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Sample records for control region sequence

  1. Mitochondrial control region sequences from an Egyptian population sample.

    PubMed

    Saunier, Jessica L; Irwin, Jodi A; Strouss, Katharine M; Ragab, Hisham; Sturk, Kimberly A; Parsons, Thomas J

    2009-06-01

    Entire mitochondrial control region data was generated for 277 unrelated Egyptian individuals. High-throughput robotics, a redundant sequencing approach, and several quality control checks were implemented to generate a high-quality database. The data presented here will augment the limited Egyptian mtDNA reference data currently available for forensic comparisons. PMID:19414160

  2. Repetitive sequences in the crocodilian mitochondrial control region: poly-A sequences and heteroplasmic tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Ray, David A; Densmore, Llewellyn D

    2003-06-01

    Heteroplasmic tandem repeats in the mitochondrial control region have been documented in a wide variety of vertebrate species. We have examined the control region from 11 species in the family Crocodylidae and identified two different types of heteroplasmic repetitive sequences in the conserved sequence block (CSB) domain-an extensive poly-A tract that appears to be involved in the formation of secondary structure and a series of tandem repeats located downstream ranging from approximately 50 to approximately 80 bp in length. We describe this portion of the crocodylian control region in detail and focus on members of the family Crocodylidae. We then address the origins of the tandemly repeated sequences in this family and suggest hypotheses to explain possible mechanisms of expansion/contraction of the sequences. We have also examined control region sequences from Alligator and Caiman and offer hypotheses for the origin of tandem repeats found in those taxa. Finally, we present a brief analysis of intraindividual and interindividual haplotype variation by examining representatives of Morelet's crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii). PMID:12716979

  3. Mitochondrial control-region sequence variation in aboriginal Australians.

    PubMed

    van Holst Pellekaan, S; Frommer, M; Sved, J; Boettcher, B

    1998-02-01

    The mitochondrial D-loop hypervariable segment 1 (mt HVS1) between nucleotides 15997 and 16377 has been examined in aboriginal Australian people from the Darling River region of New South Wales (riverine) and from Yuendumu in central Australia (desert). Forty-seven unique HVS1 types were identified, varying at 49 nucleotide positions. Pairwise analysis by calculation of BEPPI (between population proportion index) reveals statistically significant structure in the populations, although some identical HVS1 types are seen in the two contrasting regions. mt HVS1 types may reflect more-ancient distributions than do linguistic diversity and other culturally distinguishing attributes. Comparison with sequences from five published global studies reveals that these Australians demonstrate greatest divergence from some Africans, least from Papua New Guinea highlanders, and only slightly more from some Pacific groups (Indonesian, Asian, Samoan, and coastal Papua New Guinea), although the HVS1 types vary at different nucleotide sites. Construction of a median network, displaying three main groups, suggests that several hypervariable nucleotide sites within the HVS1 are likely to have undergone mutation independently, making phylogenetic comparison with global samples by conventional methods difficult. Specific nucleotide-site variants are major separators in median networks constructed from Australian HVS1 types alone and for one global selection. The distribution of these, requiring extended study, suggests that they may be signatures of different groups of prehistoric colonizers into Australia, for which the time of colonization remains elusive. PMID:9463317

  4. Population variation of human mtDNA control region sequences detected by enzymatic amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Stoneking, M; Hedgecock, D; Higuchi, R G; Vigilant, L; Erlich, H A

    1991-01-01

    A method for detecting sequence variation of hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region was developed. The technique uses hybridization of sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes to DNA sequences that have been amplified by PCR. The nucleotide sequences of the two hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region from 52 individuals were determined; these sequences were then used to define nine regions suitable for SSO typing. A total of 23 SSO probes were used to detect sequence variants at these nine regions in 525 individuals from five ethnic groups (African, Asian, Caucasian, Japanese, and Mexican). The SSO typing revealed an enormous amount of variability, with 274 mtDNA types observed among these 525 individuals and with diversity values, for each population, exceeding .95. For each of the nine mtDNA regions significant differences in the frequencies of sequence variants were observed between these five populations. The mtDNA SSO-typing system was successfully applied to a case involving individual identification of skeletal remains; the probability of a random match was approximately 0.7%. The potential useful applications of this mtDNA SSO-typing system thus include the analysis of individual identity as well as population genetic studies. Images Figure 3 PMID:1990843

  5. Solving a sequencing problem in the vertebrate mitochondrial control region using phylogenetic comparisons.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Julie; Cracraft, Joel

    2004-01-01

    The mitochondrial control region (mtCR) of the bird-of-paradise, Phonygammus keraudrenii, the Trumpet Manucode, contains a unique arrangement of homopolymers and short tandem repeats. Homopolymers occur within a few hundred bases of each other, trapping sequence information between unsequenceable barriers. A comparative strategy, involving other manucode species, allowed the prediction of primer sites in the inaccessible region. The method is suggested for similar sequencing problems. PMID:15621664

  6. Investigation of mtDNA control region sequences in an Egyptian population sample.

    PubMed

    Elmadawy, Mostafa Ali; Nagai, Atsushi; Gomaa, Ghada M; Hegazy, Hanaa M R; Shaaban, Fawzy Eid; Bunai, Yasuo

    2013-11-01

    The sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region were investigated in 101 unrelated individuals living in the northern region of Nile delta (Gharbia, N=55 and Kafrelsheikh, N=46). DNA was extracted from blood stained filter papers or buccal swabs. HV1, HV2 and HV3 were PCR amplified and sequenced; the resulted sequences were aligned and compared with revised Cambridge sequence (rCRS). The results revealed presence of total 93 different haplotypes, 86 of them are unique and 7 are shared haplotypes, the most common haplotype, was observed with a frequency, 2.97% of population sample. High mtDNA diversity was observed with genetic diversity and power of discrimination, 0.9982 and 0.9883, respectively. In this dataset the west Eurasian haplogroups predominated over the African haplogroups. The results would be useful for forensic examinations and human genetic studies. PMID:23910099

  7. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences study in Saraiki population from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Sikandar; Akhtar, Tanveer; Siddiqi, Muhammad Hassan; Rakha, Allah; Haider, Naeem; Tayyab, Muhammad; Abbas, Ghazanfar; Ali, Azam; Bokhari, Syed Yassir Abbas; Tariq, Muhammad Akram; Khan, Fazle Majid

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region was carried in 85 unrelated Sariki individuals living in the different provinces of Pakistan. DNA was extracted from blood preserved in EDTA vacutainers. Hypervariable regions (HV1, HV2 & HV3) were PCR amplified and sequenced. Sequencing results were aligned and compared with revised Cambridge reference sequence (rCRS). The sequencing results showed presence of total 63 different haplotypes, 58 of them are unique and 05 are common haplotypes shared by more than one individual. The most common haplotype observed was (W6) with a frequency 12.9% of population sample. The Saraiki population was detected with genetic diversity (0.9570) and power of discrimination (0.9458). This study will be beneficial for forensic casework. PMID:25465675

  8. Multiple independent transpositions of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, M D; Fleischer, R C

    1996-12-24

    Transpositions of mtDNA sequences to the nuclear genome have been documented in a wide variety of individual taxa, but little is known about their taxonomic frequency or patterns of variation. We provide evidence of nuclear sequences homologous to the mtDNA control region in seven species of diving ducks (tribe Aythyini). Phylogenetic analysis places each nuclear sequence as a close relative of the mtDNA haplotypes of the specie(s) in which it occurs, indicating that they derive from six independent transposition events, all occurring within the last approximately 1.5 million years. Relative-rate tests and comparison of intraspecific variation in nuclear and mtDNA sequences confirm the expectation of a greatly reduced rate of evolution in the nuclear copies. By representing mtDNA haplotypes from ancestral populations, nuclear insertions may be valuable in some phylogenetic analyses, but they also confound the accurate determination of mtDNA sequences. In particular, our data suggest that the presumably nonfunctional but more slowly evolving nuclear sequences often will not be identifiable by changes incompatible with function and may be preferentially amplified by PCR primers based on mtDNA sequences from related taxa. PMID:8986794

  9. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequence variation in migraine headache and cyclic vomiting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingxue; Ito, Masamichi; Adams, Kathleen; Li, B U K; Klopstock, Thomas; Maslim, Audrey; Higashimoto, Tomoyasu; Herzog, Juergen; Boles, Richard G

    2004-11-15

    Migraine headache is a very common condition affecting about 10% of the population that results in substantial morbidity and economic loss. The two most common variants are migraine with (MA) and without (MO) aura. Often considered to be a migraine-like variant, cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a predominately childhood condition characterized by severe, discrete episodes of nausea, vomiting, and lethargy. Disease-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variants are suggested in common migraine and CVS based upon a strong bias towards the maternal inheritance of disease, and several other factors. Temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) followed by cyclosequencing and RFLP was used to screen almost 90% of the mtDNA, including the control region (CR), for heteroplasmy in 62 children with CVS and neuromuscular disease (CVS+) and in 95 control subjects. One or two rare mtDNA-CR heteroplasmic sequence variants were found in six CVS+ and in zero control subjects (P = 0.003). These variants comprised 6 point and 2 length variants in hypervariable regions 1 and 2 (HV1 and HV2, both part of the mtDNA-CR), one half of which were clustered in the nt 16040-16188 segment of HV1 that includes the termination associated sequence (TAS), a functional location important in the regulation of mtDNA replication. Based upon our findings, sequencing and statistical analysis looking for homoplasmic nucleotide changes was performed in HV1 among 30 CVS+, 30 randomly-ascertained CVS (rCVS), 18 MA, 32 MO, and 35 control haplogroup H cases. Within the nt 16040-16188 segment, homoplasmic sequence variants were three-fold more common relative to control subjects in both CVS groups (P = 0.01 combined data) and in MO (P = 0.02), but not in MA (P = 0.5 vs. control subjects and 0.02 vs. MO). No group differences were noted in the remainder of HV1. We conclude that sequence variation in this small "peri-TAS" segment is associated with CVS and MO, but not MA. These variants

  10. Distribution of sequence variation in the mtDNA control region of Native North Americans.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, J G; Smith, D G

    1997-12-01

    The distributions of mtDNA diversity within and/or among North American haplogroups, language groups, and tribes were used to characterize the process of tribalization that followed the colonization of the New World. Approximately 400 bp from the mtDNA control region of 1 Na-Dene and 33 Amerind individuals representing a wide variety of languages and geographic origins were sequenced. With the inclusion of data from previous studies, 225 native North American (284 bp) sequences representing 85 distinct mtDNA lineages were analyzed. Mean pairwise sequence differences between (and within) tribes and language groups were primarily due to differences in the distribution of three of the four major haplogroups that evolved before settlement of the New World. Pairwise sequence differences within each of these three haplogroups were more similar than previous studies based on restriction enzyme analysis have indicated. The mean of pairwise sequence differences between Amerind members of haplogroup A, the most common of the four haplogroups in North America, was only slightly higher than that for the Eskimo, providing no evidence of separate ancestry, but was about two-thirds higher than that for the Na-Dene. However, analysis of pairwise sequence divergence between only tribal-specific lineages, unweighted for sample size, suggests that random evolutionary processes have reduced sequence diversity within the Na-Dene and that members of all three language groups possess approximately equally diverse mtDNA lineages. Comparisons of diversity within and between specific ethnic groups with the largest sample size were also consistent with this outcome. These data are not consistent with the hypothesis that the New World was settled by more than a single migration. Because lineages tended not to cluster by tribe and because lineage sharing among linguistically unrelated groups was restricted to geographically proximate groups, the tribalization process probably did not occur

  11. Rapid evolution of a heteroplasmic repetitive sequence in the mitochondrial DNA control region of carnivores.

    PubMed

    Hoelzel, A R; Lopez, J V; Dover, G A; O'Brien, S J

    1994-08-01

    We describe a repetitive DNA region at the 3' end of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and compare it in 21 carnivore species representing eight carnivore families. The sequence and organization of the repetitive motifs can differ extensively between arrays; however, all motifs appear to be derived from the core motif "ACGT." Sequence data and Southern blot analysis demonstrate extensive heteroplasmy. The general form of the array is similar between heteroplasmic variants within an individual and between individuals within a species (varying primarily in the length of the array, though two clones from the northern elephant seal are exceptional). Within certain families, notably ursids, the array structure is also similar between species. Similarity between species was not apparent in other carnivore families, such as the mustelids, suggesting rapid changes in the organization and sequence of some arrays. The pattern of change seen within and between species suggests that a dominant mechanism involved in the evolution of these arrays is DNA slippage. A comparative analysis shows that the motifs that are being reiterated or deleted vary within and between arrays, suggesting a varying rate of DNA turnover. We discuss the evolutionary implications of the observed patterns of variation and extreme levels of heteroplasmy. PMID:7932782

  12. Sequence polymorphism of the mitochondrial DNA control region in the population of Vojvodina Province, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Zgonjanin, Dragana; Veselinović, Igor; Kubat, Milovan; Furac, Ivana; Antov, Mirjana; Loncar, Eva; Tasić, Milos; Vuković, Radenko; Omorjan, Radovan

    2010-03-01

    In order to generate and establish the database for forensic identification purposes in Vojvodina Province (Serbia), the sequence of the hypervariable regions 1 (HV1) and 2 (HV2) of the mtDNA control region were determined in a population of 104 unrelated individuals from Vojvodina Province, using a fluorescent-based capillary electrophoresis sequencing method. A total of 93 different haplotypes were found, of these 83 mtDNA types were unique, nine haplotypes were shared by two individuals and one haplotype by three individuals. The variation of mtDNA HV1 and HV2 regions was confined to 116 nucleotide positions, of which 72 were observed in the HV1 and 44 in the HV2. A statistical estimate of the results for this population showed the genetic diversity of 0.9977 and the random match probability of 1.18%. Haplogroup H was the most common haplogroup (43.3%). Haplogroups observed at intermediate levels included clusters U (13.5%), T (10.6%), J (8.6%) and W (5.8%). PMID:19962932

  13. Genetic structure of Florida green turtle rookeries as indicated by mitochondrial DNA control region sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shamblin, Brian M.; Bagley, Dean A.; Ehrhart, Llewellyn M.; Desjardin, Nicole A.; Martin, R. Erik; Hart, Kristen M.; Naro-Maciel, Eugenia; Rusenko, Kirt; Stiner, John C.; Sobel, Debra; Johnson, Chris; Wilmers, Thomas; Wright, Laura J.; Nairn, Campbell J.

    2014-01-01

    Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) nesting has increased dramatically in Florida over the past two decades, ranking the Florida nesting aggregation among the largest in the Greater Caribbean region. Individual beaches that comprise several hundred kilometers of Florida’s east coast and Keys support tens to thousands of nests annually. These beaches encompass natural to highly developed habitats, and the degree of demographic partitioning among rookeries was previously unresolved. We characterized the genetic structure of ten Florida rookeries from Cape Canaveral to the Dry Tortugas through analysis of 817 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 485 nesting turtles. Two common haplotypes, CM-A1.1 and CM-A3.1, accounted for 87 % of samples, and the haplotype frequencies were strongly partitioned by latitude along Florida’s Atlantic coast. Most genetic structure occurred between rookeries on either side of an apparent genetic break in the vicinity of the St. Lucie Inlet that separates Hutchinson Island and Jupiter Island, representing the finest scale at which mtDNA structure has been documented in marine turtle rookeries. Florida and Caribbean scale analyses of population structure support recognition of at least two management units: central eastern Florida and southern Florida. More thorough sampling and deeper sequencing are necessary to better characterize connectivity among Florida green turtle rookeries as well as between the Florida nesting aggregation and others in the Greater Caribbean region.

  14. Control region sequences indicate that multiple externae represent multiple infections by Sacculina carcini (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala).

    PubMed

    Rees, David; Glenner, Henrik

    2014-08-01

    The rhizocephalan barnacle, Sacculina carcini, is a common parasite of the European shore crab, Carcinus maenas, in which it causes significant detrimental physical and behavioral modifications. In the vast majority of cases, the external portion of the parasite is present in the form of a single sac-like externa; in rare cases, double or even triple externae may occur on the same individual host. Here, we use a highly variable DNA marker, the mitochondrial control region (CR), to investigate whether multiple externae in S. carcini represent infection by multiple parasites or asexual cloning developed by a single parasite individual. Sequences for multiple externae from C. maenas hosts from the Danish inlet, Limfjorden, and from the mud flates at Roscoff, France, were compared. In almost all cases, double or triple externae from an individual host yielded different haplotypes. In the few cases where identical haplotypes were identified from externae on a multiple-infected host, this always represented the most commonly found haplotype in the population. This indicates that in Sacculina carcini, the presence of multiple externae on a single host reflects infection by different individual parasites. A haplotype network of CR sequences also suggests a degree of geographical partitioning, with no shared haplotypes between the Limfjorden and Roscoff. Our data represent the first complete CR sequences for a rhizocephalan, and a unique gene order was also revealed. Although the utility of CR sequences for population-level work must be investigated further, the CR has proved a simple to use and highly variable marker for studies of S. carcini and can easily be applied to a variety of studies in this important parasite. PMID:25473481

  15. Variability of the human mitochondrial DNA control region sequences in the Lithuanian population.

    PubMed

    Kasperaviciūte, Dalia; Kucinskas, Vaidutis

    2002-01-01

    The Lithuanians and Latvians are the only two Baltic cultures that survived until today. Since the Neolithic period the native inhabitants of the present-day Lithuanian territory have not been replaced by any other ethnic group. Therefore the genetic characterization of the present-day Lithuanians may shed some light on the early history of the Balts. We have analysed 120 DNA samples from two Lithuanian ethnolinguistic groups (Aukstaiciai and Zemaiciai) by direct sequencing of the first hypervariable segment (HVI) of the control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and restriction enzyme digestion for polymorphic site 00073. On the basis of specific nucleotide substitutions the obtained sequences were classified to mtDNA haplogroups. This revealed the presence of almost all European haplogroups (except X) in the Lithuanian sample, including those that expanded through Europe in the Palaeolithic and those whose expansion occurred during the Neolithic. Molecular diversity indices (gene diversity 0.97, nucleotide diversity 0.012 and mean number of pairwise differences 4.5) were within the range usually reported in European populations. No significant differences between Aukstaiciai and Zemaiciai subgroups were found, but some slight differences need further investigation. PMID:12080181

  16. Haplogroup Classification of Korean Cattle Breeds Based on Sequence Variations of mtDNA Control Region.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Seong-Su; Kim, Seung Chang; Choi, Seong-Bok; Kim, Su-Hyun; Lee, Chang Woo; Jung, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Eun Sung; Choi, Young-Sun; Kim, Sung-Bok; Kim, Woo Hyun; Cho, Chang-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Many studies have reported the frequency and distribution of haplogroups among various cattle breeds for verification of their origins and genetic diversity. In this study, 318 complete sequences of the mtDNA control region from four Korean cattle breeds were used for haplogroup classification. 71 polymorphic sites and 66 haplotypes were found in these sequences. Consistent with the genetic patterns in previous reports, four haplogroups (T1, T2, T3, and T4) were identified in Korean cattle breeds. In addition, T1a, T3a, and T3b sub-haplogroups were classified. In the phylogenetic tree, each haplogroup formed an independent cluster. The frequencies of T3, T4, T1 (containing T1a), and T2 were 66%, 16%, 10%, and 8%, respectively. Especially, the T1 haplogroup contained only one haplotype and a sample. All four haplogroups were found in Chikso, Jeju black and Hanwoo. However, only the T3 and T4 haplogroups appeared in Heugu, and most Chikso populations showed a partial of four haplogroups. These results will be useful for stable conservation and efficient management of Korean cattle breeds. PMID:26954229

  17. Haplogroup Classification of Korean Cattle Breeds Based on Sequence Variations of mtDNA Control Region

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Seong-Su; Kim, Seung Chang; Choi, Seong-Bok; Kim, Su-Hyun; Lee, Chang Woo; Jung, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Eun Sung; Choi, Young-Sun; Kim, Sung-Bok; Kim, Woo Hyun; Cho, Chang-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have reported the frequency and distribution of haplogroups among various cattle breeds for verification of their origins and genetic diversity. In this study, 318 complete sequences of the mtDNA control region from four Korean cattle breeds were used for haplogroup classification. 71 polymorphic sites and 66 haplotypes were found in these sequences. Consistent with the genetic patterns in previous reports, four haplogroups (T1, T2, T3, and T4) were identified in Korean cattle breeds. In addition, T1a, T3a, and T3b sub-haplogroups were classified. In the phylogenetic tree, each haplogroup formed an independent cluster. The frequencies of T3, T4, T1 (containing T1a), and T2 were 66%, 16%, 10%, and 8%, respectively. Especially, the T1 haplogroup contained only one haplotype and a sample. All four haplogroups were found in Chikso, Jeju black and Hanwoo. However, only the T3 and T4 haplogroups appeared in Heugu, and most Chikso populations showed a partial of four haplogroups. These results will be useful for stable conservation and efficient management of Korean cattle breeds. PMID:26954229

  18. Complete mitochondrial control region sequences indicate a distinct variety of brown trout Salmo trutta in the Aral Sea.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, A M; Bright, D; Stevens, J R

    2009-04-01

    Complete sequencing of the mtDNA control region (CR) from five specimens of brown trout Salmo trutta from the Amu Darya River identified two novel haplotypes belonging to the Danubian lineage. This finding supports the long-standing hypothesis that brown trout in the Aral Sea represent a distinct genetic stock and also illustrates the benefits that complete sequencing of the CR can provide for elucidating phylogeographic relationships. PMID:20735624

  19. Investigation of mtDNA control region sequences in a Tibetan population sample from China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Ke; Yao, Jun; Han, Xuan; Ding, Mei; Pang, Hao; Wang, Bao-Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial hypervariable region sequences including HVI and HVII (15,751-520) were investigated from 174 unrelated Tibetan individuals living in Tibet Autonomous Region in People's Republic of China. The resulted sequences were aligned and compared with revised Cambridge sequence (rCRS). This sequence variability rendered a high gene diversity value (0.9940 ± 0.0021) and a high random match probability (0.0118) was determined with PIC of 0.9882. Among a total of 174 samples, 217 polymorphic sites were identified, which defined 135 haplotypes. A total of 135 different haplotypes were detected, 113 of them were unique and 22 were shared. The most common haplogroup was M9a1a1c1b1 (16.09%), followed by A11 (6.32%), A (5.17%), R (4.60%), A15 (4.60%), and G3a1 (3.45). The proportions of macro-haplogroups M, N, and L were 54.60%, 42.53%, and 2.87%, respectively. By principal component analysis (PCA), there was no special cluster between Tibetans and other populations except that the structure of Tibetans closely resembled that of Uygur in component 2. PMID:25423521

  20. Optimization of human mtDNA control region sequencing for forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Bourdon, Véronique; Ng, Carolyn; Harris, Jessica; Prinz, Mechthild; Shapiro, Eli

    2014-07-01

    Sequencing mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions I and II (HVI and HVII) is useful in forensic missing person and unidentified remains cases. Improvements in ease and sensitivity of testing will yield results from more samples in a timely fashion. Routinely, amplification of HVI and HVII is followed by Sanger sequencing using the BigDye(®) Terminator v3.1 Cycle Sequencing kit (Applied Biosystems) using 4 μL of ready reaction mix (RRM). Each sequencing reaction is then purified through column filtration before capillary electrophoresis. Using lower amounts of RRM (2 μL or 1 μL) and purification using BigDye(®) XTerminator(™) (Applied Biosystems) instead of columns showed no loss of sequence length and increased the quality and the sensitivity of testing, allowing HVI and HVII typing from mitochondrial genome equivalent to 125 fg of nuclear DNA, or 100 pg of HVI/HVII amplicons. Using this methodology, testing can be completed in 1 day, and the cost of testing is reduced. PMID:24666098

  1. Controlled processing during sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Thothathiri, Malathi; Rattinger, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Longstanding evidence has identified a role for the frontal cortex in sequencing within both linguistic and non-linguistic domains. More recently, neuropsychological studies have suggested a specific role for the left premotor-prefrontal junction (BA 44/6) in selection between competing alternatives during sequencing. In this study, we used neuroimaging with healthy adults to confirm and extend knowledge about the neural correlates of sequencing. Participants reproduced visually presented sequences of syllables and words using manual button presses. Items in the sequence were presented either consecutively or concurrently. Concurrent presentation is known to trigger the planning of multiple responses, which might compete with one another. Therefore, we hypothesized that regions involved in controlled processing would show greater recruitment during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. Whole-brain analysis showed concurrent > consecutive activation in sensory, motor and somatosensory cortices and notably also in rostral-dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Region of interest analyses showed increased activation within left BA 44/6 and correlation between this region’s activation and behavioral response times. Functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity between left BA 44/6 and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. These results corroborate recent evidence and demonstrate the involvement of BA 44/6 and other control regions when ordering co-activated representations. PMID:26578941

  2. Massively parallel sequencing of the entire control region and targeted coding region SNPs of degraded mtDNA using a simplified library preparation method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Hwan Young; Oh, Se Yoon; Jung, Sang-Eun; Yang, In Seok; Lee, Yang-Han; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to forensic genetics is being explored by an increasing number of laboratories because of the potential of high-throughput sequencing for recovering genetic information from multiple markers and multiple individuals in a single run. A cumbersome and technically challenging library construction process is required for NGS. In this study, we propose a simplified library preparation method for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis that involves two rounds of PCR amplification. In the first-round of multiplex PCR, six fragments covering the entire mtDNA control region and 22 fragments covering interspersed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding region that can be used to determine global haplogroups and East Asian haplogroups were amplified using template-specific primers with read sequences. In the following step, indices and platform-specific sequences for the MiSeq(®) system (Illumina) were added by PCR. The barcoded library produced using this simplified workflow was successfully sequenced on the MiSeq system using the MiSeq Reagent Nano Kit v2. A total of 0.4 GB of sequences, 80.6% with base quality of >Q30, were obtained from 12 degraded DNA samples and mapped to the revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS). A relatively even read count was obtained for all amplicons, with an average coverage of 5200 × and a less than three-fold read count difference between amplicons per sample. Control region sequences were successfully determined, and all samples were assigned to the relevant haplogroups. In addition, enhanced discrimination was observed by adding coding region SNPs to the control region in in silico analysis. Because the developed multiplex PCR system amplifies small-sized amplicons (<250 bp), NGS analysis using the library preparation method described here allows mtDNA analysis using highly degraded DNA samples. PMID:26844917

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the tubeworm Lamellibrachia satsuma and structural conservation in the mitochondrial genome control regions of Order Sabellida.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ajit Kumar; Kwon, Yong Min; Kang, Sung Gyun; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The control region of the mitochondrial genomes shows high variation in conserved sequence organizations, which follow distinct evolutionary patterns in different species or taxa. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Lamellibrachia satsuma from the cold-seep region of Kagoshima Bay, as a part of whole genome study and extensively studied the structural features and patterns of the control region sequences. We obtained 15,037 bp of mitochondrial genome using Illumina sequencing and identified the non-coding AT-rich region or control region (354 bp, AT=83.9%) located between trnH and trnR. We found 7 conserved sequence blocks (CSB), scattered throughout the control region of L. satsuma and other taxa of Annelida. The poly-TA stretches, which commonly form the stem of multiple stem-loop structures, are most conserved in the CSB-I and CSB-II regions. The mitochondrial genome of L. satsuma encodes a unique repetitive sequence in the control region, which forms a unique secondary structure in comparison to Lamellibrachia luymesi. Phylogenetic analyses of all protein-coding genes indicate that L. satsuma forms a monophyletic clade with L. luymesi along with other tubeworms found in cold-seep regions (genera: Lamellibrachia, Escarpia, and Seepiophila). In general, the control region sequences of Annelida could be aligned with certainty within each genus, and to some extent within the family, but with a higher rate of variation in conserved regions. PMID:26776396

  4. Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, Evan

    2009-05-28

    Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 1 of 2

  5. Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, Evan

    2009-05-28

    Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 2 of 2

  6. [Polymorphism and Genetic Structure of Microtus maximowiczii (Schrenck, 1858) (Rodentia, Cricetidae) from the Middle Amur River Region as Inferred from Sequencing of the mtDNA Control Region].

    PubMed

    Sheremetyeva, I N; Kartavtseva, I V; Frisman, L V; Vasil'eva, T V; Adnagulova, A V

    2015-10-01

    The genetic variability of the mitochondrial DNA control region sequences was estimated for the Maximowicz's vole Microtus maximowiczii from the Middle Amur River region located between the confluence of Amur River with Ussuri River and Zeya River. The species as a whole was characterized by a high level of genetic variability. For each individual sample, low nucleotide diversity was observed, except for two samples in which a more than twofold increase in this index was revealed. The presence of the contact zone of two genetically distinct populations in the area between Bira and Bidzhan rivers is suggested. PMID:27169230

  7. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial DNA control region of ciscoes (genus Coregonus): Taxonomic implications for the Great Lakes species flock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Kent M.; Dorschner, Michael O.; Todd, Thomas N.; Phillips, Ruth B.

    1998-01-01

    Sequence variation in the control region (D-loop) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was examined to assess the genetic distinctiveness of the shortjaw cisco (Coregonus zenithicus). Individuals from within the Great Lakes Basin as well as inland lakes outside the basin were sampled. DNA fragments containing the entire D-loop were amplified by PCR from specimens ofC. zenithicus and the related species C. artedi, C. hoyi, C. kiyi, and C. clupeaformis. DNA sequence analysis revealed high similarity within and among species and shared polymorphism for length variants. Based on this analysis, the shortjaw cisco is not genetically distinct from other cisco species.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences in Koreans: identification of useful variable sites and phylogenetic analysis for mtDNA data quality control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; Yoo, Ji-Eun; Park, Myung Jin; Chung, Ukhee; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2006-01-01

    We have established a high-quality mtDNA control region sequence database for Koreans. To identify polymorphic sites and to determine their frequencies and haplotype frequencies, the complete mtDNA control region was sequenced in 593 Koreans, and major length variants of poly-cytosine tracts in HV2 and HV3 were determined in length heteroplasmic individuals by PCR analysis using fluorescence-labeled primers. Sequence comparison showed that 494 haplotypes defined by 285 variable sites were found when the major poly-cytosine tract genotypes were considered in distinguishing haplotypes, whereas 441 haplotypes were found when the poly-cytosine tracts were ignored. Statistical parameters indicated that analysis of partial mtDNA control region which encompasses the extended regions of HV1 and HV2, CA dinucleotide repeats in HV3 and nucleotide position 16497, 16519, 456, 489 and 499 (HV1ex+HV2ex+HV3CA+5SNPs) and the analysis of another partial mtDNA control region including extended regions of HV1 and HV2, HV3 region and nucleotide position 16497 and 16519 (HV1ex+HV2ex+HV3+2SNPs) can be used as efficient alternatives for the analysis of the entire mtDNA control region in Koreans. Also, we collated the basic informative SNPs, suggested the important mutation motifs for the assignment of East Asian haplogroups, and classified 592 Korean mtDNAs (99.8%) into various East Asian haplogroups or sub-haplogroups. Haplogroup-directed database comparisons confirmed the absence of any major systematic errors in our data, e.g., a mix-up of site designations, base shifts or mistypings. PMID:16177905

  9. The H19 Imprinting Control Region Mediates Preimplantation Imprinted Methylation of Nearby Sequences in Yeast Artificial Chromosome Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Eiichi; Matsuzaki, Hitomi; Sakaguchi, Ryuuta; Takahashi, Takuya; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse Igf2/H19 imprinted locus, differential methylation of the imprinting control region (H19 ICR) is established during spermatogenesis and is maintained in offspring throughout development. Previously, however, we observed that the paternal H19 ICR, when analyzed in yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice (YAC-TgM), was preferentially methylated only after fertilization. To identify the DNA sequences that confer methylation imprinting, we divided the H19 ICR into two fragments (1.7 and 1.2 kb), ligated them to both ends of a λ DNA fragment into which CTCF binding sites had been inserted, and analyzed this in YAC-TgM. The maternally inherited λ sequence, normally methylated after implantation in the absence of H19 ICR sequences, became hypomethylated, demonstrating protective activity against methylation within the ICR. Meanwhile, the paternally inherited λ sequence was hypermethylated before implantation only when a 1.7-kb fragment was ligated. Consistently, when two subfragments of the H19 ICR were individually investigated for their activities in YAC-TgM, only the 1.7-kb fragment was capable of introducing paternal allele-specific DNA methylation. These results show that postfertilization methylation imprinting is conferred by a paternal allele-specific methylation activity present in a 1.7-kb DNA fragment of the H19 ICR, while maternal allele-specific activities protect the allele from de novo DNA methylation. PMID:23230275

  10. Minding the gap: Frequency of indels in mtDNA control region sequence data and influence on population genetic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Insertions and deletions (indels) result in sequences of various lengths when homologous gene regions are compared among individuals or species. Although indels are typically phylogenetically informative, occurrence and incorporation of these characters as gaps in intraspecific population genetic data sets are rarely discussed. Moreover, the impact of gaps on estimates of fixation indices, such as FST, has not been reviewed. Here, I summarize the occurrence and population genetic signal of indels among 60 published studies that involved alignments of multiple sequences from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of vertebrate taxa. Among 30 studies observing indels, an average of 12% of both variable and parsimony-informative sites were composed of these sites. There was no consistent trend between levels of population differentiation and the number of gap characters in a data block. Across all studies, the average influence on estimates of ??ST was small, explaining only an additional 1.8% of among population variance (range 0.0-8.0%). Studies most likely to observe an increase in ??ST with the inclusion of gap characters were those with < 20 variable sites, but a near equal number of studies with few variable sites did not show an increase. In contrast to studies at interspecific levels, the influence of indels for intraspecific population genetic analyses of control region DNA appears small, dependent upon total number of variable sites in the data block, and related to species-specific characteristics and the spatial distribution of mtDNA lineages that contain indels. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Irritable Bowel Syndrome may be associated with maternal inheritance and mitochondrial DNA control region sequence variants

    PubMed Central

    van Tilburg, Miranda A.L.; Zaki, Essam A.; Venkatesan, Thangam; Boles, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in various functional disorders that are co-morbid to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) such as migraine, depression and chronic fatigue syndrome. The aim of the current case-control pilot study was to determine if functional symptoms in IBS show a maternal inheritance bias, and if the degree of this maternal inheritance is related to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms. Methods Pedigrees were obtained from N=308 adult IBS patients, N=102 healthy controls, and N=36 controls with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), all from Caucasian heritage, to determine probable maternal inheritance. Two mtDNA polymorphisms (16519T and 3010A), which have previously been implicated in other functional disorders, were assayed in mtDNA haplogroup H IBS subjects and compared to genetic data from N=344 published haplogroup H controls. Results Probable Maternal Inheritance was found in 17.5% IBS, 2% healthy controls and 0% IBD controls (p < 0.0001). No difference was found between IBS and control for 3010A, and a trend was found for 16519T (p=.05). IBS with maternal inheritance were significantly more likely to have the 16519T than controls (OR=5.8; 95%CI=1.5–23.1) or IBS without maternal inheritance (OR=5.2; 95%CI=1.2–22.6). Conclusions This small pilot study shows that a significant minority (1/6) of IBS patients have pedigrees suggestive of maternal inheritance. The mtDNA polymorphism 16519T, which has been previously implicated in other functional disorders, is also associated with IBS patients who display maternal inheritance. These findings suggest that mtDNA-related mitochondrial dysfunction may constitute a sub-group within IBS. Future replication studies in larger samples are needed. PMID:24500451

  12. [Genetic variation of Manchurian pheasant (Phasianus colchicus pallasi Rotshild, 1903) inferred from mitochondrial DNA control region sequences].

