiated human embryonic stem (ES) cells, pancreatic islet, and diffuse-type gastric cancer. POU2F1 (OCT1) was expressed in ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, adult colon, POU2F2 in ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, and POU2F3 in diffuse-type gastric cancer. Multiple SP1/KLF family members, other than KLF2 or KLF4, were expressed in undifferentiated human ES cells. Together, these facts indicate that POU5F1 and POU2F subfamily members

  9. Use of exotic plants to control Spartina alterniflora invasion and promote mangrove restoration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting; Liu, Shuchao; Feng, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Gan, Qian; Peng, Shaolin

    2015-01-01

    In coastal China, the exotic invasive Spartina alterniflora is preventing the establishment of native mangroves. The use of exotic species, control of exotic plant invasion, and restoration of native plant communities are timely research issues. We used exotic Sonneratia apetala Buch.-Ham and S. caseolaris (L.) Engl. to control invasive Spartina alterniflora Loisel through replacement control for five years, which concurrently promoted the restoration of native mangroves. This process includes three stages. I: In a mangrove area invaded by S. alterniflora, exotic S. apetala and S. caseolaris grew rapidly due to their relatively fast-growing character and an allelopathic effect. II: Fast-growing S. apetala and S. caseolaris eradicate S. alterniflora through shading and allelopathy. III: The growth of native mangrove was promoted because exotic plant seedlings cannot regenerate in the understory shade, whereas native mesophytic mangrove plants seedlings can grow; when the area experiences extreme low temperatures in winter or at other times, S. apetala dies, and native mangrove species grow to restore the communities. This model has important implications for addressing the worldwide problems of "how to implement the ecological control of invasion using exotic species" and "how to concurrently promote native community restoration during the control of exotic invasion". PMID:26291074

  10. Use of exotic plants to control Spartina alterniflora invasion and promote mangrove restoration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Liu, Shuchao; Feng, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Gan, Qian; Peng, Shaolin

    2015-01-01

    In coastal China, the exotic invasive Spartina alterniflora is preventing the establishment of native mangroves. The use of exotic species, control of exotic plant invasion, and restoration of native plant communities are timely research issues. We used exotic Sonneratia apetala Buch.-Ham and S. caseolaris (L.) Engl. to control invasive Spartina alterniflora Loisel through replacement control for five years, which concurrently promoted the restoration of native mangroves. This process includes three stages. I: In a mangrove area invaded by S. alterniflora, exotic S. apetala and S. caseolaris grew rapidly due to their relatively fast-growing character and an allelopathic effect. II: Fast-growing S. apetala and S. caseolaris eradicate S. alterniflora through shading and allelopathy. III: The growth of native mangrove was promoted because exotic plant seedlings cannot regenerate in the understory shade, whereas native mesophytic mangrove plants seedlings can grow; when the area experiences extreme low temperatures in winter or at other times, S. apetala dies, and native mangrove species grow to restore the communities. This model has important implications for addressing the worldwide problems of “how to implement the ecological control of invasion using exotic species” and “how to concurrently promote native community restoration during the control of exotic invasion”. PMID:26291074

  11. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  12. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  13. Influence and timing of arrival of murine neural crest on pancreatic beta cell development and maturation.

    PubMed

    Plank, Jennifer L; Mundell, Nathan A; Frist, Audrey Y; LeGrone, Alison W; Kim, Thomas; Musser, Melissa A; Walter, Teagan J; Labosky, Patricia A

    2011-01-15

    Interactions between cells from the ectoderm and mesoderm influence development of the endodermally-derived pancreas. While much is known about how mesoderm regulates pancreatic development, relatively little is understood about how and when the ectodermally-derived neural crest regulates pancreatic development and specifically, beta cell maturation. A previous study demonstrated that signals from the neural crest regulate beta cell proliferation and ultimately, beta cell mass. Here, we expand on that work to describe timing of neural crest arrival at the developing pancreatic bud and extend our knowledge of the non-cell autonomous role for neural crest derivatives in the process of beta cell maturation. We demonstrated that murine neural crest entered the pancreatic mesenchyme between the 26 and 27 somite stages (approximately 10.0 dpc) and became intermingled with pancreatic progenitors as the epithelium branched into the surrounding mesenchyme. Using a neural crest-specific deletion of the Forkhead transcription factor Foxd3, we ablated neural crest cells that migrate to the pancreatic primordium. Consistent with previous data, in the absence of Foxd3, and therefore the absence of neural crest cells, proliferation of insulin-expressing cells and insulin-positive area are increased. Analysis of endocrine cell gene expression in the absence of neural crest demonstrated that, although the number of insulin-expressing cells was increased, beta cell maturation was significantly impaired. Decreased MafA and Pdx1 expression illustrated the defect in beta cell maturation; we discovered that without neural crest, there was a reduction in the percentage of insulin-positive cells that co-expressed Glut2 and Pdx1 compared to controls. In addition, transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed decreased numbers of characteristic insulin granules and the presence of abnormal granules in insulin-expressing cells from mutant embryos. Together, these data demonstrate that

  14. Influence and timing of arrival of murine neural crest on pancreatic beta cell development and maturation

    PubMed Central

    Plank, Jennifer L.; Mundell, Nathan A.; Frist, Audrey Y.; LeGrone, Alison W.; Kim, Thomas; Musser, Melissa A.; Walter, Teagan J.; Labosky, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between cells from the ectoderm and mesoderm influence development of the endodermally-derived pancreas. While much is known about how mesoderm regulates pancreatic development, relatively little is understood about how and when the ectodermally-derived neural crest regulates pancreatic development and specifically, beta cell maturation. A previous study demonstrated that signals from the neural crest regulate beta cell proliferation and ultimately, beta cell mass. Here, we expand on that work to describe timing of neural crest arrival at the developing pancreatic bud and extend our knowledge of the non-cell autonomous role for neural crest derivatives in the process of beta cell maturation. We demonstrated that murine neural crest entered the pancreatic mesenchyme between the 26 and 27 somite stages (approximately 10.0 dpc) and became intermingled with pancreatic progenitors as the epithelium branched into the surrounding mesenchyme. Using a neural crest-specific deletion of the Forkhead transcription factor Foxd3, we ablated neural crest cells that migrate to the pancreatic primordium. Consistent with previous data, in the absence of Foxd3, and therefore the absence of neural crest cells, proliferation of Insulin-expressing cells and Insulin-positive area are increased. Analysis of endocrine cell gene expression in the absence of neural crest demonstrated that, although the number of Insulin-expressing cells was increased, beta cell maturation was significantly impaired. Decreased MafA and Pdx1 expression illustrated the defect in beta cell maturation; we discovered that without neural crest, there was a reduction in the percentage of Insulin-positive cells that co-expressed Glut2 and Pdx1 compared to controls. In addition, transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed decreased numbers of characteristic Insulin granules and the presence of abnormal granules in Insulin-expressing cells from mutant embryos. Together, these data demonstrate that

  15. Inactivation of the Transcription Factor GLI1 Accelerates Pancreatic Cancer Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Lisa D.; Zhang, Lizhi; Marler, Ronald; Svingen, Phyllis; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G.; Dave, Maneesh; Bamlet, William; McWilliams, Robert R.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Faubion, William; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.

    2014-01-01

    The role of GLI1 in pancreatic tumor initiation promoting the progression of preneoplastic lesions into tumors is well established. However, its function at later stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis remains poorly understood. To address this issue, we crossed the gli1 knock-out (GKO) animal with cre-dependent pancreatic activation of oncogenic kras concomitant with loss of the tumor suppressor tp53 (KPC). Interestingly, in this model, GLI1 played a tumor-protective function, where survival of GKO/KPC mice was reduced compared with KPC littermates. Both cohorts developed pancreatic cancer without significant histopathological differences in survival studies. However, analysis of mice using ultrasound-based imaging at earlier time points showed increased tumor burden in GKO/KPC mice. These animals have larger tumors, decreased body weight, increased lactate dehydrogenase production, and severe leukopenia. In vivo and in vitro expression studies identified FAS and FAS ligand (FASL) as potential mediators of this phenomenon. The FAS/FASL axis, an apoptotic inducer, plays a role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, where its expression is usually lost or significantly reduced in advanced stages of the disease. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays identified FAS and FASL as direct targets of GLI1, whereas GKO/KPC mice showed lower levels of this ligand compared with KPC animals. Finally, decreased levels of apoptosis were detected in tumor tissue in the absence of GLI1 by TUNEL staining. Together, these findings define a novel pathway regulated by GLI1 controlling pancreatic tumor progression and provide a new theoretical framework to help with the design and analysis of trials targeting GLI1-related pathways. PMID:24737325

  16. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia; Raposo do Amaral, Alexandre S

    2009-01-01

    Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR) from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of severe hypoglycemic episodes

  17. Dietary fat level and alcohol-induced pancreatic injury

    SciTech Connect

    Towner, S.J.; Inomata, T.; Largman, C.; French, S.W.

    1986-03-01

    Effects of dietary fat levels on alcohol-induced pancreatic injury were studied in a rat model which achieves sustained blood alcohol levels and maximal nutritional control. A diet containing 5, 25, or 35% of fat (corn oil; % total calories) and either ethanol or isocaloric dextrose were intragastrically infused in male Wistar rats for 30-120 days. Following intoxication, the pancreatic pathology was examined light-microscopically. None of pair-fed controls showed abnormal pancreas histology. These results indicate potentiation of alcohol-induced pancreatic injury. Particularly higher incidence of chronic interstitial pancreatitis with increased dietary fat.

  18. Self-Control of Task Difficulty During Early Practice Promotes Motor Skill Learning.

    PubMed

    Andrieux, Mathieu; Boutin, Arnaud; Thon, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether the effect of self-control of task difficulty on motor learning is a function of the period of self-control administration. In a complex anticipation-coincidence task that required participants to intercept 3 targets with a virtual racquet, the task difficulty was either self-controlled or imposed to the participants in the two phases of the acquisition session. First, the results confirmed the beneficial effects of self-control over fully prescribed conditions. Second, the authors also demonstrated that a partial self-control of task difficulty better promotes learning than does a complete self-controlled procedure. Overall, the results revealed that these benefits are increased when this choice is allowed during early practice. The findings are discussed in terms of theoretical and applied perspectives. PMID:25961604

  19. The Relevance of Nrf2 Pathway and Autophagy in Pancreatic Cancer Cells upon Stimulation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) pathway and autophagy both can respond to oxidative stress to promote cancer cells to survive in the tumor microenvironment. We, therefore, explored the relevance between Nrf2 pathway and autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells upon stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Pancreatic cancer cells were cultured under controlled ROS stressing condition or basal condition. Different inhibitors were used to prevent autophagy at particular stages. Nrf2 siRNA was used to inhibit Nrf2 pathway activation. Ad-mRFP-GFP-LC3 infection was used to monitor autophagic flux. The result shows that a small amount of exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can significantly improve the level of intracellular ROS. Moreover, our findings indicate that ROS promotes the activation of both Nrf2 pathway and autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, our data demonstrate that suppression of autophagic activity at particular stages results in an increased promotion of Nrf2 pathway activation upon ROS stimulation. Furthermore, we found that silencing of Nrf2 promotes autophagy upon ROS stimulation. In addition, Nrf2 interference effectively promotes autophagic flux upon ROS stimulation. In summary, our findings suggest that Nrf2 pathway and autophagy have a negative interaction with each other upon ROS stimulation. PMID:26682003

