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Sample records for control rod ejection

  1. Quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of a PWR control rod ejection accident

    SciTech Connect

    Pasichnyk, I.; Perin, Y.; Velkov, K.

    2013-07-01

    The paper describes the results of the quantitative Uncertainty and Sensitivity (U/S) Analysis of a Rod Ejection Accident (REA) which is simulated by the coupled system code ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX applying the GRS tool for U/S analysis SUSA/XSUSA. For the present study, a UOX/MOX mixed core loading based on a generic PWR is modeled. A control rod ejection is calculated for two reactor states: Hot Zero Power (HZP) and 30% of nominal power. The worst cases for the rod ejection are determined by steady-state neutronic simulations taking into account the maximum reactivity insertion in the system and the power peaking factor. For the U/S analysis 378 uncertain parameters are identified and quantified (thermal-hydraulic initial and boundary conditions, input parameters and variations of the two-group cross sections). Results for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are presented for safety important global and local parameters. (authors)

  2. Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel Experiencing a Fast Control Rod Ejection Transient

    SciTech Connect

    Ortensi, J.; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    A rapid increase of the temperature and the mechanical stress is expected in TRISO coated particle fuel that experiences a fast Total Control Rod Ejection (CRE) transient event. During this event the reactor power in the pebble bed core increases significantly for a short time interval. The power is deposited instantly and locally in the fuel kernel. This could result in a rapid increase of the pressure in the buffer layer of the coated fuel particle and, consequently, in an increase of the coating stresses. These stresses determine the mechanical failure probability of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). A new calculation procedure has been implemented at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), which analyzes the transient fuel performance behavior of TRISO fuel particles in PBRs. This early capability can easily be extended to prismatic designs, given the availability of neutronic and thermal-fluid solvers. The full-core coupled neutronic and thermal-fluid analysis has been modeled with CYNOD-THERMIX. The temperature fields for the fuel kernel and the particle coatings, as well as the gas pressures in the buffer layer, are calculated with the THETRIS module explicitly during the transient calculation. Results from this module are part of the feedback loop within the neutronic-thermal fluid iterations performed for each time step. The temperature and internal pressure values for each pebble type in each region of the core are then input to the PArticle STress Analysis (PASTA) code, which determines the particle coating stresses and the fraction of failed particles. This paper presents an investigation of a Total Control Rod Ejection (TCRE) incident in the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular reactor design using the above described calculation procedure. The transient corresponds to a reactivity insertion of $3 (~2000 pcm) reaching 35 times the nominal power in 0.5 seconds. For each position in the core

  3. Drop Ejection From an Oscillating Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, E. D.; Basaran, O. A.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of a drop of a Newtonian liquid that is pendant from or sessile on a solid rod that is forced to undergo time-periodic oscillations along its axis is studied theoretically. The free boundary problem governing the time evolution of the shape of the drop and the flow field inside it is solved by a method of lines using a finite element algorithm incorporating an adaptive mesh. When the forcing amplitude is small, the drop approaches a limit cycle at large times and undergoes steady oscillations thereafter. However, drop breakup is the consequence if the forcing amplitude exceeds a critical value. Over a wide range of amplitudes above this critical value, drop ejection from the rod occurs during the second oscillation period from the commencement of rod motion. Remarkably, the shape of the interface at breakup and the volume of the primary drop formed are insensitive to changes in forcing amplitude. The interface shape at times close to and at breakup is a multi-valued function of distance measured along the rod axis and hence cannot be described by recently popularized one-dimensional approximations. The computations show that drop ejection occurs without the formation of a long neck. Therefore, this method of drop formation holds promise of preventing formation of undesirable satellite droplets.

  4. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.; Ross, H.V.

    1958-11-18

    A control rod is described for a nuclear reactor. In certaln reactor designs it becomes desirable to use a control rod having great width but relatively llttle thickness. This patent is addressed to such a need. The neutron absorbing material is inserted in a triangular tube, leaving volds between the circular insert and the corners of the triangular tube. The material is positioned within the tube by the use of dummy spacers to achleve the desired absorption pattern, then the ends of the tubes are sealed with suitable plugs. The tubes may be welded or soldered together to form two flat surfaces of any desired width, and covered with sheetmetal to protect the tubes from damage. This design provides a control member that will not distort under the action of outside forces or be ruptured by gases generated within the jacketed control member.

  5. Control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  6. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  7. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  8. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  9. INTERCOMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR A PWR ROD EJECTION ACCIDENT

    SciTech Connect

    DIAMOND,D.J.; ARONSON,A.; JO,J.; AVVAKUMOV,A.; MALOFEEV,V.; SIDOROV,V.; FERRARESI,P.; GOUIN,C.; ANIEL,S.; ROYER,M.E.

    1999-10-01

    This study is part of an overall program to understand the uncertainty in best-estimate calculations of the local fuel enthalpy during the rod ejection accident. Local fuel enthalpy is used as the acceptance criterion for this design-basis event and can also be used to estimate fuel damage for the purpose of determining radiological consequences. The study used results from neutron kinetics models in PARCS, BARS, and CRONOS2, codes developed in the US, the Russian Federation, and France, respectively. Since BARS uses a heterogeneous representation of the fuel assembly as opposed to the homogeneous representations in PARCS and CRONOS, the effect of the intercomparison was primarily to compare different intra-assembly models. Quantitative comparisons for core power, reactivity, assembly fuel enthalpy and pin power were carried out. In general the agreement between methods was very good providing additional confidence in the codes and providing a starting point for a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in calculated fuel enthalpy using best-estimate methods.

  10. COMPOSITE CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Rock, H.R.

    1963-12-24

    A composite control rod for use in controlling a nuclear reactor is described. The control rod is of sandwich construction in which finned dowel pins are utilized to hold together sheets of the neutron absorbing material and nonabsorbing structural material thereby eliminating the need for being dependent on the absorbing material for structural support. The dowel pins perform the function of absorbing the forces due to differential thermal expansion, seating further with the fins into the sheets of material and crushing before damage is done either to the absorbing or non-absorbing material. (AEC)

  11. Control rod driveline and grapple

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A control rod driveline and grapple is disclosed for placement between a control rod drive and a nuclear reactor control rod containing poison for parasitic neutron absorption required for reactor shutdown. The control rod is provided with an enlarged cylindrical handle which terminates in an upwardly extending rod to provide a grapple point for the driveline. The grapple mechanism includes a tension rod which receives the upwardly extending handle and is provided with a lower annular flange. A plurality of preferably six grapple segments surround and grip the control rod handle. Each grapple rod segment grips the flange on the tension rod at an interior upper annular indentation, bears against the enlarged cylindrical handle at an intermediate annulus and captures the upwardly flaring frustum shaped handle at a lower and complementary female segment. The tension rods and grapple segments are surrounded by and encased within a cylinder. The cylinder terminates immediately and outward extending annulus at the lower portion of the grapple segments. Excursion of the tension rod relative to the encasing cylinder causes rod release at the handle by permitting the grapple segments to pivot outwardly and about the annulus on the tension rod so as to open the lower defined frustum shaped annulus and drop the rod. Relative movement between the tension rod and cylinder can occur either due to electromagnetic release of the tension rod within defined limits of travel or differential thermal expansion as between the tension rod and cylinder as where the reactor exceeds design thermal limits.

  12. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  13. SAFETY SYSTEM FOR CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Paget, J.A.

    1963-05-14

    A structure for monitoring the structural continuity of a control rod foi a neutron reactor is presented. A electric conductor readily breakable under mechanical stress is fastened along the length of the control rod at a plurality of positions and forms a closed circuit with remote electrical components responsive to an open circuit. A portion of the conductor between the control rod and said components is helically wound to allow free and normally unrestricted movement of the segment of conductor secured to the control rod relative to the remote components. Any break in the circuit is indicative of control rod breakage. (AEC)

  14. Coupled thermal analysis applied to the study of the rod ejection accident

    SciTech Connect

    Gonnet, M.

    2012-07-01

    An advanced methodology for the assessment of fuel-rod thermal margins under RIA conditions has been developed by AREVA NP SAS. With the emergence of RIA analytical criteria, the study of the Rod Ejection Accident (REA) would normally require the analysis of each fuel rod, slice by slice, over the whole core. Up to now the strategy used to overcome this difficulty has been to perform separate analyses of sampled fuel pins with conservative hypotheses for thermal properties and boundary conditions. In the advanced methodology, the evaluation model for the Rod Ejection Accident (REA) integrates the node average fuel and coolant properties calculation for neutron feedback purpose as well as the peak fuel and coolant time-dependent properties for criteria checking. The calculation grid for peak fuel and coolant properties can be specified from the assembly pitch down to the cell pitch. The comparative analysis of methodologies shows that coupled methodology allows reducing excessive conservatism of the uncoupled approach. (authors)

  15. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Peter T. K.

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  16. Hafnium stainless steel absorber rod for control rod

    SciTech Connect

    Charnley, J.E.; Cearley, J.E.; Dixon, R.C.; Izzo, K.R.; Aiello, L.L.

    1989-08-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a control rod having a stainless steel body for enclosing a neutron absorbing poison, the control rod having movement along an axial direction for insertion into and out of a nuclear reactor for controlling a nuclear reaction. The improvement comprising: a piece of hafnium; a piece of stainless steel joined to the hafnium by a thin diffusion interface created by friction welding. The hafnium and the stainless steel oriented serially in the axial direction with the thin diffusion interface disposed normal to the axial direction of the control rod movement; means for confining the hafnium to movement along the axial direction with the control rod; and means for attaching the piece of stainless steel to the remaining portion of the control rod to load the weld therebetween under compression or tension during the control rod movement. Whereby the thin diffusion interface is loaded in tension or compression only upon dynamic movement of the control rod.

  17. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  18. Nuclear data uncertainties by the PWR MOX/UO{sub 2} core rod ejection benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Pasichnyk, I.; Klein, M.; Velkov, K.; Zwermann, W.; Pautz, A.

    2012-07-01

    Rod ejection transient of the OECD/NEA and U.S. NRC PWR MOX/UO{sub 2} core benchmark is considered under the influence of nuclear data uncertainties. Using the GRS uncertainty and sensitivity software package XSUSA the propagation of the uncertainties in nuclear data up to the transient calculations are considered. A statistically representative set of transient calculations is analyzed and both integral as well as local output quantities are compared with the benchmark results of different participants. It is shown that the uncertainties in nuclear data play a crucial role in the interpretation of the results of the simulation. (authors)

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD DRIVE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Oakes, L.C.; Walker, C.S.

    1959-12-15

    ABS>A suspension mechanism between a vertically movable nuclear reactor control rod and a rod extension, which also provides information for the operator or an automatic control signal, is described. A spring connects the rod extension to a drive shift. The extension of the spring indicates whether (1) the rod is at rest on the reactor, (2) the rod and extension are suspended, or (3) the extension alone is suspended, the spring controlling a 3-position electrical switch.

  20. Inverted Control Rod Lock-In Device

    DOEpatents

    Brussalis, W. G.; Bost, G. E.

    1962-12-01

    A mechanism which prevents control rods from dropping out of the reactor core in the event the vessel in which the reactor is mounted should capsize is described. The mechanism includes a pivoted toothed armature which engages the threaded control rod lead screw and prevents removal of the rod whenever the armature is not attracted by the provided electromagnetic means. (AEC)

  1. Fuel followed control rod installation at AFRRI

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Mark; Owens, Chris; Forsbacka, Matt

    1992-07-01

    Fuel Followed Control Rods (FFCRs) were installed at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute's 1 MW TRIGA Reactor. The procedures for obtaining, shipping, and installing the FFCRs is described. As part of the FFCR installation, the transient rod drive was relocated. Core performance due to the addition of the fuel followed control rods is discussed. (author)

  2. Control rods in LMFBRs: a physics assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, H.F.; Collins, P.J.

    1982-08-01

    This physics assessment is based on roughly 300 control rod worth measurements in ZPPR from 1972 to 1981. All ZPPR assemblies simulated mixed-oxide LMFBRs, representing sizes of 350, 700, and 900 MWe. Control rod worth measurements included single rods, various combinations of rods, and Ta and Eu rods. Additional measurements studied variations in B/sub 4/C enrichment, rod interaction effects, variations in rod geometry, neutron streaming in sodium-filled channels, and axial worth profiles. Analyses were done with design-equivalent methods, using ENDF/B Version IV data. Some computations for the sensitivities to approximations in the methods have been included. Comparisons of these analyses with the experiments have allowed the status of control rod physics in the US to be clearly defined.

  3. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  4. Rod Ejection Accident by the Coupled System Code ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, Yann; Velkov, Kiril; Pasichnyk, Igor; Langenbuch, Siegfried

    The paper considers a Rod Ejection Accident (REA) which has been calculated by the coupled-code system ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX. For the present study, a MOX/UOX mixed core loading was developed on the basis of a generic PWR. The results are particularly focused on the fuel enthalpy rise which is the main safety criterion for such transient. A parametric REA study has been performed, showing the influence of some important thermal-hydraulic and neutron-physical parameters. Simulations have been performed using realistic or artificially decreased delayed neutron fractions for two different core states (HZP and 30% of the nominal power). Effective fuel rod temperature influence (i.e. Doppler coefficient) has been studied by using different correlations (0.5/0.5 weighting factors or the typical TDoppler = 0.7 TSurface + 0.3 TCenter) or by changing the fuel gap conductance. It is shown that the maximum enthalpy (and enthalpy increase) does not always appear in the affected fuel assembly but can also appear in the neighboring ones. This result is a direct consequence of the burn up dependence of the enthalpy. The paper also considers the case of local delayed neutron parameters and briefly describes the future REA studies foreseen at GRS such as an investigation of quantitative uncertainty propagation from the nuclear data to the transient behavior.

  5. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  6. Control rod drive hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Ose, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    A hydraulic system for a control rod drive (CRD) includes a variable output-pressure CR pump operable in a charging mode for providing pressurized fluid at a charging pressure, and in a normal mode for providing the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure, less than the charging pressure. Charging and purge lines are disposed in parallel flow between the CRD pump and the CRD. A hydraulic control unit is disposed in flow communication in the charging line and includes a scram accumulator. An isolation valve is provided in the charging line between the CRD pump and the scram accumulator. A controller is operatively connected to the CRD pump and the isolation valve and is effective for opening the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a charging mode for charging the scram accumulator, and closing the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a normal mode for providing to the CRD through the purge line the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure lower than the charging pressure.

  7. Internal Control Rod Drive Mechanisms, Design Options for IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Petrovic, Bojan

    2004-07-01

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a medium-power (335 MWe) PWR with an integral, primary circuit configuration, where all the reactor coolant system components are contained within the reactor vessel. This integral configuration is a key reason for the success of IRIS' 'safety-by-design' approach, whereby accident initiators are eliminated or the accident consequences and/or frequency are reduced. The most obvious example of the IRIS safety by design approach is the elimination of large LOCA's, since the integral reactor coolant system has no large loop piping. Another serious accident scenario that is being addressed in IRIS is the postulated ejection of a reactor control cluster assembly (RCCA). This accident initiator can be eliminated by locating the RCCA drive mechanisms (CRDMs) inside the reactor vessel. This eliminates the mechanical drive rod penetration between the RCCA and the external CRDM, eliminating the potential for differential pressure across the pressure boundary, and thus eliminating 'by design' the possibility for rod ejection accident. Moreover, the elimination of the 'large' drive-rod penetrations and the external CRDM pressure housings decreases the likelihood of boric acid leakage and subsequent corrosion of the reactor pressure boundary (like the Davis-Besse incident). This paper will discuss the IRIS top level design requirements and objectives for internal CRDMs, and provide examples candidate designs and their specific performance characteristics. (authors)

  8. Control Rod Malfunction at the NRAD Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas L. Maddock

    2010-05-01

    The neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) is a training, research, and isotope (TRIGA) reactor located at the INL. The reactor is normally shut down by the insertion of three control rods that drop into the core when power is removed from electromagnets. During a routine shutdown, indicator lights on the console showed that one of the control rods was not inserted. It was initially thought that the indicator lights were in error because of a limit switch that was out of adjustment. Through further testing, it was determined that the control rod did not drop when the scram switch was initially pressed. The control rod anomaly led to a six month shutdown of the reactor and an in depth investigation of the reactor protective system. The investigation looked into: scram switch operation, console modifications, and control rod drive mechanisms. A number of latent issues were discovered and corrected during the investigation. The cause of the control rod malfunction was found to be a buildup of corrosion in the control rod drive mechanism. The investigation resulted in modifications to equipment, changes to both operation and maintenance procedures, and additional training. No reoccurrences of the problem have been observed since corrective actions were implemented.

  9. Uncertainties propagation in the framework of a Rod Ejection Accident modeling based on a multi-physics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pallec, J. C.; Crouzet, N.; Bergeaud, V.; Delavaud, C.

    2012-07-01

    The control of uncertainties in the field of reactor physics and their propagation in best-estimate modeling are a major issue in safety analysis. In this framework, the CEA develops a methodology to perform multi-physics simulations including uncertainties analysis. The present paper aims to present and apply this methodology for the analysis of an accidental situation such as REA (Rod Ejection Accident). This accident is characterized by a strong interaction between the different areas of the reactor physics (neutronic, fuel thermal and thermal hydraulic). The modeling is performed with CRONOS2 code. The uncertainties analysis has been conducted with the URANIE platform developed by the CEA: For each identified response from the modeling (output) and considering a set of key parameters with their uncertainties (input), a surrogate model in the form of a neural network has been produced. The set of neural networks is then used to carry out a sensitivity analysis which consists on a global variance analysis with the determination of the Sobol indices for all responses. The sensitivity indices are obtained for the input parameters by an approach based on the use of polynomial chaos. The present exercise helped to develop a methodological flow scheme, to consolidate the use of URANIE tool in the framework of parallel calculations. Finally, the use of polynomial chaos allowed computing high order sensitivity indices and thus highlighting and classifying the influence of identified uncertainties on each response of the analysis (single and interaction effects). (authors)

  10. Variable flow control for a nuclear reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, Richard D.; Bhattacharyya, Ajay

    1978-01-01

    A variable flow control for a control rod assembly of a nuclear reactor that depends on turbulent friction though an annulus. The annulus is formed by a piston attached to the control rod drive shaft and a housing or sleeve fitted to the enclosure housing the control rod. As the nuclear fuel is burned up and the need exists for increased reactivity, the control rods are withdrawn, which increases the length of the annulus and decreases the rate of coolant flow through the control rod assembly.

  11. Control rod for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Walter G.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1979-01-01

    A control rod assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed having a remotely disengageable coupling between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling is actuated by first lowering then raising the drive shaft. The described motion causes axial repositioning of a pin in a grooved rotatable cylinder, each being attached to different parts of the drive shaft which are axially movable relative to each other. In one embodiment, the relative axial motion of the parts of the drive shaft is used either to couple or to uncouple the connection by forcing resilient members attached to the drive shaft into or out of shouldered engagement, respectively, with an indentation formed in the control rod.

  12. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1986-01-01

    A magnetic reed switch assembly for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electromagnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  13. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-09-30

    A magnetic reed switch assembly is described for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electro-magnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  14. Nuclear reactor remote disconnect control rod coupling indicator

    DOEpatents

    Vuckovich, Michael

    1977-01-01

    A coupling indicator for use with nuclear reactor control rod assemblies which have remotely disengageable couplings between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling indicator indicates whether the control rod and the control rod drive shaft are engaged or disengaged. A resistive network, utilizing magnetic reed switches, senses the position of the control rod drive mechanism lead screw and the control rod position indicating tube, and the relative position of these two elements with respect to each other is compared to determine whether the coupling is engaged or disengaged.

  15. Regulatory perspective on incomplete control rod insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterton, M.

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete control rod insertions experienced at South Texas Unit 1 and Wolf Creek are of safety concern to the NRC staff because they represent potential precursors to loss of shutdown margin. Even before it was determined if these events were caused by the control rods or by the fuel there was an apparent correlation of the problem with high burnup fuel. It was determined that there was also a correlation between high burnup and high drag forces as well as with rod drop time histories and lack of rod recoil. The NRC staff initial actions were aimed at getting a perspective on the magnitude of the problem as far as the number of plants and the amount of fuel that could be involved, as well as the safety significance in terms of shutdown margin. As tests have been performed and data has been analyzed the focus has shifted more toward understanding the problem and the ways to eliminate it. At this time the staff`s understanding of the phenomena is that it was a combination of factors including burnup, power history and temperature. The problem appears to be very sensitive to these factors, the interaction of which is not clearly understood. The model developed by Westinghouse provides a possible explanation but there is not sufficient data to establish confidence levels and sensitivity studies involving the key parameters have not been done. While several fixes to the problem have been discussed, no definitive fixes have been proposed. Without complete understanding of the phenomena, or fixes that clearly eliminate the problem the safety concern remains. The safety significance depends on the amount of shutdown margin lost due to incomplete insertion of the control rods. Were the control rods to stick high in the core, the reactor could not be shutdown by the control rods and other means such as emergency boration would be required.

  16. Radiological characterization of spent control rod assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Pratt, S.L.; Haggard, D.L.

    1995-10-01

    This document represents the final report of an ongoing study to provide radiological characterizations, classifications, and assessments in support of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. This report describes the results of non-destructive and laboratory radionuclide measurements, as well as waste classification assessments, of BWR and PWR spent control rod assemblies. The radionuclide inventories of these spent control rods were determined by three separate methodologies, including (1) direct assay techniques, (2) calculational techniques, and (3) by sampling and laboratory radiochemical analyses. For the BWR control rod blade (CRB) and PWR burnable poison rod assembly (BPRA), {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni, present in the stainless steel cladding, were the most abundant neutron activation products. The most abundant radionuclide in the PWR rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) was {sup 108m}Ag (130 yr halflife) produced in the Ag-In-Cd alloy used as the neutron poison. This radionuclide will be the dominant contributor to the gamma dose rate for many hundreds of years. The results of the direct assay methods agree very well ({+-}10%) with the sampling/radiochemical measurements. The results of the calculational methods agreed fairly well with the empirical measurements for the BPRA, but often varied by a factor of 5 to 10 for the CRB and the RCCA assemblies. If concentration averaging and encapsulation, as allowed by 10CFR61.55, is performed, then each of the entire control assemblies would be classified as Class C low-level radioactive waste.

  17. Control rod drive for reactor shutdown

    DOEpatents

    McKeehan, Ernest R.; Shawver, Bruce M.; Schiro, Donald J.; Taft, William E.

    1976-01-20

    A means for rapidly shutting down or scramming a nuclear reactor, such as a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor, and serves as a backup to the primary shutdown system. The control rod drive consists basically of an in-core assembly, a drive shaft and seal assembly, and a control drive mechanism. The control rod is driven into the core region of the reactor by gravity and hydraulic pressure forces supplied by the reactor coolant, thus assuring that common mode failures will not interfere with or prohibit scramming the reactor when necessary.

  18. HIGH STRENGTH CONTROL RODS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Cohen, I.

    1961-07-11

    Nuclear reactor control rods comprised of highly compressed and sintered finely divided metal alloy panticles and fine metal oxide panticles substantially uniformly distributed theretbrough are described. The metal alloy consists essentially of silver, indium, cadmium, tin, and aluminum, the amount of each being present in centain percentages by weight. The oxide particles are metal oxides of the metal alloy composition, the amount of oxygen being present in certain percentages by weight and all the oxygen present being substantially in the form of metal oxide. This control rod is characterized by its high strength and resistance to creep at elevated temperatures.

  19. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  20. CONTROL ROD DRIVE MECHANISM FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.; Liederbach, F.J.; Lones, W.

    1963-05-14

    A lead-screw-type control rod drive featuring an electric motor and a fluid motor arranged to provide a selectably alternative driving means is described. The electric motor serves to drive the control rod slowly during normal operation, while the fluid motor, assisted by an automatic declutching of the electric motor, affords high-speed rod insertion during a scram. (AEC)

  1. Measurements of control rod efficiency in RBMK critical assembly upon dropping of the rods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhitarev, V. E. Kachanov, V. M.; Sergevnin, A. Yu.; Lebedev, G. V.

    2014-12-15

    The efficiency of control rods in the RBMK critical assembly was measured in the case where one manual-control rod (MCR) is dropped from a steady critical state, and several other MCRs were additionally dropped after 44 s. The measured number of neutrons in the assembly during and after dropping of the rods was used to calculate the efficiency values of the rods by solution of the system of point kinetics equations. A series of methods of the initial data treatment for determination of the desired values of reactivity without the calculated corrections were used.

  2. Rebirth of a control rod at the Phenix power plant

    SciTech Connect

    De Carvalho, Corinne; Vignau, Bernard; Masson, Marc

    2007-07-01

    This paper outlines the operations involved in cleaning the control rod for the complementary shutdown system in the Phenix Power Plant, the French sodium-cooled fast reactor. The Phenix reactor is controlled by six control rods and a complementary shutdown system. The latter comprises a control rod and a mechanism maintaining the rod in position by means of an electromagnet. The electromagnet is continuously supplied with power and holds the rod control assembly in position by magnetisation on a plane circular surface made from pure iron. The bearing capacity of the mechanism on the rod was initially 80 daN with a rod weight of 26.3 daN. This deteriorated progressively over time. The bearing surface of the rod and the electromagnet became contaminated with a deposit of sodium oxides and metallic particles, thus creating an air gap. This reached a figure of 36 daN in 2005 and was deemed not to be sufficient to prevent the rod from dropping at the wrong time during reactor operation. The Power Plant thus decided to replace the rod mechanism in the reactor in an initial phase, followed by the control rod itself. As the Phenix Power Plant had no spare control rods left, they initiated a 'salvage' plan, over two stages, for the rod removed from the reactor and placed in the fuel storage drum: - Inspection of the bearing surface of the rod by means of a borescope to check whether the rod could be salvaged, - A cleaning operation on the bearing face and checks on the bearing capacity of the rod. The operation is subject to very stringent requirements: the rod must not be taken out of the sodium to ensure that it can be reused in the reactor. The operation must thus take place in the fuel storage drum where there are no facilities for such an operation and where operating conditions are very hostile: high temperatures (the sodium in the fuel storage drum is at a temperature of 150 deg. C, high dose rate (3 mGy/h on the bearing surface) and the bearing surface is submerged

  3. Nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bilibin, Konstantin

    1988-01-01

    A temperature responsive, self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly 10. The upper end 18 of a lower drive line 17 fits within the lower end of an upper drive line 12. The lower end (not shown) of the lower drive line 17 is connected to a neutron absorber. During normal temperature conditions the lower drive line 17 is supported by detent means 22,26. When an overtemperature condition occurs thermal actuation means 34 urges ring 26 upwardly sufficiently to allow balls 22 to move radially outwardly thereby allowing lower drive line 17 to move downwardly toward the core of the nuclear reactor resulting in automatic reduction of the reactor powder.

  4. Liquid metal drop ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project was to demonstrate the possibility of ejecting liquid metals using drop on demand printing technology. The plan was to make transducers for operation in the 100 MHz frequency range and to use these transducers to demonstrate the ability to eject drops of liquid metals such as gallium. Two transducers were made by indium bonding piezoelectric lithium niobate to quartz buffer rods. The lithium niobate plates were thinned by mechanical polishing to a thickness of 37 microns for operation at 100 MHz. Hemispherical lenses were polished in the opposite ends of the buffer rods. The lenses, which focus the sound waves in the liquid metal, had an F-number equals 1. A mechanical housing was made to hold the transducers and to allow precise control over the liquid level above the lens. We started by demonstrating the ability to eject drops of water on demand. The drops of water had a diameter of 15 microns which corresponds to the wavelength of the sound wave in the water. A videotape of this ejection was made. We then used a mixture of Gallium and Indium (used to lower the melting temperature of the Gallium) to demonstrate the ejection of liquid metal drops. This proved to be difficult because of the oxide skin which forms on the surface of the liquid. In some instances, we were able to eject metal drops, however, this was not consistent and reproducible. An experiment was set up at NASA-Lewis to stabilize the process of drop on demand liquid metal ejection. The object was to place the transducer and liquid metal in a vacuum station so that no oxide would form on the surface. We were successful in demonstrating that liquid metals could be ejected on demand and that this technology could be used for making sheet metal in space.

  5. CONTROL ROD FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR AND METHOD OF PREPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Hausner, H.H.

    1958-12-30

    BS>An improved control rod is presented for a nuclear reactor. This control rod is comprised of a rare earth metal oxide or rare earth metal carbide such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium carbide, uniformly distributed in a metal matrix having a low cross sectional area of absorption for thermal neutrons, such as aluminum, beryllium, and zirconium.

  6. DEVICE FOR CONTROLLING INSERTION OF ROD

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, B.J.

    1958-10-14

    A device for rapidly inserting a safety rod into a nuclear reactor upon a given signal or in the event of a power failure in order to prevent the possibility of extensive damage caused by a power excursion is described. A piston is slidably mounted within a vertical cylinder with provision for an electromagnetic latch at the top of the cylinder. This assembly, with a safety rod attached to the piston, is mounted over an access port to the core region of the reactor. The piston is normally latched at the top of the cylinder with the safety rod clear of the core area, however, when the latch is released, the piston and rod drop by their own weight to insert the rod. Vents along the side of the cylinder permit the escape of the air entrapped under the piston over the greater part of the distance, however, at the end of the fall the entrapped air is compressed thereby bringing the safety rod gently to rest, thus providing for a rapid automatic insertion of the rod with a minimum of structural shock.

  7. Portal Stability Controls Dynamics of DNA Ejection from Phage.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Krista G; Behrens, Manja A; Streletzky, Kiril A; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    2016-07-01

    Through a unique combination of time-resolved single-molecule (cryo-TEM) and bulk measurements (light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering), we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of stochastic DNA ejection events from phage λ. We reveal that both binding with the specific phage receptor, LamB, and thermo-mechanical destabilization of the portal vertex on the capsid are required for initiation of ejection of the pressurized λ-DNA from the phage. Specifically, we found that a measurable activation energy barrier for initiation of DNA ejection with LamB present, Ea = (1.2 ± 0.1) × 10(-19) J/phage (corresponding to ∼28 kTbody/phage at Tbody = 37 °C), results in 15 times increased rate of ejection event dynamics when the temperature is raised from 15 to 45 °C (7.5 min versus 30 s average lag time for initiation of ejection). This suggests that phages have a double fail-safe mechanism for ejection-in addition to receptor binding, phage must also overcome (through thermal energy and internal DNA pressure) an energy barrier for DNA ejection. This energy barrier ensures that viral genome ejection into cells occurs with high efficiency only when the temperature conditions are favorable for genome replication. At lower suboptimal temperatures, the infectious phage titer is preserved over much longer times, since DNA ejection dynamics is strongly inhibited even in the presence of solubilized receptor or susceptible cells. This work also establishes a light scattering based approach to investigate the influence of external solution conditions, mimicking those of the bacterial cytoplasm, on the stability of the viral capsid portal, which is directly linked to dynamics of virion deactivation. PMID:27176921

  8. COAXIAL CONTROL ROD DRIVE MECHANISM FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.J.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-04-14

    A drive mechanism is presented for the control rod or a nuclear reactor. In this device the control rod is coupled to a drive shaft which extends coaxially through the rotor of an electric motor for relative rotation with respect thereto. A gear reduction mehanism is coupled between the rotor and the drive shaft to convert the rotary motion of the motor into linear motion of the shaft with a comparatively great reduction in speed, thereby providing relatively glow linear movement of the shaft and control rod for control purposes.

  9. TOP OF MTR. CONTROL RODS AND GRID PLATE EMERGE FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP OF MTR. CONTROL RODS AND GRID PLATE EMERGE FROM REACTOR TANK. INL NEGATIVE NO. 6206. R.G. Larsen, Photographer, 6/27/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Remotely operated gripper provides vertical control rod movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutter, E.; Koch, L. J.

    1968-01-01

    Remote actuation of a gripper shaft affects vertical engagement between a drive shaft and control rod. A secondary function of the gripper is to provide remote indication of positive completion of the gripping or ungripping operation.

  11. Safety analysis forseismic motion of control rods accounting for rod misalignment

    SciTech Connect

    Osmin, W.L.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the results of three safety analyses performed by the SRL Safety Analysis Group (SAG) to assess the safety impact of control rod motion induced by a Design Basis Earthquake (DBE).

  12. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    A linear motion device, more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core, is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  13. ALLOY COMPOSITION FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL RODS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Snyder, H.J.; Eggleston, R.R.

    1963-01-22

    This invention relates to alloy compositons suitable as cortrol rod material consisting of, by weight, from 85% to 85% Ag, from 2% to 20% In, from up to 10% of Cd, from up to 5% Sn, and from up to 1.5% Al, the amount of each element employed being determined by the equation X + 2Y + 3Z + 3W + 4V = 1.4 and less, where X, Y, Z, W, and V represent the atom fractions of the elements Ag, Cd, In, Al and Sn. (AEC)

  14. Dysprosium titanate as an absorber material for control rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risovany, V. D.; Varlashova, E. E.; Suslov, D. N.

    2000-09-01

    Disprosium titanate is an attractive control rod material for the thermal neutron reactors. Its main advantages are: insignificant swelling, no out-gassing under neutron irradiation, rather high neutron efficiency, a high melting point (˜1870°C), non-interaction with the cladding at temperatures above 1000°C, simple fabrication and easily reprocessed non-radioactive waste. It can be used in control rods as pellets and powder. The disprosium titanate control rods have worked off in the MIR reactor for 17 years, in VVER-1000 - for 4 years without any operating problems. After post-irradiation examinations this type of control rod having high lifetime was recommended for the VVER and RBMK. The paper presents the examination results of absorber element dummies containing dysprosium titanate, irradiated in the SM reactor to the neutron fluence of 3.4×10 22 cm -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) and, also, the data on structure, thermal-physical properties of dysprosium titanate, efficiency of dysprosium titanate control rods.

  15. Horizontal displacement profiles in N Reactor horizontal control rod channels

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1988-12-01

    One of the potential results from N Reactor graphite moderator distortion is horizontal curvature of the horizontal control rod (HCR) channels. Mockup testing has identified two possible problem scenarios resulting from such curvature: slow scram times and rod abrasion due to rubbing of the rod on the side of the channel and subsequent displacement of T-blocks that form the sides of the channels. As a result of these potential events, surveillance tools (instrumentation) to measure HCR channel horizontal displacement was recently developed. Surveillance of HCR channel 65, performed on December 11, 1987, indicated a six inch rearward displacement near the center of the channel. This approximated the displacement which mockup testing has identified as a concern with regard to T-block movement. Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) observations indicate that T-block movement has not occurred in HCR channel 65, but that there has been some rubbing of the rod on the channel sides. Review of most recent rod hot scram times indicates normal performance for HCR 65. To further evaluate this concern, horizontal deflection and CCTV surveillance was scheduled in six HCR channels surrounding HCR channel 65. Inspection of the HCR rod tip was also performed. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Self-propelled rods exhibit a phase-separated state characterized by the presence of active stresses and the ejection of polar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitz, Sebastian; Deutsch, Andreas; Peruani, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    We study collections of self-propelled rods (SPR) moving in two dimensions for packing fractions less than or equal to 0.3. We find that in the thermodynamical limit the SPR undergo a phase transition between a disordered gas and a novel phase-separated system state. Interestingly, (global) orientational order patterns—contrary to what has been suggested—vanish in this limit. In the found novel state, the SPR self-organize into a highly dynamical, high-density, compact region—which we call aggregate—which is surrounded by a disordered gas. Active stresses build inside aggregates as a result of the combined effect of local orientational order and active forces. This leads to the most distinctive feature of these aggregates: constant ejection of polar clusters of SPR. This novel phase-separated state represents a novel state of matter characterized by large fluctuations in volume and shape, related to mass ejection, and exhibits positional as well as orientational local order. SPR systems display new physics unseen in other active matter systems.

  17. Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sease, J.D.

    1998-03-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD AND METHOD OF FABRICATION

    DOEpatents

    Porembka, S.W. Jr.

    1961-06-27

    A reactor control rod formed from a compacted powder dispersion is patented. The rod consists of titanium sheathed with a cladding alloy. The cladding alloy contains 1.3% to 1.6% by weight of tin, 0.07% to 0.12% by weight of chromium, 0.04% to 0.08% by weight of nickel, 0.09% to 0.16% by weight of iron, carbon not exceeding 0.05%, less than 0.5% by weight of incidental impurities, and the balance zirconium.

  19. VIEW OF CABLES AND TAPES ASSOCIATED WITH ADRIVE CONTROL ROD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CABLES AND TAPES ASSOCIATED WITH A-DRIVE CONTROL ROD SYSTEM, AT LEVEL +15’, DIRECTLY ABOVE PDP CONTROL ROOM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE CABLES FROM THE PDP ROOM GO THROUGH THE CONCRETE WALL, MAKE A RIGHT ANGLE TURN DOWNWARD, AND DESCEND INTO THE PDP CONTROL ROOM AS VERTICAL TAPES - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  20. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.

    Disclosed is a linear motion device and more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core. The CRDM and method disclosed is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  1. Method and apparatus for monitoring the control rods of a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gravelle, A.; Marini, J.; Romy, D.

    1984-12-04

    Method and apparatus for monitoring the movement of the control rods of a nuclear reactor. The number of steps of movement in either direction of the rod from which the control rod is suspended is counted. According to the height of the step, an indication of the position of the suspension rod and of the control rod. The apparatus comprises devices for measuring the speed of movement of the control rod, for logging variations in speed higher than a given value, and for counting such variations according to their sign. The invention is particularly useful in pressurized water nuclear reactors.

  2. Visual inspections of N Reactor horizontal control rod channels

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1990-09-01

    Safety surveillance is performed in horizontal control rod (HCR) channels to locate conditions which could slow or block rod travel. The findings guide the application of preventive measures to assure eventual rod motion impairment will not occur. Borescopes and, more recently, miniaturized closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras have been used for these examinations. Inspections and measurement results are documented in annual surveillance reports, however reported CCTV observations have been limited to highlights. The objective of this report is to catalogue the CCTV recordings in a format suitable for analysis and interpretation and to ease the access to any desired location by noting tape counter readings corresponding with each tube block in view. Searching file tapes for conditions in a specific areas in the past required counting blocks as they passed the camera to determine the distance from a feature like the edge of the reflector or a steam vent gap. This report adds the observations from recent rod channel inspections (1987 and 1988) to a comprehensive survey of graphite conditions in the moderator and reflector regions of the N Reactor core. When completed, the stand-by status of graphite components will be available for use in restart or decommissioning deliberations.

  3. Reconstitutable control assembly having removable control rods with detachable split upper end plugs

    SciTech Connect

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Knott, R.P.; Sparrow, J.A.

    1989-12-19

    This patent describes, in a reconstitutable control assembly for use with a nuclear fuel assembly, the control assembly including a spider structure and at least one control rod, an attachment joint for detachable fastening the control rod to the spider structure. The attachment joint comprising: a hollow connecting finger on the spider structure; and an elongated detachable split upper end plug on the control rod having a pair of separate upper and lower plug portions, the upper plug portion having integrally-connected tandemly- arranged upper, middle and lower sections. The lower plug portion having integrally-connected tandemly-arranged upper, middle and lower segments.

  4. Implementation of CTRLPOS, a VENTURE module for control rod position criticality searches, control rod worth curve calculations, and general criticality searches

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.A.; Renier, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    A module in the VENTURE reactor analysis code system, CTRLPOS, is developed to position control rods and perform control rod position criticality searches. The module is variably dimensioned so that calculations can be performed with any number of control rod banks each having any number of control rods. CTRLPOS can also calculate control rod worth curves for a single control rod or a bank of control rods. Control rod depletion can be calculated to provide radiation source terms. These radiation source terms can be used to predict radiation doses to personnel and estimate the shielding and long-term storage requirements for spent control rods. All of these operations are completely automated. The numerous features of the module are discussed in detail. The necessary input data for the CTRLPOS module is explained. Several sample problems are presented to show the flexibility of the module. The results presented with the sample problems show that the CTRLPOS module is a powerful tool which allows a wide variety of calculations to be easily performed.

  5. Control rod system useable for fuel handling in a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1976-11-30

    A control rod and its associated drive are used to elevate a complete stack of fuel blocks to a position above the core of a gas-cooled nuclear reactor. A fuel-handling machine grasps the control rod and the drive is unlatched from the rod. The stack and rod are transferred out of the reactor, or to a new location in the reactor, by the fuel-handling machine.

  6. Decontamination of control rod housing from Palisades Nuclear Power Station.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M.D.; Nunez, L.; Purohit, A.

    1999-05-03

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a novel decontamination solvent for removing oxide scales formed on ferrous metals typical of nuclear reactor piping. The decontamination process is based on the properties of the diphosphonic acids (specifically 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid or HEDPA) coupled with strong reducing-agents (e.g., sodium formaldehyde sulfoxylate, SFS, and hydroxylamine nitrate, HAN). To study this solvent further, ANL has solicited actual stainless steel piping material that has been recently removed from an operating nuclear reactor. On March 3, 1999 ANL received segments of control rod housing from Consumers Energy's Palisades Nuclear Plant (Covert, MI) containing radioactive contamination from both neutron activation and surface scale deposits. Palisades Power plant is a PWR type nuclear generating plant. A total of eight segments were received. These segments were from control rod housing that was in service for about 6.5 years. Of the eight pieces that were received two were chosen for our experimentation--small pieces labeled Piece A and Piece B. The wetted surfaces (with the reactor's pressurized water coolant/moderator) of the pieces were covered with as a scale that is best characterized visually as a smooth, shiny, adherent, and black/brown in color type oxide covering. This tenacious oxide could not be scratched or removed except by aggressive mechanical means (e.g., filing, cutting).

  7. Countercurrent flow-limiting characteristics of a Savannah River Plant control rod septifoil

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.L.

    1992-07-01

    Experiments were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to investigate the counter-current flow limiting characteristics of a Savannah River Plant control rod septifoil assembly. These experiments were unheated, using air and water as the working fluids. Results are presented in terms of the Wallis flooding correlation for several different control rod configurations. Flooding was observed to occur in the vicinity of the inlet slots/holes of the septifoil, rather than within the rod bundle at the location of the minimum flow area. Nearly identical flooding characteristics of the septifoil were observed for configurations with zero, three, and four rods inserted, but significantly different results occurred with 5 rods inserted.

  8. On the Physics of Fizziness: How Bubble Bursting Controls Droplets Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Thomas; Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Josserand, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    Either in a champagne glass or at the oceanic scales, the tiny bubbles rising at the surface burst in ejecting myriads of droplets. Focusing on the bubble bursting jet, prelude for these aerosols, we propose a simple scaling for the jet velocity, we unravel experimentally the intricate roles of bubble shape, capillary waves and liquid properties, and we demonstrate that droplets ejection can be tuned by changing the liquid properties. In particular, as capillary waves are shown to always evolve into a self-similar collapsing cavity, faster and smaller droplets can be produced by sheltering this collapse from remnant ripples using damping action of viscosity. These results pave the road to the characterization and control of the bursting bubble aerosols. Applications to champagne aroma diffusion will be discussed.

  9. Final Report: Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Rowsell, David Leon

    2015-06-01

    This report documents the Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation. The review followed the approved Plan of Action (POA) and Implementation Plan (IP) using the identified core requirements. The activity was limited scope focusing on the control rod drives functional isolation and fuel element movement. The purpose of this review is to ensure the facility's readiness to move fuel elements thus supporting inspection and functionally isolate the control rod drives to maintain the required shutdown margin.

  10. Radial brake assembly for a control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hekmati, A.; Gibo, E.Y.

    1992-04-07

    This patent describes a brake assembly for a control rod drive for selectively preventing travel of a control rod in a nuclear reactor vessel. It comprises a shaft having a longitudinal centerline axis; means for selectively rotating the shaft in a first direction and in a second direction, opposite to the first direction; a stationary housing having a central aperture receiving the shaft; a frame fixedly joined to the housing and having a guide hole; a rotor disc fixedly connected to the shaft for rotation therewith and having at least one rotor tooth extending radially outwardly from a perimeter thereof, the rotor tooth having a locking surface and an inclined surface extending therefrom in a circumferential direction; a brake member disposed adjacent to the rotor disc perimeter and including a base, at least one braking tooth having a locking surface extending therefrom in a circumferential direction, and a plunger extending radially outwardly from the base and slidably joined to the frame through the guide hole; the rotor tooth and the braking tooth being complementary to each other; and means for selectively positioning the brake member in a deployed position abutting the rotor disc perimeter for allowing the braking tooth locking surface to contact the rotor tooth locking surface for preventing rotation of the shaft in the first direction, and in a retracted position spaced radially away from the rotor disc for allowing the rotor disc and the shaft to rotate without restraint from the brake member, the positioning means including a tubular solenoid fixedly joined to the frame and having a central bore disposed around the brake member plunger and effective for sliding the brake member plunger relative to the frame for positioning the brake member in the deployed and retracted positions.

  11. Optimization of boiling water reactor control rod patterns using linear search

    SciTech Connect

    Kiguchi, T.; Doi, K.; Fikuzaki, T.; Frogner, B.; Lin, C.; Long, A.B.

    1984-10-01

    A computer program for searching the optimal control rod pattern has been developed. The program is able to find a control rod pattern where the resulting power distribution is optimal in the sense that it is the closest to the desired power distribution, and it satisfies all operational constraints. The search procedure consists of iterative uses of two steps: sensitivity analyses of local power and thermal margins using a three-dimensional reactor simulator for a simplified prediction model; linear search for the optimal control rod pattern with the simplified model. The optimal control rod pattern is found along the direction where the performance index gradient is the steepest. This program has been verified to find the optimal control rod pattern through simulations using operational data from the Oyster Creek Reactor.

  12. Aging assessment of BWR control rod drive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the aging phenomena associated with boiling water reactor (BWR) control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and assess the merits of various methods of managing this aging. Information for this study was acquired from (1) the results of a special CRDM aging questionnaire distributed to each US BWR utility, (2) a first-of-its-kind workshop held to discuss CRDM aging and maintenance concerns, (3) an analysis of Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) failure cases attributed to the CRD system, and (4) personal information exchange with industry experts. As part of this study, nearly 3500 NPRDS failure reports have been analyzed to examine the prevailing failure trends for CRD system components. An investigation was conducted to summarize the occurrence frequency of these component failures, discovery methods, reported failure causes, their respective symptoms, and actions taken by utilities to restore component and system service. The results of this research have identified the predominant CRDM failure modes and causes. In addition, recommendations are presented that identify specific actions utilities can implement to mitigate CRDM aging. An evaluation has also been made of certain maintenance practices and tooling which have enabled some utilities to reduce ALARA exposures received from routine CRDM replacement and rebuilding activities. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Ultrasound control of magnet growing rod distraction in early onset scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Pérez Cervera, T; Lirola Criado, J F; Farrington Rueda, D M

    2016-01-01

    The growing rod technique is currently one of the most common procedures used in the management of early onset scoliosis. However, in order to preserve spine growth and control the deformity it requires frequent surgeries to distract the rods. Magnetically driven growing rods have recently been introduced with same treatment goal, but without the inconvenience of repeated surgical distractions. One of the limitations of this technical advance is an increase in radiation exposure due to the increase in distraction frequency compared to conventional growing rods. An improvement of the original technique is presented, proposing a solution to the inconvenience of multiple radiation exposure using ultrasound technology to control the distraction process of magnetically driven growing rods. PMID:25843064

  14. NDE Assessment of PWSCC in Control Rod Drive Mechanism Housings

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Rob V.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2006-11-01

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of Nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect?, 2) What did each technique miss?, 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data and through-wall leakage; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discuss the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology and a comparison of the degradation found by the destructive evaluation with the recorded NDE responses.