    PubMed

    Kozyrenko, M M; Fisenko, P V; Zhuravlev, Iu N

    2009-04-01

    Sequence variation of the mitochondrial DNA control region was studied in Manchurian pheasants (Phasianus colchicus pallasi Rotshild, 1903) representing three geographic populations from the southern part of the Russian Far East. Extremely low population genetic differentiation (F(ST) = 0.0003) pointed to a very high gene exchange between the populations. Combination of such characters as high haplotype diversity (0.884 to 0.913), low nucleotide diversity (0.0016 to 0.0022), low R2 values (0.1235 to 0.1337), certain patterns of pairwise-difference distributions, and the absence of phylogenetic structure suggested that the phylogenetic history of Ph. C. pallasi included passing through a bottleneck with further expansion in the postglacial period. According to the data obtained, it was suggested that differentiation between the mitochondrial lineages started approximately 100 000 years ago. PMID:19507706

  13. Constraining controls on carbonate sequences with high-resolution chronostratigraphy: Upper Miocene, Cabo de Gata region, SE Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, P.; Farr, M.R.; Franseen, E.K.; Goldstein, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    A high-resolution chronostratigraphy has been developed for Miocene shallow-water carbonate strata in the Cabo de Gata region of SE Spain for evaluation of local, regional and global factors that controlled platform architecture prior to and during the Messinian salinity crisis. Paleomagnetic data were collected from strata at three localities. Mean natural remanent magnetization (NRM) ranges between 1.53 ?? 10-8 and 5.2 ?? 10-3 Am2/kg. Incremental thermal and alternating field demagnetization isolated the characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM). Rock magnetic studies show that the dominant magnetic mineral is magnetite, but mixtures of magnetite and hematite occur. A composite chronostratigraphy was derived from five stratigraphic sections. Regional stratigraphic data, biostratigraphic data, and an 40Ar/39Ar date of 8.5 ?? 0.1 Ma, for an interbedded volcanic flow, place the strata in geomagnetic polarity Chrons C4r to C3r. Sequence-stratigraphic and diagenetic evidence indicate a major unconformity at the base of depositional sequence (DS)3 that contains a prograding reef complex, suggesting that approximately 250 000 yr of record (Subchrons C3Br.2r to 3Br.1r) are missing near the Messinian-Tortonian boundary. Correlation to the GPTS shows that the studied strata represent five third- to fourth-order DSs. Basal units are temperate to subtropical ramps (DS1A, DS1B, DS2); these are overlain by subtropical to tropical reefal platforms (DS3), which are capped by subtropical to tropical cyclic carbonates (Terminal Carbonate Complex, TCC). Correlation of the Cabo de Gata record to the Melilla area of Morocco, and the Sorbas basin of Spain indicate that early - Late Tortonian ramp strata from these areas are partially time-equivalent. Similar strata are extensively developed in the Western Mediterranean and likely were influenced by a cool climate or influx of nutrients during an overall rise in global sea-level. After ramp deposition, a sequence boundary (SB3) in

  14. Analyses of nuclear ldhA gene and mtDNA control region sequences of Atlantic northern bluefin tuna populations.

    PubMed

    Ely, B; Stoner, D S; Bremer, Alvarado J R; Dean, J M; Addis, P; Cau, A; Thelen, E J; Jones, W J; Black, D E; Smith, L; Scott, K; Naseri, I; Quattro, J M

    2002-12-01

    There has been considerable debate about whether the Atlantic northern bluefin tuna exist as a single panmictic unit. We have addressed this issue by examining both mitochondrial DNA control region nucleotide sequences and nuclear gene ldhA allele frequencies in replicate size or year class samples of northern bluefin tuna from the Mediterranean Sea and the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Pairwise comparisons of multiple year class samples from the 2 regions provided no evidence for population subdivision. Similarly, analyses of molecular variance of both mitochondrial and ldhA data revealed no significant differences among or between samples from the 2 regions. These results demonstrate the importance of analyzing multiple year classes and large sample sizes to obtain accurate estimates when using allele frequencies to characterize a population. It is important to note that the absence of genetic evidence for population substructure does not unilaterally constitute evidence of a single panmictic population, as genetic differentiation can be prevented by large population sizes and by migration. PMID:14961233

  15. The Phylogeographical Pattern and Conservation of the Chinese Cobra (Naja atra) across Its Range Based on Mitochondrial Control Region Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Long-Hui; Hua, Lei; Qu, Yan-Fu; Gao, Jian-Fang; Ji, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The vulnerable Chinese cobra (Naja atra) ranges from southeastern China south of the Yangtze River to northern Vietnam and Laos. Large mountain ranges and water bodies may influence the pattern of genetic diversity of this species. We sequenced the mitochondrial DNA control region (1029 bp) using 285 individuals collected from 23 localities across the species' range and obtained 18 sequences unique to Taiwan from GenBank for phylogenetic and population analysis. Two distinct clades were identified, one including haplotypes from the two westernmost localities (Hekou and Miyi) and the other including haplotypes from all sampling sites except Miyi. A strong population structure was found (Φst = 0.76, P<0.0001) with high haplotype diversity (h = 1.00) and low nucleotide diversity (π = 0.0049). The Luoxiao and Nanling Mountains act as historical geographical barriers limiting gene exchange. In the haplotype network there were two “star” clusters. Haplotypes from populations east of the Luoxiao Mountains were represented within one cluster and haplotypes from populations west of the mountain range within the other, with haplotypes from populations south of the Nanling Mountains in between. Lineage sorting between mainland and island populations is incomplete. It remains unknown as to how much adaptive differentiation there is between population groups or within each group. We caution against long-distance transfers within any group, especially when environmental differences are apparent. PMID:25184236

  16. Population genetic diversity of the northern snakehead (Channa argus) in China based on the mitochondrial DNA control region and adjacent regions sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aiguo; Zhuo, Xiaolei; Zou, Qing; Chen, Jintao; Zou, Jixing

    2015-06-01

    Genetic variation and population structure of northern snakehead (Channa argus) from eight locations in China were investigated using mitochondrial DNA control region and adjacent regions sequences. Sequence analysis showed that there were 105 haplotypes in 260 individuals, 48 unique haplotypes and 57 shared haplotypes, but no common haplotype shared by all populations. As a whole, the haplotype diversity was high (h=0.989), while the nucleotide diversity was low (π=0.00482). AMOVA analysis detected significant genetic differentiation among all eight populations (FST=0.328, p<0.01) and 66.17% of the total variance was resulted from intra-population differentiation. UPGMA analysis indicated that the eight populations could be divided into four major clusters, which was consistent with that the eight sampled locations were belonged to four isolated river systems. The neutrality and mismatch distribution tests suggested that the eight populations of C. argus in the sampling locations underwent recent population expansion. Among the eight populations, the Erhai Lake population may represent a unique genetic resource and therefore needs to be conserved. PMID:24724976

  17. Genetic relationships among some subspecies of the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus L.), inferred from mitochondrial DNA control-region sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Clayton M.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Sage, George K.; Anderson, Clifford; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to successfully colonize and persist in diverse environments likely requires broad morphological and behavioral plasticity and adaptability, and this may partly explain why the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) exhibits a large range of morphological characteristics across their global distribution. Regional and local differences within Peregrine Falcons were sufficiently variable that ∼75 subspecies have been described; many were subsumed, and currently 19 are generally recognized. We used sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial genome to test for concordance between genetic structure and representatives of 12 current subspecies and from two areas where subspecies distributions overlap. Haplotypes were broadly shared among subspecies, and all geographic locales shared a widely distributed common haplotype (FalconCR2). Haplotypes were distributed in a star-like phylogeny, consistent with rapid expansion of a recently derived species, with observed genetic patterns congruent with incomplete lineage sorting and/or differential rates of evolution on morphology and neutral genetic characters. Hierarchical analyses of molecular variance did not uncover genetic partitioning at the continental level, despite strong population-level structure (FST = 0.228). Similar analyses found weak partitioning, albeit significant, among subspecies (FCT = 0.138). All reconstructions placed the hierofalcons' (Gyrfalcon [F. rusticolus] and Saker Falcon [F. cherrug]) haplotypes in a well-supported clade either basal or unresolved with respect to the Peregrine Falcon. In addition, haplotypes representing Taita Falcon (F. fasciinucha) were placed within the Peregrine Falcon clade.

  18. Inferring Invasion History of Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in China from Mitochondrial Control Region and Nuclear Intron Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhe; Guo, Xianwu; Chen, Liping; Bai, Xiaohui; Wei, Xinlan; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Huang, Songqian; Wang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the dispersal pathways of an invasive species is useful for adopting the appropriate strategies to prevent and control its spread. However, these processes are exceedingly complex. So, it is necessary to apply new technology and collect representative samples for analysis. This study used Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) in combination with traditional genetic tools to examine extensive sample data and historical records to infer the invasion history of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, in China. The sequences of the mitochondrial control region and the proPOx intron in the nuclear genome of samples from 37 sites (35 in China and one each in Japan and the USA) were analyzed. The results of combined scenarios testing and historical records revealed a much more complex invasion history in China than previously believed. P. clarkii was most likely originally introduced into China from Japan from an unsampled source, and the species then expanded its range primarily into the middle and lower reaches and, to a lesser extent, into the upper reaches of the Changjiang River in China. No transfer was observed from the upper reaches to the middle and lower reaches of the Changjiang River. Human-mediated jump dispersal was an important dispersal pathway for P. clarkii. The results provide a better understanding of the evolutionary scenarios involved in the rapid invasion of P. clarkii in China. PMID:26132567

  19. The emerging tree of West Eurasian mtDNAs: a synthesis of control-region sequences and RFLPs.

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, V; Richards, M; Hickey, E; Vega, E; Cruciani, F; Guida, V; Scozzari, R; Bonné-Tamir, B; Sykes, B; Torroni, A

    1999-01-01

    Variation in the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is now routinely described and used to infer the histories of peoples, by means of one of two procedures, namely, the assaying of RFLPs throughout the genome and the sequencing of parts of the control region (CR). Using 95 samples from the Near East and northwest Caucasus, we present an analysis based on both systems, demonstrate their concordance, and, using additional available information, present the most refined phylogeny to date of west Eurasian mtDNA. We describe and apply a nomenclature for mtDNA clusters. Hypervariable nucleotides are identified, and the relative mutation rates of the two systems are evaluated. We point out where ambiguities remain. The identification of signature mutations for each cluster leads us to apply a hierarchical scheme for determining the cluster composition of a sample of Berber speakers, previously analyzed only for CR variation. We show that the main indigenous North African cluster is a sister group to the most ancient cluster of European mtDNAs, from which it diverged approximately 50,000 years ago. PMID:9915963

  20. Inferring the phylogeny of disjunct populations of the azure-winged magpie Cyanopica cyanus from mitochondrial control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Fok, Koon Wah; Wade, Christopher M; Parkin, David T

    2002-08-22

    The azure-winged magpie (AWM), Cyanopica cyanus, is found in Asia and Iberia. This remarkable disjunct distribution has been variously explained by either the sixteenth-century introduction of birds into Iberia from the Far East, or by the loss of individuals from the central part of their range as a result of Pleistocene glaciations. We have used the mitochondrial control region to undertake a molecular phylogenetic analysis of the AWM, with sequences examined from individuals collected from across the current distribution range and incorporating representatives of all currently defined subspecies. The Western birds are genetically distinct from their Asian congeners and their divergence is basal in the phylogenetic tree. This indicates that the AWM is native to Iberia and not the result of a recent introduction from Asia. In Asia, two major mitochondrial DNA lineages were identified. These correspond to an Inland Asia group and a Pacific Seaboard group, and are separated topographically by the Da Hingan Ling mountains and the Yellow Sea. Molecular clock estimates suggest that these divergences are associated with Pleistocene glaciations. Furthermore, our data do not support the current classification of the AWM into 10 subspecies, as defined based on morphology and geographical distribution. PMID:12204127

  1. Control regions for chromosome replication are conserved with respect to sequence and location among Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, chromosome replication is initiated from oriC by the DnaA initiator protein associated with ATP. Three non-coding regions contribute to the activity of DnaA. The datA locus is instrumental in conversion of DnaAATP to DnaAADP (datA dependent DnaAATP hydrolysis) whereas DnaA rejuvenation sequences 1 and 2 (DARS1 and DARS2) reactivate DnaAADP to DnaAATP. The structural organization of oriC, datA, DARS1, and DARS2 were found conserved among 59 fully sequenced E. coli genomes, with differences primarily in the non-functional spacer regions between key protein binding sites. The relative distances from oriC to datA, DARS1, and DARS2, respectively, was also conserved despite of large variations in genome size, suggesting that the gene dosage of either region is important for bacterial growth. Yet all three regions could be deleted alone or in combination without loss of viability. Competition experiments during balanced growth in rich medium and during mouse colonization indicated roles of datA, DARS1, and DARS2 for bacterial fitness although the relative contribution of each region differed between growth conditions. We suggest that this fitness advantage has contributed to conservation of both sequence and chromosomal location for datA, DARS1, and DARS2. PMID:26441936

  2. Sequence comparison in the crossover region of an oncogenic avian retrovirus recombinant and its nononcogenic parent: Genetic regions that control growth rate and oncogenic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Tsichlis, P.N.; Donehower, L.; Hager, G.; Zeller, N.; Malavarca, R.; Astrin, S.; Skalka, A.M.

    1982-11-01

    NTRE is an avian retrovirus recombinant of the endogeneous nononcogenic Rous-associated virus-0 (RAV-0) and the oncogenic, exogeneous, transformation-defective (td) Prague strain of Rous sarcoma virus B (td-PrRSV-B). Oligonucleotide mapping had shown that the recombinant virus is indistinguishable from its RAV-0 parent except for the 3'-end sequences, which were derived from td-PrRSV-B. However, the virus exhibits properties which are typical of an exogenous virus: it grows to high titers in tissue culture, and it is oncogenic in vivo. To accurately define the genetic region responsible for these properties, the authors determined the nucleotide sequences of the recombinant and its RAV-0 parent by using molecular clones of their DNA. These were compared with sequences already available for PrRSV-C, a virus closely related to the exogenous parent td-PrRSV-B. The results suggested that the crossover event which generated NTRE 7 took place in a region -501 to -401 nucleotides from the 3' end of the td-PrRSV parental genome and that sequences to the right of the recombination region were responsible for its growth properties and oncogenic potential. Since the exogenous-virus-specific sequences are expected to be missing from transformation-defective mutants of the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of RSV, which, like other exogeneous viruses, grow to high tiers in tissue culture and are oncogenic in vivo, the authors concluded that the growth properties and oncogenic potential of the exogeneous viruses are determined by sequences in the U3 region of the long terminal repeat. However, the authors propose that the exogeneous-virus-specific region may play a role in determining the oncogenic spectrum of a given oncogenic virus.

  3. Application of 16S rRNA, cytochrome b and control region sequences for understanding the phylogenetic relationships in Oryx species.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Homaidan, A A; Al Farhan, A H

    2008-01-01

    The present study reports the application of mitochondrial markers for the molecular phylogeny of Oryx species, including the Arabian oryx (AO), scimitar-horned oryx (SHO) and plains oryx (PO), using the Addax as an outgroup. Sequences of three molecular markers, 16S rRNA, cytochrome b and a control region, for the above four taxa were aligned and the topologies of respective phylogenetic trees were compared. All these markers clearly differentiated the genus Addax from Oryx. However, for species-level grouping, while 16S rRNA and cytochrome b produced similar phylogeny (SHO grouped with PO), the control region grouped SHO with AO. Further studies are warranted to generate more sequencing data, apply multiple bioinformatics tools and to include relevant nuclear markers for phylogenetic analysis of Oryx species. PMID:19224456

  4. DNA sequence of the control region of phage D108: the N-terminal amino acid sequences of repressor and transposase are similar both in phage D108 and in its relative, phage Mu.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuuchi, M; Weisberg, R A; Mizuuchi, K

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the DNA sequence of the control region of phage D108 up to position 1419 at the left end of the phage genome. Open reading frames for the repressor gene, ner gene, and the 5' part of the A gene (which codes for transposase) are found in the sequence. The genetic organization of this region of phage D108 is quite similar to that of phage Mu in spite of considerable divergence, both in the nucleotide sequence and in the amino acid sequences of the regulatory proteins of the two phages. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the transposases of the two phages also share only limited homology. On the other hand, a significant amino acid sequence homology was found within each phage between the N-terminal parts of the repressor and transposase. We propose that the N-terminal domains of the repressor and transposase of each phage interact functionally in the process of making the decision between the lytic and the lysogenic mode of growth. PMID:3012481

  5. Quantitative controls on location and architecture of carbonate depositional sequences: upper miocene, cabo de gata region, se Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franseen, E.K.; Goldstein, R.H.; Farr, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    Sequence stratigraphy, pinning-point relative sea-level curves, and magnetostratigraphy provide the quantitative data necessary to understand how rates of sea-level change and different substrate paleoslopes are dominant controls on accumulation rate, carbonate depositional sequence location, and internal architecture. Five third-order (1-10 my) and fourth-order (0.1-1.0 my) upper Miocene carbonate depositional sequences (DS1A, DS1B, DS2, DS3, TCC) formed with superimposed higher-frequency sea-level cycles in an archipelago setting in SE Spain. Overall, our study indicates when areas of high substrate slope (> 15??) are in shallow water, independent of climate, the location and internal architecture of carbonate deposits are not directly linked to sea-level position but, instead, are controlled by location of gently sloping substrates and processes of bypass. In contrast, if carbonate sediments are generated where substrates of low slope ( 15.6 cm/ky to ??? 2 cm/ky and overall relative sea level rose at rates of 17-21.4 cm/ky. Higher frequency sea-level rates were about 111 to more than 260 cm/ky, producing onlapping, fining- (deepening-) upward cycles. Decreasing accumulation rates resulted from decreasing surface area for shallow-water sediment production, drowning of shallow-water substrates, and complex sediment dispersal related to the archipelago setting. Typical systems tract and parasequence development should not be expected in "bypass ramp" settings; facies of onlapping strata do not track base level and are likely to be significantly different compared to onlapping strata associated with coastal onlap. Basal and upper DS2 reef megabreccias (indicating the transition from cool to warmer climatic conditions) were eroded from steep upslope positions and redeposited downslope onto areas of gentle substrate during rapid sea-level falls (> 22.7 cm/ky) of short duration. Such rapid sea-level falls and presence of steep slopes are not conducive to formation of

  6. Quantitative controls on location and architecture of carbonate depositional sequences: Upper miocene, cabo de gata region, SE Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franseen, E.K.; Goldstein, R.H.; Farr, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Sequence stratigraphy, pinning-point relative sea-level curves, and magnetostratigraphy provide the quantitative data necessary to understand how rates of sea-level change and different substrate paleoslopes are dominant controls on accumulation rate, carbonate depositional sequence location, and internal architecture. Five third-order (1-10 my) and fourth-order (0.1-1.0 my) upper Miocene carbonate depositional sequences (DS1A, DS1B, DS2, DS3, TCC) formed with superimposed higher-frequency sea-level cycles in an archipelago setting in SE Spain. Overall, our study indicates when areas of high substrate slope (> 15??) are in shallow water, independent of climate, the location and internal architecture of carbonate deposits are not directly linked to sea-level position but, instead, are controlled by location of gently sloping substrates and processes of bypass. In contrast, if carbonate sediments are generated where substrates of low slope ( 15.6 cm/ky to ??? 2 cm/ky and overall relative sea level rose at rates of 17-21.4 cm/ky. Higher frequency sea-level rates were about 111 to more than 260 cm/ky, producing onlapping, fining- (deepening-) upward cycles. Decreasing accumulation rates resulted from decreasing surface area for shallow-water sediment production, drowning of shallow-water substrates, and complex sediment dispersal related to the archipelago setting. Typical systems tract and parasequence development should not be expected in "bypass ramp" settings; facies of onlapping strata do not track base level and are likely to be significantly different compared to onlapping strata associated with coastal onlap. Basal and upper DS2 reef megabreccias (indicating the transition from cool to warmer climatic conditions) were eroded from steep upslope positions and redeposited downslope onto areas of gentle substrate during rapid sea-level falls (> 22.7 cm/ky) of short duration. Such rapid sea-level falls and presence of steep slopes are not conducive to formation of

  7. Dpb11 Controls the Association between DNA Polymerases α and ɛ and the Autonomously Replicating Sequence Region of Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Hiroshi; Sugino, Akio; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2000-01-01

    Dpb11 is required for chromosomal DNA replication and the S-phase checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we report detection of a physical complex containing Dpb11 and DNA polymerase ɛ (Dpb11-Polɛ complex). During the S phase of the cell cycle, Dpb11 associated preferentially with DNA fragments containing autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs), at the same time as Polɛ associated with these fragments. Association of Dpb11 and Polɛ with these fragments was mutually dependent, suggesting that the Dpb11-Polɛ complex associates with the ARS. Moreover, Dpb11 was required for the association of Polα-primase with the fragments. Thus, it seems likely that association of the Dpb11-Polɛ complex with the ARS fragments is required for the association of the Polα-primase complex. Hydroxyurea inhibits late-origin firing in S. cerevisiae, and the checkpoint genes, RAD53 and MEC1, are involved in this inhibition. In the presence of hydroxyurea at temperatures permissive for cell growth, Polɛ in dpb11-1 cells associated with early- and late-origin fragments. In wild-type cells, however, it associated only with early-origin fragments. This indicates that Dpb11 may also be involved in the regulation of late-origin firing. Overall, these results suggest that Dpb11 controls the association between DNA polymerases α and ɛ and the ARS. PMID:10733584

  8. mtDNAmanager: a Web-based tool for the management and quality analysis of mitochondrial DNA control-region sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwan Young; Song, Injee; Ha, Eunho; Cho, Sung-Bae; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2008-01-01

    Background For the past few years, scientific controversy has surrounded the large number of errors in forensic and literature mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) data. However, recent research has shown that using mtDNA phylogeny and referring to known mtDNA haplotypes can be useful for checking the quality of sequence data. Results We developed a Web-based bioinformatics resource "mtDNAmanager" that offers a convenient interface supporting the management and quality analysis of mtDNA sequence data. The mtDNAmanager performs computations on mtDNA control-region sequences to estimate the most-probable mtDNA haplogroups and retrieves similar sequences from a selected database. By the phased designation of the most-probable haplogroups (both expected and estimated haplogroups), mtDNAmanager enables users to systematically detect errors whilst allowing for confirmation of the presence of clear key diagnostic mutations and accompanying mutations. The query tools of mtDNAmanager also facilitate database screening with two options of "match" and "include the queried nucleotide polymorphism". In addition, mtDNAmanager provides Web interfaces for users to manage and analyse their own data in batch mode. Conclusion The mtDNAmanager will provide systematic routines for mtDNA sequence data management and analysis via easily accessible Web interfaces, and thus should be very useful for population, medical and forensic studies that employ mtDNA analysis. mtDNAmanager can be accessed at . PMID:19014619

  9. A Novel SRP Recognition Sequence in the Homeostatic Control Region of Heat Shock Transcription Factor σ32

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Ryoji; Yura, Takashi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Mori, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock response (HSR) generally plays a major role in sustaining protein homeostasis. In Escherichia coli, the activity and amount of the dedicated transcription factor σ32 transiently increase upon heat shock. The initial induction is followed by chaperone-mediated negative feedback to inactivate and degrade σ32. Previous work reported that signal recognition particle (SRP)-dependent targeting of σ32 to the membrane is essential for feedback control, though how SRP recognizes σ32 remained unknown. Extensive photo- and disulfide cross-linking studies in vivo now reveal that the highly conserved regulatory region of σ32 that lacks a consecutive hydrophobic stretch interacts with the signal peptide-binding site of Ffh (the protein subunit of SRP). Importantly, the σ32–Ffh interaction observed was significantly affected by mutations in this region that compromise the feedback regulation, but not by deleting the DnaK/DnaJ chaperones. Homeostatic regulation of HSR thus requires a novel type of SRP recognition mechanism. PMID:27052372

  10. A Novel SRP Recognition Sequence in the Homeostatic Control Region of Heat Shock Transcription Factor σ32.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Ryoji; Yura, Takashi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Mori, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock response (HSR) generally plays a major role in sustaining protein homeostasis. In Escherichia coli, the activity and amount of the dedicated transcription factor σ(32) transiently increase upon heat shock. The initial induction is followed by chaperone-mediated negative feedback to inactivate and degrade σ(32). Previous work reported that signal recognition particle (SRP)-dependent targeting of σ(32) to the membrane is essential for feedback control, though how SRP recognizes σ(32) remained unknown. Extensive photo- and disulfide cross-linking studies in vivo now reveal that the highly conserved regulatory region of σ(32) that lacks a consecutive hydrophobic stretch interacts with the signal peptide-binding site of Ffh (the protein subunit of SRP). Importantly, the σ(32)-Ffh interaction observed was significantly affected by mutations in this region that compromise the feedback regulation, but not by deleting the DnaK/DnaJ chaperones. Homeostatic regulation of HSR thus requires a novel type of SRP recognition mechanism. PMID:27052372

  11. Helena, the hidden beauty: Resolving the most common West Eurasian mtDNA control region haplotype by massively parallel sequencing an Italian population sample.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Martin; Iuvaro, Alessandra; Strobl, Christina; Nagl, Simone; Huber, Gabriela; Pelotti, Susi; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata; Parson, Walther

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of mitochondrial (mt)DNA is a powerful tool in forensic genetics when nuclear markers fail to give results or maternal relatedness is investigated. The mtDNA control region (CR) contains highly condensed variation and is therefore routinely typed. Some samples exhibit an identical haplotype in this restricted range. Thus, they convey only weak evidence in forensic queries and limited phylogenetic information. However, a CR match does not imply that also the mtDNA coding regions are identical or samples belong to the same phylogenetic lineage. This is especially the case for the most frequent West Eurasian CR haplotype 263G 315.1C 16519C, which is observed in various clades within haplogroup H and occurs at a frequency of 3-4% in many European populations. In this study, we investigated the power of massively parallel complete mtGenome sequencing in 29 Italian samples displaying the most common West Eurasian CR haplotype - and found an unexpected high diversity. Twenty-eight different haplotypes falling into 19 described sub-clades of haplogroup H were revealed in the samples with identical CR sequences. This study demonstrates the benefit of complete mtGenome sequencing for forensic applications to enforce maximum discrimination, more comprehensive heteroplasmy detection, as well as highest phylogenetic resolution. PMID:25303789

  12. Involvement of long terminal repeat U3 sequences overlapping the transcription control region in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mRNA 3' end formation.

    PubMed Central

    DeZazzo, J D; Kilpatrick, J E; Imperiale, M J

    1991-01-01

    In retroviral proviruses, the poly(A) site is present in both long terminal repeats (LTRs) but used only in the 3' position. One mechanism to account for this selective poly(A) site usage is that LTR U3 sequences, transcribed only from the 3' poly(A) site, are required in the RNA for efficient processing. To test this possibility, mutations were made in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) U3 region and the mutated LTRs were inserted into simple and complex transcription units. HIV-1 poly(A) site usage was then quantitated by S1 nuclease analysis following transfection of each construct into human 293 cells. The results showed that U3 sequences confined to the transcription control region were required for efficient usage of the HIV-1 poly(A) site, even when it was placed 1.5 kb from the promoter. Although the roles of U3 in processing and transcription activation were separable, optimal 3' end formation was partly dependent on HIV-1 enhancer and SP1 binding site sequences. Images PMID:1996111

  13. Heteroplasmy, length and sequence variation in the mtDNA control regions of three percid fish species (Perca fluviatilis, Acerina cernua, Stizostedion lucioperca).

    PubMed Central

    Nesbø, C L; Arab, M O; Jakobsen, K S

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the control region and flanking tRNA genes of perch (Perca fluviatilis) mtDNA was determined. The organization of this region is similar to that of other vertebrates. A tandem array of 10-bp repeats, associated with length variation and heteroplasmy was observed in the 5' end. While the location of the array corresponds to that reported in other species, the length of the repeated unit is shorter than previously observed for tandem repeats in this region. The repeated sequence was highly similar to the Mt5 element which has been shown to specifically bind a putative D-loop DNA termination protein. Of 149 perch analyzed, 74% showed length variation heteroplasmy. Single-cell PCR on oocytes suggested that the high level of heteroplasmy is passively maintained by maternal transmission. The array was also observed in the two other percid species, ruffe (Acerina cernua) and zander (Stizostedion lucioperca). The array and the associated length variation heteroplasmy are therefore likely to be general features of percid mtDNAs. Among the perch repeats, the mutation pattern is consistent with unidirectional slippage, and statistical analyses supported the notion that the various haplotypes are associated with different levels of heteroplasmy. The variation in array length among and within species is ascribed to differences in predicted stability of secondary structures made between repeat units. PMID:9560404

  14. Population structure and genetic variability of six bar wrasse (Thallasoma hardwicki) in northern South China Sea revealed by mitochondrial control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaolun Allen; Ablan, Maria Carmen Anonuevo; McManus, John Williams; Bell, Johann Diepernk; Tuan, Vo Si; Cabanban, Annadel Sarmiento; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2004-01-01

    The genetic relationships among northern South China Sea populations of the six bar wrasse (Thallasoma hardwicki) were investigated. Fish collected from the Solomon Islands were used for geographic comparison. In 1998 and 1999, a total of 100 fish were sampled from 6 localities of the northern South China Sea and 3 localities of the Solomon Islands. Genetic variations in DNA sequences were examined from the first hypervariable region (HVR-1) of the mitochondrial control region, as amplified by polymerase chain reaction. High levels of haplotypic diversity (h = 0.944 +/- 0.0016, pi = 0.0224 +/- 0.01171) in the HVR-1 region of the mitochondrial control region of T. hardwicki were detected. This yielded 94 haplotypes that exhibited a minimum spanning tree with a starburst structure, suggestive of a very recent origin for most haplotypes. Neutrality tests indicated that the pattern of genetic variability in T. hardwicki is consistent either with genetic hitchhiking by an advantageous mutation or with population expansion. Partitioning populations into coherent geographic groups divided the northern South China Sea samples (Phi(CT) = 0.0313, P < 0.001) into 3 major groups: a north-central group composed of northwestern Taiwan and northern Vietnam; a southwestern group containing southern Vietnam; and a southern group including the central Philippines. These results are in concordance with mesoscale boundaries proposed by allozyme markers, thus highlighting the importance of identifying transboundary units for the conservation and management of fisheries in the South China Sea. PMID:15129326

  15. Development of a control region-based mtDNA SNaPshot™ selection tool, integrated into a mini amplicon sequencing method.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Natalie E C; de Vries, Gerda; Sijen, Titia

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is regularly applied to forensic DNA samples with limited amounts of nuclear DNA (nDNA), such as hair shafts and bones. Generally, this mtDNA analysis involves examination of the hypervariable control region by Sanger sequencing of amplified products. When samples are severely degraded, small-sized amplicons can be applied and an earlier described mini-mtDNA method by Eichmann et al. [1] that accommodates ten mini amplicons in two multiplexes is found to be a very robust approach. However, in cases with large numbers of samples, like when searching for hairs with an mtDNA profile deviant from that of the victim, the method is time (and cost) consuming. Previously, Chemale et al. [2] described a SNaPshot™-based screening tool for a Brazilian population that uses standard-size amplicons for HVS-I and HVS-II. Here, we describe a similar tool adapted to the full control region and compatible with mini-mtDNA amplicons. Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected based on their relative frequencies in a European population. They showed a high discriminatory power in a Dutch population (97.2%). The 18 SNPs are assessed in two SNaPshot™ multiplexes that pair to the two mini-mtDNA amplification multiplexes. Degenerate bases are included to limit allele dropout due to SNPs at primer binding site positions. Three SNPs provide haplogroup information. Reliability testing showed no differences with Sanger sequencing results. Since mini-mtSNaPshot screening uses only a small portion of the same PCR products used for Sanger sequencing, no additional DNA extract is consumed, which is forensically advantageous. PMID:26976467

  16. Low Genetic Diversity and Strong Geographical Structure of the Critically Endangered White-Headed Langur (Trachypithecus leucocephalus) Inferred from Mitochondrial DNA Control Region Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiran; Qiao, Yu; Pan, Wenshi; Yao, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Many Asian colobine monkey species are suffering from habitat destruction and population size decline. There is a great need to understand their genetic diversity, population structure and demographic history for effective species conservation. The white-headed langur (Trachypithecus leucocephalus) is a Critically Endangered colobine species endemic to the limestone karst forests in southwestern China. We analyzed the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences of 390 fecal samples from 40 social groups across the main distribution areas, which represented one-third of the total extant population. Only nine haplotypes and 10 polymorphic sites were identified, indicating remarkably low genetic diversity in the species. Using a subset of 77 samples from different individuals, we evaluated genetic variation, population structure, and population demographic history. We found very low values of haplotype diversity (h = 0.570 ± 0.056) and nucleotide diversity (π = 0.00323 ± 0.00044) in the hypervariable region I (HVRI) of the mtDNA control region. Distribution of haplotypes displayed marked geographical pattern, with one population (Chongzuo, CZ) showing a complete lack of genetic diversity (having only one haplotype), whereas the other population (Fusui, FS) having all nine haplotypes. We detected strong population genetic structure among habit patches (ΦST = 0.375, P < 0.001). In addition, the Mantel test showed a significant correlation between the pairwise genetic distances and geographical distances among social groups in FS (correlation coefficient = 0.267, P = 0.003), indicting isolation-by-distance pattern of genetic divergence in the mtDNA sequences. Analyses of demographic history suggested an overall stable historical population size and modest population expansion in the last 2,000 years. Our results indicate different genetic diversity and possibly distinct population history for different local populations, and suggest that CZ and FS should be

  17. Atypical regions in large genomic DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S. |; McPeek, M.S.; Speed, T.P.