  20. A role for community health promoters in tuberculosis control in the state of Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Herce, Michael E; Chapman, Jacob A; Castro, Arachu; García-Salyano, Gabriel; Khoshnood, Kaveh

    2010-04-01

    We conducted a qualitative study employing structured interviews with 38 community health workers, known as health promoters, from twelve rural municipalities of Chiapas, Mexico in order to characterize their work and identify aspects of their services that would be applicable to community-based tuberculosis (TB) control programs. Health promoters self-identify as being of Mayan Indian ethnicity. Most are bilingual, speaking Spanish and one of four indigenous Mayan languages native to Chiapas. They volunteer 11 h each week to conduct clinical and public health work in their communities. Over half (53%) work with a botiquín, a medicine cabinet stocked with essential medicines. Fifty-three percent identify TB as a major problem affecting the health of their communities, with one-fifth (21%) of promoters reporting experience caring for patients with known or suspected TB and 29% having attended to patients with hemoptysis. One-third of health promoters have access to antibiotics (32%) and one-half have experience with their administration; 55% complement their biomedical treatments with traditional Mayan medicinal plant therapies in caring for their patients. We describe how health promoters employ both traditional and allopathic medicine to treat the symptoms and diseases they encounter most frequently which include fever, diarrhea, and parasitic infections. We contend that given the complex sociopolitical climate in Chiapas and the state's unwavering TB epidemic and paucity of health care infrastructure in rural areas, efforts to implement comprehensive, community-based TB control would benefit from employing the services of health promoters. PMID:20033836

  1. Two distinct promoter architectures centered on dynamic nucleosomes control ribosomal protein gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Knight, Britta; Kubik, Slawomir; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Victoria; Dénervaud, Nicolas; Jacquet, Philippe; Ozkan, Burak; Rougemont, Jacques; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Naef, Félix; Shore, David

    2014-08-01

    In yeast, ribosome production is controlled transcriptionally by tight coregulation of the 138 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). RPG promoters display limited sequence homology, and the molecular basis for their coregulation remains largely unknown. Here we identify two prevalent RPG promoter types, both characterized by upstream binding of the general transcription factor (TF) Rap1 followed by the RPG-specific Fhl1/Ifh1 pair, with one type also binding the HMG-B protein Hmo1. We show that the regulatory properties of the two promoter types are remarkably similar, suggesting that they are determined to a large extent by Rap1 and the Fhl1/Ifh1 pair. Rapid depletion experiments allowed us to define a hierarchy of TF binding in which Rap1 acts as a pioneer factor required for binding of all other TFs. We also uncovered unexpected features underlying recruitment of Fhl1, whose forkhead DNA-binding domain is not required for binding at most promoters, and Hmo1, whose binding is supported by repeated motifs. Finally, we describe unusually micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-sensitive nucleosomes at all RPG promoters, located between the canonical +1 and -1 nucleosomes, which coincide with sites of Fhl1/Ifh1 and Hmo1 binding. We speculate that these "fragile" nucleosomes play an important role in regulating RPG transcriptional output. PMID:25085421

  2. Regulation of oncogenic KRAS signaling via a novel KRAS-integrin-linked kinase-hnRNPA1 regulatory loop in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, P-C; Yang, M-C; Kulp, S K; Salunke, S B; Himmel, L E; Fang, C-S; Jadhav, A M; Shan, Y-S; Lee, C-T; Lai, M-D; Shirley, L A; Bekaii-Saab, T; Chen, C-S

    2016-07-28

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a mediator of aggressive phenotype in pancreatic cancer. On the basis of our finding that knockdown of either KRAS or ILK has a reciprocal effect on the other's expression, we hypothesized the presence of an ILK-KRAS regulatory loop that enables pancreatic cancer cells to regulate KRAS expression. This study aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which this regulatory circuitry is regulated and to investigate the translational potential of targeting ILK to suppress oncogenic KRAS signaling in pancreatic cancer. Interplay between KRAS and ILK and the roles of E2F1, c-Myc and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein as intermediary effectors in this feedback loop was interrogated by genetic manipulations through small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA knockdown and ectopic expression, western blotting, PCR, promoter-luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and pull-down analyses. In vivo efficacy of ILK inhibition was evaluated in two murine xenograft models. Our data show that KRAS regulated the expression of ILK through E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation, which, in turn, controlled KRAS gene expression via hnRNPA1-mediated destabilization of the G-quadruplex on the KRAS promoter. Moreover, ILK inhibition blocked KRAS-driven epithelial-mesenchymal transition and growth factor-stimulated KRAS expression. The knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of ILK suppressed pancreatic tumor growth, in part, by suppressing KRAS signaling. These studies suggest that this KRAS-E2F1-ILK-hnRNPA1 regulatory loop enables pancreatic cancer cells to promote oncogenic KRAS signaling and to interact with the tumor microenvironment to promote aggressive phenotypes. This regulatory loop provides a mechanistic rationale for targeting ILK to suppress oncogenic KRAS signaling, which might foster new therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26616862

  3. A Benchtop Closed-loop System Controlled by a Bio-Inspired Silicon Implementation of the Pancreatic β Cell

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Nick; Georgiou, Pantelis; Johnston, Desmond; Toumazou, Christofer

    2009-01-01

    The normal pancreatic β-cell membrane depolarizes in response to increasing concentrations of glucose in a bursting pattern. At <7 mM (126 mg/dl), the cell is electrically silent. The bursting pulse width increases as glucose rises >7 mM (126 mg/dl) until a continuous train of bursting is seen at >25 mM (450 mg/dl). A bio-inspired silicon device has been developed using analogue electronics to implement membrane depolarization of the β cell. The device is ultralow powered, miniaturized (5 × 5 mm), and produces a bursting output identical to that characterized in electrophysiological studies. Objective The goal of this study was to demonstrate the ability of silicon implementation of β-cell electrophysiology to respond to a simulated glucose input and to drive an infusion pump in vitro. Method The silicon device response to a current source was recorded at varying simulated glucose concentrations. Subsequently, the bursting response to a changing analyte concentration measured by an amperometric enzyme electrode was converted to a voltage, driving a syringe pump loaded with a 50-ml syringe containing water. Results Bursting responses are comparable to those recorded in electrophysiology. Silicon β-cell implementation bursts with a pulse width proportional to concentration and is able to drive an infusion pump. Conclusion This is the first in vitro demonstration of closed loop insulin delivery utilizing miniaturized silicon implementation of β-cell physiology in analogue electronics. PMID:20144397

  4. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  5. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer ... in pancreatic cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized ...

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  8. Polymorphic variants in hereditary pancreatic cancer genes are not associated with pancreatic cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Robert R.; Bamlet, William R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Rider, David N.; Couch, Fergus J.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Matsumoto, Martha E.; Rabé, Kari G.; Hammer, Traci J.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Inherited risk of pancreatic cancer has been associated with mutations in several genes, including BRCA2, CDKN2A (p16), PRSS1, and PALB2. We hypothesized that common variants in these genes, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), may also influence risk for pancreatic cancer development. Methods A clinic based case-control study in non-Hispanic white persons compared 1,143 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma with 1,097 healthy controls. Twenty-eight genes directly and indirectly involved in the Fanconi/BRCA pathway (includes BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2) were identified and 248 tag-SNPs were selected. In addition, 11 SNPs in CDKN2A, PRSS1, and PRSS2 were selected. Association studies were performed at the gene level by principal components analysis, while recursive partitioning analysis was utilized to investigate pathway effects. At the individual SNP level, adjusted additive, dominant, and recessive models were investigated, and gene-environment interactions were also assessed. Results Gene level analyses showed no significant association of any genes with altered pancreatic cancer risk. Multiple single SNP analyses demonstrated associations, which will require replication. Exploratory pathway analyses by recursive partitioning demonstrated no association between SNPs and risk for pancreatic cancer. Conclusion In a candidate gene and pathway SNP association study analysis, common variations in the Fanconi/BRCA pathway and other candidate familial pancreatic cancer genes are not associated with risk for pancreatic cancer. PMID:19690177

  9. Chronic pancreatitis: A surgical disease? Role of the Frey procedure

    PubMed Central

    Roch, Alexandra; Teyssedou, Jérome; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques; Pessaux, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Although medical treatment and endoscopic interventions are primarily offered to patients with chronic pancreatitis, approximately 40% to 75% will ultimately require surgery during the course of their disease. Although pancreaticoduodenectomy has been considered the standard surgical procedure because of its favorable results on pain control, its high postoperative complication and pancreatic exocrine or/and endocrine dysfunction rates have led to a growing enthusiasm for duodenal preserving pancreatic head resection. The aim of this review is to better understand the rationale underlying of the Frey procedure in chronic pancreatitis and to analyze its outcome. Because of its hybrid nature, combining both resection and drainage, the Frey procedure has been conceptualized based on the pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis. The short and long-term outcome, especially pain relief and quality of life, are better after the Frey procedure than after any other surgical procedure performed for chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25068010

  10. Peroxiredoxin III protects pancreatic ß cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gabriele; Aumann, Nicole; Michalska, Marta; Bast, Antje; Sonnemann, Jürgen; Beck, James F; Lendeckel, Uwe; Newsholme, Philip; Walther, Reinhard

    2010-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized by a progressive autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing β cells. Macrophages and T lymphocytes release cytokines, which induce the synthesis of oxygen and nitrogen radicals in the pancreatic islets. The resulting cellular and mitochondrial damage promotes β cell death. β cells are very sensitive to the autoimmune free radical-dependent attack due to their low content of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase and catalase. A focal point of β cell protection should be the control of the mitochondrial redox status, which will result in the preservation of metabolic stimulus-secretion coupling. For this reason, there is a considerable interest in the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin III (PRX III), a thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase, which was shown to be able to protect against both oxidative and nitrosative stress. Using the Tet-On-system, we generated stably transfected rat insulinoma cells over- or under-expressing PRX III in a doxycyclin-dependent manner to analyze the effect of increased or decreased amounts of cellular PRX III, following treatment with several stressors. We provide evidence that PRX III protects pancreatic β cells from cell stress induced by accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, or the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase or caspase-9 and -3 by pro-inflammatory cytokines or streptozotocin. Basal insulin secretion was markedly decreased in cells expressing lower levels of PRX III. We suggest PRX III may be a suitable target for promoting deceleration or even prevention of stress-associated apoptosis in pancreatic β cells and the manifestation of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. PMID:20807727

  11. The association of retail promotions for cigarettes with the Master Settlement Agreement, tobacco control programmes and cigarette excise taxes

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Brett R; Farrelly, Matthew C; Mann, Nathan H

    2006-01-01

    Background Retail stores are the primary medium for marketing cigarettes to smokers in the US. The prevalence and characteristics of cigarette retail advertising and promotions have been described by several investigators. Less is known about the proportion of cigarette sales occurring as part of a retail promotion and about the effects of tobacco control policies on cigarette promotions. Objective To estimate the effect of the Master Settlement Agreement (MSA), state tobacco control programme funding and cigarette taxes on retail promotions for cigarettes in supermarkets in the US. Outcome measures Proportion of cigarette sales occurring under a retail promotion and the value of multipack promotions (eg, buy one pack, get one pack free) and cents‐off promotions, measured using scanner data in supermarkets from 50 retail market areas from 1994 to 2004. Results Promoted cigarette sales have increased significantly since the MSA (p<0.01), and are higher in market areas with high tobacco control programme funding (p<0.01) and high cigarette tax (p<0.01). The value of a multipack promotion is higher since the MSA (p<0.01) and in market areas with high cigarette tax (p<0.01). The value of a cents‐off promotion is negatively related to the MSA (p<0.01), with mixed results for tobacco control programme funding (p<0.05), and is unassociated with tax. Conclusions Higher promoted cigarette sales and increased promotional values in market areas with strong tobacco control policies, compared with market areas with weaker tobacco control policies, may partially offset the decline in smoking achieved in those areas. PMID:17130375