  15. Validation of neutron flux redistribution factors in JSI TRIGA reactor due to control rod movements.

    PubMed

    Kaiba, Tanja; Žerovnik, Gašper; Jazbec, Anže; Štancar, Žiga; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-10-01

    For efficient utilization of research reactors, such as TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, it is important to know neutron flux distribution in the reactor as accurately as possible. The focus of this study is on the neutron flux redistributions due to control rod movements. For analyzing neutron flux redistributions, Monte Carlo calculations of fission rate distributions with the JSI TRIGA reactor model at different control rod configurations have been performed. Sensitivity of the detector response due to control rod movement have been studied. Optimal radial and axial positions of the detector have been determined. Measurements of the axial neutron flux distribution using the CEA manufactured fission chambers have been performed. The experiments at different control rod positions were conducted and compared with the MCNP calculations for a fixed detector axial position. In the future, simultaneous on-line measurements with multiple fission chambers will be performed inside the reactor core for a more accurate on-line power monitoring system. PMID:26141293

  16. A hybrid attitude controller consisting of electromagnetic torque rods and an active fluid ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobari, Nona A.; Misra, Arun K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid actuation system for satellite attitude stabilization is proposed along with its feasibility analysis. The system considered consists of two magnetic torque rods and one fluid ring to produce the control torque required in the direction in which magnetic torque rods cannot produce torque. A mathematical model of the system dynamics is derived first. Then a controller is developed to stabilize the attitude angles of a satellite equipped with the abovementioned set of actuators. The effect of failure of the fluid ring or a magnetic torque rod is examined as well. It is noted that the case of failure of the magnetic torque rod whose torque is along the pitch axis is the most critical, since the coupling between the roll or yaw motion and the pitch motion is quite weak. The simulation results show that the control system proposed is quite fault tolerant.

  17. Fuel integrity consequences of a misaligned control rod incident: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Husser, D.L.; Delano, B.J.; Crist, S.H.; Mayer, J.T.; Lewis, L.Y.; Harris, K.L.

    1987-04-01

    During cycle 6 operation of the Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1 reactor, an unanticipated transient occurred as a result of the rapid withdrawal at full power of a misaligned (27% withdrawn) control rod assembly (CRA). In less than one hour, operators realigned the assembly with the remaining rods in its group. Since the removal of the misaligned CRA was known to have caused high local power changes, the preliminary assessment was that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) occurred in the rods directly affected by the withdrawal. The potentially affected fuel assembly and certain selected additional assemblies were inspected using the Babcock and Wilcox ECHO-330 System, which permits the identification of individual rod failures. Based on the data gathered during this project, the misalignment event resulted in no occurrences of SCC-related fuel rod failures. The absence of failed rods in the assembly most significantly affected by the withdrawal clearly eliminates the SCC failure mode from consideration. The details of the power transient should be sufficient as benchmark cases to develop and verify computer codes designed to model power shock events in Zircaloy-clad fuel rods. The project is applicable to both SCC failure modeling and to such areas as load-following and power recovery operations where significant control rod movement is required. The power shock event meets the project objectives by providing a no-failure case under conditions approaching or exceeding the power change and levels typically associated with the SCC failure mode. The event also confirms the ability of pressurized water reactor fuel rods to sustain large power shocks without adverse effects.

  18. Aerosol behavior during SIC control rod failure in QUENCH-13 test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Terttaliisa; Csordás, Anna Pintér; Nagy, Imre; Stuckert, Juri

    2010-02-01

    In a nuclear reactor severe accident, radioactive fission products as well as structural materials are released from the core by evaporation, and the released gases form particles by nucleation and condensation. In addition, aerosol particles may be generated by droplet formation and fragmentation of the core. In pressurized water reactors (PWR), a commonly used control rod material is silver-indium-cadmium (SIC) covered with stainless steel cladding. The control rod elements, Cd, In and Ag, have relatively low melting temperatures, and especially Cd has also a very low boiling point. Control rods are likely to fail early on in the accident due to melting of the stainless steel cladding which can be accelerated by eutectic interaction between stainless steel and the surrounding Zircaloy guide tube. The release of the control rod materials would follow the cladding failure thus affecting aerosol source term as well as fuel rod degradation. The QUENCH experimental program at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe investigates phenomena associated with reflood of a degrading core under postulated severe accident conditions. QUENCH-13 test was the first in this program to include a silver-indium-cadmium control rod of prototypic PWR design. To characterize the extent of aerosol release during the control rod failure, aerosol particle size distribution and concentration measurements in the off-gas pipe of the QUENCH facility were carried out. For the first time, it was possible to determine on-line the aerosol concentration and size distribution released from the core. These results are of prime importance for model development for the proper calculation of the source term resulting from control rod failure. The on-line measurement showed that the main aerosol release started at the bundle temperature maximum of T ˜ 1570 K at hottest bundle elevation. A very large burst of aerosols was detected 660 s later at the bundle temperature maximum of T ˜ 1650 K, followed by a relatively

  19. On-line monitoring of control rod integrity in BWRs using a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, I.; Loner, H.; Ammon, K.; Sihver, L.; Ledergerber, G.

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance of fuel and control rod integrity in the core of a boiling water reactor is essential for maintaining a safe and reliable operation. Control rods of a boiling water reactor are mainly filled with boron carbide as a neutron absorber. Due to the irradiation of boron with neutrons, a continuous production of lithium and helium will occur inside a control rod. Most of the created helium will be retained in the boron carbide lattice; however a small part will escape into the void volume of the control blade. Therefore the integrity of control rods during operation can efficiently be followed by on-line measurements of helium concentration in the reactor off-gas system using a mass spectrometer. Since helium is a fill gas in fuel rods, the same method is a useful early warning system for primary fuel failures. In this paper, we introduce an on-line helium detector system which is installed at the nuclear power plant in Leibstadt. Furthermore the measuring experiences of control rod failure detection at the plant are presented. Different causes of increased helium levels in the off-gas system have been distinguished. There are spontaneous helium releases as well as helium releases caused by changed conditions in the reactor (power reduction, control rod movement, etc.). Helium peaks can also be characterized according to the released amount of helium, the peak shape and the duration of the release, which leads to different interpretations of the release mechanisms. In addition, the measured amount of released helium from a 50 days period (280 l) is also compared to the calculated amount of produced helium from the washed out boron during the same time period (190 l).

  20. Rod electrical coupling is controlled by a circadian clock and dopamine in mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nan Ge; Chuang, Alice Z; Masson, Philippe J; Ribelayga, Christophe P

    2015-01-01

    Key points Rod photoreceptors play a key role in vision in dim light; in the mammalian retina, although rods are anatomically connected or coupled by gap junctions, a type of electrical synapse, the functional importance and regulation of rod coupling has remained elusive. We have developed a new technique in the mouse: perforated patch-clamp recording of rod inner segments in isolated intact retinae maintained by superfusion. We find that rod electrical coupling is controlled by a circadian clock and dopamine, and is weak during the day and stronger at night. The results also indicate that the signal-to-noise ratio for a dim light response is increased at night because of coupling. Our observations will provide a framework for understanding the daily variations in human vision as well as the basis of specific retinal malfunctions. Abstract Rod single-photon responses are critical for vision in dim light. Electrical coupling via gap junction channels shapes the light response properties of vertebrate photoreceptors, but the regulation of rod coupling and its impact on the single-photon response have remained unclear. To directly address these questions, we developed a perforated patch-clamp recording technique and recorded from single rod inner segments in isolated intact neural mouse retinae, maintained by superfusion. Experiments were conducted at different times of the day or under constant environmental conditions, at different times across the circadian cycle. We show that rod electrical coupling is regulated by a circadian clock and dopamine, so that coupling is weak during the day and strong at night. Altogether, patch-clamp recordings of single-photon responses in mouse rods, tracer coupling, receptive field measurements and pharmacological manipulations of gap junction and dopamine receptor activity provide compelling evidence that rod coupling is modulated in a circadian manner. These data are consistent with computer modelling. At night, single

  1. Method and means for remote removal of guide balls from nuclear reactor control rods

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.H.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of remotely removing guide balls from nuclear reactor control rods using a punch mechanism, comprising: (a) providing attachment means in the punch mechanism for attaching the punch mechanism to means for reversibly lowering the punch mechanism over the top of one of the control rods; (b) providing a die within the punch mechanism; (c) providing cylinder means within the punch mechanism operatively connected to the die for axially moving the die in a back-and-forth direction; (d) providing a die block within the punch mechanism cooperating with the die; (e) providing guide means within the punch mechanism for self-aligning the punch mechanism so that the die and the die block are automatically aligned with a first one of the guide balls therebetween when the punch mechanism is lowered over the top of the control rod; (f) lowering the punch mechanism over the control rod so that the die, the die block, and the first guide ball are in alignment; and (g) then operating the cylinder means so that the die advances into the die block, thereby removing the first guide ball from the control rod.

  2. Control rod calibration and reactivity effects at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Letícia Negrão; Gonnelli, Eduardo; Santos, Adimir dos

    2014-11-11

    Researches that aim to improve the performance of neutron transport codes and quality of nuclear cross section databases are very important to increase the accuracy of simulations and the quality of the analysis and prediction of phenomena in the nuclear field. In this context, relevant experimental data such as reactivity worth measurements are needed. Control rods may be made of several neutron absorbing materials that are used to adjust the reactivity of the core. For the reactor operation, these experimental data are also extremely important: with them it is possible to estimate the reactivity worth by the movement of the control rod, understand the reactor response at each rod position and to operate the reactor safely. This work presents a temperature correction approach for the control rod calibration problem. It is shown the control rod calibration data of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, the integral and differential reactivity curves and a theoretical analysis, performed by the MCNP-5 reactor physics code, developed and maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory, using the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library.

  3. Experience with incomplete control rod insertion in fuel with burnup exceeding approximately 40 GWD/MTU

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, E.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis and measurement experience with fuel assemblies having incomplete control rod insertion at burnups of approximately 40 GWD/MTU is presented. Control rod motion dynamics and simplified structural analyses are presented and compared to measurement data. Fuel assembly growth measurements taken with the plant Refueling Machine Z-Tape are described and presented. Bow measurements (including plug gauging) are described and potential improvements are suggested. The measurements described and analysis performed show that sufficient guide tube bow (either from creep or yield buckling) is present in some high burnup assemblies to stop the control rods before they reach their full limit of travel. Recommendations are made that, if implemented, could improve cost performance related to testing and analysis activities.

  4. Reporting trends of randomised controlled trials in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Sean L; Chan, Fiona T; Maclean, Edd; Jayakumar, Shruti; Nabeebaccus, Adam A

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) causes significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Current consensus guidelines reflect the neutral results from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Adequate trial reporting is a fundamental requirement before concluding on RCT intervention efficacy and is necessary for accurate meta-analysis and to provide insight into future trial design. The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) 2010 statement provides a framework for complete trial reporting. Reporting quality of HFpEF RCTs has not been previously assessed, and this represents an important validation of reporting qualities to date. Objectives The aim was to systematically identify RCTs investigating the efficacy of pharmacological therapies in HFpEF and to assess the quality of reporting using the CONSORT 2010 statement. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases were searched from January 1996 to November 2015, with RCTs assessing pharmacological therapies on clinical outcomes in HFpEF patients included. The quality of reporting was assessed against the CONSORT 2010 checklist. Results A total of 33 RCTs were included. The mean CONSORT score was 55.4% (SD 17.2%). The CONSORT score was strongly correlated with journal impact factor (r=0.53, p=0.003) and publication year (r=0.50, p=0.003). Articles published after the introduction of CONSORT 2010 statement had a significantly higher mean score compared with those published before (64% vs 50%, p=0.02). Conclusions Although the CONSORT score has increased with time, a significant proportion of HFpEF RCTs showed inadequate reporting standards. The level of adherence to CONSORT criteria could have an impact on the validity of trials and hence the interpretation of intervention efficacy. We recommend improving compliance with the CONSORT statement for future RCTs. PMID:27547434

  5. Control Rod Pattern Planning of a BWR using Enhanced Nelder-Mead Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yoko Kobayashi; Eitaro Aiyoshi

    2004-07-01

    We propose a new optimization algorithm for the short-term planning of control rod patterns in an operating BWR. This algorithm is based on the enhanced Nelder-Mead simplex method in which convergence ability is improved for constrained problems in several ways. The main characteristic of this approach is it uses continuous values for the axial positions of control rods. Through calculations in an actual BWR plant, we showed that the new algorithm is effective for automation of short-term planning and reduction of the engineer's workload. (authors)

  6. Analysis of dose rates received around the storage pool for irradiated control rods in a BWR nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, J; Abarca, A; Gallardo, S

    2011-08-01

    BWR control rods are activated by neutron reactions in the reactor. The dose produced by this activity can affect workers in the area surrounding the storage pool, where activated rods are stored. Monte Carlo (MC) models for neutron activation and dose assessment around the storage pool have been developed and validated. In this work, the MC models are applied to verify the expected reduction of dose when the irradiated control rod is hanged in an inverted position into the pool. PMID:21093278

  7. An Analytical Study of Fuzzy Control of a Flexible Rod Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, D.; Lee, S. W.; Boghiu, D.

    1998-02-01

    The non-linear nature of very high speed, flexible rod mechanisms has been previously confirmed, both experimentally and analytically in reference [1]. Therefore, effective control system design for flexible mechanisms operating at very high speeds must consider the non-linearities when designing a controller for very high speeds. Active control via fuzzy logic is assessed as means to suppress the elastic transverse bending vibration of a flexible rod of a slider crank mechanism. Several pairs of piezoelectric elements are used to provide the control action. Sensor output of deflection is fed to the fuzzy controller, which determines the voltage input to the actuators. A three mode approximation is used in the simulation study. Computer simulation shows that fuzzy control can be used to suppress bending vibrations at high speeds, and even at speeds where the uncontrolled response would be unstable.

  8. BWR feedwater nozzle and control-rod-drive return line nozzle cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    In its 1978 Annual Report to Congress, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission identified as an unresolved safety issue the appearance of cracks in feedwater nozzles at boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Later similar cracking, detected in return water lines for control-rod-drive systems at BWRs, was designated Part II of the issue. This article outlines the resolution of these cracking problems.

  9. Parallel Magnetic Flow Electromagnet for Movable Coil Control-rod Driving Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jige, Zhang

    2006-07-01

    The parallel magnetic flow electromagnet can effectively relax the saturation, which easily takes place in the single magnetic flow electromagnet, and accordingly can improve the drive capacity of the movable coil electromagnet drive mechanism for a mobile reactor control rod. (authors)

  10. Summary of dynamic analyses of the advanced neutron source reactor inner control rods

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrich, W.R.

    1995-08-01

    A summary of the structural dynamic analyses that were instrumental in providing design guidance to the Advanced Neutron source (ANS) inner control element system is presented in this report. The structural analyses and the functional constraints that required certain performance parameters were combined to shape and guide the design effort toward a prediction of successful and reliable control and scram operation to be provided by these inner control rods.

  11. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  12. Development and control of the process for the manufacture of zircaloy-4 tubing for LWBR fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The technical requirements for the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) fuel elements (fuel rods) imposed certain unique requirements for the low hafnium Zircaloy-4 tubing used as fuel rod cladding. This report describes, in detail, the tube manufacturing process, the product and process controls used, the inspections and tests performed, and the efforts involved in refining a commercial tube reducing process to produce tubes that would satisfy the requirements for LWBR fuel rod cladding.

  13. High Temperature Electromechanical Components for Control Rod Drive Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Thomas E.; Lazarus, Jonathan D.; Yaspo, Robert; Cole, Allan R.; Otwell, Robert L.; Schuster, Gary B.; Jaing, Thomas J.; Meyer, Raymond A.; Shukla, Jaikaran N.; Maldonado, Jerry

    1994-07-01

    The SP-100 power system converts heat generated within a compact fast spectrum nuclear reactor directly to electricity for spacecraft applications. The reactor control system contains the only moving mechanical and electromechanical components in the entire electrical generating system. The high temperature, vacuum environment presents unique challenges for these reactor control system components. This paper describes the environmental testing of these components that has been completed and that is in progress. The specific components and assemblies include electromagnetic (EM) coils, stepper motors, EM clutches, EM brakes, ball bearings, ball screw assemblies, constant torque spring motors, gear sets, position sensors, and very high temperature sliding bearings.

  14. Maintaining a Critical Spectra within Monteburns for a Gas-Cooled Reactor Array by Way of Control Rod Manipulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adigun, Babatunde John; Fensin, Michael Lorne; Galloway, Jack D.; Trellue, Holly Renee

    2016-06-07

    Our burnup study examined the effect of a predicted critical control rod position on the nuclide predictability of several axial and radial locations within a 4×4 graphite moderated gas cooled reactor fuel cluster geometry. To achieve this, a control rod position estimator (CRPE) tool was developed within the framework of the linkage code Monteburns between the transport code MCNP and depletion code CINDER90, and four methodologies were proposed within the tool for maintaining criticality. Two of the proposed methods used an inverse multiplication approach - where the amount of fissile material in a set configuration is slowly altered until criticalitymore » is attained - in estimating the critical control rod position. Another method carried out several MCNP criticality calculations at different control rod positions, then used a linear fit to estimate the critical rod position. The final method used a second-order polynomial fit of several MCNP criticality calculations at different control rod positions to guess the critical rod position. The results showed that consistency in prediction of power densities as well as uranium and plutonium isotopics was mutual among methods within the CRPE tool that predicted critical position consistently well. Finall, while the CRPE tool is currently limited to manipulating a single control rod, future work could be geared toward implementing additional criticality search methodologies along with additional features.« less

  15. Controlled self-assembly of conjugated rod-coil block copolymers for applications in organic optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuefei

    Organic electronics are of great interest in manufacturing light weight, mechanical flexible, and inexpensive large area devices. While significant improvements have been made over the last several years and it is now clear that morphology on the lengthscale of exciton diffusion (10nm) is of crucial importance, a clear relationship between structure and device properties has not emerged. This lack of understanding largely emerges from an inability to control morphology on this lengthscale. This thesis will center around an approach, based on block copolymer self-assembly, to generate equilibrium nanostructures on the 10 nm lengthscale of exciton diffusion and study their effects on device performance. Self-assembly of semiconducting block copolymers is complicated by the non-classical chain shape of conjugated polymers. Unlike classical polymers, the chains do not assume a Gaussian coil shape which is stretched near block copolymer interfaces, instead the chains are elongated and liquid crystalline. Previous work has demonstrated how these new molecular interactions and shapes control the phase diagram of so-called rod-coil block copolymers. Here, we will focus on controlling domain size, orientation, and chemical structure. While domain size can be controlled directly through molecular weight, this requires significant additional synthesis of domain size is to be varied. Here, the domain size is controlled by blending homopolymers into a self-assembling rod-coil block copolymer. When coil-like blocks are incorporated, the domains swell, as expected. When rod-like blocks are incorporated, they interdigitate with the rods of the block copolymers. This results in an increase in interfacial area which forces the coils to rearrange and an overall decrease in domain size with increasing rod content. Control over lamellar orientation is crucial in order to design and control charge transport pathways and exciton recombination or separation interfaces. While numerous

  16. Simulation and operation of the EBR-2 automatic control rod drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, W. K.; Larson, H. A.; Dean, E. M.; Christensen, L. J.

    An automatic control rod drive system (ACRDS) installed at EBR-II produces shaped power transients from 40% to full reactor power at a linear ramp rate of 4 MWt/s. A digital computer and modified control rod drive provides this capability. Simulation and analysis of ACRDS experiments establish the safety envelope for reactor transient operation. Tailored transients are required as part of USDOE operational reliability testing program for prototypic fast reactor fuel cladding breach behavior studies. After initial EBR-II driver fuel testing and system checkout, test subassemblies were subjected to both slow and fast transients. In addition, the ACRDS is used for steady state operation and will be qualified to control power ascent from initial critical to full power.

  17. Material ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, David F.; Forbes, Terry G.; Aurass, Henry; Chen, James; Martens, Piet; Rompolt, Bogdan; Rusin, Vojtech; Martin, Sara F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the major discussions and conclusions of the Flares 22 Workshop concerning the physical processes involved in mass ejecta events, with an emphasis on large-scale phenomena, especially Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). New insights have been gained from recent data obtained from the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and Yohkoh spacecraft and from several new ground-based radio and optical instruments, as well as from theoretical advances concerning the origins, driving mechanisms and long-term evolution of CMEs.

  18. Visual inspections of N Reactor horizontal control rod channels. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1990-09-01

    Safety surveillance is performed in horizontal control rod (HCR) channels to locate conditions which could slow or block rod travel. The findings guide the application of preventive measures to assure eventual rod motion impairment will not occur. Borescopes and, more recently, miniaturized closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras have been used for these examinations. Inspections and measurement results are documented in annual surveillance reports, however reported CCTV observations have been limited to highlights. The objective of this report is to catalogue the CCTV recordings in a format suitable for analysis and interpretation and to ease the access to any desired location by noting tape counter readings corresponding with each tube block in view. Searching file tapes for conditions in a specific areas in the past required counting blocks as they passed the camera to determine the distance from a feature like the edge of the reflector or a steam vent gap. This report adds the observations from recent rod channel inspections (1987 and 1988) to a comprehensive survey of graphite conditions in the moderator and reflector regions of the N Reactor core. When completed, the stand-by status of graphite components will be available for use in restart or decommissioning deliberations.

  19. Feasibility study of the University of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade in respect to control rod system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutic, Avdo

    The objectives of this thesis are twofold: to determine the highest achievable power levels of the current University of Utah TRIG Reactor (UUTR) core configuration with the existing three control rods, and to design the core for higher reactor power by optimizing the control rod worth. For the current core configuration, the maximum reactor power, eigenvalue keff, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity have been measured and calculated. These calculated estimates resulted from thermal power calibrations, and the control rod worth measurements at various power levels. The results were then used as a benchmark to verify the MCNP5 core simulations for the current core and then to design a core for higher reactor power. This study showed that the maximum achievable power with the current core configuration and control rod system is 150kW, which is 50kW higher than the licensed power of the UUTR. The maximum achievable UUTR core power with the existing fuel is determined by optimizing the core configuration and control rod worth, showing that a power upgrade of 500 kW is achievable. However, it requires a new control rod system consisting of a total of four control rods. The cost of such an upgrade is $115,000.

  20. Synthesis of iron oxide rods coated with polymer brushes and control of their assembly in thin films.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun; Ishige, Ryohei; Tsujii, Yoshinobu; Ohno, Kohji

    2015-01-27

    We investigated the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) using monodisperse rod-type particles of iron oxide, β-FeOOH. The slow hydrolysis of iron(III) chloride yielded monodisperse β-FeOOH rods with an average length-to-width ratio, L/W, of 6 (L = 210 nm and W = 35 nm on average). The surfaces of the β-FeOOH rods were modified with a triethoxysilane derivative as an ATRP-initiating site, namely, (2-bromo-2-methyl)propionyloxypropyl triethoxysilane. The SI-ATRP of MMA, mediated by a copper complex, was performed using the initiator-coated β-FeOOH rods in the presence of a "sacrificial" free initiator. Well-defined poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes with molecular weights of up to 700,000 could be grafted on the β-FeOOH rods with a surface density as high as 0.3 chains/nm(2). The resultant polymer-brush-afforded hybrid rods exhibited high dispersibility in various solvents for PMMA without forming aggregates. Thin films were prepared by dip-coating from a suspension of the hybrid rods, and the rods were oriented in a specific direction in the films. The arrangement of the rods could be controlled by varying the chain length of the polymer brush and the withdrawal speed during the dip-coating process. PMID:25552325

  1. A rule-based expert system for automatic control rod pattern generation for boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.S.; Lin, C. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on an expert system for generating control rod patterns that has been developed. The knowledge is transformed into IF-THEN rules. The inference engine uses the Rete pattern matching algorithm to match facts, and rule premises and conflict resolution strategies to make the system function intelligently. A forward-chaining mechanism is adopted in the inference engine. The system is implemented in the Common Lisp programming language. The three-dimensional core simulation model performs the core status and burnup calculations. The system is successfully demonstrated by generating control rod programming for the 2894-MW (thermal) Kuosheng nuclear power plant in Taiwan. The computing time is tremendously reduced compared to programs using mathematical methods.

  2. Control rod absorber section fabrication by square tube configuration and dual laser welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, L.L.; Charnley, J.E.; Mees, J.A.; Dixon, R.C.

    1990-05-15

    This patent describes a process for the assembly of a planar section of a cruciform shaped control rod from tubes. It comprises: providing tubes, the tubes having cylindrical interior volumes for the containment of neutron absorbing poisons and having square external sections for being joined by welding in side-by-side relation; filling the cylindrical interior volumes with neutron absorbing poisons; plugging the tubes to seal the neutron absorbing poisons within the tubes: providing a jig for maintaining the tubes in side-by-side relation to form a planar section of the control rod, the jig having a leading end for holding the ends of the tubes in side-by-side relation and having a trailing end for holding the tubes in side-by-side relation.

  3. A gel aspiration-ejection system for the controlled production and delivery of injectable dense collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kamranpour, Neysan O; Miri, Amir K; James-Bhasin, Mark; Nazhat, Showan N

    2016-03-01

    A gel aspiration-ejection (GAE) system has been developed for the advanced production and delivery of injectable dense collagen (I-DC) gels of unique collagen fibrillar densities (CFDs). Through the creation of negative pressure, GAE aspirates prefabricated highly hydrated collagen gels into a needle, simultaneously inducing compaction and meso-scale anisotropy (i.e., fibrillar alignment) on the gels, and by subsequent reversal of the pressure, I-DC gels can be controllably ejected. The system generates I-DC gels with CFDs ranging from 5 to 32 wt%, controlling the initial scaffold microstructure, anisotropy, hydraulic permeability, and mechanical properties. These features could potentially enable the minimally invasive delivery of more stable hydrogels. The viability, metabolic activity, and differentiation of seeded mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was investigated in the I-DC gels of distinct CFDs and extents of anisotropy produced through two different gauge needles. MSC osteoblastic differentiation was found to be relatively accelerated in I-DC gels that combined physiologically relevant CFDs and increased fibrillar alignment. The ability to not only support homogenous cell seeding, but also to direct and accelerate their differentiation through tissue-equivalent anisotropy, creates numerous opportunities in regenerative medicine. PMID:27003606

  4. Factors influencing helium measurements for detection of control rod failures in BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, I.; Sihver, L.; Loner, H.; Ledergerber, G.; Schnurr, B.

    2012-07-01

    Much effort has been made to minimize the number and consequences of fuel failures at nuclear power plants. The consequences of control rod failures have also gained an increased attention. In this paper we introduce a system for on-line surveillance of control rod integrity which has several advantages comparing to the surveillance methods available today in boiling water reactors (BWRs). This system measures the helium released from failed control rods containing boron carbide (B4C). However, there are a number of factors that might influence measurements, which have to be taken into consideration when evaluating the measured data. These factors can be separated into two groups: 1) local adjustments, made on the sampling line connecting the detector to the off-gas system, and 2) plant operational parameters. The adjustments of the sample line conditions include variation of gas flow rate and gas pressure in the line. Plant operational factors that may influence helium measurements can vary from plant to plant. The factors studied at Leibstadt nuclear power plant (KKL) were helium impurities in injected hydrogen gas, variation of the total off-gas flow and regular water refill. In this paper we discuss these factors and their significance and present experimental results of measurements at KKL. (authors)

  5. Exercise Training in Older Patients with Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kitzman, Dalane W.; Brubaker, Peter H.; Morgan, Timothy M.; Stewart, Kathryn P.; Little, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Background HF with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFPEF) is the most common form of HF in the older population. Exercise intolerance is the primary chronic symptom in HFPEF patients and is a strong determinant of their reduced quality of life (QOL). Exercise training (ET) improves exercise intolerance and QOL in HF patients with reduced ejection fraction. However, the effect of ET in HFPEF has not been examined in a randomized, controlled trial. Methods and Results This was a randomized, attention-controlled, single blind study of 16 weeks of medically supervised ET (3 days per week) on exercise intolerance and QOL in 53 elderly (mean age 70±6 yrs; range 60–82; 46 women, 7 men) patients with isolated HFPEF (EF ≥ 50%, and no significant coronary, valvular, or pulmonary disease). Attention controls received biweekly follow-up telephone calls. Forty-six patients completed the study (24 ET, 22 controls). Attendance at exercise sessions in the ET group was excellent (88%; range 64–100%). There were no trial-related adverse events. Peak exercise oxygen uptake, the primary outcome, increased significantly in the ET group compared to the control group (13.8±2.5 to 16.1±2.6 ml/kg/min, change 2.3±2.2 ml/kg/min vs. 12.8±2.6 to 12.5±3.4, change −0.3±2.1 ml/kg/min) (p=0.0002). There were significant improvements in peak power output, exercise time, 6 minute walk distance, and ventilatory anaerobic threshold (all p<0.002). There was improvement in the physical QOL score (p=0.03) but not the total score (p=0.11). Conclusions ET improves peak and submaximal exercise capacity in older patients with HFPEF. PMID:20852060

  6. Impact of the control rod consumption on the reactivity control of a SFR break-even core

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, D.; Fontaine, B.

    2012-07-01

    Current design studies on Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) differ from those performed in the past by the fact that design criteria are now those of the Generation IV reactors. In order to improve their safety, reactors with break-even cores are preferred because they minimize the needs in terms of reactivity control and limit the consequences of control rod withdrawal. Furthermore, as the reactivity control needs are low, break-even core enables the use of absorbing materials with reduced efficiency (natural boron, hafnium...). Nevertheless, the use of control rods with few absorbing materials may present the disadvantage of a non-negligible ({approx}10%) loss of efficiency due to their consumption under irradiation. This paper presents a methodology to calculate accurately and analyze this consumption. (authors)

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of a research reactor with nominal power of 7 MW to design new control safety rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoushtari, M. K.; Kakavand, T.; Sadat Kiai, S. M.; Ghaforian, H.

    2010-03-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation has been established for a research reactor with nominal power of 7 MW. A detailed model of the reactor core was employed including standard and control fuel elements, reflectors, irradiation channels, control rods, reactor pool and thermal column. The following physical parameters of reactor core were calculated for the present LEU core: core reactivity ( ρ), control rod (CR) worth, thermal and epithermal neutron flux distributions, shutdown margin and delayed neutron fraction. Reduction of unfavorable effects of blockage probability of control safety rod (CSR)s in their interiors because of not enough space in their sites, and lack of suitable capabilities to fabricate very thin plates for CSR cladding, is the main aim of the present study. Making the absorber rod thinner and CSR cladding thicker by introducing a better blackness absorbing material and a new stainless steel alloy, respectively, are two studied ways to reduce the effects of mentioned problems.

  8. Rodding Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rods can be made of stainless steel or titanium. Regular rods do not expand. They have many ... v regular), the rod materials (stainless steel v titanium) and the age for a first rodding surgery. ...

  9. Test-fuel power-coupling dependence on TREAT control-rod positions

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, L.J.; Klotzkin, G.; Hart, P.R.; Swanson, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    The Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) is a graphite moderated, UO/sub 2/ fueled test reactor located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and operated by Argonne National Laboratory. Test fuel is placed in containment vessels in the center of the reactor and subjected to computer-controlled transient irradiations which can result in experimental fuel melting or even vaporizing. The reactor was designed to have a strong negative temperature coefficient and to operate adiabatically. Consequently large reactivity insertions, up to 6.2% ..delta..k/k, may be required during a transient as the core temperature increases as much as 570/sup 0/C. This reactivity insertion is accomplished typically over 10 to 20 seconds by hydraulically actuated transient control rods. Evaluation of empirical data has indicated that control-rod-position changes cause power-coupling changes during a transient and usually are the primary factor in determining the ratio of the transient-averaged to steady-state test-fuel power coupling.

  10. Rapid-L Operator-Free Fast Reactor Concept Without Any Control Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Tsunoda, Hirokazu; Mishima, Kaichiro; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2003-07-15

    The 200-kW(electric) uranium-nitride-fueled lithium-cooled fast reactor concept 'RAPID-L' to achieve highly automated reactor operation has been demonstrated. RAPID-L is designed for a lunar base power system. It is one of the variants of the RAPID (Refueling by All Pins Integrated Design) fast reactor concept, which enables quick and simplified refueling. The essential feature of the RAPID concept is that the reactor core consists of an integrated fuel assembly instead of conventional fuel subassemblies. In this small-size reactor core, 2700 fuel pins are integrated and encased in a fuel cartridge. Refueling is conducted by replacing a fuel cartridge. The reactor can be operated without refueling for up to 10 yr.Unique challenges in reactivity control systems design have been addressed in the RAPID-L concept. The reactor has no control rod but involves the following innovative reactivity control systems: lithium expansion modules (LEM) for inherent reactivity feedback, lithium injection modules (LIM) for inherent ultimate shutdown, and lithium release modules (LRM) for automated reactor startup. All these systems adopt {sup 6}Li as a liquid poison instead of B{sub 4}C rods. In combination with LEMs, LIMs, and LRMs, RAPID-L can be operated without an operator. This reactor concept is also applicable to the terrestrial fast reactors. In this paper, the RAPID-L reactor concept and its transient characteristics are presented.

  11. Detection and sizing of defects in control rod drive mechanism penetrations using eddy current and ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Light, G.M.; Fisher, J.L.; Tennis, R.F.; Stolte, J.S.; Hendrix, G.J.

    1996-08-01

    Over the last two years, concern has been generated about the capabilities of performing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of the closure-head penetrations in nuclear-reactor pressure vessels. These penetrations are primarily for instrumentation and control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and are usually thick-walled Inconel tubes, which are shrink-fitted into the steel closure head. The penetrations are then welded between the outside surface of the penetration and the inside surface of the closure head. Stress corrosion cracks initiating at the inner surface of the penetration have been reported at several plants. Through-wall cracks in the CRDM penetration or CRDM weld could lead to loss of coolant in the reactor vessel. The CRDM penetration presents a complex inspection geometry for conventional NDE techniques. A thermal sleeve, through which pass the mechanical linkages for operating the control rods, is inserted into the penetration in such a way that only a small annulus (nominally 3 mm) exists between the thermal sleeve and inside surface of the penetration. Ultrasonic (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) techniques that could be used to provide defect detection and sizing capability were investigated. This paper describes the ET and UT techniques, the probes developed, and the results obtained using these probes and techniques on CRDM penetration mock-ups.

  12. Effect of aging upon CE and B and W control rod drives

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, E.; Gunther, W.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of aging upon the Babcock Wilcox (B W) and Combustion Engineering (CE) Control Rod Drive (CRD) systems has been evaluated as part of the US NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Operating experience data for the 1980--1990 time period was reviewed to identify predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. These results, in conjunction with an assessment of component materials and operating environment, conclude that both systems are susceptible to age degradation. System failures have resulted in significant plant effects, including power reductions, plant shutdowns, scrams, and Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) actuation. Current industry inspection and maintenance practices were assessed. Some of these practices effectively address aging, while others do not.

  13. Effect of aging upon CE and B and W control rod drives

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, E.; Gunther, W.

    1992-05-01

    The effect of aging upon the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and Combustion Engineering (CE) Control Rod Drive (CRD) systems has been evaluated as part of the US NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Operating experience data for the 1980--1990 time period was reviewed to identify predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. These results, in conjunction with an assessment of component materials and operating environment, conclude that both systems are susceptible to age degradation. System failures have resulted in significant plant effects, including power reductions, plant shutdowns, scrams, and Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) actuation. Current industry inspection and maintenance practices were assessed. Some of these practices effectively address aging, while others do not.

  14. Research relative to an advanced rod control system for quadrupole mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, George R.

    1987-01-01

    The design of a suitable amplifier output stage using available transistors and passive components is summarized. All of the analysis and calculation confirm that it is feasible to design the amplifier and quadrupole coupling circuit needed for the Advanced Rod Control System. The progress obtained so far concerning the three frequency tank circuits to be used in the oscillator for the mass spectrometer of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) project is presented. Results from this study look promising. However, it is not known what minimum impedance levels are required to make it possible for the oscillator to work properly. Therefore, it is necessary to construct a prototype circuit in the laboratory which can be measured and tested in an oscillator circuit. Continued attempts will be made to develop a useful inductor motor with better characteristics than the one being used at the moment. It is important that such a model be found if computer simulation is to reflect reality more closely.

  15. STABILIZED RARE EARTH OXIDES FOR A CONTROL ROD AND METHOD OF PREPARATION

    DOEpatents

    McNees, R.A.; Potter, R.A.

    1964-01-14

    A method is given for preparing mixed oxides of the formula MR/sub x/O/ sub 12/ wherein M is tungsten or molybdenum and R is a rare earth in the group consisting of samarium, europium, dysprosium, and gadolinium and x is 4 to 5. Oxides of this formula, and particularly the europiumcontaining species, are useful as control rod material for water-cooled nuclear reactors owing to their stability, favorable nuclear properties, and resistance to hydration. These oxides may be utilized as a dispersion in a stainlesssteel matrix. Preparation of these oxides is effected by blending tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide with a rare earth oxide, compressing the mixture, and firing at an elevated temperature in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. (AEC)

  16. Nuclear Data Library Effects on Fast to Thermal Flux Shapes Around PWR Control Rod Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, A.; Ferroukhi, H.; Zhu, T.; Pautz, A.

    2014-04-01

    The development of a high-fidelity computational scheme to estimate the accumulated fluence at the tips of PWR control rods (CR) has been initiated at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Both the fluence from high-energy (E>1 MeV) neutrons as well as for the thermal range (E<0.625 eV) are required as these affect the CR integrity through stresses/strains induced by coupled clad embrittlement / absorber swelling phenomena. The concept of the PSI scheme under development is to provide from validated core analysis models, the volumetric neutron source to a full core MCNPX model that is then used to compute the neutron fluxes. A particular aspect that needs scrutiny is the ability of the MCNPX-based calculation methodology to accurately predict the flux shapes along the control rod surfaces, especially for fully withdrawn CRs. In that case, the tip is located a short distance above the core/reflector interface and since this situation corresponds to a large part of reactor operation, the accumulated fluence will highly depend on the achieved calculation accuracy and precision in this non-fueled zone. The objective of the work presented in this paper is to quantify the influence of nuclear data on the calculated fluxes at the CR tips by (1) conducting a systematic comparison of modern neutron cross-section libraries, including JENDL-4.0, JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0, and (2) by quantifying the uncertainties in the neutron flux calculations with the help of available neutron cross-section variances/covariances data. For completeness, the magnitude of these nuclear data-based uncertainties is also assessed in relation to the influence from other typical sources of modeling uncertainties/biases.

  17. Reduction of ahead of schedule anodes through anode rod quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, F.; Menard, Y.; Perron, C.; Proulx, A.L.

    1996-10-01

    One of the major causes of ahead of schedule anodes reported in recent years by the P155 potroom operation was related to the inherent weakness in the rod welded joints. The development and implementation of an apparatus and procedure to measure, detect and reject the faulty rods prior to anode rodding, will be presented and discussed. The technology has not only significantly reduced the number of ahead of schedule anodes, it has also provided useful information concerning other process improvements.

  18. Development of a HTSMA-Actuated Surge Control Rod for High-Temperature Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II; Noebe, Ronald; Bigelow, Glen; Culley, Dennis; Stevens, Mark; Penney, Nicholas; Gaydosh, Darrell; Quackenbush, Todd; Carpenter, Bernie

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, a demand for compact, lightweight, solid-state actuation systems has emerged, driven in part by the needs of the aeronautics industry. However, most actuation systems used in turbomachinery require not only elevated temperature but high-force capability. As a result, shape memory alloy (SMA) based systems have worked their way to the forefront of a short list of viable options to meet such a technological challenge. Most of the effort centered on shape memory systems to date has involved binary NiTi alloys but the working temperatures required in many aeronautics applications dictate significantly higher transformation temperatures than the binary systems can provide. Hence, a high temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) based on NiTiPdPt, having a transformation temperature near 300 C, was developed. Various thermo-mechanical processing schemes were utilized to further improve the dimensional stability of the alloy and it was later extruded/drawn into wire form to be more compatible with envisioned applications. Mechanical testing on the finished wire form showed reasonable work output capability with excellent dimensional stability. Subsequently, the wire form of the alloy was incorporated into a benchtop system, which was shown to provide the necessary stroke requirements of approx.0.125 inches for the targeted surge-control application. Cycle times for the actuator were limited to 4 seconds due to control and cooling constraints but this cycle time was determined to be adequate for the surge control application targeted as the primary requirement was initial actuation of a surge control rod, which could be completed in approximately one second.

  19. A tetrachromatic display for the spatiotemporal control of rod and cone stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Florian S; Paulun, Vivian C; Weiss, David; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2015-08-01

    We present an apparatus that allows independent stimulation of rods and short (S)-, middle (M)-, and long (L)-wavelength-sensitive cones. Previously presented devices allow rod and cone stimulation independently, but only for a spatially invariant stimulus design (Pokorny, Smithson, & Quinlan, 2004; Sun, Pokorny, & Smith, 2001b). We overcame this limitation by using two spectrally filtered projectors with overlapping projections. This approach allows independent rod and cone stimulation in a dynamic two-dimensional scene with appropriate resolution in the spatial, temporal, and receptor domains. Modulation depths were ±15% for M-cones and L-cones, ±20% for rods, and ±50% for S-cones, all with respect to an equal-energy mesopic background at 3.4 cd/m2. Validation was provided by radiometric measures and behavioral data from two trichromats, one protanope, one deuteranope, and one night-blind observer. PMID:26305863

  20. Controlling chaos based on a novel intelligent integral terminal sliding mode control in a rod-type plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safa, Khari; Zahra, Rahmani; Behrooz, Rezaie

    2016-05-01

    An integral terminal sliding mode controller is proposed in order to control chaos in a rod-type plasma torch system. In this method, a new sliding surface is defined based on a combination of the conventional sliding surface in terminal sliding mode control and a nonlinear function of the integral of the system states. It is assumed that the dynamics of a chaotic system are unknown and also the system is exposed to disturbance and unstructured uncertainty. To achieve a chattering-free and high-speed response for such an unknown system, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system is utilized in the next step to approximate the unknown part of the nonlinear dynamics. Then, the proposed integral terminal sliding mode controller stabilizes the approximated system based on Lyapunov’s stability theory. In addition, a Bee algorithm is used to select the coefficients of integral terminal sliding mode controller to improve the performance of the proposed method. Simulation results demonstrate the improvement in the response speed, chattering rejection, transient response, and robustness against uncertainties.

  1. Dynamic Simulation of Trapping and Controlled Rotation of a Microscale Rod Driven by Line Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghshenas-Jaryani, Mahdi; Bowling, Alan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2013-03-01

    Since the invention of optical tweezers, several biological and engineering applications, especially in micro-nanofluid, have been developed. For example, development of optically driven micromotors, which has an important role in microfluidic applications, has vastly been considered. Despite extensive experimental studies in this field, there is a lack of theoretical work that can verify and analyze these observations. This work develops a dynamic model to simulate trapping and controlled rotation of a microscale rod under influence of the optical trapping forces. The laser beam, used in line optical tweezers with a varying trap's length, was modeled based on a ray-optics approach. Herein, the effects of viscosity of the surrounding fluid (water), gravity, and buoyancy were included in the proposed model. The predicted results are in overall agreement with the experimental observation, which make the theoretical model be a viable tool for investigating the dynamic behavior of small size objects manipulated by optical tweezers in fluid environments. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. MCB-1148541.

  2. Disposal Of Irradiated Cadmium Control Rods From The Plumbrook Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Posivak, E.J.; Berger, S.R.; Freitag, A.A.

    2008-07-01

    Innovative mixed waste disposition from NASA's Plum Brook Reactor Facility was accomplished without costly repackaging. Irradiated characteristic hardware with contact dose rates as high as 8 Sv/hr was packaged in a HDPE overpack and stored in a Secure Environmental Container during earlier decommissioning efforts, awaiting identification of a suitable pathway. WMG obtained regulatory concurrence that the existing overpack would serve as the macro-encapsulant per 40CFR268.45 Table 1.C. The overpack vent was disabled and the overpack was placed in a stainless steel liner to satisfy overburden slumping requirements. The liner was sealed and placed in shielded shoring for transport to the disposal site in a US DOT Type A cask. Disposition via this innovative method avoided cost, risk, and dose associated with repackaging the high dose irradiated characteristic hardware. In conclusion: WMG accomplished what others said could not be done. Large D and D contractors advised NASA that the cadmium control rods could only be shipped to the proposed Yucca mountain repository. NASA management challenged MOTA to find a more realistic alternative. NASA and MOTA turned to WMG to develop a methodology to disposition the 'hot and nasty' waste that presumably had no path forward. Although WMG lead a team that accomplished the 'impossible', the project could not have been completed with out the patient, supportive management by DOE-EM, NASA, and MOTA. (authors)

  3. Lifetime of PWR silver-indium-cadmium control rods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sipush, P.J.; Woodcock, J.; Chickering, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    A hot cell examination was performed on selected rodlets of a lead rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) which had experienced eleven cycles of operation in Point Beach Unit 1. The principal purpose of the program was to evaluate the performance of RCCAs. The hot cell examination of the rodlets involved detailed visual inspections, profilometry, metallography, cladding chemistry, dosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, corrosion tests, microhardness tests, absorber density measurements, and cladding tensile tests. Wear scars and a hairline crack in the cladding were evaluated. The results of the examinations and analysis of WEPCO site photographs led to an estimate of the service life for RCCAs which are used in Westinghouse 14 x 14 fuel assemblies. Also, wear scar widths were correlated with wear scar depths. The correlation may be used to estimate wear scar depths based on site photographs of wear scars for 14 x 14 RCCAs. The results of the program may be used as guidelines for RCCAs for 15 x 15 and 17 x 17 Westinghouse fuel designs. 10 refs., 89 figs., 26 tabs.

  4. Genetic algorithm based active vibration control for a moving flexible smart beam driven by a pneumatic rod cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Shi, Ming-li; Wang, Bin; Xie, Zhuo-wei

    2012-05-01

    A rod cylinder based pneumatic driving scheme is proposed to suppress the vibration of a flexible smart beam. Pulse code modulation (PCM) method is employed to control the motion of the cylinder's piston rod for simultaneous positioning and vibration suppression. Firstly, the system dynamics model is derived using Hamilton principle. Its standard state-space representation is obtained for characteristic analysis, controller design, and simulation. Secondly, a genetic algorithm (GA) is applied to optimize and tune the control gain parameters adaptively based on the specific performance index. Numerical simulations are performed on the pneumatic driving elastic beam system, using the established model and controller with tuned gains by GA optimization process. Finally, an experimental setup for the flexible beam driven by a pneumatic rod cylinder is constructed. Experiments for suppressing vibrations of the flexible beam are conducted. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed pneumatic drive scheme and the adopted control algorithms are feasible. The large amplitude vibration of the first bending mode can be suppressed effectively.

  5. Controlled synthesis of ZnO from nanospheres to micro-rods and its gas sensing studies.

    PubMed

    Navale, Shalaka C; Gosavi, S W; Mulla, I S

    2008-06-15

    1D ZnO rods are synthesized using less explored hydrazine method. Here we find, besides being combustible hydrazine can also be used as a structure-directing agent. The ratio of zinc nitrate (ZN) to hydrazine is found to control the morphology of ZnO. At lower concentration of ZN as compared with hydrazine the morphology of ZnO is found to be spherical. As we increase the hydrazine content the morphology changes from spherical (diameter approximately 100 nm) to the elongated structures including shapes like Y, T as well dumbbell (diameter approximately 40 nm and length approximately 150 nm). Interestingly for more than 50% of hydrazine ZnO micro-rods are formed. Such rods are of diameter approximately 120 nm having length of about 1 microm for ZN to hydrazine ratio of 1:9, isolated as well as bundle of rods are seen in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals the phase formation with average particle size of 37 nm as calculated using Scherrer's formula. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is also done to confirm the d-spacing in ZnO. Gas sensing study for these samples shows high efficiency and selectivity towards LPG at all operating temperatures. Photoluminescence (PL) study for these samples is performed at room temperature to find potential application as photoelectric material. PMID:18585218

  6. Analysis of the dose rate produced by control rods discharged from a BWR into the irradiated fuel pool.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, J; Gallardo, S; Abarca, A; Juan, V

    2010-01-01

    BWR control rods become activated by neutron reactions into the reactor. Therefore, when they are withdrawn from the reactor, they must be stored into the storage pool for irradiated fuel at a certain depth under water. Dose rates on the pool surface and the area surrounding the pool should be lower than limits for workers. The MCNP code based on the Monte Carlo method has been applied to model this situation and to calculate dose rates at points of interest. PMID:19836252

  7. Nondestructive Examination of Possible PWSCC in Control Rod Drive Mechanism Housings

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Rob V.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect? 2) What did each technique miss? and 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data and through-wall leakage; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discuss the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology and a comparison of the degradation found by the destructive evaluation with the recorded NDE responses.