    1994-07-19

    Large genomic DNA sequences contain regions with distinctive patterns of sequence organization. The authors describe a method using logarithms of probabilities based on seventh-order Markov chains to rapidly identify genomic sequences that do not resemble models of genome organization built from compilations of octanucleotide usage. Data bases have been constructed from Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA sequences of >1000 nt and human sequences of >10,000 nt. Atypical genes and clusters of genes have been located in bacteriophage, yeast, and primate DNA sequences. The authors consider criteria for statistical significance of the results, offer possible explanations for the observed variation in genome organization, and give additional applications of these methods in DNA sequence analysis.

  18. Classification and phylogeny of sika deer (Cervus nippon) subspecies based on the mitochondrial control region DNA sequence using an extended sample set.

    PubMed

    Ba, Hengxing; Yang, Fuhe; Xing, Xiumei; Li, Chunyi

    2015-06-01

    To further refine the classification and phylogeny of sika deer subspecies, the well-annotated sequences of the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of 13 sika deer subspecies from GenBank were downloaded, aligned and analyzed in this study. By reconstructing the phylogenetic tree with an extended sample set, the results revealed a split between Northern and Southern Mainland Asia/Taiwan lineages, and moreover, two subspecies, C.n.mantchuricus and C.n.hortulorum, were existed in Northern Mainland Asia. Unexpectedly, Dybowskii's sika deer that was thought to originate from Northern Mainland Asia joins the Southern Mainland Asia/Taiwan lineage. The genetic divergences were ranged from 2.1% to 4.7% between Dybowskii's sika deer and all the other established subspecies at the mtDNA sequence level, which suggests that the maternal lineage of uncertain sika subspecies in Europe had been maintained until today. This study also provides a better understanding for the classification, phylogeny and phylogeographic history of sika deer subspecies. PMID:24063645

  19. mtDNA control-region sequence variation suggests multiple independent origins of an "Asian-specific" 9-bp deletion in sub-Saharan Africans.

    PubMed Central

    Soodyall, H.; Vigilant, L.; Hill, A. V.; Stoneking, M.; Jenkins, T.

    1996-01-01

    The intergenic COII/tRNA(Lys) 9-bp deletion in human mtDNA, which is found at varying frequencies in Asia, Southeast Asia, Polynesia, and the New World, was also found in 81 of 919 sub-Saharan Africans. Using mtDNA control-region sequence data from a subset of 41 individuals with the deletion, we identified 22 unique mtDNA types associated with the deletion in Africa. A comparison of the unique mtDNA types from sub-Saharan Africans and Asians with the 9-bp deletion revealed that sub-Saharan Africans and Asians have sequence profiles that differ in the locations and frequencies of variant sites. Both phylogenetic and mismatch-distribution analysis suggest that 9-bp deletion arose independently in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia and that the deletion has arisen more than once in Africa. Within Africa, the deletion was not found among Khoisan peoples and was rare to absent in western and southwestern African populations, but it did occur in Pygmy and Negroid populations from central Africa and in Malawi and southern African Bantu-speakers. The distribution of the 9-bp deletion in Africa suggests that the deletion could have arisen in central Africa and was then introduced to southern Africa via the recent "Bantu expansion." PMID:8644719

  20. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequence variation suggests an independent origin of an {open_quotes}Asian-specific{close_quotes} 9-bp deletion in Africans

    SciTech Connect

    Soodyall, H.; Redd, A.; Vigilant

    1994-09-01

    The intergenic noncoding region between the cytochrome oxidase II and lysyl tRNA genes of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is associated with two tandemly arranged copies of a 9-bp sequence. A deletion of one of these repeats has been found at varying frequencies in populations of Asian descent, and is commonly referred to as an {open_quotes}Asian-specific{close_quotes} marker. We report here that the 9-bp deletion is also found at a frequency of 10.2% (66/649) in some indigenous African populations, with frequencies of 28.6% (20/70) in Pygmies, 26.6% (12/45) in Malawians and 15.4% (31/199) in southeastern Bantu-speaking populations. The deletion was not found in 123 Khoisan individuals nor in 209 western Bantu-speaking individuals, with the exception of 3 individuals from one group that was admixed with Pygmies. Sequence analysis of the two hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region reveals that the types associated with the African 9-bp deletion are different from those found in Asian-derived populations with the deletion. Phylogenetic analysis separates the {open_quotes}African{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Asian{close_quotes} 9-bp deletion types into two different clusters which are statistically supported. Mismatch distributions based on the number of differences between pairs of mtDNA types are consistent with this separation. These findings strongly support the view that the 9-bp deletion originated independently in Africa and in Asia.

  1. Comparison of mitochondrial DNA control region sequence and microsatellite DNA analyses in estimating population structure and gene flow rates in Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wirgin, I.; Waldman, J.; Stabile, J.; Lubinski, B.; King, T.

    2002-01-01

    Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus is large, long-lived, and anadromous with subspecies distributed along the Atlantic (A. oxyrinchus oxyrinchus) and Gulf of Mexico (A. o. desotoi) coasts of North America. Although it is not certain if extirpation of some population units has occurred, because of anthropogenic influences abundances of all populations are low compared with historical levels. Informed management of A. oxyrinchus demands a detailed knowledge of its population structure, levels of genetic diversity, and likelihood to home to natal rivers. We compared the use of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequence and microsatellite nuclear DNA (nDNA) analyses in identifying the stock structure and homing fidelity of Atlantic and Gulf coast populations of A. oxyrinchus. The approaches were concordant in that they revealed moderate to high levels of genetic diversity and suggested that populations of Atlantic sturgeon are highly structured. At least six genetically distinct management units were detected using the two approaches among the rivers surveyed. Mitochondrial DNA sequences revealed a significant cline in haplotype diversity along the Atlantic coast with monomorphism observed in Canadian populations. High levels of nDNA diversity were also observed among populations along the Atlantic coast, including the two Canadian populations, probably resulting from the more rapid rate of mutational and evolutionary change at microsatellite loci. Estimates of gene flow among populations were similar between both approaches with the exception that because of mtDNA monomorphism in Canadian populations, gene flow estimates between them were unobtainable. Analyses of both genomes provided high resolution and confidence in characterizing the population structure of Atlantic sturgeon. Microsatellite analysis was particularly informative in delineating population structure in rivers that were recently glaciated and may prove diagnostic in rivers that are

  2. Mitochondrial sequences of Seriatopora corals show little agreement with morphology and reveal the duplication of a tRNA gene near the control region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flot, J.-F.; Licuanan, W. Y.; Nakano, Y.; Payri, C.; Cruaud, C.; Tillier, S.

    2008-12-01

    The taxonomy of corals of the genus Seriatopora has not previously been studied using molecular sequence markers. As a first step toward a re-evaluation of species boundaries in this genus, mitochondrial sequence variability was analyzed in 51 samples collected from Okinawa, New Caledonia, and the Philippines. Four clusters of sequences were detected that showed little concordance with species currently recognized on a morphological basis. The most likely explanation is that the skeletal characters used for species identification are highly variable (polymorphic or phenotypically plastic); alternative explanations include introgression/hybridization, or deep coalescence and the retention of ancestral mitochondrial polymorphisms. In all individuals sequenced, two copies of trnW were found on either side of the atp8 gene near the putative D-loop, a novel mitochondrial gene arrangement that may have arisen from a duplication of the trnW-atp8 region followed by a deletion of one atp8.

  3. Use of whole-genome sequencing to trace, control and characterize the regional expansion of extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing ST15 Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kai; Lokate, Mariette; Deurenberg, Ruud H.; Tepper, Marga; Arends, Jan P.; Raangs, Erwin G. C.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome; Grundmann, Hajo; Rossen, John W. A.; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the transmission of a CTX-M-15-producing ST15 Klebsiella pneumoniae between patients treated in a single center and the subsequent inter-institutional spread by patient referral occurring between May 2012 and September 2013. A suspected epidemiological link between clinical K. pneumoniae isolates was supported by patient contact tracing and genomic phylogenetic analysis from May to November 2012. By May 2013, a patient treated in three institutions in two cities was involved in an expanding cluster caused by this high-risk clone (HiRiC) (local expansion, CTX-M-15 producing, and containing hypervirulence factors). A clone-specific multiplex PCR was developed for patient screening by which another patient was identified in September 2013. Genomic phylogenetic analysis including published ST15 genomes revealed a close homology with isolates previously found in the USA. Environmental contamination and lack of consistent patient screening were identified as being responsible for the clone dissemination. The investigation addresses the advantages of whole-genome sequencing in the early detection of HiRiC with a high propensity of nosocomial transmission and prolonged circulation in the regional patient population. Our study suggests the necessity for inter-institutional/regional collaboration for infection/outbreak management of K. pneumoniae HiRiCs. PMID:26864946

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Cynoglossus abbreviatus (Pleuronectiformes: Cynoglossidae) with control region translocation and tRNA-Gln gene inversion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Gong, Li; Kong, Xiao-Yu

    2016-05-01

    Cynoglossus abbreviatus (Cynoglossidae, Soleoidei) is characterized by a bilaterally asymmetrical with both eyes on the left side. In this study, the complete mitogenome of this tongue sole has been reported for the first time. The gene order in C. abbreviatus mitogenome possesses a novel rearrangement like other tonguefish. The tRNA-Gln gene moves from the light strand to the heavy strand, accompanied by tRNA-Ile gene shuffling, leaving a large non-coding region (88 bp) between these two tRNAs. Additionally, the control region translocates to the place between ND1 and tRNA-Gln genes. The total length is 16,417 bp, with 30.9%, 29.5%, 24.9% and 14.7% for A, T, C and G, respectively (60.4% for AT content). These molecular data will provide useful information about the mechanism of gene reorganization in Cynoglossidae mitogenome and further phylogenetic study on Pleuronectiformes. PMID:25427811

  5. Structure and evolution of the Phasianidae mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zuhao; Ke, Dianhua

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA control region is an area of the mitochondrial genome which is non-coding DNA. To infer the structural and evolutionary characteristics of Phasianidae mitochondrial DNA control region, the entire control region sequences of 34 species were analyzed. The length of the control region sequences ranged from 1144 bp (Phasianus colchicus) to 1555 bp (Coturnix japonica) and can be separated into three domains. The average genetic distances among the species within the genera varied from 1.96% (Chrysolophus) to 12.05% (Coturnix). The average genetic distances showed significantly negative correlation with ts/tv. In most genera (except Coturnix), domain I is the most variable among the three domains. However, the first 150 nucleotides apparently evolved at unusually low rates. Four conserved sequence boxes in the domain II of Phasianidae sequences were identified. The alignment of the Phasianidae four boxes and CSB-1 sequences showed considerable sequence variation. PMID:24617466

  6. Characterization of the red knot (Calidris canutus) mitochondrial control region.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Deborah M; Baker, Allan J

    2003-08-01

    We sequenced the complete mitochondrial control regions of 11 red knots (Calidris canutus). The control region is 1168 bp in length and is flanked by tRNA glutamate (glu) and the gene ND6 at its 5' end and tRNA phenylalanine (phe) and the gene 12S on its 3' end. The sequence possesses conserved sequence blocks F, E, D, C, CSB-1, and the bird similarity box (BSB), as expected for a mitochondrial copy. Flanking tRNA regions show correct secondary structure, and a relative rate test indicated no significant difference between substitution rates in the sequence we obtained versus the known mitochondrial sequence of turnstones (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae). These characteristics indicate that the sequence is mitochondrial in origin. To confirm this, we sequenced the control region of a single individual using both purified mitochondrial DNA and genomic DNA. The sequences were identical using both methods. The sequence and methods presented in this paper may now serve as a reference for future studies using knot and other avian control regions. Furthermore, the discovery of five variable sites in 11 knots towards the 3' end of the control region, and the variability of this region in contrast to the more conserved central domain in the alignment between knots and other Charadriiformes, highlights the importance of this area as a source of variation for future studies in knots and other birds. PMID:12897864

  7. Two control regions for eukaryotic tRNA gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    DeFranco, D; Schmidt, O; Söll, D

    1980-01-01

    Two Drosophila tRNALys genes with identical coding sequences were shown to transcribe with very different efficiences in nuclear extracts from Xenopus oocytes. The use of recombinant plasmids in which the 5'-flanking sequences of these genes were either "switched" or replaced by defined pBR322 sequences revealed two control regions for tRNA gene transcription. An internal control region comprising the mature tRNA coding sequence (and possibly its 3'-flanking sequences) is sufficient for transcription initiation, and an external control region comprising the 5'-flanking sequences represses this transcription. All transcripts have short leader sequences. Altered precursor tRNAs transcribed from truncated tRNALys genes (missing a single base pair in the acceptor stem) are not processed well in vitro. Images PMID:6774336

  8. Time Separation Between Events in a Sequence: a Regional Property?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirwood, R.; Fitzenz, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    understand the rate controlling processes that determine such sequences per tectonic region and fluid/heat flow provinces.

  9. TAG Sequence Identification of Genomic Regions Using TAGdb.

    PubMed

    Ruperao, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Second-generation sequencing (SGS) technology has enabled the sequencing of genomes and identification of genes. However, large complex plant genomes remain particularly difficult for de novo assembly. Access to the vast quantity of raw sequence data may facilitate discoveries; however the volume of this data makes access difficult. This chapter discusses the Web-based tool TAGdb that enables researchers to identify paired read second-generation DNA sequence data that share identity with a submitted query sequence. The identified reads can be used for PCR amplification of genomic regions to identify genes and promoters without the need for genome assembly. PMID:26519409

  10. Wiggle—Predicting Functionally Flexible Regions from Primary Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jenny; Gribskov, Michael; Bourne, Philip E

    2006-01-01

    The Wiggle series are support vector machine–based predictors that identify regions of functional flexibility using only protein sequence information. Functionally flexible regions are defined as regions that can adopt different conformational states and are assumed to be necessary for bioactivity. Many advances have been made in understanding the relationship between protein sequence and structure. This work contributes to those efforts by making strides to understand the relationship between protein sequence and flexibility. A coarse-grained protein dynamic modeling approach was used to generate the dataset required for support vector machine training. We define our regions of interest based on the participation of residues in correlated large-scale fluctuations. Even with this structure-based approach to computationally define regions of functional flexibility, predictors successfully extract sequence-flexibility relationships that have been experimentally confirmed to be functionally important. Thus, a sequence-based tool to identify flexible regions important for protein function has been created. The ability to identify functional flexibility using a sequence based approach complements structure-based definitions and will be especially useful for the large majority of proteins with unknown structures. The methodology offers promise to identify structural genomics targets amenable to crystallization and the possibility to engineer more flexible or rigid regions within proteins to modify their bioactivity. PMID:16839194

  11. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  12. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-10-01

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  13. [On the Population Genetic Portrait of Kaluga, Acipenser dauricus Georgi, 1775 Analysis of Sequence Variation in the Mitochondrial DNA Control Region].

    PubMed

    Shedko, S V; Miroshnichenko, I L; Nemkova, G A; Shedko, M B

    2015-09-01

    The variability of the mtDNA D-loop was examined in kaluga endemic to the Amur River, which is classified as critically endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened species. Sequencing of the D-loop fragment (819 bp) in 122 kaluga specimens collected in Lower Amur revealed 27 unique genotypes. The sample was characterized by a relatively low level of haplotypic (0.927) and nucleotide (0.0044) diversity. No considerable deviations from the neutral mutation model of DNA polymorphism were observed. Overall, the mismatch distribution patterns and the results of testing of simple demographic models (sudden demographic expansion and exponential population growth) pointed to a past increase in the number of kaluga sturgeons. According to the Bayesian skyline, the kaluga population doubled over the last two to three thousand years. The number of mature females in the modern kaluga population and the assessment of their long-term effective population size (Nef) are roughly at the same level (about three thousand individuals), which confirms the validity of assigning kaluga to the category of species on the brink of extinction. PMID:26606799

  14. Correlation approach to identify coding regions in DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ossadnik, S. M.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, it was observed that noncoding regions of DNA sequences possess long-range power-law correlations, whereas coding regions typically display only short-range correlations. We develop an algorithm based on this finding that enables investigators to perform a statistical analysis on long DNA sequences to locate possible coding regions. The algorithm is particularly successful in predicting the location of lengthy coding regions. For example, for the complete genome of yeast chromosome III (315,344 nucleotides), at least 82% of the predictions correspond to putative coding regions; the algorithm correctly identified all coding regions larger than 3000 nucleotides, 92% of coding regions between 2000 and 3000 nucleotides long, and 79% of coding regions between 1000 and 2000 nucleotides. The predictive ability of this new algorithm supports the claim that there is a fundamental difference in the correlation property between coding and noncoding sequences. This algorithm, which is not species-dependent, can be implemented with other techniques for rapidly and accurately locating relatively long coding regions in genomic sequences.

  15. Terminal region sequence variations in variola virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Massung, R F; Loparev, V N; Knight, J C; Totmenin, A V; Chizhikov, V E; Parsons, J M; Safronov, P F; Gutorov, V V; Shchelkunov, S N; Esposito, J J

    1996-07-15

    Genome DNA terminal region sequences were determined for a Brazilian alastrim variola minor virus strain Garcia-1966 that was associated with an 0.8% case-fatality rate and African smallpox strains Congo-1970 and Somalia-1977 associated with variola major (9.6%) and minor (0.4%) mortality rates, respectively. A base sequence identity of > or = 98.8% was determined after aligning 30 kb of the left- or right-end region sequences with cognate sequences previously determined for Asian variola major strains India-1967 (31% death rate) and Bangladesh-1975 (18.5% death rate). The deduced amino acid sequences of putative proteins of > or = 65 amino acids also showed relatively high identity, although the Asian and African viruses were clearly more related to each other than to alastrim virus. Alastrim virus contained only 10 of 70 proteins that were 100% identical to homologs in Asian strains, and 7 alastrim-specific proteins were noted. PMID:8661439

  16. The regions of sequence variation in caulimovirus gene VI.

    PubMed

    Sanger, M; Daubert, S; Goodman, R M

    1991-06-01

    The sequence of gene VI from figwort mosaic virus (FMV) clone x4 was determined and compared with that previously published for FMV clone DxS. Both clones originated from the same virus isolation, but the virus used to clone DxS was propagated extensively in a host of a different family prior to cloning whereas that used to clone x4 was not. Differences in the amino acid sequence inferred from the DNA sequences occurred in two clusters. An N-terminal conserved region preceded two regions of variation separated by a central conserved region. Variation in cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) gene VI sequences, all of which were derived from virus isolates from hosts from one host family, was similar to that seen in the FMV comparison, though the extent of variation was less. Alignment of gene VI domains from FMV and CaMV revealed regions of amino acid sequence identical in both viruses within the conserved regions. The similarity in the pattern of conserved and variable domains of these two viruses suggests common host-interactive functions in caulimovirus gene VI homologues, and possibly an analogy between caulimoviruses and certain animal viruses in the influence of the host on sequence variability of viral genes. PMID:2024500

  17. Kinetoplast DNA minicircles: regions of extensive sequence divergence.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, W O; Wirth, D F

    1987-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the kinetoplast minicircle DNA of Leishmania species exhibits species-specific sequence divergence and this observation has led to the development of a DNA probe-based diagnostic test for leishmaniasis. In the work reported here, we demonstrate that the minicircle is composed of three types of DNA sequences with differing specificities reflecting different rates of DNA sequence change. A library of cloned fragments of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) from Leishmania mexicana amazonensis was prepared and the cloned subfragments were found to contain DNA sequences with different taxonomic specificities based on hybridization analysis with various species of Leishmania. Four groups of subfragments were found, those that hybridized with a large number of Leishmania sp. as well as sequences unique to the species, subspecies, or isolate. Analysis of nested deletions of a single, full-length minicircle demonstrates that these different taxonomic specificities are contained within a single minicircle. This implies that different regions of a single minicircle have DNA sequences that diverge at different rates. These sequences represent potentially valuable tools in diagnostic, epidemiologic, and ecological studies of leishmaniasis and provide the basis for a model of kDNA sequence evolution. Images PMID:3025880

  18. Rapid Evolution of Virus Sequences in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hagai, Tzachi; LaBarbera, Anthony; Solovey, Mark; Andino, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Nodamura Virus (NoV) is a nodavirus originally isolated from insects that can replicate in a wide variety of hosts, including mammals. Because of their simplicity and ability to replicate in many diverse hosts, NoV, and the Nodaviridae in general, provide a unique window into the evolution of viruses and host-virus interactions. Here we show that the C-terminus of the viral polymerase exhibits extreme structural and evolutionary flexibility. Indeed, fewer than 10 positively charged residues from the 110 amino acid-long C-terminal region of protein A are required to support RNA1 replication. Strikingly, this region can be replaced by completely unrelated protein sequences, yet still produce a functional replicase. Structure predictions, as well as evolutionary and mutational analyses, indicate that the C-terminal region is structurally disordered and evolves faster than the rest of the viral proteome. Thus, the function of an intrinsically unstructured protein region can be independent of most of its primary sequence, conferring both functional robustness and sequence plasticity on the protein. Our results provide an experimental explanation for rapid evolution of unstructured regions, which enables an effective exploration of the sequence space, and likely function space, available to the virus. PMID:25502394

  19. The Main Sequence of Explosive Solar Active Regions: Comparison of Emerging and Mature Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron

    2011-01-01

    For mature active regions, an active region s magnetic flux content determines the maximum free energy the active region can have. Most Large flares and CMEs occur in active regions that are near their free-energy limit. Active-region flare power radiated in the GOES 1-8 band increases steeply as the free-energy limit is approached. We infer that the free-energy limit is set by the rate of release of an active region s free magnetic energy by flares, CMEs and coronal heating balancing the maximum rate the Sun can put free energy into the active region s magnetic field. This balance of maximum power results in explosive active regions residing in a "mainsequence" in active-region (flux content, free energy content) phase space, which sequence is analogous to the main sequence of hydrogen-burning stars in (mass, luminosity) phase space.

  20. A database of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions I and II sequences of individuals from Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Lehocký, Ivan; Baldovic, Marian; Kádasi, Ludevít; Metspalu, Ene

    2008-09-01

    In order to identify polymorphic positions and to determine their frequencies and the frequency of haplotypes in the human mitochondrial control region, two hypervariable regions (HV1 and HV2) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 374 unrelated individuals from Slovakia were amplified and sequenced. Sequence comparison led to the identification of 284 mitochondrial lineages as defined by 163 variable sites. Genetic diversity (GD) was estimated at 0.997 and the probability of two randomly selected individuals from population having identical mtDNA types (random match probability, RMP) for the both regions is 0.60%. PMID:19083829

  1. Climatic controls on Pennsylvanian sequences, United States

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, C.B.; Dulong, F.T.; Edgar, N.T.

    1996-08-01

    Temporal and spatial paleoclimate changes were primary controls on changes in sediment supply, both siliciclastic and chemical, in Pennsylvanian deposystems of the United States. Tectonic and eustatic processes, as well as climatically induced changes in sediment supply, controlled accommodation space and sequence stratigraphy within these deposystems. Interbasinal correlations of lithologies sensitive to climate, such as coeval paleosols, provide continental-scale records of climatic and eustatic conditions. Pennsylvanian bio- and lithostratigraphy are indicative of climate change at time scales that range from long-term (tens of millions of years) as Pangea formed and North America moved northward through the paleoequator, to intermediate-term hundred thousand year cycles controlled by orbital forcing, to very short-term events perhaps analogous to El Nino. Because of proximity to the humid tropics, the long-term climate of eastern basins of the United States was generally wetter than western basins. In the east, pluvial parts of climate cycles occur during low-stand events and are recorded by intense chemical weathering, high terrestrial organic productivity, restricted erosion, and siliciclastic sediment starvation. These conditions resulted in highly leached mineral paleosols (Ultisols) and coal beds (Histosols) of interbasinal extent. Drier parts of climate cycles in the east occurred during highstands of sea level when erosion and siliciclastic transport were maximum. In the western basins pluvial periods are generally indicated by shifts from eolian to fluvial and lacustrine sedimentary regimes in continental environments and from evaporate and carbonate to siliciclastic deposition, including black shale petroleum source rocks, in marine environments. Tectonics controlled basin development and glacial eustasy controlled sea level cycles. Climate, however, was the primary control on sediment supply and lithostratigraphy.

  2. Non-standard D region usage by human TCRB sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.J.; Lanchbury, J.S.

    1996-06-01

    T-cell receptor P (TCRB) chain variability is primarily created by a specific process of rearrangement of three sets of gene segments, V D, and J regions, with deletion of the intervening DNA. This process utilizes one of at least 51 TCRBV gene segments, downstream of which are two clusters of D, J, and C region genes. The TCRBC1 cluster contains a TCRBD1 (DB1) gene, six TCRBJ1 genes and the TCRBC1 (CB1) gene. The TCRBC2 cluster is similar, with a TCRBD2 (DB2) gene, seven TCRBJ2 genes, and the TCRBC2 (CB2) gene. The TCRBD genes are unusual in that they can be translated in all three reading frames. The region between the V and J region segments (the junctional region) shows the greatest sequence variability and there is good evidence that this region contacts the major histocompatibility complex peptide complex. Complexity at the V-D and D-J junctions is enhanced by exonuclease activity, the addition of a variable number of template-independent N nucleotides by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase, and by P nucleotide addition by a DNA polymerase. As a result of these processes and the sequence similarity between the germline TCRBD1 and TCRBD2 segments, it is not always possible to clearly assign TCRBD gene segment usage to either TCRBD1 or TCRBD2. Where TCRBD1 is used, {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} downstream rearrangement can occur either to the TCRBJ1-CB1 cluster or the TCRBJ2-CB2 cluster. Only the TCRBJ2-CB2 cluster is downstream of TCRBD2, and hence is generally utilized in sequences containing TCRBD2. In the TCRD locus, however, multiple TCRDD segment usage is not uncommon. Sequences have also been reported for the TCRB locus in which both TCRBD1 and TCRBD2 were used in a single sequence, and more recently, TCRBD2 - TCRBJ1, and occasional TCRBD2 - TCRBD1 - TCRBJ1 and TCRBD1 - TCRBD2 - TCRBJ1 {open_quotes}non-standard{close_quotes} rearrangements have been reported. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Hierarchical Control of Cognitive Processes: Switching Tasks in Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Darryl W.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2006-01-01

    Hierarchical control of cognitive processes was studied by examining the relationship between sequence- and task-level processing in the performance of explicit, memorized task sequences. In 4 experiments, switch costs in task-switching performance were perturbed by sequence initiation times that varied with sequence complexity, preparation time,…

  4. Regional correlation of deposition sequences in the southern Mesozoic marine province, northwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, J.I.; Oldow, J.S. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    Strata of the Mesozoic marine province of a northwestern Nevada, deposited in subaerial to deep marine environment in a backarc basin, underwent severe deformation during the late Mesozoic. Restoration of stratigraphic relations among constituent volcanic, volcanogenic, carbonate, and continentally-derived siliciclastic rocks has been hampered by sparse biostratigraphic age control. Regional correlation of coeval facies is made possible by coupling depositional sequences with biostratigraphic control in the southwestern Gabbs Valley Range, the southern Shoshone Mountains, and the southern Clan Alpine Mountains, which serve as reference sections for Late Triassic and Early Jurassic ammonite zonation of western North America. Differentiation between regionally significant sequence boundaries and those of limited areal extent is possible only by linking the biostratigraphy and physical stratigraphic relations, such as abrupt vertical transitions in lithology corresponding to large facies changes. Physical stratigraphic relations alone are not adequate for correlation ad indicated by the diachronous initiation of Early to Middle( ) Jurassic deposition in half-graben basins (Dunlap Formation) which locally cloaks eustatically( ) controlled depositional sequences. Within these limitations, three regionally extensive sequences are recognized in the reference sections and have lower boundaries at the base of Upper Triassic shallow marine to deltaic carbonate-clastic rocks (Luning Formation) and at the base and within subtidal to offshore-marine carbonate and clastic rocks (Triassic and Jurassic Volcano Peak Group).

  5. Detecting pore-lining regions in transmembrane protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alpha-helical transmembrane channel and transporter proteins play vital roles in a diverse range of essential biological processes and are crucial in facilitating the passage of ions and molecules across the lipid bilayer. However, the experimental difficulties associated with obtaining high quality crystals has led to their significant under-representation in structural databases. Computational methods that can identify structural features from sequence alone are therefore of high importance. Results We present a method capable of automatically identifying pore-lining regions in transmembrane proteins from sequence information alone, which can then be used to determine the pore stoichiometry. By labelling pore-lining residues in crystal structures using geometric criteria, we have trained a support vector machine classifier to predict the likelihood of a transmembrane helix being involved in pore formation. Results from testing this approach under stringent cross-validation indicate that prediction accuracy of 72% is possible, while a support vector regression model is able to predict the number of subunits participating in the pore with 62% accuracy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first tool capable of identifying pore-lining regions in proteins and we present the results of applying it to a data set of sequences with available crystal structures. Our method provides a way to characterise pores in transmembrane proteins and may even provide a starting point for discovering novel routes of therapeutic intervention in a number of important diseases. This software is freely available as source code from: http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/downloads/memsat-svm/. PMID:22805427

  6. Comparison of Sequencing (Barcode Region) and Sequence-Tagged-Site PCR for Blastocystis Subtyping

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Blastocystis is the most common nonfungal microeukaryote of the human intestinal tract and comprises numerous subtypes (STs), nine of which have been found in humans (ST1 to ST9). While efforts continue to explore the relationship between human health status and subtypes, no consensus regarding subtyping methodology exists. It has been speculated that differences detected in subtype distribution in various cohorts may to some extent reflect different approaches. Blastocystis subtypes have been determined primarily in one of two ways: (i) sequencing of small subunit rRNA gene (SSU-rDNA) PCR products and (ii) PCR with subtype-specific sequence-tagged-site (STS) diagnostic primers. Here, STS primers were evaluated against a panel of samples (n = 58) already subtyped by SSU-rDNA sequencing (barcode region), including subtypes for which STS primers are not available, and a small panel of DNAs from four other eukaryotes often present in feces (n = 18). Although the STS primers appeared to be highly specific, their sensitivity was only moderate, and the results indicated that some infections may go undetected when this method is used. False-negative STS results were not linked exclusively to certain subtypes or alleles, and evidence of substantial genetic variation in STS loci was obtained. Since the majority of DNAs included here were extracted from feces, it is possible that STS primers may generally work better with DNAs extracted from Blastocystis cultures. In conclusion, due to its higher applicability and sensitivity, and since sequence information is useful for other forms of research, SSU-rDNA barcoding is recommended as the method of choice for Blastocystis subtyping. PMID:23115257

  7. Artificial Intelligence Controls Tape-Recording Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Otamura, Roy M.; Zottarelli, Lawrence J.

    1989-01-01

    Developmental expert-system computer program intended to schedule recording of large amounts of data on limited amount of magnetic tape. Schedules recording using two sets of rules. First set incorporates knowledge of locations for recording of new data. Second set incorporates knowledge about issuing commands to recorder. Designed primarily for use on Voyager Spacecraft, also applicable to planning and sequencing in industry.

  8. PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS IN THE CEPHEUS FLARE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kun, Maria; Balog, Zoltan; Kenyon, Scott J.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Gutermuth, Robert A.

    2009-12-01

    We present results of optical spectroscopic and BVR {sub C} I {sub C} photometric observations of 77 pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars in the Cepheus flare region. A total of 64 of these are newly confirmed PMS stars, originally selected from various published candidate lists. We estimate effective temperatures and luminosities for the PMS stars, and comparing the results with PMS evolutionary models, we estimate stellar masses of 0.2-2.4 M {sub sun} and stellar ages of 0.1-15 Myr. Among the PMS stars, we identify 15 visual binaries with separations of 2-10 arcsec. From archival IRAS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and Spitzer data, we construct their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and classify 5% of the stars as Class I, 10% as Flat SED, 60% as Class II, and 3% as Class III young stellar objects. We identify 12 classical T Tauri stars and two weak-line T Tauri stars as members of NGC 7023, with a mean age of 1.6 Myr. The 13 PMS stars associated with L1228 belong to three small aggregates: RNO 129, L1228A, and L1228S. The age distribution of the 17 PMS stars associated with L1251 suggests that star formation has propagated with the expansion of the Cepheus flare shell. We detect sparse aggregates of {approx}6-7 Myr old PMS stars around the dark clouds L1177 and L1219, at a distance of {approx}400 pc. Three T Tauri stars appear to be associated with the Herbig Ae star SV Cep at a distance of 600 pc. Our results confirm that the molecular complex in the Cepheus flare region contains clouds of various distances and star-forming histories.

  9. Time Sequence of Jupiter's Equatorial Region (Time Sets 2 & 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Time sequence of Jupiter's equatorial region at 756 nanometers (nm). The mosaics cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 22,000 kilometers and were taken ten hours (approximately one Jovian rotation) apart. The dark region near the center of the mosaic is an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the Galileo Probe entry site. The near-infrared continuum filter shows the features of Jupiter's main visible cloud deck.

    Jupiter's atmospheric circulation is dominated by alternating jets of east/west (zonal) winds. The bands have different widths and wind speeds but have remained constant as long as telescopes and spacecraft have measured them. The top half of these mosaics lies within Jupiter's North Equatorial Belt, a westward (left) current. The bottom half shows part of the Equatorial Zone, a fast moving eastward current. The clouds near the hotspot are the fastest moving features in these mosaics, moving at about 100 meters per second, or 224 miles per hour.

    North is at the top. The mosaics cover latitudes 1 to 19 degrees and are centered at longitude 336 degrees West. The grid lines, fixed in longitude, mark 350 degrees west (on the left edge) with decreasing longitude lines marking every 5 degrees moving east (to the right). The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers by the Solid State Imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  10. Iterative exponential growth of stereo- and sequence-controlled polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jonathan C.; Ehrlich, Deborah J. C.; Gao, Angela X.; Leibfarth, Frank A.; Jiang, Yivan; Zhou, Erica; Jamison, Timothy F.; Johnson, Jeremiah A.