  12. Faculty Development in Tobacco Cessation: Training Health Professionals and Promoting Tobacco Control in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Muramoto, Myra L.; Lando, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Issues Cessation programs are essential components of comprehensive tobacco control. Health care providers, especially physicians, have major responsibility for role modeling and promoting cessation. For successful, sustainable cessation training programs, countries need health care professionals with knowledge and skills to deliver and teach tobacco cessation. Approach Review literature relevant to faculty development in tobacco cessation and discuss its strategic potential in tobacco control. Key findings Faculty development is essential for sustainable tobacco cessation training programs, and a potentially powerful strategy to shift professional and societal norms toward cessation and support of comprehensive tobacco control in countries with normative tobacco use and underdeveloped tobacco control programs. Implications Medical faculty are in a key position to influence tobacco cessation and control programs because of their roles as educators and researchers, receptivity to innovation and, influence on competencies and standards for medical education and practice. Faculty development programs must consider the number and type of faculty, and tobacco cessation curricula needed. Faculty development fosters the ability to institutionalize cessation education for students and community practitioners. Academic faculty are often leaders in their professional disciplines, influential in establishing clinical practice standards, and technical experts for government and other key health organizations. Conclusion Training health care professional faculty to become knowledgeable and committed to tobacco cessation opens opportunities to promote cessation and shift professional and societal norms away from tobacco use. PMID:19737208

  13. Study protocol for a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of S-ketamine for pain treatment in patients with chronic pancreatitis (RESET trial)

    PubMed Central

    Juel, Jacob; Olesen, Søren Schou; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Dahan, Albert; Wilder-Smith, Oliver; Madzak, Adnan; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease that causes irreversible damage to pancreatic tissue. Pain is its most prominent symptom. In the absence of pathology suitable for endoscopic or surgical interventions, pain treatment usually includes opioids. However, opioids often have limited efficacy. Moreover, side effects are common and bothersome. Hence, novel approaches to control pain associated with CP are highly desirable. Sensitisation of the central nervous system is reported to play a key role in pain generation and chronification. Fundamental to the process of central sensitisation is abnormal activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, which can be antagonised by S-ketamine. The RESET trial is investigating the analgaesic and antihyperalgesic effect of S-ketamine in patients with CP. Methods and analysis 40 patients with CP will be enrolled. Patients are randomised to receive 8 h of intravenous S-ketamine followed by oral S-ketamine, or matching placebo, for 4 weeks. To improve blinding, 1 mg of midazolam will be added to active and placebo treatment. The primary end point is clinical pain relief as assessed by a daily pain diary. Secondary end points include changes in patient-reported outcome measures, opioid consumption and rates of side effects. The end points are registered through the 4-week medication period and for an additional follow-up period of 8 weeks to investigate long-term effects. In addition, experimental pain measures also serves as secondary end points, and neurophysiological imaging parameters are collected. Furthermore, experimental baseline recordings are compared to recordings from a group of healthy controls to evaluate general aspects of pain processing in CP. Ethics and dissemination The protocol is approved by the North Denmark Region Committee on Health Research Ethics (N-20130040) and the Danish Health and Medicines Authorities (EudraCT number: 2013-003357-17). The results will be

  14. Plasma lactoferrin levels in patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Figarella, C; Gaia, E; Piantino, P

    1983-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a nonenzymatic secretory protein of human pancreas specifically increased in the external pancreatic secretion of patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis. The possibility of an elevated concentration of plasma lactoferrin level in these patients needed to be explored even if the low pancreatic concentration of the protein did not favor this hypothesis. As expected, no increase could be observed between the plasma lactoferrin level of 16 patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis (131 +/- 15 micrograms/l), compared to 17 controls (166 +/- 11 micrograms/l) and 15 patients with different organic diseases (187 +/- 18 micrograms/l). PMID:6628844

  15. Nkx6.1 controls a gene regulatory network required for establishing and maintaining pancreatic Beta cell identity.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Ashleigh E; Taylor, Brandon L; Benthuysen, Jacqueline R; Liu, Jingxuan; Thorel, Fabrizio; Yuan, Weiping; Jiao, Yang; Kaestner, Klaus H; Herrera, Pedro L; Magnuson, Mark A; May, Catherine Lee; Sander, Maike

    2013-01-01

    All pancreatic endocrine cell types arise from a common endocrine precursor cell population, yet the molecular mechanisms that establish and maintain the unique gene expression programs of each endocrine cell lineage have remained largely elusive. Such knowledge would improve our ability to correctly program or reprogram cells to adopt specific endocrine fates. Here, we show that the transcription factor Nkx6.1 is both necessary and sufficient to specify insulin-producing beta cells. Heritable expression of Nkx6.1 in endocrine precursors of mice is sufficient to respecify non-beta endocrine precursors towards the beta cell lineage, while endocrine precursor- or beta cell-specific inactivation of Nkx6.1 converts beta cells to alternative endocrine lineages. Remaining insulin(+) cells in conditional Nkx6.1 mutants fail to express the beta cell transcription factors Pdx1 and MafA and ectopically express genes found in non-beta endocrine cells. By showing that Nkx6.1 binds to and represses the alpha cell determinant Arx, we identify Arx as a direct target of Nkx6.1. Moreover, we demonstrate that Nkx6.1 and the Arx activator Isl1 regulate Arx transcription antagonistically, thus establishing competition between Isl1 and Nkx6.1 as a critical mechanism for determining alpha versus beta cell identity. Our findings establish Nkx6.1 as a beta cell programming factor and demonstrate that repression of alternative lineage programs is a fundamental principle by which beta cells are specified and maintained. Given the lack of Nkx6.1 expression and aberrant activation of non-beta endocrine hormones in human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived insulin(+) cells, our study has significant implications for developing cell replacement therapies. PMID:23382704

  16. Technical advance: stringent control of transgene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana using the Top10 promoter system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, J.; Scott, A. C.; Thompson, W. F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We show that the tightly regulated tetracycline-sensitive Top10 promoter system (Weinmann et al. Plant J. 1994, 5, 559-569) is functional in Arabidopsis thaliana. A pure breeding A. thaliana line (JL-tTA/8) was generated which expressed a chimeric fusion of the tetracycline repressor and the activation domain of Herpes simplex virus (tTA), from a single transgenic locus. Plants from this line were crossed with transgenics carrying the ER-targeted green fluorescent protein coding sequence (mGFP5) under control of the Top10 promoter sequence. Progeny from this cross displayed ER-targeted GFP fluorescence throughout the plant, indicating that the tTA-Top10 promoter interaction was functional in A. thaliana. GFP expression was repressed by 100 ng ml-1 tetracycline, an order of magnitude lower than the concentration used previously to repress expression in Nicotiana tabacum. Moreover, the level of GFP expression was controlled by varying the concentration of tetracycline in the medium, allowing a titred regulation of transgenic activity that was previously unavailable in A. thaliana. The kinetics of GFP activity were determined following de-repression of the Top10:mGFP5 transgene, with a visible ER-targeted GFP signal appearing from 24 to 48 h after de-repression.

  17. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    John, Bindu; Bellipady, Sumanth Shetty; Bhat, Shrinivasa Undaru

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n = 34; control group, n = 24). Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118. PMID:27088040

  18. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    John, Bindu; Bellipady, Sumanth Shetty; Bhat, Shrinivasa Undaru

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n = 34; control group, n = 24). Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118. PMID:27088040

  19. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of strategies to promote adherence to tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Volmink, J; Garner, P

    1997-11-29

    A literature review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of strategies promoting adherence to treatment for tuberculosis (TB). Five studies met the inclusion criteria of being randomized or pseudorandomized controlled trials of interventions to promote adherence with curative or preventive treatment for TB, with at least one measure of adherence. The relative risk for tested reminder cards sent to patients who defaulted upon treatment was 1.2, 1.4 for help given to patients by lay health workers, 1.6 for monetary incentives offered to patients, 1.2 for health education, 2.4 or 1.1 for a combination of a patient incentive and health education, and 1.2 for intensive supervision of staff to TB clinics. No completed trial of directly observed treatment was included in the review. All of the interventions tested improved adherence, but it remains unclear whether health education alone leads to better adherence to treatment. PMID:9418086

  20. UHRF1 regulation of the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway in pancreatic cancer contributes to oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Alainin, Wafa; Gana, Thompson; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Olayanju, Adedamola; Barrera, Lawrence N; Ferguson, Robert; Campbell, Fiona; Andrews, Timothy; Goldring, Christopher; Kitteringham, Neil; Park, Brian K; Nedjadi, Taoufik; Schmid, Michael C; Slupsky, Joseph R; Greenhalf, William; Neoptolemos, John P; Costello, Eithne

    2016-02-01

    The cellular defence protein Nrf2 is a mediator of oncogenesis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and other cancers. However, the control of Nrf2 expression and activity in cancer is not fully understood. We previously reported the absence of Keap1, a pivotal regulator of Nrf2, in ∼70% of PDAC cases. Here we describe a novel mechanism whereby the epigenetic regulator UHRF1 suppresses Keap1 protein levels. UHRF1 expression was observed in 20% (5 of 25) of benign pancreatic ducts compared to 86% (114 of 132) of pancreatic tumours, and an inverse relationship between UHRF1 and Keap1 levels in PDAC tumours (n = 124) was apparent (p = 0.002). We also provide evidence that UHRF1-mediated regulation of the Nrf2 pathway contributes to the aggressive behaviour of PDAC. Depletion of UHRF1 from PDAC cells decreased growth and enhanced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. UHRF1 depletion also led to reduced levels of Nrf2-regulated downstream proteins and was accompanied by heightened oxidative stress, in the form of lower glutathione levels and increased reactive oxygen species. Concomitant depletion of Keap1 and UHRF1 restored Nrf2 levels and reversed cell cycle arrest and the increase in reactive oxygen species. Mechanistically, depletion of UHRF1 reduced global and tumour suppressor promoter methylation in pancreatic cancer cell lines, and KEAP1 gene promoter methylation was reduced in one of three cell lines examined. Thus, methylation of the KEAP1 gene promoter may contribute to the suppression of Keap1 protein levels by UHRF1, although our data suggest that additional mechanisms need to be explored. Finally, we demonstrate that K-Ras drives UHRF1 expression, establishing a novel link between this oncogene and Nrf2-mediated cellular protection. Since UHRF1 over-expression occurs in other cancers, its ability to regulate the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway may be critically important to the malignant behaviour of these cancers. PMID:26497117