  8. NDE of Possible Service-Induced PWSCC in Control Rod Drive Mechanism Housings Removed from Service

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Robert V.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2006-09-22

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are being performed to assess the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques on removed-from-service control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and the associated J-groove attachment welds. This work is being performed to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE techniques such as ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), and visual testing (VT) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. The basic NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory-based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper describes the NDE measurements that were employed on the two CRDMs to detect and characterize the indications and the analysis of these indications. The two CRDM assemblies were removed from service from the North Anna 2 vessel head, including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material. One nozzle contains suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the second contains evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, although this was unconfirmed. A destructive test plan is being developed to directly characterize the indications found using nondestructive testing. The results of this destructive testing will be included when the destructive testing is completed.

  9. Calculation of the Phenix end-of-life test 'Control Rod Withdrawal' with the ERANOS code

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, V.

    2012-07-01

    The Inst. of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) acts as technical support to French public authorities. As such, IRSN is in charge of safety assessment of operating and under construction reactors, as well as future projects. In this framework, one current objective of IRSN is to evaluate the ability and accuracy of numerical tools to foresee consequences of accidents. Neutronic studies step in the safety assessment from different points of view among which the core design and its protection system. They are necessary to evaluate the core behavior in case of accident in order to assess the integrity of the first barrier and the absence of a prompt criticality risk. To reach this objective one main physical quantity has to be evaluated accurately: the neutronic power distribution in core during whole reactor lifetime. Phenix end of life tests, carried out in 2009, aim at increasing the experience feedback on sodium cooled fast reactors. These experiments have been done in the framework of the development of the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. Ten tests have been carried out: 6 on neutronic and fuel aspects, 2 on thermal hydraulics and 2 for the emergency shutdown. Two of them have been chosen for an international exercise on thermal hydraulics and neutronics in the frame of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project. Concerning neutronics, the Control Rod Withdrawal test is relevant for safety because it allows evaluating the capability of calculation tools to compute the radial power distribution on fast reactors core configurations in which the flux field is very deformed. IRSN participated to this benchmark with the ERANOS code developed by CEA for fast reactors studies. This paper presents the results obtained in the framework of the benchmark activity. A relatively good agreement was found with available measures considering the approximations done in the modeling. The work underlines the importance of burn-up calculations in order to have a fine

  10. Rapid quenching of molten lithium-aluminum jets in water under loss-of-control-rod-cooling conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.; Schwarz, C.E.; Allison, D.K.; Hyder, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    A series of fifteen tests were performed to investigate the thermal interactions between molten LiAl control rod material and water under conditions prototypic of the loss-of-control-rod-cooling (LCRC) accident scenario. The experimental parameters such as melt mass, stream diameter, melt temperature and flowrate, water depth and water temperature were controlled or varied to agree with analytically determined conditions, thus insuring prototypicality of the experiments and applicability of the results. Experiments were performed in an actual Q-septifoil with web insert; the test section was one meter tall. Natural triggers were investigated in selected tests, to evaluate the self-triggering potential of this system. The self-triggering mechanisms that were investigated were thermal stratification of the water pool, two-phase flow in the water pool, and simultaneous drop of a control rod in parallel channel. Only benign interactions were observed during these tests with some evidence of pressurization in the tests with deepest and hottest water pools. There was no evidence of any explosive interactions in any of the tests, even those with natural triggers. The molten LiAl jets was found to undergo jet breakup and fragmentation; in some cases the debris hung up in the web, in other cases the debris settled into a loose debris bed at the bottom of the septifoil. It is concluded from these tests that molten lithium-aluminum alloy injected into water under conditions prototypic of LCRC conditions will not self-trigger to a steam explosion nor can it be triggered by naturally occurring triggers. The mode of interaction is benign jet breakup and fragmentation, followed by debris solidification. Explosive events did not occur and may not even be possible under these conditions. As a result, the LCRC accident cannot propagate damage and should not be a power-limiting concern in the K-reactor.

  11. Nondestructive and Destructive Examination Studies on Removed-from-Service Control Rod Drive Mechanism Penetrations

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Crawford, Susan L.; Doctor, Steven R.; Seffens, Rob J.; Schuster, George J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Harris, Robert V.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2007-06-07

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objectives of this work are to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. Two CRDM assemblies were removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE and destructive examination (DE) measurements; this report addresses the following questions: 1) What did each NDE technique detect? 2) What did each NDE technique miss? 3) How accurately did each NDE technique characterize the detected flaws? 4) Why did the NDE techniques perform or not perform? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. This report focuses on a CRDM assembly that contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data and through-wall leakage. The NDE measurements used to examine the CRDM assembly followed standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. These techniques included eddy current testing (ET), time-of-flight diffraction ultrasound, and penetrant testing. In addition, laboratory-based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assembly with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. These techniques included volumetric ultrasonic inspection of the J-groove weld metal and visual testing via replicant material of the J-groove weld. The results from these NDE studies were used to

  12. Electrostatic Droplet Ejection Using Planar Needle Inkjet Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakiai, Kazunori; Ishida, Yuji; Baba, Akiyoshi; Asano, Tanemasa

    2005-07-01

    For the purpose of investigating the electrostatic droplet ejection event, a planar needle inkjet head with a projected cone-shaped needle (3-D head) was prepared to observe the phenomenon of droplet ejection. As the initial approach to developing a liquid ejection monitoring method, electric current was also measured. The ejection was found to take place as a series of single events that are composed of fine droplet ejections forming the Taylor cone and the subsequent swing back of the liquid front owing to the relationship between surface tension and electrostatic force. The critical factors for ejecting fine droplets in the case of using the inkjet head having a protruding needle were back pressure from the reservoir and the wetting control of the structures. The fast Fourier transform of electric current revealed the appearance of periodic signals during ejection, which may be used in developing a technique of sensing droplet ejection.

  13. cAMP controls rod photoreceptor sensitivity via multiple targets in the phototransduction cascade

    PubMed Central

    Astakhova, Luba A.; Samoiliuk, Evgeniia V.; Govardovskii, Victor I.

    2012-01-01

    In early studies, both cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cGMP were considered as potential secondary messengers regulating the conductivity of the vertebrate photoreceptor plasma membrane. Later discovery of the cGMP specificity of cyclic nucleotide–gated channels has shifted attention to cGMP as the only secondary messenger in the phototransduction cascade, and cAMP is not considered in modern schemes of phototransduction. Here, we report evidence that cAMP may also be involved in regulation of the phototransduction cascade. Using a suction pipette technique, we recorded light responses of isolated solitary rods from the frog retina in normal solution and in the medium containing 2 µM of adenylate cyclase activator forskolin. Under forskolin action, flash sensitivity rose more than twofold because of a retarded photoresponse turn-off. The same concentration of forskolin lead to a 2.5-fold increase in the rod outer segment cAMP, which is close to earlier reported natural day/night cAMP variations. Detailed analysis of cAMP action on the phototransduction cascade suggests that several targets are affected by cAMP increase: (a) basal dark phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity decreases; (b) at the same intensity of light background, steady background-induced PDE activity increases; (c) at light backgrounds, guanylate cyclase activity at a given fraction of open channels is reduced; and (d) the magnitude of the Ca2+ exchanger current rises 1.6-fold, which would correspond to a 1.6-fold elevation of [Ca2+]in. Analysis by a complete model of rod phototransduction suggests that an increase of [Ca2+]in might also explain effects (b) and (c). The mechanism(s) by which cAMP could regulate [Ca2+]in and PDE basal activity is unclear. We suggest that these regulations may have adaptive significance and improve the performance of the visual system when it switches between day and night light conditions. PMID:23008435

  14. RAPID-L Highly Automated Fast Reactor Concept Without Any Control Rods (1) Reactor concept and plant dynamics analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Tsunoda, Hirokazu; Mishima, Kaichiro; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2002-07-01

    The 200 kWe uranium-nitride fueled lithium cooled fast reactor concept 'RAPID-L' to achieve highly automated reactor operation has been demonstrated. RAPID-L is designed for Lunar base power system. It is one of the variants of RAPID (Refueling by All Pins Integrated Design), fast reactor concept, which enable quick and simplified refueling. The essential feature of RAPID concept is that the reactor core consists of an integrated fuel assembly instead of conventional fuel subassemblies. In this small size reactor core, 2700 fuel pins are integrated altogether and encased in a fuel cartridge. Refueling is conducted by replacing a fuel cartridge. The reactor can be operated without refueling for up to 10 years. Unique challenges in reactivity control systems design have been attempted in RAPID-L concept. The reactor has no control rod, but involves the following innovative reactivity control systems: Lithium Expansion Modules (LEM) for inherent reactivity feedback, Lithium Injection Modules (LIM) for inherent ultimate shutdown, and Lithium Release Modules (LRM) for automated reactor startup. All these systems adopt lithium-6 as a liquid poison instead of B{sub 4}C rods. In combination with LEMs, LIMs and LRMs, RAPID-L can be operated without operator. This is the first reactor concept ever established in the world. This reactor concept is also applicable to the terrestrial fast reactors. In this paper, RAPID-L reactor concept and its transient characteristics are presented. (authors)

  15. Models for grains and gas ejection dynamics from a silo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yixian; Aussillous, Pascale; Ruyer, Pierre; Iusti/Gep Team; Semia/Limar Team

    2015-11-01

    In the hypothetical conditions of a reactivity initiated accident in a nuclear power plant, some of the fuel rods could break. If fuel fragmentation occurs, hot fuel particles and pressurized gas could interact with the surrounding fluid. The violence of this interaction depends on the discharge rate toward the fluid. In the present work, we study the discharge dynamics and identify the parameters governing this flow. In this paper, we focus on the experimental study of the discharge of a silo composed of spherical glass beads, with an orifice either lateral or at the bottom, with or without air flow. The measured parameters are the mass flow rate and the pressure along the silo, whereas the controlled parameters are the size of particles, the size of orifices, and the flow rate of air. For the case without air flow we found that the flow rate of particles ejected from the bottom orifice is 3 times greater than from the lateral orifice. For the case of a lateral orifice, when the form of the orifice is rectangular with width W and height D, we identify two regimes which depend on the ratio of width to height W / D . For the case with air flow, we found that the flow rate increases with the air flow. A simple physical model is proposed to describe the grains and gas ejection.

  16. Automatic safety rod for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1988-01-01

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  17. Controlled rolling process for dual phase steels and application to rod, wire, sheet and other shapes

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, G.; Ahn, J.H.; Kim, N.J.

    1986-10-28

    An improved, energy efficient, hot rolling method for direct production of cold formable dual-phase steel is provided. The steel is heated to completely austenitize it and then continuously hot rolled and cooled down into the ferrite-austenite two phase region to a temperature which is just below the effective Ar[sub 3] temperature. The hot rolled steel is then rapidly quenched to provide an alloy containing strong, tough lath martensite (fibers) in a ductile soft ferrite matrix. The method is particularly useful for providing rods in which form the alloy is capable of being drawn into high strength wire or the like in a cold drawing operation without any intermediate annealing or patenting, and has excellent strength, ductility and fatigue characteristics. 3 figs.

  18. Controlled rolling process for dual phase steels and application to rod, wire, sheet and other shapes

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Ahn, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Nack-Joon

    1986-01-01

    An improved, energy efficient, hot rolling method for direct production of cold formable dual-phase steel is provided. The steel is heated to completely austenitize it and then continuously hot rolled and cooled down into the ferrite-austenite two phase region to a temperature which is just below the effective Ar.sub.3 temperature. The hot rolled steel is then rapidly quenched to provide an alloy containing strong, tough lath martensite (fibers) in a ductile soft ferrite matrix. The method is particularly useful for providing rods in which form the alloy is capable of being drawn into high strength wire or the like in a cold drawing operation without any intermediate annealing or patenting, and has excellent strength, ductility and fatigue characteristics.

  19. Shape-Controlled Paclitaxel Nanoparticles with Multiple Morphologies: Rod-Shaped, Worm-Like, Spherical, and Fingerprint-Like

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although many nanocarriers have been developed to encapsulate paclitaxel (PTX), the drug loading and circulation time in vivo always are not ideal because of its rigid “brickdust” molecular structure. People usually concentrate their attention on the spherical nanocarriers, here paclitaxel nanoparticles with different geometries were established through the chemical modification of PTX, nanoprecipitation, and core-matched cargos. Previously we have developed rod-shape paclitaxel nanocrystals using block copolymer, pluronic F127. Unfortunately, the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of PTX nanocrystals is very poor. However, when PTX was replaced by its prodrug, the geometry of the nanoparticles changed from rod-shaped to worm-like. The worm-like nanoparticles can be further changed to spherical nanoparticles using the nanoprecipitation method, and changed to fingerprint-like nanoparticles upon the addition of the core-matched PTX. The nanoparticles with nonspherical morphologies, including worm-like nanoparticles and fingerprint-like nanoparticles, offer significant advantages in regards to key PK parameters in vivo. More important, in this report the application of the core-matching technology in creating a core-matched environment capable of controlling the in vivo PK of paclitaxel was demonstrated, and it revealed a novel technique platform to construct nanoparticles and improve the poor PK profiles of the drugs. PMID:25188586

  20. Making Highly Pure Glass Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed quasi-containerless method for making glass rods or fibers minimizes contact between processing equipment and product. Method allows greater range of product sizes and shapes than achieved in experiments on containerless processing. Molten zone established in polycrystalline rod. Furnace sections separated, and glass rod solidifies between them. Clamp supports solid glass as it grows in length. Pulling clamp rapidly away from melt draws glass fiber. Fiber diameter controlled by adjustment of pulling rate.

  1. Evaluation and Repair of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Alloy 600/182 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Charles R.; Arey, Melvin L. Jr.; Robinson, Michael R.; Whitaker, David E.

    2002-07-01

    In February 2001, a routine visual inspection of the reactor vessel head of Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 3 identified boric acid crystals at nine of sixty-nine locations where control rod drive mechanism housings (CRDM nozzles) penetrate the head. The boric acid deposits resulted from primary coolant leaking from cracks in the nozzle attachment weld and from through-thickness cracks in the nozzle wall. A general overview of the inspection and repair process is presented and results of the metallurgical analysis are discussed in more detail. The analysis confirmed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is the mechanism of failure of both the Alloy 182 weld filler material and the alloy 600 wrought base material. (authors)

  2. Benchmark of Atucha-2 PHWR RELAP5-3D control rod model by Monte Carlo MCNP5 core calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Pecchia, M.; D'Auria, F.; Mazzantini, O.

    2012-07-01

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and peculiarities require the adoption of advanced Monte Carlo codes for performing realistic neutronic simulations. Therefore core models of Atucha-2 PHWR were developed using MCNP5. In this work a methodology was set up to collect the flux in the hexagonal mesh by which the Atucha-2 core is represented. The scope of this activity is to evaluate the effect of obliquely inserted control rod on neutron flux in order to validate the RELAP5-3D{sup C}/NESTLE three dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic model, applied by GRNSPG/UNIPI for performing selected transients of Chapter 15 FSAR of Atucha-2. (authors)

  3. Composite Lightning Rods for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Charles F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Composite, lightweight sacrificial tip with graphite designed reduces lightning-strike damage to composite parts of aircraft and dissipates harmful electrical energy. Device consists of slender composite rod fabricated from highly-conductive unidirectional reinforcing fibers in matrix material. Rods strategically installed in trailing edges of aircraft wings, tails, winglets, control surfaces, and rearward-most portion of aft fuselage.

  4. Rhodopsin kinase and arrestin binding control the decay of photoactivated rhodopsin and dark adaptation of mouse rods.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Nymark, Soile; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Berry, Justin D; Adler, Leopold; Koutalos, Yiannis; Kefalov, Vladimir J; Cornwall, M Carter

    2016-07-01

    Photoactivation of vertebrate rhodopsin converts it to the physiologically active Meta II (R*) state, which triggers the rod light response. Meta II is rapidly inactivated by the phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues by G-protein receptor kinase (Grk1) and subsequent binding of arrestin 1 (Arr1). Meta II exists in equilibrium with the more stable inactive form of rhodopsin, Meta III. Dark adaptation of rods requires the complete thermal decay of Meta II/Meta III into opsin and all-trans retinal and the subsequent regeneration of rhodopsin with 11-cis retinal chromophore. In this study, we examine the regulation of Meta III decay by Grk1 and Arr1 in intact mouse rods and their effect on rod dark adaptation. We measure the rates of Meta III decay in isolated retinas of wild-type (WT), Grk1-deficient (Grk1(-/-)), Arr1-deficient (Arr1(-/-)), and Arr1-overexpressing (Arr1(ox)) mice. We find that in WT mouse rods, Meta III peaks ∼6 min after rhodopsin activation and decays with a time constant (τ) of 17 min. Meta III decay slows in Arr1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼27 min), whereas it accelerates in Arr1(ox) rods (τ of ∼8 min) and Grk1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼13 min). In all cases, regeneration of rhodopsin with exogenous 11-cis retinal is rate limited by the decay of Meta III. Notably, the kinetics of rod dark adaptation in vivo is also modulated by the levels of Arr1 and Grk1. We conclude that, in addition to their well-established roles in Meta II inactivation, Grk1 and Arr1 can modulate the kinetics of Meta III decay and rod dark adaptation in vivo. PMID:27353443

  5. Coronal mass ejections

    SciTech Connect

    Steinolfson, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are now recognized as an important component of the large-scale evolution of the solar corona. Some representative observations of CMEs are reviewed with emphasis on more recent results. Recent observations and theory are examined as they relate to the following aspects of CMEs: (1) the role of waves in determining the white-light signature; and (2) the mechanism by which the CME is driven (or launched) into the corona.

  6. Peptidic ligands to control the three-dimensional self-assembly of quantum rods in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Bizien, Thomas; Even-Hernandez, Pascale; Postic, Marie; Mazari, Elsa; Chevance, Soizic; Bondon, Arnaud; Hamon, Cyrille; Troadec, David; Largeau, Ludovic; Dupuis, Christophe; Gosse, Charlie; Artzner, Franck; Marchi, Valérie

    2014-09-24

    The use of peptidic ligands is validated as a generic chemical platform allowing one to finely control the organization in solid phase of semiconductor nanorods originally dispersed in an aqueous media. An original method to generate, on a macroscopic scale and with the desired geometry, three-dimensional supracrystals composed of quantum rods is introduced. In a first step, nanorods are transferred in an aqueous phase thanks to the substitution of the original capping layer by peptidic ligands. Infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy data prove that the exchange is complete; fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrates that the emitter optical properties are not significantly altered; electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering experiments assess the good colloidal stability of the resulting aqueous suspension. In a second step, water evaporation in a microstructured environment yields superstructures with a chosen geometry and in which nanorods obey a smectic B arrangement, as shown by electron microscopy. Incidentally, bulk drying in a capillary tube generates a similar local order, as evidenced by small angle X-ray scattering. PMID:24864008

  7. A simultaneous spin/eject mechanism for aerospace payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, G. D.; Banks, T. N.

    1976-01-01

    A simultaneous spin/eject mechanism was developed for aerospace applications requiring a compact, passive device which would accommodate payload support and controlled-release functions, and which would provide a highly accurate spin-ejection motion to the payload. The mechanism satisfied the requirements and is adaptable to other deployment applications.

  8. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kasada, R.; Ha, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Sakamoto, K.

    2016-01-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test. PMID:27161666

  9. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kasada, R; Ha, Y; Higuchi, T; Sakamoto, K

    2016-01-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test. PMID:27161666

  10. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasada, R.; Ha, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Sakamoto, K.

    2016-05-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test.

  11. CONTROL ROD ROTATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Baumgarten, A.; Karalis, A.J.

    1961-11-28

    A threaded rotatable shaft is provided which rotates in response to linear movement of a nut, the shaft being surrounded by a pair of bellows members connected to either side of the nut to effectively seal the reactor from leakage and also to store up energy to shut down the reactor in the event of a power failure. (AEC)

  12. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1958-04-22

    An electromagnetic apparatus for moving a rod-like member in small steps in either direction is described. The invention has particular application in the reactor field where the reactor control rods must be moved only a small distance and where the use of mechanical couplings is impractical due to the high- pressure seals required. A neutron-absorbing rod is mounted in a housing with gripping uaits that engage the rod, and coils for magnetizing the gripping units to make them grip, shift, and release the rod are located outside the housing.

  13. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    predictions. After confirming that the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF worked and provided consistent results with FRAPTRAN predictions for a single fuel rod configuration, the same type of analysis was carried out for a bigger system which is the 4x4 PWR bundle consisting of 15 fuel pins and one control guide tube. Steady- state calculations at Hot Full Power (HFP) conditions for control guide tube out (unrodded) were performed using the 4x4 PWR array with CTF/TORT-TD coupled code system. Fuel centerline, surface and average temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD with and without the new fuel thermal conductivity model were compared against CTF/TORT-TD/FRAPTRAN predictions to demonstrate the improvement in fuel centerline predictions when new model was used. In addition to that constant and CTF dynamic gap conductance model were used with the new thermal conductivity model to show the performance of the CTF dynamic gap conductance model and its impact on fuel centerline and surface temperatures. Finally, a Rod Ejection Accident (REA) scenario using the same 4x4 PWR array was run both at Hot Zero Power (HZP) and Hot Full Power (HFP) condition, starting at a position where half of the control rod is inserted. This scenario was run using CTF/TORT-TD coupled code system with and without the new fuel thermal conductivity model. The purpose of this transient analysis was to show the impact of thermal conductivity degradation (TCD) on feedback effects, specifically Doppler Reactivity Coefficient (DRC) and, eventually, total core reactivity.

  14. Automatic safety rod for reactors. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-03-23

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  15. Time to retrieve the best benefits from renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibition in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction: lessons from randomized controlled trials and registries.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram

    2014-12-20

    Numerous registries, including the most recent ESC Euro-observational registry, have reported a large and persistent gap between real-life practice in the use of life-saving evidence-based therapies (such as renin angiotensin antagonists, beta-blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists) and recommended practices in international guidelines. Although the use of multiple renin angiotensin aldosterone system-inhibitors is associated with the development of worsening renal function and hyperkalemia in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, increased efforts should be expended to initiate and maintain target doses of these agents so as to provide their benefits on mortality and hospitalizations for heart failure. PMID:25465821

  16. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small button'' in the latch mechanism had broken off of the lock plunger'' and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  17. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small ``button`` in the latch mechanism had broken off of the ``lock plunger`` and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  18. FUEL ROD ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1959-09-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods aod a tubular casing through which a coolant flows in heat-change contact with the ruel rods are described. The casting is of trefoil section and carries the fuel rods, each of which has two fin engaging the serrated fins of the other two fuel rods, whereby the fuel rods are held in the casing and are interlocked against relative longitudinal movement.

  19. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... 70. You can have a normal ejection fraction reading and still have heart failure (called HFpEF or ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. HF Resources For Life ...

  20. A Destructive Validation of NDE Responses of Service-Induced PWSCC Found in North Anna 2 Control Rod Drive Nozzle 31

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Robert V.; Crawford, Susan L.; Seffens, Rob J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Moyer, C.

    2009-07-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies.

  1. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways. PMID:26718442

  2. Investigation of combined free and forced convection in a 2 x 6 rod bundle during controlled flow transients

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.M.; Khan, E.U.

    1980-10-01

    An experimental study was performed to obtain local fluid velocity and temperature measurements in the mixed (combined free and forced) convection regime for specific flow coastdown transients. A brief investigation of steady-state flows for the purely free-convection regime was also completed. The study was performed using an electrically heated 2 x 6 rod bundle contained in a flow housing. In addition a transient data base was obtained for evaluating the COBRA-WC thermal-hydraulic computer program (a modified version of the COBRA-IV code).

  3. Possibility of controlled ejection of ferrofluid grains from a magnetically ordered ferrofluid using high frequency non-linear acoustic pulses - a particle dynamical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia S.; Manciu, Marian; Sen, Surajit

    2000-10-01

    We consider a model dilute ferrofluid that is subjected to a strong, homogeneous magnetic field directed perpendicular to the surface of the ferrofluid, such that there is a chain formation in the direction perpendicular to the surface of the liquid. We study the propagation of impulses generated at high-frequency across finite times through the ferrofluid chains. Our numerical analysis shows that a very high-frequency sequence of non-linear acoustic pulses of appropriate magnitudes, initiated at the base of the container, can lead to the ejection of desired number of ferrofluid grains through the liquid-air interface. The proposed mechanism, if successfully realized in the laboratory, could help design a nozzle-free, ultrafast, ink-jet printer of unparalleled resolution.

  4. Piston rod seal

    DOEpatents

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  5. SIMION analysis of a high performance linear accumulation octopole with enhanced ejection capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taban, Ioana M.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Römpp, Andreas; Cerjak, Iliya; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2005-07-01

    Here, we present the results of extensive SIMION 7.0 modelling of a new linear octopole ion trap. The octopole was designed to increase the efficiency of an electrospray ion source coupled to a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. This improvement was achieved by applying a pulsed axial field to the octopole to eject the ion packet with a time and energy distribution that better match the acceptance criteria of the FTICR cell, thus increasing the trapping efficiency and sensitivity. The axial field was produced by applying a pulsed dc potential to the custom-designed ejection electrodes located between the octopole rods. The time and energy profiles of the ejected ion packets for several electrode shapes were calculated and are discussed in terms of their compatibility with efficient trapping of the ion packet in the FTICR cell. Preliminary experimental results show increased signal using the dc ejection electrodes of approximately 100%.

  6. Effect of rod gap spacing on a suction panel for laminar flow and noise control in supersonic wind tunnels. M.S. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of a coordinated experimental and theoretical study of a sound shield concept which aims to provide a means of noise reduction in the test section of supersonic wind tunnels at high Reynolds numbers. The model used consists of a planar array of circular rods aligned with the flow, with adjustable gaps between them for boundary layer removal by suction, i.e., laminar flow control. One of the basic requirements of the present sound shield concept is to achieve sonic cross flow through the gaps in order to prevent lee-side flow disturbances from penetrating back into the shielded region. Tests were conducted at Mach 6 over a local unit Reynolds number range from about 1.2 x 10 to the 6th power to 13.5 x 10 to the 6th power per foot. Measurements of heat transfer, static pressure, and sound levels were made to establish the transition characteristics of the boundary layer on the rod array and the sound shielding effectiveness.

  7. Quality of Anticoagulation Control in Preventing Adverse Events in Heart Failure Patients in Sinus Rhythm: A Warfarin Aspirin Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction Trial (WARCEF) Substudy

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Shunichi; Thompson, John L.P.; Qian, Min; Ye, Siqin; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Mann, Douglas L.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Levin, Bruce; Pullicino, Patrick M.; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Teerlink, John R.; Graham, Susan; Mohr, J.P.; Labovitz, Arthur J.; Buchsbaum, Richard; Estol, Conrado J.; Lok, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between time in therapeutic range (TTR) and clinical outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients in sinus rhythm (SR) treated with warfarin. Methods and Results We used data from the Warfarin vs. Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction Trial (WARCEF) to assess the relationship of TTR with the WARCEF primary outcome (ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, or death); with death alone; ischemic stroke alone; major hemorrhage alone; and net clinical benefit (primary outcome and major hemorrhage combined). Multivariable Cox models were used to examine how the event risk changed with TTR and to compare the high TTR, low TTR, and aspirin patients, with TTR being treated as a time-dependent covariate. 2,217 patients were included in the analyses, among whom 1,067 were randomized to warfarin and 1,150 were randomized to aspirin. The median (IQR) follow-up duration was 3.6 (2.0–5.0) years. Mean (±SD) age was 61±11.3 years, with 80% being men. The mean (±SD) TTR was 57% (±28.5%). Increasing TTR was significantly associated with reduction in primary outcome (adjusted p<0.001), death alone (adjusted p=0.001), and improved net clinical benefit (adjusted p<0.001). A similar trend was observed for the other two outcomes but significance was not reached (adjusted p=0.082 for ischemic stroke, adjusted p=0.109 for major hemorrhage). Conclusions In HF patients in SR, increasing TTR is associated with better outcome and improved net clinical benefit. Patients in whom good quality anticoagulation can be achieved may benefit from the use of anticoagulants. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00041938. PMID:25850425

  8. Multivalent counterions inhibit DNA ejection from viral capsid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Toan

    2008-03-01

    Viral DNA packaged inside a bacteriophage is tighly bent. This stored bending energy of DNA is believed to be the main driving force to eject viral DNA into host cell upon capsid binding. One can control the amount of ejected DNA by subjecting the virus to a solution of PEG8000 molecules. The molecules cannot penetrate the viral capsid, therefore, they exert an osmotic pressure on the virus preventing DNA ejection. Experiments showed that for a given osmotic pressure, the degree of ejection also depends on the concentration of small ions in solution. Interestingly, for multivalent ions (such as Mg2+, Spd3+ or HexCo3+), this dependence is non-monotonic. We propose a simple electrostatic theory to explain this non-monotonic behavior. This is based on the fact that DNA molecules can invert its net charge at high enough multivalent counterion concentration. In other words, as multivalent counterion concentration is increased from zero, charge of DNA molecules change from negative to positive. At the concentration where DNA net charge is zero, the DNA molecules experience an attraction between different segments and DNA ejected amount is reduced. At low or high counterion concentration, DNA segments are charged (negatively or positively), repel each other and DNA ejected amount is increased. Fitting the result of the theory to experimental data, we obtain a numerical value for Mg2+ mediated DNA - DNA attraction energy to be -0.008kT per base.

  9. Pull rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1988-04-21

    A pull rod assembly comprising a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring, said piston device being mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  10. Angular Momentum Ejection and Recoil*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohia, O.; Coppi, B.

    2009-11-01

    The spontaneous rotation phenomenon observed in axisymmetric magnetically confined plasmas has been explained by the ``accretion theory'' [1] that considers the plasma angular momentum as gained from its interaction with the magnetic field and the surrounding material wall. The ejection of angular momentum to the wall, and the consequent recoil are attributed to modes excited at the edge while the transport of the (recoil) angular momentum from the edge toward the center is attributed to a different kind of mode. The toroidal phase velocity of the edge mode, to which the sign of the ejected angular momentum is related, is considered to change its direction in the transition from the H-regime to the L-regime. For the latter case, edge modes with phase velocity in the direction of vdi are driven by the temperature gradient of a cold ion population at the edge and damped on the ``hot'' ion population. The ``balanced'' double interaction [2] of the mode with the two populations, corresponding to a condition of marginal stability, leads to ejection of hot ions and loss of angular momentum in the direction of vdi while the cold population acquires angular momentum in the opposite direction. In the H-regime resistive ballooning modes with phase velocities in the direction of vde are viewed as the best candidates for the excited edge modes. *Sponsored in part by the U.S. DOE. [1] B. Coppi, Nucl. Fusion 42, 1 (2002) [2] B. Coppi and F. Pegoraro, Nucl. Fusion 17, 969 (1977)

  11. Composition of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, T. H.; Weberg, M.; von Steiger, R.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Lepri, S. T.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the physical origin of plasmas that are ejected from the solar corona. To address this issue, we perform a comprehensive analysis of the elemental composition of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using recently released elemental composition data for Fe, Mg, Si, S, C, N, Ne, and He as compared to O and H. We find that ICMEs exhibit a systematic abundance increase of elements with first ionization potential (FIP) < 10 eV, as well as a significant increase of Ne as compared to quasi-stationary solar wind. ICME plasmas have a stronger FIP effect than slow wind, which indicates either that an FIP process is active during the ICME ejection or that a different type of solar plasma is injected into ICMEs. The observed FIP fractionation is largest during times when the Fe ionic charge states are elevated above Q Fe > 12.0. For ICMEs with elevated charge states, the FIP effect is enhanced by 70% over that of the slow wind. We argue that the compositionally hot parts of ICMEs are active region loops that do not normally have access to the heliosphere through the processes that give rise to solar wind. We also discuss the implications of this result for solar energetic particles accelerated during solar eruptions and for the origin of the slow wind itself.

  12. Ejecting Phage DNA against Cellular Turgor Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Sanjin; Šiber, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We examine in vivo ejection of noncondensed DNA from tailed bacteriophages into bacteria. The ejection is dominantly governed by the physical conditions in the bacteria. The confinement of the DNA in the virus capsid only slightly helps the ejection, becoming completely irrelevant during its last stages. A simple calculation based on the premise of condensed DNA in the cell enables us to estimate the maximal bacterial turgor pressure against which the ejection can still be fully realized. The calculated pressure (∼5 atm) shows that the ejection of DNA into Gram-negative bacteria could proceed spontaneously, i.e., without the need to invoke active mechanisms. PMID:25418173

  13. Control of the saturation temperature in magnetic heating by using polyethylene-glycol-coated rod-shaped nickel-ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Yousaf; Bae, Hongsub; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook

    2016-02-01

    Polyethylene-glycol (PEG)-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles were prepared for magnetic hyperthermia applications by using the co-precipitation method. The PEG coating occurred during the synthesis of the nanoparticles. The coated nanoparticles were rod-shaped with an average length of 16 nm and an average diameter of 4.5 nm, as observed using transmission electron microscopy. The PEG coating on the surfaces of the nanoparticles was confirmed from the Fourier-transform infrared spectra. The nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic characteristics with negligible coercive force. Further, magnetic heating effects were observed in aqueous solutions of the coated nanoparticles. The saturation temperature could be controlled at 42 ℃ by changing the concentration of the nanoparticles in the aqueous solution. Alternately, the saturation temperature could be controlled for a given concentration of nanoparticles by changing the intensity of the magnetic field. The Curie temperature of the nanoparticles was estimated to be 495 ℃. These results for the PEG-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles showed the possibility of utilizing them for controlled magnetic hyperthermia at 42 ℃.

  14. FUEL ROD CLUSTERS

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, A.B.

    1959-08-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods and a tubular casing therefor through which a coolant flows in heat-exchange contact with the fuel rods is described. The fuel rcds are held in the casing by virtue of the compressive force exerted between longitudinal ribs of the fuel rcds and internal ribs of the casing or the internal surfaces thereof.

  15. Rod Photoreceptors Detect Rapid Flicker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, J. D.; MacLeod, Donald I. A.

    1977-01-01

    Rod-isolation techniques show that light-adapted human rods detect flicker frequencies as high as 28 hertz, and that the function relating rod critical flicker frequency to stimulus intensity contains two distinct branches. (MLH)

  16. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    ElGuindy, Ahmed; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has recently emerged as a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Contrary to initial beliefs, HFpEF is now known to be as common as heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and carries an unacceptably high mortality rate. With a prevalence that has been steadily rising over the past two decades, it is very likely that HFpEF will represent the dominant heart failure phenotype over the coming few years. The scarcity of trials in this semi-discrete form of heart failure and lack of unified enrolment criteria in the studies conducted to date might have contributed to the current absence of specific therapies. Understanding the epidemiological, pathophysiological and molecular differences (and similarities) between these two forms of heart failure is cornerstone to the development of targeted therapies. Carefully designed studies that adhere to unified diagnostic criteria with the recruitment of appropriate controls and adoption of practical end-points are urgently needed to help identify effective treatment strategies. PMID:25610841

  17. Electrically induced drop detachment and ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalli, Andrea; Preston, Daniel J.; Tio, Evelyn; Martin, David W.; Miljkovic, Nenad; Wang, Evelyn N.; Blanchette, Francois; Bush, John W. M.

    2016-02-01

    A deformed droplet may leap from a solid substrate, impelled to detach through the conversion of surface energy into kinetic energy that arises as it relaxes to a sphere. Electrowetting provides a means of preparing a droplet on a substrate for lift-off. When a voltage is applied between a water droplet and a dielectric-coated electrode, the wettability of the substrate increases in a controlled way, leading to the spreading of the droplet. Once the voltage is released, the droplet recoils, due to a sudden excess in surface energy, and droplet detachment may follow. The process of drop detachment and lift-off, prevalent in both biology and micro-engineering, has to date been considered primarily in terms of qualitative scaling arguments for idealized superhydrophobic substrates. We here consider the eletrically-induced ejection of droplets from substrates of finite wettability and analyze the process quantitatively. We compare experiments to numerical simulations and analyze how the energy conversion efficiency is affected by the applied voltage and the intrinsic contact angle of the droplet on the substrate. Our results indicate that the finite wettability of the substrate significantly affects the detachment dynamics, and so provide new rationale for the previously reported large critical radius for drop ejection from micro-textured substrates.

  18. Analysis of melt ejection during long pulsed laser drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting-Zhong, Zhang; Zhi-Chao, Jia; Hai-Chao, Cui; De-Hua, Zhu; Xiao-Wu, Ni; Jian, Lu

    2016-05-01

    In pulsed laser drilling, melt ejection greatly influences the keyhole shape and its quality as well, but its mechanism has not been well understood. In this paper, numerical simulation and experimental investigations based on 304 stainless steel and aluminum targets are performed to study the effects of material parameters on melt ejection. The numerical method is employed to predict the temperatures, velocity fields in the solid, liquid, and vapour front, and melt pool dynamics of targets as well. The experimental methods include the shadow-graphic technique, weight method, and optical microscope imaging, which are applied to real-time observations of melt ejection phenomena, measurements of collected melt and changes of target mass, observations of surface morphology and the cross-section of the keyhole, respectively. Numerical and experimental results show that the metallic material with high thermal diffusivity like aluminum is prone to have a thick liquid zone and a large quantity of melt ejection. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, the liquid zone is used to illustrate the relations between melt ejection and material thermal diffusivity for the first time. The research result in this paper is useful for manufacturing optimization and quality control in laser-material interaction. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. KYLX_0341) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405147).

  19. Chronic vagal stimulation for the treatment of low ejection fraction heart failure: results of the NEural Cardiac TherApy foR Heart Failure (NECTAR-HF) randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zannad, Faiez; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Tuinenburg, Anton E.; Wright, David; Brugada, Josep; Butter, Christian; Klein, Helmut; Stolen, Craig; Meyer, Scott; Stein, Kenneth M.; Ramuzat, Agnes; Schubert, Bernd; Daum, Doug; Neuzil, Petr; Botman, Cornelis; Castel, Maria Angeles; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Solomon, Scott D.; Wold, Nicholas; Ruble, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim The neural cardiac therapy for heart failure (NECTAR-HF) was a randomized sham-controlled trial designed to evaluate whether a single dose of vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) would attenuate cardiac remodelling, improve cardiac function and increase exercise capacity in symptomatic heart failure patients with severe left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction despite guideline recommended medical therapy. Methods Patients were randomized in a 2 : 1 ratio to receive therapy (VNS ON) or control (VNS OFF) for a 6-month period. The primary endpoint was the change in LV end systolic diameter (LVESD) at 6 months for control vs. therapy, with secondary endpoints of other echocardiography measurements, exercise capacity, quality-of-life assessments, 24-h Holter, and circulating biomarkers. Results Of the 96 implanted patients, 87 had paired datasets for the primary endpoint. Change in LVESD from baseline to 6 months was −0.04 ± 0.25 cm in the therapy group compared with −0.08 ± 0.32 cm in the control group (P = 0.60). Additional echocardiographic parameters of LV end diastolic dimension, LV end systolic volume, left ventricular end diastolic volume, LV ejection fraction, peak V02, and N-terminal pro-hormone brain natriuretic peptide failed to show superiority compared to the control group. However, there were statistically significant improvements in quality of life for the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (P = 0.049), New York Heart Association class (P = 0.032), and the SF-36 Physical Component (P = 0.016) in the therapy group. Conclusion Vagal nerve stimulation as delivered in the NECTAR-HF trial failed to demonstrate a significant effect on primary and secondary endpoint measures of cardiac remodelling and functional capacity in symptomatic heart failure patients, but quality-of-life measures showed significant improvement. PMID:25176942

  20. The tripole linear ion trap with highly efficient orthogonal ion ejection designed by computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Gary A; Masujima, Tsutomu

    2008-05-01

    An ion guide, consisting of three rods carrying three alternating current (AC) voltages symmetrically delayed, called a tripole, was used as a linear ion trap (LIT) and studied by computer simulations. Radial containment of ions was also demonstrated with the pseudopotential which was calculated by approximating the tripole electric potential to the multipoles expansion. This work found a new analyte concentrator, which performs effective ion ejection, and is suitable for use with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The efficiency of the overall process from the trapping until the ejection was higher than 90%, although some degree of ion spatial and kinetic energy spread which can be corrected with a reflectron was obtained. The reason for the ejection of this tripole linear ion trap (tLIT) lies in the high space available between the rods. The ejection is optimized with the application of focusing voltages, especially suitable for a tripole symmetry (one electrode has a pulse offset voltage and the other two have a fraction of that pulse). The beam is finally well parallelized with a rectangular Einzel lens. PMID:18384193

  1. Ultrasonic Phased Array Assessment of the Interference Fit and Leak Path of the North Anna Unit 2 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzle 63 with Destructive Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Hanson, Brady D.; Mathews, Royce

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasonic testing (UT) for primary water leak path assessments of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) upper head penetrations. Operating reactors have experienced leakage when stress corrosion cracking of nickel-based alloy penetrations allowed primary water into the annulus of the interference fit between the penetration and the low-alloy steel RPV head. In this investigation, UT leak path data were acquired for an Alloy 600 control rod drive mechanism nozzle penetration, referred to as Nozzle 63, which was removed from the North Anna Unit 2 reactor when the RPV head was replaced in 2002. In-service inspection prior to the head replacement indicated that Nozzle 63 had a probable leakage path through the interference fit region. Nozzle 63 was examined using a phased-array UT probe with a 5.0-MHz, eight-element annular array. Immersion data were acquired from the nozzle inner diameter surface. The UT data were interpreted by comparing to responses measured on a mockup penetration with known features. Following acquisition of the UT data, Nozzle 63 was destructively examined to determine if the features identified in the UT examination, including leakage paths and crystalline boric acid deposits, could be visually confirmed. Additional measurements of boric acid deposit thickness and low-alloy steel wastage were made to assess how these factors affect the UT response. The implications of these findings for interpreting UT leak path data are described.

  2. Factors Affecting Ejection Risk in Rollover Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Funk, James R.; Cormier, Joseph M.; Bain, Charles E.; Wirth, Jeffrey L.; Bonugli, Enrique B.; Watson, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Ejection greatly increases the risk of injury and fatality in a rollover crash. The purpose of this study was to determine the crash, vehicle, and occupant characteristics that affect the risk of ejection in rollovers. Information from real world rollover crashes occurring from 2000 – 2010 was obtained from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) in order to analyze the effect of the following parameters on ejection risk: seatbelt use, rollover severity, vehicle type, seating position, roof crush, side curtain airbag deployment, glazing type, and occupant age, gender, and size. Seatbelt use was found to reduce the risk of partial ejection and virtually eliminate the risk of complete ejection. For belted occupants, the risk of partial ejection risk was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, light trucks and vans (LTVs), and larger occupants. For unbelted occupants, the risk of complete ejection was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, LTVs, far side occupants, and higher levels of roof crush. Roof crush was not a significant predictor of ejection after normalizing for rollover severity. Curtain airbag deployment was associated with reduced rates of partial and complete ejection, but the effect was not statistically significant, perhaps due to the small sample size (n = 89 raw cases with curtain deployments). A much greater proportion of occupants who were ejected in spite of curtain airbag deployment passed through the sunroof and other portals as opposed to the adjacent side window compared to occupants who were ejected in rollovers without a curtain airbag deployment. The primary factors that reduce ejection risk in rollover crashes are, in generally decreasing order of importance: seatbelt use, fewer roof inversions, passenger car body type, curtain airbag deployment, near side seating position, and small occupant size. PMID:23169130

  3. Factors affecting ejection risk in rollover crashes.

    PubMed

    Funk, James R; Cormier, Joseph M; Bain, Charles E; Wirth, Jeffrey L; Bonugli, Enrique B; Watson, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Ejection greatly increases the risk of injury and fatality in a rollover crash. The purpose of this study was to determine the crash, vehicle, and occupant characteristics that affect the risk of ejection in rollovers. Information from real world rollover crashes occurring from 2000 - 2010 was obtained from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) in order to analyze the effect of the following parameters on ejection risk: seatbelt use, rollover severity, vehicle type, seating position, roof crush, side curtain airbag deployment, glazing type, and occupant age, gender, and size. Seatbelt use was found to reduce the risk of partial ejection and virtually eliminate the risk of complete ejection. For belted occupants, the risk of partial ejection risk was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, light trucks and vans (LTVs), and larger occupants. For unbelted occupants, the risk of complete ejection was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, LTVs, far side occupants, and higher levels of roof crush. Roof crush was not a significant predictor of ejection after normalizing for rollover severity. Curtain airbag deployment was associated with reduced rates of partial and complete ejection, but the effect was not statistically significant, perhaps due to the small sample size (n = 89 raw cases with curtain deployments). A much greater proportion of occupants who were ejected in spite of curtain airbag deployment passed through the sunroof and other portals as opposed to the adjacent side window compared to occupants who were ejected in rollovers without a curtain airbag deployment. The primary factors that reduce ejection risk in rollover crashes are, in generally decreasing order of importance: seatbelt use, fewer roof inversions, passenger car body type, curtain airbag deployment, near side seating position, and small occupant size. PMID:23169130

  4. Differential Phosphorylation Provides a Switch to Control How α-Arrestin Rod1 Down-regulates Mating Pheromone Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Alvaro, Christopher G; Aindow, Ann; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are integral membrane proteins that initiate stimulus-dependent activation of cognate heterotrimeric G-proteins, triggering ensuing downstream cellular responses. Tight regulation of GPCR-evoked pathways is required because prolonged stimulation can be detrimental to an organism. Ste2, a GPCR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that mediates response of MATa haploids to the peptide mating pheromone α-factor, is down-regulated by both constitutive and agonist-induced endocytosis. Efficient agonist-stimulated internalization of Ste2 requires its association with an adaptor protein, the α-arrestin Rod1/Art4, which recruits the HECT-domain ubiquitin ligase Rsp5, allowing for ubiquitinylation of the C-terminal tail of the receptor and its engagement by the clathrin-dependent endocytic machinery. We previously showed that dephosphorylation of Rod1 by calcineurin (phosphoprotein phosphatase 2B) is required for optimal Rod1 function in Ste2 down-regulation. We show here that negative regulation of Rod1 by phosphorylation is mediated by two distinct stress-activated protein kinases, Snf1/AMPK and Ypk1/SGK1, and demonstrate both in vitro and in vivo that this phospho-regulation impedes the ability of Rod1 to promote mating pathway desensitization. These studies also revealed that, in the absence of its phosphorylation, Rod1 can promote adaptation independently of Rsp5-mediated receptor ubiquitinylation, consistent with recent evidence that α-arrestins can contribute to cargo recognition by both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent mechanisms. However, in cells lacking a component (formin Bni1) required for clathrin-independent entry, Rod1 derivatives that are largely unphosphorylated and unable to associate with Rsp5 still promote efficient adaptation, indicating a third mechanism by which this α-arrestin promotes desensitization of the pheromone-response pathway. PMID:26920760

  5. Differential Phosphorylation Provides a Switch to Control How α-Arrestin Rod1 Down-regulates Mating Pheromone Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, Christopher G.; Aindow, Ann; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are integral membrane proteins that initiate stimulus-dependent activation of cognate heterotrimeric G-proteins, triggering ensuing downstream cellular responses. Tight regulation of GPCR-evoked pathways is required because prolonged stimulation can be detrimental to an organism. Ste2, a GPCR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that mediates response of MATa haploids to the peptide mating pheromone α-factor, is down-regulated by both constitutive and agonist-induced endocytosis. Efficient agonist-stimulated internalization of Ste2 requires its association with an adaptor protein, the α-arrestin Rod1/Art4, which recruits the HECT-domain ubiquitin ligase Rsp5, allowing for ubiquitinylation of the C-terminal tail of the receptor and its engagement by the clathrin-dependent endocytic machinery. We previously showed that dephosphorylation of Rod1 by calcineurin (phosphoprotein phosphatase 2B) is required for optimal Rod1 function in Ste2 down-regulation. We show here that negative regulation of Rod1 by phosphorylation is mediated by two distinct stress-activated protein kinases, Snf1/AMPK and Ypk1/SGK1, and demonstrate both in vitro and in vivo that this phospho-regulation impedes the ability of Rod1 to promote mating pathway desensitization. These studies also revealed that, in the absence of its phosphorylation, Rod1 can promote adaptation independently of Rsp5-mediated receptor ubiquitinylation, consistent with recent evidence that α-arrestins can contribute to cargo recognition by both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent mechanisms. However, in cells lacking a component (formin Bni1) required for clathrin-independent entry, Rod1 derivatives that are largely unphosphorylated and unable to associate with Rsp5 still promote efficient adaptation, indicating a third mechanism by which this α-arrestin promotes desensitization of the pheromone-response pathway. PMID:26920760

  6. Understanding flame rods

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, J.A. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The flame rod is probably the least understood method of flame detection. Although it is not recommended for oilfired equipment, it is very common on atmospheric, or {open_quotes}in-shot,{close_quotes} gas burners. It is also possible, although not common, to have an application with a constant gas pilot, monitored by a flame rod, and maintaining an oil main flame. Regardless of the application, chances are that flame rods will be encountered during the course of servicing. The technician today must be versatile and able to work on many different types of equipment. One must understand the basic principles of flame rods, and how to correct potential problems. The purpose of a flame detection system is two-fold: (1) to prove there is no flame when there shouldn`t be one, and (2) to prove there is a flame when there should be one. Flame failure response time is very important. This is the amount of time it takes to realize there is a loss of flame, two to four seconds is typical today. Prior to flame rods, either bi-metal or thermocouple type flame detectors were common. The response time for these detectors was up to three minutes, seldom less than one minute.