    2015-10-01

    Chemists have long sought sequence-controlled synthetic polymers that mimic nature's biopolymers, but a practical synthetic route that enables absolute control over polymer sequence and structure remains a key challenge. Here, we report an iterative exponential growth plus side-chain functionalization (IEG+) strategy that begins with enantiopure epoxides and facilitates the efficient synthesis of a family of uniform >3 kDa macromolecules of varying sequence and stereoconfiguration that are coupled to produce unimolecular polymers (>6 kDa) with sequences and structures that cannot be obtained using traditional polymerization techniques. Selective side-chain deprotection of three hexadecamers is also demonstrated, which imbues each compound with the ability to dissolve in water. We anticipate that these new macromolecules and the general IEG+ strategy will find broad application as a versatile platform for the scalable synthesis of sequence-controlled polymers.

  11. Intrusion Detection in Control Systems using Sequence Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, Mai; Onoda, Takashi

    Intrusion detection is considered effective in control systems. Sequences of the control application behavior observed in the communication, such as the order of the control device to be controlled, are important in control systems. However, most intrusion detection systems do not effectively reflect sequences in the application layer into the detection rules. In our previous work, we considered utilizing sequences for intrusion detection in control systems, and demonstrated the usefulness of sequences for intrusion detection. However, manually writing the detection rules for a large system can be difficult, so using machine learning methods becomes feasible. Also, in the case of control systems, there have been very few observed cyber attacks, so we have very little knowledge of the attack data that should be used to train the intrusion detection system. In this paper, we use an approach that combines CRF (Conditional Random Field) considering the sequence of the system, thus able to reflect the characteristics of control system sequences into the intrusion detection system, and also does not need the knowledge of attack data to construct the detection rules.

  12. Colorectal Cancer Genetic Heterogeneity Delineated by Multi-Region Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rui; Xie, Zhen-Rong; Luo, Hua-You; Zeng, Yu-Jian; Xu, Yu; Wang, La-Mei; Kong, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Kun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) leads to an underestimation of the mutational landscape portrayed by a single needle biopsy and consequently affects treatment precision. The extent of colorectal cancer (CRC) genetic ITH is not well understood in Chinese patients. Thus, we conducted deep sequencing by using the OncoGxOne™ Plus panel, targeting 333 cancer-specific genes in multi-region biopsies of primary and liver metastatic tumors from three Chinese CRC patients. We determined that the extent of ITH varied among the three cases. On average, 65% of all the mutations detected were common within individual tumors. KMT2C aberrations and the NCOR1 mutation were the only ubiquitous events. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis showed that the tumors evolved in a branched manner. Comparison of the primary and metastatic tumors revealed that PPP2R1A (E370X), SETD2 (I1608V), SMAD4 (G382T), and AR splicing site mutations may be specific to liver metastatic cancer. These mutations might contribute to the initiation and progression of distant metastasis. Collectively, our analysis identified a substantial level of genetic ITH in CRC, which should be considered for personalized therapeutic strategies. PMID:27023146

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi: sequence analysis of the variable region of kinetoplast minicircles.

    PubMed

    Telleria, Jenny; Lafay, Bénédicte; Virreira, Myrna; Barnabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel; Svoboda, Michal

    2006-12-01

    The comparisons of 170 sequences of kinetoplast DNA minicircle hypervariable region obtained from 19 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi and 2 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi marenkellei showed that only 56% exhibited a significant homology one with other sequences. These sequences could be grouped into homology classes showing no significant sequence similarity with any other homology group. The 44% remaining sequences thus corresponded to unique sequences in our data set. In the DTU I ("Discrete Typing Units") 51% of the sequences were unique. In contrast, in the DTU IId, 87.5% of sequences were distributed into three classes. The results obtained for T. cruzi marinkellei, showed that all sequences were unique, without any similarity between them and T. cruzi sequences. Analysis of palindromes in all sequence sets show high frequency of the EcoRI site. Analysis of repetitive sequences suggested a common ancestral origin of the kDNA. The editing mechanism that occurs in kinetoplastidae is discussed. PMID:16730709

  14. Development of a species-specific sequence-characterized amplified region marker for roses.

    PubMed

    Riaz, S; Sadia, B; Awan, F S; Khan, I A; Sadaqat, H A; Khan, I A

    2012-01-01

    DNA fingerprints of four rose species, Rosa centifolia, R. Gruss-an-Teplitz, R. bourboniana, and R. damascena, were developed using RAPD-PCR. We identified a unique polymorphic band in R. centifolia. This 762-bp fragment was produced by the random primer GLI-2. The fragment was eluted and directly cloned in a TA cloning vector, pTZ57R/T. Digestion of the plasmid with EcoRI confirmed the cloning of GLI-2(762) in pTZ57R/T. A second enzyme, PstI, used in combination with EcoRI, gave complete digestion of the plasmid, and the 762-bp fragment was confirmed on the gel. Subsequently, the polymorphic amplicon was sequenced with an AB1 373 DNA sequencer system using the PRISM(TM) Ready Reaction DyeDeoxy(TM) Terminator Cycle Sequencing kit. After sequencing, specific primers (23 bp long) were designed based on the sequence of the flanking regions of the original RAPD fragment. These primers will effectively allow fingerprinting for the identification of R. centifolia species. In essence, we developed an SCAR marker to authenticate the identity of R. centifolia species and to distinguish it from its substitutes. Such techniques are required not only to complement conventional parameters in creating the passport data of commercial and medicinal products of rose, but also for routine quality control in commercial and government rosaries and rose nurseries. PMID:22427036

  15. Phaneorozoic sequence stratigraphy of Bolivia and adjacent regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sempere, T. )

    1993-02-01

    Phaneorozoic sequence stratigraphy of the Pacific margin of western South America, particularly the Bolivian section, has been completed and new interpretations and hypotheses have been proposed as a result of data analyses of this information. The Paleozoic margin was initially passive (late Cambrian-Llanvirn, [open quotes]Puna aulacogen[close quotes]), but became active during a middle Ordovician compressional episode. Most of late Cambrian to early Triassic Bolivian rocks are of marine origin, with dark shale units recording sea level rises, whereas middle Triassic to Recent rocks were mainly deposited in continental environments (except six restricted-marine ingressions in the late Cretaceous-Danian, and one in the late Miocene, all with hydrocarbon potential). A noteworthy similarity exists between the Devonian to Jurassic stratigraphies of Bolivia and the Parana basin, suggesting that Bolivia behaved as part of the Brazilian craton from late Cambrian to late Jurassic, when it was captured into the Pacific margin geotectonic system. Organic-rich units correlate with Paleozoic highstand deposits and younger ingressions. The Bolivian Phanerozoic strata is characterized by thick layers, partly due to middle Ordovician-Carboniferous and late Cretaceous-Cenozoic foreland basins. Paleozoic foreland geometries include northeastern onlaps and, potentially, stratigraphic traps. Hydrocarbon generation, migration and trapping mainly depended on Cenozoic structural loading and burial and on propagation of Andean deformation which are comprised of Paleozoic shale decollements. Precise knowledge of the evolution of the Phanerozoic geodynamic contexts and basin geometries through sedimentation and subsequent deformations is crucial for hydrocarbon exploration strategies in these regions.

  16. Visual attention control in image sequences using multiple knowledge sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasch, Jost

    1993-05-01

    Both biological visual systems and image understanding systems are forced by resource limitations to reduce input data to their essential part, to keep the amount of data manageable in succeeding processing levels and to maintain a realistic chance to achieve real-time performance even for complex tasks. We present a new design and implementation of a visual attention control system (GOAL) for a significant reduction of data while maintaining salient information. The visual attention system deals not with synthetic images or simple static images but is developed for complex dynamic real image sequences emphasizing arbitrary traffic scenes recorded from a car built-in camera. GOAL is part of the image understanding system MOVIE for real-time interpretation of traffic scenes and supports the model-based scene analysis (MOSAIC) by directing high-level vision processes to salient regions. Based on a model of human attention (the guided search model from Wolfe and Cave) requirements for the module `visual attention' of an image understanding system are derived. GOAL combines different knowledge sources (both motion and shape-oriented) to achieve a robust, spatially restricting, and expectation-driven attention control system. The knowledge sources consist of four very basic image operations, namely (1) enhanced difference image method, (2) direct depth method, (3) local symmetry detection, and (4) 2D - 3D line movement. Each knowledge source contributes to an accumulated evidence for the existence of attention fields. The knowledge sources are temporally stabilized by using a Kalman filter. The nonlinear combination of multiple knowledge sources makes the selection of attention fields much more robust even with merely increasing computational power. This is shown with results from various real image sequences.

  17. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions using infrared fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Steffens, D L; Roy, R

    1998-06-01

    The non-coding region of the mitochondrial genome provides an attractive target for human forensic identification studies. Two hypervariable (HV) regions, each approximately 250-350 bp in length, contain the majority of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variability among different individuals. Various approaches to determine mtDNA sequence were evaluated utilizing highly sensitive infrared (IR) fluorescence detection. HV regions were amplified either together or separately and cycle-sequenced using a Thermo Sequenase protocol. An M13 universal primer sequence tail covalently attached to the 5' terminus of an amplification primer facilitated electrophoretic analysis and direct sequencing of the amplification products using IR detection. PMID:9631201

  18. Automated manual transmission shift sequence controller

    DOEpatents

    Lawrie, Robert E.; Reed, Richard G.; Rausen, David J.

    2000-02-01

    A powertrain system for a hybrid vehicle. The hybrid vehicle includes a heat engine, such as a diesel engine, and an electric machine, which operates as both, an electric motor and an alternator, to power the vehicle. The hybrid vehicle also includes a manual-style transmission configured to operate as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver. The engine and the electric machine drive an input shaft which in turn drives an output shaft of the transmission. In addition to driving the transmission, the electric machine regulates the speed of the input shaft in order to synchronize the input shaft during either an upshift or downshift of the transmission by either decreasing or increasing the speed of the input shaft. When decreasing the speed of the input shaft, the electric motor functions as an alternator to produce electrical energy which may be stored by a storage device. Operation of the transmission is controlled by a transmission controller which receives input signals and generates output signals to control shift and clutch motors to effect smooth launch, upshift shifts, and downshifts of the transmission, so that the transmission functions substantially as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver, while internally substantially functioning as a manual transmission.

  19. Control for stochastic sampling variation and qualitative sequencing error in next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, Thomas; Crawford, Erin L.; Yeo, Jiyoun; Zhang, Xiaolu; Willey, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical implementation of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) is challenged by poor control for stochastic sampling, library preparation biases and qualitative sequencing error. To address these challenges we developed and tested two hypotheses. Methods Hypothesis 1: Analytical variation in quantification is predicted by stochastic sampling effects at input of (a) amplifiable nucleic acid target molecules into the library preparation, (b) amplicons from library into sequencer, or (c) both. We derived equations using Monte Carlo simulation to predict assay coefficient of variation (CV) based on these three working models and tested them against NGS data from specimens with well characterized molecule inputs and sequence counts prepared using competitive multiplex-PCR amplicon-based NGS library preparation method comprising synthetic internal standards (IS). Hypothesis 2: Frequencies of technically-derived qualitative sequencing errors (i.e., base substitution, insertion and deletion) observed at each base position in each target native template (NT) are concordant with those observed in respective competitive synthetic IS present in the same reaction. We measured error frequencies at each base position within amplicons from each of 30 target NT, then tested whether they correspond to those within the 30 respective IS. Results For hypothesis 1, the Monte Carlo model derived from both sampling events best predicted CV and explained 74% of observed assay variance. For hypothesis 2, observed frequency and type of sequence variation at each base position within each IS was concordant with that observed in respective NTs (R2 = 0.93). Conclusion In targeted NGS, synthetic competitive IS control for stochastic sampling at input of both target into library preparation and of target library product into sequencer, and control for qualitative errors generated during library preparation and sequencing. These controls enable accurate clinical diagnostic reporting of

  20. Deep sequencing of the MHC region in the Chinese population contributes to studies of complex disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fusheng; Cao, Hongzhi; Zuo, Xianbo; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Liu, Xiaomin; Xu, Ricong; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Yuanwei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Jin, Xin; Gao, Jinping; Mei, Junpu; Sheng, Yujun; Li, Qibin; Liang, Bo; Shen, Juan; Shen, Changbing; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Caihong; Fan, Xing; Xu, Fengping; Yue, Min; Yin, Xianyong; Ye, Chen; Zhang, Cuicui; Liu, Xiao; Yu, Liang; Wu, Jinghua; Chen, Mengyun; Zhuang, Xuehan; Tang, Lili; Shao, Haojing; Wu, Longmao; Li, Jian; Xu, Yu; Zhang, Yijie; Zhao, Suli; Wang, Yu; Li, Ge; Xu, Hanshi; Zeng, Lei; Wang, Jianan; Bai, Mingzhou; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Wei; Kang, Tian; Wu, Yanyan; Xu, Xun; Zhu, Zhengwei; Cui, Yong; Wang, Zaixing; Yang, Chunjun; Wang, Peiguang; Xiang, Leihong; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Anping; Gao, Xinghua; Zhang, Furen; Xu, Jinhua; Zheng, Min; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Jianzhong; Yu, Xueqing; Li, Yingrui; Yang, Sen; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Liu, Jianjun; Hammarström, Lennart; Sun, Liangdan; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-07-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region has been shown to be associated with numerous diseases. However, it remains a challenge to pinpoint the causal variants for these associations because of the extreme complexity of the region. We thus sequenced the entire 5-Mb MHC region in 20,635 individuals of Han Chinese ancestry (10,689 controls and 9,946 patients with psoriasis) and constructed a Han-MHC database that includes both variants and HLA gene typing results of high accuracy. We further identified multiple independent new susceptibility loci in HLA-C, HLA-B, HLA-DPB1 and BTNL2 and an intergenic variant, rs118179173, associated with psoriasis and confirmed the well-established risk allele HLA-C*06:02. We anticipate that our Han-MHC reference panel built by deep sequencing of a large number of samples will serve as a useful tool for investigating the role of the MHC region in a variety of diseases and thus advance understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:27213287

  1. Mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region-1 sequence variation and phylogeny of the concolor gibbons, Nomascus.

    PubMed

    Monda, Keri; Simmons, Rachel E; Kressirer, Philipp; Su, Bing; Woodruff, David S

    2007-11-01

    The still little known concolor gibbons are represented by 14 taxa (five species, nine subspecies) distributed parapatrically in China, Myanmar, Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. To set the stage for a phylogeographic study of the genus we examined DNA sequences from the highly variable mitochondrial hypervariable region-1 (HVR-1 or control region) in 51 animals, mostly of unknown geographic provenance. We developed gibbon-specific primers to amplify mtDNA noninvasively and obtained >477 bp sequences from 38 gibbons in North American and European zoos and >159 bp sequences from ten Chinese museum skins. In hindsight, we believe these animals represent eight of the nine nominal subspecies and four of the five nominal species. Bayesian, maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony haplotype network analyses gave concordant results and show Nomascus to be monophyletic. Significant intraspecific variation within N. leucogenys (17 haplotypes) is comparable with that reported earlier in Hylobates lar and less than half the known interspecific pairwise distances in gibbons. Sequence data support the recognition of five species (concolor, leucogenys, nasutus, gabriellae and probably hainanus) and suggest that nasutus is the oldest and leucogenys, the youngest taxon. In contrast, the subspecies N. c. furvogaster, N. c. jingdongensis, and N. leucogenys siki, are not recognizable at this otherwise informative genetic locus. These results show that HVR-1 sequence is variable enough to define evolutionarily significant units in Nomascus and, if coupled with multilocus microsatellite or SNP genotyping, more than adequate to characterize their phylogeographic history. There is an urgent need to obtain DNA from gibbons of known geographic provenance before they are extirpated to facilitate the conservation genetic management of the surviving animals. PMID:17455231

  2. Chronology of Eocene-Miocene sequences on the New Jersey shallow shelf: implications for regional, interregional, and global correlations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, James V.; Miller, Kenneth G.; Sugarman, Peter J.; Barron, John; McCarthy, Francine M.G.; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Katz, Miriam E.; Feigenson, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 313 continuously cored and logged latest Eocene to early-middle Miocene sequences at three sites (M27, M28, and M29) on the inner-middle continental shelf offshore New Jersey, providing an opportunity to evaluate the ages, global correlations, and significance of sequence boundaries. We provide a chronology for these sequences using integrated strontium isotopic stratigraphy and biostratigraphy (primarily calcareous nannoplankton, diatoms, and dinocysts [dinoflagellate cysts]). Despite challenges posed by shallow-water sediments, age resolution is typically ±0.5 m.y. and in many sequences is as good as ±0.25 m.y. Three Oligocene sequences were sampled at Site M27 on sequence bottomsets. Fifteen early to early-middle Miocene sequences were dated at Sites M27, M28, and M29 across clinothems in topsets, foresets (where the sequences are thickest), and bottomsets. A few sequences have coarse (∼1 m.y.) or little age constraint due to barren zones; we constrain the age estimates of these less well dated sequences by applying the principle of superposition, i.e., sediments above sequence boundaries in any site are younger than the sediments below the sequence boundaries at other sites. Our age control provides constraints on the timing of deposition in the clinothem; sequences on the topsets are generally the youngest in the clinothem, whereas the bottomsets generally are the oldest. The greatest amount of time is represented on foresets, although we have no evidence for a correlative conformity. Our chronology provides a baseline for regional and interregional correlations and sea-level reconstructions: (1) we correlate a major increase in sedimentation rate precisely with the timing of the middle Miocene climate changes associated with the development of a permanent East Antarctic Ice Sheet; and (2) the timing of sequence boundaries matches the deep-sea oxygen isotopic record, implicating glacioeustasy as a major driver

  3. Sequence analysis of two genomic regions containing the KIT and the FMS receptor tyrosine kinase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, C.; Hampe, A.; Lachaume, P.

    1997-01-15

    The KIT and FMS tyrosine kinase receptors, which are implicated in the control of cell growth and differentiation, stem through duplications from a common ancestor. We have conducted a detailed structural analysis of the two loci containing the KIT and FMS genes. The sequence of the {approximately}90-kb KIT locus reveals the position and size of the 21 introns and of the 5{prime} regulatory region of the KIT gene. The introns and the 3{prime}-untranslated parts of KIT and FMS have been analyzed in parallel. Comparison of the two sequences shows that, while introns of both genes have extensively diverged in size and sequence, this divergence is, at least in part, due to intron expansion through internal duplications, as suggested by the discrete extant analogies. Repetitive elements as well as exon predictions obtained using the GRAIL and GENEFINDER programs are described in detail. These programs led us to identify a novel gene, designated SMF, immediately downstream of FMS, in the opposite orientation. This finding emphasizes the gene-rich characteristic of this genomic region. 49 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. OrfPredictor: predicting protein-coding regions in EST-derived sequences.

    PubMed

    Min, Xiang Jia; Butler, Gregory; Storms, Reginald; Tsang, Adrian

    2005-07-01

    OrfPredictor is a web server designed for identifying protein-coding regions in expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived sequences. For query sequences with a hit in BLASTX, the program predicts the coding regions based on the translation reading frames identified in BLASTX alignments, otherwise, it predicts the most probable coding region based on the intrinsic signals of the query sequences. The output is the predicted peptide sequences in the FASTA format, and a definition line that includes the query ID, the translation reading frame and the nucleotide positions where the coding region begins and ends. OrfPredictor facilitates the annotation of EST-derived sequences, particularly, for large-scale EST projects. OrfPredictor is available at https://fungalgenome.concordia.ca/tools/OrfPredictor.html. PMID:15980561

  5. Sequence of the dog immunoglobulin alpha and epsilon constant region genes

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, M.; Selinger, D.; Mark, G.E.; Hollis, G.F.; Hickey, G.J.

    1995-03-01

    The immunoglobulin alpha (IGHAC) and epsilon (IGHEC) germline constant region genes were isolated from a dog liver genomic DNA library. Sequence analysis indicates that the dog IGHEC gene is encoded by four exons spread out over 1.7 kilobases (kb). The IGHAC sequence encompasses 1.5 kb and includes all three constant region coding exons. The complete exon/intron sequence of these genes is described. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Sequence analysis of the 3' non-coding region of mouse immunoglobulin light chain messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hamlyn, P H; Gillam, S; Smith, M; Milstein, C

    1977-01-01

    Using an oligonucleotide d(pT10-C-A) as primer, cDNA has been transcribed from the 3' non-coding region of mouse immunoglobulin light chain mRNA and sequenced by a modification1 of the 'plus-minus' gel method2. The sequence obtained has partially corrected and extended a previously obtained sequence3. The new data contains an unusual sequence in which a trinucleotide is repeated seven times. Images PMID:405661

  7. [Structure analysis of mtDNA control region of spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) and its related species].

    PubMed

    He, Chong-Bo; Cao, Jie; Liu, Wei-Dong; Zhou, Zun-Chun; Ge, Long-Li; Gao, Xiang-Gang; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2007-07-01

    Spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) is the only species of Genus Verasper in China. The fish was naturally distributed in Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea in northern China and Kyushu in Japan and in Korean sea area. Using PCR product direct sequencing, mitochondrial control region sequences of 24 individuals of spotted halibut was confirmed and analyzed. 4 control region haplotypes, resulting from length heteroplamy of the tandem repeat region, was obtained from these 24 fish. Sequence analysis demonstrated that there were four similar structures in the control region, i.e., extended terminal associated sequences (ETAS), central conserved sequence block (CSB), conserved sequence block (CSB), and repeat region, in V. moseri, Limanda ferruginea, Reinhardtius hippoglossoides, Heppoglossoides platessoides, Paralichthys olivaceous, Solea solea, S. senegalensis, and S. lascari. By comparing with other vertebrates, we found that there were similar repeated sequences immediately after the CSB-3 in all of the anuran species. PMID:17646149

  8. Modular sequence elements associated with origin regions in eukaryotic chromosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Dobbs, D L; Shaiu, W L; Benbow, R M

    1994-01-01

    We have postulated that chromosomal replication origin regions in eukaryotes have in common clusters of certain modular sequence elements (Benbow, Zhao, and Larson, BioEssays 14, 661-670, 1992). In this study, computer analyses of DNA sequences from six origin regions showed that each contained one or more potential initiation regions consisting of a putative DUE (DNA unwinding element) aligned with clusters of SAR (scaffold associated region), and ARS (autonomously replicating sequence) consensus sequences, and pyrimidine tracts. The replication origins analyzed were from the following loci: Tetrahymena thermophila macronuclear rDNA gene, Chinese hamster ovary dihydrofolate reductase amplicon, human c-myc proto-oncogene, chicken histone H5 gene, Drosophila melanogaster chorion gene cluster on the third chromosome, and Chinese hamster ovary rhodopsin gene. The locations of putative initiation regions identified by the computer analyses were compared with published data obtained using diverse methods to map initiation sites. For at least four loci, the potential initiation regions identified by sequence analysis aligned with previously mapped initiation events. A consensus DNA sequence, WAWTTDDWWWDHWGWHMAWTT, was found within the potential initiation regions in every case. An additional 35 kb of combined flanking sequences from the six loci were also analyzed, but no additional copies of this consensus sequence were found. Images PMID:8041609

  9. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10–49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n = 2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n = 2), Candida tropicalis (n = 1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n = 1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study. PMID:26506340

  10. Control of Task Sequences: What Is the Role of Language?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich; Kleffner-Canucci, Killian; Kikumoto, Atsushi; Redford, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    It is almost a truism that language aids serial-order control through self-cuing of upcoming sequential elements. We measured speech onset latencies as subjects performed hierarchically organized task sequences while "thinking aloud" each task label. Surprisingly, speech onset latencies and response times (RTs) were highly synchronized,…

  11. Timing, Sequencing, and Executive Control in Repetitive Movement Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krampe, Ralf Th.; Mayr, Ulrich; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2005-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that the timing and sequencing of target durations require low-level timing and executive control. Sixteen young (M-sub(age) = 19 years) and 16 older (M-sub(age) = 70 years) adults participated in 2 experiments. In Experiment 1, individual mean-variance functions for low-level timing (isochronous tapping) and the sequencing…

  12. MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR POPULATIONS IN THE VIRGO OVERDENSITY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Tisserand, P.; Willman, B.; Arimoto, N.; Okamoto, S.; Mateo, M.; Saviane, I.; Walsh, S.; Geha, M.; Jordan, A.; Zoccali, M.; Olszewski, E.; Walker, M.; Kroupa, P.

    2013-05-20

    We present deep color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for two Subaru Suprime-Cam fields in the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS)/Virgo Overdensity (VOD) and compare them to a field centered on the highest concentration of Sagittarius (Sgr) Tidal Stream stars in the leading arm, Branch A of the bifurcation. A prominent population of main-sequence stars is detected in all three fields and can be traced as faint as g Almost-Equal-To 24 mag. Using theoretical isochrone fitting, we derive an age of 9.1{sup +1.0}{sub -1.1} Gyr, a median abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.70{sup +0.15}{sub -0.20} dex, and a heliocentric distance of 30.9 {+-} 3.0 kpc for the main sequence of the Sgr Stream Branch A. The dominant main-sequence populations in the two VSS/VOD fields ({Lambda}{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 265 Degree-Sign , B{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 13 Degree-Sign ) are located at a mean distance of 23.3 {+-} 1.6 kpc and have an age of {approx}8.2 Gyr, and an abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.67{sup +0.16}{sub -0.12} dex, similar to the Sgr Stream stars. These statistically robust parameters, derived from the photometry of 260 main-sequence stars, are also in good agreement with the age of the main population in the Sgr dwarf galaxy (8.0 {+-} 1.5 Gyr). They also agree with the peak in the metallicity distribution of 2-3 Gyr old M giants, [Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -0.6 dex, in the Sgr north leading arm. We then compare the results from the VSS/VOD fields with the Sgr Tidal Stream model by Law and Majewski based on a triaxial Galactic halo shape that is empirically calibrated with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Sgr A-branch and Two Micron All Sky Survey M-giant stars. We find that the most prominent feature in the CMDs, the main-sequence population at 23 kpc, is not explained by the model. Instead the model predicts in these directions a low-density filamentary structure of Sgr debris stars at {approx}9 kpc and a slightly higher concentration of Sgr stars spread over a heliocentric distance range of 42-53 kpc. At best

  13. Pre-main-sequence population in NGC 1893 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. K.; Samal, M. R.; Chauhan, N.; Eswaraiah, C.; Pandey, J. C.; Chen, W. P.; Ojha, D. K.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we continued our efforts to understand the star formation scenario in and around the young cluster NGC 1893. We used a sample of the young stellar sources (YSOs) identified on the basis of multiwavelength data (optical, near-infrared (NIR), mid-infrared (MIR) and X-ray) to study the nature of YSOs associated with the region. The identified YSOs show an age spread of ~ 5 Myr. The YSOs located near the nebulae at the periphery of the cluster are relatively younger in comparison to those located within the cluster region. The present results are in accordance with those obtained by us in previous studies. Other main results from the present study are: 1) the fraction of disk bearing stars increases towards the periphery of the cluster; 2) there is an evidence supporting the notion that the mechanisms for disk dispersal operate less efficiently for low-mass stars; 3) the sample of Class II sources is found to be relatively older in comparison to that of Class III sources. A comparison of various properties of YSOs in the NGC 1893 region with those in the Tr 37/ IC 1396 region is also discussed.

  14. Sequence Controlled Self-Knotting Colloidal Patchy Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coluzza, Ivan; van Oostrum, Peter D. J.; Capone, Barbara; Reimhult, Erik; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Knotted chains are a promising class of polymers with many applications for materials science and drug delivery. Here we introduce an experimentally realizable model for the design of chains with controllable topological properties. Recently, we have developed a systematic methodology to construct self-assembling chains of simple particles, with final structures fully controlled by the sequence of particles along the chain. The individual particles forming the chain are colloids decorated with mutually interacting patches, which can be manufactured in the laboratory with current technology. Our methodology is applied to the design of sequences folding into self-knotting chains, in which the end monomers are by construction always close together in space. The knotted structure can then be externally locked simply by controlling the interaction between the end monomers, paving the way to applications in the design and synthesis of active materials and novel carriers for drugs delivery.

  15. Characterization and evolution of the mitochondrial DNA control region in hornbills (Bucerotiformes).

    PubMed

    Delport, Wayne; Ferguson, J Willem H; Bloomer, Paulette

    2002-06-01

    We determined the mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of six Bucerotiformes. Hornbills have the typical avian gene order and their control region is similar to other avian control regions in that it is partitioned into three domains: two variable domains that flank a central conserved domain. Two characteristics of the hornbill control region sequence differ from that of other birds. First, domain I is AT rich as opposed to AC rich, and second, the control region is approximately 500 bp longer than that of other birds. Both these deviations from typical avian control region sequence are explainable on the basis of repeat motifs in domain I of the hornbill control region. The repeat motifs probably originated from a duplication of CSB-1 as has been determined in chicken, quail, and snowgoose. Furthermore, the hornbill repeat motifs probably arose before the divergence of hornbills from each other but after the divergence of hornbills from other avian taxa. The mitochondrial control region of hornbills is suitable for both phylogenetic and population studies, with domains I and II probably more suited to population and phylogenetic analyses, respectively. PMID:12029361

  16. Multiple interdependent sequence elements control splicing of a fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 alternative exon.

    PubMed Central

    Del Gatto, F; Plet, A; Gesnel, M C; Fort, C; Breathnach, R

    1997-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene contains a pair of mutually exclusive alternative exons, one of which (K-SAM) is spliced specifically in epithelial cells. We have described previously (F. Del Gatto and R. Breathnach, Mol. Cell. Biol. 15:4825-4834, 1995) some elements controlling K-SAM exon splicing, namely weak exon splice sites, an exon-repressing sequence, and an intron-activating sequence. We identify here two additional sequences in the intron downstream from the K-SAM exon which activate splicing of the exon. The first sequence (intron-activating sequence 2 [IAS2]) lies 168 to 186 nucleotides downstream from the exon's 5' splice site. The second sequence (intron-activating sequence 3 [IAS3]) lies 933 to 1,052 nucleotides downstream from the exon's 5' splice site. IAS3 is a complex region composed of several parts, one of which (nucleotides 963 to 983) can potentially form an RNA secondary structure with IAS2. This structure is composed of two stems separated by an asymmetric bulge. Mutations which disrupt either stem decrease activation, while compensatory mutations which reestablish the stem restore activation, either completely or partially, depending on the mutation. We present a model for K-SAM exon splicing involving the intervention of multiple, interdependent pre-mRNA sequence elements. PMID:9271388

  17. Sequence analysis and compositional properties of untranslated regions of human mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Pesole, G; Fiormarino, G; Saccone, C

    1994-03-25

    A detailed computer analysis of the untranslated regions, 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR, of human mRNA sequences is reported. The compositional properties of these regions, compared with those of the corresponding coding regions, indicate that 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR are less affected by the isochore compartmentalization than the corresponding third codon positions of mRNAs. The presence of higher functional constraints in 5'-UTR is also reported. Dinucleotide analysis shows a depletion of CpG and TpA in both sequences. A search for significant sequence motifs using the WORDUP algorithm reveals the patterns already known to have a functional role in the mRNA UTR, and several other motifs whose functional roles remain to be demonstrated. This type of analysis may be particularly useful for guiding site-directed mutagenesis experiments. In addition, it can be used for assessing the nature of anonymous sequences now produced in large amounts in megabase sequencing projects. PMID:8144029

  18. Analysis of the cystic fibrosis lung microbiota via serial Illumina sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA hypervariable regions.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Heather; Wang, Pauline W; Diaz Caballero, Julio; Fung, Pauline; Gong, Yunchen; Donaldson, Sylva L; Yuan, Lijie; Keshavjee, Shaf; Zhang, Yu; Yau, Yvonne C W; Waters, Valerie J; Tullis, D Elizabeth; Hwang, David M; Guttman, David S

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of bacterial communities using DNA sequencing has revolutionized our ability to study microbes in nature and discover the ways in which microbial communities affect ecosystem functioning and human health. Here we describe Serial Illumina Sequencing (SI-Seq): a method for deep sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene using next-generation sequencing technology. SI-Seq serially sequences portions of the V5, V6 and V7 hypervariable regions from barcoded 16S rRNA amplicons using an Illumina short-read genome analyzer. SI-Seq obtains taxonomic resolution similar to 454 pyrosequencing for a fraction of the cost, and can produce hundreds of thousands of reads per sample even with very high multiplexing. We validated SI-Seq using single species and mock community controls, and via a comparison to cystic fibrosis lung microbiota sequenced using 454 FLX Titanium. Our control runs show that SI-Seq has a dynamic range of at least five orders of magnitude, can classify >96% of sequences to the genus level, and performs just as well as 454 and paired-end Illumina methods in estimation of standard microbial ecology diversity measurements. We illustrate the utility of SI-Seq in a pilot sample of central airway secretion samples from cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:23056217

  19. Analysis of the regions flanking the human insulin gene and sequence of an Alu family member.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G I; Pictet, R; Rutter, W J

    1980-01-01

    The regions around the human insulin gene have been studied by heteroduplex, hybridization and sequence analysis. These studies indicated that there is a region of heterogeneous length located approximately 700 bp before the 5' end of the gene; and that the 19 kb of cloned DNA which includes the 1430 bp insulin gene as well as 5650 bp before and 11,500 bp after the gene is single copy sequence except for 500 bp located 6000 bp from the 3' end of the gene. This 500 bp segment contains a member of the Alu family of dispersed middle repetitive sequences as well as another less highly repeated homopolymeric segment. The sequence of this region was determined. This Alu repeat is bordered by 19 bp direct repeats and also contains an 83 bp sequence which is present twice. The regions flanking the human and rat I insulin genes were compared by heteroduplex analysis to localize homologous sequences in the flanking regions which could be involved in the regulation of insulin biosynthesis. The homology between the two genes is restricted to the region encoding preproinsulin and a short region of approximately 60 bp flanking the 5' side of the genes. Images PMID:6253909

  20. Sequence of the Saccharomyces GAL region and its transcription in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Citron, B A; Donelson, J E

    1984-01-01

    In Saccharomyces, the enzymes used to convert galactose to glucose are specified by three coordinately expressed, tightly linked genes, GAL7, GAL10, and GAL1. These genes are induced by galactose and are controlled by the positive regulator gene gal4 and the negative regulator gene gal80. GAL81 mutations, which are known to alter the gal4 protein, produce a constitutive phenotype. We have cloned fragments of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis DNA that span 26.3 kilobases surrounding the three clustered GAL genes. About 5 kilobases of the sequence was determined, which includes the entire GAL1 gene, the two intercistronic regions, and portions of the coding sequences of GAL10 and GAL7. Some amino acid homology between the GAL1 gene product, galactokinase, and the Escherichia coli galactokinase was detected. By using various Saccharomyces DNA fragments, the accumulation of GAL1 and GAL10 RNA in yeast cells after induction with galactose was studied. Our results, using wild-type, gal4-, gal80-, and GAL81-1- yeast cells, support the hypothesis that control is exerted at the transcriptional level. Images PMID:6715281

  1. Proximal and distal sequences control UV cone pigment gene expression in transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenqin; Williams, John; Smallwood, Philip M; Touchman, Jeffrey W; Roman, Laura M; Nathans, Jeremy

    2004-04-30

    The molecular basis of cone photoreceptor-specific gene expression is largely unknown. In this study, we define cis-acting DNA sequences that control the cell type-specific expression of the zebrafish UV cone pigment gene by transient expression of green fluorescent protein transgenes following their injection into zebrafish embryos. These experiments show that 4.8 kb of 5'-flanking sequences from the zebrafish UV pigment gene direct expression specifically to UV cones and that this activity requires both distal and proximal sequences. In addition, we demonstrate that a proximal region located between -215 and -110 bp (with respect to the initiator methionine codon) can function in the context of a zebrafish rhodopsin promotor to convert its specificity from rod-only expression to rod and UV cone expression. These experiments demonstrate the power of transient transgenesis in zebrafish to efficiently define cis-acting regulatory sequences in an intact vertebrate. PMID:14966125

  2. Biothems: Sequence stratigraphic units and their implications for regional tectono-stratigraphic interpretations

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, H.R. ); Frye, M.W. ); Couples, G.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Biothems are regional wedge- or lens-shaped bodies of strata that are bounded shelfward or cratonward by paleontologically recognizable unconformities; generally thicken on marine shelves, where they are typically conformable with underlying and overlying biothems; are commonly thinner or represent starved sequences further basinward; and in their most basinward extent, are either bounded by biostratigraphically recognizable unconformities or are conformable with underlying and overlying biothems. As recognized to date, biothems have a logical distribution of faunal and floral components, as well as facies groupings that represent internally consistent and logical sequences of depositional environments. A west-to-east transect within the North American Mississippian System which extends from the Basin and Range Province, across the Transcontinental Arch (TA), into the Anadarko Basin, was constructed to demonstrate the regional distribution and tectono-stratigraphic significance of biothems relative to the axis of the TA. The relationships portrayed on the transect, tied to an understanding of North American Mississippian paleogeography, imply that biothems deposited during relative highstand events on one flank of the TA are time-equivalent to biothems deposited during relative lowstand events on the opposite flank of the TA. This distribution is interpreted to have been controlled by intraplate tectonic events that formed piano key basins along the flanks of the TA. The spatial patterns of these basins are not consistent with published models of basin evolution. A further conclusion is that the lack of coincident, transgressive or regressive Mississippian biothems on either flank of the TA suggests that it is inadvisable to impose the Mississippi Valley-derived eustasy curve on western flank depositional sequences.