  1. Molecular insights into connective tissue growth factor action in rat pancreatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Karger, Anna; Fitzner, Brit; Brock, Peter; Sparmann, Gisela; Emmrich, Jörg; Liebe, Stefan; Jaster, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Pancreatic fibrosis, a key feature of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, is mediated by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been suggested to play a major role in fibrogenesis by enhancing PSC activation after binding to alpha5beta1 integrin. Here, we have focussed on molecular determinants of CTGF action. Inhibition of CTGF expression in PSC by siRNA was associated with decreased proliferation, while application of exogenous CTGF stimulated both cell growth and collagen synthesis. Real-time PCR studies revealed that CTGF target genes in PSC not only include mediators of matrix remodelling but also the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6. CTGF stimulated binding of NF-kappaB to the IL-6 promoter, and siRNA targeting the NF-kappaB subunit RelA interfered with CTGF-induced IL-6 expression, implicating the NF-kappaB pathway in the mediation of the CTGF effect. In further studies, we have analyzed regulation of CTGF expression in PSC. Transforming growth factor-beta1, activin A and tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhanced expression of the CTGF gene, while interferon-gamma displayed the opposite effect. The region from -74 to -125 of the CTGF promoter was revealed to be critical for its activity in PSC as well as for the inhibitory effect of interferon-gamma. Taken together, our results indicate a tight control of CTGF expression in PSC at the transcriptional level. CTGF promotes fibrogenesis both directly by enhancing PSC proliferation and matrix protein synthesis, and indirectly through the release of proinflammatory cytokines that may accelerate the process of chronic inflammation. PMID:18639630

  2. A randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trial of masitinib plus gemcitabine in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deplanque, G.; Demarchi, M.; Hebbar, M.; Flynn, P.; Melichar, B.; Atkins, J.; Nowara, E.; Moyé, L.; Piquemal, D.; Ritter, D.; Dubreuil, P.; Mansfield, C. D.; Acin, Y.; Moussy, A.; Hermine, O.; Hammel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Masitinib is a selective oral tyrosine–kinase inhibitor. The efficacy and safety of masitinib combined with gemcitabine was compared against single-agent gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients and methods Patients with inoperable, chemotherapy-naïve, PDAC were randomized (1 : 1) to receive gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) in combination with either masitinib (9 mg/kg/day) or a placebo. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) in the modified intent-to-treat population. Secondary OS analyses aimed to characterize subgroups with poor survival while receiving single-agent gemcitabine with subsequent evaluation of masitinib therapeutic benefit. These prospectively declared subgroups were based on pharmacogenomic data or a baseline characteristic. Results Three hundred and fifty-three patients were randomly assigned to receive either masitinib plus gemcitabine (N = 175) or placebo plus gemcitabine (N = 178). Median OS was similar between treatment-arms for the overall population, at respectively, 7.7 and 7.1 months, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.89 (95% CI [0.70; 1.13]. Secondary analyses identified two subgroups having a significantly poor survival rate when receiving single-agent gemcitabine; one defined by an overexpression of acyl–CoA oxidase-1 (ACOX1) in blood, and another via a baseline pain intensity threshold (VAS > 20 mm). These subgroups represent a critical unmet medical need as evidenced from median OS of 5.5 months in patients receiving single-agent gemcitabine, and comprise an estimated 63% of patients. A significant treatment effect was observed in these subgroups for masitinib with median OS of 11.7 months in the ‘ACOX1’ subgroup [HR = 0.23 (0.10; 0.51), P = 0.001], and 8.0 months in the ‘pain’ subgroup [HR = 0.62 (0.43; 0.89), P = 0.012]. Despite an increased toxicity of the combination as compared with single-agent gemcitabine, side-effects remained manageable. Conclusions The

  3. Loss of Ifnar1 in Pancreatic Acinar Cells Ameliorates the Disease Course of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Katharina J; Raulefs, Susanne; Kong, Bo; Steiger, Katja; Regel, Ivonne; Gewies, Andreas; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon constitutes an essential component of the combinational therapy against viral disease. Acute pancreatitis is one side effect of type I interferon-based therapy, implying that activation of type I interferon signaling affects the homeostasis and integrity of pancreatic acinar cells. Here, we investigated the role of type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells using a caerulein-induced murine model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreas-specific ablation of interferon (alpha and beta) receptor 1 (Ifnar1) partially protected animals from caerulein-induced pancreatitis, as demonstrated by reduced tissue damage. Profiling of infiltrating immune cells revealed that this dampened tissue damage response correlated with the number of macrophages in the pancreas. Pharmacologic depletion of macrophages reversed the protective effect of Ifnar1 deficiency. Furthermore, expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2), a potent factor for macrophage recruitment, was significantly increased in the Ifnar1-deficient pancreas. Thus, type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells controls pancreatic homeostasis by affecting the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response in the pancreas. PMID:26618925

  4. All-trans retinoic acid ameliorates glycemic control in diabetic mice via modulating pancreatic islet production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chiao-Yun; Yuan, Tze-An; Cho, Candy Hsin-Hua; Chang, Fang-Pei; Mao, Wan-Yu; Wu, Ruei-Ren; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Shen, Chia-Ning

    2016-09-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are associated with impairment in vitamin A metabolism. This study evaluated whether treatment with retinoic acid, the biologically active metabolite of vitamin A, can ameliorate diabetes. All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) was used to treat streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice which revealed atRA administration ameliorated blood glucose levels of diabetic mice. This hyperglycemic amelioration was accompanied by an increase in the amount of β cells co-expressed Pdx1 and insulin and by restoration of the vascular laminin expression. The atRA-induced production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A from the pancreatic islets was possibly the key factor that mediated the restoration of islet vascularity and recovery of β-cell mass. Furthermore, the combination of islet transplantation and atRA administration significantly rescued hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. These findings suggest that vitamin A derivatives can potentially be used as a supplementary treatment to improve diabetes management and glycemic control. PMID:27381866

  5. Pancreatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces juices that help ... help control blood sugar levels. Problems with the pancreas can lead to many health problems. These include ...

  6. Iron isotope fractionation during proton-promoted, ligand-controlled, and reductive dissolution of Goethite.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Jan G; Kraemer, Stephan M; Teutsch, Nadya; Borer, Paul M; Halliday, Alex N; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2006-06-15

    Iron isotope fractionation during dissolution of goethite (alpha-FeOOH) was studied in laboratory batch experiments. Proton-promoted (HCl), ligand-controlled (oxalate dark), and reductive (oxalate light) dissolution mechanisms were compared in order to understand the behavior of iron isotopes during natural weathering reactions. Multicollector ICP-MS was used to measure iron isotope ratios of dissolved iron in solution. The influence of kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation during different time scales of dissolution was investigated. Proton-promoted dissolution did not cause iron isotope fractionation, concurrently demonstrating the isotopic homogeneity of the goethite substrate. In contrast, both ligand-controlled and reductive dissolution of goethite resulted in significant iron isotope fractionation. The kinetic isotope effect, which caused an enrichment of light isotopes in the early dissolved fractions, was modeled with an enrichment factor for the 57Fe/ 54Fe ratio of -2.6 per thousandth between reactive surface sites and solution. Later dissolved fractions of the ligand-controlled experiments exhibit a reverse trend with a depletion of light isotopes of approximately 0.5 per thousandth in solution. We interpret this as an equilibrium isotope effect between Fe(III)-oxalate complexes in solution and the goethite surface. In conclusion, different dissolution mechanisms cause diverse iron isotope fractionation effects and likely influence the iron isotope signature of natural soil and weathering environments. PMID:16830543

  7. Bile acids-mediated overexpression of MUC4 via FAK-dependent c-Jun activation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Suhasini; Cruz, Eric; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Guha, Sushovan; Brand, Randall E; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P; Kumar, Sushil; Batra, Surinder K

    2016-08-01

    The majority of pancreatic cancer (PC) patients are clinically presented with obstructive jaundice with elevated levels of circulatory bilirubin and alkaline phosphatases. In the current study, we examined the implications of bile acids (BA), an important component of bile, on the pathophysiology of PC and investigated their mechanistic association in tumor-promoting functions. Integration of results from PC patient samples and autochthonous mouse models showed an elevated levels of BA (p < 0.05) in serum samples compared to healthy controls. Similarly, an elevated BA levels was observed in pancreatic juice derived from PC patients (p < 0.05) than non-pancreatic non-healthy (NPNH) controls, further establishing the clinical association of BA with the pathogenesis of PC. The tumor-promoting functions of BA were established by observed transcriptional upregulation of oncogenic MUC4 expression. Luciferase reporter assay revealed distal MUC4 promoter as the primary responsive site to BA. In silico analysis recognized two c-Jun binding sites at MUC4 distal promoter, which was biochemically established using ChIP assay. Interestingly, BA treatment led to an increased transcription and activation of c-Jun in a FAK-dependent manner. Additionally, BA receptor, namely FXR, which is also upregulated at transcriptional level in PC patient samples, was demonstrated as an upstream molecule in BA-mediated FAK activation, plausibly by regulating Src activation. Altogether, these results demonstrate that elevated levels of BA increase the tumorigenic potential of PC cells by inducing FXR/FAK/c-Jun axis to upregulate MUC4 expression, which is overexpressed in pancreatic tumors and is known to be associated with progression and metastasis of PC. PMID:27185392

  8. Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis-as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:24132440

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Joji Kurian; Kim, Min-Sik; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Raju, Rajesh; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Sakamuri, Sruthi; Tankala, Shantal Gupta; Singal, Mukul; Nair, Bipin; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava; Maitra, Anirban; Gowda, Harsha; Hruban, Ralph H; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. The etiology of pancreatic cancer is heterogeneous with a wide range of alterations that have already been reported at the level of the genome, transcriptome, and proteome. The past decade has witnessed a large number of experimental studies using high-throughput technology platforms to identify genes whose expression at the transcript or protein levels is altered in pancreatic cancer. Based on expression studies, a number of molecules have also been proposed as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of this deadly cancer. Currently, there are no repositories which provide an integrative view of multiple Omics data sets from published research on pancreatic cancer. Here, we describe the development of a web-based resource, Pancreatic Cancer Database (http://www.pancreaticcancerdatabase.org), as a unified platform for pancreatic cancer research. PCD contains manually curated information pertaining to quantitative alterations in miRNA, mRNA, and proteins obtained from small-scale as well as high-throughput studies of pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We believe that PCD will serve as an integrative platform for scientific community involved in pancreatic cancer research. PMID:24839966

  10. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  11. Control of gene conversion and somatic hypermutation by immunoglobulin promoter and enhancer sequences.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu Yuan; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Schatz, David G

    2006-12-25

    It is thought that gene conversion (GCV) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes occur in two steps: the generation of uracils in DNA by activation-induced cytidine deaminase, followed by their subsequent repair by various DNA repair pathways to generate sequence-diversified products. It is not known how either of the two steps is targeted specifically to Ig loci. Because of the tight link between transcription and SHM, we have investigated the role of endogenous Ig light chain (IgL) transcriptional control elements in GCV/SHM in the chicken B cell line DT40. Promoter substitution experiments led to identification of a strong RNA polymerase II promoter incapable of supporting efficient GCV/SHM. This surprising finding indicates that high levels of transcription are not sufficient for robust GCV/SHM in Ig loci. Deletion of the IgL enhancer in a context in which high-level transcription was not compromised showed that the enhancer is not necessary for GCV/SHM. Our results indicate that cis-acting elements are important for Ig gene diversification, and we propose that targeting specificity is achieved through the combined action of several Ig locus elements that include the promoter. PMID:17178919