  7. Intramedullary rodding in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Mulpuri, K; Joseph, B

    2000-01-01

    The results of intramedullary rodding of long bones of 16 children with osteogenesis imperfecta, over a 10-year period, were analyzed. Sheffield elongating rods or non-elongating rods were used. The frequency of fractures was dramatically reduced after implantation of either type of rod, and the ambulatory status improved in all instances. The results were significantly better after Sheffield rodding with regard to the frequency of complications requiring reoperations and the longevity of the rods. Migration of the rods, encountered frequently, appears to be related to improper placement of the rods in the bone. It seems likely that if care is taken to ensure precise placement of a rod of appropriate size, several of these complications may be avoided. PMID:10739296

  8. Rod Control Assemblies Wear Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczorowski, Damien; Georges, Jean-Mary; Bec, Sandrine; Vannes, Andre-Bernard; Tonck, Andre; Vernot, Jean-Philippe

    2002-07-01

    In nuclear power plants, slender tubular components are subjected to vibrations in a PHTW environment. As a result, the two contacting surfaces, tubes and their guides undergo impact at low contact pressures. The components are usually made of stainless steel and it was found that the influence of the PHTW, combined with other actions (such as corrosion, erosion, squeeze film effect, third body effect and cavitation) leads to a particular wear of the material. Therefore, this paper aims to show that the colloidal oxides, formed on the steel surfaces in PHTW, play a principal role in the wear of the surfaces. Actually, due to the specific kinematic conditions of the contact, the flow of compacted oxides abrades the surfaces. (authors)

  9. Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a synopsis of the initiation of the strong-field magnetic explosions that produce large, fast coronal mass ejections. Cartoons based on observations are used to describe the inferred basic physical processes and sequences that trigger and drive the explosion. The magnetic field that explodes is a sheared-core bipole that may or may not be embedded in surrounding strong magnetic field, and may or may not contain a flux rope before it starts to explode. We describe three different mechanisms that singly or in combination trigger the explosion: (1) runaway internal tether-cutting reconnection, (2) runaway external tether-cutting reconnection, and (3) ideal MHD instability or loss or equilibrium. For most eruptions, high-resolution, high-cadence magnetograms and chromospheric and coronal movies (such as from TRACE and/or Solar-B) of the pre-eruption region and of the onset of the eruption and flare are needed to tell which one or which combination of these mechanisms is the trigger. Whatever the trigger, it leads to the production of an erupting flux rope. Using a simple model flux rope, we demonstrate that the explosion can be driven by the magnetic pressure of the expanding flux rope, provided the shape of the expansion is "fat" enough.

  10. Characteristics of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukder, F.; Marchese, A. K.; Tulsee, T.

    2014-12-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) is a release of charged particles resulting from solar activity. These charged particles can affect electronics on spacecraft, airplanes, global positioning systems, and communication satellites. The purpose of this research was to study CME data from satellites and correlate these to other properties. Solar wind data collected by STEREO A/B and ACE satellites were analyzed. The data consisted of solar wind flux for various elements (helium through iron), as well as the components of the interplanetary magnetic field. CME events are known to cause a surge in the helium flux, as well as other particles. It is hypothesized that a CME event will cause an increase in the number of lighter elements relative to heavier particles. This is because for a given input of energy, lighter elements are expected to be accelerated to a greater extent than heavier elements. A significant increase was observed in the ratio between helium to oxygen (He/O) prior to intense CMEs. A CME event on November 4, 2003 caused an eleven-fold increase in the He/O ratio, while for another event on April 2, 2001 the He/O ratio increased from 80 to 700. A significant increase in He/O ratio is not observed during weaker CMEs. Furthermore, it was also observed that not all increases in the ratio were accompanied by CMEs. The increase in He/O ratio prior to the CME arrival might be used as a way to predict future events.

  11. Anchor for Fiberglas Guy Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Solution to problem of anchoring fiberglas guy rods to install nut with threads on outer circumference, followed by aluminum sleeve. Sleeve has opening oval at upper and round at bottom end. End of rod is split so fiberglas wedge can be inserted to form V-shaped end. Spread end of rod fits into tapered hole in sleeve and threaded aluminum coupling is put over rod and sleeve.

  12. Ordering stripe structures of nanoscale rods in diblock copolymer scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2002-05-01

    We report a simulation on the formation of ordered stripe structures of nanoscale rods driven by symmetric diblock copolymer melts. Due to the preferential adsorption of one species of the diblock onto the mobile rods, the phase ordering process will couple with the movement of rods. We find that the self-assembly of rods on the copolymer scaffold produces the highly ordered nanowires of rods, and copolymer blends in turn form the well-oriented lamellar structure. This is due to the interplay among the micro-phase separating dynamics in the diblock copolymer, the wetting interaction between rods and diblock copolymer, and the nematic ordering dynamics of rods. We examine the influence of the domain size, the wetting strength, and the rod number density on the formation of such a nanoscale structure. Additionally, we indicate that the orientation of the pattern can be well controlled by external fields acting on the rods. The results suggest that our model system may provide a novel and simple way to control and design the ordering nanowire structure.

  13. Biomechanical study comparing a new combined rod-plate system with conventional dual-rod and plate systems.

    PubMed

    Sha, Mo; Ding, Zheng-Qi; Ting, Hu S; Kang, Liang-Qi; Zhai, Wen-Liang; Liu, Hui

    2013-02-01

    Most anterior spinal instrumentation systems are designed as either a plate or dual-rod system and have corresponding limitations. Dual-rod designs may offer greater adjustability; however, this system also maintains a high profile and lacks a locking design. Plate systems are designed to be stiffer, but the fixed configuration is not adaptable to the variety of vertebral body shapes. The authors designed a new combined rod-plate system (D-rod) to overcome these limitations and compared its biomechanical performance with the conventional dual-rod and plate system. Eighteen pig spinal specimens were divided into 3 groups (6 per group). An L1 corpectomy was performed and fixed with the D-rod (group A; n=6), Z-plate (Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee) (group B; n=6), or Ventrofix (Synthes, Paoli, Pennsylvania) (group C; n=6) system. T13-L2 range of motion was measured with a 6 degrees of freedom (ie, flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation) spine simulator under pure moments of 6.0 Nm. The D-rod and Ventrofix specimens were significantly stiffer than the Z-plate specimens (P<.05) based on results obtained from lateral bending and flexion-extension tests. The D-rod and Z-plate specimens were significantly stiffer than the Ventrofix specimens (P<.05) in axial rotation. The D-rod combines the advantages of the plate and dual-rod systems, where the anterior rod exhibits the design of a low-profile locking plate, enhanced stability, and decreased interference of the surrounding vasculature. The posterior rods function in compression and distraction, and the dual-rod system offers greater adjustability and control over screw placement. The results indicate that it may provide adequate stability for anterior thoracolumbar reconstruction. PMID:23383624

  14. Analysis of the in-vessel control rod guide tube and subpile room shielding design for the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Bucholz, J.A.; Engle, W.W. Jr.; Williams, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    An extensive sheilding analysis of the control rod guide tube (CRGT) and the subpile room was performed for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. A two-dimensional model for the CRGT and subpile room was developed. Coupled 39 neutron group and 44 gamma group calculations with the multigroup DORT discrete originates transport code were done using cross sections from the ANSL-V library including photoneutron production. Different shield designs were investigated with a shield thickness of 10 to 15 mm. None of the shields affected the neutron dose rate and gamma dose rate at the top of the subpile room, which were 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 5} mrem/h and 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 3} mrem/h, respectively. An L-shaped cylindrical boral shield positioned around the core pressure boundary tube at the bottom of the reflector vessel with the horizontal part extended over the whole bottom of the reflector vessel reduced the maximal displacements per atom (DPA) level and helium production level in the primary coolant supply adapter and its flange after 40 years of reactor operation from 1 and 500 appm to 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -2} and 2 {center_dot} 10{sup -2} appm compared with the unshielded arrangement. Shields of boral and hafnium with the horizontal part of the shield restricted to a radius of 485 mm gave a maximal DPA of 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -2} and a helium production of up to 20 appm. Heat loads of up to 70 W{center_dot}cm{sup -3} were calculated at the most exposed parts of the shield both for boral and hafnium shields. A depletion/activation analysis of the hafnium shield showed that at the most exposed part of the shield, the naturally occurring isotope {sup 177}Hf is 34% depleted at the end of two years of reactor operation. This high burnup is somewhat balanced by a subsequent buildup of {sup 178}Hf, {sup 179}Hf, and {sup 180}Hf. In all other parts of the shield, the burnup is much smaller.

  15. Crystal phase-controlled synthesis of rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals for in vivo imaging in the near-infrared wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Tatsuya; Ishigami, Yujiro; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Shimada, Taisuke; Baba, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu; Torimoto, Tsukasa

    2016-03-01

    Rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals (NCs) exhibiting intense near-band edge photoluminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelength region, were successfully prepared by the thermal reaction of metal acetates and Te precursors in 1-dodecanethiol. Increasing the reaction temperature resulted in the formation of larger AgInTe2 NCs with crystal structures varying from hexagonal to tetragonal at reaction temperatures of 280 °C or higher. The energy gap was increased from 1.13 to 1.20 eV with a decrease in rod width from 8.3 to 5.6 nm, accompanied by a blue shift in the photoluminescence (PL) peak wavelength from 1097 to 1033 nm. The optimal PL quantum yield was approximately 18% for AgInTe2 NCs with rod widths of 5.6 nm. The applicability of AgInTe2 NCs as a NIR-emitting material for in vivo biological imaging was examined by injecting AgInTe2 NC-incorporated liposomes into the back of a C57BL/6 mouse, followed by in vivo photoluminescence imaging in the NIR region.Rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals (NCs) exhibiting intense near-band edge photoluminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelength region, were successfully prepared by the thermal reaction of metal acetates and Te precursors in 1-dodecanethiol. Increasing the reaction temperature resulted in the formation of larger AgInTe2 NCs with crystal structures varying from hexagonal to tetragonal at reaction temperatures of 280 °C or higher. The energy gap was increased from 1.13 to 1.20 eV with a decrease in rod width from 8.3 to 5.6 nm, accompanied by a blue shift in the photoluminescence (PL) peak wavelength from 1097 to 1033 nm. The optimal PL quantum yield was approximately 18% for AgInTe2 NCs with rod widths of 5.6 nm. The applicability of AgInTe2 NCs as a NIR-emitting material for in vivo biological imaging was examined by injecting AgInTe2 NC-incorporated liposomes into the back of a C57BL/6 mouse, followed by in vivo photoluminescence imaging in the NIR region. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  16. Sept. 28, 2012 Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Video Gallery

    This Sept. 28 coronal mass ejection (CME) from the sun, captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), is the event which caused the near total annihilation of the new radiation belt and sl...

  17. Aug. 31, 2012 Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Video Gallery

    This two part movie shows an Aug. 31 coronal mass ejection (CME) from the sun , the same event that caused depletion and refilling of the radiation belts just after the Relativistic Electron-Proton...

  18. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Gladden, James D.; Linke, Wolfgang A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of this series devoted to heart failure (HF), we review the epidemiology, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Gaps in knowledge and needed future research are discussed. PMID:24663384

  19. Improvement in Jc performance below liquid nitrogen temperature for SmBa2Cu3Oy superconducting films with BaHfO3 nano-rods controlled by low-temperature growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, S.; Yoshida, Y.; Ichino, Y.; Xu, Q.; Matsumoto, K.; Ichinose, A.; Awaji, S.

    2016-01-01

    For use in high-magnetic-field coil-based applications, the critical current density (Jc) of REBa2Cu3Oy (REBCO, where RE = rare earth) coated conductors must be isotropically improved, with respect to the direction of the magnetic field; these improvements must be realized at the operating conditions of these applications. In this study, improvement of the Jc for various applied directions of magnetic field was achieved by controlling the morphology of the BaHfO3 (BHO) nano-rods in a SmBCO film. We fabricated the 3.0 vol. % BHO-doped SmBCO film at a low growth temperature of 720 °C, by using a seed layer technique (Ts = 720 °C film). The low-temperature growth resulted in a morphological change in the BHO nano-rods. In fact, a high number density of (3.1 ± 0.1) × 103 μm-2 of small (diameter: 4 ± 1 nm), discontinuous nano-rods that grew in various directions, was obtained. In Jc measurements, the Jc of the Ts = 720 °C film in all directions of the applied magnetic field was higher than that of the non-doped SmBCO film. The Jcmin (6.4 MA/cm2) of the former was more than 6 times higher than that (1.0 MA/cm2) of the latter at 40 K, under 3 T. The aforementioned results indicated that the discontinuous BHO nano-rods, which occurred with a high number density, exerted a 3D-like flux pinning at the measurement conditions considered. Moreover, at 4.2 K and under 17 T, a flux pinning force density of 1.6 TN/m3 was realized; this value was comparable to the highest value recorded, to date.

  20. CFD Simulations of Vibration Induced Droplet Ejection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Ashley; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1998-11-01

    Vibration-induced droplet ejection is a process that occurs when a liquid droplet is placed on a vibrating membrane. Above a critical value of the excitation amplitude, Faraday waves form on the surface of the drop. As the amplitude is increased secondary drops are ejected from the wave crests. A Navier-Stokes solver designed to simulate the transient fluid mechanics of the process is presented. The solver is based on a MAC method on a staggered grid. A volume of fluid method is implemented to track the free surface. The volume fraction is advected via a second-order, unsplit method that minimizes numerical diffusion of the interface. Surface tension is incorporated as a continuum surface force. This work is intended to provide a comprehensive description of the fluid dynamics involved in vibration-induced droplet ejection, with the aim of understanding the mechanism behind the ejection process. The evolution of the interface through droplet ejection will be simulated. The dependence of the ejection process on the driving parameters will be evaluated and the resonance characteristics of the drop will be determined. The results of the computations will be compared with experimental results.

  1. Low speed vehicle passenger ejection restraint effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Seluga, Kristopher J; Ojalvo, Irving U; Obert, Richard M

    2005-07-01

    Current golf carts and LSV's (Low Speed Vehicles) produce a significant number of passenger ejections during sharp turns. These LSV's do not typically possess seatbelts, but do provide outboard bench seat hip restraints that also serve as handholds. However, many current restraint designs appear incapable of preventing passenger ejections due to their low height and inefficient handhold position. Alternative handhold and hip restraint designs may improve passenger safety. Accordingly, this paper examines minimum size requirements for hip restraints to prevent passenger ejection during sharp turns and evaluates the effectiveness of a handhold mounted at the center of the bench seat. In this study, a simulation of a turning cart supplies the dynamic input to a biomechanical model of an adult male seated in a golf cart. Various restraint combinations are considered, both with and without the central handhold, to determine the likelihood of passenger ejection. It is shown that only the largest restraint geometries prevent passenger ejection. Adequate hip restraints should be much larger than current designs and a central handhold should be provided. In this way, golf cart and LSV manufacturers could reduce passenger ejections and improve fleet safety by incorporating recommendations provided herein. PMID:15893288

  2. What triggers coronal mass ejections ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulanier, Guillaume

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large clouds of highly magnetized plasma. They are ac-celerated from the solar atmosphere into interplanetary space by the Lorentz force, which is associated to their strong current-carrying magnetic fields. Both theory and observations lead to the inevitable conclusion that the launch of a CME must result from the sudden release of free magnetic energy, which has slowly been accumulated in the corona for a long time before the eruption. Since the incomplete, but seminal, loss-of-equilibrium model was proposed by van Tend and Kuperus (1978), a large variety of analytical and numerical storage-and-release MHD models has been put forward in the past 20 years or so. All these models rely on the slow increase of currents and/or the slow decrease of the restraining magnetic tension preceding the eruption. But they all put the emphazis on different physical mechanisms to achieve this preeruptive evolution, and to suddenly trigger and later drive a CME. Nevertheless, all these models actually share many common features, which all describe many individual observed aspects of solar eruptions. It is therefore not always clear which of all the suggested mecha-nisms do really account for the triggering of observed CMEs in general. Also, these mechanisms should arguably not be as numerous as the models themselves, owing to the common occurence of CMEs. In order to shed some light on this challenging, but unripe, topic, I will attempt to rediscuss the applicability of the models to the Sun, and to rethink the most sensitive ones in a common frame, so as to find their common denominator. I will elaborate on the idea that many of the proposed triggering mechanisms may actually only be considered as different ways to apply a "last push", which puts the system beyond its eruptive threshold. I will argue that, in most cases, the eruptive threshold is determined by the vertical gradient of the magnetic field in the low-β corona, just like the usual

  3. Crystal phase-controlled synthesis of rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals for in vivo imaging in the near-infrared wavelength region.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Tatsuya; Ishigami, Yujiro; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Shimada, Taisuke; Baba, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu; Torimoto, Tsukasa

    2016-03-01

    Rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals (NCs) exhibiting intense near-band edge photoluminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelength region, were successfully prepared by the thermal reaction of metal acetates and Te precursors in 1-dodecanethiol. Increasing the reaction temperature resulted in the formation of larger AgInTe2 NCs with crystal structures varying from hexagonal to tetragonal at reaction temperatures of 280 °C or higher. The energy gap was increased from 1.13 to 1.20 eV with a decrease in rod width from 8.3 to 5.6 nm, accompanied by a blue shift in the photoluminescence (PL) peak wavelength from 1097 to 1033 nm. The optimal PL quantum yield was approximately 18% for AgInTe2 NCs with rod widths of 5.6 nm. The applicability of AgInTe2 NCs as a NIR-emitting material for in vivo biological imaging was examined by injecting AgInTe2 NC-incorporated liposomes into the back of a C57BL/6 mouse, followed by in vivo photoluminescence imaging in the NIR region. PMID:26899620

  4. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Mohammad K; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M

    2014-10-14

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  5. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Mohammad K.; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  6. Locked-wrap fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Samuel; Chertock, Alan J.; Punches, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for spacing fast reactor fuel rods using a wire wrapper improved by orienting the wire-wrapped fuel rods in a unique manner which introduces desirable performance characteristics not attainable by previous wire-wrapped designs. Use of this method in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor results in: (a) improved mechanical performance, (b) improved rod-to-rod contact, (c) reduced steel volume, and (d) improved thermal-hydraulic performance. The method produces a "locked wrap" design which tends to lock the rods together at each of the wire cluster locations.

  7. Pulse Ejection Presentation System Synchronized with Breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadowaki, Ami; Sato, Junta; Ohtsu, Kaori; Bannai, Yuichi; Okada, Kenichi

    Trials on transmission of olfactory information together with audio/visual information are currently being conducted in the field of multimedia. However, continuous emission of scents in high concentration creates problems of human adaptation and remnant odors in air. To overcome such problems we developed an olfactory display in conjunction with Canon Inc. This display has high emission control in the ink-jet so that it can provide stable pulse emission of scents. Humans catch a scent when they breathe in and inhale smell molecules in air. Therefore, it is important that the timing of scent presentation is synchronized with human breathing. We also developed a breath sensor which detects human inspiration. In this study, we combined the olfactory display with the breath sensor to make a pulse ejection presentation system synchronized the breath. The experimental evaluation showed that the system had more than 90 percent of detection rate. Another evaluation was held at KEIO TECHNO-MALL 2007. From questionnaire results of the participants, we found that the system made the user feel continuous sense of smell avoiding adaptation. It is expected that our system enables olfactory information to be synchronized with audio/visual information in arbitrary duration at any time.

  8. Planet Scattering Around Binaries: Ejections, Not Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smullen, Rachel A.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Shannon, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Transiting circumbinary planets discovered by Kepler provide unique insight into binary star and planet formation. Several features of this new found population, for example the apparent pile-up of planets near the innermost stable orbit, may distinguish between formation theories. In this work, we determine how planet-planet scattering shapes planetary systems around binaries as compared to single stars. In particular, we look for signatures that arise due to differences in dynamical evolution in binary systems. We carry out a parameter study of N-body scattering simulations for four distinct planet populations around both binary and single stars. While binarity has little influence on the final system multiplicity or orbital distribution, the presence of a binary dramatically effects the means by which planets are lost from the system. Most circumbinary planets are lost due to ejections rather than planet-planet or planet-star collisions. The most massive planet in the system tends to control the evolution. Systems similar to the only observed multi-planet circumbinary system, Kepler-47, can arise from much more tightly packed, unstable systems. Only extreme initial conditions introduce differences in the final planet populations. Thus, we suggest that any intrinsic differences in the populations are imprinted by formation.

  9. Interplanetary Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    Although more than ten thousand coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are produced during each solar cycle at the Sun, only a small fraction hits the Earth. Only a small fraction of the Earth-directed CMEs ultimately arrive at Earth depending on their interaction with the solar wind and other large-scale structures such as coronal holes and CMEs. The interplanetary propagation is essentially controlled by the drag force because the propelling force and the solar gravity are significant only near the Sun. Combined remote-sensing and in situ observations have helped us estimate the influence of the solar wind on the propagation of CMEs. However, these measurements have severe limitations because the remote-sensed and in-situ observations correspond to different portions of the CME. Attempts to overcome this problem are made in two ways: the first is to model the CME and get the space speed of the CME, which can be compared with the in situ speed. The second method is to use stereoscopic observation so that the remote-sensed and in-situ observations make measurements on the Earth-arriving part of CMEs. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission observed several such CMEs, which helped understand the interplanetary evolution of these CMEs and to test earlier model results. This paper discusses some of these issues and updates the CME/shock travel time estimates for a number of CMEs.

  10. Planet scattering around binaries: ejections, not collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smullen, Rachel A.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Shannon, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Transiting circumbinary planets discovered by Kepler provide unique insight into binary star and planet formation. Several features of this new found population, for example the apparent pile-up of planets near the innermost stable orbit, may distinguish between formation theories. In this work, we determine how planet-planet scattering shapes planetary systems around binaries as compared to single stars. In particular, we look for signatures that arise due to differences in dynamical evolution in binary systems. We carry out a parameter study of N-body scattering simulations for four distinct planet populations around both binary and single stars. While binarity has little influence on the final system multiplicity or orbital distribution, the presence of a binary dramatically affects the means by which planets are lost from the system. Most circumbinary planets are lost due to ejections rather than planet-planet or planet-star collisions. The most massive planet in the system tends to control the evolution. Systems similar to the only observed multiplanet circumbinary system, Kepler-47, can arise from much more tightly packed, unstable systems. Only extreme initial conditions introduce differences in the final planet populations. Thus, we suggest that any intrinsic differences in the populations are imprinted by formation.

  11. APPARATUS FOR SHEATHING RODS

    DOEpatents

    Ford, W.K.; Wyatt, M.; Plail, S.

    1961-08-01

    An arrangement is described for sealing a solid body of nuclear fuel, such as a uranium metal rod, into a closelyfitting thin metallic sheath with an internal atmosphere of inert gas. The sheathing process consists of subjecting the sheath, loaded with the nuclear fuel body, to the sequential operations of evacuation, gas-filling, drawing (to entrap inert gas and secure close contact between sheath and body), and sealing. (AEC)

  12. Vortices in vibrated granular rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neicu, Toni; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2002-03-01

    We report the first experimental observation of vortex patterns in granular rods inside a container that is vibrated vertically . The experiments were carried out with an anodized aluminum circular container which is rigidly attached to an electromagnetic shaker and the patterns are imaged using a high-frame rate digital camera. At low rod numbers and driving amplitudes, the rods are observed to lie horizontally. Above a critical number or packing fraction of rods, moving domains of vertical rods are spontaneously observed to form which coexist with horizontal rods. These small domains of vertical rods coarsen over time to form a few large vortices. The size of the vortices increases with the number of rods. We are able to track the ends of the vertical rods and obtain the velocity fields of the vortices. The mean azimuthal velocity as a function of distance from the center of the vortex is obtained as a function of the packing fraction. We will report the phase diagram of the various patterns observed as function of number of rods and driving amplitude. The mechanism for the formation and motion of the domains of vertical rods will be also discussed.

  13. The evaluation of corrosion resistant rod end rolling element bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Braza, J.F.; Giuntoli, K.; Imundo, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    Recent developments on carburizing grades of stainless steels have provided new materials to produce corrosion resistant airframe control bearings. This paper presents the application of one of these new carburizing grades of stainless steel to rod end ball bearings. The outer ring of the rod end bearing is made out of carburized stainless steel, while the inner ring and balls are made out of through-hardened stainless steel. The stainless steel rod end bearings were evaluated according to various ASTM and Military specifications for performance and corrosion resistance. The stainless steel rod end bearings exceeded the performance requirements of standard rod end bearings (which are comprised of a carburized 8620 steel outer ring and 52100 steel inner ring and balls) in accordance with MIL-B-6039. The rod end bearings were evaluated in the radial fracture load, axial fracture load, and radial dynamic load tests. Also, salt spray and alternate immersion corrosion tests (ASTM B 117-85 and G 44-88, respectively) were conducted on the stainless steel rod end bearings. The stainless steel rod end bearings exhibited superior corrosion resistance to the standard 8620/52100 steel rod end bearings.

  14. Radiation dose distributions due to sudden ejection of cobalt device.

    PubMed

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-09-01

    The evaluation of the radiation dose during accident in a nuclear reactor is of great concern from the viewpoint of safety. One of important accident must be analyzed and may be occurred in open pool type reactor is the rejection of cobalt device. The study is evaluating the dose rate levels resulting from upset withdrawal of co device especially the radiation dose received by the operator in the control room. Study of indirect radiation exposure to the environment due to skyshine effect is also taken into consideration in order to evaluate the radiation dose levels around the reactor during the ejection trip. Microshield, SHLDUTIL, and MCSky codes were used in this study to calculate the radiation dose profiles during cobalt device ejection trip inside and outside the reactor building. PMID:27423021

  15. Flexible growing rods: a pilot study to determine if polymer rod constructs may provide stability to skeletally immature spines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical treatments for early onset scoliosis (EOS), including growing rod constructs, involve many complications. Some are due to biomechanical factors. A construct that is more flexible than current instrumentation systems may reduce complications. The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine spine range of motion (ROM) after implantation of simulated growing rod constructs with a range of clinically relevant structural properties. The hypothesis was that ROM of spines instrumented with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods would be greater than metal rods and lower than noninstrumented controls. Further, adjacent segment motion was expected to be lower with polymer rods compared to conventional systems. Methods Biomechanical tests were conducted on 6 skeletally immature porcine thoracic spines (domestic swine, 35-40 kg). Spines were harvested after death from swine that had been utilized for other studies (IACUC approved) which had not involved the spine. Paired pedicle screws were used as anchors at proximal and distal levels. Specimens were tested under the following conditions: control, then dual rods of PEEK (6.25 mm), titanium (4 mm), and CoCr (5 mm) alloy. Lateral bending (LB) and flexion-extension (FE) moments of ±5 Nm were applied. Vertebral rotations were measured using video. Differences were determined by two-tailed t-tests and Bonferroni correction with four primary comparisons: PEEK vs control and PEEK vs CoCr, in LB and FE (α=0.05/4). Results In LB, ROM of specimens with PEEK rods was lower than control at each instrumented level. ROM was greater for PEEK rods than both Ti and CoCr at every instrumented level. Mean ROM at proximal and distal noninstrumented levels was lower for PEEK than for Ti and CoCr. In FE, mean ROM at proximal and distal noninstrumented levels was lower for PEEK than for metal. Combining treated levels, in LB, ROM for PEEK rods was 35% of control (p<0.0001) and 270% of CoCr rods (p<0.01). In FE, ROM with PEEK

  16. Active space debris removal using capture and ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missel, Jonathan William

    2013-03-01

    Low Earth Orbit is over-cluttered with rogue objects that threaten existing technological assets and interfere with allocating new ones. Traditional satellite missions are not efficient enough to collect an appreciable amount of debris due to the high cost of orbit transfers. Many alternate proposals are politically controversial, costly, or dependent on undeveloped technology. This dissertation attempts to solve the problem by introducing a new mission architecture, Space Sweeper, and bespoke hardware, Sling-Sat, that sequentially captures and ejects debris plastically. Resulting momentum exchanges are exploited to aid in subsequent orbit transfers, thus saving fuel. Sling-Sat is a spinning satellite that captures debris at the ends of adjustable-length arms. Arm length controls the angular rate to achieve a desired tangential ejection speed. Timing the release exacts the ejection angle. This process redirects debris to burn up in the atmosphere, or reduce its lifetime, by lowering its perigee. This dissertation establishes feasibility of principles fundamental to the proposed concept. Hardware is conceptualized to accommodate Space Sweeper's specialized needs. Mathematical models are built for the purpose of analysis and simulation. A kinematic analysis investigates system demands and long-term behavior resulting from repeated debris interaction. A successful approach to enforce debris capture is established through optimal control techniques. A study of orbital parameters and their response to debris interactions builds an intuition for missions of this nature. Finally, a J2-compliant technique for path optimization is demonstrated. The results strongly support feasibility of the proposed mission.

  17. The effects of intraventricular gradients on left ventricular ejection dynamics.

    PubMed

    Murgo, J P; Alter, B R; Dorethy, J F; Altobelli, S A; Craig, W E; McGranahan, G M

    1983-11-01

    The generation of abnormal gradients between the apical cavity and the subaortic valvular region of the left ventricle in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has traditionally been equated to a dynamic obstruction to left ventricular outflow. To examine this concept in more detail, left ventricular ejection dynamics were studied during cardiac catheterization in 30 patients with HCM and 29 patients with no evidence of cardiovascular disease. Using multisensor catheterization techniques, ascending aortic flow velocity and micromanometer left ventricular and aortic pressures were simultaneously recorded during rest (n = 47). Dynamic left ventricular emptying was also analyzed with frame-by-frame angiography (n = 46). The temporal distribution of left ventricular outflow was independently derived from both flow velocity and angiographic techniques. The HCM patients were subdivided into three groups: I, intraventricular gradients at rest (n = 9); II, intraventricular gradients only with provocation (n = 12); III, no intraventricular gradients despite provocation (n = 9). Expressed as a precentage of the available systolic ejection period (%SEP), the time required for ejection of the total stroke volume was (mean +/- 1 S.D.): Group I, 69 +/- 17% (flow), 64 +/- 6% (angio); Group II, 63 +/- 14% (flow), 65 +/- 6% (angio); Group III, 61 +/- 16% (flow), 62 +/- 4% (angio); control group, 90 +/- 5% (flow) 86 +/- 10% (angio). No significant difference was observed between any of the three HCM subgroups, but, compared with the control group, ejection was completed much earlier in systole independent of the presence or absence of intraventricular gradients. The presence of coexisting mitral regurgitation in 12 of the HCM patients did not alter these results. This study demonstrates that 'outflow obstruction', as traditionally defined by the presence of an abnormal intraventricular pressure gradient and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, does not impede left

  18. Numerical Simulations of a Flux Rope Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Mackay, D. H.; Poedts, S.

    2015-03-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most violent phenomena observed on the Sun. One of the most successful models to explain CMEs is the flux rope ejection model, where a magnetic flux rope is expelled from the solar corona after a long phase along which the flux rope stays in equilibrium while magnetic energy is being accumulated. However, still many questions are outstanding on the detailed mechanism of the ejection and observations continuously provide new data to interpret and put in the context. Currently, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) are providing new insights into the early phase of CME evolution. In particular, observations show the ejection of magnetic flux ropes from the solar corona and how they evolve into CMEs. However, these observations are difficult to interpret in terms of basic physical mechanisms and quantities, thus, we need to compare equivalent quantities to test and improve our models. In our work, we intend to bridge the gap between models and observations with our model of flux rope ejection where we consistently describe the full life span of a flux rope from its formation to ejection. This is done by coupling the global non-linear force-free model (GNLFFF) built to describe the slow low- β formation phase, with a full MHD simulation run with the software MPI-AMRVAC, suitable to describe the fast MHD evolution of the flux rope ejection that happens in a heterogeneous β regime. We also explore the parameter space to identify the conditions upon which the ejection is favoured (gravity stratification and magnetic field intensity) and we produce synthesised AIA observations (171 Å and 211 Å). To carry this out, we run 3D MHD simulation in spherical coordinates where we include the role of thermal conduction and radiative losses, both of which are important for determining the temperature distribution of the solar corona during a CME. Our model of

  19. Computational fluid dynamics of left ventricular ejection.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, J G; Wang, M; Pasipoularides, A

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation addresses the effects of simple geometric variations on intraventricular ejection dynamics, by methods from computational fluid dynamics. It is an early step in incorporating more and more relevant characteristics of the ejection process, such as a continuously changing irregular geometry, in numerical simulations. We consider the effects of varying chamber eccentricities and outflow valve orifice-to-inner surface area ratios on instantaneous ejection gradients along the axis of symmetry of the left ventricle. The equation of motion for the streamfunction was discretized and solved iteratively with specified boundary conditions on a boundary-fitted adaptive grid, using an alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) algorithm. The unsteady aspects of the ejection process were subsequently introduced into the numerical simulation. It was shown that for given chamber volume and outflow orifice area, higher chamber eccentricities require higher ejection pressure gradients for the same velocity and local acceleration values at the aortic anulus than more spherical shapes. This finding is referable to the rise in local acceleration effects across the outflow axis. This is to be contrasted with the case of outflow orifice stenosis, in which it was shown that it is the convective acceleration effects that are intensified strongly. PMID:1562106

  20. Polymer ejection from strong spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piili, J.; Linna, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    We examine the ejection of an initially strongly confined flexible polymer from a spherical capsid through a nanoscale pore. We use molecular dynamics for unprecedentedly high initial monomer densities. We show that the time for an individual monomer to eject grows exponentially with the number of ejected monomers. By measurements of the force at the pore we show this dependence to be a consequence of the excess free energy of the polymer due to confinement growing exponentially with the number of monomers initially inside the capsid. This growth relates closely to the divergence of mixing energy in the Flory-Huggins theory at large concentration. We show that the pressure inside the capsid driving the ejection dominates the process that is characterized by the ejection time growing linearly with the lengths of different polymers. Waiting time profiles would indicate that the superlinear dependence obtained for polymers amenable to computer simulations results from a finite-size effect due to the final retraction of polymers' tails from capsids.

  1. Bond of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) rods to concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Zahrani, M.M.; Nanni, A.; Al-Dulaijan, S.U.; Bakis, C.E.

    1996-11-01

    The bond behavior between FRP rods and concrete is one of the most important aspects to predicting the short- and long-term performance of FRP reinforced concrete structures including development and transfer length. In this research, the direct pull-out test was used to study the FRP/concrete bond behavior. This method allows measurement of the loaded- and free-end slip of the FRP rod and placement of a strain probe inside the rod to measure internal strain distribution in both axial and radial directions along the bonded length without affecting the FRP/concrete interface. Knowledge of strain distribution is necessary to study the load transfer mechanism between FRP rod and concrete. The scope of this paper include experimental results obtained with the direct pull-out test using 12.7 mm glass and carbon FRP rods with smooth and axisymmetrical deformed surfaces. The typical results are given as nominal bond and shear stress vs. free- and loaded-end slip. Experimental results obtained from strain probes used during pull-out tests are also presented as nominal bond and shear stress vs. strain. For smooth rods, friction is the main controlling factor. For deformed rods, bond tends to be controlled by strength and mechanical action of the axisymmetrical deformations rather than adhesion and friction. The strength of concrete appears to have no effect on the bond strength and failure mechanism of these particular machined FRP rods when concrete splitting is avoided.

  2. Comparing Single Versus Double Screw-Rod Anterior Instrumentation for Treating Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures with Incomplete Neurological Deficit: A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu; Wang, Juan; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Following a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TCBF), anterior screw-rods apply pressure upon the graft site. However, there is limited evidence comparing single screw-rod anterior instrumentation (SSRAI) to double screw-rod anterior instrumentation (DSRAI) for TCBFs. Our objective was to compare SSRAI versus DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 51 participants with T11-L2 TCBFs (AO classification: A3) were randomly assigned to receive SSRAI or DSRAI. Key preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative data were collected. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine the independent factors associated with inferior clinical outcomes, as well as the comparative efficacy of SSRAI and DSRAI. RESULTS There were no significant differences in the key demographic and clinical characteristics between the two groups (all p>0.05). Smoking status was significantly associated with inferior three-month and six-month Denis pain scores (Wald statistic=4.246, p=0.039). Both SSRAI and DSRAI were significantly effective in improving three-month and six-month postoperative degree of kyphosis, three-month and six-month postoperative ASIA impairment scale scores, three-month and six-month postoperative Denis pain score, and three-month and six-month postoperative Denis work score (all p<0.001). Although there were no significant differences between DSRAI and SSRAI with respect to all outcomes (all p>0.05), DSRAI displayed significantly longer operating times, as well as significantly larger operative blood losses (both p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS SSRAI may be preferable over DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit due to its lower operating time and amount of operative blood loss. PMID:27197020

  3. Comparing Single Versus Double Screw-Rod Anterior Instrumentation for Treating Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures with Incomplete Neurological Deficit: A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yu; Wang, Juan; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TCBF), anterior screw-rods apply pressure upon the graft site. However, there is limited evidence comparing single screw-rod anterior instrumentation (SSRAI) to double screw-rod anterior instrumentation (DSRAI) for TCBFs. Our objective was to compare SSRAI versus DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit. Material/Methods A total of 51 participants with T11-L2 TCBFs (AO classification: A3) were randomly assigned to receive SSRAI or DSRAI. Key preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative data were collected. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine the independent factors associated with inferior clinical outcomes, as well as the comparative efficacy of SSRAI and DSRAI. Results There were no significant differences in the key demographic and clinical characteristics between the two groups (all p>0.05). Smoking status was significantly associated with inferior three-month and six-month Denis pain scores (Wald statistic=4.246, p=0.039). Both SSRAI and DSRAI were significantly effective in improving three-month and six-month postoperative degree of kyphosis, three-month and six-month postoperative ASIA impairment scale scores, three-month and six-month postoperative Denis pain score, and three-month and six-month postoperative Denis work score (all p<0.001). Although there were no significant differences between DSRAI and SSRAI with respect to all outcomes (all p>0.05), DSRAI displayed significantly longer operating times, as well as significantly larger operative blood losses (both p<0.001). Conclusions SSRAI may be preferable over DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit due to its lower operating time and amount of operative blood loss. PMID:27197020

  4. Driving mechanisms for coronal mass ejections.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    Mass ejections are new bright features observed in white-light that give the appearance of outward moving material. An acknowledged key ingredient in both the ejection and its progenitor is the magnetic field, although the precise nature of its role, particularily in the driving mechanism, remains unclear. The author begins by reviewing analyses of coordinated data sets that establish the relative time sequence and spatial location of individually identified phenomena (such as the flare impulsive phase, eruptive prominence, CME trajectory, etc.) that better define potential drivers. Some of the models and numerical simulations that have been developed with the intent of determining the physical interactions in the driving mechanism and coronal mass ejection are then considered.

  5. Whipple's ejection model and the Geminid stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.; Poole, L. M. G.; Webster, A. R.

    2016-02-01

    Many attempts to model the Geminid meteor stream have been based on Whipple's model for the ejection of meteoroids from comets. Using the most accurate data available from the IAU photographic meteor data base and by considering the scatter of the secularly near-invariant quantities of the simulated ejected test particles predicted by applying Whipple's model to the asteroid Phaethon - the prime candidate for the progenitor of the Geminid stream - we show that the model predicts ejection speeds that are about a factor of at least 3 too low. We have considered the other candidate progenitors: the asteroids 2005 UD and 1999 YC, and find neither of these to be credible candidates although we find that 2005 is the likely parent of the day-time Sextantid stream.

  6. Coronal mass ejections and coronal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildner, E.; Bassi, J.; Bougeret, J. L.; Duncan, R. A.; Gary, D. E.; Gergely, T. E.; Harrison, R. A.; Howard, R. A.; Illing, R. M. E.; Jackson, B. V.

    1986-01-01

    Research on coronal mass ejections (CMF) took a variety of forms, both observational and theoretical. On the observational side there were: case studies of individual events, in which it was attempted to provide the most complete descriptions possible, using correlative observations in diverse wavelengths; statistical studies of the properties CMEs and their associated activity; observations which may tell us about the initiation of mass ejections; interplanetary observations of associated shocks and energetic particles even observations of CMEs traversing interplanetary space; and the beautiful synoptic charts which show to what degree mass ejections affect the background corona and how rapidly (if at all) the corona recovers its pre-disturbance form. These efforts are described in capsule form with an emphasis on presenting pictures, graphs, and tables so that the reader can form a personal appreciation of the work and its results.

  7. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  8. Falls and ejections from pickup trucks.

    PubMed

    Bucklew, P A; Osler, T M; Eidson, J J; Clevenger, F W; Olson, S E; Demarest, G B

    1992-04-01

    The medical records of 50 patients who sustained injuries during falls or ejections from pickup truck beds and were admitted to the University of New Mexico Level I Trauma Center between January 1985 and December 1989 were retrospectively examined. Falls and ejections commonly involve young adults, and usually occur in the summer months during the afternoon or evening. Twenty-three individuals were thrown from the pickup truck bed during a motor vehicle collision and 27 simply fell out, and this distinction was not related to age or ethanol use. Although those thrown from the pickup truck bed during a crash were less severely injured (average ISS 15.4) than those who simply fell from the bed (average ISS 17.4), this difference was not statistically significant. Mortality was equal in these two groups, with three deaths occurring in each group. Overall, injuries incurred during falls and ejections were more serious than those incurred in MVCs (average ISS 16.5 vs. 14.5, p = 0.06). The head was the most frequently injured body region following falls or ejections (68%), followed by the extremities (46%), the face (28%), the thorax (22%), and the abdomen (10%). Every death in this series was attributed to a head injury. The overall mortality for the series was 12%. Sixteen additional fatalities from falls and ejections during the study period were discovered in a review of the records of the State Medical Examiner. The average age of this cohort was 24 years. Fifteen of these deaths were the result of falls rather than ejections (94%), and 13 were attributed to head injuries (81%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1569621

  9. A transcriptome resource for pharaoh cuttlefish (Sepia pharaonis) after ink ejection by brief pressing.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Zhong, Huan; Xiao, Jun; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Ziming; Zeng, Ling; Chen, Daohai; Sun, Yulin; Zhao, Juan; Wang, Fenghua

    2016-08-01

    Ink ejection is one of the most important defense mechanisms against external stimuli for pharaoh cuttlefish (Sepia pharaonis). The molecular changes during this process remain unknown. To understand the transcriptome changes after ink ejection by brief pressing, two cDNA libraries of pharaoh cuttlefish, from the inkjet group and control group were sequenced using Illumina HiSeq™ 2000. A total of 9,255,502,440nt bases were obtained and by de novo assembly, 73,298 unigenes were generated, which first provided numerous expressed sequence tags from pharaoh cuttlefish. By comparing the expression levels between the two groups, we identified 7064 up-regulated and 2024 down-regulated genes after ink ejection. These differentially-expressed genes included genes related to immunity, cancer, and blood coagulation, which indicated the various effects after ink ejection by brief pressing. These results provide new valuable resources for functional genomic and genetic studies on pharaoh cuttlefish. PMID:27270126

  10. Halo Coronal Mass Ejections and Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2009-01-01

    In this letter, I show that the discrepancies in the geoeffectiveness of halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) reported in the literature arise due to the varied definitions of halo CMEs used by different authors. In particular, I show that the low geoeffectiveness rate is a direct consequence of including partial halo CMEs. The geoeffectiveness of partial halo CMEs is lower because they are of low speed and likely to make a glancing impact on Earth. Key words: Coronal mass ejections, geomagnetic storms, geoeffectiveness, halo CMEs.

  11. System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module

    DOEpatents

    Matchett, R.L.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Bacvinsicas, W.S.; Roof, D.R.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1988-07-28

    A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system. 7 figs.

  12. System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module

    DOEpatents

    Matchett, Richard L.; Roof, David R.; Kikta, Thomas J.; Wilczynski, Rosemarie; Nilsen, Roy J.; Bacvinskas, William S.; Fodor, George

    1990-01-01

    A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system.

  13. 26. A typical outer rod room, or rack room, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. A typical outer rod room, or rack room, showing the racks for the nine horizontal control rods (HCRs) that would be inserted or withdrawn from the pile to control the rate of reaction. In this case, it is the 105-F Reactor in February 1945. The view is looking away from the pile, which is out of the picture on the left. Several of the cooling water hose reels for the rods can be seen at the end of the racks near the wall. D-8323 - B Reactor, Richland, Benton County, WA

  14. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N.

    1983-11-01

    Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

  15. Investigating the optical XNOR gate using plasmonic nano-rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Majid; Kaboli, Milad

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a coherent perfect absorption (CPA)-type XNOR gate based on plasmonic nano particle is proposed. It consists of two plasmonic nano rod arrays on top of two parallel arms with quartz substrate. The operation principle is based on the absorbable formation of a conductive path in the dielectric layer of a plasmonic nano-particles waveguide. Since the CPA efficiency depends strongly on the number of plasmonic nano-rod and the nano rod location, an efficient binary optimization method based the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is used to design an optimized array of the plasmonic nano-rod in order to achieve the maximum absorption coefficient in the 'off' state and the minimum absorption coefficient in the 'on' state. In Binary PSO (BPSO), a group of birds consists a matrix with binary entries, control the presence ('1‧) or the absence ('0‧) of nano rod in the array.