  3. Isolation and sequencing of a putative promoter region of the murine G protein beta 1 subunit (GNB1) gene.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Junichi; Kitanaka, Nobue; Takemura, Motohiko; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Hembree, Cambria M; Goodman, Nancy L; Uhl, George R

    2002-02-01

    The expression of the heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein beta 1 subunit gene (GNB1) is regulated by psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines. Since the up-regulation appears to be one of the candidate processes of sensitization, it is necessary to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanism of the GNB1 gene regulation for a better understanding the establishment of sensitization. In the present study, we describe the isolation and nucleotide sequence analysis of the GNB1 gene promoter region. We have isolated approximately 10 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the mouse of GNB1 gene and found potential elements involved in putative transcriptional control of the GNB1, such as AP1, AP2, Sp1, cyclic AMP response element, and nuclear factor kappa B recognition sites, within the sequences 0.3 kb upstream from the putative transcription start site. This region was highly rich in G + C content, but lacked TATA or CATT boxes. Comparing the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA clone with the human genome databases using the BLAST program a region containing putative exon 1 and promoter of the human GNB1 gene in chromosome 1 was found. The cloning and sequence analysis of an extensive portion of the 5'-flanking regulatory region of the GNB1 gene provides new insights into the factors involved in the regulation by psychostimulants of GNB1 expression. PMID:12180136

  4. Plasmonic Nanopores for Trapping, Controlling Displacement, and Sequencing of DNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of developing a DNA sequencing methodology, we theoretically examine the feasibility of using nanoplasmonics to control the translocation of a DNA molecule through a solid-state nanopore and to read off sequence information using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that high-intensity optical hot spots produced by a metallic nanostructure can arrest DNA translocation through a solid-state nanopore, thus providing a physical knob for controlling the DNA speed. Switching the plasmonic field on and off can displace the DNA molecule in discrete steps, sequentially exposing neighboring fragments of a DNA molecule to the pore as well as to the plasmonic hot spot. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the exposed DNA fragments contains information about their nucleotide composition, possibly allowing the identification of the nucleotide sequence of a DNA molecule transported through the hot spot. The principles of plasmonic nanopore sequencing can be extended to detection of DNA modifications and RNA characterization. PMID:26401685

  5. Plasmonic Nanopores for Trapping, Controlling Displacement, and Sequencing of DNA.

    PubMed

    Belkin, Maxim; Chao, Shu-Han; Jonsson, Magnus P; Dekker, Cees; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2015-11-24

    With the aim of developing a DNA sequencing methodology, we theoretically examine the feasibility of using nanoplasmonics to control the translocation of a DNA molecule through a solid-state nanopore and to read off sequence information using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that high-intensity optical hot spots produced by a metallic nanostructure can arrest DNA translocation through a solid-state nanopore, thus providing a physical knob for controlling the DNA speed. Switching the plasmonic field on and off can displace the DNA molecule in discrete steps, sequentially exposing neighboring fragments of a DNA molecule to the pore as well as to the plasmonic hot spot. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the exposed DNA fragments contains information about their nucleotide composition, possibly allowing the identification of the nucleotide sequence of a DNA molecule transported through the hot spot. The principles of plasmonic nanopore sequencing can be extended to detection of DNA modifications and RNA characterization. PMID:26401685

  6. Comparison of Exome and Genome Sequencing Technologies for the Complete Capture of Protein‐Coding Regions

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveld, Stefan H.; Spielmann, Malte; Mundlos, Stefan; Veltman, Joris A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT For next‐generation sequencing technologies, sufficient base‐pair coverage is the foremost requirement for the reliable detection of genomic variants. We investigated whether whole‐genome sequencing (WGS) platforms offer improved coverage of coding regions compared with whole‐exome sequencing (WES) platforms, and compared single‐base coverage for a large set of exome and genome samples. We find that WES platforms have improved considerably in the last years, but at comparable sequencing depth, WGS outperforms WES in terms of covered coding regions. At higher sequencing depth (95x–160x), WES successfully captures 95% of the coding regions with a minimal coverage of 20x, compared with 98% for WGS at 87‐fold coverage. Three different assessments of sequence coverage bias showed consistent biases for WES but not for WGS. We found no clear differences for the technologies concerning their ability to achieve complete coverage of 2,759 clinically relevant genes. We show that WES performs comparable to WGS in terms of covered bases if sequenced at two to three times higher coverage. This does, however, go at the cost of substantially more sequencing biases in WES approaches. Our findings will guide laboratories to make an informed decision on which sequencing platform and coverage to choose. PMID:25973577

  7. Whole-genome sequencing to control antimicrobial resistance

    PubMed Central

    Köser, Claudio U.; Ellington, Matthew J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2014-01-01

    Following recent improvements in sequencing technologies, whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is positioned to become an essential tool in the control of antibiotic resistance, a major threat in modern healthcare. WGS has already found numerous applications in this area, ranging from the development of novel antibiotics and diagnostic tests through to antibiotic stewardship of currently available drugs via surveillance and the elucidation of the factors that allow the emergence and persistence of resistance. Numerous proof-of-principle studies have also highlighted the value of WGS as a tool for day-to-day infection control and, for some pathogens, as a primary diagnostic tool to detect antibiotic resistance. However, appropriate data analysis platforms will need to be developed before routine WGS can be introduced on a large scale. PMID:25096945

  8. Research on the timing sequence control in large laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Wang, Lingfang; Wang, Chao; Tang, Ling; Chen, Ji; Zhang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The timing sequence, between different pulses in SG-III laser facility, is controlled with three arbitrary waveform generators. The external clock and trigger are used to inhibit the timing jitter, which is provided by the synchronization system. Close-loop monitoring is used to make sure that the temporal phase can be recovered after reboot of the arbitrary waveform generator. The verification experiment shows that the three arbitrary waveform generators can work synchronously , which ensures the synchronization error control of the SG-III laser facility.

  9. Flagellar transcriptional activators FlbB and FlaI: gene sequences and 5' consensus sequences of operons under FlbB and FlaI control.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D H; Frantz, B B; Matsumura, P

    1988-01-01

    The regulation of the expression of the operons in the flagella-chemotaxis regulon in Escherichia coli has been shown to be a highly ordered cascade which closely parallels the assembly of the flagellar structure and the chemotaxis machinery (T. Iino, Annu. Rev. Genet. 11:161-182, 1977; Y. Komeda, J. Bacteriol. 168: 1315-1318). The master operon, flbB, has been sequenced, and one of its gene products (FlaI) has been identified. On the basis of the deduced amino acid sequence, the FlbB protein has similarity to an alternate sigma factor which is responsible for expression of flagella in Bacillus subtilis. In addition, we have sequenced the 5' regions of a number of flagellar operons and compared these sequences with the 5' region of flagellar operons directly and indirectly under FlbB and FlaI control. We found both a consensus sequence which has been shown to be in all other flagellar operons (J. D. Helmann and M. J. Chamberlin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:6422-6424) and a derivative consensus sequence, which is found only in the 5' region of operons directly under FlbB and FlaI control. Images PMID:2832369

  10. Mapping of retrotransposon sequences in the unstable region surrounding the spinal muscular atrophy locus in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M.J.; Nesbit, M.A.; Theodosiou, A.M.

    1995-05-20

    The mutation that underlies the autosomal recessive disorder spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is located on chromosome 5q13. Recent studies show that SMA patients frequently have deletions and rearrangements in this region compared to normal controls. During the isolation of candidate cDNAs for the disease, the authors identified a sequence that shows high homology to the THE-1 retrotransposon gene family. Using YAC fragmentation techniques, they have refined the localization of this sequence to the domain known to show instability in SMA patients. The implication of these results for the mechanism of the mutation in SMA is discussed. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Automatic detection of regions of interest in complex video sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberger, Wilfried M.; Rohaly, Ann M.

    2001-06-01

    Studies of visual attention and eye movements have shown that people generally attend to only a few areas in typical scenes. These areas are commonly referred to as regions of interest (ROIs). When scenes are viewed with the same context and motivation, these ROIs are often highly correlated amongst different people, motivating the development of computational models of visual attention. This paper describes a novel model of visual attention designed to provide an accurate and robust prediction of a viewer's locus of attention across a wide range of typical video content. The model has been calibrated and verified using data gathered in an experiment in which the eye movements of 24 viewers were recorded while viewing material form a large database of still and video scenes. Certain characteristics of the scene content, such as moving objects, people, foreground and centrally-located objects, were found to exert a strong influence on viewers' attention. The results of comparing model predictions to experimental data demonstrate a strong correlation between the predicted ROIs and viewers' fixations.

  12. Hemispheric asymmetries and the control of motor sequences.

    PubMed

    Serrien, Deborah J; Sovijärvi-Spapé, Michiel M

    2015-04-15

    Sequencing of finger positions reflects a prototype of skilled behaviour. In order to perform sequencing, cognitive control supports the requirements and postural transitions. In this electroencephalography (EEG) study, we evaluate the effects of hand dominance and assess the neural correlates of unimanual and bimanual sequencing in left- and right-handers. The behavioural measurements provided an index of response planning (response time to first key press) and response execution (time between successive key presses, taps/s and percentage of correct responses), whereas the neural dynamics was determined by means of EEG coherence, expressing the functional connectivity between brain areas. Correlations between brain activity and behaviour were calculated for exploring the neural correlates that are functionally relevant for sequencing. Brain-behavioural correlations during response planning and execution revealed the significance of circuitry in the left hemisphere, underlining its significant role in the organisation of goal-directed behaviour. This lateralisation profile was independent of intrinsic constraints (hand dominance) and extrinsic demands (task requirements), suggesting essential higher-order computations in the left hemisphere. Overall, the observations highlight that the left hemisphere is specialised for sequential motor organisation in left- and right-handers, suggesting an endogenous hemispheric asymmetry for compound actions and the representation of skill; processes that can be separated from those that are involved in hand dominance. PMID:25617529

  13. Tracking TCRβ Sequence Clonotype Expansions during Antiviral Therapy Using High-Throughput Sequencing of the Hypervariable Region

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark W.; Hughes, Joseph; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Swann, Rachael; Barclay, Stephen T.; Mills, Peter R.; Patel, Arvind H.; Thomson, Emma C.; McLauchlan, John

    2016-01-01

    To maintain a persistent infection viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) employ a range of mechanisms that subvert protective T cell responses. The suppression of antigen-specific T cell responses by HCV hinders efforts to profile T cell responses during chronic infection and antiviral therapy. Conventional methods of detecting antigen-specific T cells utilize either antigen stimulation (e.g., ELISpot, proliferation assays, cytokine production) or antigen-loaded tetramer staining. This limits the ability to profile T cell responses during chronic infection due to suppressed effector function and the requirement for prior knowledge of antigenic viral peptide sequences. Recently, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies have been developed for the analysis of T cell repertoires. In the present study, we have assessed the feasibility of HTS of the TCRβ complementarity determining region (CDR)3 to track T cell expansions in an antigen-independent manner. Using sequential blood samples from HCV-infected individuals undergoing antiviral therapy, we were able to measure the population frequencies of >35,000 TCRβ sequence clonotypes in each individual over the course of 12 weeks. TRBV/TRBJ gene segment usage varied markedly between individuals but remained relatively constant within individuals across the course of therapy. Despite this stable TRBV/TRBJ gene segment usage, a number of TCRβ sequence clonotypes showed dramatic changes in read frequency. These changes could not be linked to therapy outcomes in the present study; however, the TCRβ CDR3 sequences with the largest fold changes did include sequences with identical TRBV/TRBJ gene segment usage and high junction region homology to previously published CDR3 sequences from HCV-specific T cells targeting the HLA-B*0801-restricted 1395HSKKKCDEL1403 and HLA-A*0101-restricted 1435ATDALMTGY1443 epitopes. The pipeline developed in this proof of concept study provides a platform for the design of future

  14. Identification of Medically Important Yeast Species by Sequence Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Leaw, Shiang Ning; Chang, Hsien Chang; Sun, Hsiao Fang; Barton, Richard; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2006-01-01

    Infections caused by yeasts have increased in previous decades due primarily to the increasing population of immunocompromised patients. In addition, infections caused by less common species such as Pichia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon, and Saccharomyces spp. have been widely reported. This study extensively evaluated the feasibility of sequence analysis of the rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions for the identification of yeasts of clinical relevance. Both the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of 373 strains (86 species), including 299 reference strains and 74 clinical isolates, were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The sequences were compared to reference data available at the GenBank database by using BLAST (basic local alignment search tool) to determine if species identification was possible by ITS sequencing. Since the GenBank database currently lacks ITS sequence entries for some yeasts, the ITS sequences of type (or reference) strains of 15 species were submitted to GenBank to facilitate identification of these species. Strains producing discrepant identifications between the conventional methods and ITS sequence analysis were further analyzed by sequencing of the D1-D2 domain of the large-subunit rRNA gene for species clarification. The rates of correct identification by ITS1 and ITS2 sequence analysis were 96.8% (361/373) and 99.7% (372/373), respectively. Of the 373 strains tested, only 1 strain (Rhodotorula glutinis BCRC 20576) could not be identified by ITS2 sequence analysis. In conclusion, identification of medically important yeasts by ITS sequencing, especially using the ITS2 region, is reliable and can be used as an accurate alternative to conventional identification methods. PMID:16517841

  15. PROTEINS FROM EIGHT EUKARYOTIC CYTOCHROME P-450 FAMILIES SHARE A SEGMENTED REGION OF SEQUENCE SIMILARITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proteins from eight eukaryotic families in the cytochrome P-450 superfamily share one region of sequence similarity. his region begins 275-310 amino acids from the amino terminus of each P-450, continues for 170 residues, and ends 35-50 amino acids before the carboxyl terminus. h...

  16. DNA Replication Control Is Linked to Genomic Positioning of Control Regions in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is in part controlled by three non-coding genomic sequences, DARS1, DARS2, and datA that modulate the activity of the initiator protein DnaA. The relative distance from oriC to the non-coding regions are conserved among E. coli species, despite large variations in genome size. Here we use a combination of i) site directed translocation of each region to new positions on the bacterial chromosome and ii) random transposon mediated translocation followed by culture evolution, to show genetic evidence for the importance of position. Here we provide evidence that the genomic locations of these regulatory sequences are important for cell cycle control and bacterial fitness. In addition, our work shows that the functionally redundant DARS1 and DARS2 regions play different roles in replication control. DARS1 is mainly involved in maintaining the origin concentration, whether DARS2 is also involved in maintaining single cell synchrony. PMID:27589233

  17. A strategy for sequence control in vinyl polymers via iterative controlled radical cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Hibi, Yusuke; Ouchi, Makoto; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in sequence-controlled polymers toward advanced functional materials. However, control of side-chain order for vinyl polymers has been lacking feasibility in the field of polymer synthesis because of the inherent feature of chain-growth propagation. Here we show a general and versatile strategy to control sequence in vinyl polymers through iterative radical cyclization with orthogonally cleavable and renewable bonds. The proposed methodology employs a repetitive and iterative intramolecular cyclization via a radical intermediate in a one-time template with a radical-generating site at one end and an alkene end at the other, each of which is connected to a linker via independently cleavable and renewable bonds. The unique design specifically allowed control of radical addition reaction although inherent chain-growth intermediate (radical species) was used, as well as the iterative cycle and functionalization for resultant side chains, to lead to sequence-controlled vinyl polymers (or oligomers). PMID:26996881

  18. A strategy for sequence control in vinyl polymers via iterative controlled radical cyclization.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yusuke; Ouchi, Makoto; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in sequence-controlled polymers toward advanced functional materials. However, control of side-chain order for vinyl polymers has been lacking feasibility in the field of polymer synthesis because of the inherent feature of chain-growth propagation. Here we show a general and versatile strategy to control sequence in vinyl polymers through iterative radical cyclization with orthogonally cleavable and renewable bonds. The proposed methodology employs a repetitive and iterative intramolecular cyclization via a radical intermediate in a one-time template with a radical-generating site at one end and an alkene end at the other, each of which is connected to a linker via independently cleavable and renewable bonds. The unique design specifically allowed control of radical addition reaction although inherent chain-growth intermediate (radical species) was used, as well as the iterative cycle and functionalization for resultant side chains, to lead to sequence-controlled vinyl polymers (or oligomers). PMID:26996881

  19. A strategy for sequence control in vinyl polymers via iterative controlled radical cyclization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibi, Yusuke; Ouchi, Makoto; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2016-03-01

    There is a growing interest in sequence-controlled polymers toward advanced functional materials. However, control of side-chain order for vinyl polymers has been lacking feasibility in the field of polymer synthesis because of the inherent feature of chain-growth propagation. Here we show a general and versatile strategy to control sequence in vinyl polymers through iterative radical cyclization with orthogonally cleavable and renewable bonds. The proposed methodology employs a repetitive and iterative intramolecular cyclization via a radical intermediate in a one-time template with a radical-generating site at one end and an alkene end at the other, each of which is connected to a linker via independently cleavable and renewable bonds. The unique design specifically allowed control of radical addition reaction although inherent chain-growth intermediate (radical species) was used, as well as the iterative cycle and functionalization for resultant side chains, to lead to sequence-controlled vinyl polymers (or oligomers).

  20. Relative rates of evolution in the coding and control regions of African mtDNAs.

    PubMed

    Howell, Neil; Elson, Joanna L; Howell, Corinna; Turnbull, Douglass M

    2007-10-01

    Reduced median networks of African haplogroup L mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences were analyzed to determine the pattern of substitutions in both the noncoding control and coding regions. In particular, we attempted to determine the causes of the previously reported (Howell et al. 2004) violation of the molecular clock during the evolution of these sequences. In the coding region, there was a significantly higher rate of substitution at synonymous sites than at nonsynonymous sites as well as in the tRNA and rRNA genes. This is further evidence for the operation of purifying selection during human mtDNA evolution. For most sites in the control region, the relative rate of substitution was similar to the rate of neutral evolution (assumed to be most closely approximated by the substitution rate at 4-fold degenerate sites). However, there are a number of mutational hot spots in the control region, approximately 3% of the total sites, that have a rate of substitution greater than the neutral rate, at some sites by more than an order of magnitude. It is possible either that these sites are evolving under conditions of positive selection or that the substitution rate at some sites in the control region is strongly dependent upon sequence context. Finally, we obtained preliminary evidence for "nonideal" evolution in the control region, including haplogroup-specific substitution patterns and a decoupling between relative rates of substitution in the control and coding regions. PMID:17642471

  1. Proteome-Wide Discovery of Evolutionary Conserved Sequences in Disordered Regions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Yeh, Brian J.; van Dyk, Dewald; Davidson, Alan R.; Andrews, Brenda J.; Weiss, Eric L.; Moses, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    At least 30% of human proteins are thought to contain intrinsically disordered regions, which lack stable structural conformation. Despite lacking enzymatic functions and having few protein domains, disordered regions are functionally important for protein regulation and contain short linear motifs (short peptide sequences involved in protein-protein interactions), but in most disordered regions, the functional amino acid residues remain unknown. We searched for evolutionarily conserved sequences within disordered regions according to the hypothesis that conservation would indicate functional residues. Using a phylogenetic hidden Markov model (phylo-HMM), we made accurate, specific predictions of functional elements in disordered regions even when these elements are only two or three amino acids long. Among the conserved sequences that we identified were previously known and newly identified short linear motifs, and we experimentally verified key examples, including a motif that may mediate interaction between protein kinase Cbk1 and its substrates. We also observed that hub proteins, which interact with many partners in a protein interaction network, are highly enriched in these conserved sequences. Our analysis enabled the systematic identification of the functional residues in disordered regions and suggested that at least 5% of amino acids in disordered regions are important for function. PMID:22416277

  2. Different evolutionary patterns of SNPs between domains and unassigned regions in human protein-coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Pang, Erli; Wu, Xiaomei; Lin, Kui

    2016-06-01

    Protein evolution plays an important role in the evolution of each genome. Because of their functional nature, in general, most of their parts or sites are differently constrained selectively, particularly by purifying selection. Most previous studies on protein evolution considered individual proteins in their entirety or compared protein-coding sequences with non-coding sequences. Less attention has been paid to the evolution of different parts within each protein of a given genome. To this end, based on PfamA annotation of all human proteins, each protein sequence can be split into two parts: domains or unassigned regions. Using this rationale, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in protein-coding sequences from the 1000 Genomes Project were mapped according to two classifications: SNPs occurring within protein domains and those within unassigned regions. With these classifications, we found: the density of synonymous SNPs within domains is significantly greater than that of synonymous SNPs within unassigned regions; however, the density of non-synonymous SNPs shows the opposite pattern. We also found there are signatures of purifying selection on both the domain and unassigned regions. Furthermore, the selective strength on domains is significantly greater than that on unassigned regions. In addition, among all of the human protein sequences, there are 117 PfamA domains in which no SNPs are found. Our results highlight an important aspect of protein domains and may contribute to our understanding of protein evolution. PMID:26833483

  3. THE 'MAIN SEQUENCE' OF EXPLOSIVE SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS: DISCOVERY AND INTERPRETATION

    SciTech Connect

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Adams, Mitzi; Gary, G. Allen

    2009-08-01

    We examine the location and distribution of the production of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and major flares by sunspot active regions in the phase space of two whole-active-region magnetic quantities measured from 1897 SOHO/MDI magnetograms. These magnetograms track the evolution of 44 active regions across the central disk of radius 0.5 R {sub Sun}. The two quantities are {sup L}WL{sub SG}, a gauge of the total free energy in an active region's magnetic field, and {sup L}{phi}, a measure of the active region's total magnetic flux. From these data and each active region's history of production of CMEs, X flares, and M flares, we find (1) that CME/flare-productive active regions are concentrated in a straight-line 'main sequence' in (log {sup L}WL{sub SG}, log {sup L}{phi}) space, (2) that main-sequence active regions have nearly their maximum attainable free magnetic energy, and (3) evidence that this arrangement plausibly results from equilibrium between input of free energy to an explosive active region's magnetic field in the chromosphere and corona by contortion of the field via convection in and below the photosphere and loss of free energy via CMEs, flares, and coronal heating, an equilibrium between energy gain and loss that is analogous to that of the main sequence of hydrogen-burning stars in (mass, luminosity) space.

  4. Sequence Ready Characterization of the Pericentromeric Region of 19p12

    SciTech Connect

    Evan E. Eichler

    2006-08-31

    Current mapping and sequencing strategies have been inadequate within the proximal portion of 19p12 due, in part, to the presence of a recently expanded ZNF (zinc-finger) gene family and the presence of large (25-50 kb) inverted beta-satellite repeat structures which bracket this tandemly duplicated gene family. The virtual of absence of classically defined “unique” sequence within the region has hampered efforts to identify and characterize a suitable minimal tiling path of clones which can be used as templates required for finished sequencing of the region. The goal of this proposal is to develop and implement a novel sequence-anchor strategy to generate a contiguous BAC map of the most proximal portion of chromosome 19p12 for the purpose of complete sequence characterization. The target region will be an estimated 4.5 Mb of DNA extending from STS marker D19S450 (the beginning of the ZNF gene cluster) to the centromeric (alpha-satellite) junction of 19p11. The approach will entail 1) pre-selection of 19p12 BAC and cosmid clones (NIH approved library) utilizing both 19p12 -unique and 19p12-SPECIFIC repeat probes (Eichler et al., 1998); 2) the generation of a BAC/cosmid end-sequence map across the region with a density of one marker every 8kb; 3) the development of a second-generation of STS (sequence tagged sites) which will be used to identify and verify clonal overlap at the level of the sequence; 4) incorporation of these sequence-anchored overlapping clones into existing cosmid/BAC restriction maps developed at Livermore National Laboratory; and 5) validation of the organization of this region utilizing high-resolution FISH techniques (extended chromatin analysis) on monochromosomal 19 somatic cell hybrids and parental cell lines of source material. The data generated will be used in the selection of the most parsimonious tiling path of BAC clones to be sequenced as part of the JGI effort on chromosome 19 and should serve as a model for the sequence

  5. Analysis of tandem gene copies in maize chromosomal regions reconstructed from long sequence reads

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jiaqiang; Feng, Yaping; Kumar, Dibyendu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Tingting; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Messing, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Haplotype variation not only involves SNPs but also insertions and deletions, in particular gene copy number variations. However, comparisons of individual genomes have been difficult because traditional sequencing methods give too short reads to unambiguously reconstruct chromosomal regions containing repetitive DNA sequences. An example of such a case is the protein gene family in maize that acts as a sink for reduced nitrogen in the seed. Previously, 41–48 gene copies of the alpha zein gene family that spread over six loci spanning between 30- and 500-kb chromosomal regions have been described in two Iowa Stiff Stalk (SS) inbreds. Analyses of those regions were possible because of overlapping BAC clones, generated by an expensive and labor-intensive approach. Here we used single-molecule real-time (Pacific Biosciences) shotgun sequencing to assemble the six chromosomal regions from the Non-Stiff Stalk maize inbred W22 from a single DNA sequence dataset. To validate the reconstructed regions, we developed an optical map (BioNano genome map; BioNano Genomics) of W22 and found agreement between the two datasets. Using the sequences of full-length cDNAs from W22, we found that the error rate of PacBio sequencing seemed to be less than 0.1% after autocorrection and assembly. Expressed genes, some with premature stop codons, are interspersed with nonexpressed genes, giving rise to genotype-specific expression differences. Alignment of these regions with those from the previous analyzed regions of SS lines exhibits in part dramatic differences between these two heterotic groups. PMID:27354512

  6. Sequencing of the Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Region for Strain Identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Robert W.; Griffen, Ann L.; Wen, Bo-Gui; Leys, Eugene J.

    1999-01-01

    The ribosomal intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) of 19 laboratory strains and 30 clinical samples of Porphyromonas gingivalis were amplified by PCR and sequenced to provide a strain identifier. The ISR is a variable region of DNA located between the conserved 16S and 23S rRNA genes. This makes it an ideal locus for differentiation of strains within a species: primers specific for the conserved flanking genes were used to amplify the ISR, which was then sequenced to identify the strain. We have constructed a P. gingivalis ISR sequence database to facilitate strain identification. ISR sequence analysis provides a strain identifier that can be easily reproduced among laboratories and catalogued for unambiguous comparison. PMID:10405432

  7. Structure-function studies of HIV-1: influence of long terminal repeat U3 region sequences on virus production.

    PubMed

    Velpandi, A; Nagashunmugam, T; Otsuka, T; Cartas, M; Srinivasan, A

    1992-06-01

    DNA sequence analyses of several human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates revealed extensive genetic diversity in the env gene and, to a lesser extent, in other regions of the viral genome, including the long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences. Since the LTRs contain elements responsible for the control of transcription, the difference in the LTR region may play a crucial role in the overall replication rate of HIV. To evaluate the role of the LTR, we have constructed a number of infectious hybrid HIV molecular clones containing LTRs from different proviral DNAs linked to the body of the viral genome, and analyzed them in a transient expression system. Both parental and hybrid proviral DNAs were transfected into human rhabdomyosarcoma cells for monitoring virus production. Proviral DNA designate pZ6 (HIVZr6) showed a high level of virus in the medium of the transfected culture in comparison to the pHXB2 (HIVHTLV-III) and pARV (HIVSF-2) DNAs. Hybrid proviral DNAs containing viral genes from pZ6, linked to LTR U3 sequences of pHXB2 and pARV at the 5' end, showed virus production similar to the levels observed with pZ6. These results indicate that the extent of virus production does not correlate with the LTR U3 sequences, and may involve other regions of the viral genome. PMID:1351391

  8. Comparative Genomic Sequence Analysis of the Human Chromosome 21 Down Syndrome Critical Region

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Atsushi; Noguchi, Hideki; Taylor, Todd D.; Ito, Takehiko; Pletcher, Mathew T.; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Reeves, Roger H.; Hattori, Masahira

    2002-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of the gene content of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) is essential for understanding the etiology of Down syndrome (DS). Here we report the largest comparison of finished mouse and human sequence to date for a 1.35-Mb region of mouse chromosome 16 (MMU16) that corresponds to human chromosome 21q22.2. This includes a portion of the commonly described “DS critical region,” thought to contain a gene or genes whose dosage imbalance contributes to a number of phenotypes associated with DS. We used comparative sequence analysis to construct a DNA feature map of this region that includes all known genes, plus 144 conserved sequences ≥100 bp long that show ≥80% identity between mouse and human but do not match known exons. Twenty of these have matches to expressed sequence tag and cDNA databases, indicating that they may be transcribed sequences from chromosome 21. Eight putative CpG islands are found at conserved positions. Models for two human genes, DSCR4 and DSCR8, are not supported by conserved sequence, and close examination indicates that low-level transcripts from these loci are unlikely to encode proteins. Gene prediction programs give different results when used to analyze the well-conserved regions between mouse and human sequences. Our findings have implications for evolution and for modeling the genetic basis of DS in mice. [Sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the DDBJ/GenBank under accession nos. AP003148 through AP003158, and AB066227. Supplemental material is available at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:12213769

  9. Delineation of the regulatory region sequences of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virB operon.

    PubMed Central

    Das, A; Pazour, G J

    1989-01-01

    A virB-lacZ translational fusion was constructed to monitor expression of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens virB operon. Expression of the fusion gene was dependent on the presence of pTiA6 virA, virG, and a plant factor acetosyringone. Analysis of deletion mutants, constructed by exonuclease Bal31 digestion, showed that 68 residues upstream of the virB transcription initiation site was necessary for its expression. A TT----CC substitution at positions -62 and -61 led to a 7 fold reduction in virB expression. The virB upstream region contains a tetradecameric sequence, dPuT/ATDCAATGHAAPy (D = A, G or T; H = A, C or T), that is conserved in the non-transcribed regions of all vir genes. Alteration of the position of this sequence relative to the promoter region sequences had a drastic negative effect on virB expression. PMID:2748333

  10. Structure of mitochondrial DNA control region of Pholis fangi and its phylogenetic implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Dianrong; Gao, Tianxiang

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of Pholis fangi was amplified via polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing. The length of the mtDNA CR consensus sequence of P. fangi was 853 bp in length. In accordance with the recognition sites as were previously reported in fish species, the mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi can be divided into 3 domains, i.e., the extended terminal associated sequence (ETAS), the central conserved sequence block (CSB), and the CSB domain. In addition, the following structures were identified in the mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi: 2 ETASs in the ETAS domain (TAS and cTAS), 6 CSBs in the central CSB domain (CSB-F to CSB-A), and 3 CSBs in the CSB domain (CSB-1 to CSB-3). These demonstrated that the structure of the mtDNA CR of P. fangi was substantially different from those of most other fish species. The mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi contained one conserved region from 656 bp to 815 bp. Similar to most other fish species, P. fangi has no tandem repeat sequences in its mtDNA CR sequence. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete mtDNA CR sequences showed that there were no genetic differences within P. fangi populations of the same geographical origin and between P. fangi populations of different geographical origins.