  12. Snail1 transcriptional repressor binds to its own promoter and controls its expression

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Sandra; Escrivà, Maria; Puig, Isabel; Barberà, Maria José; Dave, Natàlia; Herranz, Nicolás; Larriba, Maria Jesús; Takkunen, Minna; Francí, Clara; Muñoz, Alberto; Virtanen, Ismo; Baulida, Josep; de Herreros, Antonio García

    2006-01-01

    The product of Snail1 gene is a transcriptional repressor of E-cadherin expression and an inductor of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition in several epithelial tumour cell lines. Transcription of Snail1 is induced when epithelial cells are forced to acquire a mesenchymal phenotype. In this work we demonstrate that Snail1 protein limits its own expression: Snail1 binds to an E-box present in its promoter (at −146 with respect to the transcription start) and represses its activity. Therefore, mutation of the E-box increases Snail1 transcription in epithelial and mesenchymal cells. Evidence of binding of ectopic or endogenous Snail1 to its own promoter was obtained by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments. Studies performed expressing different forms of Snail1 under the control of its own promoter demonstrate that disruption of the regulatory loop increases the cellular levels of Snail protein. These results indicate that expression of Snail1 gene can be regulated by its product and evidence the existence of a fine-tuning feed-back mechanism of regulation of Snail1 transcription. PMID:16617148

  13. [Morphological features of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the AINTEGUMENTA gene of rape under control of the Dahlia mosaic virus promoter].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Cheremis, A V; Vakhitov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the AINTEGUMENTA gene of rape under control of the 35S promoter and the promoter of dahlia mosaic virus were obtained. The transgenic plants were characterized by increase in the length of the leaves, flower sizes, stem height, and weight of seeds; at the same time, the degree of increase was greater in the case of use of the dahlia mosaic virus promoter as a regulator of transcription. Ectopic expression of the AINTEGUMENTA gene promoted prolongation of leaf growth, while sizes of epidermal cells of the leaves remained unchanged. PMID:23785848

  14. The role of pancreatic islets in experimental pancreatic carcinogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, O.; Ohigashi, H.; Imaoka, S.; Nakai, I.; Mitsuo, M.; Weide, L.; Pour, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    Our previous studies have suggested that the presence of intact islets is essential for the induction of pancreatic exocrine tumors in the Syrian hamster model. To validate this, we investigated the effect of the carcinogen, N-nitrosobis(2-oxo-propyl)amine (BOP) in hamsters, in which homologous isolated intact islets were transplanted into the submandibular gland (SMG). Freshly isolated pure islets from hamster donors were transplanted into the left SMG of 20 female host hamsters. Ten of these hamsters (group 1) received BOP (40 mg/kg) weekly for 3 weeks. Another 10 hamsters (group 2) were kept untreated. In groups 3 and 4 (10 hamsters each) the salt solution or isolated pancreatic ductal cells, respectively, was injected into the gland. In other groups (10 hamsters each) islets were transplanted into the peri-SMG connective tissue (group 5) or into the renal subcapsular space (group 6). Hamsters of group 1 (40 mg/kg, weekly for 3 weeks) as were group 7 hamsters, which served as BOP-treated controls. All BOP-treated hamsters developed pancreatic lesions. Similar hyperplastic and atypical ductal/ductular proliferation and in situ carcinoma were found in the SMG of many group 1 hamsters. No such lesions were found in the SMG, peri-SMG, or renal subcapsular space of the other groups. Islets appear to be involved in carcinogenicity of BOP. The mechanism is obscure. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7485408

  15. Targeting the sphingolipid metabolism to defeat pancreatic cancer cell resistance to the chemotherapeutic gemcitabine drug.

    PubMed

    Guillermet-Guibert, Julie; Davenne, Lise; Pchejetski, Dimitri; Saint-Laurent, Nathalie; Brizuela, Leyre; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Cuvillier, Olivier; Susini, Christiane; Bousquet, Corinne

    2009-04-01

    Defeating pancreatic cancer resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine remains a challenge to treat this deadly cancer. Targeting the sphingolipid metabolism for improving tumor chemosensitivity has recently emerged as a promising strategy. The fine balance between intracellular levels of the prosurvival sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and the proapoptotic ceramide sphingolipids determines cell fate. Among enzymes that control this metabolism, sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1), a tumor-associated protein overexpressed in many cancers, favors survival through S1P production, and inhibitors of SphK1 are used in ongoing clinical trials to sensitize epithelial ovarian and prostate cancer cells to various chemotherapeutic drugs. We here report that the cellular ceramide/S1P ratio is a critical biosensor for predicting pancreatic cancer cell sensitivity to gemcitabine. A low level of the ceramide/S1P ratio, associated with a high SphK1 activity, correlates with a robust intrinsic pancreatic cancer cell chemoresistance toward gemcitabine. Strikingly, increasing the ceramide/S1P ratio, by using pharmacologic (SphK1 inhibitor or ceramide analogue) or small interfering RNA-based approaches to up-regulate intracellular ceramide levels or reduce SphK1 activity, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Conversely, decreasing the ceramide/S1P ratio, by up-regulating SphK1 activity, promoted gemcitabine resistance in these cells. Development of novel pharmacologic strategies targeting the sphingolipid metabolism might therefore represent an interesting promising approach, when combined with gemcitabine, to defeat pancreatic cancer chemoresistance to this drug. PMID:19372554

  16. Expression of major histocompatibility antigens in human chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jalleh, R P; Gilbertson, J A; Williamson, R C; Slater, S D; Foster, C S

    1993-10-01

    T-lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine pancreas and liver in patients with chronic pancreatitis has suggested that cell mediated immune mechanisms may play a part in the pathogenesis of this disease. As expression of major histocompatibility (MHC) antigens is a prerequisite for organ specific autoimmunity, the expression of HLA class I (beta 2-microglobulin) and class II (HLA-DR) determinants have been analysed, together with the presence of T-lymphocytes, in 93 patients (64 men and 29 women, mean age 40.6 years) having an operation for chronic pancreatitis. Ethanol (63 patients), recurrent acute pancreatitis (12), congenital lesions (2), and unknown (16) were suggested to be the causes of the disease. Immunohistochemical staining of formalin fixed and paraffin wax embedded tissue sections used conventional immunohistochemical techniques with specific anti-serum samples. No MHC expression was identified in 10 histologically normal pancreatic control specimens or in four cases of chronic pancreatitis secondary to obstruction by neuroendocrine tumours within the head of the pancreas. beta 2-microglobulin expression by pancreatic exocrine epithelial cells was seen in 76 chronic pancreatitis specimens (82%) while HLA-DR was present in 61 (66%). Simultaneous expression of both class I and II determinants was seen in 53 (57%) of cases. MHC determinant expression was not found in 10 cases (11%) of chronic pancreatitis. In the positive specimens, expression was confined to ductal and ductular (interlobular and intralobular) epithelium with no staining of acinar cells. Staining was not related to the suspected cause of the disease or age. T-lymphocytes were more prominent in chronic pancreatitis mean (SEM) (131 (15) cells per high powered field) than controls (5 (1), p < 0.01). Aberrant MHC expression by exocrine pancreatic epithelial cells occurring in the presence of an appreciable T-cell infiltration confirmed that the appropriate cellular conditions were present for

  17. Promoting fertilizer use via controlled release of a bacteria-encapsulated film bag.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin-San

    2010-05-26

    A phosphate-solubilizing bacterium ( Burkholderia cepacia isolate) encapsulated in maleic anhydride (MA) grafted onto poly(butylene succinate adipate) (PBSA) and then combined with starch as film bag material (PBSA-g-MA/starch) incubated in a saline solution required approximately 20 days to deplete the starch in the film bags. Thereafter, the cell concentration in the saline solution increased significantly because of the release of cells from the severely destroyed film bags and also their growth by use of depolymerized PBSA-g-MA fragments as a substrate. The incubation proceeded for 60 days, by which time the PBSA-g-MA/starch composite had suffered a >80% weight loss. For practical application, effectiveness of the above-mentioned film bags was demonstrated because it could improve the absorbability of a fertilizer for plants and promote the growth of plants. As a result, it can avoid the accumulation of the phosphate in excess fertilizer that lead to the phenomenon of poor soils. These results demonstrate that PBSA-g-MA/starch can be used to encapsulate cells of an indigenous phosphate-solubilizing bacterium ( B. cepacia isolate) to form a controlled release of bacteria-encapsulated film bag (BEFB). The B. cepacia isolate was able to degrade the film bags material, causing cell release. Biodegradability of the film bags depended upon the type of material used, because the PBSA film bags were also degraded but to a lesser degree. The addition of starch made the film bags more biodegradable. The decrease in intrinsic viscosity was also higher for the starch composite, suggesting a strong connection between the biodegradability and these characteristics. The results suggest that the release of fertilizer-promoted bacteria might be controllable via a suitable film bag material formulation. In addition, this work adopted live bacteria to promote the absorption of phosphate, which is superior to the phosphate used in the traditional way. PMID:20420423

  18. Effectiveness of interventions to promote physical activity in children and adolescents: systematic review of controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    McMinn, Alison M; Griffin, Simon J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To review the published literature on the effectiveness of interventions to promote physical activity in children and adolescents. Design Systematic review. Data sources Literature search using PubMed, SCOPUS, Psychlit, Ovid Medline, Sportdiscus, and Embase up to December 2006. Review methods Two independent reviewers assessed studies against the following inclusion criteria: controlled trial, comparison of intervention to promote physical activity with no intervention control condition, participants younger than 18 years, and reported statistical analyses of a physical activity outcome measure. Levels of evidence, accounting for methodological quality, were assessed for three types of intervention, five settings, and three target populations. Results The literature search identified 57 studies: 33 aimed at children and 24 at adolescents. Twenty four studies were of high methodological quality, including 13 studies in children. Interventions that were found to be effective achieved increases ranging from an additional 2.6 minutes of physical education related physical activity to 283 minutes per week of overall physical activity. Among children, limited evidence for an effect was found for interventions targeting children from low socioeconomic populations, and environmental interventions. Strong evidence was found that school based interventions with involvement of the family or community and multicomponent interventions can increase physical activity in adolescents. Conclusion Some evidence was found for potentially effective strategies to increase children's levels of physical activity. For adolescents, multicomponent interventions and interventions that included both school and family or community involvement have the potential to make important differences to levels of physical activity and should be promoted. A lack of high quality evaluations hampers conclusions concerning effectiveness, especially among children. PMID:17884863

  19. Australia's role in promoting and supporting tuberculosis control in the Western Pacific Region.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kerrie A

    2013-07-01

    Twenty-one percent of the world's tuberculosis cases are found in the Western Pacific Region. The region has demonstrated a lower rate of decline in incidence than the regions of Africa, the Americas and Europe. Issues around drug resistance, human immunodeficiency virus and diabetes impact on the burden of tuberculosis disease in the Western Pacific Region. Australia has exhibited a low and relatively stable tuberculosis incidence rate but has not progressed toward the desired international goal for tuberculosis elimination (<1 case per million population). The pathogenesis and transmission of tuberculosis make it difficult to achieve elimination within a geographically defined area. These aspects of disease control are amplified by globalisation and Australia's increasing economic and strategic engagement within the Western Pacific Region and South-East Asia. Promoting and supporting tuberculosis control within the Western Pacific Region provides an opportunity for Australia to maintain its low tuberculosis incidence rate and progress toward elimination. PMID:23849030