  16. Methodology of the Westinghouse dynamic rod worth measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.A.; Chapman, D.M.; Easter, M.E.; Hill, D.J.; Hoerner, J.A. ); Kurtz, P.N. )

    1992-01-01

    During zero-power physics testing, plant operations personnel use one of various techniques to measure the reactivity worth of the control rods to confirm shutdown margin. A simple and fast procedure for measuring rod worths called dynamic rod worth measurement (DRWM) has been developed at Westinghouse. This procedure was tested at the recent startups of Point Beach Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 cycle 20 and Unit 2 cycle 18. The results of these tests show that DRWM measures rod worths with accuracy comparable to that of both boron dilution and rod bank exchange measurements. The DRWM procedure is a fast process of measuring the reactivity worth of individual banks by inserting and withdrawing the bank continuously at the maximum stepping speed without changing the boron concentration and recording the signals of the ex-core detectors.

  17. Piston and connecting rod assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor); Chatten, John K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A piston and connecting rod assembly includes a piston crown, a piston skirt, a connecting rod, and a bearing insert. The piston skirt is a component separate from the piston crown and is connected to the piston crown to provide a piston body. The bearing insert is a component separate from the piston crown and the piston skirt and is fixedly disposed within the piston body. A bearing surface of a connecting rod contacts the bearing insert to thereby movably associate the connecting rod and the piston body.

  18. Relaxation of rod misalignment technical specification requirements: An increased operational flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    John, G.; Leipner-Gomes, C.I.; Johansen, B.J.

    1995-12-31

    The pressurized water reactor technical specification (T/S) limiting condition for operation (LCO) for rod misalignment and rod position indication (RPI) typically requires all rod cluster control assemblies to be positioned with {+-}12 steps of the group demand position. The LCO is approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for use by all Westinghouse plants, and the core design incorporates a peaking factor uncertainty to accommodate potential rod misalignments within this approved LCO. Also, the LCO requires all RPI channels and the demand position indicator system to be operable and capable of determining the control rod position within {+-}12 steps.

  19. Forces during Bacteriophage DNA Packaging and Ejection

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Prashant K.; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Grayson, Paul D.; Squires, Todd M.; Kondev, Jané; Phillips, Rob

    2005-01-01

    The conjunction of insights from structural biology, solution biochemistry, genetics, and single-molecule biophysics has provided a renewed impetus for the construction of quantitative models of biological processes. One area that has been a beneficiary of these experimental techniques is the study of viruses. In this article we describe how the insights obtained from such experiments can be utilized to construct physical models of processes in the viral life cycle. We focus on dsDNA bacteriophages and show that the bending elasticity of DNA and its electrostatics in solution can be combined to determine the forces experienced during packaging and ejection of the viral genome. Furthermore, we quantitatively analyze the effect of fluid viscosity and capsid expansion on the forces experienced during packaging. Finally, we present a model for DNA ejection from bacteriophages based on the hypothesis that the energy stored in the tightly packed genome within the capsid leads to its forceful ejection. The predictions of our model can be tested through experiments in vitro where DNA ejection is inhibited by the application of external osmotic pressure. PMID:15556983

  20. The DNA ejection process in bacteriophage lambda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Paul

    Bacteriophages have long served as model systems through which the nature of life may be explored. From a physical or mechanical point of view, phages are excellent examples of natural nanotechnology: they are nanometer-scale systems which depend critically on forces, pressures, velocities, and other fundamentally physical quantities for their biological functions. The study of the physical properties of phages has therefore provided an arena for application of physics to biology. In particular, recent studies of the motor responsible for packaging a phage gnome into a capsid showed a buildup of pressure within the capsid of tens of atmospheres. This thesis reports a combined theoretical and experimental study on various aspects of the genome ejection process, so that a comparison may be drawn with the packaging experiments. In particular, we examine various theoretical models of the forces within a phage capsid, deriving formulas both for the force driving genome ejection and for the velocity at which the genome is translocated into a host cell. We describe an experiment in which the force was measured as a function of the amount of genome within the phage capsid, and another where the genome ejection velocity was measured for single phages under the microscope. We make direct quantitative comparisons between the theory and experiments, stringently testing the extent to which we are able to model the genome ejection process.

  1. Do centrioles generate a polar ejection force?

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    A microtubule-dependent polar ejection force that pushes chromosomes away from spindle poles during prometaphase is observed in animal cells but not in the cells of higher plants. Elongating microtubules and kinesin-like motor molecules have been proposed as possible causes, but neither accounts for all the data. In the hypothesis proposed here a polar ejection force is generated by centrioles, which are found in animals but not in higher plants. Centrioles consist of nine microtubule triplets arranged like the blades of a tiny turbine. Instead of viewing centrioles through the spectacles of molecular reductionism and neo-Darwinism, this hypothesis assumes that they are holistically designed to be turbines. Orthogonally oriented centriolar turbines could generate oscillations in spindle microtubules that resemble the motion produced by a laboratory vortexer. The result would be a microtubule-mediated ejection force tending to move chromosomes away from the spindle axis and the poles. A rise in intracellular calcium at the onset of anaphase could regulate the polar ejection force by shutting down the centriolar turbines, but defective regulation could result in an excessive force that contributes to the chromosomal instability characteristic of most cancer cells. PMID:15889341

  2. How much dust does Enceladus eject?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, Sascha; Southworth, Benjamin; Schmidt, Juergen; Srama, Ralf; Postberg, Frank

    2016-04-01

    There is an ongoing argument how much dust per second the ice volcanoes on Saturn's ice moon eject. By adjusting their plume model to the dust flux measured by the Cassini dust detector during the close Enceladus flyby in 2005, Schmidt et al. (2008) obtained a total dust production rate in the plumes of about

  3. How much dust does Enceladus eject?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Postberg, Frank; Schmidt, Juergen

    2016-07-01

    There is an ongoing argument how much dust per second the ice volcanoes on Saturn's ice moon eject. By adjusting their plume model to the dust flux measured by the Cassini dust detector during the close Enceladus flyby in 2005, Schmidt et al. (2008) obtained a total dust production rate in the plumes of about

  4. A new apex-ejecting perfused rat heart preparation: relation between coronary flow and loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Wikman-Coffelt, J; Coffelt, R J; Rapcsak, M; Sievers, R; Rouleau, J L; Parmley, W W

    1983-12-01

    The isolated perfused rat heart is an important experimental preparation for both mechanical and biochemical studies. In order to define better the relationship between coronary flow and loading conditions, a new preparation was developed in which the left ventricle ejected through the apex, while the aortic perfusion pressure could be separately controlled at a higher level than the apex afterload. Results were compared with a standard aortic perfused and ejecting preparation. All analyses were made at low calcium concentration (1.6 mmol X litre-1) for reducing cardiac performance. Coronary flow was related to perfusion pressure in the aortic ejecting preparation when the aortic afterload chamber was between 6.0 and 9.3 kPa (45 and 70 mmHg). Coronary autoregulation was demonstrable in the apex ejecting preparation irrespective of the height of the apex afterload chamber and the aortic ejecting preparation when the aortic chamber was between 11.0 and 16.0 kPa (83 and 120 mmHg). Following the addition of 10(-6) mol X litre-1 adenosine, there was significant coronary vasodilatation, and flow became pressure dependent in all cases. In the apex-ejecting preparation, with a high aortic pressure, coronary flow remained at relatively fixed level, and increases in oxygen demand were met by increasing oxygen extraction. Thus, in this preparation oxygen extraction was directly related to workload. With abrupt increases in afterload, going from 6.0 to 9.3 kPa (45 to 70 mmHg) to a higher level, there was evidence of transient hypoxia with the aortic ejecting but not the apex ejecting preparation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6661747

  5. Review of major injuries and fatalities in USAF ejections, 1981-1995.

    PubMed

    Collins, R; McCarthy, G W; Kaleps, I; Knox, F S

    1997-01-01

    Our laboratories are examining injuries and deaths resulting from mechanical forces applied to aircrew members in the course of Department of Defense aviation operations. In this paper we report only on bodily injuries sustained during ejection from US Air force, aircraft for the fiscal years 1981-1996, that is, major injuries and fatalities resulting directly from seat acceleration forces, from aerodynamic forces applied to crew members during escape through the effects of windblast and parachute opening shock; from direct contact: and from parachute landing injuries. Such injuries occur typically to the head, neck, cervical spine, thorax, thoracolumbar spine, ribs, pelvis, and the upper and lower extremities. Injuries are usually caused by anomalies in the ejection sequence or by delaying ejection until too close to the ground. Conversely, a planned ejection in a modern ejection seat in controlled, low speed flight imposes forces well below injury thresholds. In the USAF, 10-50 aircrew eject yearly, with a decline since 1991. We conclude that the risk of fatality is 0-11% and of major injury is 2-25%. Both are remarkably low and decreasing in the later years of this study period. The absolute number of head, neck, and spine injuries is 0-10 yearly and similarly decreasing. The results of this study are intended to provide a basis for estimating potential savings in deaths, injuries, and costs expected from the development of improved protective measures. PMID:9731384

  6. Rod Climbing of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Wang, Xiaorong

    We wish to report an unexpected effect observed for particle suspensions sucked to pass through a vertical pipe. Above a critical concentration, the suspension on the outside of the pipe may climb along the outside wall of the pipe and then display a surprising rod-climbing effect. Our study shows that the phenomenon is influenced mainly by the suspension composition, the pipe dimension and the suction speed. The effects of the pipe materials of different kinds are negligible. Increasing the suction force and the concentration increases the climbing height. Increasing the pipe diameter and wall thickness reduces the climbing effect. This behavior may be relevant to that the suspensions of the type described are all displaying markedly shear-thickening.

  7. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1957-08-20

    An electromagnetic device for moving an object in a linear path by increments is described. The device is specifically adapted for moving a neutron absorbing control rod into and out of the core of a reactor and consists essentially of an extension member made of magnetic material connected to one end of the control rod and mechanically flexible to grip the walls of a sleeve member when flexed, a magnetic sleeve member coaxial with and slidable between limit stops along the flexible extension, electromagnetic coils substantially centrally located with respect to the flexible extension to flex the extension member into gripping engagement with the sleeve member when ener gized, moving electromagnets at each end of the sleeve to attract the sleeve when energized, and a second gripping electromagnet positioned along the flexible extension at a distance from the previously mentioned electromagnets for gripping the extension member when energized. In use, the second gripping electromagnet is deenergized, the first gripping electromagnet is energized to fix the extension member in the sleeve, and one of the moving electromagnets is energized to attract the sleeve member toward it, thereby moving the control rod.

  8. Regenerative hyperpolarization in rods.

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, F S

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical properties of the rods in Necturus maculosus were studied at the cell body and the outer segments in dark and light under current and voltage clamp with a pair of intracellular electrodes separated by about 1 mum. 2. The membrane resistance in the dark was voltage- and time-dependent both for the cell body and the outer segment. Slight depolarizations in the cell body reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 10 M omega with a time constant of about 1 sec. Polarization in either direction, at the outer segment, when greater than about 20 mV, reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 30 M omega. The dark potential in the cell body was typically -30 to -35 m V; at the outer segment it was typically only -10 to -15 mV. 3. The light-elicited voltage response in both the cell body and the outer segment was largest with the membrane near the dark potential level. In both regions, the response was reduced when the membrane was polarized in either direction. 4. Under voltage-clamp conditions, a reversal potential for the light response near + 10 mV was measured at the outer segment. At the cell body no reversal potential for the light response was measured; there the clamping current required during the light response was almost of the same magnitude at all potential levels. 5. When the membrane at the cell body was hyperpolarized in the dark under voltage clamp, a transient outward current, typically about one-half the magnitude of the initial inward clamping current was required to maintain the membrane at the clamped potential level. This outward current transient was associated with a decrease in membrane resistance with similar time course. The transient outward current reversed and became inward when the membrane was clamped to potentials more negative than -80 mV. Thus, the transient outward current appears to involve a transient activation initiated by hyperpolarization. I is regenerative in that it is initiated by hyperpolarization and tends to

  9. Light vehicle occupant ejections--a comprehensive investigation.

    PubMed

    Malliaris, A C; DeBlois, J H; Digges, K H

    1996-01-01

    Occupant ejections, about 1.5% of all crash-involved occupant events, are relatively infrequent but very harmful events in highway crashes of light vehicles, including cars, pickup trucks, vans, and multipurpose vehicles (utility vehicles, jeeps, etc.). The disparity between frequency of harm to ejectees and ejection frequency is at least one order of magnitude. Partial ejections, although less frequent, have an incidence that is comparable to that of complete ejections, except for restrained occupants, where complete ejections are very infrequent. Notwithstanding the high effectiveness of safety belts in preventing ejections, and the multifold growth of safety belt use in the last 10 years, there is no detectable reduction in the ejection rate in the same period. Ejections per se and not other pre-ejection occupant impacts are responsible for the bulk of the harm to ejectees. Furthermore, ejected occupants sustain harm much larger than that which would have occurred, had these occupants not been ejected. "Closed glazing" is the leading ejection path. "Doors" and "windshield" are distant seconds. All glazing except the windshield fail overwhelmingly by disintegration. Latch failure is the primary mode of failure in opening doors. Hinges and other modes of failure are relatively minor concerns. The sources of data in this investigation are: the National Accident Sampling System for the years 1988 to 1991, and the Fatal Accident Reporting System for 1982 to 1992. PMID:8924175

  10. Status of rod consolidation, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    It is estimated that the spent fuel storage pools at some domestic light-water reactors will run out of space before 2003, the year that the US Department of Energy currently predicts it will have a repository available. Of the methods being studied to alleviate the problem, rod consolidation is one of the leading candidates for achieving more efficient use of existing space in spent fuel storage pools. Rod consolidation involves mechanically removing all the fuel rods from the fuel assembly hardware (i.e., the structural components) and placing the fuel rods in a close-packed array in a canister without space grids. A typical goal of rod consolidation systems is to insert the fuel rods from two fuel assemblies into a canister that has the same exterior dimensions as one standard fuel assembly (i.e., to achieve a consolidation or compaction ratio of 2:1) and to compact the nonfuel-bearing structural components from those two fuel assemblies by a factor of 10 to 20. This report provides an overview of the current status of rod consolidation in the United States and a small amount of information on related activities in other countries. 85 refs., 36 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Real barchan dune collisions and ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Barchyn, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    From high-resolution satellite imagery of barchan sand dunes, we provide geomorphological evidence of collisions that result in the ejection of a barchan from the wake of another barchan dune. Previous interpretations suggest this outcome is evidence of soliton or solitary wave behaviour; however, the physical mechanisms for mass exchange are not fully understood, resulting in debate. Our evidence and interpretation indicates that mass is transferred to the upwind barchan by shadowing a portion of downwind barchan's stoss slope. Turbulent, unsaturated airflow erodes the surface between the dunes, creating a smaller dune that ejects from the wake region. Previous observations lacked the spatial resolution required to document this process; therefore, our observations clarify the collision dynamics of barchans. A broader implication of our observations is the role of collisions in maintaining an “equilibrium” size distribution in barchan swarms.

  12. MHD shocks in coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is the study of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced as a result of the interaction of ejected lower coronal plasma with the ambient corona. The types of shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced for representative coronal conditions and disturbance velocities were determined. The wave system and the interactions between the ejecta and ambient corona were studied using both analytic theory and numerical solutions of the time-dependent, nonlinear MHD equations. Observations from the SMM coronagraph/polarimeter provided both guidance and motivation and are used extensively in evaluating the results. As a natural consequence of the comparisons with the data, the simulations assisted in better understanding the physical interactions in coronal mass ejections (CME's).

  13. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections detected by HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Alejandro

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is being constructed at the volcano Sierra Negra (4100 m a.s.l.) in Mexico. HAWC’s primary purpose is the study of both: galactic and extra-galactic sources of high energy gamma rays. HAWC will consist of 300 large water Cherenkov detectors (WCD), instrumented with 1200 photo-multipliers. The Data taking has already started while construction continues, with the completion projected for late 2014. The HAWC counting rate will be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above the geomagnetic cutoff of the site (˜ 8 GV). In particular, HAWC will detect solar energetic particles known as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs), and the effects of Coronal Mass Ejections on the galactic cosmic ray flux, known as Forbush Decreases. In this paper, we present a description of the instrument and its response to interplanetary coronal mass ejections, and other solar wind large scale structures, observed during the August-December 2013 period.

  14. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections During 1996 - 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2007-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections, the interplanetary counterparts of coronal mass ejections at the Sun, are the major drivers of interplanetary shocks in the heliosphere, and are associated with modulations of the galactic cosmic ray intensity, both short term (Forbush decreases caused by the passage of the shock, post-shock sheath, and ICME), and possibly with longer term modulation. Using several in-situ signatures of ICMEs, including plasma temperature, and composition, magnetic fields, and cosmic ray modulations, made by near-Earth spacecraft, we have compiled a "comprehensive" list of ICMEs passing the Earth since 1996, encompassing solar cycle 23. We summarize the properties of these ICMEs, such as their occurrence rate, speeds and other parameters, the fraction of ICMEs that are classic magnetic clouds, and their association with solar energetic particle events, halo CMEs, interplanetary shocks, geomagnetic storms, shocks and cosmic ray decreases.

  15. Pilot ejection, parachute, and helicopter crash injuries.

    PubMed

    McBratney, Colleen M; Rush, Stephen; Kharod, Chetan U

    2014-01-01

    USAF Pararescuemen (PJs) respond to downed aircrew as a fundamental mission for personnel recovery (PR), one of the Air Force's core functions. In addition to responding to these in Military settings, the PJs from the 212 Rescue Squadron routinely respond to small plane crashes in remote regions of Alaska. While there is a paucity of information on the latter, there have been articles detailing injuries sustained from helicopter crashes and while ejecting or parachuting from fixed wing aircraft. The following represents a new chapter added to the Pararescue Medical Operations Handbook, Sixth Edition (2014, editors Matt Wolf, MD, and Stephen Rush, MD, in press). It was designed to be a quick reference for PJs and their Special Operations flight surgeons to help with understanding of mechanism of injury with regard to pilot ejection, parachute, and helicopter accident injuries. It outlines the nature of the injuries sustained in such mishaps and provides an epidemiologic framework from which to approach the problem. PMID:25399374

  16. Ejectable underwater sound source recovery assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irick, S. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An underwater sound source is described that may be ejectably mounted on any mobile device that travels over water, to facilitate in the location and recovery of the device when submerged. A length of flexible line maintains a connection between the mobile device and the sound source. During recovery, the sound source is located be particularly useful in the recovery of spent rocket motors that bury in the ocean floor upon impact.

  17. Sputter ejection of matter from Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haff, P. K.; Watson, C. C.; Yung, Y. L.

    1981-01-01

    Direct collisional interaction of magnetospheric particles, particularly 520-eV S ions, with Io, cause sputter removal of matter. It is estimated that direct sputtering of a full-disk S-containing atmosphere with an exobase at a few hundred km, can provide up to 5 x 10 to the tenth S atoms per sq cm-s. Supplies of S and O required to stabilize the torus are estimated to be from 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 12th per sq cm-s. Sputtering rates are calculated for an atmosphere containing a one percent concentration of Na and K, and are found to be large enough to supply the fluxes required to maintain the Na and K clouds. Sputtering is found to remove heavy molecules from the atmosphere, and the rate of direct sputtering of unprotected surfaces is calculated for ejections of S and Na. Atomic species on the surface are ejected at a rate proportional to the surface abundance; and plume sputtering, avalanche cascading, and ionic saltation which lead to spatial and temporal variations in the number of ejected particles are observed.

  18. Potential Method of Predicting Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imholt, Timothy

    2001-10-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) may be described as a blast of gas and highly charged solar mass fragments ejected into space. These ejections, when directed toward Earth, have many different effects on terrestrial systems ranging from the Aurora Borealis to changes in wireless communication. The early prediction of these solar events cannot be overlooked. There are several models currently accepted and utilized to predict these events, however, with earlier prediction of both the event and the location on the sun where the event occurs allows us to have earlier warnings as to when they will affect man-made systems. A better prediction could perhaps be achieved by utilizing low angular resolution radio telescope arrays to catalog data from the sun at different radio frequencies on a regular basis. Once this data is cataloged a better predictor for these CME’s could be found. We propose a model that allows a prediction to be made that appears to be longer than 24 hours.

  19. Potential Method of Predicting Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imholt, Timothy; Roberts, J. A.; Scott, J. B.; University Of North Texas Team

    2000-10-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) may be described as a blast of gas and highly charged solar mass fragments ejected into space. These ejections, when directed toward Earth, have many different effects on terrestrial systems ranging from the Aurora Borealis to changes in wireless communications. The importance of an early prediction of these solar events cannot be overlooked. There are several models currently accepted and utilized to predict these events, however, with earlier prediction of both the event and the location on the sun where the event occur allows us to have earlier warnings as to when they will effect man-made systems. A better prediction could perhaps be achieved by utilizing low angular resolution radio telescope arrays to catalog data from the sun at different radio frequencies on a regular basis. Once this data is cataloged a better predictor for these CME's could be found. We propose a model that allows a prediction to be made that appears to be longer than 24 hours.

  20. Transient ion ejection during nanocomposite thermite reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lei; Piekiel, Nicholas; Chowdhury, Snehaunshu; Lee, Donggeun; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2009-10-01

    We observe an intense ion pulse from nanocomposite thermite reactions, which we temporally probe using a recently developed temperature jump/time of flight mass spectrometer. These ion pulses are observed to be much shorter in duration than the overall thermite reaction time. Ion ejection appears in stages as positive ions are ejected prior to nanocomposite thermite ignition, and ignition of the thermite mixtures leads to a second ionization step which is primarily dominated by negative species. The positive species are identified from mass spectrometric measurements and the results show that the positive ion species are comprised of Na ions with minor species of Al and K ions. This observation can be explained by a diffusion based ion-current mechanism, in which strong Al ion diffusion flux formed through the oxide shell, and the surface Na and K ions from salt contaminations are ejected by the strong electrostatic repulsion. The fact that the negative ionization step occurs during the ignition event suggests a strong relation between the nanocomposite thermite reaction and the negative ionization process.

  1. Computer simulation of the gap-tripole ion trap with linear injection, 3D ion accumulation, and versatile packet ejection.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Gary A; Masujima, Tsutomu

    2008-09-01

    The behavior of a completely new ion trap is shown with SIMION 7.0 simulations. The simulated trap, which was a mix of a linear and a 3D trap, was made by axially setting two ion guides with a gap between them. Each guide consisted of three rods with three symmetrically delayed radio frequency (rf) voltages (tripole). The "injected" ions were linearly contained by pulsed potentials on the entrance and exit plates. Then the three-dimensional (3D) rf field in the gap, which was created by the tripole special rod arrangement, could trap the ions when the translational energy was dampened by collisions with low-pressure nitrogen. Because the injected ions were trapped in the small gap, the trapping cycle could be repeated many times before ion ejection, so a high concentrated ion cloud could be obtained. This trapping and accumulation methodology is not possible in most conventional multipole linear traps with even number of poles. Compared with quadrupole linear trap at the same rf amplitude, tripole lost more ions due to strong charge repulsion in the ion cloud. However, tripole could catch up the ions at higher voltage. Radial and axial mass-independent ejection of the ions localized in the tripole gap was very simple, compared with conventional linear ion traps that need extra and complicated electrodes for effective axial ejection. PMID:18635376

  2. The interval ejection fraction: a cineangiographic and radionuclide study

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, A.J.; Bianco, J.A.; Shulman, R.M.; Folland, E.D.; Parisi, A.F.; Tow, D.E.

    1982-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of the first-third ejection fraction (1/3 EF) for detecting patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), resting contrast ventriculography and first-pass radionuclide angiography with a high-count-rate, multicrystal camera system were performed in 47 subjects: 22 normal controls and 25 patients with clinically stable angina pectoris and severe CAD without and with resting wall motion abnormalities. By contrast angiography, only group 3 had depressed global EF or 1/3 EF compared with control. Whereas 11 of 25 CAD patients had global EF outside the normal range, only two of 25 had depressed 1/3 EF. Both had left ventricular asynergy and a depressed global EF. Studies performed using first-pass radionuclide angiography revealed similar results. A wide range of 1/3 EF values was found in normal subjects by both techniques. Thus, the ejection fraction during the first third of systole at rest is of limited value for detecting patients with CAD.

  3. Statistical properties of a folded elastic rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Deboeuf, Stéphanie; Boué, Laurent; Corson, Francis; Boudaoud, Arezki; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    2010-03-01

    A large variety of elastic structures naturally seem to be confined into environments too small to accommodate them; the geometry of folded structures span a wide range of length-scales. The elastic properties of these confined systems are further constrained by self-avoidance as well as by the dimensionality of both structures and container. To mimic crumpled paper, we devised an experimental setup to study the packing of a dimensional elastic object in 2D geometries: an elastic rod is folded at the center of a circular Hele-Shaw cell by a centripetal force. The initial configuration of the rod and the acceleration of the rotating disk allow to span different final folded configurations while the final rotation speed controls the packing intensity. Using image analysis we measure geometrical and mechanical properties of the folded configurations, focusing on length, curvature and energy distributions.

  4. Dynamic and static light scattering analysis of DNA ejection from the phage λ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löf, David; Schillén, Karin; Jönsson, Bengt; Evilevitch, Alex

    2007-07-01

    With the aid of time-resolved dynamic light scattering (DLS) and static light scattering (SLS), we have analyzed the ejection kinetics from the bacterial virus bacteriophage (or phage) λ , triggered in vitro by its receptor. We have used DLS to investigate the kinetics in such a system. Furthermore, we have shown that both SLS and DLS can be interchangeably used to study the process of phage DNA release. DLS is superior to SLS in that it also allows the change in the light scattering arising from each of the components in the system to be monitored under conditions such that the relaxation times are separable. With help of these two methods we present a model explaining the reason for the observed decrease in the scattering intensity accompanying DNA ejection from phage. We emphasize that ejection from phage capsid occurs through a very long tail (which is nearly three times longer than the capsid diameter), which significantly separates ejected DNA from the scattering volume of the capsid. The scattering intensity recorded during the DNA ejection process is the result of a change in the form factor of the phage particle, i.e., the change in the interference effects between the phage capsid and the DNA confined in the phage particle. When the DNA molecule is completely ejected it remains in the proximity of the phage for some time, thus contributing to the scattering signal as it diffuses away from the phage capsid, into the scattering volume and returns to its unperturbed chain conformation in bulk solution. The free DNA chain does not contribute to the scattered intensity, when measured at a large angle, due to the DNA form factor and the low concentration. Although the final diffusion-controlled step can lead to overestimation of the real ejection time, we can still use both scattering methods to estimate the initial DNA ejection rates, which are mainly dependent on the pressure-driven DNA ejection from the phage, allowing studies of the effects of various

  5. Hopf solitons and elastic rods

    SciTech Connect

    Harland, Derek; Sutcliffe, Paul; Speight, Martin

    2011-03-15

    Hopf solitons in the Skyrme-Faddeev model are stringlike topological solitons classified by the integer-valued Hopf charge. In this paper we introduce an approximate description of Hopf solitons in terms of elastic rods. The general form of the elastic rod energy is derived from the field theory energy and is found to be an extension of the classical Kirchhoff rod energy. Using a minimal extension of the Kirchhoff energy, it is shown that a simple elastic rod model can reproduce many of the qualitative features of Hopf solitons in the Skyrme-Faddeev model. Features that are captured by the model include the buckling of the charge three solution, the formation of links at charges five and six, and the minimal energy trefoil knot at charge seven.

  6. A statistical approach to close packing of elastic rods and to DNA packaging in viral capsids

    PubMed Central

    Katzav, E.; Adda-Bedia, M.; Boudaoud, A.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a statistical approach for studying the close packing of elastic rods. This phenomenon belongs to the class of problems of confinement of low dimensional objects, such as DNA packaging in viral capsids. The method developed is based on Edwards' approach, which was successfully applied to polymer physics and to granular matter. We show that the confinement induces a configurational phase transition from a disordered (isotropic) phase to an ordered (nematic) phase. In each phase, we derive the pressure exerted by the rod (DNA) on the container (capsid) and the force necessary to inject (eject) the rod into (out of) the container. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the present results with respect to physical and biological problems. Regarding DNA packaging in viral capsids, these results establish the existence of ordered configurations, a hypothesis upon which previous calculations were built. They also show that such ordering can result from simple mechanical constraints. PMID:17146049

  7. The distribution of ejected brown dwarfs in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, S. P.; Hubber, D. A.; Moraux, E.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2005-12-01

    We examine the spatial distribution of brown dwarfs produced by the decay of small-N stellar systems as expected from the embryo ejection scenario. We model a cluster of several hundred stars grouped into 'cores' of a few stars/brown dwarfs. These cores decay, preferentially ejecting their lowest-mass members. Brown dwarfs are found to have a wider spatial distribution than stars, however once the effects of limited survey areas and unresolved binaries are taken into account it can be difficult to distinguish between clusters with many or no ejections. A large difference between the distributions probably indicates that ejections have occurred, however similar distributions sometimes arise even with ejections. Thus the spatial distribution of brown dwarfs is not necessarily a good discriminator between ejection and non-ejection scenarios.

  8. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemay, Serge G.; Panja, Debabrata; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-02-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly in vitro, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been interpreted in terms of the decrease in free energy of the densely packed DNA associated with genome ejection. Here we detail a simple model of genome ejection in terms of the hydrostatic and osmotic pressures inside the phage, a bacterium, and a buffer solution or culture medium. We argue that the hydrodynamic flow associated with the water movement from the buffer solution into the phage capsid and further drainage into the bacterial cytoplasm, driven by the osmotic gradient between the bacterial cytoplasm and culture medium, provides an alternative mechanism for phage genome ejection in vivo; the mechanism is perfectly consistent with phage genome ejection in vitro.

  9. Nuclear design of Helical Cruciform Fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to increase the power density of current and new light water reactor designs, the Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods are proposed. The HCF rods are equivalent to a cylindrical rod, with the fuel in a cruciform shaped, twisted axially. The HCF rods increase the surface area to volume ratio and inter-subchannel mixing behavior due to their cruciform and helical shapes, respectively. In a previous study, the HCF rods have shown the potential to up-rate existing PWRs by 50% and BWRs by 25%. However, HCF rods do display different neutronics modeling and performance. The cruciform cross section of HCF rods creates radially asymmetric heat generation and temperature distribution. The nominal HCF rod's beginning of life reactivity is reduced, compared to a cylindrical rod with the same fuel volume, by 500 pcm, due to increase in absorption in cladding. The rotation of these rods accounts for reactivity changes, which depends on the H/HM ratio of the pin cell. The HCF geometry shows large sensitivities to U{sup 235} or gadolinium enrichments compared to a cylindrical geometry. In addition, the gadolinium-containing HCF rods show a stronger effect on neighboring HCF rods than in case of cylindrical rods, depending on the orientation of the HCF rods. The helical geometry of the rods introduces axial shadowing of about 600 pcm, not seen in typical cylindrical rods. (authors)

  10. Process-based tolerance assessment of connecting rod machining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G. V. S. S.; Rao, P. Srinivasa; Surendra Babu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Process tolerancing based on the process capability studies is the optimistic and pragmatic approach of determining the manufacturing process tolerances. On adopting the define-measure-analyze-improve-control approach, the process potential capability index ( C p) and the process performance capability index ( C pk) values of identified process characteristics of connecting rod machining process are achieved to be greater than the industry benchmark of 1.33, i.e., four sigma level. The tolerance chain diagram methodology is applied to the connecting rod in order to verify the manufacturing process tolerances at various operations of the connecting rod manufacturing process. This paper bridges the gap between the existing dimensional tolerances obtained via tolerance charting and process capability studies of the connecting rod component. Finally, the process tolerancing comparison has been done by adopting a tolerance capability expert software.

  11. Chembio extraction on a chip by nanoliter droplet ejection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongyu; Kwon, Jae Wan; Kim, Eun Sok

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes a novel liquid separation technique for chembio extraction by an ultrasonic nanoliter-liquid-droplet ejector built on a PZT sheet. This technique extracts material from an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) in a precise amount through digital control of the number of nanoliter droplets, without any mixing between the two liquids in the ATPS. The ultrasonic droplet ejector uses an acoustic streaming effect produced by an acoustic beam focused on the liquid surface, and ejects liquid droplets only from the liquid surface without disturbing most of the liquid below the surface. This unique characteristic of the focused acoustic beam is perfect (1) for separating a top-layer liquid (from the bulk of liquid) that contains particles of interest or (2) for recovering a top-layer liquid that has different phase from a bottom-layer liquid. Three kinds of liquid extraction are demonstrated with the ultrasonic droplet ejector: (1) 16 microl of top layer in Dextran-polyethylene glycol-water ATPS (aqueous two-phase system) is recovered within 20 s; (2) micron sized particles that float on water surface are ejected out with water droplets; and (3) oil layer on top of water is separated out. PMID:15726211

  12. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Narrow Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycka, D.; Raymond, J. C.; Biesecker, D. A.; Li, J.; Ciaravella, A.

    2003-05-01

    We present Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) observations of five narrow coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that were among 15 narrow CMEs originally selected by Gilbert and coworkers. Two events (1999 March 27, April 15) were ``structured,'' i.e., in white-light data they exhibited well-defined interior features, and three (1999 May 9, May 21, June 3) were ``unstructured,'' i.e., appeared featureless. In UVCS data the events were seen as 4°-13° wide enhancements of the strongest coronal lines H I Lyα and O VI λλ1032, 1037. We derived electron densities for several of the events from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO) C2 white-light observations. They are comparable to or smaller than densities inferred for other CMEs. We modeled the observable properties of examples of the structured (1999 April 15) and unstructured (1999 May 9) narrow CMEs at different heights in the corona between 1.5 and 2 Rsolar. The derived electron temperatures, densities, and outflow speeds are similar for those two types of ejections. They were compared with properties of polar coronal jets and other CMEs. We discuss different scenarios of narrow CME formation as either a jet formed by reconnection onto open field lines or a CME ejected by expansion of closed field structures. Overall, we conclude that the existing observations do not definitively place the narrow CMEs into the jet or the CME picture, but the acceleration of the 1999 April 15 event resembles acceleration seen in many CMEs, rather than constant speeds or deceleration observed in jets.

  13. Analysis of Double-encapsulated Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, Jason Dean; Medvedev, Pavel G; Novascone, Stephen Rhead; Perez, Danielle Marie; Williamson, Richard L

    2014-09-01

    In an LWR fuel rod, the cladding encapsulates the fuel, contains fission products, and transfers heat directly to the water coolant. In some situations, it may be advantageous to separate the cladding from the coolant through use of a secondary cladding or capsule. This may be done to increase confidence that the fuel or fission products will not mix with the coolant, to provide a mechanism for controlling the rod temperature, or to place multiple experimental rodlets within a single housing. With an axisymmetric assumption, it is possible to derive closed-form expressions for the temperature profile in a fuel rod using radially-constant thermal conductivity in the fuel. This is true for both a traditional fuel-cladding rod and a double-encapsulated fuel (fuel, cladding, capsule) configuration. Likewise, it is possible to employ a fuel performance code to analyse both a traditional and a double-encapsulated fuel. In the case of the latter, two sets of gap heat transfer conditions must be imposed. In this work, we review the equations associated with radial heat transfer in a cylindrical system, present analytic and computational results for a postulated power and gas mixture history for IFA-744, and describe the analysis of the AFC-2A, 2B metallic fuel alloy experiments at the Advanced Test Reactor, including the effect of a release of fission products into the cladding-capsule gap. The computational results for these two cases were obtained using BISON, a fuel performance code under development at Idaho National Laboratory.

  14. Metabolomic Fingerprint of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Zordoky, Beshay N.; Sung, Miranda M.; Ezekowitz, Justin; Mandal, Rupasri; Han, Beomsoo; Bjorndahl, Trent C.; Bouatra, Souhaila; Anderson, Todd; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Wishart, David S.; Dyck, Jason R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical entity. Preclinical studies have shown differences in the pathophysiology between HFpEF and HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Therefore, we hypothesized that a systematic metabolomic analysis would reveal a novel metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that will help understand its pathophysiology and assist in establishing new biomarkers for its diagnosis. Methods and Results Ambulatory patients with clinical diagnosis of HFpEF (n = 24), HFrEF (n = 20), and age-matched non-HF controls (n = 38) were selected for metabolomic analysis as part of the Alberta HEART (Heart Failure Etiology and Analysis Research Team) project. 181 serum metabolites were quantified by LC-MS/MS and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Compared to non-HF control, HFpEF patients demonstrated higher serum concentrations of acylcarnitines, carnitine, creatinine, betaine, and amino acids; and lower levels of phosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, and sphingomyelins. Medium and long-chain acylcarnitines and ketone bodies were higher in HFpEF than HFrEF patients. Using logistic regression, two panels of metabolites were identified that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of 0.942 and 0.981, respectively. Conclusions The metabolomics approach employed in this study identified a unique metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that is distinct from that of HFrEF. This metabolomic fingerprint has been utilized to identify two novel panels of metabolites that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02052804 PMID:26010610

  15. Perforation of HY-100 steel plates with long rod projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchak, S.J.; Altman, B.S.; Forrestal, M.J.

    1993-07-01

    The authors conducted perforation experiments with 4340 steel, rod projectiles and HY-100 steel, target plates at striking velocities between 80 and 370 m/s. Projectiles were machined to nominally 30-mm-diameter and 281-mm-length so they could be launched from a 30-mm-powder gun without sabots. The target plates were rigidly clamped at 305-mm diameter and had a nominal thickness of 10.2 mm. In addition to measuring striking and residual projectile velocities, they obtained back surface framing camera data that showed clearly the plate deformation and plug ejection process. An Imacon 792 camera provided up to 20 frames per experiment with an interframe time duration of 10 {mu}s. The modeling work is in progress, but they present a beam model that exhibits the features observed in the experiments.

  16. M2-F1 ejection seat test at South Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 was fitted with an ejection seat before the airtow flights began. The project selected the seat used in the T-37 as modified by the Weber Company to use a rocket rather than a ballistic charge for ejection. To test the ejection seat, the Flight Research Center's Dick Klein constructed a plywood mockup of the M2-F1's top deck and canopy. On the first firings, the test was unsuccessful, but on the final test the dummy in the seat landed safely. The M2-F1 ejection seat was later used in the two Lunar Landing Research Vehicles and the three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles. Three of them crashed, but in each case the pilot ejected from the vehicle successfully. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with

  17. Particle Ejection and Levitation Technology (PELT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Each of the six Apollo landers touched down at unique sites on the lunar surface. Aside from the Apollo 12 landing site located 180 meters from the Surveyor III lander, plume impingement effects on ground hardware during the landings were not a problem. The planned return to the Moon requires numerous landings at the same site. Since the top few centimeters of lunar soil are loosely packed regolith, plume impingement from the lander will eject the granular material at high velocities. A picture shows what the astronauts viewed from the window of the Apollo 14 lander. There was tremendous dust excavation beneath the vehicle. With high-vacuum conditions on the Moon (10 (exp -14) to 10 (exp -12) torr), motion of all particles is completely ballistic. Estimates derived from damage to Surveyor III caused by the Apollo 12 lander show that the speed of the ejected regolith particles varies from 100 m/s to 2,000 m/s. It is imperative to understand the physics of plume impingement to safely design landing sites for future Moon missions. Aerospace scientists and engineers have examined and analyzed images from Apollo video extensively in an effort to determine the theoretical effects of rocket exhaust impingement. KSC has joined the University of Central Florida (UCF) to develop an instrument that will measure the 3-D vector of dust flow caused by plume impingement during descent of landers. The data collected from the instrument will augment the theoretical studies and analysis of the Apollo videos.

  18. MEMEX: Mechanisms of Energetic Mass Ejection Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chappell, C. R.; Clemmons, J. H.; Cully, C. M.; Donovan, E.; Earle, G. D.; Heelis, R. A.; Kistler, L. M.; Kepko, L.; Khazanov, G. V.; Knudsen, D. J.; Lessard, M.; McFadden, J. P.; Nicolls, M. J.; Pollock, C. J.; Pfaff, R. F.; Rankin, R.; Rowland, D. E.; Semeter, J. L.; Thayer, J. P.; Winglee, R.

    2013-12-01

    MEMEX is designed to find out how gravitationally-trapped volatile matter is being lost from atmospheres by energetic processes, depleting them of key constituents, as has occurred most dramatically at Mars. This process is exemplified in geospace by the dissipation of solar energy to produce ionospheric outflows that feed back on dynamics of the solar wind interaction with Earth's magnetosphere. Kinetic and electromagnetic energy flow from the Sun into the coupled (auroral) ionosphere, where resultant electron, ion, and gas heating give rise to upwelling, ionization, and mass ejection. Proposed mechanisms involve wave-particle heating interactions, upward ambipolar electric fields, or ponderomotive forces. A large number of free energy sources have been identified, but empirical guidance remains weak concerning their relative importance. Moreover, it is unclear if the waves interact with particles primarily in a cyclotron resonant mode, or in a lower hybrid exchange of electron (parallel) and ion (perpendicular) energy, or in a bulk ponderomotive mode. MEMEX will answer the questions raised by these issues: Where do the waves that produce mass ejection grow? How do they propagate and transport energy? How can wave amplitudes, heating, and escape rates be derived from solar wind conditions? Is the heating a cyclotron resonant process or a bulk ponderomotive forcing process? To obtain answers, MEMEX will for the first time simultaneously observe the magnetospheric and atmospheric boundary conditions applied to the topside or exobase layer, and the response of ions and electrons to the ensuing battle between electrodynamic forcing and collisional damping.

  19. Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radick, Richard R.

    2001-12-01

    The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) is a proof-of-concept space experiment designed to observe solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and forecast their arrival at Earth. SMEI will image CMEs by sensing sunlight scattered from the free electrons in these ejecta (i.e., Thomson scattering). SMEI will be launched by a Titan II rocket into a circular, 830-km, sun-synchronous orbit in mid-2002 as part of the Space Test Program's CORIOLIS mission. SMEI will image nearly the entire sky once per spacecraft orbit over a mission lifetime of three years. Successful operation of SMEI will represent a major step in improving space weather forecasts by providing one- to three-day predictions of geomagnetic storms at the Earth. The SMEI experiment is being designed and constructed by a team of scientists and engineers from the Air Force Research Laboratory, the University of Birmingham (UB) in the United Kingdom, the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), and Boston University. The Air Force, NASA, and UB are providing financial support.

  20. Global Response to Local Ionospheric Mass Ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Fok, M.-C.; Delcourt, D. C.; Slinker, S. P.; Fedder, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We revisit a reported "Ionospheric Mass Ejection" using prior event observations to guide a global simulation of local ionospheric outflows, global magnetospheric circulation, and plasma sheet pressurization, and comparing our results with the observed global response. Our simulation framework is based on test particle motions in the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global circulation model electromagnetic fields. The inner magnetosphere is simulated with the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) of Fok and Wolf, driven by the transpolar potential developed by the LFM magnetosphere, and includes an embedded plasmaspheric simulation. Global circulation is stimulated using the observed solar wind conditions for the period 24-25 Sept 1998. This period begins with the arrival of a Coronal Mass Ejection, initially with northward, but later with southward interplanetary magnetic field. Test particles are launched from the ionosphere with fluxes specified by local empirical relationships of outflow to electrodynamic and particle precipitation imposed by the MIlD simulation. Particles are tracked until they are lost from the system downstream or into the atmosphere, using the full equations of motion. Results are compared with the observed ring current and a simulation of polar and auroral wind outflows driven globally by solar wind dynamic pressure. We find good quantitative agreement with the observed ring current, and reasonable qualitative agreement with earlier simulation results, suggesting that the solar wind driven global simulation generates realistic energy dissipation in the ionosphere and that the Strangeway relations provide a realistic local outflow description.

  1. Synthesis and Liquid-Crystal Behavior of Bent Colloidal Silica Rods.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Chen, Guangdong; Martinez-Miranda, Luz J; Yu, Hua; Liu, Kun; Nie, Zhihong

    2016-01-13

    The design and assembly of novel colloidal particles are of both academic and technological interest. We developed a wet-chemical route to synthesize monodisperse bent rigid silica rods by controlled perturbation of emulsion-templated growth. The bending angle of the rods can be tuned in a range of 0-50° by varying the strength of perturbation in the reaction temperature or pH in the course of rod growth. The length of each arm of the bent rods can be individually controlled by adjusting the reaction time. For the first time we demonstrated that the bent silica rods resemble banana-shaped liquid-crystal molecules and assemble into ordered structures with a typical smectic B2 phase. The bent silica rods could serve as a visualizable mesoscopic model for exploiting the phase behaviors of bent molecules which represent a typical class of liquid-crystal molecules. PMID:26700616

  2. Vibrational Power Flow Analysis of Rods and Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlever, James Christopher; Bernhard, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method to model vibrational power flow and predict the resulting energy density levels in uniform rods and beams is investigated. This method models the flow of vibrational power in a manner analogous to the flow of thermal power in a heat conduction problem. The classical displacement solutions for harmonically excited, hysteretically damped rods and beams are used to derive expressions for the vibrational power flow and energy density in the rod and beam. Under certain conditions, the power flow in these two structural elements will be shown to be proportional to the energy density gradient. Using the relationship between power flow and energy density, an energy balance on differential control volumes in the rod and beam leads to a Poisson's equation which models the energy density distribution in the rod and beam. Coupling the energy density and power flow solutions for rods and beams is also discussed. It is shown that the resonant behavior of finite structures complicates the coupling of solutions, especially when the excitations are single frequency inputs. Two coupling formulations are discussed, the first based on the receptance method, and the second on the travelling wave approach used in Statistical Energy Analysis. The receptance method is the more computationally intensive but is capable of analyzing single frequency excitation cases. The traveling wave approach gives a good approximation of the frequency average of energy density and power flow in coupled systems, and thus, is an efficient technique for use with broadband frequency excitation.

  3. Fission gas release restrictor for breached fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kadambi, N. Prasad; Tilbrook, Roger W.; Spencer, Daniel R.; Schwallie, Ambrose L.

    1986-01-01

    In the event of a breach in the cladding of a rod in an operating liquid metal fast breeder reactor, the rapid release of high-pressure gas from the fission gas plenum may result in a gas blanketing of the breached rod and rods adjacent thereto which impairs the heat transfer to the liquid metal coolant. In order to control the release rate of fission gas in the event of a breached rod, the substantial portion of the conventional fission gas plenum is formed as a gas bottle means which includes a gas pervious means in a small portion thereof. During normal reactor operation, as the fission gas pressure gradually increases, the gas pressure interiorly of and exteriorly of the gas bottle means equalizes. In the event of a breach in the cladding, the gas pervious means in the gas bottle means constitutes a sufficient restriction to the rapid flow of gas therethrough that under maximum design pressure differential conditions, the fission gas flow through the breach will not significantly reduce the heat transfer from the affected rod and adjacent rods to the liquid metal heat transfer fluid flowing therebetween.

  4. LWR fuel rod bundle behavior under severe fuel damage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuczera, B. Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.

    1988-01-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) safety research and development activities conducted at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe have recently been reorganized with a concentrated mission under the LWR safety project group. The topics treated relate mainly to severe-accident analysis research and source term assessment as well as to source term mitigation measures. A major part of the investigations concerns the early phase of a severe core meltdown accident, specifically LWR rod assembly behavior under sever fuel damage (SFD) conditions. To determine the extent of fuel rod damage, including the relocation behavior of molten reaction products, damage propagation, time-dependent H{sub 2} generation from clad oxidation, and fragmentation of oxygen-embrittled materials during cooldown and quenching, extensive out-of-pile rod bundle experiments have been initiated in the new CORA test facility. The bundle parameters, such as rod dimensions, rod pitch, and grid spacer, can be adjusted to both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions. Currently, the test program consists of 15 experiments in which the influence of Inconel grid spacer, (Ag,In,Cd)-absorber rods (PWR) and of B{sub 4}C control blades (BWR) on fuel damage initiation and damage propagation are being investigated for different boundary conditions. As of June 1988, four bundle tests had been successfully carried out for PWR accident conditions.