  11. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    PubMed Central

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.; Eberhard, Jessica R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Sanchez, Juan J.; Hernandez, Alexis; Müeller, Heinrich; Graves, Gary R.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Wright, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified with increasing frequency, particularly in birds (Class Aves). In this study, we investigate the evolutionary history of mitochondrial control region states within the avian order Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos). To this aim, we reconstructed a comprehensive multi-locus phylogeny of parrots, used PCR of three diagnostic fragments to classify the mitochondrial control region state as single or duplicated, and mapped these states onto the phylogeny. We further sequenced 44 selected species to validate these inferences of control region state. Ancestral state reconstruction using a range of weighting schemes identified six independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications within Psittaciformes. Analysis of sequence data showed that varying levels of mitochondrial gene and tRNA homology and degradation were present within a given clade exhibiting duplications. Levels of divergence between control regions within an individual varied from 0–10.9% with the differences occurring mainly between 51 and 225 nucleotides 3′ of the goose hairpin in domain I. Further investigations into the fates of duplicated mitochondrial genes, the potential costs and benefits of having a second control region, and the complex relationship between evolutionary rates, selection, and time since duplication are needed to fully explain these patterns in the mitochondrial genome. PMID:22543055

  12. Mitochondrial DNA control region of three mackerels, genus Rastrelliger: structure, molecular diversity and phylogenetic relationship.

    PubMed

    Jondeung, Amnuay; Karinthanyakit, Wirangrong

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial control regions (CR) of three mackerels (Rastrelliger spp.) were examined and analyzed. The CR contained three domains, in which three termination-associated sequences (TAS-I, TAS-II and TAS-III), two central conserved sequence blocks (CSB-E, CSB-D), three conserved sequence blocks (CSB-I, CSB-II, and CSB-III) and a putative promoter were detected. Molecular indices analyses of the aligned complete CR sequences showed high level of haplotype diversities and genetic divergences among the three species. The intraspecific divergence among species of this genus ranked from 0.25% to 1.62% and interspecific divergence from 1.90% to 4.30%. The phylogenetic tree shows monophyly with R. brachysoma as a basal species of Rastrelliger. Applying the average divergence rate for fish control regions, the results suggest that the time of separation among Rastrelligers could have occurred in the middle Pleistocene era. PMID:26119119

  13. Programmed factor binding to simian virus 40 GC-box replication and transcription control sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, R L; Gralla, J D

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear footprinting revealed a temporal program involving factor binding to the repetitive GC-box DNA elements present in the simian virus 40 regulatory region. This program specified ordered and directional binding to these tandem regulatory sequences in vivo during the late phase of infection. The program was interrupted by the DNA replication inhibitor aphidicolin or by inactivation of the viral replication factor simian virus 40 T antigen, suggesting a link between viral DNA replication and new factor binding. Measurements of DNA accumulation in viruses lacking either the distal or proximal halves of the GC-box region suggested that the region has a dual role in replication control. Overall, the data point to important relationships between DNA replication and factor binding to the GC-box DNA, a multifunctional regulatory region. Images PMID:2152821

  14. Regional Changes in the Sequence of Cotton Leaf Curl Multan Betasatellite

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Sohail; Tahir, Muhammad Nouman; Baloch, Ghulam Rasool; Javaid, Shaista; Khan, Ali Qaiser; Amin, Imran; Briddon, Rob W.; Mansoor, Shahid

    2014-01-01

    Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) in Pakistan and northwestern India is caused by monopartite begomoviruses in association with an essential, disease-specific satellite, Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMB). Following a recent upsurge in CLCuD problems in Sindh province (southern Pakistan), sequences of clones of CLCuMB were obtained from Sindh and Punjab province (central Pakistan), where CLCuD has been a problem since the mid-1980s. The sequences were compared to all sequences of CLCuMB available in the databases. Analysis of the sequences shows extensive sequence variation in CLCuMB, most likely resulting from recombination. The range of sequence variants differ between Sindh, the Punjab and northwestern India. The possible significance of the findings with respect to movement of the CLCuD between the three regions is discussed. Additionally, the lack of sequence variation within the only coding sequence of CLCuMB suggests that the betasatellite is not involved in resistance breaking which became a problem after 2001 in the Punjab and subsequently also in northwestern India. PMID:24859342

  15. Nucleotide sequence of the regulatory locus controlling expression of bacterial genes for bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1987-01-01

    Production of light by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and by recombinant hosts containing cloned lux genes is controlled by the density of the culture. Density-dependent regulation of lux gene expression has been shown to require a locus consisting of the luxR and luxI genes and two closely linked divergent promoters. As part of a genetic analysis to understand the regulation of bioluminescence, we have sequenced the region of DNA containing this control circuit. Open reading frames corresponding to luxR and luxI were identified; transcription start sites were defined by S1 nuclease mapping and sequences resembling promoter elements were located. Images PMID:3697093

  16. Natural and artificial RNAs occupy the same restricted region of sequence space

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ryan; Lladser, Manuel E.; Wu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Chen; Yarus, Michael; De Sterck, Hans; Knight, Rob

    2010-01-01

    Different chemical and mutational processes within genomes give rise to sequences with different compositions and perhaps different capacities for evolution. The evolution of functional RNAs may occur on a “neutral network” in which sequences with any given function can easily mutate to sequences with any other. This neutral network hypothesis is more likely if there is a particular region of composition that contains sequences that are functional in general, and if many different functions are possible within this preferred region of composition. We show that sequence preferences in active sites recovered by in vitro selection combine with biophysical folding rules to support the neutral network hypothesis. These simple active-site specifications and folding preferences obtained by artificial selection experiments recapture the previously observed purine bias and specific spread along the GC axis of naturally occurring aptamers and ribozymes isolated from organisms, although other types of RNAs, such as miRNA precursors and spliceosomal RNAs, that act primarily through complementarity to other amino acids do not share these preferences. These universal evolved sequence features are therefore intrinsic in RNA molecules that bind small-molecule targets or catalyze reactions. PMID:20032164

  17. Functional analysis and nucleotide sequence of the promoter region of the murine hck gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, P; Stanley, E; Holtzman, D A; Dunn, A R

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of the promoter region and exon 1 of the murine hck gene have been characterized in detail. RNase protection analysis has established that hck transcripts initiate from heterogeneous start sites located within the hck gene. Fusion gene constructs containing hck 5'-flanking sequences and the bacterial Neor gene have been introduced into the hematopoietic cell lines FDC-P1 and WEHI-265 by using a self-inactivating retroviral vector. The transcriptional start sites of the fusion gene are essentially identical to those of the endogenous hck gene. Analysis of infected WEHI-265 cell lines treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reveals a 3- to 5-fold elevation in the levels of endogenous hck mRNA and a 1.4- to 2.6-fold increase in the level of Neor fusion gene transcripts, indicating that hck 5'-flanking sequences are capable of conferring LPS responsiveness on the Neor gene. The 5'-flanking region of the hck gene contains sequences similar to an element which is thought to be involved in the LPS responsiveness of the class II major histocompatibility gene A alpha k. A subset of these sequences are also found in the 5'-flanking regions of other LPS-responsive genes. Moreover, this motif is related to the consensus binding sequence of NF-kappa B, a transcription factor which is known to be regulated by LPS. Images PMID:2388619

  18. Translational control by lysine-encoding A-rich sequences

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Laura L.; Pavlovic-Djuranovic, Slavica; Koutmou, Kristin S.; Green, Rachel; Szczesny, Pawel; Djuranovic, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression involves a wide array of cellular mechanisms that control the abundance of the RNA or protein products of that gene. We describe a gene regulatory mechanism that is based on polyadenylate [poly(A)] tracks that stall the translation apparatus. We show that creating longer or shorter runs of adenosine nucleotides, without changes in the amino acid sequence, alters the protein output and the stability of mRNA. Sometimes, these changes result in the production of an alternative “frameshifted” protein product. These observations are corroborated using reporter constructs and in the context of recombinant gene sequences. About 2% of genes in the human genome may be subject to this uncharacterized yet fundamental form of gene regulation. The potential pool of regulated genes encodes many proteins involved in nucleic acid binding. We hypothesize that the genes we identify are part of a large network whose expression is fine-tuned by poly(A) tracks, and we provide a mechanism through which synonymous mutations may influence gene expression in pathological states. PMID:26322332

  19. Human phosphoribosylformylglycineamide amidotransferase (FGARAT): regional mapping, complete coding sequence, isolation of a functional genomic clone, and DNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Patterson, D; Bleskan, J; Gardiner, K; Bowersox, J

    1999-11-01

    Purines play essential roles in many cellular functions, including DNA replication, transcription, intra- and extra-cellular signaling, energy metabolism, and as coenzymes for many biochemical reactions. The de-novo synthesis of purines requires 10 enzymatic steps for the production of inosine monophosphate (IMP). Defects in purine metabolism are associated with human diseases. Further, many anticancer agents function as inhibitors of the de-novo biosynthetic pathway. Genes or cDNAs for most of the enzymes comprising this pathway have been isolated from humans or other mammals. One notable exception is the phosphoribosylformylglycineamide amidotransferase (FGARAT) gene, which encodes the fourth step of this pathway. This gene has been cloned from numerous microorganisms and from Drosophila melanogaster and C. elegans. We report here the identification of a human cDNA containing the coding region of the FGARAT mRNA and the isolation of a P1 clone that contains an intact human FGARAT gene. The P1 clone corrects the purine auxotrophy and protein deficiency of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants (AdeB) deficient in both the activity and the protein for FGARAT. The P1 clone was used to regionally map the FGARAT gene to chromosome region 17p13, a location consistent with our prior assignment of this gene to chromosome 17. A comparison of the DNA sequence of the human FGARAT and FGARAT DNA sequence from 17 other organisms is reported. The isolation of this gene means that DNA clones for all the 10 steps of IMP synthesis have been isolated from humans or other mammals. PMID:10548741

  20. Role of DNA sequence in chromatin remodeling and the formation of nucleosome-free regions

    PubMed Central

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    AT-rich DNA is concentrated in the nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) associated with transcription start sites of most genes. We tested the hypothesis that AT-rich DNA engenders NFR formation by virtue of its rigidity and consequent exclusion of nucleosomes. We found that the AT-rich sequences present in many NFRs have little effect on the stability of nucleosomes. Rather, these sequences facilitate the removal of nucleosomes by the RSC chromatin remodeling complex. RSC activity is stimulated by AT-rich sequences in nucleosomes and inhibited by competition with AT-rich DNA. RSC may remove NFR nucleosomes without effect on adjacent ORF nucleosomes. Our findings suggest that many NFRs are formed and maintained by an active mechanism involving the ATP-dependent removal of nucleosomes rather than a passive mechanism due to the intrinsic instability of nucleosomes on AT-rich DNA sequences. PMID:25403179

  1. Role of DNA sequence in chromatin remodeling and the formation of nucleosome-free regions.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2014-11-15

    AT-rich DNA is concentrated in the nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) associated with transcription start sites of most genes. We tested the hypothesis that AT-rich DNA engenders NFR formation by virtue of its rigidity and consequent exclusion of nucleosomes. We found that the AT-rich sequences present in many NFRs have little effect on the stability of nucleosomes. Rather, these sequences facilitate the removal of nucleosomes by the RSC chromatin remodeling complex. RSC activity is stimulated by AT-rich sequences in nucleosomes and inhibited by competition with AT-rich DNA. RSC may remove NFR nucleosomes without effect on adjacent ORF nucleosomes. Our findings suggest that many NFRs are formed and maintained by an active mechanism involving the ATP-dependent removal of nucleosomes rather than a passive mechanism due to the intrinsic instability of nucleosomes on AT-rich DNA sequences. PMID:25403179

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 LTR TATA and TAR region sequences required for transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J A; Harrich, D; Soultanakis, E; Wu, F; Mitsuyasu, R; Gaynor, R B

    1989-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 LTR is regulated at the transcriptional level by both cellular and viral proteins. Using HeLa cell extracts, multiple regions of the HIV LTR were found to serve as binding sites for cellular proteins. An untranslated region binding protein UBP-1 has been purified and fractions containing this protein bind to both the TAR and TATA regions. To investigate the role of cellular proteins binding to both the TATA and TAR regions and their potential interaction with other HIV DNA binding proteins, oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis of both these regions was performed followed by DNase I footprinting and transient expression assays. In the TATA region, two direct repeats TC/AAGC/AT/AGCTGC surround the TATA sequence. Mutagenesis of both of these direct repeats or of the TATA sequence interrupted binding over the TATA region on the coding strand, but only a mutation of the TATA sequence affected in vivo assays for tat-activation. In addition to TAR serving as the site of binding of cellular proteins, RNA transcribed from TAR is capable of forming a stable stem-loop structure. To determine the relative importance of DNA binding proteins as compared to secondary structure, oligonucleotide-directed mutations in the TAR region were studied. Local mutations that disrupted either the stem or loop structure were defective in gene expression. However, compensatory mutations which restored base pairing in the stem resulted in complete tat-activation. This indicated a significant role for the stem-loop structure in HIV gene expression. To determine the role of TAR binding proteins, mutations were constructed which extensively changed the primary structure of the TAR region, yet left stem base pairing, stem energy and the loop sequence intact. These mutations resulted in decreased protein binding to TAR DNA and defects in tat-activation, and revealed factor binding specifically to the loop DNA sequence. Further mutagenesis which inverted

  3. POLYMORPHISM IN THE CODING REGION SEQUENCE OF GDF8 GENE IN INDIAN SHEEP.

    PubMed

    Pothuraju, M; Mishra, S K; Kumar, S N; Mohamed, N F; Kataria, R S; Yadav, D K; Arora, R

    2015-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify polymorphism in the coding sequence of GDF8gene across indigenous meat type sheep breeds. A 1647 bp sequence was generated, encompassing 208 bp of the 5'UTR, 1128 bp of coding region (exon1, 2 and 3) as well as 311 bp of 3'UTR. The sheep and goat GDF8 gene sequences were observed to be highly conserved as compared to cattle, buffalo, horse and pig. Several nucleotide variations were observed across coding sequence of GDF8 gene in Indian sheep. Three polymorphic sites were identified in the 5'UTR, one in exon 1 and one in the exon 2 regions. Both SNPs in the exonic region were found to be non-synonymous. The mutations c.539T > G and c.821T > A discovered in this study in the exon 1 and exon 2, respectively, have not been previously reported. The information generated provides preliminary indication of the functional diversity present in Indian sheep at the coding region of GDF8gene. The novel as well as the previously reported SNPs discovered in the Indian sheep warrant further analysis to see whether they affect the phenotype. Future studies will need to establish the affect of reported SNPs in the expression of the GDF8 gene in Indian sheep population. PMID:26845859

  4. Rapid detection and sequencing of alleles in the 3' flanking region of the interleukin-6 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bowcock, A M; Ray, A; Erlich, H; Sehgal, P B

    1989-01-01

    The 3' flanking region of the interleukin 6 gene is polymorphic due to insertions of different size. Within this region lies a sequence of approximately 500 base pairs that is AT rich. Based on flanking sequence information we have constructed oligonucleotides which prime the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and amplify this AT rich region. The amplification products visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis gave fragment sizes for both homozygous and heterozygous individuals that were concordant with those observed by conventional genomic blotting techniques. Alleles that could not be typed by Southern analysis were resolved with this approach. These results illustrate the value of PCR for the rapid detection of length polymorphisms such as those due to variable numbers of tandem repeats. In contrast to RFLP analysis this procedure takes less than a day to perform, is cheaper, avoids the use of radioactivity and requires far less substrate DNA. Three different human alleles were sequenced, and differences were detected that were due to both large duplications and loss of one or two bases, suggesting that AT rich regions identify highly polymorphic loci. The same primers also amplified non-human primate DNA, allowing a comparison of the human sequence with that of the common chimpanzee and baboon. Images PMID:2789373

  5. Intra-tumor Heterogeneity in Localized Lung Adenocarcinomas Delineated by Multi-region Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Junya; Zhang, Jianhua; Wedge, David C.; Song, Xingzhi; Zhang, Jiexin; Seth, Sahil; Chow, Chi-Wan; Cao, Yu; Gumbs, Curtis; Gold, Kathryn A.; Kalhor, Neda; Little, Latasha; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Moran, Cesar; Protopopov, Alexei; Sun, Huandong; Tang, Jiabin; Wu, Xifeng; Ye, Yuanqing; William, William N.; Lee, Jack J.; Heymach, John V.; Hong, Waun Ki; Swisher, Stephen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Futreal, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cancers are composed of populations of cells with distinct molecular and phenotypic features, a phenomenon termed intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH). ITH in lung cancers has not been well studied. We applied multi-region whole exome sequencing (WES) on 11 localized lung adenocarcinomas. All tumors showed clear evidence of ITH. On average, 76% of all mutations and 20/21 known cancer gene mutations were identified in all regions of individual tumors suggesting single-region sequencing may be adequate to identify the majority of known cancer gene mutations in localized lung adenocarcinomas. With a median follow-up of 21 months post-surgery, 3 patients have relapsed and all 3 patients had significantly larger fractions of subclonal mutations in their primary tumors than patients without relapse. These data indicate larger subclonal mutation fraction may be associated with increased likelihood of postsurgical relapse in patients with localized lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:25301631

  6. Auditory sequence processing reveals evolutionarily conserved regions of frontal cortex in macaques and humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Benjamin; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Sun, Li; Hunter, David; Dick, Frederic; Smith, Kenny; Thiele, Alexander; Griffiths, Timothy D; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Petkov, Christopher I

    2015-01-01

    An evolutionary account of human language as a neurobiological system must distinguish between human-unique neurocognitive processes supporting language and evolutionarily conserved, domain-general processes that can be traced back to our primate ancestors. Neuroimaging studies across species may determine whether candidate neural processes are supported by homologous, functionally conserved brain areas or by different neurobiological substrates. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging in Rhesus macaques and humans to examine the brain regions involved in processing the ordering relationships between auditory nonsense words in rule-based sequences. We find that key regions in the human ventral frontal and opercular cortex have functional counterparts in the monkey brain. These regions are also known to be associated with initial stages of human syntactic processing. This study raises the possibility that certain ventral frontal neural systems, which play a significant role in language function in modern humans, originally evolved to support domain-general abilities involved in sequence processing. PMID:26573340

  7. Auditory sequence processing reveals evolutionarily conserved regions of frontal cortex in macaques and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Benjamin; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Sun, Li; Hunter, David; Dick, Frederic; Smith, Kenny; Thiele, Alexander; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Petkov, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    An evolutionary account of human language as a neurobiological system must distinguish between human-unique neurocognitive processes supporting language and evolutionarily conserved, domain-general processes that can be traced back to our primate ancestors. Neuroimaging studies across species may determine whether candidate neural processes are supported by homologous, functionally conserved brain areas or by different neurobiological substrates. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging in Rhesus macaques and humans to examine the brain regions involved in processing the ordering relationships between auditory nonsense words in rule-based sequences. We find that key regions in the human ventral frontal and opercular cortex have functional counterparts in the monkey brain. These regions are also known to be associated with initial stages of human syntactic processing. This study raises the possibility that certain ventral frontal neural systems, which play a significant role in language function in modern humans, originally evolved to support domain-general abilities involved in sequence processing. PMID:26573340

  8. The Monitoring and Control of Task Sequences in Human and Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Desrochers, Theresa M.; Burk, Diana C.; Badre, David; Sheinberg, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to plan and execute a series of tasks leading to a desired goal requires remarkable coordination between sensory, motor, and decision-related systems. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to play a central role in this coordination, especially when actions must be assembled extemporaneously and cannot be programmed as a rote series of movements. A central component of this flexible behavior is the moment-by-moment allocation of working memory and attention. The ubiquity of sequence planning in our everyday lives belies the neural complexity that supports this capacity, and little is known about how frontal cortical regions orchestrate the monitoring and control of sequential behaviors. For example, it remains unclear if and how sensory cortical areas, which provide essential driving inputs for behavior, are modulated by the frontal cortex during these tasks. Here, we review what is known about moment-to-moment monitoring as it relates to visually guided, rule-driven behaviors that change over time. We highlight recent human work that shows how the rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (RLPFC) participates in monitoring during task sequences. Neurophysiological data from monkeys suggests that monitoring may be accomplished by neurons that respond to items within the sequence and may in turn influence the tuning properties of neurons in posterior sensory areas. Understanding the interplay between proceduralized or habitual acts and supervised control of sequences is key to our understanding of sequential task execution. A crucial bridge will be the use of experimental protocols that allow for the examination of the functional homology between monkeys and humans. We illustrate how task sequences may be parceled into components and examined experimentally, thereby opening future avenues of investigation into the neural basis of sequential monitoring and control. PMID:26834581

  9. Spouse-to-Spouse Transmission and Evolution of Hypervariable Region 1 and 5’ Untranslated Region of Hepatitis C Virus Analyzed by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Caraballo Cortes, Kamila; Zagordi, Osvaldo; Jabłońska, Joanna; Pawełczyk, Agnieszka; Kubisa, Natalia; Perlejewski, Karol; Bukowska-Ośko, Iwona; Płoski, Rafał; Radkowski, Marek; Laskus, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission between spouses remains poorly characterized, largely due to the limited availability of samples from the early stage of infection, as well as methodological constraints. A fifty-eight year-old male developed acute hepatitis C infection and his 53-year old spouse has been HCV-positive for over 10 years. Serum samples were collected from both at the time of acute hepatitis C diagnosis in male (baseline) and then at 9 and 13 months. Hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) and 5’ untranslated region (5’UTR) sequences were amplified and subjected to next generation sequencing (NGS) using a pyrosequencing platform. Genetic variants were inferred by Shorah reconstruction method and compared by phylogenetic and sequence diversity analysis. As the sequencing error of the procedure was previously determined to be ≤ 1.5%, the analysis was conducted with and without the 1.5% cut-off with regard to the frequency of variants. No identical HVR1 variants were identified in spouses at baseline and follow-up samples regardless whether the cut-off was applied or not. However, there was high similarity (98.3%) between a minor baseline donor variant (1.7% frequency) and the most abundant baseline recipient variant (62.5% frequency). Furthermore, donor and recipient strains clustered together when compared to 10 control subjects from the same area and infected with the same HCV subtype. There was an increase in HVR1 complexity (number of genetic variants) over time in both spouses. In contrast, the 5'UTR region was stable and of low complexity throughout the study. In conclusion, intrafamilial HCV transmission may be established by a very minor variant and investigation of this phenomenon requires high-sensitivity assays, such as NGS. PMID:26918636

  10. Systematic sequencing of the Escherichia coli genome: analysis of the 0-2.4 min region.

    PubMed Central

    Yura, T; Mori, H; Nagai, H; Nagata, T; Ishihama, A; Fujita, N; Isono, K; Mizobuchi, K; Nakata, A

    1992-01-01

    A contiguous 111,402-nucleotide sequence corresponding to the 0 to 2.4 min region of the E. coli chromosome was determined as a first step to complete structural analysis of the genome. The resulting sequence was used to predict open reading frames and to search for sequence similarity against the PIR protein database. A number of novel genes were found whose predicted protein sequences showed significant homology with known proteins from various organisms, including several clusters of genes similar to those involved in fatty acid metabolism in bacteria (e.g., betT, baiF) and higher organisms, iron transport (sfuA, B, C) in Serratia marcescens, and symbiotic nitrogen fixation or electron transport (fixA, B, C, X) in Azorhizobium caulinodans. In addition, several genes and IS elements that had been mapped but not sequenced (e.g., leuA, B, C, D) were identified. We estimate that about 90 genes are represented in this region of the chromosome with little spacer. Images PMID:1630901

  11. Analysis of mixtures using next generation sequencing of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanna; Erlich, Henry A.; Calloway, Cassandra D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To apply massively parallel and clonal sequencing (next generation sequencing or NGS) to the analysis of forensic mixed samples. Methods A duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable regions I/II (HVI/HVII) was developed for NGS analysis on the Roche 454 GS Junior instrument. Eight sets of multiplex identifier-tagged 454 fusion primers were used in a combinatorial approach for amplification and deep sequencing of up to 64 samples in parallel. Results This assay was shown to be highly sensitive for sequencing limited DNA amounts ( ~ 100 mtDNA copies) and analyzing contrived and biological mixtures with low level variants ( ~ 1%) as well as “complex” mixtures (≥3 contributors). PCR artifact “hybrid” sequences generated by jumping PCR or template switching were observed at a low level (<2%) in the analysis of mixed samples but could be eliminated by reducing the PCR cycle number. Conclusion This study demonstrates the power of NGS technologies targeting the mtDNA HVI/HVII regions for analysis of challenging forensic samples, such as mixtures and specimens with limited DNA. PMID:26088845

  12. Regions of the polytene chromosomes of Drosophila virilis carrying multiple dispersed p Dv 111 DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gubenko, I.S.; Evgen'ev, M.B.

    1986-09-01

    The cloned sequences of p Dv 111 DNA hybridized in situ with more than 170 regions of Drosophila virilis salivary gland chromosomes. Comparative autoradiography of in situ hybridization and the nature of pulse /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 3/H-deoxycytidine incorporation into the polytene chromosomes of D. virilis at the puparium formation stage showed that the hybridization sites of p Dv 111 are distributed not only in the heterochromatic regions but also in the euchromatic regions of the chromosomes that are not late replicating. Two distinct bands of hybridization of p Dv 111 /sup 3/H-DNA were observed in the region of the heat shock puff 20CD. The regions of the distal end of chromosome 2, in which breaks appeared during radiation-induced chromosomal rearrangements, hybridized with the p Dv 111 DNA.

  13. Controlling the bond scission sequence of oxygenates for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottlemyer, Alan L.

    intermediates was observed on the Pt and Pt/WC surfaces. For CH3OH decomposition, DFT calculations suggested that the bond scission sequence could be controlled using monolayer coverage of Pt on WC. The Ni/Pt bimetallic system was studied as an example for using oxygenates as a hydrogen source. There are two well characterized surface structures for the Ni/Pt system: the surface configuration, in which the Ni atoms reside primarily on the surface of the Pt bulk, and the subsurface configuration, in which the second atomic layer is enriched in Ni atoms and the surface is enriched in Pt atoms. These configurations are denoted NiPtPt and PtNiPt, respectively. DFT results revealed that trends established for the Ni/Pt(111) system extend to the Ni/Pt(100) analogue. TPD studies revealed that the NiPtPt surface was more active for oxygenate reforming than the Pt or PtNiPt surfaces. HREELS confirmed the presence of strongly bound reaction intermediates, including aldehyde-like species, and suggested that the first decomposition step was likely O-H bond scission. Thus, the binding energies of the deprotonated reaction intermediates are important parameters in controlling the decomposition pathways of oxygenates. These studies have demonstrated that the bond scission sequence of oxygenate decomposition can be controlled using bimetallic and transition metal carbide catalysts. While this study has focused on oxygenate decomposition for energy applications, the principles and methodology applied herein are universally applicable to the development of novel and marketable value-added products. The value in such a methodology is in the combination of both calculations to predict catalytic and chemical properties, and experiments to fine-tune theoretical predictions.

  14. Digital Sequences and a Time Reversal-Based Impact Region Imaging and Localization Method

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half. PMID:24084123

  15. Digital sequences and a time reversal-based impact region imaging and localization method.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half. PMID:24084123

  16. A search for conserved sequences in coding regions reveals that the let-7 microRNA targets Dicer within its coding sequence

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Joshua J.; Legesse-Miller, Aster; Coller, Hilary A.

    2008-01-01

    Recognition sites for microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to be located in the 3′ untranslated regions of transcripts. In a computational screen for highly conserved motifs within coding regions, we found an excess of sequences conserved at the nucleotide level within coding regions in the human genome, the highest scoring of which are enriched for miRNA target sequences. To validate our results, we experimentally demonstrated that the let-7 miRNA directly targets the miRNA-processing enzyme Dicer within its coding sequence, thus establishing a mechanism for a miRNA/Dicer autoregulatory negative feedback loop. We also found computational evidence to suggest that miRNA target sites in coding regions and 3′ UTRs may differ in mechanism. This work demonstrates that miRNAs can directly target transcripts within their coding region in animals, and it suggests that a complete search for the regulatory targets of miRNAs should be expanded to include genes with recognition sites within their coding regions. As more genomes are sequenced, the methodological approach that we used for identifying motifs with high sequence conservation will be increasingly valuable for detecting functional sequence motifs within coding regions. PMID:18812516

  17. Nucleotide sequence of the hypervariable region of the human C2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.B.; Volanakis, J.V. )

    1991-03-15

    It has been previously suggested that the multiallelic Bam H1/Sst I RFLPs of the human C2 gene arose through deletion/insertion of a tandemly-repeated minisatellite region. In this study the authors subcloned and sequenced the Sst I polymorphic fragment of the b haplotype of the C2 gene. This restriction fragment is 2,450 bp long and maps 1,550 bp 3{prime} of exon 3. Its nucleotide sequence is characterized by the presence of at least 4 different repeated regions varying in size from 18 to 58 bp. One of these regions starting at position 1,413 is 48 bp long and is repeated five times. The first 3 repeats are in tandem and are separated by 72 bp from two additional tandem repeats. Sequence homology among the 5 repeats ranges between 93 and 98%. Eighty three percent of the nucleotides of the repeated-region are G or C. It seems likely that this nucleotide repeat resulted in the multiallelic RFLPs through a mechanism of unequal recombination or replication slippage.

  18. Upstream regulatory regions required to stabilize binding to the TATA sequence in an adenovirus early promoter.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J; Wu, F; Gaynor, R

    1987-10-26

    Of the five early adenovirus promoters, the early region 3 (E3) promoter is one of the most strongly induced by the E1A protein. To identify cellular proteins involved in both the basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter, DNase I footprinting using partially purified Hela cell extracts was performed. Four regions of the E3 promoter serve as binding domains for cellular proteins. These regions are found between -156 to -179 (site IV), -83 to -103 (site III), -47 to -67 (site II), and -16 to -37 (site I), relative to the start of transcription. Examination of the DNA sequences in each binding domain suggests that site III likely serves as a binding site for activator protein 1 (AP-1), site II for the cyclic AMP regulatory element binding protein (CREB), and site I for a TATA binding factor. The factors binding to either site II or III were sufficient to stabilize binding to the TATA sequence (site I). Mutagenesis studies indicated that both sites II and III, in addition to site I, are needed for complete basal and E1A-induced transcription. These results suggest that multiple cellular factors are involved in both the basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter, and that either of two upstream regions are capable of stabilizing factor binding to the TATA sequence. PMID:2959908

  19. Upstream regulatory regions required to stabilize binding to the TATA sequence in an adenovirus early promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J; Wu, F; Gaynor, R

    1987-01-01

    Of the five early adenovirus promoters, the early region 3 (E3) promoter is one of the most strongly induced by the E1A protein. To identify cellular proteins involved in both the basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter, DNase I footprinting using partially purified Hela cell extracts was performed. Four regions of the E3 promoter serve as binding domains for cellular proteins. These regions are found between -156 to -179 (site IV), -83 to -103 (site III), -47 to -67 (site II), and -16 to -37 (site I), relative to the start of transcription. Examination of the DNA sequences in each binding domain suggests that site III likely serves as a binding site for activator protein 1 (AP-1), site II for the cyclic AMP regulatory element binding protein (CREB), and site I for a TATA binding factor. The factors binding to either site II or III were sufficient to stabilize binding to the TATA sequence (site I). Mutagenesis studies indicated that both sites II and III, in addition to site I, are needed for complete basal and E1A-induced transcription. These results suggest that multiple cellular factors are involved in both the basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter, and that either of two upstream regions are capable of stabilizing factor binding to the TATA sequence. Images PMID:2959908

  20. DFLpred: High-throughput prediction of disordered flexible linker regions in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanchi; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Disordered flexible linkers (DFLs) are disordered regions that serve as flexible linkers/spacers in multi-domain proteins or between structured constituents in domains. They are different from flexible linkers/residues because they are disordered and longer. Availability of experimentally annotated DFLs provides an opportunity to build high-throughput computational predictors of these regions from protein sequences. To date, there are no computational methods that directly predict DFLs and they can be found only indirectly by filtering predicted flexible residues with predictions of disorder. Results: We conceptualized, developed and empirically assessed a first-of-its-kind sequence-based predictor of DFLs, DFLpred. This method outputs propensity to form DFLs for each residue in the input sequence. DFLpred uses a small set of empirically selected features that quantify propensities to form certain secondary structures, disordered regions and structured regions, which are processed by a fast linear model. Our high-throughput predictor can be used on the whole-proteome scale; it needs <1 h to predict entire proteome on a single CPU. When assessed on an independent test dataset with low sequence-identity proteins, it secures area under the receiver operating characteristic curve equal 0.715 and outperforms existing alternatives that include methods for the prediction of flexible linkers, flexible residues, intrinsically disordered residues and various combinations of these methods. Prediction on the complete human proteome reveals that about 10% of proteins have a large content of over 30% DFL residues. We also estimate that about 6000 DFL regions are long with ≥30 consecutive residues. Availability and implementation: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/DFLpred/. Contact: lkurgan@vcu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307636

  1. Nonessential region of bacteriophage P4: DNA sequence, transcription, gene products, and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Ghisotti, D; Finkel, S; Halling, C; Dehò, G; Sironi, G; Calendar, R

    1990-01-01

    We sequenced the leftmost 2,640 base pairs of bacteriophage P4 DNA, thus completing the sequence of the 11,627-base-pair P4 genome. The newly sequenced region encodes three nonessential genes, which are called gop, beta, and cII (in order, from left to right). The gop gene product kills Escherichia coli when the beta protein is absent; the gop and beta genes are transcribed rightward from the same promoter. The cII gene is transcribed leftward to a rho-independent terminator. Mutation of this terminator creates a temperature-sensitive phenotype, presumably owing to a defect in expression of the beta gene. Images PMID:2403440

  2. Targeted enrichment of genomic DNA regions for next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    ElSharawy, Abdou; Sauer, Sascha; van Helvoort, Joop M.L.M.; van der Zaag, P.J.; Franke, Andre; Nilsson, Mats; Lehrach, Hans; Brookes, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the latest targeted enrichment methods and aspects of their utilization along with second-generation sequencing for complex genome analysis. In doing so, we provide an overview of issues involved in detecting genetic variation, for which targeted enrichment has become a powerful tool. We explain how targeted enrichment for next-generation sequencing has made great progress in terms of methodology, ease of use and applicability, but emphasize the remaining challenges such as the lack of even coverage across targeted regions. Costs are also considered versus the alternative of whole-genome sequencing which is becoming ever more affordable. We conclude that targeted enrichment is likely to be the most economical option for many years to come in a range of settings. PMID:22121152

  3. Local generation of multineuronal spike sequences in the hippocampal CA1 region

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Eran; Roux, Lisa; Eichler, Ronny; Buzsáki, György

    2015-01-01

    Sequential activity of multineuronal spiking can be observed during theta and high-frequency ripple oscillations in the hippocampal CA1 region and is linked to experience, but the mechanisms underlying such sequences are unknown. We compared multineuronal spiking during theta oscillations, spontaneous ripples, and focal optically induced high-frequency oscillations (“synthetic” ripples) in freely moving mice. Firing rates and rate modulations of individual neurons, and multineuronal sequences of pyramidal cell and interneuron spiking, were correlated during theta oscillations, spontaneous ripples, and synthetic ripples. Interneuron spiking was crucial for sequence consistency. These results suggest that participation of single neurons and their sequential order in population events are not strictly determined by extrinsic inputs but also influenced by local-circuit properties, including synapses between local neurons and single-neuron biophysics. PMID:26240336

  4. Sequence polymorphism of the mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions I and II in 205 Singapore Malays.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hang Yee; Tang, June S W; Budowle, Bruce; Allard, Marc W; Syn, Christopher K C; Tan-Siew, Wai Fun; Chow, Shui Tse

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences of the hypervariable regions HV1 and HV2 were analyzed in 205 unrelated ethnic Malays residing in Singapore as an initial effort to generate a database for forensic identification purposes. Sequence polymorphism was detected using PCR and direct sequencing analysis. A total of 152 haplotypes was found containing 152 polymorphisms. Out of the 152 haplotypes, 115 were observed only once and 37 types were seen in multiple individuals. The most common haplotype (16223T, 16295T, 16362C, 73G, 146C, 199C, 263G, and 315.1C) was shared by 7 (3.41%) individuals, two haplotypes were shared by 4 individuals, seven haplotypes were shared by 3 individuals, and 27 haplotypes by 2 individuals. Haplotype diversity and random match probability were estimated to be 0.9961% and 0.87%, respectively. PMID:17150401

  5. Hydraulic fracturing and the Crooked Lake Sequences: Insights gleaned from regional seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Ryan; Stern, Virginia; Novakovic, Mark; Atkinson, Gail; Gu, Yu Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Within central Alberta, Canada, a new sequence of earthquakes has been recognized as of 1 December 2013 in a region of previous seismic quiescence near Crooked Lake, ~30 km west of the town of Fox Creek. We utilize a cross-correlation detection algorithm to detect more than 160 events to the end of 2014, which is temporally distinguished into five subsequences. This observation is corroborated by the uniqueness of waveforms clustered by subsequence. The Crooked Lake Sequences have come under scrutiny due to its strong temporal correlation (>99.99%) to the timing of hydraulic fracturing operations in the Duvernay Formation. We assert that individual subsequences are related to fracturing stimulation and, despite adverse initial station geometry, double-difference techniques allow us to spatially relate each cluster back to a unique horizontal well. Overall, we find that seismicity in the Crooked Lake Sequences is consistent with first-order observations of hydraulic fracturing induced seismicity.