  20. Force control tasks with pure haptic feedback promote short-term focused attention.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dangxiao; Zhang, Yuru; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Gaofeng; Yang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Focused attention has great impact on our quality of life. Our learning, social skills and even happiness are closely intertwined with our capacity for focused attention. Attention promotion is replete with examples of training-induced increases in attention capability, most of which rely on visual and auditory stimulation. Pure haptic stimulation to increase attention capability is rarely found. We show that accurate force control tasks with pure haptic feedback enhance short-term focused attention. Participants were trained by a force control task in which information from visual and auditory channels was blocked, and only haptic feedback was provided. The trainees were asked to exert a target force within a pre-defined force tolerance for a specific duration. The tolerance was adaptively modified to different levels of difficulty to elicit full participant engagement. Three attention tests showed significant changes in different aspects of focused attention in participants who had been trained as compared with those who had not, thereby illustrating the role of haptic-based sensory-motor tasks in the promotion of short-term focused attention. The findings highlight the potential value of haptic stimuli in brain plasticity and serve as a new tool to extend existing computer games for cognitive enhancement. PMID:25296407

  1. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  2. Characterization of a putative cis-regulatory element that controls transcriptional activity of the pig uroplakin II gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Mi-Ryung; Park, Jong-Yi; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Oh, Jae-Wook; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} The sequences of -604 to -84 bp of the pUPII promoter contained the region of a putative negative cis-regulatory element. {yields} The core promoter was located in the 5F-1. {yields} Transcription factor HNF4 can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. {yields} These features of the pUPII promoter are fundamental to development of a target-specific vector. -- Abstract: Uroplakin II (UPII) is a one of the integral membrane proteins synthesized as a major differentiation product of mammalian urothelium. UPII gene expression is bladder specific and differentiation dependent, but little is known about its transcription response elements and molecular mechanism. To identify the cis-regulatory elements in the pig UPII (pUPII) gene promoter region, we constructed pUPII 5' upstream region deletion mutants and demonstrated that each of the deletion mutants participates in controlling the expression of the pUPII gene in human bladder carcinoma RT4 cells. We also identified a new core promoter region and putative negative cis-regulatory element within a minimal promoter region. In addition, we showed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter (5F-1) region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. Transient cotransfection experiments showed that HNF4 positively regulates pUPII gene promoter activity. Thus, the binding element and its binding protein, HNF4 transcription factor, may be involved in the mechanism that specifically regulates pUPII gene transcription.

  3. Laparoscopic enucleation of pancreatic insulinomas.

    PubMed

    Schraibman, Vladimir; Goldenberg, Alberto; de Matos Farah, Jose Francisco; Apodaca, Franz Robert; Goldman, Suzan; Lobo, Edson Jose

    2007-08-01

    Insulinomas are rare endocrine pancreatic tumors whose incidence has been increasing in recent years owing to early detection by clinical and radiologic, such as remote neural monitoring, computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound (US) findings. The classical treatment consists of open surgical resection, which is associated with relative morbidity and mortality rates. The aim of this paper was to present 5 patients who were diagnosed with pancreatic insulinomas that were treated by laparoscopic resection. Five (5) patients, ranging from 14 to 45 years and presenting with classical Whipple Triad, had lesions ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 cm by CT (body and tail of the pancreas), which were subsequently diagnosed as insulinomas. An ecoendoscopy showed no combined lesions. They were treated by a laparoscopic resection. Glicemic levels were controlled during surgery with an expected glucose rise. All patients had an uneventfull recovery. The mean length of follow-up is 14 months. The laparoscopic resection of pancreatic insulinomas is a reliable procedure for superficial lesions in the body and tail of the pancreas. PMID:17705715

  4. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  5. Acute Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Werlin, Steven L.

    2001-10-01

    There are no drugs that cure or abate pancreatitis. The treatment of patients with mild and moderate episodes of pancreatitis (85%) is supportive and expectant. Central issues include the removal of the initiating process (if possible), relief of pain, and maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be required for stone extraction in patients with biliary pancreatitis. Surgery is rarely required. The aims of treatment for patients with severe disease includes treatment of local, systemic, and septic complications in addition to those for mild and moderate disease. Homeostasis is maintained by the correction of hypocalcemia, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, electrolyte imbalances, and hypoxemia. A large number of medications have been used unsuccessfully in an attempt to halt the progression of the autodigestive process within the pancreas and to reduce pancreatic secretions. Nutritional support with either enteral or parenteral feeding is given. Intravenous antibiotics or selective bowel decontamination decrease mortality in patients with severe episodes of pancreatitis. The treatment for these individuals is often prolonged. Surgical treatment of traumatic pancreatitis with ductal rupture includes repair or resection. At times, simple drainage is performed and definitive surgery is deferred until later. Surgical treatment of severe pancreatitis includes debridement of necrotic and infected tissue. The emerging consensus appears to be that necrosectomy and local lavage or open management with planned re-exploration offers better survival than the conventional therapy of resection plus drainage alone. PMID:11560787

  6. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  7. Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer Can pancreatic cancer be found early? Pancreatic cancer is hard to ... Testing: What You Need to Know . Testing for pancreatic cancer in people at high risk For people in ...

  8. Hypermethylation of MST1 in IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuhara, Takataro; Tomiyama, Takashi; Yasuda, Kaneki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Yoshio; Son, Yonsu; Nomura, Shosaku; Uchida, Kazushige; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kinashi, Tatsuo

    2015-08-07

    The serine/threonine kinase Mst1 plays important roles in the control of immune cell trafficking, proliferation, and differentiation. Previously, we reported that Mst1 was required for thymocyte selection and regulatory T-cell functions, thereby the prevention of autoimmunity in mice. In humans, MST1 null mutations cause T-cell immunodeficiency and hypergammaglobulinemia with autoantibody production. RASSF5C(RAPL) is an activator of MST1 and it is frequently methylated in some tumors. Herein, we investigated methylation of the promoter regions of MST1 and RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from patients with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Increased number of CpG methylation in the 5′ region of MST1 was detected in AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions, whereas AIP patients without extrapancreatic lesions were similar to controls. In RA patients, we detected a slight increased CpG methylation in MST1, although the overall number of methylation sites was lower than that of AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions. There were no significant changes of the methylation levels of the CpG islands in the 5′ region of RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from AIP and RA patients. Consistently, we found a significantly down-regulated expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells of AIP patients. Our results suggest that the decreased expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells due to hypermethylation of the promoter contributes to the pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP. - Highlights: • Mst1 controls immune cells trafficking, cell proliferation and differentiation. • Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an idiopathic pancreatitis affecting multiple organs. • Decreased MST1 expression and increased CpG methylation of promoter of MST1 in AIP. • Slight increased CpG methylation of MST1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients. • MST1 contributes pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP.

  9. Promoted growth of murine hair follicles through controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Makoto; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether or not the controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is effective in promoting the hair follicle growth of mice in second anagen of hair cycle. VEGF was incorporated into a biodegradable collagen hydrogel for its controlled release. Following implantation of the collagen hydrogel incorporating 0 or 2 microg of VEGF and injection of 0 or 2 microg of VEGF in the solution form into the back subcutis of mice, the hair follicle growth was evaluated photometrically and histologically in terms of the skin color of reverse side of the implanted or injected site, the skin thickness, and the area occupied by hair follicle tissue. Ten days later, the skin color of mice implanted with the collagen hydrogel incorporating 2 microg of VEGF was significantly darker than that injected with 2 pg of VEGF. The collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF increased the hair follicle area at the implanted site to a significantly greater extent than other agents while significant angiogenetic effect in the skin tissue was observed. VEGF-free, empty collagen hydrogels did not affect the skin darkness, hair follicle growth, and the angiogenesis. Moreover, the hair shaft length was significantly elongated by the collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF, in marked contrast to other agents. Immunohistolchemicalstaining with proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that the collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF promoted the proliferation of cells around the hair follicle more frequently than free VEGF. We concluded that the controlled release of VEGF more positively acted on the hair growth cycle of mice for hair growth than the injection of free VEGF. PMID:12013184

  10. Effects of Montelukast in an Experimental Model of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Angı, Serkan; Eken, Hüseyin; Kılıç, Erol; Karaköse, Oktay; Balci, Gürhan; Somuncu, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the hematological, biochemical, and histopathological effects of Montelukast on pancreatic damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model created by cerulein in rats before and after the induction of pancreatitis. Materials/Methods Forty rats were divided into 4 groups with 10 rats each. The study groups were: the Cerulein (C) group, the Cerulein + early Montelukast (CMe) group, the Cerulein + late Montelukast (CMl) group, and the Control group. The pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, leukocyte, hematocrit, pancreatic amylase, and lipase values were measured in the arterial blood samples taken immediately before rats were killed. Results There were statistically significant differences between the C group and the Control group in the values of pancreatic amylase, lipase, blood leukocyte, hematocrit, pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, and pancreatic water content, and also in each of the values of edema, inflammation, vacuolization, necrosis, and total histopathological score (P<0.05). When the CMl group and C group were compared, no statistically significant differences were found in any parameter analyzed. When the CMe group was compared with the C group, pancreatic amylase, lipase, pH, PO2, pCO2, HCO3, pancreatic water content, histopathological edema, inflammation, and total histopathological score values were significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). Finally, when the CMe group and the Control group were compared, significant differences were found in all except 2 (leukocyte and pO2) parameters (P<0.05). Conclusions Leukotriene receptor antagonists used in the late phases of pancreatitis might not result in any benefit; however, when they are given in the early phases or prophylactically, they may decrease pancreatic damage. PMID:27479458

  11. Effects of Montelukast in an Experimental Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Angı, Serkan; Eken, Hüseyin; Kılıc, Erol; Karaköse, Oktay; Balci, Gürhan; Somuncu, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We evaluated the hematological, biochemical, and histopathological effects of Montelukast on pancreatic damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model created by cerulein in rats before and after the induction of pancreatitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Forty rats were divided into 4 groups with 10 rats each. The study groups were: the Cerulein (C) group, the Cerulein + early Montelukast (CMe) group, the Cerulein + late Montelukast (CMl) group, and the Control group. The pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, leukocyte, hematocrit, pancreatic amylase, and lipase values were measured in the arterial blood samples taken immediately before rats were killed. RESULTS There were statistically significant differences between the C group and the Control group in the values of pancreatic amylase, lipase, blood leukocyte, hematocrit, pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, and pancreatic water content, and also in each of the values of edema, inflammation, vacuolization, necrosis, and total histopathological score (P<0.05). When the CMl group and C group were compared, no statistically significant differences were found in any parameter analyzed. When the CMe group was compared with the C group, pancreatic amylase, lipase, pH, PO2, pCO2, HCO3, pancreatic water content, histopathological edema, inflammation, and total histopathological score values were significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). Finally, when the CMe group and the Control group were compared, significant differences were found in all except 2 (leukocyte and pO2) parameters (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Leukotriene receptor antagonists used in the late phases of pancreatitis might not result in any benefit; however, when they are given in the early phases or prophylactically, they may decrease pancreatic damage. PMID:27479458

  12. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to pancreatic atrophy in newly diagnosed pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moinuddin, Irfan; Bala, Asif; Ali, Butool; Khan, Husna; Bracamonte, Erika; Sussman, Amy