  5. Impact ejection, spallation, and the origin of meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    A model for the ejection of material from an impact crater which links ejection velocity, fragment size, and shock pressure through a simplified stress-wave propagation and reflection scheme is presented. It is shown that a small amount of material (0.01 to 0.05 projectile mass) may be ejected at high velocity without suffering petrologically detectable shock pressures. The largest fragments ejected at any velocity are spalls that originate from the target planet's surface. The spall size is proportional to the radius of the primary impactor and the target tensile strength and inversely proportional to ejection velocity. The shock level in the spalls is low, typically half of the dynamic crushing strength of the rock. The model also predicts the aspect ratio of the spalled fragments, the angle of ejection, and the sizes and shock level of other fragments originating deeper in the target. Comparison with observational and experimental data shows generally good agreement.

  6. Stuck fuel rod capping sleeve

    DOEpatents

    Gorscak, Donald A.; Maringo, John J.; Nilsen, Roy J.

    1988-01-01

    A stuck fuel rod capping sleeve to be used during derodding of spent fuel assemblies if a fuel rod becomes stuck in a partially withdrawn position and, thus, has to be severed. The capping sleeve has an inner sleeve made of a lower work hardening highly ductile material (e.g., Inconel 600) and an outer sleeve made of a moderately ductile material (e.g., 304 stainless steel). The inner sleeve may be made of an epoxy filler. The capping sleeve is placed on a fuel rod which is then severed by using a bolt cutter device. Upon cutting, the capping sleeve deforms in such a manner as to prevent the gross release of radioactive fuel material

  7. Echocardiographic assessment of ejection fraction in left ventricular hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wandt, B; Bojo, L; Tolagen, K; Wranne, B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the value of Simpson's rule, Teichholz's formula, and recording of mitral ring motion in assessing left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy.
DESIGN—Left ventricular ejection fraction calculated by Simpson's rule and by Techholz's formula and estimated by mitral ring motion was compared with values obtained by radionuclide angiography.
SETTING—Secondary referral centre.
PATIENTS—16 patients with left ventricular hypertrophy and a clinical diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or hypertension.
RESULTS—Calculation by Teichholz's formula overestimated left ventricular ejection fraction by 10% (p = 0.002) and estimation based on mitral ring motion—that is, long axis measurements—underestimated ejection fraction by 19% (p = 0.002), without significant correlation between ring motion and ejection fraction. There was no significant difference between mean values of ejection fraction calculated by Simpson's rule and measured by the reference method, but a considerable scatter about the regression line with a standard error of the estimate of 9.3 EF%.
CONCLUSIONS—In patients with left ventricular hypertrophy the ejection fraction, calculated by Teichholz's formula or Simpson's rule, is a poor measure of left ventricular function. When mitral ring motion is used for the assessment in these patients the function should be expressed in ways other than by the ejection fraction.


Keywords: left ventricular hypertrophy; ejection fraction; mitral ring motion; atrioventricular plane displacement PMID:10409535

  8. Space probe/satellite ejection apparatus for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyly, H. M.; Miller, C. D.; Cloyd, R. A.; Heller, C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An ejection apparatus for spinning and propelling objects for ejection from a spacecraft at a desired velocity and rotational speed is discussed. The apparatus includes a launch cradle on which the space object to be ejected rests. The cradle is rotatably supported by a central hub secured to the upper end of the pneumatic cylinder piston shaft. Release mechanisms consisting of a retractable pin and locking lug is utilized to hold the cradle and object to be ejected. The release mechanism has a fixed barrier member which holds the retractable pin in engagement with the locking lug until release by upward movement of the launch cradle beyond the barrier height.

  9. Space probe/satellite ejection apparatus for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyly, H. M.; Miller, C. D.; Cloyd, R. A.; Heller, C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An ejection apparatus for spinning and propelling objects for ejection from a spacecraft at a desired velocity and rotational speed is discussed. The apparatus includes a launch cradle on which the space object to be ejected rests. The cradle is rotatably supported by a central hub secured to the upper end of the pneumatic cylinder piston shaft. Release mechanisms consisting of a retractable pin and locking lug is utilized to hold the cradle and object to be ejected. The release mechanism has a fixed barrier member which holds the retractable pin in engagement with the locking lug until release by upward movement of the launch cradle beyond the barrier height.

  10. Interval ejection fraction: a cineangiographic and radionuclide study

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, A.J.; Bianco, J.A.; Shulman, R.M.; Folland, E.D.; Paris, A.F.; Tow, D.E.

    1982-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of the first-third ejection fraction (1/3 EF) for detecting patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), resting contrast ventriculography and first-pass radionuclide angiography with a high-count-rate, multicrystal camera system were performed in 47 subjects: 22 normal controls (group 1) and 25 patients with clinically stable angina pectoris and severe CAD (mean 2.3 vessels) without (group 2, n = 12) and with (group 3, n = 13) resting wall motion abnormalities. By contrast angiography, only group 3 had depressed global EF or 1/3 EF compared with control (global EF: group 1, 0.71 = 0.09; group 2, 0.67 = 0.09 (NS); group 3, 0.49 = 0.05 (p < 0.01 vs groups 1 and 2); 1/3 EF: group 1, 0.29 = 0.06; group 2, 0.28 = 0.05 (NS); group 3, 0.22 = 0.05 (p < 0.01 vs groups 1 and 2)). Whereas 11 of 25 CAD patients had global EF outside the normal range, only two of 25 had depressed 1/3 EF. Both had left ventricular asynergy and a depressed global EF. Studies performed using first-pass radionuclide angiography revealed similar results, i.e., only four of 25 CAD patients, all with left ventricular asynergy and depressed global EF, had depressed 1/3 EF values. A wide range of 1/3 EF values was found in normal subjects by both techniques. Thus, the ejection fraction during the first third of systole at rest is of limited value for detecting patients with CAD.

  11. ISAAC: A REXUS Student Experiment to Demonstrate an Ejection System with Predefined Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, G.; Berquand, A.; Company-Vallet, E.; Granberg, V.; Grigore, V.; Ivchenko, N.; Kevorkov, R.; Lundkvist, E.; Olentsenko, G.; Pacheco-Labrador, J.; Tibert, G.; Yuan, Y.

    2015-09-01

    ISAAC Infrared Spectroscopy to Analyse the middle Atmosphere Composition — was a student experiment launched from SSC's Esrange Space Centre, Sweden, on 29th May 2014, on board the sounding rocket REXUS 15 in the frame of the REXUS/BEXUS programme. The main focus of the experiment was to implement an ejection system for two large Free Falling Units (FFUs) (240 mm x 80 mm) to be ejected from a spinning rocket into a predefined direction. The system design relied on a spring-based ejection system. Sun and angular rate sensors were used to control and time the ejection. The flight data includes telemetry from the Rocket Mounted Unit (RMU), received and saved during flight, as well as video footage from the GoPro camera mounted inside the RMU and recovered after the flight. The FFUs' direction, speed and spin frequency as well as the rocket spin frequency were determined by analyzing the video footage. The FFU-Rocket-Sun angles were 64.3° and 104.3°, within the required margins of 90°+45°. The FFU speeds were 3.98 mIs and 3.74 mIs, lower than the expected 5± 1 mIs. The FFUs' spin frequencies were 1 .38 Hz and 1 .60 Hz, approximately half the rocket's spin frequency. The rocket spin rate slightly changed from 3. 163 Hz before the ejection to 3.1 17 Hz after the ejection of the two FFUs. The angular rate, sun sensor data and temperature on the inside of the rocket module skin were also recorded. The experiment design and results of the data analysis are presented in this paper.

  12. Site controlled red-yellow-green light emitting InGaN quantum discs on nano-tipped GaN rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, M.; Li, H.; Kusch, G.; Zhao, C.; Ooi, B.; Edwards, P. R.; Martin, R. W.; Holmes, J. D.; Parbrook, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips' broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD's confinement dimensions, rather than significantly increasing the In%. This article details the easily controlled method of manipulating the QDs dimensions producing high crystal quality InGaN without complicated growth conditions needed for strain relaxation and alloy compositional changes seen for bulk planar GaN templates.We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips' broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD

  13. Site controlled red-yellow-green light emitting InGaN quantum discs on nano-tipped GaN rods.

    PubMed

    Conroy, M; Li, H; Kusch, G; Zhao, C; Ooi, B; Edwards, P R; Martin, R W; Holmes, J D; Parbrook, P J

    2016-06-01

    We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips' broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD's confinement dimensions, rather than significantly increasing the In%. This article details the easily controlled method of manipulating the QDs dimensions producing high crystal quality InGaN without complicated growth conditions needed for strain relaxation and alloy compositional changes seen for bulk planar GaN templates. PMID:27174084

  14. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lionello, Roberto; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A.; Török, Tibor; Riley, Pete; Mikić, Zoran E-mail: cdowns@predsci.com E-mail: tibor@predsci.com E-mail: mikic@predsci.com

    2013-11-01

    We describe a new MHD model for the propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) in the solar wind. Accurately following the propagation of ICMEs is important for determining space weather conditions. Our model solves the MHD equations in spherical coordinates from a lower boundary above the critical point to Earth and beyond. On this spherical surface, we prescribe the magnetic field, velocity, density, and temperature calculated typically directly from a coronal MHD model as time-dependent boundary conditions. However, any model that can provide such quantities either in the inertial or rotating frame of the Sun is suitable. We present two validations of the technique employed in our new model and a more realistic simulation of the propagation of an ICME from the Sun to Earth.

  15. Geometrical Properties of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, Hebe; Bothmer, Volker

    Based on the SOHO/LASCO dataset, a collection of "structured" coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has been compiled within the period 1996-2002, in order to analyze their three-dimensional configuration. These CME events exhibit white-light fine structures, likely indicative of their possible 3D topology. From a detailed investigation of the associated low coronal and photospheric source regions, a generic scheme has been deduced, which considers the white-light topology of a CME projected in the plane of the sky as being primarily dependent on the orientation and position of the source region's neutral line on the solar disk. The obtained results imply that structured CMEs are essentially organized along a symmetry axis, in a cylindrical manner. The measured dimensions of the cylinder's base and length yield a ratio of 1.6. These CMEs seem to be better approximated by elliptic cones, rather than by the classical ice cream cone, characterized by a circular cross section.

  16. Global Acceleration of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Lara, Alejandro; Lepping, Ronald; Kaiser, Michael; Berdichevsky, Daniel; St. Cyr, O. Chris; Lazarus, Al

    1999-01-01

    Using the observed relation between speeds of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) near the Sun and in the solar wind, we estimate a global acceleration acting on the CMEs. Our study quantifies the qualitative results of Gosling [1997] and numerical simulations that CMEs at 1 AU with speeds closer to the solar wind. We found a linear relation between the global acceleration and the initial speed of the CMEs and the absolute value of the acceleration is similar to the slow solar wind acceleration. Our study naturally divides CMEs into fast and slow ones, the dividing line being the solar wind speed. Our results have important implications to space weather prediction models which need to incorporate this effect in estimating the CME arrival time at 1 AU. We show that the arrival times of CMEs at 1 AU are drastically different from the zero acceleration case.

  17. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  18. Coronal Mass Ejections: From Sun to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, S.

    2016-06-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are gigantic expulsions of magnetized plasmas from the solar corona into the interplanetary (IP) space. CMEs spawn ~ 1015 gr of mass and reach speeds ranging between several hundred to a few thousand km/s (e.g., Gopalswamy et al. 2009; Vourlidas et al. 2010). It takes 1-5 days for a CME to reach Earth. CMEs are one of the most energetic eruptive manifestations in the solar system and are major drivers of space weather via their magnetic fields and energetic particles, which are accelerated by CME-driven shocks. In this review we give a short account of recent, mainly observational, results on CMEs from the STEREO and SDO missions which include the nature of their pre-eruptive and eruptive configurations and the CME propagation from Sun to Earth. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting capabilities in CME studies that will soon become available from new solar and heliospheric instrumentation.

  19. A catastrophe mechanism for coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.; Isenberg, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    The ideal-MHD equations are used to show that a coronal current filament can suddenly lose equilibrium if its magnetic energy exceeds a critical value. The loss of equilibrium in the configuration results from an imbalance between magnetic tension and compression, and this imbalance ejects the filament upwards. Near the critical value, the equilibrium configuration develops a vertical current sheet attached to the photosphere at the point directly below the filament. When equilibrium is lost, field lines anchored to the photosphere are stretched upwards, and the current sheet rapidly grows longer. Without reconnection in the current sheet, the filament travels only a short distance before reaching a new equilibrium, and the net magnetic energy released is less than 1 percent of the stored magnetic energy. However, with reconnection, the filament travels upwards indefinitely, and all of the stored energy is released.

  20. Probing Coronal Mass Ejections with Faraday Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Fischer, P. D.; Kooi, J. E.; Buffo, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are one of the most important solar phenomena in affecting conditions on Earth. There is not a consensus as to the physical mechanisms responsible for ejecting CME material from the solar atmosphere. Measurements that specify basic physical properties close to the Sun, when the CME is still evolving, should be useful in determining the correct theoretical model. One of the best observational techniques is that of Faraday rotation, a rotation in the plane of polarization of radio waves when propagating through a magnetized medium like the corona. The importance of Faraday rotation in determining the structure and evolutionary history of CMEs was discussed in Liu et al (ApJ 665, 1439, 2007). In this paper, we report Faraday rotation observations of ``constellations'' of background extragalactic radio sources near the Sun on three days in August, 2012, with the intention of observing a source occulted by a CME. Observations were made with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. We made polarization measurements at 6 frequencies between 1.31 and 1.94 GHz. On August 2, 2012, a CME clearly visible on the LASCO C3 coronagraph occulted a radio source from our sample, 0843+1547. Preliminary data analysis shows a Faraday rotation transient for 0843+1547 which appears to be associated with the CME. The Faraday rotation measure changes from nearly 0 before CME passage, to a value of about -12 radians/square-meter before declining after CME passage. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of models for CME structure, as well as the status of our observations of other sources on August 2, and on other days. This work was supported at the University of Iowa by grant ATM09-56901.

  1. Magnetic Reconnection in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermo, R. L.; Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many varied space and astrophysical plasmas, and as such plays an important role in the dynamics of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). It is widely regarded that reconnection is instrumental in the formation and ejection of the initial CME flux rope, but reconnection also continues to affect the dynamics as it propagates through the interplanetary medium. For example, reconnection on the leading edge of the ICME, by which it interacts with the interplanetary medium, leads to flux erosion. However, recent in situ observations by Gosling et al. found signatures of reconnection exhausts in the interior. In light of this data, we consider the stability properties of systems with this flux rope geometry with regard to their minimum energy Taylor state. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field relaxing back towards the minimum energy state, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity remain invariant. In reversed field pinches, this relaxation is mediated by reconnection in the interior of the system, as has been shown theoretically and experimentally. By treating the ICME flux rope in a similar fashion, we show analytically that the the elongation of the flux tube cross section in the latitudinal direction will result in a departure from the Taylor state. The resulting relaxation of the magnetic field causes reconnection to commence in the interior of the ICME, in agreement with the observations of Gosling et al. We present MHD simulations in which reconnection initiates at a number of rational surfaces, and ultimately produces a stochastic magnetic field. If the time scales for this process are shorter than the propagation time to 1 AU, this result explains why many ICME flux ropes no longer exhibit the smooth, helical flux structure characteristic of a magnetic cloud.

  2. Hydraulic lock for displacer rod drive mechanism (DRDM) and method of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, E.D.

    1990-12-18

    This paper describes a drive rod latch in combination with a nuclear reactor having a drive rod disposed in a rod housing characterized in that the drive rod has one end selectively exposed to a first, relatively low pressure zone of the reactor and another end thereof in communication with a second, relatively high pressure zone of the reactor. The drive rod further having disposed on an end thereof a valve member and the rod housing having disposed thereon a corresponding valve seat, and a control valve for selectively establishing communication between the housing and the first zone of the reactor whereby a pressure differential is created across the piston. The pressure differential being sufficient to seat the valve member against the valve seat to thereby establish a pressure boundary.

  3. Process development and fabrication for sphere-pac fuel rods. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Welty, R.K.; Campbell, M.H.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium fuel rods containing sphere-pac fuel have been fabricated for in-reactor tests and demonstrations. A process for the development, qualification, and fabrication of acceptable sphere-pac fuel rods is described. Special equipment to control fuel contamination with moisture or air and the equipment layout needed for rod fabrication is described and tests for assuring the uniformity of the fuel column are discussed. Fuel retainers required for sphere-pac fuel column stability and instrumentation to measure fuel column smear density are described. Results of sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication campaigns are reviewed and recommended improvements for high throughput production are noted.

  4. Three-Rod Linear Ion Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, Gary R.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1993-01-01

    Three-parallel-rod electrode structures proposed for use in linear ion traps and possibly for electrostatic levitation of macroscopic particles. Provides wider viewing angle because they confine ions in regions outside rod-electrode structures.

  5. Solid-state-laser-rod holder

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.; Barnes, N.P.; Griggs, J.E.

    1981-08-11

    The disclosure relates to a solid state laser rod holder comprising Invar, copper tubing, and epoxy joints. Materials and coefficients of expansion of the components of the holder combine with the rod to produce a joint which will give before the rod itself will. The rod may be lased at about 70 to 80/sup 0/K and returned from such a temperature to room temperature repeatedly without its or the holder's destruction.

  6. Fighter Pilot Ejection Study as an Educational Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Garry; Jovanoski, Zlatko

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we apply the well-known equations of projectile motion to the case of a fighter pilot ejecting from an aircraft, the aim being to establish under what conditions there is danger of impact with the rear vertical stabilizer. The drag force on the pilot after ejection is assumed to vary as the velocity squared and the aircraft motion…

  7. On Modeling of Ejection Process in a Training Combat Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głowiński, Sebastian; Krzyżyński, Tomasz

    2011-09-01

    The paper deals with modeling and simulation of motion trajectory of an ejection seat in the training-combat aircraft TS-11 "Iskra". The ejection seat and its operation are characterized. Mathematical and computer models are elaborated with the help of MATLAB-Simulink applications. Additionally, simulations are conducted for various velocities of the aircraft.

  8. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  9. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  10. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  11. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  12. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  13. Young Star Probably Ejected From Triple System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Astronomers analyzing nearly 20 years of data from the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array radio telescope have discovered that a small star in a multiple-star system in the constellation Taurus probably has been ejected from the system after a close encounter with one of the system's more-massive components, presumed to be a compact double star. This is the first time any such event has been observed. Path of Small Star, 1983-2001 "Our analysis shows a drastic change in the orbit of this young star after it made a close approach to another object in the system," said Luis Rodriguez of the Institute of Astronomy of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). "The young star was accelerated to a large velocity by the close approach, and certainly now is in a very different, more remote orbit, and may even completely escape its companions," said Laurent Loinard, leader of the research team that also included Monica Rodriguez in addition to Luis Rodriguez. The UNAM astronomers presented their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Seattle, WA. The discovery of this chaotic event will be important for advancing our understanding of classical dynamic astronomy and of how stars evolve, including possibly providing an explanation for the production of the mysterious "brown dwarfs," the astronomers said. The scientists analyzed VLA observations of T Tauri, a multiple system of young stars some 450 light-years from Earth. The observations were made from 1983 to 2001. The T Tauri system includes a "Northern" star, the famous star that gives its name to the class of young visible stars, and a "Southern" system of stars, all orbiting each other. The VLA data were used to track the orbit of the smaller Southern star around the larger Southern object, presumed to be a pair of stars orbiting each other closely. The astronomers' plot of the smaller star's orbit shows that it followed an apparently elliptical orbit around its twin companions

  14. Mechanoresponsive change in photoluminescent color of rod-like liquid-crystalline compounds and control of molecular orientation on photoaligned layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Mizuho; Miura, Seiya; Okumoto, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Mayuko; Fukae, Ryohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we reported novel liquid-crystalline luminophore that switches its photoluminescent color by mechanically grinding. Mechanochromic luminescence (MCL) is expected for mechanical sensor, cellular imaging, detection of microenvironmental changes, and optical memory. In this work, we focused on liquid-crystalline MCL compounds on alignment layer. Controlling the molecular alignment of MCL compounds with photoalignment layer have potential to succeed in functional MCL film such as polarized micropatterned MCL and directional detection of mechanical stimuli. Herein, we prepared asymmetric rodlike MCL compounds containing cyano- and pyridyl molecular terminal and explored their photoluminescence behavior under mechanical stimulus. The cyano terminated compound showed a nematic phase and tuned its photoluminescent color from green to yellow upon grinding, while the pyridyl-terminated compounds that show no mesophase changed its photoluminescent color from blue to green and reverted to its initial color by heating above its melting point. The cyano-terminated MCL was aligned along the orientation direction of photoalignment layer and pyridyl-terminated MCL exhibited uniaxial alignment when it coated on photoaligned film containing carboxylic acid.

  15. Air pollution and heart failure: Relationship with the ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Abreu-Afonso, Javier; Rodríguez, Sergio; Juarez-Prera, Ruben A; Arroyo-Ucar, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Yenny; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Avanzas, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the concentrations of particulate matter in ambient air are associated with hospital admission due to heart failure in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and reduced ejection fraction. METHODS: We studied 353 consecutive patients admitted into a tertiary care hospital with a diagnosis of heart failure. Patients with ejection fraction of ≥ 45% were classified as having heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and those with an ejection fraction of < 45% were classified as having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. We determined the average concentrations of different sizes of particulate matter (< 10, < 2.5, and < 1 μm) and the concentrations of gaseous pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and ozone) from 1 d up to 7 d prior to admission. RESULTS: The heart failure with preserved ejection fraction population was exposed to higher nitrogen dioxide concentrations compared to the heart failure with reduced ejection fraction population (12.95 ± 8.22 μg/m3 vs 4.50 ± 2.34 μg/m3, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that nitrogen dioxide was a significant predictor of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (odds ratio ranging from (1.403, 95%CI: 1.003-2.007, P = 0.04) to (1.669, 95%CI: 1.043-2.671, P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that short-term nitrogen dioxide exposure is independently associated with admission in the heart failure with preserved ejection fraction population. PMID:23538391

  16. Synaptic transmission from rods to rod-dominated bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Yang, X L; Wu, S M

    1993-06-11

    Synaptic transmission between photoreceptors and bipolar cells was studied in dark-adapted tiger salamander retinas. Based on the relative light sensitivity, bipolar cells, either depolarizing (DBC) or hyperpolarizing (HBC), fell into two groups: one receives inputs primarily from rods (rod-dominated bipolar cells, DBCR and HBCR) and the other receives inputs primarily from cones (cone-dominated bipolar cells, DBCC and HBCC). The input-output relations of the rod-DBCR and rod-HBCR synapses were determined by plotting the voltage responses of the rod and DBCR (or HBCR) to dim 500-nm light steps, which polarizes only the rods but not the cones. The slope gains of both synapses were the highest near the dark rod voltage (-2.5 for the rod-DBCR synapse and 4.0 for the rod-HBCR synapse), and they (the absolute values) became progressively smaller at more hyperpolarized rod voltages. PMID:8186975

  17. Magnetic Reconfiguration in CMEs/Ejective Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, A. C.; Suess, S. T.

    2008-01-01

    We present (1) the standard concept for the large transient change in field configuration in the solar magnetic explosions that produce an ejective flare and become a coronal mass ejection (CME) and (2) an observational test of this picture of CME production. In linear span, the largest change in field configuration in these events is wrought by the CME in the outer corona and solar wind. In the outer corona, the CME is essentially a magnetic bubble that transiently pushes aside the previously radial surrounding field. The source magnetic field that explodes to become the CME is initially a closed arcade enveloping sheared and twisted sigmoid field that snakes along the polarity dividing line and forms the core of the arcade. The sigmoid field has a large store of pent-up free magnetic energy. This eventually causes the sigmoid to become unstable and to begin to erupt as a flux rope. The erupting flux rope becomes the core of the CME plasmoid. The flux rope and enveloping CME plasmoid are created and built up (given more magnetic flux) and unleashed to escape by reconnection of the legs of the erupting sigmoid and arcade. Simultaneously, this tether-cutting reconnection produces beneath the escaping plasmoid a growing coronal X-ray flare arcade rooted in two separating ribbons of chromospheric flare emission. As the unleashed CME plasmoid propels itself into the outer corona, it takes with it the top of the arcade envelope field that arches over it. The continuing reconnection finally recloses the 'opened' stretched legs of the envelope, thus restoring the pre-eruption closed-arcade field configuration. This reconnection scenario for producing the CME plasmoid implies that the magnetic flux spanned by the full-grown flare arcade nearly equals the magnetic flux in the CME plasmoid in the outer corona. We have found that a wide range of exploding source regions produce CMEs that pass this test for production by tether-cutting reconnection (Moore, Sterling, &Suess

  18. Status of the Solar Mass Ejection Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, J. C.; Radick, R. R.; Webb, D. F.

    2001-05-01

    The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) is a proof-of-concept experiment designed to detect and track coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as they propagate from the Sun through interplanetary space to the Earth and beyond. SMEI will Image CMEs by sensing sunlight scattered from the free electrons in these structures (Thomson scattering). SMEI will be launched by a Titan II rocket into a circular, sun-synchronous (830 km) orbit in 2002 as part of the Space Test Program's CORIOLIS mission. SMEI will image the entire sky once per spacecraft orbit over a mission lifetime of three years. The major subsystems of SMEI are three electronic camera assemblies and a data-handling unit. Each camera consists of a baffle, a radiator, a bright object sensor, an electronics box, and a strongbox containing a shutter, optics and a CCD. Each camera images a 3x60 degree field. Together, they view a 180-degree slice of sky, and sweep over the entire sky once per orbit. SMEI's basic data product will be a 100-minute cadence of all-sky maps of heliospheric brightness, with stars removed, having an angular resolution of about one degree and a photometric precision of about 0.1%. Successful operation of SMEI will represent a major step in improving space weather forecasts. When combined with in-situ solar wind measurements from upstream monitors such as WIND and ACE, SMEI will provide one- to three-day predictions of impending geomagnetic storms at the Earth. SMEI will complement missions such as SoHO, GOES SXI, Solar-B, and STEREO by providing data relating solar drivers to terrestrial effects. Other benefits of SMEI will include observations of variable stars, extra-Solar planetary transits, novae and supernovae, comets and asteroids. The SMEI experiment is being designed and constructed by a team of scientists and engineers from the Air Force Research Laboratory, the University of Birmingham (UB) in the United Kingdom, the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), and Boston University. The

  19. Investigating pyroclast ejection dynamics using shock-tube experiments: temperature, grain size and vent geometry effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, V.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions eject large quantities of gas and particles into the atmosphere. The portion directly above the vent commonly shows characteristics of underexpanded jets. Understanding the factors that influence the initial pyroclast ejection dynamics is necessary in order to better assess the resulting near- and far-field hazards. Field observations are often insufficient for the characterization of volcanic explosions due to lack of safe access to such environments. Fortunately, their dynamics can be simulated in the laboratory where experiments are performed under controlled conditions. We ejected loose natural particles from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25˚ and 500˚C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), sample-to-vent distance and vent geometry. For each explosion we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle and the production of fines. Further, we varied the setup to allow for different sample-to-gas ratios and deployed four different vent geometries: 1) cylindrical, 2) funnel with a flaring of 30˚, 3) funnel with a flaring of 15˚ and 4) nozzle. The results showed maximum particle velocities up to 296 m/s, gas spreading angles varying from 21˚ to 37˚ and particle spreading angles from 3˚ to 40˚. Moreover we observed dynamically evolving ejection characteristics and variations in the production of fines during the course of individual experiments. Our experiments mechanistically mimic the process of pyroclast ejection. Thus the capability for constraining the effects of input parameters (fragmentation conditions) and conduit/vent geometry on ballistic pyroclastic plumes has been clearly established. These data obtained in the presence of well-documented conduit and vent conditions, should greatly enhance our ability to numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  20. Rod cluster having improved vane configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Shockling, L.A.; Francis, T.A.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes a pressurized water reactor vessel, the vessel defining a predetermined axial direction of the flow of coolant therewithin and having plural spider assemblies supporting, for vertical movement within the vessel, respective clusters of rods in spaced, parallel axial relationship, parallel to the predetermined axial direction of coolant flow, and a rod guide for each spider assembly and respective cluster of rods. The rod guide having horizontally oriented support plates therewithin, each plate having an interior opening for accommodating axial movement therethrough of the spider assembly and respective cluster of rods. The opening defining plural radially extending channels and corresponding parallel interior wall surfaces of the support plate.

  1. Exploiting rod technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-06-01

    ROD development was proceeding apace until recent budgetary decisions caused funding support for ROD development to be drastically reduced. The funding which was originally provided by DARPA and the Balanced Technology Initiative (BTI) Office has been cut back to zero from $800K. To determine the aeroballistic coefficients of a candidate dart, ARDEC is currently supporting development out of its own 6.2 funds at about $100K. ARDEC has made slow progress toward achieving this end because of failures in the original dart during testing. It appears that the next dart design to be tested will diverge from the original concept visualized by DARPA and Science and Technology Associates (STA). STA, the design engineer, takes exception to these changes on the basis of inappropriate test conditions and insufficient testing. At this time, the full resolution of this issue will be difficult because of the current management structure, which separates the developer (ARDEC) from the designer (STA).

  2. The role of attractive interactions in rod-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Antypov, Dmytro; Cleaver, Douglas J

    2004-06-01

    We present a computer simulation study of binary mixtures of prolate Gay-Berne particles and Lennard-Jones spheres. Results are presented for three such rod-sphere systems which differ from each other only in the interaction between unlike particles. Both the mixing-demixing behavior and the transitions between the isotropic and any liquid crystalline phases are studied for each system, as a function of temperature and concentration ratio. For systems which show macroscopic demixing, the rod-sphere interaction is shown to give direct control over interfacial anchoring properties, giving rise to the possibility of micellar phase formation in the case of homeotropic anchoring. Additionally, it is shown that on incorporating high concentrations of spheres into a system of rods with weak demixing properties, microphase-separated structures can be induced, including bicontinuous and lamellar arrangements. PMID:15268056

  3. Tribe kills fuel rod proposal

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-13

    This article is a review of nuclear utilities` efforts to find a repository of spent fuel rods. The rejection by the Mescalero Apaches of plans to build a waste repository on tribal lands has left a number of utilities scrambling to find interim solutions. Prairie Island will have to close before the end of the year unless a solution is found, and the Hope Creek/Salem units, exhausting there storage capacity within ten years, are considering dry-cask storage.

  4. RECOVERY OF ROD PHOTORESPONSES IN ABCR-DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Ambarish S.; Qtaishat, Nasser M.; Little, Deborah M.; Pepperberg, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose ABCR protein in the rod outer segment is thought to facilitate movement of the all-trans retinal photoproduct of rhodopsin bleaching out of the disk lumen. We investigated the extent to which ABCR deficiency affects post-bleach recovery of the rod photoresponse in ABCR-deficient (abcr−/−) mice. Methods Electroretinographic (ERG) a-wave responses were recorded from abcr−/− mice and two control strains. Using a bright probe flash, we examined the course of rod recovery following fractional rhodopsin bleaches of ~10−6, ~3×10−5, ~0.03 and ~0.30–0.40. Results Dark-adapted abcr−/− mice and controls exhibited similar normalized near-peak amplitudes of the paired-flash-ERG-derived, weak-flash response. Response recovery following ~10−6 bleaching exhibited an average exponential time constant of 319, 171 and 213 ms, respectively, in the abcr−/− and the two control strains. Recovery time constants determined for ~3×10−5 bleaching did not differ significantly among strains. However, those determined for the ~0.03 bleach indicated significantly faster recovery in abcr−/− (2.34 ± 0.74 min) than in the controls (5.36 ± 2.20 min, and 5.92 ± 2.44 min). Following ~0.30–0.40 bleaching, the initial recovery in the abcr−/− was on average faster than in controls. Conclusions By comparison with controls, abcr−/− mice exhibit faster rod recovery following a bleach of ~0.03. The data suggest that ABCR in normal rods may directly or indirectly prolong all-trans retinal clearance from the disk lumen over a significant bleaching range, and that the essential function of ABCR may be to promote the clearance of residual amounts of all-trans retinal that remain in the disks long after bleaching. PMID:18263807

  5. Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment

    DOEpatents

    Donck, Harry A.; Veca, Anthony R.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

  6. Coronal Mass Ejections and Their Heliospheric Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been recognized as the most energetic phenomenon in the heliosphere, deriving their energy from the stressed magnetic fields on the Sun. The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission has accumulated a wealth of information on CMEs with unprecedented extent, clarity, and uniformity. The CME data base has been useful in confirming results from past missions and obtaining a number of new results on the initiation, propagation, and heliospheric consequences of CMEs. This paper highlights some of the recent results on the morphological, physical, and kinematic properties of CMEs observed during solar cycle 23. White-light signatures of CMEs and their utility in inferring coronal magnetic fields near the Sun will be discussed. Presence of coronal holes near eruption regions have been shown to significantly modify the trajectories of CMEs. New results on the interaction of CMEs with large-scale structures such as coronal holes and other CMEs will be presented. Finally, the CME consequences in the heliosphere such as interplanetary shocks, type II radio bursts, energetic particles, geomagnetic storms, and cosmic ray modulation will be discussed

  7. Streamer Waves Driven by Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Song, Hong-Qiang; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Wu, Zhao; Fu, Hui

    Between July 5th and July 7th 2004, two intriguing fast coronal mass ejection(CME)-streamer interaction events were recorded by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO). At the beginning of the events, the streamer was pushed aside from their equilibrium position upon the impact of the rapidly outgoing and expanding ejecta; then, the streamer structure, mainly the bright streamer belt, exhibited elegant large scale sinusoidal wavelike motions. The motions were apparently driven by the restoring magnetic forces resulting from the CME impingement, suggestive of magnetohydrodynamic kink mode propagating outwards along the plasma sheet of the streamer. The mode is supported collectively by the streamer structure and is therefore named "streamer wave" in the present study. With the whitelight coronagraph data, we show that the streamer wave has a period of about 1 hour, a wavelength varying from 2 to 4 solar radii, an amplitude of about a few tens of solar radii, and a propagating phase speed in the range 300 to 500 km/s. We also find that there is a tendency for the phase speed to decline with increasing heliocentric distance. These observations provide good examples of large scale wave phenomena carried by corona structures, and have significance in developing seismological techniques for diagnosing plasma and magnetic parameters in the outer corona.

  8. Streamer Waves Driven by Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Song, H. Q.; Li, B.; Xia, L. D.; Wu, Z.; Fu, H.; Li, Xing

    2010-05-01

    Between 2004 July 5 and July 7, two intriguing fast coronal mass ejection (CME)-streamer interaction events were recorded by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. At the beginning of the events, the streamer was pushed aside from its equilibrium position upon the impact of the rapidly outgoing and expanding ejecta; then, the streamer structure, mainly the bright streamer belt, exhibited elegant large-scale sinusoidal wavelike motions. The motions were apparently driven by the restoring magnetic forces resulting from the CME impingement, suggestive of magnetohydrodynamic kink mode propagating outward along the plasma sheet of the streamer. The mode is supported collectively by the streamer-plasma sheet structure and is therefore named "streamer wave" in the present study. With the white light coronagraph data, we show that the streamer wave has a period of about 1 hr, a wavelength varying from 2 to 4 solar radii, an amplitude of about a few tens of solar radii, and a propagating phase speed in the range 300-500 km s-1. We also find that there is a tendency for the phase speed to decline with increasing heliocentric distance. These observations provide good examples of large-scale wave phenomena carried by coronal structures and have significance in developing seismological techniques for diagnosing plasma and magnetic parameters in the outer corona.

  9. Coronal Mass Ejections and Solar Radio Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2010-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have important connections to various types of radio emissions from the Sun. The persistent noise storm radiation (type I storm at metric wavelengths, type III storms at longer wavelengths) can be clearly interrupted by the occurrence of a CME in the active region that produces the storm. Sometimes the noise storm completely disappears and other times, it reappears in the active region. Long-lasting type III bursts are associated with CME eruption, thought to be due to the reconnection process taking place beneath the erupting CME. Type II bursts are indicative of electron acceleration in the CME-driven shocks and hence considered to be the direct response of the CME propagation in the corona and interplanetary medium. Finally type IV bursts indicate large-scale post-eruption arcades containing trapped electrons that produce radio emission. This paper summarizes some key results that connect CMEs to various types of radio emission and what we can learn about particle acceleration in the corona) and interplanetary medium. Particular emphasis will be placed on type If bursts because of their connection to interplanetary shocks detected in situ.

  10. Particle Heating Resulting from Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Suman; Sundar De, Syam; Guha, Gautam

    2016-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is a continuous phenomena occurring from the entire solar coronal zone responsible for the outflow of solar masses, viz., protons, electrons, neutrons and solar wind in the form of plasma. These perturb the Earth's atmosphere via magnetopause. Very high temperature plasma generator in the solar atmosphere produces huge magnetic dipoles with intense magnetic field. It traps the energetic charged particles released from the solar corona. These particles gyrate along the magnetic field lines and are gradually elongated outwards from the Sun. Due to this, the field lines get detached at some critical limit thereby enhancing the magnetic reconnection with the interplanetary magnetic field releasing huge energy in the form of X-rays and γ-rays. This perturbs the Earth's atmosphere. In this work, the situation has been investigated by momentum balance equation, energy balance equation along with the equations of continuity and states. From the analyses, the dispersive nature of the thermospheric medium is studied. Variation of normalized electron temperature with dimensionless time has been critically contemplated. The altitude dependent electric field in the medium is also investigated.

  11. Dynamic simulation of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Wu, S. T.

    1980-01-01

    A model is developed for the formation and propagation through the lower corona of the loop-like coronal transients in which mass is ejected from near the solar surface to the outer corona. It is assumed that the initial state for the transient is a coronal streamer. The initial state for the streamer is a polytropic, hydrodynamic solution to the steady-state radial equation of motion coupled with a force-free dipole magnetic field. The numerical solution of the complete time-dependent equations then gradually approaches a stationary coronal streamer configuration. The streamer configuration becomes the initial state for the coronal transient. The streamer and transient simulations are performed completely independent of each other. The transient is created by a sudden increase in the pressure at the base of the closed-field region in the streamer configuration. Both coronal streamers and coronal transients are calculated for values of the plasma beta (the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure) varying from 0.1 to 100.

  12. Solar Sources of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) originate in the solar corona.Due to recent ample solar images from space missions, especially the STEREO mission, we know that CMEs initiate not only from flaring active regions of strong magnetic field, prominence (filaments) in decayed active regions, but also from coronal structures in higher coronaover regions no apparent strong magnetic fields on the solar disk. Regardless the differences of their appearances, these regionsmust all include non-potential magnetic field or free magnetic energy in order to produce CMEs. When an energized magnetic structure erupts, the free magnetic energy converts to kinetic energy and few other types ofenergy, and the magnetic structure leaves the corona and propagates into the interplanetary space. At the source regions, the initiations of CMEs often accompany with solar flares, filament eruptions, coronalEUV dimmings and waves, and post eruption loop brightennings. Studying the CME source regions and the processes is essential for the understanding of CME initiation and their interplanetary consequences.

  13. STREAMER WAVES DRIVEN BY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Song, H. Q.; Li, B.; Xia, L. D.; Wu, Z.; Fu, H.; Li Xing

    2010-05-01

    Between 2004 July 5 and July 7, two intriguing fast coronal mass ejection (CME)-streamer interaction events were recorded by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. At the beginning of the events, the streamer was pushed aside from its equilibrium position upon the impact of the rapidly outgoing and expanding ejecta; then, the streamer structure, mainly the bright streamer belt, exhibited elegant large-scale sinusoidal wavelike motions. The motions were apparently driven by the restoring magnetic forces resulting from the CME impingement, suggestive of magnetohydrodynamic kink mode propagating outward along the plasma sheet of the streamer. The mode is supported collectively by the streamer-plasma sheet structure and is therefore named 'streamer wave' in the present study. With the white light coronagraph data, we show that the streamer wave has a period of about 1 hr, a wavelength varying from 2 to 4 solar radii, an amplitude of about a few tens of solar radii, and a propagating phase speed in the range 300-500 km s{sup -1}. We also find that there is a tendency for the phase speed to decline with increasing heliocentric distance. These observations provide good examples of large-scale wave phenomena carried by coronal structures and have significance in developing seismological techniques for diagnosing plasma and magnetic parameters in the outer corona.

  14. Solar origins of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    The large scale properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), such as morphology, leading edge speed, and angular width and position, have been cataloged for many events observed with coronagraphs on the Skylab, P-78, and SMM spacecraft. While considerable study has been devoted to the characteristics of the SMEs, their solar origins are still only poorly understood. Recent observational work has involved statistical associations of CMEs with flares and filament eruptions, and some evidence exists that the flare and eruptive-filament associated CMEs define two classes of events, with the former being generally more energetic. Nevertheless, it is found that eruptive-filament CMEs can at times be very energetic, giving rise to interplanetary shocks and energetic particle events. The size of the impulsive phase in a flare-associated CME seems to play no significant role in the size or speed of the CME, but the angular sizes of CMEs may correlate with the scale sizes of the 1-8 angstrom x-ray flares. At the present time, He 10830 angstrom observations should be useful in studying the late development of double-ribbon flares and transient coronal holes to yield insights into the CME aftermath. The recently available white-light synoptic maps may also prove fruitful in defining the coronal conditions giving rise to CMEs.

  15. EIT Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurman, J. B.; Fisher, Richard B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Before the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we had only the sketchiest of clues as to the nature and topology of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) below 1.1 - 1.2 solar radii. Occasionally, dimmings (or 'transient coronal holes') were observed in time series of soft X-ray images, but they were far less frequent than CME's. Simply by imaging the Sun frequently and continually at temperatures of 0.9 - 2.5 MK we have stumbled upon a zoo of CME phenomena in this previously obscured volume of the corona: (1) waves, (2) dimmings, and (3) a great variety of ejecta. In the three and a half years since our first observations of coronal waves associated with CME's, combined Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) and extreme ultra-violet imaging telescope (EIT) synoptic observations have become a standard prediction tool for space weather forecasters, but our progress in actually understanding the CME phenomenon in the low corona has been somewhat slower. I will summarize the observations of waves, hot (> 0.9 MK) and cool ejecta, and some of the interpretations advanced to date. I will try to identify those phenomena, analysis of which could most benefit from the spectroscopic information available from ultraviolet coronograph spectrometer (UVCS) observations.

  16. Electric Fuel Rod Simulator Fabrication at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Larry J.; McCulloch, Reg

    2004-02-04

    Commercial vendors could not supply the high-quality, highly instrumented electric fuel rod simulators (FRS) required for large thermal-hydraulic safety-oriented experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1970s and early 1980s. Staff at ORNL designed, developed, and manufactured the simulators utilized in these safety experiments. Important FRS design requirements include (1) materials of construction, (2) test power requirements and availability, (3) experimental test objectives, (4) supporting thermal analyses, and (5) extensive quality control throughout all phases of FRS fabrication. This paper will present an overview of these requirements (design, analytics, and quality control) as practiced at ORNL to produce a durable high-quality FRS.

  17. Electric Fuel Rod Simulator Fabrication at ORNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Larry J.; McCulloch, Reg

    2004-02-01

    Commercial vendors could not supply the high-quality, highly instrumented electric fuel rod simulators (FRS) required for large thermal-hydraulic safety-oriented experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1970s and early 1980s. Staff at ORNL designed, developed, and manufactured the simulators utilized in these safety experiments. Important FRS design requirements include (1) materials of construction, (2) test power requirements and availability, (3) experimental test objectives, (4) supporting thermal analyses, and (5) extensive quality control throughout all phases of FRS fabrication. This paper will present an overview of these requirements (design, analytics, and quality control) as practiced at ORNL to produce a durable high-quality FRS.

  18. Perforation of HY-100 steel plates with 4340 R{sub c} 38 and T-250 maraging steel rod projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Forrestal, M.J.; Hanchak, S.J.

    1998-05-25

    The authors conducted perforation experiments with 4340 Rc 38 and T-250 maraging steel, long rod projectiles and HY-100 steel target plates at striking velocities between 80 and 370 m/s. Flat-end rod projectiles with lengths of 89 and 282 mm were machined to nominally 30-mm-diameter so they could be launched from a 30-mm-powder gun without sabots. The target plates were rigidly clamped at a 305-mm-diameter and had nominal thicknesses of 5.3 and 10.5 mm. Four sets of experiments were conducted to show the effects of rod length and plate thickness on the measured ballistic limit and residual velocities. In addition to measuring striking and residual projectile velocities, they obtained framing camera data on the back surfaces of several plates that showed clearly the plate deformation and plug ejection process. They also present a beam model that exhibits qualitatively the experimentally observed mechanisms.

  19. Evidence linking coronal mass ejections with interplanetary magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.; Hildner, E.

    1983-01-01

    Using proxy data for the occurrence of those mass ejections from the solar corona which are directed earthward, we investigate the association between the post-1970 interplanetary magnetic clouds of Klein and Burlaga and coronal mass ejections. The evidence linking magnetic clouds following shocks with coronal mass ejections is striking; six of nine clouds observed at Earth were preceded an appropriate time earlier by meter-wave type II radio bursts indicative of coronal shock waves and coronal mass ejections occurring near central meridian. During the selected periods when no clouds were detected near Earth, the only type II bursts reported were associated with solar activity near the limbs. Where the proxy solar data to be sought are not so clearly suggested, that is, for clouds preceding interaction regions and clouds within cold magnetic enhancements, the evidence linking the clouds and coronal mass ejections is not as clear; proxy data usually suggest many candidate mass-ejection events for each cloud. Overall, the data are consistent with and support the hypothesis suggested by Klein and Burlaga that magnetic clouds observed with spacecraft at 1 AU are manifestations of solar coronal mass ejection transients.

  20. Improved Measurement of Ejection Velocities From Craters Formed in Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Byers, Terry; Cardenas, Francisco; Montes, Roland; Potter, Elliot E.

    2014-01-01

    A typical impact crater is formed by two major processes: compression of the target (essentially equivalent to a footprint in soil) and ejection of material. The Ejection-Velocity Measurement System (EVMS) in the Experimental Impact Laboratory has been used to study ejection velocities from impact craters formed in sand since the late 1990s. The original system used an early-generation Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera; custom-written software; and a complex, multicomponent optical system to direct laser light for illumination. Unfortunately, the electronic equipment was overtaken by age, and the software became obsolete in light of improved computer hardware.

  1. Simulation of a liquid droplet ejection device using multi-actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yoshihiro; Yoshino, Michitaka; Yasuda, Akira; Tanuma, Chiaki

    2016-07-01

    An equivalent circuit model for a liquid droplet ejection device using a multiactuator has been developed. The equivalent circuit was simplified using a gyrator in the synthesis of the outputs of many elements. The simulation was performed for an inkjet head having three piezoelectric elements using MATLAB/Simulink. In this model, the pressure chamber is filled with a Newtonian fluid. For this reason, the model assumed only the resistance component of the pressure chamber and the nozzle as a load. Furthermore, since the resistance component of the inlet is much larger than that of the nozzle, it is not considered in this model. As a result, by providing a time difference between the driving signals of the piezoelectric elements, we found that the pressure of the ink chamber could be arbitrarily controlled. By this model, it becomes possible to control the pressure in the ink chamber of the inkjet head required for the ejection of various inks.

  2. A Model for Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Benjamin J.; Masson, Sophie; Li, Yan; DeVore, C. Richard; Luhmann, Janet; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Fisher, George H.

    2016-05-01

    Stealth coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are events in which there are almost no observable signatures of the CME eruption in the low corona but often a well-resolved slow flux rope CME observed in the coronagraph data. We present results from a three-dimensional numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of the 2008 June 1-2 slow streamer blowout CME that Robbrecht et al. [2009] called “the CME from nowhere.” We model the global coronal structure using a 1.4 MK isothermal solar wind and a low-order potential field source surface representation of the Carrington Rotation 2070 magnetogram synoptic map. The bipolar streamer belt arcade is energized by simple shearing flows applied in the vicinity of the helmet streamer’s polarity inversion line. The slow expansion of the energized helmet-streamer arcade results in the formation of a radial current sheet. The subsequent onset of expansion-driven flare reconnection initiates the stealth CME while gradually releasing ~1.5E+30 erg of stored magnetic energy over the 20+ hour eruption duration. We show the energy flux available for flare heating and flare emission during the eruption is approximately two orders of magnitude below the energy flux required to heat the ambient background corona, thus confirming the “stealth” character of the 2008 June 1-2 CME’s lack of observable on disk signatures. We also present favorable comparisons between our simulation results and the multi-viewpoint SOHO-LASCO and STEREO-SECCHI coronagraph observations of the pre-eruption streamer structure and the initiation and evolution of the stealth streamer blowout CME.