  6. Sequence stratigraphic and tectonic controls on Shannon incised-valley distribution, Hartzog Draw, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.D.; Van Wagoner, J.C.; Jennette, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    The Upper Cretaceous Shannon Sandstone in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming is interpreted as stacked tidal bars infilling northwest-southeast trending incised valleys. The Shannon Sandstone can be subdivided into 3 sequences: Copenhagen Blue, Crimson Red, and Canary Yellow. The Copenhagen Blue sequence boundary is a regional unconformity at the base of the Shannon Sandstone marked by distal tidal-bar deposits resting on offshore mudstones of the Cody. The overlying Crimson Red sequence is the main reservoir interval at Hartzog Draw and is composed of proximal tidal-bar deposits. The highly erosional Canary Yellow sequence boundary forms the trap at Hartzog Draw by juxtaposing the reservoir sandstones of the Crimson Red sequence with the overlying offshore mudstones of the Canary Yellow sequence. The Shannon Sandstone is therefore an erosional remnant of originally more extensive tide-dominated deltas deposited within northwest-southeast trending incised valleys. The orientation and distribution of the Shannon incised valleys is the result of the interplay between tectonics and eustacy. During lowstand incised valley development the orientation of fluvial systems incising the shelf was strongly controlled by pre-existing northwest-southeast trending structural elements in the basin. During the subsequent sea-level rise the shoreline backstepped in a landward direction. The shoreline also gradually rotated from an east-west orientation during the lowstand to a north-south orientation during the highstand systems tract. Ultimately the highstand shorelines were located over 160 kms landward of the lowstand shorelines and oriented subparallel to the lowstand incised valleys.

  7. Sequence stratigraphic and tectonic controls on Shannon incised-valley distribution, Hartzog Draw, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.D.; Van Wagoner, J.C.; Jennette, D.C. )

    1996-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Shannon Sandstone in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming is interpreted as stacked tidal bars infilling northwest-southeast trending incised valleys. The Shannon Sandstone can be subdivided into 3 sequences: Copenhagen Blue, Crimson Red, and Canary Yellow. The Copenhagen Blue sequence boundary is a regional unconformity at the base of the Shannon Sandstone marked by distal tidal-bar deposits resting on offshore mudstones of the Cody. The overlying Crimson Red sequence is the main reservoir interval at Hartzog Draw and is composed of proximal tidal-bar deposits. The highly erosional Canary Yellow sequence boundary forms the trap at Hartzog Draw by juxtaposing the reservoir sandstones of the Crimson Red sequence with the overlying offshore mudstones of the Canary Yellow sequence. The Shannon Sandstone is therefore an erosional remnant of originally more extensive tide-dominated deltas deposited within northwest-southeast trending incised valleys. The orientation and distribution of the Shannon incised valleys is the result of the interplay between tectonics and eustacy. During lowstand incised valley development the orientation of fluvial systems incising the shelf was strongly controlled by pre-existing northwest-southeast trending structural elements in the basin. During the subsequent sea-level rise the shoreline backstepped in a landward direction. The shoreline also gradually rotated from an east-west orientation during the lowstand to a north-south orientation during the highstand systems tract. Ultimately the highstand shorelines were located over 160 kms landward of the lowstand shorelines and oriented subparallel to the lowstand incised valleys.

  8. Cell mutants defective in synthesizing a heparan sulfate proteoglycan with regions of defined monosaccharide sequence

    SciTech Connect

    De Agostini, A.L.; Lau, H.K.; Leone, C.; Youssoufian, H. ); Rosenberg, R.D. Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1990-12-01

    The authors have demonstrated that mouse LTA cells synthesize cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with regions of defined monosaccharide sequence that specifically interact with antithrombin (HSPG{sup act}). It remains unclear how HSPG{sup act} can be generated by a biosynthetic pathway with no simple template for directing the ordered assembly of monosaccharide units. To examine this issue, they treated LTA cells with ethyl methanesulfonate and then isolated seven stable mutants that synthesize only 8 - 27% of the wild-type HSPG{sup act} but produce normal amounts of other HSPGs. These mutants are recessive in nature and fall into at least two different complementation groups. The delineation of the molecular basis of these defects should help to elucidate the manner by which cells synthesize HSPGs with regions of defined monosaccharide sequence.

  9. A Comprehensive, Automatically Updated Fungal ITS Sequence Dataset for Reference-Based Chimera Control in Environmental Sequencing Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, R. Henrik; Tedersoo, Leho; Ryberg, Martin; Kristiansson, Erik; Hartmann, Martin; Unterseher, Martin; Porter, Teresita M.; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Walker, Donald M.; de Sousa, Filipe; Gamper, Hannes Andres; Larsson, Ellen; Larsson, Karl-Henrik; Kõljalg, Urmas; Edgar, Robert C.; Abarenkov, Kessy

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region is the most commonly chosen genetic marker for the molecular identification of fungi in environmental sequencing and molecular ecology studies. Several analytical issues complicate such efforts, one of which is the formation of chimeric—artificially joined—DNA sequences during PCR amplification or sequence assembly. Several software tools are currently available for chimera detection, but rely to various degrees on the presence of a chimera-free reference dataset for optimal performance. However, no such dataset is available for use with the fungal ITS region. This study introduces a comprehensive, automatically updated reference dataset for fungal ITS sequences based on the UNITE database for the molecular identification of fungi. This dataset supports chimera detection throughout the fungal kingdom and for full-length ITS sequences as well as partial (ITS1 or ITS2 only) datasets. The performance of the dataset on a large set of artificial chimeras was above 99.5%, and we subsequently used the dataset to remove nearly 1,000 compromised fungal ITS sequences from public circulation. The dataset is available at http://unite.ut.ee/repository.php and is subject to web-based third-party curation. PMID:25786896

  10. Regulation and targeting of recombination in extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin switch region sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H; Maizels, N

    1994-01-01

    We have used extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin heavy-chain S mu and S gamma 3 switch region sequences to study activation and targeting of recombination by a transcriptional enhancer element. Substrates are transiently introduced into activated primary murine B cells, in which recombination involving S-region sequences deletes a conditionally lethal marker, and recombination is measured by transformation of Escherichia coli in the second step of the assay. Previously we found that as many as 25% of replicated substrates recombined during 40-h transfection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated primary cells and that efficient recombination was dependent on the presence of S-region sequences as well as a transcriptional activator region in the constructs (H. Leung and N. Maizels, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:4154-4158, 1992). Here we show that recombination of the switch substrates is threefold more efficient in LPS-cultured primary B cells than in the T-cell line EL4; the activities responsible for switch substrate recombination thus appear to be more abundant or more active in cells which can carry out chromosomal switch recombination. We test the role of the transcriptional activator region and show that the immunoglobulin heavy-chain intron enhancer (E mu) alone stimulates recombination as well as E mu combined with a heavy-chain promoter and that mutations that diminish enhancer-dependent transcription 500-fold diminish recombinational activation less than 2-fold. These observations suggest that the enhancer stimulates recombination by a mechanism that does not depend on transcript production or that is insensitive to the level of transcript production over a very broad range. Furthermore, we find that E mu stimulates recombination when located either upstream or downstream of S mu but that the position of the recombinational activator does affect the targeting of recombination junctions, suggesting that the relatively imprecise targeting of

  11. Designing a Bioengine for Detection and Analysis of Base String on an Affected Sequence in High-Concentration Regions

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Bijoy Kumar; Kim, Tai-hoon

    2013-01-01

    We design an Algorithm for bioengine. As a program are enable optimal alignments searching between two sequences, the host sequence (normal plant) as well as query sequence (virus). Searching for homologues has become a routine operation of biological sequences in 4 × 4 combination with different subsequence (word size). This program takes the advantage of the high degree of homology between such sequences to construct an alignment of the matching regions. There is a main aim which is to detect the overlapping reading frames. This program also enables to find out the highly infected colones selection highest matching region with minimum gap or mismatch zones and unique virus colones matches. This is a small, portable, interactive, front-end program intended to be used to find out the regions of matching between host sequence and query subsequences. All the operations are carried out in fraction of seconds, depending on the required task and on the sequence length. PMID:24000321

  12. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  13. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Wei; Xia, Yingying; Wang, Chongzhi; Tang, Y Tom; Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  14. Sequence determination of a new parrot bornavirus-5 strain in Japan: implications of clade-specific sequence diversity in the regions interacting with host factors.

    PubMed

    Komorizono, Ryo; Makino, Akiko; Horie, Masayuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the genome sequence of a new parrot bornavirus-5 (PaBV-5) detected in Eclectus roratus was determined. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genus Bornavirus is divided into three major clades and that PaBV-5 belongs to clade 2, which contains avian viruses that exhibit infectivity to mammalian cells. Sequence comparisons of the regions known to interact with host factors indicated that the clade 2 avian viruses possess sequences intermediate between the clade 1 mammalian viruses and the clade 3 avian viruses, suggesting that the identified regions might contribute to the differences in virological properties between the three clades. PMID:27166599

  15. Phylogeographic patterns and evolution of the mitochondrial DNA control region in two neotropical cats (Mammalia, felidae).

    PubMed

    Eizirik, E; Bonatto, S L; Johnson, W E; Crawshaw, P G; Vié, J C; Brousset, D M; O'Brien, S J; Salzano, F M

    1998-11-01

    The ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) and margay (L. wiedii) are sister-species of Neotropical cats which evolved from a lineage that migrated into South America during the formation of the Panamanian land bridge 3-5 million years ago. Patterns of population genetic divergence of each species were studied by phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences in individuals sampled across the distribution of these taxa. Abundant genetic diversity and remarkably concordant phylogeographic partitions for both species were observed, identifying parallel geographic regions which likely reflect historical faunal barriers. Inferred aspects of phylogeography, population genetic structure, and demographic history were used to formulate conservation recommendations for these species. In addition, observed patterns of sequence variation provided insight into the molecular evolution of the mtDNA control region in closely related felids. PMID:9797412

  16. Genetic variability among Schistosoma japonicum isolates from different endemic regions in China revealed by sequences of three mitochondrial DNA genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, G H; Mo, X H; Zou, F C; Li, J; Weng, Y B; Lin, R Q; Xia, C M; Zhu, X Q

    2009-05-26

    The present study examined sequence variation in three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) regions, namely cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3 (cox3), NADH dehydrogenase subunits 4 and 5 (nad4 and nad5), among Schistosoma japonicum isolates from different endemic regions in China, and their phylogenetic relationships were re-constructed. A portion of the cox3 gene (pcox3), a portion of the nad4 and nad5 genes (pnad4 and pnad5) were amplified separately from individual trematodes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the amplicons were subjected to direct sequencing. In the mountainous areas, sequence variations between parasites from Yunnan and those from Sichuan were 0.3% for pcox3, 0.0-0.1% for pnad4, and 0.0-0.2% for pnad5. In the lake/marshland areas, sequence variations between male and female parasites among different geographical locations were 0.0-0.3% for pcox3, 0.0-0.7% for pnad4, and 0.0-1.6% for pnad5. Sequence variations between S. japonicum from mountainous areas and those from lake/marshland areas were 0.0-0.5% for pcox3, 0.0-0.7% for pnad4, and 0.0-1.6% for pnad5. Phylogenetic analyses based on the combined sequences of pcox3, pnad4 and pnad5 revealed that S. japonicum isolates from mountainous areas (Yunnan and Sichuan provinces) clustered together. For isolates from the lake/marshland areas, isolates from Anhui and Jiangsu provinces clustered together and was sister to samples from Jiangxi province, while isolates from Hubei and Zhejiang province clustered together. However, isolates from different geographical locations in Hunan province were in different clades. These findings demonstrated the usefulness and attributes of the three mtDNA sequences for population genetic studies of S. japonicum, and have implications for studying population biology, molecular epidemiology, and genetic structure of S. japonicum, as well as for the effective control of schistosomiasis. PMID:19303214

  17. Improved sequence-based prediction of disordered regions with multilayer fusion of multiple information sources

    PubMed Central

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Stach, Wojciech; Chen, Ke; Kedarisetti, Kanaka Durga; Disfani, Fatemeh Miri; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Intrinsically disordered proteins play a crucial role in numerous regulatory processes. Their abundance and ubiquity combined with a relatively low quantity of their annotations motivate research toward the development of computational models that predict disordered regions from protein sequences. Although the prediction quality of these methods continues to rise, novel and improved predictors are urgently needed. Results: We propose a novel method, named MFDp (Multilayered Fusion-based Disorder predictor), that aims to improve over the current disorder predictors. MFDp is as an ensemble of 3 Support Vector Machines specialized for the prediction of short, long and generic disordered regions. It combines three complementary disorder predictors, sequence, sequence profiles, predicted secondary structure, solvent accessibility, backbone dihedral torsion angles, residue flexibility and B-factors. Our method utilizes a custom-designed set of features that are based on raw predictions and aggregated raw values and recognizes various types of disorder. The MFDp is compared at the residue level on two datasets against eight recent disorder predictors and top-performing methods from the most recent CASP8 experiment. In spite of using training chains with ≤25% similarity to the test sequences, our method consistently and significantly outperforms the other methods based on the MCC index. The MFDp outperforms modern disorder predictors for the binary disorder assignment and provides competitive real-valued predictions. The MFDp's outputs are also shown to outperform the other methods in the identification of proteins with long disordered regions. Availability: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/MFDp.html Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: lkurgan@ece.ualberta.ca PMID:20823312

  18. Discrimination of two natural biocontrol agents in the Mediterranean region based on mitochondrial DNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Evangelou, V I; Bouga, M; Emmanouel, N G; Perdikis, D Ch; Papadoulis, G Th

    2013-12-01

    Macrolophus pygmaeus and M. melanotoma (Hemiptera: Miridae) are biological control agents used in greenhouse crops, the former preferring plants of the Solanaceae family and the latter the aster Dittrichia viscosa. The discrimination of these species is of high significance for effective biological pest control, but identification based on morphological characters of the host plant is not always reliable. In this study, sequencing analysis of mitochondrial gene segments 12S rDNA and COI has been combined with crossing experiments and morphological observations to develop new markers for Macrolophus spp. discrimination and to provide new data on their genetic variability. This is the first comprehensive research in Greece on M. pygmaeus and M. melanotoma genetic variability based on sequencing data from 12S rDNA and COI gene segments. The relationship of this variability to host plant preference must be investigated in an agricultural ecosystem. PMID:23839086

  19. Divergence of human [alpha]-chain constant region gene sequences: A novel recombinant [alpha]2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Chintalacharuvu, K. R.; Morrison, S.L. ); Raines, M. )

    1994-06-01

    IgA is the major Ig synthesized in humans and provides the first line of defense at the mucosal surfaces. The constant region of IgA heavy chain is encoded by the [alpha] gene on chromosome 14. Previous studies have indicated the presence of two [alpha] genes, [alpha]1 and [alpha]2 existing in two allotypic forms, [alpha]2 m(1) and [alpha]2 m(2). Here the authors report the cloning and complete nucleotide sequence determination of a novel human [alpha] gene. Nucleotide sequence comparison with the published [alpha] sequences suggests that the gene arose as a consequence of recombination or gene conversion between the two [alpha]2 alleles. The authors have expressed the gene as a chimeric protein in myeloma cells indicating that it encodes a functional protein. The novel IgA resembles IgA2 m(2) in that disulfide bonds link H and L chains. This novel recombinant gene provides insights into the mechanisms of generation of different constant regions and suggests that within human populations, multiple alleles of [alpha] may be present providing IgAs of different structures.

  20. Transcribed sequences of the Escherichia coli btuB gene control its expression and regulation by vitamin B12.

    PubMed Central

    Lundrigan, M D; Köster, W; Kadner, R J

    1991-01-01

    The Escherichia coli btuB gene product is an outer membrane protein required for the active transport of vitamin B12 and other cobalamins. Synthesis of BtuB is repressed when cells are grown in the presence of cobalamins. Mapping of the 5' end of the btuB transcript revealed that a 240-nucleotide transcribed leader precedes the coding sequence. Point mutations causing increased expression under repressing conditions were isolated by use of a btuB-lacZ gene fusion. Mutations at many sites within the leader region affected btuB-lacZ regulation, whereas some base changes upstream of the start of transcription affected the absolute level of expression but not its repressibility. Analysis of btuB-phoA gene fusions and btuB-lacZ operon and gene fusions of various lengths showed that sequences within the btuB coding region (between nucleotides +250 and +350) had to be present for proper expression and transcriptional regulation. Sequences within the leader region (up to +250) conferred regulation of translational fusions. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled at both the transcriptional and translational levels and that different but possibly overlapping sequences in the transcribed region, including the coding region for the transport protein itself, mediate these two modes of regulation. Images PMID:1847525

  1. Partial sequence of Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) immunoglobulin gamma heavy chain constant region.

    PubMed

    Ukaji, Takao; Sumiyama, Daisuke; Kai, Osamu

    2011-10-01

    We determined the sequence of the immunoglobulin gamma heavy-chain constant (IGHC) region of the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus). To isolate a part of the IGHC complementary DNA, we designed primers on the basis of highly conserved sequences in mouse, rat and hamster. The deduced IGHC is structurally similar to counterparts in other mammalian species and shows 84.6% identity to the IGHC of hamster IgG, 76.6% to rat IgG1, 83.3% to rat IgG2a, 78.1% to mouse IgG1, 81.8% to mouse IgG2a, 79.1% to mouse IgG2b and 79.2% to mouse IgG3 at the nucleotide level. The results suggest that gerbil IgG is closely related to hamster IgG and rat IgG2a. PMID:21951909

  2. Identification of Novel Transcribed Regions in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Using RNA-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingwen; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Kere, Juha; Jiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as a model organism to investigate vertebrate development and human genetic diseases. However, the zebrafish genome annotation is still ongoing and incomplete, and there are still new gene transcripts to be found. With the introduction of massive parallel sequencing, whole transcriptome studies became possible. In the present study, we aimed to discover novel transcribed regions (NTRs) using developmental transcriptome data from RNA sequencing. In order to achieve this, we developed an in-house bioinformatics pipeline for NTR discovery. Using the pipeline, we detected 152 putative NTRs that at the time of discovery were not annotated in Ensembl and NCBI gene database. Four randomly selected NTRs were successfully validated using RT-PCR, and expression profiles of 10 randomly selected NTRs were evaluated using qRT-PCR. The identification of these 152 NTRs provide new information for zebrafish genome annotation as well as new candidates for studies of zebrafish gene function. PMID:27462902

  3. Similarity graphing and enzyme-reaction database: methods to detect sequence regions of importance for recognition of chemical structures.

    PubMed

    Sumi, K; Nishioka, T; Oda, J

    1991-04-01

    We developed a new method which searches sequence segments responsible for the recognition of a given chemical structure. These segments are detected as those locally conserved among a sequence to be analyzed (target sequence) and a set of sequences (reference sequences). Reference sequences are the sequences of functionally related proteins, ligands of which contain a common chemical substructure in their molecular structures. 'Similarity graphing' cuts target sequences into segments, aligns them with reference sequence pairwise, calculates the degree of similarity for each alignment, and shows graphically cumulative similarity values on target sequence. Any locally conserved regions, short or long in length and weak or strong in similarity, are detected at their optimal conditions by adjusting three parameters. The 'enzyme-reaction database' contains chemical structures and their related enzymes. When a chemical substructure is input into the database, sequences of the enzymes related to the input substructure are systematically searched from the NBRF sequence database and output as reference sequences. Examples of analysis using similarity graphing in combination with the enzyme-reaction database showed a great potentiality in the systematic analysis of the relationships between sequences and molecular recognitions for protein engineering. PMID:1881867

  4. lac repressor blocks in vivo transcription of lac control region DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sellitti, M A; Pavco, P A; Steege, D A

    1987-01-01

    Transcription of the Escherichia coli lac repressor gene (lacI) in vivo produces monocistronic mRNAs with discrete 3' ends in the lac control region, although the DNA sequence of this region does not specify a strong termination signal of the traditional form. Direct analysis of lac transcripts was used to show that the DNA sequence alone does not provide the signal to end the repressor mRNA and to establish that of the proteins with specific binding sites on control region DNA only the lac repressor has a striking effect on the continuity of lacI gene transcription. RNAs with 3' ends in the control region sequence are major mRNA species produced from a repressor-bound template, reflecting as much as a 50-fold increase over their levels in the repressor's absence. Repressor binding to the operator thus has a dual function. In addition to blocking initiation of transcription from the lacZ promoter, repressor serves as a termination factor by setting the length of its own transcript and separating lacI and lacZYA into two distinct transcription units. Images PMID:3554233

  5. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of Three Veroniceae Species (Plantaginaceae): Comparative Analysis and Highly Divergent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoung Su; Chung, Myong Gi; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of Veronica and related genera were weakly supported by molecular and paraphyletic taxa. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Veronica nakaiana and the related species Veronica persica and Veronicastrum sibiricum. The chloroplast genome length of V. nakaiana, V. persica, and V. sibiricum ranged from 150,198 bp to 152,930 bp. A total of 112 genes comprising 79 protein coding genes, 29 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes were observed in three chloroplast genomes. The total number of SSRs was 48, 51, and 53 in V. nakaiana, V. persica, and V. sibiricum, respectively. Two SSRs (10 bp of AT and 12 bp of AATA) were observed in the same regions (rpoC2 and ndhD) in three chloroplast genomes. A comparison of coding genes and non-coding regions between V. nakaiana and V. persica revealed divergent sites, with the greatest variation occurring petD-rpoA region. The complete chloroplast genome sequence information regarding the three Veroniceae will be helpful for elucidating Veroniceae phylogenetic relationships. PMID:27047524

  6. Comparative Sequence Analysis of the Sorghum Rph Region and the Maize Rp1 Resistance Gene Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Emberton, John; SanMiguel, Phillip; Ogden, Matthew; Llaca, Victor; Messing, Joachim; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    A 268-kb chromosomal segment containing sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genes that are orthologous to the maize (Zea mays) Rp1 disease resistance (R) gene complex was sequenced. A region of approximately 27 kb in sorghum was found to contain five Rp1 homologs, but most have structures indicating that they are not functional. In contrast, maize inbred B73 has 15 Rp1 homologs in two nearby clusters of 250 and 300 kb. As at maize Rp1, the cluster of R gene homologs is interrupted by the presence of several genes that appear to have no resistance role, but these genes were different from the ones found within the maize Rp1 complex. More than 200 kb of DNA downstream from the sorghum Rp1-orthologous R gene cluster was sequenced and found to contain many duplicated and/or truncated genes. None of the duplications currently exist as simple tandem events, suggesting that numerous rearrangements were required to generate the current genomic structure. Four truncated genes were observed, including one gene that appears to have both 5′ and 3′ deletions. The maize Rp1 region is also unusually enriched in truncated genes. Hence, the orthologous maize and sorghum regions share numerous structural features, but all involve events that occurred independently in each species. The data suggest that complex R gene clusters are unusually prone to frequent internal and adjacent chromosomal rearrangements of several types. PMID:12481055

  7. The organisation of repetitive sequences in the pericentromeric region of human chromosome 10.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M S; Slijepcevic, P; Ponder, B A

    1993-01-01

    Three satellite DNA families are present in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10; the alpha satellite and two 5 bp satellite families defined here as satellites 2 and 3. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) demonstrates that these sequences are organised into five discrete arrays which are linked within a region of approximately 5.3 Megabases (Mb) of DNA. The alpha satellite is largely confined to a 2.2 Mb array which is flanked on its p arm side by two 100-150 kb satellite 3 arrays and on its q arm side by a 900 kb satellite 2 array and a further 320 kb satellite 3 array. This linear order is corroborated by fluorescent in situ hybridisation analyses. In total, these arrays account for 3.6 Mb of DNA in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10. These data provide both physical information on sequences which may be involved in centromere function and a map across the centromere which has the potential to link yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs currently being developed on both arms of this chromosome. Images PMID:8290346

  8. An exploration of the sequence of a 2.9-Mb region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster: The Adh region

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburner, M.; Misra, S.; Roote, J.; Lewis, S.E.; Blazej, R.; Davis, T.; Doyle, C.; Galle, R.; George, R.; Harris, N.; Hartzell, G.; Harvey, D.; Hong, L.; Houston, K.; Hoskins, R.; Johnson, G.; Martin, C.; Moshrefi, A.; Palazzolo, M.; Reese, M.G.; Spradling, A.; Tsang, G.; Wan, K.; Whitelaw, K.; Kimmel, B.; Celniker, S.; Rubin, G.M.

    1999-03-24

    A contiguous sequence of nearly 3 Mb from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been sequenced from a series of overlapping P1 and BAC clones. This region covers 69 chromosome polytene bands on chromosome arm 2L, including the genetically well-characterized

  9. A General Approach to Sequence-Controlled Polymers Using Macrocyclic Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A new and general strategy for the synthesis of sequence-defined polymers is described that employs relay metathesis to promote the ring opening polymerization of unstrained macrocyclic structures. Central to this approach is the development of a small molecule “polymerization trigger” which when coupled with a diverse range of sequence-defined units allows for the controlled, directional synthesis of sequence controlled polymers. PMID:26053158

  10. Quality control test for sequence-phenotype assignments.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Maria Teresa Lara; Rosario, Pablo Benjamín Leon; Luna-Nevarez, Pablo; Gamez, Alba Savin; Martínez-del Campo, Ana; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Relating a gene mutation to a phenotype is a common task in different disciplines such as protein biochemistry. In this endeavour, it is common to find false relationships arising from mutations introduced by cells that may be depurated using a phenotypic assay; yet, such phenotypic assays may introduce additional false relationships arising from experimental errors. Here we introduce the use of high-throughput DNA sequencers and statistical analysis aimed to identify incorrect DNA sequence-phenotype assignments and observed that 10-20% of these false assignments are expected in large screenings aimed to identify critical residues for protein function. We further show that this level of incorrect DNA sequence-phenotype assignments may significantly alter our understanding about the structure-function relationship of proteins. We have made available an implementation of our method at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/en/software/chispas. PMID:25700273

  11. Control of Integrated Task Sequences Shapes Components of Reaching.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Priya; Whitall, Jill; Kagerer, Florian A

    2016-01-01

    Reaching toward an object usually consists of a sequence of elemental actions. Using a reaching task sequence, the authors investigated how task elements of that sequence affected feedforward and feedback components of the reaching phase of the movement. Nine right-handed adults performed, with their dominant and nondominant hands, 4 tasks of different complexities: a simple reaching task; a reach-to-grasp task; a reach-to-grasp and lift object task; and a reach-to-grasp, lift, and place object task. Results showed that in the reach-to-grasp and lift object task more time was allocated to the feedforward component of the reach phase, while latency between the task elements decreased. We also found between-hand differences, supporting previous findings of increased efficiency of processing planning-related information in the preferred hand. The presence of task-related modifications supports the concept of contextual effects when planning a movement. PMID:27254601

  12. Quality Control Test for Sequence-Phenotype Assignments

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Maria Teresa Lara; Rosario, Pablo Benjamín Leon; Luna-Nevarez, Pablo; Gamez, Alba Savin; Martínez-del Campo, Ana; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Relating a gene mutation to a phenotype is a common task in different disciplines such as protein biochemistry. In this endeavour, it is common to find false relationships arising from mutations introduced by cells that may be depurated using a phenotypic assay; yet, such phenotypic assays may introduce additional false relationships arising from experimental errors. Here we introduce the use of high-throughput DNA sequencers and statistical analysis aimed to identify incorrect DNA sequence-phenotype assignments and observed that 10–20% of these false assignments are expected in large screenings aimed to identify critical residues for protein function. We further show that this level of incorrect DNA sequence-phenotype assignments may significantly alter our understanding about the structure-function relationship of proteins. We have made available an implementation of our method at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/en/software/chispas. PMID:25700273

  13. Contamination-controlled high-throughput whole genome sequencing for influenza A viruses using the MiSeq sequencer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Kai; Lee, Chun Kiat; Tang, Julian Wei-Tze; Loh, Tze Ping; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Accurate full-length genomic sequences are important for viral phylogenetic studies. We developed a targeted high-throughput whole genome sequencing (HT-WGS) method for influenza A viruses, which utilized an enzymatic cleavage-based approach, the Nextera XT DNA library preparation kit, for library preparation. The entire library preparation workflow was adapted for the Sentosa SX101, a liquid handling platform, to automate this labor-intensive step. As the enzymatic cleavage-based approach generates low coverage reads at both ends of the cleaved products, we corrected this loss of sequencing coverage at the termini by introducing modified primers during the targeted amplification step to generate full-length influenza A sequences with even coverage across the whole genome. Another challenge of targeted HTS is the risk of specimen-to-specimen cross-contamination during the library preparation step that results in the calling of false-positive minority variants. We included an in-run, negative system control to capture contamination reads that may be generated during the liquid handling procedures. The upper limits of 99.99% prediction intervals of the contamination rate were adopted as cut-off values of contamination reads. Here, 148 influenza A/H3N2 samples were sequenced using the HTS protocol and were compared against a Sanger-based sequencing method. Our data showed that the rate of specimen-to-specimen cross-contamination was highly significant in HTS. PMID:27624998

  14. A compendium of human mitochondrial DNA control region: development of an international standard forensic database.

    PubMed

    Miller, K W; Budowle, B

    2001-06-01

    A compendium of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region types has been constructed. This updated compilation indexes over 10,000 population-specific mtDNA nucleotide sequences in a standardized format. The sequences represent mtDNA types from the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) mtDNA database and from the public literature. The SWGDAM data are considered to be of higher quality than the public data, particularly for counting the number of times a particular haplotype has been observed. PMID:11387646

  15. [Variability of the mtDNA Control Region in Goose Anser albifrons Scopoli, 1769].

    PubMed

    Volkovsky, D V; Fisenko, P V; Gerasimov, Yu N; Zhuravlev, Yu N

    2016-03-01

    Sequence variation of the mtDNA (D loop) control region was examined in greater white-fronted goose Anser albifrons Scopoli, 1769 individuals (n = 71). The obtained sequences were compared with those from the NCBI GenBank database. The high level of similarity of the sample from Primorye (A. albifrons) with the sample from Japan (A. a. frontalis) at the level of molecular variation, genetic distance, phylogenetic reconstruction, and haplotype network was demonstrated. A hypothesis on the ways of spring goose migration in the Far East was made. It was confirmed that white-fronted geese wintering in Japan fly to their breeding grounds through Kamchatka. PMID:27281856

  16. A genome walking strategy for the identification of nucleotide sequences adjacent to known regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailong; Yao, Ting; Cai, Mei; Xiao, Xiuqing; Ding, Xuezhi; Xia, Liqiu

    2013-02-01

    To identify the transposon insertion sites in a soil actinomycete, Saccharopolyspora spinosa, a genome walking approach, termed SPTA-PCR, was developed. In SPTA-PCR, a simple procedure consisting of TA cloning and a high stringency PCR, following the single primer-mediated, randomly-primed PCR, can eliminate non-target DNA fragments and obtain target fragments specifically. Using SPTA-PCR, the DNA sequence adjacent to the highly conserved region of lectin coding gene in onion plant, Allium chinense, was also cloned. PMID:23108875

  17. Kinematic Distances of Pre-main Sequence Stars in the Lupus Star-Forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.; Bertout, C.

    2014-06-01

    The problem of the determination of distances has always played a central role in astronomy. However, little recent progress has been made in the distance determination of faint young stellar objects such as pre-main sequence (PMS) stars. Many of the PMS stars were neither observed by the Hipparcos satellite due to their magnitude nor have any trigonometric parallax measured from the ground due to their distance. Here we investigate the kinematic properties of the Lupus moving group with the primary objective of deriving individual parallaxes for each group member of this star-forming region.