    2016-02-01

    Acute oxalate nephropathy can occur due to primary hyperoxaluria and secondary hyperoxaluria. The primary hyperoxalurias are a group of autosomal recessive disorders of endogenous oxalate overproduction. Secondary hyperoxaluria may occur as a result of excess dietary intake, poisoning with oxalate precursors (ethylene glycol), or enteric hyperoxaluria. The differential diagnosis of enteric hyperoxaluria includes inflammatory bowel disease, short bowel syndrome, bariatric surgery (with jejunoileal bypass or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass), celiac disease, partial colectomy, and chronic pancreatitis. The common etiology in all these processes is fat malabsorption, steatorrhea, saponification of calcium, and absorption of free oxalate. Hyperoxaluria causes increased urinary oxalate excretion, urolithiasis (promoted by hypovolemia, decreased urinary pH caused by metabolic acidosis, and decreased citrate and magnesium concentrations in urine), tubulointerstitial oxalate deposits, and tubulointerstitial nephritis. We report a rare case of acute oxalate nephropathy due to pancreatic atrophy and exocrine insufficiency caused by newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer. PMID:26614399

  13. A Web-Based Health Promotion Program for Older Workers: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hersch, Rebekah K; Schlossberg, Dana; Leaf, Samantha L

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent evidence supports the efficacy of programs that promote improvements in the health practices of workers 50 years and older who are at higher risk for chronic diseases than younger workers are. Internet-based programs that promote healthy practices have also shown promise and, therefore, should be especially appropriate for workers aged 50 years and older. Objective The purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of HealthyPast50, a fully automated Web-based health promotion program based on social cognitive theory and aimed specifically at workers 50 years and older. Methods The randomized controlled trial was conducted across multiple US offices of a large global information technology company. The sample included 278 employees aged 50 to 68 who were recruited online and randomly assigned to the Web-based HealthyPast50 program or to a wait-list control condition. Self-report measures of diet, physical activity, stress, and tobacco use were collected online before and 3 months after the program group was given access to the program. Use data included number of log-ins and number of pages accessed. The primary analysis was multiple linear regression, following intent-to-treat principles with multiple imputation using the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach for nonmonotone missing data. Potential moderators from demographic characteristics and program dosage effects were assessed using multiple linear regression models. Additional analyses were conducted on complete (nonimputed) cases, excluding program participants who used the program for less than 30 minutes. Results Retention rates were good for both groups: 80.4% (111/138) for the program group and 94.3% (132/140) for the control group. Program group participants spent a mean of 102.26 minutes in the program (SD 148.32), logged in a mean of 4.33 times (SD 4.28), and viewed a mean of 11.04 pages (SD 20.08). In the analysis of the imputed dataset, the program group performed

  14. Ebselen inhibits QSOX1 enzymatic activity and suppresses invasion of pancreatic and renal cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Hanavan, Paul D.; Borges, Chad R.; Katchman, Benjamin A.; Faigel, Douglas O.; Ho, Thai H.; Ma, Chen-Ting; Sergienko, Eduard A.; Meurice, Nathalie; Petit, Joachim L.; Lake, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1 (QSOX1) is a highly conserved disulfide bond-generating enzyme that is overexpressed in diverse tumor types. Its enzymatic activity promotes the growth and invasion of tumor cells and alters extracellular matrix composition. In a nude mouse-human tumor xenograft model, tumors containing shRNA for QSOX1 grew significantly more slowly than controls, suggesting that QSOX1 supports a proliferative phenotype in vivo. High throughput screening experiments identified ebselen as an in vitro inhibitor of QSOX1 enzymatic activity. Ebselen treatment of pancreatic and renal cancer cell lines stalled tumor growth and inhibited invasion through Matrigel in vitro. Daily oral treatment with ebselen resulted in a 58% reduction in tumor growth in mice bearing human pancreatic tumor xenografts compared to controls. Mass spectrometric analysis of ebselen-treated QSOX1 mechanistically revealed that C165 and C237 of QSOX1 covalently bound to ebselen. This report details the anti-neoplastic properties of ebselen in pancreatic and renal cancer cell lines. The results here offer a “proof-of-principle” that enzymatic inhibition of QSOX1 may have clinical relevancy. PMID:26158899

  15. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Daniel; Friess, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients. PMID:26681935

  16. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  17. Characterization of human mitochondrial ferritin promoter: identification of transcription factors and evidences of epigenetic control.

    PubMed

    Guaraldo, Michela; Santambrogio, Paolo; Rovelli, Elisabetta; Di Savino, Augusta; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cittaro, Davide; Roetto, Antonella; Levi, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is an iron storage protein belonging to the ferritin family but, unlike the cytosolic ferritin, it has an iron-unrelated restricted tissue expression. FtMt appears to be preferentially expressed in cell types characterized by high metabolic activity and oxygen consumption, suggesting a role in protecting mitochondria from iron-dependent oxidative damage. The human gene (FTMT) is intronless and its promoter region has not been described yet. To analyze the regulatory mechanisms controlling FTMT expression, we characterized the 5' flanking region upstream the transcriptional starting site of FTMT by in silico enquiry of sequences conservation, DNA deletion analysis, and ChIP assay. The data revealed a minimal promoter region and identified the presence of SP1, CREB and YY1 as positive regulators, and GATA2, FoxA1 and C/EBPβ as inhibitors of the transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, the FTMT transcription is increased by acetylating and de-methylating agent treatments in K562 and HeLa cells. These treatments up-regulate FtMt expression even in fibroblasts derived from a Friedreich ataxia patient, where it might exert a beneficial effect against mitochondrial oxidative damage. The expression of FTMT appears regulated by a complex mechanism involving epigenetic events and interplay between transcription factors. PMID:27625068

  18. Translationally controlled tumor protein supplemented chitosan modified glass ionomer cement promotes osteoblast proliferation and function.

    PubMed

    Sangsuwan, Jiraporn; Wanichpakorn, Supreya; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) supplemented in a novel glass ionomer cement (BIO-GIC) on normal human osteoblasts (NHost cells). BIO-GIC was a glass ionomer cement (GIC) modified by adding chitosan and albumin to promote the release of TCTP. NHost cells were seeded on specimens of GIC, GIC+TCTP, BIO-GIC and BIO-GIC+TCTP. Cell proliferation was determined by BrdU assay. It was found that BIO-GIC+TCTP had significantly higher proliferation of cells than other specimens. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and osteopontin (OPN) gene expressions assessed by quantitative real time PCR and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were used to determine cell differentiation. Bone cell function was investigated by calcium deposition using alizarin assay. Both BMP-2 and OPN gene expressions of cells cultured on specimens with added TCTP increased gradually up-regulation after day 1 and reached the highest on day 3 then down-regulation on day 7. The ALP activity of cells cultured on BIO-GIC+TCTP for 7 days and calcium content after 14 days were significantly higher than other groups. BIO-GIC+TCTP can promote osteoblast cells proliferation, differentiation and function. PMID:26046268

  19. A retinoic acid receptor-specific element controls the retinoic acid receptor-beta promoter.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, B; Lehmann, J M; Zhang, X K; Hermann, T; Husmann, M; Graupner, G; Pfahl, M

    1990-11-01

    The morphogen retinoic acid (RA) regulates gene transcription by interacting with specific nuclear receptors that recognize DNA sequences near responsive promoters. While much has recently been learned about the nuclear receptor proteins, little is known about the genes that are directly regulated by RA and their cis-acting response elements recognized by these receptors. Here we have analyzed the RA receptor-beta (RAR beta) gene promoter that is controlled by RA. We find that a RA-responsive element (RARE) is located adjacent to the TATA box. The RARE shows a direct repeat symmetry which is essential for its function. While thyroid hormone-responsive elements can also function as RAR response elements, we show here that this RARE is activated by endogenous RARs and RAR beta, but cannot be regulated by thyroid hormone receptors and other known nuclear receptors. In addition, we find that RAR gamma is a poor activator of this RARE. However, the response element is bound with high affinity by both RAR beta and RAR gamma as well as by thyroid hormone receptors. Thus, interaction between specific response elements and receptors is insufficient for gene activation. PMID:2177841

  20. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuepeng; Bai, Yongyu; Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP. PMID:26895040

  1. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP. PMID:26895040

  2. Inhibitory effect of RNA-mediated knockdown of zinc finger protein 91 pseudogene on pancreatic cancer cell growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiyi; Li, Ning; Hu, Jiong; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, human pancreatic cancer is a rare malignancy with a poor prognosis. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are known to have a crucial role in cancer occurrence and progression; however, the role of pseudogene-expressed lncRNAs, a major type of lncRNA, have not been thoroughly analyzed in cancer. Therefore, the present study focused on zinc finger protein 91 pseudogene (ZFP91-P). ZFP91-P expression was initially detected in two pancreatic cancer cell lines by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and the highest expression of ZFP91-P was found in the BXPC-3-H cell line. Subsequently, BXPC-3-H cells were transfected with ZFP91-P short hairpin RNA (shRNA) using a plasmid vector and termed shZFP91-P. Cells transfected with negative control plasmid vector were termed shCon. MTT and Transwell assays were performed to analyze the proliferation and migration of BXPC-3-H cells, respectively, and western blotting was used to detect epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers, including vimentin and β-catenin. The present study showed that depletion of ZFP91-P markedly decreased pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and inhibited cell migration capacity. In addition, the expression of β-catenin increased while vimentin expression decreased. The current findings suggest that high expression of ZFP91-P promotes the migration of BXPC-3-H cells and may be a novel marker for early diagnosis for pancreatic cancer. PMID:27446435

  3. PHLPP negatively regulates cell motility through inhibition of Akt activity and integrin expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alena J.; Wen, Yang-An; Stevens, Payton D.; Liu, Jingpeng; Wang, Chi; Gao, Tianyan

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is currently the fourth leading cause for cancer-related mortality. Malignant progression of pancreatic cancer depends not only on rapid proliferation of tumor cells but also on increased cell motility. In this study, we showed that increased PHLPP expression significantly reduced the rate of migration in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells whereas knockdown of PHLPP had the opposite effect. In addition, cell motility at the individual cell level was negatively regulated by PHLPP as determined using time-lapse imaging. Interestingly, the expression of β1 and β4 integrin proteins were decreased in PHLPP overexpressing cells and increased in PHLPP knockdown cells whereas the mRNA levels of integrin were not altered by changes in PHLPP expression. In determining the molecular mechanism underlying PHLPP-mediated regulation of integrin expression, we found that inhibition of lysosome activity rescued integrin expression in PHLPP overexpressing cells, thus suggesting that PHLPP negatively controls cell motility by inhibiting Akt activity to promote lysosome-dependent degradation of integrins. Functionally, the increased cell migration observed in PHLPP knockdown cells was effectively blocked by the neutralizing antibodies against β1 or β4 integrin. Taken together, our study identified a tumor suppressor role of PHLPP in suppressing cell motility by negatively regulating integrin expression in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:26760962

  4. Vouchers versus Lotteries: What works best in promoting Chlamydia screening? A cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Niza, Claudia; Rudisill, Caroline; Dolan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In this cluster randomised trial (N=1060), we tested the impact of financial incentives (£5 voucher vs. £200 lottery) framed as a gain or loss to promote Chlamydia screening in students aged 18–24 years, mimicking the standard outreach approach to student in halls of residence. Compared to the control group (1.5%), the lottery increased screening to 2.8% and the voucher increased screening to 22.8%. Incentives framed as gains were marginally more effective (10.5%) that loss-framed incentives (7.1%). This work fundamentally contributes to the literature by testing the predictive validity of Prospect Theory to change health behaviour in the field. PMID:25061507