  3. ROTATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS DURING ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, B. J.; Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R. E-mail: yanli@ssl.berkeley.edu E-mail: spiro.k.antiochos@nasa.gov

    2009-06-01

    Understanding the connection between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) is one of the most important problems in solar-terrestrial physics. We calculate the rotation of erupting field structures predicted by numerical simulations of CME initiation via the magnetic breakout model. In this model, the initial potential magnetic field has a multipolar topology and the system is driven by imposing a shear flow at the photospheric boundary. Our results yield insight on how to connect solar observations of the orientation of the filament or polarity inversion line (PIL) in the CME source region, the orientation of the CME axis as inferred from coronagraph images, and the ICME flux rope orientation obtained from in situ measurements. We present the results of two numerical simulations that differ only in the direction of the applied shearing motions (i.e., the handedness of the sheared-arcade systems and their resulting CME fields). In both simulations, eruptive flare reconnection occurs underneath the rapidly expanding sheared fields transforming the ejecta fields into three-dimensional flux rope structures. As the erupting flux ropes propagate through the low corona (from 2 to 4 R{sub sun}) the right-handed breakout flux rope rotates clockwise and the left-handed breakout flux rope rotates counterclockwise, in agreement with recent observations of the rotation of erupting filaments. We find that by 3.5 R {sub sun} the average rotation angle between the flux rope axes and the active region PIL is approximately 50 deg. We discuss the implications of these results for predicting, from the observed chirality of the pre-eruption filament and/or other properties of the CME source region, the direction and amount of rotation that magnetic flux rope structures will experience during eruption. We also discuss the implications of our results for CME initiation models.

  4. How much dust does Enceladus eject?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, Sascha; Horanyi, Mihaly; Schmidt, Jürgen; Southworth, Ben

    2015-04-01

    There is an ongoing argument how much dust per second the ice volcanoes on Saturn's ice moon Enceladus eject. By adjusting their plume model to the dust flux measured by the Cassini dust detector during the close Enceladus flyby in 2005, as well as to the plume brightness in Cassini imaging, Schmidt et al. (2008) obtained a total dust production rate in the plumes of about 5 kg/s. On the other hand, Ingersoll and Ewald (2011) derived a dust production rate of 51 kg/s from photometry of very high phase-angle images of the plume, a method that is sensitive also to particles in the size range of microns and larger. Knowledge of the production rate is essential for estimating the dust to gas mass ratio, which in turn is an important constraint for finding the plume source mechanism. Here we report on numerical simulations of the Enceladus dust plume. We run a large number of dynamical simulations including gravity and Lorentz force to investigate the earliest phase of the ring particle life span. The magnetic field in the vicinity of Enceladus is based on the model by Simon et al. (2012). The evolution of the electrostatic charge carried by the initially uncharged grains is treated self-consistently. Our numerical simulations reproduce dust measurements by the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) during Cassini plume traversals as well as the snowfall pattern derived from ISS observations of the Enceladus surface (Schenk et al, 2011, EPSC abstract). Based on our simulation results we are able to draw conclusions about the dust production rate as well as wether the Enceladus dust plume constitutes a dusty plasma.

  5. Videodensitometric ejection fraction from intravenous digital subtraction right ventriculograms: correlation with first pass radionuclide ejection fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Detrano, R.; MacIntyre, W.; Salcedo, E.E.; O'Donnell, J.; Underwood, D.A.; Simpfendorfer, C.; Go, R.T.; Butters, K.; Withrow, S.

    1985-06-01

    Thirty-one consecutive patients undergoing intravenous blurred mask digital subtraction right ventriculography were submitted to first pass radionuclide angiography. Second order mask resubtraction of end-diastolic and end-systolic right ventricular digital image frames was executed using preinjection end-diastolic and end-systolic frames to rid the digital subtraction images of mis-registration artifact. End-diastolic and end-systolic perimeters were drawn manually by two independent observers with a light pen. Ejection fractions calculated from the integrated videodensitometric counts within these perimeters correlated well with those derived from the first pass radionuclide right ventriculogram (r = 0.84) and the interobserver correlation was acceptable (r = 0.91). Interobserver differences occurred more frequently in patients with atrial fibrillation and in those whose tricuspid valve planes were difficult to discern on the digital subtraction right ventriculograms. These results suggest that videodensitometric analysis of digital subtraction right ventriculograms is an accurate method of determining right ventricular ejection fraction and may find wide clinical applicability.

  6. Stability and failure analysis of steering tie-rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, GongFeng; Zhang, YiLiang; Xu, XueDong; Ding, DaWei

    2008-11-01

    A new car in operation of only 8,000 km, because of malfunction, resulting in lost control and rammed into the edge of the road, and then the basic vehicle scrapped. According to the investigation of the site, it was found that the tie-rod of the car had been broken. For the subjective analysis of the accident and identifying the true causes of rupture of the tierod, a series of studies, from the angle of theory to experiment on the bended broken tie-rod, were conducted. The mechanical model was established; the stability of the defective tie-rod was simulated based on ANSYS software. Meanwhile, the process of the accident was simulated considering the effect of destabilization of different vehicle speed and direction of the impact. Simultaneously, macro graphic test, chemical composition analysis, microstructure analysis and SEM analysis of the fracture were implemented. The results showed that: 1) the toughness of the tie-rod is at a normal level, but there is some previous flaws. One quarter of the fracture surface has been cracked before the accident. However, there is no relationship between the flaw and this incident. The direct cause is the dynamic instability leading to the large deformation of impact loading. 2) The declining safety factor of the tie-rod greatly due to the previous flaws; the result of numerical simulation shows that previous flaw is the vital factor of structure instability, on the basis of the comparison of critical loads of the accident tie-rod and normal. The critical load can decrease by 51.3% when the initial defect increases 19.54% on the cross-sectional area, which meets the Theory of Koiter.

  7. System for measuring spatial distribution of ejected droplets, a concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayvazian, R. A.

    1968-01-01

    System measures the spatial distribution of high-velocity droplets ejected from a nozzle or spray gun. The system employs an electrically resistive grid as the sensing screen, electrical leads, and a signal scanner such as a cathode ray tube.

  8. Particle ejection during mergers of dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Carucci, Isabella P.; Sparre, Martin; Hansen, Steen H.; Joyce, Michael E-mail: sparre@dark-cosmology.dk E-mail: joyce@lpnhe.in2p3.fr

    2014-06-01

    Dark matter halos are built from accretion and merging. During merging some of the dark matter particles may be ejected with velocities higher than the escape velocity. We use both N-body simulations and single-particle smooth-field simulations to demonstrate that rapid changes to the mean field potential are responsible for such ejection, and in particular that dynamical friction plays no significant role in it. Studying a range of minor mergers, we find that typically between 5–15% of the particles from the smaller of the two merging structures are ejected. We also find that the ejected particles originate essentially from the small halo, and more specifically are particles in the small halo which pass later through the region in which the merging occurs.

  9. Classification of Contextual Use of Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction Assessments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngjun; Garvin, Jennifer; Goldstein, Mary K; Meystre, Stéphane M

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the left ventricular ejection fraction is critical for the optimal care of patients with heart failure. When a document contains multiple ejection fraction assessments, accurate classification of their contextual use is necessary to filter out historical findings or recommendations and prioritize the assessments for selection of document level ejection fraction information. We present a natural language processing system that classifies the contextual use of both quantitative and qualitative left ventricular ejection fraction assessments in clinical narrative documents. We created support vector machine classifiers with a variety of features extracted from the target assessment, associated concepts, and document section information. The experimental results showed that our classifiers achieved good performance, reaching 95.6% F1-measure for quantitative assessments and 94.2% F1-measure for qualitative assessments in a five-fold cross-validation evaluation. PMID:26262121

  10. Mass ejected by impacts with materials of various strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-02-01

    Similarity solutions are used to discuss impacts on asteroids of various strengths, concentrating on the voids produced, the mass ejected, and its thermodynamic and mechanical state. Numerical calculations have advantages and limitations for the next step in complexity.

  11. CONTROL FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lichtenberger, H.V.; Cameron, R.A.

    1959-03-31

    S>A control rod operating device in a nuclear reactor of the type in which the control rod is gradually withdrawn from the reactor to a position desired during stable operation is described. The apparatus is comprised essentially of a stop member movable in the direction of withdrawal of the control rod, a follower on the control rod engageable with the stop and means urging the follower against the stop in the direction of withdrawal. A means responsive to disengagement of the follower from the stop is provided for actuating the control rod to return to the reactor shut-down position.

  12. Ejection of gaseous clumps from gravitationally unstable protostellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, E. I.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the dynamics of gaseous clumps formed via gravitational fragmentation in young protostellar disks, focusing on the fragments that are ejected from the disk via many-body gravitational interaction. Methods: Numerical hydrodynamics simulations were employed to study the evolution of young protostellar disks that were formed from the collapse of rotating pre-stellar cores. Results: The protostellar disks that formed in our models undergo gravitational fragmentation driven by continuing mass-loading from parental collapsing cores. Several fragments can be ejected from the disk during the early evolution, but the low-mass fragments (<15 MJup) disperse, which creates spectacular bow-type structures while passing through the disk and collapsing core. The least massive fragment that survived the ejection (21 MJup) straddles the planetary-mass limit, while the most massive ejected fragments (145 MJup) can break up into several pieces, leading to the ejection of wide separation binary clumps in the brown-dwarf mass range. About half of the ejected fragments are gravitationally bound, the majority are supported by rotation against gravity, and all fragments have the specific angular momentum that is much higher than that expected for brown dwarfs. We found that the internal structure of the ejected fragments is distinct from what would be expected for gravitationally contracting clumps formed via molecular cloud fragmentation, which can help in differentiating their origin. Conclusions: The ejection of fragments is an important process, which is inherent to massive protostellar disks, and which produces freely floating pre-brown dwarf cores, regulates the disk and stellar masses and, potentially, enriches the intracluster medium with processed dust and complex organics.

  13. Mist Ejection of Silicon Microparticle Using a Silicon Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Yoshinori; Murakami, Takaaki; Yoshida, Yukihisa; Itoh, Toshihiro

    The novel mist-jet technology using a silicon nozzle and a silicon reflector has been developed. Ejection of water mist containing the silicon microparticles is demonstrated. Impurities of the silicon microparticles ejected on the substrate are analyzed. It has been verified for the first time that the contamination is reduced by the silicon head. The silicon pattern drawn by the head is successfully formed.

  14. Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction – Concept, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Challenges for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Miljkovik, Lidija Veterovska; Spiroska, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) with preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (HFpEF) occurs in 40 to 60% of the patients with HF, with a prognosis which is similar to HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). HFpEF pathophysiology is different from that of HFrEF, and has been characterized with diastolic dysfunction. Diastolic dysfunction has been defined with elevated left ventricular stiffness, prolonged iso-volumetric LV relaxation, slow LV filing and elevated LV end-diastolic pressure. Arterial hypertension occurs in majority cases with HFpEF worldwide. Patients are mostly older and obese. Diabetes mellitus and atrial fibrillation appear proportionally in a high frequency of patients with HFpEF. The HFpEF diagnosis is based on existence of symptoms and signs of heart failure, normal or approximately normal ejection and diagnosing of LV diastolic dysfunction by means of heart catheterization or Doppler echocardiography and/or elevated concentration of plasma natriuretic peptide. The present recommendations for HFpEF treatment include blood pressure control, heart chamber frequency control when atrial fibrillation exists, in some situations even coronary revascularization and an attempt for sinus rhythm reestablishment. Up to now, it is considered that no medication or a group of medications improve the survival of HFpEF patients. Due to these causes and the bad prognosis of the disorder, rigorous control is recommended of the previously mentioned precipitating factors for this disorder. This paper presents a universal review of the most important parameters which determine this disorder.

  15. Self-assembly of rod-coil-rod ABA-type triblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Zhong; Sun, Zhao-Yan; Zhang, Cheng-Xiang; An, Li-Jia; Tong, Zhen

    2008-02-21

    Self-assembled behavior of symmetric ABA rod-coil-rod triblock copolymer melts is studied by applying self-consistent-field lattice techniques in three-dimensional space. The phase diagram is constructed to understand the effects of the chain architecture on the self-assembled behavior. Four stable structures are observed for the ABA rod-coil-rod triblock, i.e., spherelike, lamellar, gyroidlike, and cylindrical structures. Different from AB rod-coil diblock and BAB coil-rod-coil triblock copolymers, the lamellar structure observed in ABA rod-coil-rod triblock copolymer melts is not stable for high volume fraction of the rod component (f(rod)=0.8), which is attributed to the intramolecular interactions between the two rod blocks of the polymer chain. When 0.3rod)<0.7, the intramolecular interactions between the two rigid blocks of the polymer chain are decrease, which results in the occurrence of some interesting metastable mixed structures. These structures have not been observed in polymers containing only one rod block, such as a lamellar-alt-lamellar structure. The results are expected to provide guidance for the design of microstructures in experiments. PMID:18298171

  16. Stereoscopic Observations of Low Coronal Ejections With and Without CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, N. V.; Wülser, J.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Lemen, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    Yohkoh soft X-ray images of solar flares have frequently shown characteristic ejections during the impulsive phase. They are thought to be plasmoids that hold important information on magnetic reconnection. These ejections are intimately associated with coronal mass ejections (e.g., Nitta & Akiyama 1999; Kim et al. 2005). They probably represent internal structures of CMEs, i.e., high-temperature counterparts of filament eruptions. However, their relation with ejections seen at low temperatures has not been studied systematically, although TRACE has revealed many beautiful examples. In this work we study ejections observed by the SECCHI EUVI on STEREO. Some of them are associated with CMEs, and others are not. Using pairs of EUVI images from spacecraft A and B, the trajectories of ejecta in individual channels (with representative temperatures 0.1-2 MK) are reconstructed in 3D. We discuss these ejections at different temperatures in the context of CMEs. Specifically, we ask what kinetic properties are correlated with CMEs and how they are related with CME manifestations in the low corona such as dimming and waves.

  17. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Crever, F.E.

    1962-05-01

    BS>A slow-acting shim rod for control of major variations in reactor neutron flux and a fast-acting control rod to correct minor flux variations are employed to provide a sensitive, accurate control system. The fast-acting rod is responsive to an error signal which is produced by changes in the neutron flux from a predetermined optimum level. When the fast rod is thus actuated in a given direction, means is provided to actuate the slow-moving rod in that direction to return the fast rod to a position near the midpoint of its control range. (AEC)

  18. Rotation of a Thin Elastic Rod Injected into a Cylindrical Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, Connor; Su, Tianxiang; Wicks, Nathan; Pabon, Jahir; Reis, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    We report the results from an experimental investigation of the buckling of a thin elastic rod injected into a horizontal cylindrical constraint, with an emphasis on comparing the two cases of rotating, or not, the rod at the injection site. We are particularly interested on the total length of rod that can be injected into the pipe prior to the onset of helical buckling. This instability arises due to the frictional rod-constraint contact that eventually leads to the buildup of axial stress on the rod, above a critical value. We explore the dependence of the buckling conditions on the physical and control parameters of the system (e.g. material and geometric parameters, injection speed and rotation frequency) and rationalize the underlying physical mechanism through a reduced model. Funding and support provided by Schlumberger-Doll Research.

  19. Growth and Morphology of Rod Eutectics

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Teng; Shan Liu; R. Trivedi

    2008-03-17

    The formation of rod eutectic microstructure is investigated systematically in a succinonitrile-camphor alloy of eutectic composition by using the directional solidification technique. A new rod eutectic configuration is observed in which the rods form with elliptical cylindrical shape. Two different orientations of the ellipse are observed that differ by a 90{sup o} rotation such that the major and the minor axes are interchanged. Critical experiments in thin samples, where a single layer of rods forms, show that the spacing and orientation of the elliptic rods are governed by the growth rate and the sample thickness. In thicker samples, multi layers of rods form with circular cross-section and the scaling law between the spacing and velocity predicted by the Jackson and Hunt model is validated. A theoretical model is developed for a two-dimensional array of elliptical rods that are arranged in a hexagonal or a square array, and the results are shown to be consistent with the experimental observations. The model of elliptic rods is also shown to reduce to that for the circular rod eutectic when the lengths of the two axes are equal, and to the lamellar eutectic model when one of the axes is much larger than the other one.

  20. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest; Pardini, John A.; Walker, David E.

    1987-01-01

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  1. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  2. The directional sensitivity of retinal rods.

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, M; Ching, C C; Kitahara, K

    1983-01-01

    Rod field sensitivity, 10-S(r) (i.e. the reciprocal of the radiance of a background required for 10-fold elevation of rod threshold) was measured for monochromatic backgrounds traversing the pupil at various points (r) on three subjects. The wave-length dependency of the directional sensitivities of the three foveal cone mechanisms of the principal subject have been reported previously (Alpern & Kitahara, 1983). Rods, as cones, are less sensitive to obliquely incident, than to normally incident backgrounds. At the pupil margin (4 mm) the effect is between 0.368 and 0.976 log10 units smaller for rods. After correction for losses by corneal reflexion and by absorption in the lens, S(r) for rods is reasonably described by the parabolic equation used by Stiles (1937) to quantify the directional sensitivity of cones. The small effect for rods precludes a description as consistently precise as this equation provides for cones. The steepness of the parabolic curve best fitting the directional sensitivity data of the rods of the principal subject was independent of background wave number. For a second subject, whose rods are supposed to be smaller, it was directly proportional to the square of that wave number. The latter is the expectation if the directional sensitivity of this subject's rods were determined by principles outlined in the diffraction theory of Simon (1970). PMID:6644624

  3. [New therapy concepts for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction].

    PubMed

    Tschöpe, C; Pieske, B

    2015-04-01

    The management of patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) remains challenging and requires an accurate diagnosis. Although currently no convincing therapy that can prolong survival in patients with HFpEF has been established, treatment of fluid retention, heart rate and control of comorbidities are important cornerstones to improve the quality of life and symptoms. In recent years many new therapy targets have been tested for development of successful interventional strategies for HFpEF. Insights into new mechanisms of HFpEF have shown that heart failure is associated with dysregulation of the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-protein kinase (NO-cGMP-PK) pathway. Two new drugs are currently under investigation to test whether this pathway can be significantly improved by either the neprilysin inhibitor LCZ 696 due to an increase in natriuretic peptides or by the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator vericiguat, which is also able to increase cGMP. In addition, several preclinical or early phase studies which are currently investigating new mechanisms for matrix, intracellular calcium and energy regulation including the role of microRNAs and new devices are presented and discussed. PMID:25737289

  4. Dynamics of left ventricular ejection in obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Murgo, J P; Alter, B R; Dorethy, J F; Altobelli, S A; McGranahan, G M

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dynamics of left ventricular ejection in patients with obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 30 patients with HCM and 29 patients with no evidence of cardiovascular disease were studied during cardiac catheterization. Using a single multisensor catheter, electromagnetically derived ascending aortic flow velocity and high fidelity left ventricular and aortic pressures were recorded during rest (n = 47) and provocative maneuvers (n = 23). Dynamic ventricular emptying during rest was also analyzed with frame-by-frame angiography (n = 46). Left ventricular outflow was independently derived from both flow velocity and angiographic techniques. The HCM patients were subdivided into three groups: (I) intraventricular gradients at rest (n = 9), (II) intraventricular gradients only with provocation (n = 12), and (III) no intraventricular gradients despite provocation (n = 9). During rest, the percentage of the total systolic ejection period during which forward aortic flow existed was as follows (mean +/- 1 SD): group I, 69 +/- 17% (flow), 64 +/- 6% (angio); group II, 63 +/- 14% (flow), 65 +/- 6% (angio); group III, 61 +/- 16% (flow), 62 +/- 4% (angio); control group, 90 +/- 5% (flow), 86 +/- 9% (angio). No significant difference was observed between any of the HCM subgroups, but compared with the control group, ejection was completed much earlier in systole independent of the presence or absence of intraventricular gradients. These results suggest that "outflow obstruction," as traditionally defined by the presence of an abnormal intraventricular pressure gradient and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, does not impede left ventricular outflow in HCM. PMID:6449522

  5. Dynamics of left ventricular ejection in obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Murgo, J P; Alter, B R; Dorethy, J F; Altobelli, S A; McGranahan, G M

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dynamics of left ventricular ejection in patients with obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 30 patients with HCM and 29 patients with no evidence of cardiovascular disease were studied during cardiac catheterization. Using a single multisensor catheter, electromagnetically derived ascending aortic flow velocity and high fidelity left ventricular and aortic pressures were recorded during rest (n = 47) and provocative maneuvers (n = 23). Dynamic ventricular emptying during rest was also analyzed with frame-by-frame angiography (n = 46). Left ventricular outflow was independently derived from both flow velocity and angiographic techniques. The HCM patients were subdivided into three groups: (I) intraventricular gradients at rest (n = 9), (II) intraventricular gradients only with provocation (n = 12), and (III) no intraventricular gradients despite provocation (n = 9). During rest, the percentage of the total systolic ejection period during which forward aortic flow existed was as follows (mean +/- 1 SD): group I, 69 +/- 17% (flow), 64 +/- 6% (angio); group II, 63 +/- 14% (flow), 65 +/- 6% (angio); group III, 61 +/- 16% (flow), 62 +/- 4% (angio); control group, 90 +/- 5% (flow), 86 +/- 9% (angio). No significant difference was observed between any of the HCM subgroups, but compared with the control group, ejection was completed much earlier in systole independent of the presence or absence of intraventricular gradients. These results suggest that "outflow obstruction," as traditionally defined by the presence of an abnormal intraventricular pressure gradient and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, does not impede left ventricular outflow in HCM. PMID:6449522

  6. Characterizing the original ejection velocity field of the Koronis family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, V.; Nesvorný, D.; Aljbaae, S.

    2016-06-01

    An asteroid family forms as a result of a collision between an impactor and a parent body. The fragments with ejection speeds higher than the escape velocity from the parent body can escape its gravitational pull. The cloud of escaping debris can be identified by the proximity of orbits in proper element, or frequency, domains. Obtaining estimates of the original ejection speed can provide valuable constraints on the physical processes occurring during collision, and used to calibrate impact simulations. Unfortunately, proper elements of asteroids families are modified by gravitational and non-gravitational effects, such as resonant dynamics, encounters with massive bodies, and the Yarkovsky effect, such that information on the original ejection speeds is often lost, especially for older, more evolved families. It has been recently suggested that the distribution in proper inclination of the Koronis family may have not been significantly perturbed by local dynamics, and that information on the component of the ejection velocity that is perpendicular to the orbital plane (vW), may still be available, at least in part. In this work we estimate the magnitude of the original ejection velocity speeds of Koronis members using the observed distribution in proper eccentricity and inclination, and accounting for the spread caused by dynamical effects. Our results show that (i) the spread in the original ejection speeds is, to within a 15% error, inversely proportional to the fragment size, and (ii) the minimum ejection velocity is of the order of 50 m/s, with larger values possible depending on the orbital configuration at the break-up.

  7. Computing Temperatures In Optically Pumped Laser Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program presents new model solving temperature-distribution problem for laser rods of finite length and calculates both radial and axial components of temperature distributions in these rods. Contains several self-checking schemes to prevent over-writing of memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  8. Tipping Time of a Quantum Rod

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrikar, Onkar

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of a quantum rod, pivoted at its lower end on an impenetrable floor and restricted to moving in the vertical plane under the gravitational potential, is studied analytically under the approximation that the rod is initially localized to a "small-enough" neighbourhood around the point of classical unstable equilibrium. It is shown…

  9. Two Solar Flares that Became X-ray Plasma Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, M.

    Solar flares and X-ray plasma ejections (XPEs) occur simultaneously but usually are separated spatially. We present two exceptional events observed by Yohkoh in 2001 October 2 (event 1) and 2000 October 16 (event 2), in which features of flares and XPEs are mixed. Namely, the soft and hard X-ray images show intense sources of emission that move dynamically. Both events occurred inside broad active regions showing complicated multi-level structure reaching up to 200 Mm high. Both events show also similar four-stages evolution: (1) a fast rise of a system of loops, (2) sudden changes in their emission distribution, (3) a reconfiguration leading to liberation of large amounts of plasma, (4) a small, static loop as the final remnant. Nevertheless, the events are probably caused by different physical processes: emerging magnetic flux plus reconnection (event 1) and reconnection plus ballooning instability (event 2). Different is also the final destination of the ejected plasma: in the event 1 overlying magnetic fields stop the ejection, in the event 2 the ejection destabilizes the overall magnetic structure and forms a coronal mass ejection (CME).

  10. Could Jupiter or Saturn Have Ejected a Fifth Giant Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutier, Ryan; Tamayo, Daniel; Valencia, Diana

    2015-11-01

    Models of the dynamical evolution of the early solar system that follow the dispersal of the gaseous protoplanetary disk have been widely successful in reconstructing the current orbital configuration of the giant planets. Statistically, some of the most successful dynamical evolution simulations have initially included a hypothetical fifth giant planet, of ice giant (IG) mass, which gets ejected by a gas giant during the early solar system’s proposed instability phase. We investigate the likelihood of an IG ejection (IGE) event by either Jupiter or Saturn through constraints imposed by the current orbits of their wide-separation regular satellites Callisto and Iapetus, respectively. We show that planetary encounters that are sufficient to eject an IG often provide excessive perturbations to the orbits of Callisto and Iapetus, making it difficult to reconcile a planet ejection event with the current orbit of either satellite. Quantitatively, we compute the likelihood of reconciling a regular Jovian satellite orbit with the current orbit of Callisto following an IGE by Jupiter of ∼42%, and conclude that such a large likelihood supports the hypothesis of a fifth giant planet’s existence. A similar calculation for Iapetus reveals that it is much more difficult for Saturn to have ejected an IG and reconciled a Kronian satellite orbit with that of Iapetus (likelihood ∼1%), although uncertainties regarding the formation of Iapetus, with its unusual orbit, complicates the interpretation of this result.

  11. Inhibition of DNA ejection from bacteriophage by Mg+2 counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sell; Tran, C. V.; Nguyen, T. T.

    2011-03-01

    The problem of inhibiting viral DNA ejection from bacteriophages by multivalent counterions, specifically Mg+2 counterions, is studied. Experimentally, it is known that MgSO4 salt has a strong and nonmonotonic effect on the amount of DNA ejected. There exists an optimal concentration at which the minimum amount of DNA is ejected from the virus. At lower or higher concentrations, more DNA is ejected from the capsid. We propose that this phenomenon is the result of DNA overcharging by Mg+2 multivalent counterions. As Mg+2 concentration increases from zero, the net charge of DNA changes from negative to positive. The optimal inhibition corresponds to the Mg+2 concentration where DNA is neutral. At lower/higher concentrations, DNA genome is charged. It prefers to be in solution to lower its electrostatic self-energy, which consequently leads to an increase in DNA ejection. By fitting our theory to available experimental data, the strength of DNA-DNA short range attraction energies, mediated by Mg+2, is found to be -0.004 kBT per nucleotide base. This and other fitted parameters agree well with known values from other experiments and computer simulations. The parameters are also in agreement qualitatively with values for tri- and tetravalent counterions.

  12. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.; West, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

  13. Vortex Noise from Rotating Cylindrical Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, E Z; Deming, A F

    1935-01-01

    A series of round rods of the some diameter were rotated individually about the mid-point of each rod. Vortices are shed from the rods when in motion, giving rise to the emission of sound. With the rotating system placed in the open air, the distribution of sound in space, the acoustical power output, and the spectral distribution have been studied. The frequency of emission of vortices from any point on the rod is given by the formula von Karman. From the spectrum estimates are made of the distribution of acoustical power along the rod, the amount of air concerned in sound production, the "equivalent size" of the vortices, and the acoustical energy content for each vortex.

  14. Rod-Coil Block Polyimide Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Kinder, James D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    This invention is a series of rod-coil block polyimide copolymers that are easy to fabricate into mechanically resilient films with acceptable ionic or protonic conductivity at a variety of temperatures. The copolymers consist of short-rigid polyimide rod segments alternating with polyether coil segments. The rods and coil segments can be linear, branched or mixtures of linear and branched segments. The highly incompatible rods and coil segments phase separate, providing nanoscale channels for ion conduction. The polyimide segments provide dimensional and mechanical stability and can be functionalized in a number of ways to provide specialized functions for a given application. These rod-coil black polyimide copolymers are particularly useful in the preparation of ion conductive membranes for use in the manufacture of fuel cells and lithium based polymer batteries.

  15. Parallel Operation of Multiple Closely Spaced Small Aspect Ratio Rod Pinches

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor J.; Leckbee, Joshua; Bennett, Nichelle; Madrid, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David V.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale R.; Lake, Patrick W.; McCourt, Andrew L.

    2014-12-10

    A series of simulations and experiments to resolve questions about the operation of arrays of closely spaced small aspect ratio rod pinches has been performed. Design and post-shot analysis of the experimental results are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Both simulations and experiments support these conclusions. Penetration of current to the interior of the array appears to be efficient, as the current on the center rods is essentially equal to the current on the outer rods. Current loss in the feed due to the formation of magnetic nulls was avoided in these experiments by design of the feed surface ofmore » the cathode and control of the gap to keep the electric fields on the cathode below the emission threshold. Some asymmetry in the electron flow to the rod was observed, but the flow appeared to symmetrize as it reached the end of the rod. Interaction between the rod pinches can be controlled to allow the stable and consistent operation of arrays of rod pinches.« less

  16. Parallel Operation of Multiple Closely Spaced Small Aspect Ratio Rod Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor J.; Leckbee, Joshua; Bennett, Nichelle; Madrid, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David V.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale R.; Lake, Patrick W.; McCourt, Andrew L.

    2014-12-10

    A series of simulations and experiments to resolve questions about the operation of arrays of closely spaced small aspect ratio rod pinches has been performed. Design and post-shot analysis of the experimental results are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Both simulations and experiments support these conclusions. Penetration of current to the interior of the array appears to be efficient, as the current on the center rods is essentially equal to the current on the outer rods. Current loss in the feed due to the formation of magnetic nulls was avoided in these experiments by design of the feed surface of the cathode and control of the gap to keep the electric fields on the cathode below the emission threshold. Some asymmetry in the electron flow to the rod was observed, but the flow appeared to symmetrize as it reached the end of the rod. Interaction between the rod pinches can be controlled to allow the stable and consistent operation of arrays of rod pinches.

  17. Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L

    2014-01-01

    Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

  18. Calculated concrete target damage by multiple rod impact and penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P A; Murphy, M J

    2006-12-29

    The effect of enhanced crater formation has been demonstrated experimentally when multiple and delayed shaped charge jets impact and penetrate concrete. The concept for enhancement utilizes a single follow-on jet at the centerline of holes produced by multiple precursor jets penetrating the surrounding the region. Calculations of the 3D crater enhancement phenomena have been conducted with multiple rods to simulate the steady state portion of the multiple jet penetration process. It is expected that this analysis methodology will be beneficial for optimization of the multiple jet crater enhancement application. We present calculated results using ALE3D where the model uses the standard Gruneisen equation of state combined with a rate dependent strength model including material damage parameters. This study focuses on the concrete material damage model as a representation of the portion of the target that would eventually be ejected creating a large bore-hole. The calculations are compared with the experimental evidence and limitations of the modeling approach are discussed.

  19. Eulerian Formulation of Spatially Constrained Elastic Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynen, Alexandre

    Slender elastic rods are ubiquitous in nature and technology. For a vast majority of applications, the rod deflection is restricted by an external constraint and a significant part of the elastic body is in contact with a stiff constraining surface. The research work presented in this doctoral dissertation formulates a computational model for the solution of elastic rods constrained inside or around frictionless tube-like surfaces. The segmentation strategy adopted to cope with this complex class of problems consists in sequencing the global problem into, comparatively simpler, elementary problems either in continuous contact with the constraint or contact-free between their extremities. Within the conventional Lagrangian formulation of elastic rods, this approach is however associated with two major drawbacks. First, the boundary conditions specifying the locations of the rod centerline at both extremities of each elementary problem lead to the establishment of isoperimetric constraints, i.e., integral constraints on the unknown length of the rod. Second, the assessment of the unilateral contact condition requires, in principle, the comparison of two curves parametrized by distinct curvilinear coordinates, viz. the rod centerline and the constraint axis. Both conspire to burden the computations associated with the method. To streamline the solution along the elementary problems and rationalize the assessment of the unilateral contact condition, the rod governing equations are reformulated within the Eulerian framework of the constraint. The methodical exploration of both types of elementary problems leads to specific formulations of the rod governing equations that stress the profound connection between the mechanics of the rod and the geometry of the constraint surface. The proposed Eulerian reformulation, which restates the rod local equilibrium in terms of the curvilinear coordinate associated with the constraint axis, describes the rod deformed configuration

  20. Polarization instability of Raman solitons ejected during supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Chao, Qing; Wagner, Kelvin H

    2015-12-28

    We numerically investigate polarization instability of soliton fission and the polarization dynamics of Raman solitons ejected during supercontinuum generation in a photonics crystal fiber using the coupled vector generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equations for both linear and circular birefringent fibers. The evolution of the state of polarizations of the ejected Raman soliton as representated on the Poincaré sphere is affected by both nonlinear and linear polarization rotations on the Poincaré sphere. The polarization dynamics reveal the presence of a polarization separatrix and the emergence of stable slow and unstable fast eigen-polarizations for the Raman solitons ejected in the supercontinuum generation process. Circularly birefringent fiber is investigated and found to simplify the nonlinear polarization dynamics. PMID:26832032

  1. Three-dimensional reconstruction of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Bernard V.; Hick, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Computer assisted tomography (CAT) techniques are used to reconstruct the three dimensional shape of coronal mass ejections in the interplanetary medium. Both the Helios 2 spacecraft zodiacal-light photometers and the Solwind coronograph measure changes in Thomson scattering of sunlight from electrons. The technique from near-perpendicular Solwind and Helios views are applied to determine the density of a mass ejection which left the solar surface on 24 May 1979. The coronograph and the Helios perspective views are not simultaneous; the Solwind observations extend outward to sky plane distances of only 10 of the solar radius, whereas the Helios 16 photometer observes to as close as 17 of the solar radius from the sun. The solution is obtained by assuming outward radial expansion and that the coronal mass ejections (CME's) have the same speed everywhere at the same height. The analyses show that CME's are extensive three dimensional structures (the CME of 24 May appears approximately shell) like in three dimensions.

  2. Fluctuation Pressure Assisted Ejection of DNA From Bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Michael J.

    2011-03-01

    The role of thermal pressure fluctuations excited within tightly packaged DNA while it is ejected from protein capsid shells is discussed in a model calculation. At equilibrium before ejection we assume the DNA is folded many times into a bundle of parallel segments that forms an equilibrium conformation at minimum free energy, which presses tightly against capsid walls. Using a canonical ensemble at temperature T we calculate internal pressure fluctuations against a slowly moving or static capsid mantle for an elastic continuum model of the folded DNA bundle. It is found that fluctuating pressures on the capsid from thermal excitation of longitudinal acoustic vibrations in the bundle whose wavelengths are exceeded by the bend persistence length may have root-mean-square values that are several tens of atmospheres for typically small phage dimensions. Comparisons are given with measured data on three mutants of lambda phage with different base pair lengths and total genome ejection pressures.

  3. Capstan Friction Model for DNA Ejection from Bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Sandip

    2012-12-01

    Bacteriophages infect cells by attaching to the outer membrane and injecting their DNA into the cell. The phage DNA is then transcribed by the cell’s transcription machinery. A number of physical mechanisms by which DNA can be translocated from the phage capsid into the cell have been identified. A fast ejection driven by the elastic and electrostatic potential energy of the compacted DNA within the viral capsid appears to be used by most phages, at least to initiate infection. In recent in vitro experiments, the speed of DNA translocation from a λ phage capsid has been measured as a function of ejected length over the entire duration of the event. Here, a mechanical model is proposed that is able to explain the observed dependence of exit velocity on ejected length, and that is also consistent with the accepted picture of the geometric arrangement of DNA within the viral capsid.

  4. Prevention by nifedipine of cold pressor-induced decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, S.Z.; White, H.D.; Holman, B.L.; Nesto, R.W.; Mudge, G.H. Jr.; Muller, J.E.; Kozlowski, J.; Wynne, J.

    1983-06-01

    To examine the effects of nifedipine on changes in ventricular function produced by cold, the cold pressor test was administered to eight patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease. Radionuclide ventriculograms were obtained at baseline and during the cold pressor stimulus both before and after administration of nifedipine, 10 mg buccally; thus, four serial radionuclide ventriculograms were obtained per patient. The cold pressor stimulus did not produce any significant difference in the mean (+/- standard deviation) peak rate-pressure product during the control or nifedipine test (10,900 +/- 3,390 versus 10,600 +/- 3,700). However, the increase in systolic blood pressure (p . 0.05) and the peak systolic blood pressure achieved (p less than 0.001) were greater during the control (134 +/- 19 to 160 +/- 25 mm Hg) than during the nifedipine (125 +/- 18 to 145 +/- 21 mm Hg) cold pressor test. The mean global left ventricular ejection fraction decreased during the control cold pressor test from a baseline value of 0.60 +/- 0.08 to 0.52 +/- 0.08 (p . 0.004). After nifedipine, this variable did not change during the repeat cold pressor test (0.63 +/- 0.09) compared with the repeat baseline value (0.63 +/- 0.11). Therefore, the difference in left ventricular ejection fraction response during control versus nifedipine cold pressor testing was highly significant (p less than 0.0001). In patients with obstructive coronary artery disease, nifedipine abolished the decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction observed during the control cold pressor test and may be of value to protect patients from cold-induced left ventricular dysfunction. The mechanism may be a combination of coronary artery vasodilation and systolic unloading of the left ventricle.

  5. Exercise Intolerance In Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anisha A.; Hamilton, Dale J.

    2016-01-01

    More than 50% of Americans with heart failure have preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Exercise intolerance is a hallmark of HFpEF, but the pathophysiology is not well understood. Diverse etiologies and incomplete mechanistic understanding have resulted in ineffective management strategies to improve the outcomes of HFpEF. Traditional therapies that have been beneficial in the treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), neurohormonal blockade in particular, have not been effective in treating HFpEF. In this review, we address underlying mechanisms of HFpEF and present the rationale supporting exercise as a component of comprehensive management. PMID:27486493

  6. Nanoparticle plasma ejected directly from solid copper by localized microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Jerby, E.; Golts, A.; Shamir, Y.; Wonde, S.; Ashkenazi, D.; Eliaz, N.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; LeGarrec, J. L.; Narayanan, T.; Sztucki, M.; Barkay, Z.

    2009-11-09

    A plasma column ejected directly from solid copper by localized microwaves is studied. The effect stems from an induced hotspot that melts and emits ionized copper vapors as a confined fire column. Nanoparticles of {approx}20-120 nm size were revealed in the ejected column by in situ small-angle x-ray scattering. Optical spectroscopy confirmed the dominance of copper particles in the plasma column originating directly from the copper substrate. Nano- and macroparticles of copper were verified also by ex situ scanning electron microscopy. The direct conversion of solid metals to nanoparticles is demonstrated and various applications are proposed.

  7. Nusat I - The first gas can ejected satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twiggs, Robert J.

    Nusat I, an 18-inch diameter satellite, made history on April 29, 1985 by being the first satellite ejected from a newly designed Get-Away-Special canister on the Challenger orbiter. This ejection marked the beginning of a new era of satellite designs which can be inexpensively placed in orbit via the Space Shuttle. This paper describes the development of that project, including the project organization and funding, satellite design evolution, final design objectives, final satellite assembly and testing, integration before launch, and operational performance.

  8. Ejection of cool plasma into the hot corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, P.; Peter, H.; Bingert, S.

    2011-08-01

    Context. The corona is highly dynamic and shows transient events on various scales in space and time. Most of these features are related to changes in the magnetic field structure or impulsive heating caused by the conversion of magnetic to thermal energy. Aims: We investigate the processes that lead to the formation, ejection and fall of a confined plasma ejection that was observed in a numerical experiment of the solar corona. By quantifying physical parameters such as mass, velocity, and orientation of the plasma ejection relative to the magnetic field, we provide a description of the nature of this particular plasma ejection. Methods: The time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) equations are solved in a box extending from the chromosphere, which serves as a reservoir for mass and energy, to the lower corona. The plasma is heated by currents that are induced through field line braiding as a consequence of photospheric motions included in the model. Spectra of optically thin emission lines in the extreme ultraviolet range are synthesized, and magnetic field lines are traced over time. We determine the trajectory of the plasma ejection and identify anomalies in the profiles of the plasma parameters. Results: Following strong heating just above the chromosphere, the pressure rapidly increases, leading to a hydrodynamic explosion above the upper chromosphere in the low transition region. The explosion drives the plasma, which needs to follow the magnetic field lines. The ejection is then moving more or less ballistically along the loop-like field lines and eventually drops down onto the surface of the Sun. The speed of the ejection is in the range of the sound speed, well below the Alfvén velocity. Conclusions: The plasma ejection observed in a numerical experiment of the solar corona is basically a hydrodynamic phenomenon, whereas the rise of the heating rate is of magnetic nature. The granular motions in the photosphere lead (by chance) to a

  9. Thermoreversible Gels Composed of Colloidal Silica Rods with Short-Range Attractions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ryan P; Hong, Kunlun; Wagner, Norman J

    2016-08-23

    Dynamic arrest transitions of colloidal suspensions containing nonspherical particles are of interest for the design and processing of various particle technologies. To better understand the effects of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on gel and glass formation, we present a colloidal model system of octadecyl-coated silica rods, termed as adhesive hard rods (AHR), which enables control of rod aspect ratio and temperature-dependent interactions. The aspect ratios of silica rods were controlled by varying the initial TEOS concentration following the work of Kuijk et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 2346-2349) and temperature-dependent attractions were introduced by coating the calcined silica rods with an octadecyl-brush and suspending in tetradecane. The rod length and aspect ratio were found to increase with TEOS concentration as expected, while other properties such as the rod diameter, coating coverage, density, and surface roughness were nearly independent of the aspect ratio. Ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering measurements revealed temperature-dependent attractions between octadecyl-coated silica rods in tetradecane, as characterized by a low-q upturn in the scattered intensity upon thermal quenching. Lastly, the rheology of a concentrated AHR suspension in tetradecane demonstrated thermoreversible gelation behavior, displaying a nearly 5 orders of magnitude change in the dynamic moduli as the temperature was cycled between 15 and 40 °C. The adhesive hard rod model system serves as a tunable platform to explore the combined influence of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on the dynamic arrest transitions in colloidal suspensions with thermoreversible, short-range attractions. PMID:27466883

  10. Core design study of a supercritical light water reactor with double row fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    An equilibrium core for supercritical light water reactor has been designed. A novel type of fuel assembly with dual rows of fuel rods between water rods is chosen and optimized to get more uniform assembly power distributions. Stainless steel is used for fuel rod cladding and structural material. Honeycomb structure filled with thermal isolation is introduced to reduce the usage of stainless steel and to keep moderator temperature below the pseudo critical temperature. Water flow scheme with ascending coolant flow in inner regions is carried out to achieve high outlet temperature. In order to enhance coolant outlet temperature, the radial power distributions needs to be as flat as possible through operation cycle. Fuel loading pattern and control rod pattern are optimized to flatten power distribution at inner regions. Axial fuel enrichment is divided into three parts to control axial power peak, which affects maximum cladding surface temperature. (authors)

  11. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. I. STATISTICS AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SOURCE REGION CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M.; Muhr, N.; Kienreich, I.; Utz, D.

    2011-09-10

    We use high time cadence images acquired by the STEREO EUVI and COR instruments to study the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from their initiation through impulsive acceleration to the propagation phase. For a set of 95 CMEs we derived detailed height, velocity, and acceleration profiles and statistically analyzed characteristic CME parameters: peak acceleration, peak velocity, acceleration duration, initiation height, height at peak velocity, height at peak acceleration, and size of the CME source region. The CME peak accelerations we derived range from 20 to 6800 m s{sup -2} and are inversely correlated with the acceleration duration and the height at peak acceleration. Seventy-four percent of the events reach their peak acceleration at heights below 0.5 R{sub sun}. CMEs that originate from compact sources low in the corona are more impulsive and reach higher peak accelerations at smaller heights. These findings can be explained by the Lorentz force, which drives the CME accelerations and decreases with height and CME size.

  12. Granular materials interacting with thin flexible rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Alfredo Gay; Campello, Eduardo M. B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we develop a computational model for the simulation of problems wherein granular materials interact with thin flexible rods. We treat granular materials as a collection of spherical particles following a discrete element method (DEM) approach, while flexible rods are described by a large deformation finite element (FEM) rod formulation. Grain-to-grain, grain-to-rod, and rod-to-rod contacts are fully permitted and resolved. A simple and efficient strategy is proposed for coupling the motion of the two types (discrete and continuum) of materials within an iterative time-stepping solution scheme. Implementation details are shown and discussed. Validity and applicability of the model are assessed by means of a few numerical examples. We believe that robust, efficiently coupled DEM-FEM schemes can be a useful tool to the simulation of problems wherein granular materials interact with thin flexible rods, such as (but not limited to) bombardment of grains on beam structures, flow of granular materials over surfaces covered by threads of hair in many biological processes, flow of grains through filters and strainers in various industrial segregation processes, and many others.

  13. Gelation and mechanical response of patchy rods.

    PubMed

    Kazem, Navid; Majidi, Carmel; Maloney, Craig E

    2015-10-28

    We perform Brownian dynamics simulations to study the gelation of suspensions of attractive, rod-like particles. We show that in detail the rod-rod surface interactions can dramatically affect the dynamics of gelation and the structure and mechanics of the networks that form. If the attraction between the rods is perfectly smooth along their length, they will collapse into compact bundles. If the attraction is sufficiently corrugated or patchy, over time, a rigid space-spanning network will form. We study the structure and mechanical properties of the networks that form as a function of the fraction of the surface, f, that is allowed to bind. Surprisingly, the structural and mechanical properties are non-monotonic in f. At low f, there are not a sufficient number of cross-linking sites to form networks. At high f, rods bundle and form disconnected clusters. At intermediate f, robust networks form. The elastic modulus and yield stress are both non-monotonic in the surface coverage. The stiffest and strongest networks show an essentially homogeneous deformation under strain with rods re-orienting along the extensional axis. Weaker, more clumpy networks at high f re-orient relatively little with strong non-affine deformation. These results suggest design strategies for tailoring surface interactions between rods to yield rigid networks with optimal mechanical properties. PMID:26381995

  14. More on the penetration of yawed rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Z.; Dekel, E.; Ashuach, Y.

    2006-08-01

    One of the most complex processes, in the field of terminal ballistics, is that of yawed impact of long rods. In spite of many experimental observations, and some analytical modeling, a clear picture of this issue is still lacking. In order to gain some insight into the operating mechanisms, we developed a simple engineering model which considers the yawed rod as a series of small disks. We then define the effective length and diameter of the rod by considering those disks which are going to hit the initial crater which is opened by the impact. We also performed a series of 3D numerical simulations with various L/D tungsten alloy rods impacting a steel target, at yaws in the full range of 0-90^circ. We analyzed the results of these simulations in terms of the normalized penetration (P/D), where D is the rod diameter, and looked for systematic trends in the results for the various rods. The agreement between our model predictions and both experimental data and simulation results is quite good. Based on this agreement we can highlight some new features of the penetration process of yawed rods.