  18. Defining the functional domains in the control region of the adenovirus type 2 specific VARNA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Wu, G J; Railey, J F; Cannon, R E

    1987-04-01

    The outer boundaries of the internal transcriptional control region in the VARNA1 gene have been located from positions +10 to +69. To further define the detailed organization of the functional domains in this region and the function(s) of the 5' flanking sequence, and to obtain a more detailed insight into other transcriptionally important sequences, we have constructed 77 mutants with deletion endpoints at almost every one to five base-pairs in the entire region from -30 to +160 for transcriptional studies. Using our highly active crude extract under our assay conditions, and quantitatively measuring the transcriptional efficiency and competing strength of each mutant, we have revealed new features of important transcriptional control sequences and defined the transcriptional functions of several functional domains in this gene. The essential domain is from +59/+63 to +66/+68, which corresponds to the B block sequence. This is smaller than that defined previously. The second most important domain is the region from +12/14 to +40, which includes the A block sequence that dictates the wild-type major start site and amplifies the events started by the B block region, mediated through factors and RNA polymerase III. Furthermore, the domain from -5 to +11 affects the use of certain start site(s). Moreover, the 5' flanking region from -30 to +1 contributes 80 to 90% of the overall transcriptional efficiency of the gene. Finally, our transcriptional studies of mutants deleted of the A block sequence and all of the upstream sequence indicated that an intimate interaction between the two blocks is essential for initiation of transcription. Furthermore, the B block sequence is more important than the A block sequence in the transcription reaction. The mechanism and control of transcriptional initiation in the VARNA1 gene is similar to that in some tRNA genes, but differs from that in others. PMID:3625769

  19. Sequence stratigraphic control on prolific HC reservoir development, Southwest Iran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasemi, Y.; Kondroud, K.N.

    2008-01-01

    An important carbonate formation in the Persian Gulf and the onshore oil fields of Southwest Iran is the Lowermost Cretaceous Fahliyan formation. The formation in Darkhowain field consists of unconformity-bounded depositional sequences containing prolific hydrocarbon reservoirs of contrasting origin. Located in the high stand systems tract (HST) of the lower sequence encompassing over 200m of oil column are the most prolific reservoir. Another reservoir is over 80m thick consisting of shallowing-upward cycles that are best developed within the transgressive systems tract of the upper sequence. Vertical facies distribution and their paleobathymetry and geophysical log signatures of the Fahliyan formation in the Darkhowain platform reveal the presence of two unconformity-bounded depositional sequences in Vail et al., Van Wagoner et al., and Sarg. The Fahliyan formation mainly consists of platform carbonates composed of restricted bioclastic lime mudstone to packstone of the platform interior, Lithocodium boundstone or ooid-intraclast-bioclast grainstone of the high energy platform margin and the bioclast packstone to lime mudstone related to the off-platform setting.

  20. 40 CFR 81.112 - Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.112 Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region: Region 1. 81.107Greenwood Intrastate Air Quality Control Region: Region 2....

  1. 40 CFR 81.112 - Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.112 Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region: Region 1. 81.107Greenwood Intrastate Air Quality Control Region: Region 2....

  2. HYBRIDCHECK: software for the rapid detection, visualization and dating of recombinant regions in genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ben J; van Oosterhout, Cock

    2016-03-01

    HYBRIDCHECK is a software package to visualize the recombination signal in large DNA sequence data set, and it can be used to analyse recombination, genetic introgression, hybridization and horizontal gene transfer. It can scan large (multiple kb) contigs and whole-genome sequences of three or more individuals. HYBRIDCHECK is written in the r software for OS X, Linux and Windows operating systems, and it has a simple graphical user interface. In addition, the r code can be readily incorporated in scripts and analysis pipelines. HYBRIDCHECK implements several ABBA-BABA tests and visualizes the effects of hybridization and the resulting mosaic-like genome structure in high-density graphics. The package also reports the following: (i) the breakpoint positions, (ii) the number of mutations in each introgressed block, (iii) the probability that the identified region is not caused by recombination and (iv) the estimated age of each recombination event. The divergence times between the donor and recombinant sequence are calculated using a JC, K80, F81, HKY or GTR correction, and the dating algorithm is exceedingly fast. By estimating the coalescence time of introgressed blocks, it is possible to distinguish between hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting. HYBRIDCHECK is libré software and it and its manual are free to download from http://ward9250.github.io/HybridCheck/. PMID:26394708

  3. The 2012 Ferrara seismic sequence: Regional crustal structure, earthquake sources, and seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagnini, Luca; Herrmann, Robert B.; Munafò, Irene; Buttinelli, Mauro; Anselmi, Mario; Akinci, Aybige; Boschi, E.

    2012-10-01

    Inadequate seismic design codes can be dangerous, particularly when they underestimate the true hazard. In this study we use data from a sequence of moderate-sized earthquakes in northeast Italy to validate and test a regional wave propagation model which, in turn, is used to understand some weaknesses of the current design spectra. Our velocity model, while regionalized and somewhat ad hoc, is consistent with geophysical observations and the local geology. In the 0.02-0.1 Hz band, this model is validated by using it to calculate moment tensor solutions of 20 earthquakes (5.6 ≥ MW ≥ 3.2) in the 2012 Ferrara, Italy, seismic sequence. The seismic spectra observed for the relatively small main shock significantly exceeded the design spectra to be used in the area for critical structures. Observations and synthetics reveal that the ground motions are dominated by long-duration surface waves, which, apparently, the design codes do not adequately anticipate. In light of our results, the present seismic hazard assessment in the entire Pianura Padana, including the city of Milan, needs to be re-evaluated.

  4. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  5. Earthquake sequence in East Vrancea crustal region (Romania): source characteristics and seismotectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Emilia; Borleanu, Felix; Otilia Placinta, Anica; Popa, Mihaela; Radulian, Mircea; Moldovan, Iren Adelina

    2016-04-01

    The goal of the paper is to investigate the crustal earthquake sequence generated in the East Vrancea crustal zone at the end of 2014 (22 November 2014). The main shock, occurred on 22 November 2014, 19:14 (45.860N, 27.160E, h = 39 km, ML = 5.7), is the greatest instrumentally recorded earthquake produced in this region. The aftershocks are unusually small for the sequences characterizing the Vrancea foredeep area (around 200 events with magnitude below 2). The largest aftershocks were recorded on 7 December 2015 (ML = 4.4) and 19 January 2015 (ML = 3.8). We apply cross-correlation analysis together with empirical Green's function (EGF) deconvolution and spectral ratios techniques to optimise the source parameters determination. At the same time we applied inversion techniques to retrieve the moment tensor solution for the largest shocks. For EGF and spectral ratios applications, we associated to the main event many co-located aftershocks (2.0 ≤ ML ≤ 4.4), selected according to the requirements for empirical Green's functions. The source parameters are estimated as mean values for all the available earthquake pairs. Source scaling properties and focal mechanism are investigated and discussed in terms of the regional seismotectonics and comparatively with the source scaling relationships for the Vrancea intermediate-depth earthquakes.

  6. Genetic organization, size, and complete sequence of early region 3 genes of human adenovirus type 41.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, H Y; Pieniazek, N; Pieniazek, D; Luftig, R B

    1996-01-01

    The complete nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences for open reading frames (ORFs) of the human adenovirus type 41 (Ad41) early region 3 (E3) gene have been determined. The sequence of the Ad41 E3 gene (map units 74 to 83.9) consists of 3,373 nucleotides and has one TATA box and two polyadenylation signals (AATAAA). Analysis of the nucleotide sequence reveals that the E3 gene can encode six ORFs, designated RL1 to RL6. These are all expressed at the mRNA level, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR analysis of AD41-infected cell RNA. When compared with known E3 sequences of most other human adenoviruses deposited in GenBank, the sequences of RL1 to RL3 were found to be unique to subgroup F adenoviruses (Ad40 and Ad41). They encode putative proteins of 173 amino acids (19.4 kDa) and 276 amino acids (31.6 kDa) in one reading frame as well as a 59- amino-acid (6.7 kDa) protein in an overlapping reading frame. RL4 encodes a 90-amino-acid protein (10.1 kDa) with 40% homology to the Ad2 E3 10.4-kDa protein, which induces degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and functions together with the Ad2 E3 14.5-kDa protein to protect mouse cell lines against lysis. RL5 encodes a protein of 107 amino acid residues (12.3 kDa) and is analogous to the Ad E3 14.5-kDa protein. RL6 codes for a protein of 122 amino acids (14.7 kDa) that is analogous to the Ad2 14.7-kDa protein, which functions to protect Ad-infected cells from tumor necrosis factor-induced cytolysis. This finding of three unique (RL1 to RL3) E3 gene ORFs may explain why subgroup F adenoviruses differ substantially from other human adenoviruses in their host range; i.e., they replicate predominantly in the host's gastrointestinal rather than respiratory tract. A recent phylogenetic study that compared subgroup F Ad40 DNA sequences with representatives of subgroups B (Ad3), C (Ad2), and E (Ad4) reached a similar conclusion about the uniqueness of RL1 and RL2. PMID:8642703

  7. Polymorphic simple sequence repeat regions in chloroplast genomes: applications to the population genetics of pines.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, W; Morgante, M; McDevitt, R; Vendramin, G G; Rafalski, J A

    1995-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), consisting of tandemly repeated multiple copies of mono-, di-, tri-, or tetranucleotide motifs, are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes and are frequently used as genetic markers, taking advantage of their length polymorphism. We have examined the polymorphism of such sequences in the chloroplast genomes of plants, by using a PCR-based assay. GenBank searches identified the presence of several (dA)n.(dT)n mononucleotide stretches in chloroplast genomes. A chloroplast (cp) SSR was identified in three pine species (Pinus contorta, Pinus sylvestris, and Pinus thunbergii) 312 bp upstream of the psbA gene. DNA amplification of this repeated region from 11 pine species identified nine length variants. The polymorphic amplified fragments were isolated and the DNA sequence was determined, confirming that the length polymorphism was caused by variation in the length of the repeated region. In the pines, the chloroplast genome is transmitted through pollen and this PCR assay may be used to monitor gene flow in this genus. Analysis of 305 individuals from seven populations of Pinus leucodermis Ant. revealed the presence of four variants with intrapopulational diversities ranging from 0.000 to 0.629 and an average of 0.320. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of cpDNA on the same populations previously failed to detect any variation. Population subdivision based on cpSSR was higher (Gst = 0.22, where Gst is coefficient of gene differentiation) than that revealed in a previous isozyme study (Gst = 0.05). We anticipate that SSR loci within the chloroplast genome should provide a highly informative assay for the analysis of the genetic structure of plant populations. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7644491

  8. Sequence Level Analysis of Recently Duplicated Regions in the Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] Genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single recessive gene, rxp, on linkage group (LG) D2 controls bacterial leaf pustule resistance in soybean. Markers linked to rxp were used to develop BAC contigs spanning the Rxp region. We identified two homoeologous contigs (GmA and GmA’) composed of five bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC...

  9. Sequence comparisons of the variable VP2 region of eight infectious bursal disease virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Dormitorio, T V; Giambrone, J J; Duck, L W

    1997-01-01

    The VP2 gene is part of the genomic segment A of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). It has been identified as the major host-protective antigen of IBDV and is known to contain conformationally dependent protective epitopes. A 643-base pair segment covering the hypervariable region of this gene from three recent serologic variant IBDV isolates from the southeastern United States, two variants from the Delmarva Peninsula, and three serologic standard viruses were amplified and sequenced using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and cycle sequencing techniques. This was done to determine the molecular similarity among isolates that differ antigenically and pathologically. Sequence analysis suggested that the Arkansas (Ark) and Mississippi (Miss) isolates evolved closely and separately from the Delmarva variants (GLS and DELE), in contrast to the other southeastern variant Georgia (Ga), which is more closely related (98.32%) to Delaware E (DELE). All variants, except for Miss, underwent a shift in amino acid number 222 from proline to threonine. The sequence of Univax BD virus, a commercially available intermediate vaccine, was markedly different, evolving from a separate lineage than the others. Restriction enzyme sites could differentiate most isolates. Except for Miss, variants do not have EcoRII site at the larger hydrophilic domain. All variants lost their HaeIII, StuI, and StyI cutting sites with a change in base number 856. The TaqI site is in DELE, whereas the SpeI site is absent in the standard vaccine viruses. The SWASASGS heptapeptide is conserved in all virulent viruses, including APHIS, but not in the attenuated (Univax BD and Bursa Vac 3) and published (D78 and PBG98) vaccines. PMID:9087318

  10. MiRNA Expression Profile for the Human Gastric Antrum Region Using Ultra-Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hamoy, Igor G.; Darnet, Sylvain; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Gonçalves, André Nicolau; Alencar, Dayse O.; Cruz, Aline; Magalhães, Leandro; Araújo Jr., Wilson; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Paulo; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are small non-coding nucleotide sequences that regulate gene expression. These structures are fundamental to several biological processes, including cell proliferation, development, differentiation and apoptosis. Identifying the expression profile of microRNAs in healthy human gastric antrum mucosa may help elucidate the miRNA regulatory mechanisms of the human stomach. Methodology/Principal Findings A small RNA library of stomach antrum tissue was sequenced using high-throughput SOLiD sequencing technology. The total read count for the gastric mucosa antrum region was greater than 618,000. After filtering and aligning using with MirBase, 148 mature miRNAs were identified in the gastric antrum tissue, totaling 3,181 quality reads; 63.5% (2,021) of the reads were concentrated in the eight most highly expressed miRNAs (hsa-mir-145, hsa-mir-29a, hsa-mir-29c, hsa-mir-21, hsa-mir-451a, hsa-mir-192, hsa-mir-191 and hsa-mir-148a). RT-PCR validated the expression profiles of seven of these highly expressed miRNAs and confirmed the sequencing results obtained using the SOLiD platform. Conclusions/Significance In comparison with other tissues, the antrum’s expression profile was unique with respect to the most highly expressed miRNAs, suggesting that this expression profile is specific to stomach antrum tissue. The current study provides a starting point for a more comprehensive understanding of the role of miRNAs in the regulation of the molecular processes of the human stomach. PMID:24647245

  11. Variable Genome Sequences of the Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Regulatory Region Isolated from an Infected Mouse Tissue Viral Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Libbey, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome, isolated from an infected murine tissue homogenate, was sequenced to completion. The lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys were the source of the tissue homogenate in order to mirror the heterogeneity of the virus population in vivo. The regulatory region sequence was found to be highly variable. PMID:27231357

  12. Intergenic Sequence Ribotyping using a region neighboring dkgB links genovar to Kauffman-White serotype of Salmonella enterica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intergenic Sequence Ribotyping using a region neighboring dkgB links genovar to Kauffman-White serotype of Salmonella enterica Previous research identified that the 5S ribosomal (rrn) gene and associated flanking sequences that are closely linked to the dkgB gene of Salmonella enterica were highly ...

  13. Variable Genome Sequences of the Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Regulatory Region Isolated from an Infected Mouse Tissue Viral Suspension.

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Fujinami, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome, isolated from an infected murine tissue homogenate, was sequenced to completion. The lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys were the source of the tissue homogenate in order to mirror the heterogeneity of the virus population in vivo The regulatory region sequence was found to be highly variable. PMID:27231357

  14. Spliced synthetic genes as internal controls in RNA sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Simon A; Chen, Wendy Y; Wong, Ted; Deveson, Ira W; Blackburn, James; Andersen, Stacey B; Nielsen, Lars K; Mattick, John S; Mercer, Tim R

    2016-09-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) can be used to assemble spliced isoforms, quantify expressed genes and provide a global profile of the transcriptome. However, the size and diversity of the transcriptome, the wide dynamic range in gene expression and inherent technical biases confound RNA-seq analysis. We have developed a set of spike-in RNA standards, termed 'sequins' (sequencing spike-ins), that represent full-length spliced mRNA isoforms. Sequins have an entirely artificial sequence with no homology to natural reference genomes, but they align to gene loci encoded on an artificial in silico chromosome. The combination of multiple sequins across a range of concentrations emulates alternative splicing and differential gene expression, and it provides scaling factors for normalization between samples. We demonstrate the use of sequins in RNA-seq experiments to measure sample-specific biases and determine the limits of reliable transcript assembly and quantification in accompanying human RNA samples. In addition, we have designed a complementary set of sequins that represent fusion genes arising from rearrangements of the in silico chromosome to aid in cancer diagnosis. RNA sequins provide a qualitative and quantitative reference with which to navigate the complexity of the human transcriptome. PMID:27502218

  15. Sequence comparisons in the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with emphasis on regions of likely homology with sequences in the Rossmann fold in the methionyl and tyrosyl enzymes.

    PubMed

    Walker, E J; Jeffrey, P D

    1988-02-01

    Amino acid sequences of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases specific for 12 different amino acids have now been published. Differences in origin at the species and organelle level result in 20 distinct sequences being available for comparison. Some of these were compared in small groups as they were determined and, although some homologies were detected, it was generally concluded that there was surprisingly little sequence homology in this functionally related group of enzymes. We have made comparisons of all of the available sequences by using a combination of computer and manual alignment methods and knowledge of the sequences in the Rossmann fold region of methionyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from B. stearothermophilus, enzymes whose three-dimensional structures have been described. It emerges that all of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase sequences thus examined show considerable homology with each other over at least parts of this region, some over virtually all of it. We conclude that a great deal more similarity than had previously been suspected exists in these proteins. In particular, the alignments we have made strongly imply the existence of a mononucleotide binding site of the Rossmann fold configuration in all of the synthetases compared. PMID:3283733

  16. NO and temperature control of the D region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, A. D.; Taubenheim, J.

    1983-04-01

    It is postulated that the behavior of the D region parameters, first and foremost the electron concentration, is controlled not only (and probably not primarily) by the variations in solar and geophysical parameters but also by the changes in the characteristics of the strato-mesosphere, its thermal and dynamical regime. This is seen as the essence of the meteorological control of the D region. The way that this meteorological control is exercised, that is, the influence of the meteorological parameter on the D region characteristics, is investigated. The goal is to determine the indices which, together with the well known solar and geophysical indices, could be used to adequately describe the behavior of the D region. Calculations are performed showing that the experimentally observed seasonal variations in the ion composition, which lead to the systematic summer-to-winter difference in the electron concentration, can be accounted for by the seasonal changes in the mesospheric temperature.

  17. Bacterial interspersed mosaic elements (BIMEs) are a major source of sequence polymorphism in Escherichia coli intergenic regions including specific associations with a new insertion sequence.

    PubMed

    Bachellier, S; Clément, J M; Hofnung, M; Gilson, E

    1997-03-01

    A significant fraction of Escherichia coli intergenic DNA sequences is composed of two families of repeated bacterial interspersed mosaic elements (BIME-1 and BIME-2). In this study, we determined the sequence organization of six intergenic regions in 51 E. coli and Shigella natural isolates. Each region contains a BIME in E. coli K-12. We found that multiple sequence variations are located within or near these BIMEs in the different bacteria. Events included excisions of a whole BIME-1, expansion/deletion within a BIME-2 and insertions of non-BIME sequences like the boxC repeat or a new IS element, named IS 1397. Remarkably, 14 out of IS 1397 integration sites correspond to a BIME sequence, strongly suggesting that this IS element is specifically associated with BIMEs, and thus inserts only in extragenic regions. Unlike BIMEs, IS 1397 is not detected in all E. coli isolates. Possible relationships between the presence of this IS element and the evolution of BIMEs are discussed. PMID:9055066

  18. Holocene fire activity in the Carpathian region: regional climate vs. local controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florescu, Gabriela; Feurdean, Angelica

    2015-04-01

    Introduction. Fire drives significant changes in ecosystem structure and function, diversity, species evolution, biomass dynamics and atmospheric composition. Palaeodata and model-based studies have pointed towards a strong connection between fire activity, climate, vegetation and people. Nevertheless, the relative importance of these factors appears to be strongly variable and a better understanding of these factors and their interaction needs a thorough investigation over multiple spatial (local to global) and temporal (years to millennia) scales. In this respect, sedimentary charcoal, associated with other proxies of climate, vegetation and human impact, represents a powerful tool of investigating changes in past fire activity, especially in regions with scarce fire dataset such as the CE Europe. Aim. To increase the spatial and temporal coverage of charcoal records and facilitate a more critical examination of the patterns, drivers and consequences of biomass burning over multiple spatial and temporal scales in CE Europe, we have investigated 6 fossil sequences in the Carpathian region (northern Romania). These are located in different geographical settings, in terms of elevation, vegetation composition, topography and land-use. Specific questions are: i) determine trends in timing and magnitude of fire activity, as well as similarities and differences between elevations; ii) disentangle the importance of regional from local controls in fire activity; iii) evaluate ecological consequences of fire on landscape composition, structure and diversity. Methods. We first determine the recent trends in fire activity (the last 150 years) from charcoal data and compare them with instrumental records of temperature, precipitation, site history and topography for a better understanding of the relationship between sedimentary charcoal and historical fire activity. We then statistically quantify centennial to millennial trends in fire activity (frequency, magnitude) based on

  19. Characterization of the mouse beta maj globin transcription termination region: a spacing sequence is required between the poly(A) signal sequence and multiple downstream termination elements.

    PubMed Central

    Tantravahi, J; Alvira, M; Falck-Pedersen, E

    1993-01-01

    For the majority of mRNA encoding eukaryotic transcription units, there is little or no knowledge of the elements responsible for transcription termination or how they may interact with RNA polymerase. In this report, we have used recombinant adenovirus reporter vectors to characterize the mouse beta maj globin sequence elements that cause transcription termination. Within the globin 3' termination region, we have identified at least three sequence elements which induce significant levels of transcription termination (> 50%). The smallest functionally active element (64% termination) is 69 bp in length. The natural arrangement of these elements results in a cumulative termination which is greater than 90%. Recognition of the termination elements by RNA polymerase II depends on the presence of a functional poly(A) signal sequence. We demonstrate that efficient transcription termination depends on appropriate spacing between the poly(A) signal sequence and the termination element. Images PMID:8417354

  20. Automatic sequencing and control of Space Station airlock operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himel, Victor; Abeles, Fred J.; Auman, James; Tqi, Terry O.

    1989-01-01

    Procedures that have been developed as part of the NASA JSC-sponsored pre-prototype Checkout, Servicing and Maintenance (COSM) program for pre- and post-EVA airlock operations are described. This paper addresses the accompanying pressure changes in the airlock and in the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Additionally, the paper focuses on the components that are checked out, and includes the step-by-step sequences to be followed by the crew, the required screen displays and prompts that accompany each step, and a description of the automated processes that occur.

  1. Pre-main-sequence population in NGC 1893 region: X-ray properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. K.; Samal, M. R.; Yadav, Ram Kesh; Richichi, Andrea; Lata, Sneh; Pandey, J. C.; Ojha, D. K.; Chen, W. P.

    2014-05-01

    Continuing the attempt to understand the properties of the stellar content in the young cluster NGC 1893 we have carried out a comprehensive multi-wavelength study of the region. The present study focuses on the X-ray properties of T-Tauri Stars (TTSs) in the NGC 1893 region. We found a correlation between the X-ray luminosity, LX, and the stellar mass (in the range 0.2-2.0 M) of TTSs in the NGC 1893 region, similar to those reported in some other young clusters, however the value of the power-law slope obtained in the present study (∼0.9) for NGC 1893 is smaller than those (∼1.4-3.6) reported in the case of TMC, ONC, IC 348 and Chameleon star forming regions. However, the slope in the case of Class III sources (Weak line TTSs) is found to be comparable to that reported in the case of NGC 6611 (∼1.1). It is found that the presence of circumstellar disks has no influence on the X-ray emission. The X-ray luminosity for both CTTSs and WTTSs is found to decrease systematically with age (in the range ∼0.4-5 Myr). The decrease of the X-ray luminosity of TTSs (slope ∼-0.6) in the case of NGC 1893 seems to be faster than observed in the case of other star-forming regions (slope -0.2 to -0.5). There is indication that the sources having relatively large NIR excess have relatively lower LX values. TTSs in NGC 1893 do not follow the well established X-ray activity - rotation relation as in the case of main-sequence stars.

  2. swDMR: A Sliding Window Approach to Identify Differentially Methylated Regions Based on Whole Genome Bisulfite Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qianzhi; Liu, Qi; Chen, BingYu; Huang, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is a widespread epigenetic modification that plays an essential role in gene expression through transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The emergence of whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) represents an important milestone in the detection of DNA methylation. Characterization of differential methylated regions (DMRs) is fundamental as well for further functional analysis. In this study, we present swDMR (http://sourceforge.net/projects/swdmr/) for the comprehensive analysis of DMRs from whole genome methylation profiles by a sliding window approach. It is an integrated tool designed for WGBS data, which not only implements accessible statistical methods to perform hypothesis test adapted to two or more samples without replicates, but false discovery rate was also controlled by multiple test correction. Downstream analysis tools were also provided, including cluster, annotation and visualization modules. In summary, based on WGBS data, swDMR can produce abundant information of differential methylated regions. As a convenient and flexible tool, we believe swDMR will bring us closer to unveil the potential functional regions involved in epigenetic regulation. PMID:26176536

  3. Computational and biological analysis of 680 kb of DNA sequence from the human 5q31 cytokine gene cluster region.

    PubMed

    Frazer, K A; Ueda, Y; Zhu, Y; Gifford, V R; Garofalo, M R; Mohandas, N; Martin, C H; Palazzolo, M J; Cheng, J F; Rubin, E M

    1997-05-01

    With the human genome project advancing into what will be a 7- to 10-year DNA sequencing phase, we are presented with the challenge of developing strategies to convert genomic sequence data, as they become available, into biologically meaningful information. We have analyzed 680 kb of noncontiguous DNA sequence from a 1-Mb region of human chromosome 5q31, coupling computational analysis with gene expression studies of tissues isolated from humans as well as from mice containing human YAC transgenes. This genomic interval has been noted previously for containing the cytokine gene cluster and a quantitative trait locus associated with inflammatory diseases. Our analysis identified and verified expression of 16 new genes, as well as 7 previously known genes. Of the total of 23 genes in this region, 78% had similarity matches to sequences in protein databases and 83% had exact expressed sequence tag (EST) database matches. Comparative mapping studies of eight of the new human genes discovered in the 5q31 region revealed that all are located in the syntenic region of mouse chromosome 11q. Our analysis demonstrates an approach for examining human sequence as it is made available from large sequencing programs and has resulted in the discovery of several biomedically important genes, including a cyclin, a transcription factor that is homologous to an oncogene, a protein involved in DNA repair, and several new members of a family of transporter proteins. PMID:9149945

  4. The regional costs and benefits of acid rain control

    SciTech Connect

    Berkman, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    Congress recently enacted acid rain control legislation as part of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments following a decade-long debate among disparate regional interests. Although Congress succeeded in drafting a law acceptable to all regions, the regional costs and benefits of the legislation remain uncertain. The research presented here attempts to estimate the regional costs and benefits and the economic impacts of acid rain controls. These estimates are made using a modeling system composed of econometric, linear programming and input-output models. The econometric and linear programming components describe markets for electricity and coal. The outputs of these components including capital investment, electricity demand, and coal production are taken as exogenous inputs by a multiregional input-output model. The input-output model produces estimates of changes in final demand, gross output, and employment. The utility linear programming model also predicts sulfur dioxide emissions (an acid-rain precursor). According to model simulations, the costs of acid rain control exceed the benefits for many regions including several regions customarily thought to be the major beneficiaries of acid rain control such as New England.

  5. Opportunistic DNA Recombination With Epstein-Barr Virus at Sites of Control Region Rearrangements Mediating JC Virus Neurovirulence.

    PubMed

    Wortman, Margaret J; Lundberg, Patric S; Dagdanova, Ayuna V; Venkataraman, Pranav; Daniel, Dianne C; Johnson, Edward M

    2016-05-01

    We document a unique DNA recombination between polyomavirus JC (JC virus [JCV]) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) at sequences of JCV found infecting the brain. Archetype JCV is present in bone marrow and uroepithelial cells of most adults. During immunosuppression, JCV can infect the brain, causing a demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Rearrangements in the archetype noncoding control region are necessary for neurovirulence. Two NCCR deletions and a duplication occur at sequences of homology with EBV, present latently in B cells, which may be coinfected with both viruses. Recombination between JCV and EBV occurs in B lymphoblasts at a sequence essential for JCV neurovirulence and in cerebrospinal fluid of immunosuppressed patients with multiple sclerosis, those susceptible to progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Interviral recombination is a model for conferring advantages on JCV in the brain. It can alter a critical noncoding control region sequence and potentially facilitate use of EBV DNA abilities to transfer among different cell types. PMID:26690342

  6. Analysis of sequence diversity in hypervariable regions of the external glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, P; Balfe, P; Ludlam, C A; Bishop, J O; Brown, A J

    1990-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences in three hypervariable regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env gene were obtained by sequencing provirus present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected individuals. Single molecules of target sequences were isolated by limiting dilution and amplified in two stages by the polymerase chain reaction, using nested primers. The product was directly sequenced to avoid errors introduced by Taq polymerase during the amplification process. There was extensive variation between sequences from the same individual as well as between sequences from different individuals. Interpatient variability was markedly less in individuals infected from a common source. A high proportion of amino acid substitutions in the hypervariable regions altered the number and positions of potential N-linked glycosylation sites. Sequences in two hypervariable regions frequently contained short (3- to 15-bp) duplications or deletions, and by amplifying peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA containing 10(2) or 10(3) proviral molecules and analyzing the product by high-resolution electrophoresis, the total number and abundance of distinct length variants within an individual could be estimated, providing a more comprehensive analysis of the variants present than would be obtained by sequencing alone. Sequences from many individuals showed frequent amino acid substitutions at certain key positions for neutralizing-antibody and cytotoxic T-cell recognition in the immunodominant loop. The rates of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution in the region of this and flanking regions indicate that strong positive selection for amino acid change is operating in the generation of antigenic diversity. Images PMID:2243378

  7. Size Sequencing as a Window on Executive Control in Children with Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGonigle-Chalmers, Margaret; Bodner, Kimberly; Fox-Pitt, Alicia; Nicholson, Laura

    2008-01-01

    A study is reported in which size sequencing on a touch screen is used as a measure of executive control in 20 high-functioning children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The data show a significant and age-independent effect of the length of sequence that can be executed without errors by these children, in comparison with a chronologically…

  8. Quadruplex-forming sequences occupy discrete regions inside plant LTR retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Lexa, Matej; Kejnovský, Eduard; Šteflová, Pavlína; Konvalinová, Helena; Vorlíčková, Michaela; Vyskot, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Retrotransposons with long terminal repeats (LTR) form a significant proportion of eukaryotic genomes, especially in plants. They have gag and pol genes and several regulatory regions necessary for transcription and reverse transcription. We searched for potential quadruplex-forming sequences (PQSs) and potential triplex-forming sequences (PTSs) in 18 377 full-length LTR retrotransposons collected from 21 plant species. We found that PQSs were often located in LTRs, both upstream and downstream of promoters from which the whole retrotransposon is transcribed. Upstream-located guanine PQSs were dominant in the minus DNA strand, whereas downstream-located guanine PQSs prevailed in the plus strand, indicating their role both at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Our circular dichroism spectroscopy measurements confirmed that these PQSs readily adopted guanine quadruplex structures—some of them were paralell-stranded, while others were anti-parallel-stranded. The PQS often formed doublets at a mutual distance of up to 400 bp. PTSs were most abundant in 3′UTR (but were also present in 5′UTR). We discuss the potential role of quadruplexes and triplexes as the regulators of various processes participating in LTR retrotransposon life cycle and as potential recombination sites during post-insertional retrotransposon-based genome rearrangements. PMID:24106085

  9. Identification of six Trypanosoma cruzi lineages by sequence-characterised amplified region markers.

    PubMed

    Brisse, S; Dujardin, J C; Tibayrenc, M

    2000-11-01

    Six discrete phylogenetic lineages were recently identified in Trypanosoma cruzi, on the basis of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) characterisation. The objective of the present study was to develop specific PCR-based markers for the identification of each of the six lineages. Eighty-seven T. cruzi stocks representative of all the lineages were characterised by RAPD with three primers, resulting in the identification of three fragments that were specifically amplified in the given sets of lineages. After cloning and sequencing these fragments, three pairs of sequence-characterised amplified region (SCAR) primers were designed. After PCR amplification using the SCAR primers, the initial polymorphism was retained either as the presence or absence of amplification, or as size variation between the PCR products. Although most PCR products, taken individually, were distributed across several lineages, the combination of the three SCAR markers resulted in characteristic patterns that were distinct in the six lineages. Furthermore, T. cruzi lineages were distinguished from Trypanosoma rangeli, T. cruzi marinkellei and T. cruzi-like organisms. The excellent correspondence of these new PCR markers with the phylogenetic lineages, allied with their sensitivity, makes them reliable tools for lineage identification and strain characterisation in T. cruzi. The approach described here could be generalised to any species of microorganism harbouring clear-cut phylogenetic subdivisions. PMID:11087920

  10. Isolation of expressed sequences from the region commonly deleted in Velo-cardio-facial syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sirotkin, H.; Morrow, B.; DasGupta, R.

    1994-09-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is a relatively common autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by cleft palate, cardiac abnormalities, learning disabilities and a characteristic facial dysmorphology. Most VCFS patients have interstitial deletions of 22q11 of 1-2 mb. In an effort to isolate the gene(s) responsible for VCFS we have utilized a hybrid selection protocol to recover expressed sequences from three non-overlapping YACs comprising almost 1 mb of the commonly deleted region. Total yeast genomic DNA or isolated YAC DNA was immobilized on Hybond-N filters, blocked with yeast and human ribosomal and human repetitive sequences and hybridized with a mixture of random primed short fragment cDNA libraries. Six human short fragment libraries derived from total fetus, fetal brain, adult brain, testes, thymus and spleen have been used for the selections. Short fragment cDNAs retained on the filter were passed through a second round of selection and cloned into lambda gt10. cDNAs shown to originate from the YACs and from chromosome 22 are being used to isolate full length cDNAs. Three genes known to be present on these YACs, catechol-O-methyltransferase, tuple 1 and clathrin heavy chain have been recovered. Additionally, a gene related to the murine p120 gene and a number of novel short cDNAs have been isolated. The role of these genes in VCFS is being investigated.