  5. Vouchers versus Lotteries: What works best in promoting Chlamydia screening? A cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Niza, Claudia; Rudisill, Caroline; Dolan, Paul

    2014-03-01

    In this cluster randomised trial (N=1060), we tested the impact of financial incentives (£5 voucher vs. £200 lottery) framed as a gain or loss to promote Chlamydia screening in students aged 18-24 years, mimicking the standard outreach approach to student in halls of residence. Compared to the control group (1.5%), the lottery increased screening to 2.8% and the voucher increased screening to 22.8%. Incentives framed as gains were marginally more effective (10.5%) that loss-framed incentives (7.1%). This work fundamentally contributes to the literature by testing the predictive validity of Prospect Theory to change health behaviour in the field. PMID:25061507

  6. A natural food sweetener with anti-pancreatic cancer properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Dai, L-H; Dou, D-Q; Ma, L-Q; Sun, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Mogroside V is a triterpenoid isolated from the traditional Chinese medical plant Siraitia grosvenorii. Mogroside V has a high degree of sweetness and a low calorific content. Herein, we found that mogroside V possesses tumor growth inhibitory activity in in vitro and in vivo models of pancreatic cancer by promoting apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 cells), which may in part be mediated through regulating the STAT3 signaling pathway. These results were confirmed in vivo in a mouse xenograft model of pancreatic cancer. In xenograft tumors, Ki-67 and PCNA, the most commonly used markers of tumor cell proliferation, were downregulated after intravenous administration of mogroside V. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays showed that mogroside V treatment promoted apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells in the xenograft tumors. Furthermore, we found that mogroside V treatment significantly reduced the expression of CD31-labeled blood vessels and of the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor in the xenografts, indicating that mogroside V might limit the growth of pancreatic tumors by inhibiting angiogenesis and reducing vascular density. These results therefore demonstrate that the natural, sweet-tasting compound mogroside V can inhibit proliferation and survival of pancreatic cancer cells via targeting multiple biological targets. PMID:27065453

  7. A natural food sweetener with anti-pancreatic cancer properties

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C; Dai, L-H; Dou, D-Q; Ma, L-Q; Sun, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Mogroside V is a triterpenoid isolated from the traditional Chinese medical plant Siraitia grosvenorii. Mogroside V has a high degree of sweetness and a low calorific content. Herein, we found that mogroside V possesses tumor growth inhibitory activity in in vitro and in vivo models of pancreatic cancer by promoting apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 cells), which may in part be mediated through regulating the STAT3 signaling pathway. These results were confirmed in vivo in a mouse xenograft model of pancreatic cancer. In xenograft tumors, Ki-67 and PCNA, the most commonly used markers of tumor cell proliferation, were downregulated after intravenous administration of mogroside V. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays showed that mogroside V treatment promoted apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells in the xenograft tumors. Furthermore, we found that mogroside V treatment significantly reduced the expression of CD31-labeled blood vessels and of the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor in the xenografts, indicating that mogroside V might limit the growth of pancreatic tumors by inhibiting angiogenesis and reducing vascular density. These results therefore demonstrate that the natural, sweet-tasting compound mogroside V can inhibit proliferation and survival of pancreatic cancer cells via targeting multiple biological targets. PMID:27065453

  8. Intra-abdominal hypertension and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mifkovic, A; Skultety, J; Sykora, P; Prochotsky, A; Okolicany, R

    2013-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) contributes to organ dysfunction and leads to the development of the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). IAH and ACS are relatively frequent findings in patiens with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and are associated with deterioration in organ functions. The most affected are cardiovascular, respiratory and renal functions. The incidence of IAH in patients with SAP is approximately 60-80%. There is an accumulating evidence in human and animal studies that changes of perfusion, particularly to the microvasculature, are crucial events in the progression of acute pancreatitis (AP). The perfusion of the small and large intestine is impaired due to reduced arterial pressure, increased vascular resistence and diminished portal blood flow. Bacterial translocation has been described in patients with ACS, and this may apply to patients with SAP. Approximately 30-40% of SAP patients develop ACS because of pancreatic (retroperitoneal) inflammation, peripancreatic tissue edema, formation of fluid collections or abdominal distension. Surgical debridement was the preferred treatment to control necrotizing pancreatitis in the past. However, the management of necrotizing pancreatitis has changed over the last decade. The main objective of this article is to describe the association between IAH and AP and to emphasize this situation in clinical praxis as well (Fig. 1, Ref. 38). PMID:23406186

  9. Stable expression of pertussis toxin in Bordetella bronchiseptica under the control of a tightly regulated promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, A; Staendner, L H; Rohde, M; Piatti, G; Timmis, K N; Guzmán, C A

    1997-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) is an essential component of accellular vaccines against whooping cough. However, the industrial production of PT from Bordetella pertussis is impaired by slow growth and poor yields. To overcome these problems, we have constructed a minitransposon containing the tox operon under the control of a tightly regulated promoter responsive to an aromatic inducer. The expression cassettes have been integrated into the chromosome of Bordetella bronchiseptica 5376 and ATCC 10580 bvg. Five recombinant clones containing the tox operon under the control of the Psal promoter, which is activated by the product of nahR, were further characterized. The recombinant clones expressed PT after only 3 h of induction with sodium salicylate at levels similar to those of B. pertussis grown for 24 h. The stability of the engineered phenotype was 100% after 72 h of growth without selective pressure. The growth pattern was not modified either under noninducing conditions or in the presence of the inducer at low concentrations, suggesting that strain performance would not be affected in bioreactors when uncoupled from gene expression. Recombinant PT, which was localized mainly in the periplasm, was purified by affinity chromatography. The recombinant protein was immunologically indistinguishable from wild-type PT and retained its biological activity as determined by the CHO cell-clustering test. These recombinant clones appear to be useful tools for the cost-effective production of PT under conditions of improved biosafety, as demonstrated by the inducible expression of PT uncoupled from the bacterial biomass in a nonvirulent and fast-growing B. bronchiseptica background. PMID:8979346

  10. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of strategies to promote adherence to tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Volmink, J.; Garner, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of strategies to promote adherence to treatment for tuberculosis. IDENTIFICATION: Searches in Medline (1966 to August 1996), the Cochrane trials register (up to October 1996), and LILACS (Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud) (1982 to September 1996); screening of references in articles on compliance and adherence; contact with experts in research on tuberculosis and adherence. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Randomised or pseudorandomised controlled trials of interventions to promote adherence with curative or preventive treatment for tuberculosis, with at least one measure of adherence. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for estimates of effect for categorical outcomes. RESULTS: Five trials met the inclusion criteria. The relative risk for tested reminder cards sent to patients who defaulted on treatment was 1.2 (95% confidence interval 1.1 to 1.4), for help given to patients by lay health workers 1.4 (1.1 to 1.8), for monetary incentives offered to patients 1.6 (1.3 to 2.0), for health education 1.2 (1.1 to 1.4), for a combination of a patient incentive and health education 2.4 (1.5 to 3.7) or 1.1 (1.0 to 1.2), and for intensive supervision of staff in tuberculosis clinics 1.2 (1.1 to 1.3). There were no completed trials of directly observed treatment. All of the interventions tested improved adherence. On current evidence it is unclear whether health education by itself leads to better adherence to treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Reliable evidence is available to show some specific strategies improve adherence to tuberculosis treatment, and these should be adopted in health systems, depending on their appropriateness to practice circumstances. Further innovations require testing to help find specific approaches that will be useful in low income countries. Randomised controlled trials evaluating the independent effects of directly observed treatment are awaited. PMID:9418086

  11. Management of chronic pancreatitis. Focus on enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Dobrilla, G

    1989-01-01

    The goals of treatment with pancreatic extracts in patients with chronic relapsing pancreatitis are twofold: pain relief and control of maldigestion caused by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Experience with the use of pancreatic enzymes for analgesic purposes suggests that the less severe the pain, the greater the analgesic effect of these enzymes. However, the number of trials, as well as the number of patients treated, is fairly small and more studies in larger patient populations are needed. The use of pancreatic enzymes for maldigestion owing to exocrine pancreatic insufficiency which is secondary to chronic pancreatitis, pancreatectomy, cystic fibrosis, or GI bypass surgery incurs several problems. These problems are primarily caused by gastric inactivation of the enzymes, low enzyme activity of many commercial preparations and/or poor patient compliance. Treatment with conventional enzyme products (powdered extracts, enteric-coated tablets or capsules) has been disappointing. At best, results were inconsistent, showing a high degree of individual variation. The introduction of enzyme preparations in the form of pH-sensitive enteric-coated microspheres in hard gelatin capsules represents a significant advance. These microspheres are superior to conventional enzyme preparations in improving the symptoms of pancreatic insufficiency, particularly steatorrhea, where low doses of microspheres are as effective as large doses of conventional enzyme preparations. Steatorrhea, however, is rarely completely resolved. In cases refractory to therapy, treatment with the combination of pH-sensitive enteric-coated microspheres and H2-antagonists or prostaglandins has met with some success. PMID:2702247

  12. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the abdomen. The surgeon can look at the pancreas and other organs for tumors and take biopsy ... pancreatic cancers appear to be confined to the pancreas at the time they are found. Even then, ...

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... age at the time of diagnosis is 71. Gender Men are slightly more likely to develop pancreatic ... of these syndromes can be found by genetic testing. For more information on genetic testing, see Can ...

  14. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... of immunosuppressive medications?" [ Top ] Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry Data In its 2010 annual report, 1 the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry presented data on 571 patients who received pancreatic islet allo- ...

  15. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  16. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Common symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. However, not every patient with ... help the pancreas to recover. Patients who have abdominal pain can be treated with pain medications. Some patients ...

  17. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... very important to distinguish between exocrine and endocrine cancers of the pancreas. They have distinct risk factors and causes, have ... are by far the most common type of pancreas cancer. If you are told you have pancreatic cancer, ...

  18. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  19. Randomized Controlled Trial of Positive Affect Induction to Promote Physical Activity After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Janey C.; Charlson, Mary E.; Hoffman, Zachary; Wells, Martin T.; Wong, Shing-Chiu; Hollenberg, James P.; Jobe, Jared B.; Boschert, Kathryn A.; Isen, Alice M.; Allegrante, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Within 1 year after percutaneous coronary intervention, more than 20% of patients experience new adverse events. Physical activity confers a 25% reduction in mortality; however, physical activity is widely underused. Thus, there is a need for more powerful behavioral interventions to promote physical activity. Our objective was to motivate patients to achieve an increase in expenditure of 336 kcal/wk or more at 12 months as assessed by the Paffenbarger Physical Activity and Exercise Index. Methods Two hundred forty-two patients were recruited immediately after percutaneous coronary intervention between October 2004 and October 2006. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 groups. The patient education (PE) control group (n=118) (1) received an educational workbook, (2) received a pedometer, and (3) set a behavioral contract for a physical activity goal. The positive affect/self-affirmation (PA) intervention group (n=124) received the 3 PE control components plus (1) a PA workbook chapter, (2) bimonthly induction of PA by telephone, and (3) small mailed gifts. All patients were contacted with standardized bimonthly telephone follow-up for 12 months. Results Attrition was 4.5%, and 2.1% of patients died. Significantly more patients in the PA intervention