  15. FORECASTING A CORONAL MASS EJECTION'S ALTERED TRAJECTORY: ForeCAT

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.; Evans, R. M.

    2013-09-20

    To predict whether a coronal mass ejection (CME) will impact Earth, the effects of the background on the CME's trajectory must be taken into account. We develop a model, ForeCAT (Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory), of CME deflection due to magnetic forces. ForeCAT includes CME expansion, a three-part propagation model, and the effects of drag on the CME's deflection. Given the background solar wind conditions, the launch site of the CME, and the properties of the CME (mass, final propagation speed, initial radius, and initial magnetic strength), ForeCAT predicts the deflection of the CME. Two different magnetic backgrounds are considered: a scaled background based on type II radio burst profiles and a potential field source surface (PFSS) background. For a scaled background where the CME is launched from an active region located between a coronal hole and streamer region, the strong magnetic gradients cause a deflection of 8. Degree-Sign 1 in latitude and 26. Degree-Sign 4 in longitude for a 10{sup 15} g CME propagating out to 1 AU. Using the PFSS background, which captures the variation of the streamer belt (SB) position with height, leads to a deflection of 1. Degree-Sign 6 in latitude and 4. Degree-Sign 1 in longitude for the control case. Varying the CME's input parameters within observed ranges leads to the majority of CMEs reaching the SB within the first few solar radii. For these specific backgrounds, the SB acts like a potential well that forces the CME into an equilibrium angular position.

  16. Anisotropy in CdSe quantum rods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang-shi

    2003-09-01

    The size-dependent optical and electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals have drawn much attention in the past decade, and have been very well understood for spherical ones. The advent of the synthetic methods to make rod-like CdSe nanocrystals with wurtzite structure has offered us a new opportunity to study their properties as functions of their shape. This dissertation includes three main parts: synthesis of CdSe nanorods with tightly controlled widths and lengths, their optical and dielectric properties, and their large-scale assembly, all of which are either directly or indirectly caused by the uniaxial crystallographic structure of wurtzite CdSe. The hexagonal wurtzite structure is believed to be the primary reason for the growth of CdSe nanorods. It represents itself in the kinetic stabilization of the rod-like particles over the spherical ones in the presence of phosphonic acids. By varying the composition of the surfactant mixture used for synthesis we have achieved tight control of the widths and lengths of the nanorods. The synthesis of monodisperse CdSe nanorods enables us to systematically study their size-dependent properties. For example, room temperature single particle fluorescence spectroscopy has shown that nanorods emit linearly polarized photoluminescence. Theoretical calculations have shown that it is due to the crossing between the two highest occupied electronic levels with increasing aspect ratio. We also measured the permanent electric dipole moment of the nanorods with transient electric birefringence technique. Experimental results on nanorods with different sizes show that the dipole moment is linear to the particle volume, indicating that it originates from the non-centrosymmetric hexagonal lattice. The elongation of the nanocrystals also results in the anisotropic inter-particle interaction. One of the consequences is the formation of liquid crystalline phases when the nanorods are dispersed in solvent to a high enough

  17. Opsin activation of transduction in the rods of dark-reared Rpe65 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jie; Woodruff, Michael L; Cilluffo, Marianne C; Crouch, Rosalie K; Fain, Gordon L

    2005-10-01

    Rpe65 knockout mice (Rpe65-/-) are unable to synthesize the visual pigment chromophore 11-cis retinal; however, if these animals are reared in complete darkness, the rod photoreceptors accumulate a small amount of 9-cis retinal and its corresponding visual pigment isorhodopsin. Suction-electrode recording of single rods from dark-reared Rpe65-/- mice showed that the rods were about 400 times less sensitive than wild-type control rods and that the maximum responses were much smaller in amplitude. Spectral sensitivity measurements indicated that Rpe65-/- rod responses were generated by isorhodopsin rather than rhodopsin. Sensitivity and pigment concentration were compared in the same mice by measuring light responses from rods of one eye and pigment concentration from the retina of the other eye. Retinas had 11-35% of the normal pigment level, but the rods were of the order of 20-30 times less sensitive than could be accounted for by the loss in quantum catch. This extra desensitization must be caused by opsin-dependent activation of the visual cascade, which leads to a state equivalent to light adaptation in the dark-adapted rod. By comparing the sensitivity of dark-reared Rpe65-/- rods to that produced in normal rods by background light, we estimate that Rpe65-/- opsin is of the order of 2.5x10(-5) as efficient in activating transduction as photoactivated rhodopsin (Rh*) in WT mice. Dark-reared Rpe65-/- rods are less desensitized than rods from cyclic light-reared Rpe65-/- mice, have about 50% more photocurrent and degenerate at a slower rate. Retinas sectioned after 9 months in darkness show a larger number of photoreceptor nuclei in dark-reared animals than in cyclic light-reared animals, though both have fewer nuclei than in cyclic light-reared wild-type retinas. Both also have shorter outer segments and a lower free-Ca2+ concentration. These experiments provide the first quantitative measurement of opsin activation in physiologically responding mammalian rods

  18. Phototransduction in mouse rods and cones

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yingbin; Yau, King-Wai

    2010-01-01

    Phototransduction is the process by which light triggers an electrical signal in a photoreceptor cell. Image-forming vision in vertebrates is mediated by two types of photoreceptors: the rods and the cones. In this review, we provide a summary of the success in which the mouse has served as a vertebrate model for studying rod phototransduction, with respect to both the activation and termination steps. Cones are still not as well-understood as rods partly because it is difficult to work with mouse cones due to their scarcity and fragility. The situation may change, however. PMID:17226052

  19. Interaction of Fixed Number of Photons with Retinal Rod Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Nam Mai; Cheng, Mei Fun; Bessarab, Dmitri A.; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2014-05-01

    New tools and approaches of quantum optics offer a unique opportunity to generate light pulses carrying a precise number of photons. Accurate control over the light pulses helps to improve the characterization of photoinduced processes. Here, we study interaction of a specialized light source which provides flashes containing just one photon, with retinal rod cells of Xenopus laevis toads. We provide unambiguous proof of the single-photon sensitivity of rod cells without relying on the statistical modeling. We determine their quantum efficiencies without the use of any precalibrated detectors and obtain the value of (29±4.7)%. Our approach provides the path for future studies and applications of quantum properties of light in phototransduction, vision, and photosynthesis.

  20. Discovery of collimated ejection from the symbiotic binary BF Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skopal, A.; Tomov, N. A.; Tomova, M. T.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Detection of collimated ejection from white dwarfs (WD) in symbiotic binaries is very rare and has employed a variety of methods in X-ray, radio, optical imagery, and spectroscopy. To date, its signature in the optical spectra has only been recorded for four objects (MWC 560, Hen 3-1341, StHα 190, and Z And). Aims: We present the first observational evidence of highly-collimated bipolar ejection from the symbiotic binary BF Cyg, which developed during its current (2006-12) active phase, and determine their physical parameters. Methods: We monitored the outburst with the optical high-resolution spectroscopy and multicolour UBVRCIC photometry. Results: During 2009, three years after the 2006-eruption of BF Cyg, satellite components to Hα and Hβ lines emerged in the spectrum. During 2012, they became stable and were located symmetrically with respect to the main emission core of the line. Spectral properties of these components suggest bipolar ejection collimated within an opening angle of ≲15°, whose radiation is produced by an optically thin medium with the emission measure of 1-2 × 1059 (d/3.8 kpc)2 cm-3. Conclusions: Formation of the collimated ejection a few years after the eruption and its evolution on a time scale of years at a constant optical brightness can aid us in better understanding the accretion process during the active phases of symbiotic stars. Based on data collected with 2-m telescope at the Rozhen National Astronomical Observatory and the David Dunlap Observatory.

  1. 49 CFR 571.226 - Standard No. 226; Ejection Mitigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (within the meaning of 49 CFR 567.7). S3. Definitions. Ejection impactor means a device specified in S7.1... three or fewer carlines, as that term is defined in 49 CFR 583.4, in the United States during a... of 49 CFR 567.7) before September 1, 2018, after having been previously certified in accordance...

  2. Constraints on the original ejection velocity fields of asteroid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, V.; Nesvorný, D.

    2016-04-01

    Asteroid families form as a result of large-scale collisions among main belt asteroids. The orbital distribution of fragments after a family-forming impact could inform us about their ejection velocities. Unfortunately, however, orbits dynamically evolve by a number of effects, including the Yarkovsky drift, chaotic diffusion, and gravitational encounters with massive asteroids, such that it is difficult to infer the ejection velocities eons after each family's formation. Here, we analyse the inclination distribution of asteroid families, because proper inclination can remain constant over long time intervals, and could help us to understand the distribution of the component of the ejection velocity that is perpendicular to the orbital plane (vW). From modelling the initial break up, we find that the distribution of vW of the fragments, which manage to escape the parent body's gravity, should be more peaked than a Gaussian distribution (i.e. be leptokurtic) even if the initial distribution was Gaussian. We surveyed known asteroid families for signs of a peaked distribution of vW using a statistical measure of the distribution peakedness or flatness known as kurtosis. We identified eight families whose vW distribution is significantly leptokurtic. These cases (e.g. the Koronis family) are located in dynamically quiet regions of the main belt, where, presumably, the initial distribution of vW was not modified by subsequent orbital evolution. We suggest that, in these cases, the inclination distribution can be used to obtain interesting information about the original ejection velocity field.

  3. 49 CFR 571.226 - Standard No. 226; Ejection Mitigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (within the meaning of 49 CFR 567.7). S3. Definitions. Ejection impactor means a device specified in S7.1... three or fewer carlines, as that term is defined in 49 CFR 583.4, in the United States during a... of 49 CFR 567.7) before September 1, 2018, after having been previously certified in accordance...

  4. 49 CFR 571.226 - Standard No. 226; Ejection Mitigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard No. 226; Ejection Mitigation. 571.226 Section 571.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards §...

  5. An Investigation of ejected particulate from shocked Lead (Pb) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routley, Nathan; Kendall, Paul; Edwards, Terry; Burns, Malcolm; Mears, Alan

    2011-06-01

    Abstract. An experimental series has been carried out to investigate the relationship between shock break out pressure, surface roughness and the quantity of ejected particulate emitted from Lead (Pb) samples. High Explosives (HE) mounted against the rear surface of the Pb samples generate an attenuating shock wave in the Pb. For each shot, the Pb sample thickness was chosen to provide a range of shock break out pressures, which spanned melt on release, ~27 GPa for Pb. For the majority of the experiments the free surface finish was manufactured to have a predefined groove depth and wavelength. The interaction of the shock wave with these surface features on the Pb / vacuum interface can lead to micro-jetting from the Pb with particulate being ejected. The ejected particulate was diagnosed using a mixture of piezoelectric probes and Asay barrier style probes. The free surface velocity history was measured with heterodyne velocimetry probes. The ejected particulate mass-velocity distributions have been correlated with the shock breakout pressure and surface roughness. The results show a transition in ejecta production at the Pb melt on release pressure.

  6. Electronic circuit detects left ventricular ejection events in cardiovascular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebben, V. D.; Webb, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Electronic circuit processes arterial blood pressure waveform to produce discrete signals that coincide with beginning and end of left ventricular ejection. Output signals provide timing signals for computers that monitor cardiovascular systems. Circuit operates reliably for heart rates between 50 and 200 beats per minute.

  7. Syntaxin 3 and SNAP-25 pairing, regulated by omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid, controls the delivery of rhodopsin for the biogenesis of cilia-derived sensory organelles, the rod outer segments.

    PubMed

    Mazelova, Jana; Ransom, Nancy; Astuto-Gribble, Lisa; Wilson, Michael C; Deretic, Dusanka

    2009-06-15

    The biogenesis of cilia-derived sensory organelles, the photoreceptor rod outer segments (ROS), is mediated by rhodopsin transport carriers (RTCs). The small GTPase Rab8 regulates ciliary targeting of RTCs, but their specific fusion sites have not been characterized. Here, we report that the Sec6/8 complex, or exocyst, is a candidate effector for Rab8. We also show that the Qa-SNARE syntaxin 3 is present in the rod inner segment (RIS) plasma membrane at the base of the cilium and displays a microtubule-dependent concentration gradient, whereas the Qbc-SNARE SNAP-25 is uniformly distributed in the RIS plasma membrane and the synapse. Treatment with omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid [DHA, 22:6(n-3)] causes increased co-immunoprecipitation and colocalization of SNAP-25 and syntaxin 3 at the base of the cilium, which results in the increased delivery of membrane to the ROS. This is particularly evident in propranolol-treated retinas, in which the DHA-mediated increase in SNARE pairing overcomes the tethering block, including dissociation of Sec8 into the cytosol. Together, our data indicate that the Sec6/8 complex, syntaxin 3 and SNAP-25 regulate rhodopsin delivery, probably by mediating docking and fusion of RTCs. We show further that DHA, an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid of the ROS, increases pairing of syntaxin 3 and SNAP-25 to regulate expansion of the ciliary membrane and ROS biogenesis. PMID:19454479

  8. Flux Pinning Properties in YBa2Cu3Oy Films with BaSnO3 Nano-rods and Spatially-controlled Y2O3 Nano-dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueyoshi, Tetsuro; Tokita, Yuuki; Fujiyoshi, Takanori; Mitsugi, Fumiaki; Ikegami, Tomoaki

    The quasi-multilayered films consisting of YBa2Cu3Oy layers with BaSnO3 nano-rods and pseudo-layers of Y2O3 were prepared using a multilayering process in a PLD method, in order to investigate the influence of the spatial distribution of Y2O3 nano-dots on the hybrid flux pinning. The additional doping of Y2O3, however, hardly contributed to the flux pinning at higher temperature, probably due to Y2O3 nano-dots in small size in this work. At lower temperature, on the other hand, all the multilayered films show higher critical current density Jc than the film only with BaSnO3 nano-rods in a wide range of magnetic field orientations centered at B || ab. In particular, more flat angular dependence of Jc at low magnetic field around B || ab was found for the multilayered film with Y2O3 nano-dots more distributed in the out-of-plane direction. For B || c, by contrast, the magnetic field dependence of Jc was more weakened for the multilayered film with more correlated row of Y2O3 nano-dots along the in-plane direction.

  9. Impact of AD995 alumina rods

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Furnish, M.D.; Reinhart, W.D.; Grady, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Gas guns and velocity interferometric techniques have been used to determine the loading behavior of an AD995 alumina rod 19 mm in diameter by 75 mm and 150 mm long, respectively. Graded-density materials were used to impact both bare and sleeved alumina rods while the velocity interferometer was used to monitor the axial-velocity of the free end of the rods. Results of these experiments demonstrate that (1) a time-dependent stress pulse generated during impact allows an efficient transition from the initial uniaxial strain loading to a uniaxial stress state as the stress pulse propagates through the rod, and (2) the intermediate loading rates obtained in this configuration lie between split Hopkinson bar and shock-loading techniques.

  10. Double-clad nuclear fuel safety rod

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, William H.; Atcheson, Donald B.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan

    1984-01-01

    A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

  11. Subclinical LV Dysfunction Detection Using Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Hypertensive Patients with Preserved LV Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Amal Mohamed; Keddeas, Viola William; Ali, Yasmin Abdelrazek; El Okl, Reham Atef

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early detection of subclinical left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction in hypertensive patients is important for the prevention of progression of hypertensive heart disease. METHODS We studied 60 hypertensive patients (age ranged from 21 to 49 years, the duration of hypertension ranged from 1 to 18 years) and 30 healthy controls, all had preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), detected by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2D-STE). RESULTS There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding ejection fraction (EF) by Simpson’s method. Systolic velocity was significantly higher in the control group, and global longitudinal strain was significantly higher in the control group compared with the hypertensive group. In the hypertensive group, 23 of 60 patients had less negative global longitudinal strain than −19.1, defined as reduced systolic function, which is detected by 2D-STE (subclinical systolic dysfunction), when compared with 3 of 30 control subjects. CONCLUSION 2D-STE detected substantial impairment of LV systolic function in hypertensive patients with preserved LVEF, which identifies higher risk subgroups for earlier medical intervention. PMID:27385916

  12. A simple retinal mechanism contributes to perceptual interactions between rod- and cone-mediated responses in primates.

    PubMed

    Grimes, William N; Graves, Logan R; Summers, Mathew T; Rieke, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Visual perception across a broad range of light levels is shaped by interactions between rod- and cone-mediated signals. Because responses of retinal ganglion cells, the output cells of the retina, depend on signals from both rod and cone photoreceptors, interactions occurring in retinal circuits provide an opportunity to link the mechanistic operation of parallel pathways and perception. Here we show that rod- and cone-mediated responses interact nonlinearly to control the responses of primate retinal ganglion cells; these nonlinear interactions, surprisingly, were asymmetric, with rod responses strongly suppressing subsequent cone responses but not vice-versa. Human psychophysical experiments revealed a similar perceptual asymmetry. Nonlinear interactions in the retinal output cells were well-predicted by linear summation of kinetically-distinct rod- and cone-mediated signals followed by a synaptic nonlinearity. These experiments thus reveal how a simple mechanism controlling interactions between parallel pathways shapes circuit output and perception. PMID:26098124

  13. Epigenomic landscapes of retinal rods and cones

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Alisa; Luo, Chongyuan; Davis, Fred P; Mukamel, Eran A; Henry, Gilbert L; Nery, Joseph R; Urich, Mark A; Picard, Serge; Lister, Ryan; Eddy, Sean R; Beer, Michael A; Ecker, Joseph R; Nathans, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptors are highly similar in many respects but they have important functional and molecular differences. Here, we investigate genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation and chromatin accessibility in mouse rods and cones and correlate differences in these features with gene expression, histone marks, transcription factor binding, and DNA sequence motifs. Loss of NR2E3 in rods shifts their epigenomes to a more cone-like state. The data further reveal wide differences in DNA methylation between retinal photoreceptors and brain neurons. Surprisingly, we also find a substantial fraction of DNA hypo-methylated regions in adult rods that are not in active chromatin. Many of these regions exhibit hallmarks of regulatory regions that were active earlier in neuronal development, suggesting that these regions could remain undermethylated due to the highly compact chromatin in mature rods. This work defines the epigenomic landscapes of rods and cones, revealing features relevant to photoreceptor development and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11613.001 PMID:26949250

  14. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  15. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets. PMID:27131565

  16. High-throughput rod-induced electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Teh, Kwok Siong; Han, Zhibin; Luo, Guoxi; Shi, Chuan; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao; Lin, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    A high throughput electrospinning process, directly from flat polymer solution surfaces induced by a moving insulating rod, has been proposed and demonstrated. Different rods made of either phenolic resin or paper with a diameter of 1–3 cm and a resistance of about 100–500 MΩ, has been successfully utilized in the process. The rod is placed approximately 10 mm above the flat polymer solution surface with a moving speed of 0.005–0.4 m s‑1 this causes the solution to generate multiple liquid jets under an applied voltage of 15–60 kV for the tip-less electrospinning process. The local electric field induced by the rod can boost electrohydrodynamic instability in order to generate Taylor cones and liquid jets. Experimentally, it is found that a large rod diameter and a small solution-to-rod distance can enhance the local electrical field to reduce the magnitude of the applied voltage. In the prototype setup with poly (ethylene oxide) polymer solution, an area of 5 cm  ×  10 cm and under an applied voltage of 60 kV, the maximum throughput of nanofibers is recorded to be approximately144 g m‑2 h‑1.

  17. The sympathetic/parasympathetic imbalance in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Floras, John S.; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic imbalance, a cardinal phenotype of human heart failure, has adverse implications for symptoms during wakefulness and sleep; for cardiac, renal, and immune function; for exercise capacity; and for lifespan and mode of death. The objectives of this Clinical Review are to summarize current knowledge concerning mechanisms for disturbed parasympathetic and sympathetic circulatory control in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and its clinical and prognostic implications; to demonstrate the patient-specific nature of abnormalities underlying this common phenotype; and to illustrate how such variation provides opportunities to improve or restore normal sympathetic/parasympathetic balance through personalized drug or device therapy. PMID:25975657

  18. 49 CFR 230.93 - Pistons and piston rods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pistons and piston rods. 230.93 Section 230.93... Tenders Driving Gear § 230.93 Pistons and piston rods. (a) Maintenance and testing. Pistons and piston rods shall be maintained in safe and suitable condition for service. Piston rods shall be inspected...

  19. International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.

    1981-05-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

  20. Mechanical performance of fiberglass sucker-rod strings

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, H.A.

    1988-08-01

    The natural frequencies of fiberglass sucker-rod strings can be calculated by treating the rod strings as modified spring/mass vibration systems. The ratio of the pumping-unit operating speed to the rod-string natural frequency can then be used as a basis for understanding fiberglass-rod performance and for predicting downhole pump stroke lengths.

  1. Bacterial Flagella as a Model Rigid Rod of Tunable Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Walter; Yardimci, Sevim; Gibaud, Thomas; Snow, Henry; Urbach, Jeff; Dogic, Zvonimir

    In this research, we study the physical properties of suspensions of bacterial flagella from Salmonella typhimurium prepared in a variety of rigid polymorphic shapes. Flagella act as a rigid colloidal particle that can exhibit non-trivial geometry including helices of varying dimensions, straight rods, or a combination of the two in the same filament. By controlling the conditions in which flagella are prepared, the polymorphic shape assumed by the filament can be controlled. Utilizing different polymorphic shapes, we combine results from optical microscopy observations of single filaments with bulk rheological measurements to help understand the role that constituent colloidal geometry plays in complex bulk behavior.

  2. Preliminary design report for the prototypical fuel rod consolidation system

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, J.M.

    1986-12-03

    This report documents NUTECH's preliminary design of a dry, spent fuel rod consolidation system. This preliminary design is the result of Phase I of a planned four phase project. The present report on this project provides a considerable amount of detail for a preliminary design effort. The design and all of its details are described in this Preliminary Design Report (PDR). The NUTECH dry rod consolidation system described herein is remotely operated. It provides for automatic operation, but with operator hold points between key steps in the process. The operator has the ability to switch to a manual operation mode at any point in the process. The system is directed by the operator using an executive computer which controls and coordinates the operation of the in-cell equipment. The operator monitors the process using an in-cell closed circuit television (CCTV) system with audio output and equipment status displays on the computer monitor. The in-cell mechanical equipment consists of the following: (1) two overhead cranes with manipulators; (2) a multi-degree of freedom fuel handling table and its clamping equipment; (3) a fuel assembly end fitting removal station and its tools; (4) a consolidator (which pulls rods, assembles the consolidated bundle and loads the canister); (5) a canister end cap welder and weld inspection system; (6) decontamination systems; and (7) the CCTV and microphone systems.

  3. Design and diagnosis of deviated rod-pumped wells

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.G. )

    1992-07-01

    Commonly used methods for designing rod-pumping installations presume vertical wells. This paper introduces a wave equation methodology that applies to deviated wells, whether they are deviated intentionally or unintentionally. Restrictions on surface locations and interest in horizontal drilling are increasing the need for deviated wells. Together with long-standing crooked-hole problems, these are promising subjects for further study. This paper describes a predictive method that applies to 3D problems. A well deemed too crooked to pump is studies, and a procedure for designing intentionally deviated wells is presented. The relative friction effects of rod guides are discussed, and the effect of borehole path on power consumption is treated. Deviated wells can be adequately designed with wave equation methods, and highly deviated wells can be produced with rod-pumping equipment when care is taken to control the path of the borehole. This paper should be considered as a progress report because much remains to be learned about the application of this petroleum technology.

  4. Time-Dependent Regional Myocardial Strains in Patients with Heart Failure with a Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shane P.; Secomb, Timothy W.; Hong, Brian D.; Moulton, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To better understand the etiology of HFpEF in a controlled human population, regional time-varying strains were computed using echocardiography speckle tracking in patients with heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction and normal subjects. Methods. Eleven normal volunteers and ten patients with echo-graded diastolic dysfunction and symptoms of heart failure were imaged with echocardiography and longitudinal, circumferential, and rotational strains were determined using speckle-tracking. Diastolic strain rate was also determined. Patient demographics and echo-derived flows, volumes, and pressures were recorded. Results. Peak longitudinal and circumferential strain was globally reduced in patients (p < 0.001), when compared to controls. The patients attained peak longitudinal and circumferential strain at a consistently later point in systole than controls. Rotational strains were not different in most LV regions. Early diastolic strain rate was significantly reduced in the patients (p < 0.001). LV mass and wall thickness were significantly increased in the patients; however ejection fraction was preserved and stroke volume was diminished (p < 0.001). Conclusions. This study shows that patients with HFpEF have reduced early diastolic strain rate and reduced peak strain that is regionally homogeneous and that they also utilize a longer fraction of systole to achieve peak axial strains. PMID:27042673

  5. Photovoltage of Rods and Cones in the Macaque Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeweis, David M.; Schnapf, Julie L.

    1995-05-01

    The kinetics, gain, and reliability of light responses of rod and cone photoreceptors are important determinants of overall visual sensitivity. In voltage recordings from photoreceptors in an intact primate retina, rods were found to be functionally isolated from each other, unlike the tightly coupled rods of cold-blooded vertebrates. Cones were observed to receive excitatory input from rods, which indicates that the cone pathway also processes rod signals. This input might be expected to degrade the spatial resolution of mesopic vision.

  6. Improvement in J{sub c} performance below liquid nitrogen temperature for SmBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} superconducting films with BaHfO{sub 3} nano-rods controlled by low-temperature growth

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, S. Yoshida, Y.; Ichino, Y.; Xu, Q.; Matsumoto, K.; Ichinose, A.; Awaji, S.

    2016-01-01

    For use in high-magnetic-field coil-based applications, the critical current density (J{sub c}) of REBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (REBCO, where RE = rare earth) coated conductors must be isotropically improved, with respect to the direction of the magnetic field; these improvements must be realized at the operating conditions of these applications. In this study, improvement of the J{sub c} for various applied directions of magnetic field was achieved by controlling the morphology of the BaHfO{sub 3} (BHO) nano-rods in a SmBCO film. We fabricated the 3.0 vol. % BHO-doped SmBCO film at a low growth temperature of 720 °C, by using a seed layer technique (T{sub s} = 720 °C film). The low-temperature growth resulted in a morphological change in the BHO nano-rods. In fact, a high number density of (3.1 ± 0.1) × 10{sup 3} μm{sup −2} of small (diameter: 4 ± 1 nm), discontinuous nano-rods that grew in various directions, was obtained. In J{sub c} measurements, the J{sub c} of the T{sub s} = 720 °C film in all directions of the applied magnetic field was higher than that of the non-doped SmBCO film. The J{sub c}{sup min} (6.4 MA/cm{sup 2}) of the former was more than 6 times higher than that (1.0 MA/cm{sup 2}) of the latter at 40 K, under 3 T. The aforementioned results indicated that the discontinuous BHO nano-rods, which occurred with a high number density, exerted a 3D-like flux pinning at the measurement conditions considered. Moreover, at 4.2 K and under 17 T, a flux pinning force density of 1.6 TN/m{sup 3} was realized; this value was comparable to the highest value recorded, to date.

  7. NEURONATIN IS A STRESS-RESPONSIVE PROTEIN OF ROD PHOTORECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    SHINDE, VISHAL; PITALE, PRIYAMVADA M.; HOWSE, WAYNE; GORBATYUK, OLEG; GORBATYUK, MARINA

    2016-01-01

    Neuronatin (NNAT) is a small transmembrane proteolipid that is highly expressed in the embryonic developing brain and several other peripheral tissues. This study is the first to provide evidence that NNAT is detected in the adult retina of various adult rod-dominant mammals, including wild-type (WT) rodents, transgenic rodents expressing mutant S334ter, P23H, or T17M rhodopsin, non-human primates, humans, and cone-dominant tree shrews. Immunohistochemical and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses were applied to detect NNAT. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that NNAT immunofluorescence is restricted to the outer segments (OSs) of photoreceptors without evidence of staining in other retinal cell types across all mammalian species. Moreover, in tree shrew retinas, we found NNAT to be co-localized with rhodopsin, indicating its predominant expression in rods. The rod-derived expression of NNAT was further confirmed by qRT-PCR in isolated rod photoreceptor cells. We also used these cells to mimic cellular stress in transgenic retinas by treating them with the endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer, tunicamycin. Thus, our data revealed accumulation of NNAT around the nucleus as compared to dispersed localization of NNAT within control cells. This distribution coincided with the partial intracellular mislocalization of NNAT to the outer nuclear layer observed in transgenic retinas. In addition, stressed retinas demonstrated an increase of NNAT mRNA and protein levels. Therefore, our study demonstrated that NNAT is a novel stress-responsive protein with a potential structural and/or functional role in adult mammalian retinas. PMID:27109921

  8. Neuronatin is a stress-responsive protein of rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Vishal; Pitale, Priyamvada M; Howse, Wayne; Gorbatyuk, Oleg; Gorbatyuk, Marina

    2016-07-22

    Neuronatin (NNAT) is a small transmembrane proteolipid that is highly expressed in the embryonic developing brain and several other peripheral tissues. This study is the first to provide evidence that NNAT is detected in the adult retina of various adult rod-dominant mammals, including wild-type (WT) rodents, transgenic rodents expressing mutant S334ter, P23H, or T17M rhodopsin, non-human primates, humans, and cone-dominant tree shrews. Immunohistochemical and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses were applied to detect NNAT. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that NNAT immunofluorescence is restricted to the outer segments (OSs) of photoreceptors without evidence of staining in other retinal cell types across all mammalian species. Moreover, in tree shrew retinas, we found NNAT to be co-localized with rhodopsin, indicating its predominant expression in rods. The rod-derived expression of NNAT was further confirmed by qRT-PCR in isolated rod photoreceptor cells. We also used these cells to mimic cellular stress in transgenic retinas by treating them with the endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer, tunicamycin. Thus, our data revealed accumulation of NNAT around the nucleus as compared to dispersed localization of NNAT within control cells. This distribution coincided with the partial intracellular mislocalization of NNAT to the outer nuclear layer observed in transgenic retinas. In addition, stressed retinas demonstrated an increase of NNAT mRNA and protein levels. Therefore, our study demonstrated that NNAT is a novel stress-responsive protein with a potential structural and/or functional role in adult mammalian retinas. PMID:27109921

  9. The Accretion Flow–Discrete Ejection Connection in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punsly, Brian; Rodriguez, Jérôme; Trushkin, Sergei A.

    2016-07-01

    The microquasar GRS 1915+105 is known for its spectacular discrete ejections. They occur unexpectedly, thus their inception has escaped direct observation. It has been shown that the X-ray flux increases in the hours leading up to a major ejection. In this article, we consider the serendipitous interferometric monitoring of a modest version of a discrete ejection described in Reid et al. that would have otherwise escaped detection in daily radio light curves. The observation begins ˜1 hr after the onset of the ejection, providing unprecedented accuracy on the estimate of the ejection time. The astrometric measurements allow us to determine the time of ejection as {{MJD}} {56436.274}-0.013+0.016, i.e., within a precision of 41 minutes (95% confidence). Just like larger flares, we find that the X-ray luminosity increases in last 2–4 hr preceding ejection. Our finite temporal resolution indicates that this elevated X-ray flux persists within {21.8}-19.1+22.6 minutes of the ejection with 95% confidence, the highest temporal precision of the X-ray–superluminal ejection connection to date. This observation provides direct evidence that the physics that launches major flares occurs on smaller scales as well (lower radio flux and shorter ejection episodes). The observation of a X-ray spike prior to a discrete ejection, although of very modest amplitude, suggests that the process linking accretion behavior to ejection is general from the smallest scales to high luminosity major superluminal flares.

  10. A Survey of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections During 1996 - 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Ian; Cane, Hilary

    2007-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections, the interplanetary counterparts of coronal mass ejections at the Sun, are the major drivers of interplanetary shocks in the heliosphere, and are associated with modulations of the galactic cosmic ray intensity, both short term (Forbush decreases caused by the passage of the shock, post-shock sheath, and ICME) and possibly with longer term modulation. Using several in-situ signatures of ICMEs, including plasma temperature, and composition, magnetic fields, and cosmic ray modulations, made by near-Earth spacecraft, we have compiled a "comprehensive" list of ICMEs passing the Earth since 1996, encompassing solar cycle 23. We summarize the properties of these ICMEs, such as their occurrence rate, speeds, association with solar energetic particle events, shocks and cosmic ray decreases.

  11. Light-induced ejection of calcium atoms from polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mango, F.; Maccioni, E.

    2008-12-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of calcium atoms at room temperature has been observed in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated cell when the walls are illuminated with non resonant visible light. Ca atomic density in the gas phase, monitored by the LIF, is much higher than normal room-temperature vapour pressure of calcium. In past years photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) was observed for several alkali metals that adsorbed to solid films of PDMS polymers. High yields of photo-desorbed atoms (and molecules in the case of sodium) can be induced, at room temperature and below, by weak intensity radiation. The desorption is characterised by a frequency threshold, whereas any power threshold is undetectable. The calcium photo-ejection is characterised both by a frequency threshold (about 18 500 cm-1) and by an observable power threshold (whose value becomes lower when the photo-ejecting light wavelength decreases).

  12. Fuel rod mechanical deformation during the PBF/LOFT lead rod loss-of-coolant experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Varacalle, Jr., D. J.; MacDonald, P. E.; Shiozawa, S.; Driskell, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of four PBF/LOFT Lead Rod (LLR) sequential blowdown tests conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) are presented. Each test employed four separately shrouded fuel rods. The primary objective of the test series was to evaluate the extent of mechanical deformation that would be expected to occur to low pressure (0.1 MPa), light water reactor design fuel rods when subjected to a series of double ended cold leg break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests, and to determine whether subjecting these deformed fuel rods to subsequent testing would result in rod failure. The extent of mechanical deformation (buckling, collapse, or waisting of the cladding) was evaluated by comparison of cladding temperature and system pressure measurements with out-of-pile experimental data, and by posttest visual examinations and cladding diametral measurements.

  13. Measurements of ejection velocities in collisional disruption of ice spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Masahiko; Higa, Michiya

    1996-09-01

    Impact experiments are performed on ice spheres to measure the velocity field of ejected ice fragments and the conditions under which the fragments would reaccumulate during accretion in the outer solar system are considered. A single-stage light gas gun set in a cold room at -18°C and an image-converter camera running at 2 × 10 5-1 × 10 4 frames per second with a xenon flash lamp are used for observing the collisional phenomena. Spherical projectiles of ice ( mp = 1.5 g) collide head-on with spherical targets ( Mt = 1.5, 12, 172 g) at 150-690 m s -1. The ejection velocity is observed to vary with the initial position and ranges from 3 to 1/10 of the impact velocity ( Vi). The ejection velocity of fragments at the rear side of the target ( Ve) varies with distance from the impact point according to a power law relation, V e = V a( 1/D) -n, where Va is the antipodal velocity, l and D are the distance and the target diameter, and n = 1.5-2.0. Va depends on the specific energy ( Q) at a constant mass ratio ( m p/M t = 0.13 ) and the empirical dependence is written as Va = 0.35 × Q0.52. The ejection velocity of fine fragments formed by the jetting process near the impact point is determined to be 1.7-2.9 times as large as the impact velocity irrespective of the target size and the impact velocity.

  14. Determining the full halo coronal mass ejection characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainshtein, V. G.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper we determined the parameters of 45 full halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) for various modifications of their cone forms (“ice cream cone models”). We show that the CME determined characteristics depend significantly on the CME chosen form. We show that, regardless of the CME chosen form, the trajectory of practically all the considered HCMEs deviate from the radial direction to the Sun-to-Earth axis at the initial stage of their movement.

  15. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  16. Spatial Relationship of Signatures of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Gosling, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are characterized by a number of signatures. In particular, we examine the relationship between Fe charge states and other signatures during ICMEs in solar cycle 23. Though enhanced Fe charge states characterize many ICMEs, average charge states vary from event to event, are more likely to be enhanced in faster or flare-related ICMEs, and do not appear to depend on whether the ICME is a magnetic cloud.

  17. Associations between coronal mass ejections and interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Howard, R. A.; Koomen, M. J.; Michels, D. J.; Schwenn, R.; Muhlhauser, K. H.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Nearly continuous complementary coronal observations and interplanetary plasma measurements for the years 1979-1982 are compared. It is shown that almost all low latitude high speed coronal mass ejections (CME's) were associated with shocks at HELIOS 1. Some suitably directed low speed CME's were clearly associated with shocks while others may have been associated with disturbed plasma (such as NCDE's) without shocks. A few opposite hemisphere CME's associated with great flares seem to be associated with shocks at HELIOS.

  18. Ejection behavior characteristics in experimental cratering in sandstone targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Frank; Reiser, Fiona; Dufresne, Anja; Poelchau, Michael H.; Hoerth, Tobias; Deutsch, Alex; Kenkmann, Thomas; Thoma, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Within the frame of the MEMIN research unit (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Numerical Impact Research Network), impact experiments on sandstone targets were carried out to systematically study the influence of projectile mass, velocity, and target water saturation on the cratering and ejection processes. The projectiles were accelerated with two-stage light-gas guns (Ernst-Mach-Institute) onto fine-grained targets (Seeberger sandstone) with about 23% porosity. Collection of the ejecta on custom-designed catchers allowed determination of particle shape, size distribution, ejection angle, and microstructures. Mapping of the ejecta imprints on the catcher surface enabled linking of the different patterns to ejection stages observed on high-speed videos. The increase in projectile mass from 0.067 to 7.1 g correlates with an increase in the total ejected mass; ejecta angles, however, are similar in range for all experiments. The increase in projectile velocity from 2.5 to 5.1 km s-1 correlates with a total ejecta mass increase as well as in an increase in comminution efficiency, and a widening of the ejecta cone. A higher degree of water saturation of the target yields an increase in total ejecta mass up to 400% with respect to dry targets, higher ejecta velocity, and a steeper cone. These data, in turn, suggest that the reduced impedance contrast between the quartz grains of the target and the pores plays a primary role in the ejecta mass increase, while vaporization of water determines the ejecta behavior concerning ejecta velocity and particle distribution.

  19. The impact ejection of living organisms into space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of natural processes to blast living organisms into space was examined. It is suggested that rocks ejected from the Earth by a giant meteorite or comet impact can carry microorganisms into space. Such microscopic Earth life would have an opportunity to colonize the other planets if it can survive the rigors of space until it falls into the atmosphere of a hospitable planet.

  20. Passive electrical properties of rod outer segments

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Gertrude; Fatt, P.

    1968-01-01

    1. Measurements on a packed suspension of randomly oriented, dark-adapted frog rods at frequencies of 15 c/s-0·5 Mc/s indicate a behaviour similar to that of other biological materials. 2. Results are analysed on the assumption that the low-frequency limiting resistance is determined by current flowing in the suspending medium and that, of the rods, two thirds are oriented perpendicular to the applied field and one third parallel to it. Those parallel to the field are treated as non-conductors. 3. From the high-frequency limiting resistance the conductivity of the rod interior is calculated to vary linearly with the conductivity of the medium. The slope of the relation of internal to external conductivity is 0·50 with a limiting internal conductivity (at zero external) of 280 μmho/cm. 4. On the assumption that the suspension can be represented as a single-capacitance network, the characteristic frequency of impedance is used to calculate a capacitance for the rod surface of 1·54 μF/cm2. On the assumption of a distribution in properties of the suspension according to the theory of Bruggeman, the capacitance is calculated to have a value of about one half this. 5. At frequencies below 5 kc/s the impedance locus deviates from the curve describing the behaviour at higher frequencies. It is suggested that this may involve conduction in a thin layer extending along the surface of the rod. PMID:5685292

  1. Gelation And Mechanical Response of Patchy Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazem, Navid; Majidi, Carmel; Maloney, Craig

    We perform Brownian Dynamics simulations to study the gelation of suspensions of attractive, rod-like particles. We show that details of the particle-particle interactions can dramatically affect the dynamics of gelation and the structure and mechanics of the networks that form. If the attraction between the rods is perfectly smooth along their length, they will collapse into compact bundles. If the attraction is sufficiently corrugated or patchy, over time, a rigid space spanning network forms. We study the structure and mechanical properties of the networks that form as a function of the fraction of the surface that is allowed to bind. Surprisingly, the structural and mechanical properties are non-monotonic in the surface coverage. At low coverage, there are not a sufficient number of cross-linking sites to form networks. At high coverage, rods bundle and form disconnected clusters. At intermediate coverage, robust networks form. The elastic modulus and yield stress are both non-monotonic in the surface coverage. The stiffest and strongest networks show an essentially homogeneous deformation under strain with rods re-orienting along the extensional axis. Weaker, clumpy networks at high surface coverage exhibit relatively little re-orienting with strong non-affine deformation. These results suggest design strategies for tailoring surface interactions between rods to yield rigid networks with optimal properties. National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  2. Dynamic behavior of rod photoreceptor disks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhe; Jiang, Yunhai; Koutalos, Yiannis

    2002-09-01

    Eukaryotic cells use membrane organelles, like the endoplasmic reticulum or the Golgi, to carry out different functions. Vertebrate rod photoreceptors use hundreds of membrane sacs (the disks) for the detection of light. We have used fluorescent tracers and single cell imaging to study the properties of rod photoreceptor disks. Labeling of intact rod photoreceptors with membrane markers and polar tracers revealed communication between intradiskal and extracellular space. Internalized tracers moved along the length of the rod outer segment, indicating communication between the disks as well. This communication involved the exchange of both membrane and aqueous phase and had a time constant in the order of minutes. The communication pathway uses approximately 2% of the available membrane disk area and does not allow the passage of molecules larger than 10 kDa. It was possible to load the intradiskal space with fluorescent Ca(2+) and pH dyes, which reported an intradiskal Ca(2+) concentration in the order of 1 microM and an acidic pH 6.5, both of them significantly different than intracellular and extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and pH. The results suggest that the rod photoreceptor disks are not discrete, passive sacs but rather comprise an active cellular organelle. The communication between disks may be important for membrane remodeling as well as for providing access to the intradiskal space of the whole outer segment. PMID:12202366

  3. Single Rod Vibration in Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichselbaum, Noah; Wang, Shengfu; Bardet, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Fluid structure interaction of a single rod in axial flow is a coupled dynamical system present in many application including nuclear reactors, steam generators, and towed antenna arrays. Fluid-structure response can be quantified thanks to detailed experimental data where both structure and fluid responses are recorded. Such datum deepen understanding of the physics inherent to the system and provide high-dimensionality quantitative measurements to validate coupled structural and CFD codes with various level of complexity. In this work, single rods fixed on both ends in a concentric pipe, are subjected to an axial flow with Reynolds number based on hydraulic diameter of Re =4000. Rods of varying material stiffness and diameter are utilized in the experiment resulting in a range of dimensionless U between 0.5 and 1, where U = (ρA/EI)1/2uL. Experimental measurements of the velocity field around the rod are taken with PIV from time-resolved Nd:YLF laser and a high speed CMOS camera. Three-dimensional and temporal vibration and deflection of the rod is recorded with shadowgraphy utilizing two sets of pulsed high power LED and dedicated CMOS camera. Through integration of these two diagnostics, it is possible to reconstruct the full FSI domain providing unique validation data.

  4. IR Variability During a Shell Ejection of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2006-02-01

    Every 5.5 years, η Carinae experiences a dramatic ``spectroscopic event'' when high-excitation lines in its UV, optical, and IR spectrum disappear, and its hard X-ray and radio continuum flux crash. This periodicity has been attributed to a very eccentric binary system with a shell ejection occurring at periastron. Mid-IR images and spectra with T-ReCS are needed to measure changes in the current bolometric luminosity and to trace dust formation episodes. This will provide a direct estimate of the mass ejected. Near-IR emission lines trace related changes in the post-event wind and ionization changes in the circumstellar environment needed to test specific models for the cause of η Car's variability as it recovers from its recent ``event''. High resolution near-IR spectra with GNIRS will continue the important work of HST/STIS, investigating changes in the direct and reflected spectrum of the stellar wind, and ionization changes in the nebula. The complex kinematic structure of η Car's ejecta also holds important clues to its mass ejection history, and is essential for interpreting other data. Phoenix can provide a unique kinematic map of the complex density and time-variable ionization structure of η Car's nebula, which is our best example of the pre-explosion environment of very massive stars.

  5. Effects of Slag Ejection on Solid Rocket Motor Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Purinton, David C.; Hengel, John E.; Skelley, Stephen E.

    1995-01-01

    In past firings of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) both static test and flight motors have shown small pressure perturbations occurring primarily between 65 and 80 seconds. A joint NASA/Thiokol team investigation concluded that the cause of the pressure perturbations was the periodic ingestion and ejection of molten aluminum oxide slag from the cavity around the submerged nozzle nose which tends to trap and collect individual aluminum oxide droplets from the approach flow. The conclusions of the team were supported by numerous data and observations from special tests including high speed photographic films, real time radiography, plume calorimeters, accelerometers, strain gauges, nozzle TVC system force gauges, and motor pressure and thrust data. A simplistic slag ballistics model was formulated to relate a given pressure perturbation to a required slag quantity. Also, a cold flow model using air and water was developed to provide data on the relationship between the slag flow rate and the chamber pressure increase. Both the motor and the cold flow model exhibited low frequency oscillations in conjunction with periods of slag ejection. Motor and model frequencies were related to scaling parameters. The data indicate that there is a periodicity to the slag entrainment and ejection phenomena which is possibly related to organized oscillations from instabilities in the dividing streamline shear layer which impinges on the underneath surface of the nozzle.

  6. Investigation of a clamshell roll-out ejection concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatakeyama, L. F.

    1971-01-01

    The equations for the motion, forces, and couples generated by clamshells released from spinning sounding rockets in accordance with a roll-out ejection concept are presented. The application of these equations to a study of a system for the Javelin rocket vehicle is discussed. The roll-out ejection concept advocated requires that each deploying clamshell be pivoted about an axis at its trailing edge located in the system sectioning plane. Clamshell despinning is a consequence of this deployment since the pivotal rate is in opposition to the rocket vehicle spin. The energy required by the deployment is derived largely from the rotational energy of the clamshell. Thus, the rocket vehicle will not be significantly despun by this kind of clamshell deployment. This ejection concept also permits a system design which makes it possible to limit clamshell angular motion to rotation about that one of its centroidal principal axes which is brought into parallelism with the rocket vehicle longitudinal axis. Also, by equalizing the moments of inertia about the other centroidal principal axes, the roll-out motion can be decoupled from any extraneous angular motion about these axes.

  7. Mergers and ejections of black holes in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2012-05-01

    We report on results of fully consistent N-body simulations of globular cluster models with N= 100 000 members containing neutron stars and black holes (BHs). Using the improved 'algorithmic regularization' method of Hellström & Mikkola for compact subsystems, the new code NBODY7 enables for the first time general relativistic coalescence to be achieved for post-Newtonian terms and realistic parameters. Following an early stage of mass segregation, a few BHs form a small dense core which usually leads to the formation of one dominant binary. The subsequent evolution by dynamical shrinkage involves the competing processes of ejection and mergers by radiation energy loss. Unless the binary is ejected, long-lived triple systems often exhibit Kozai cycles with extremely high inner eccentricity (e > 0.999) which may terminate in coalescence at a few Schwarzschild radii. A characteristic feature is that ordinary stars as well as BHs and even BH binaries are ejected with high velocities. On the basis of the models studied so far, the results suggest a limited growth of a few remaining stellar mass BHs in globular clusters.

  8. Droplet ejection performance of a monolithic thermal inkjet print head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A. K.; Darabi, J.

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents a simulation study of the droplet ejection performance of a thermal inkjet print head. The geometry of the print head comprises a dome-shaped ink chamber, a nozzle guide and a ring-shaped heater integrated on each chamber. The design eliminates direct contact between the heater and the ink, thus minimizing heater burnout. The ink manifold, ink chamber and nozzle are aligned, thus facilitating higher nozzle density. The model simulates thermal bubble dynamics including nucleation and growth of thermal bubbles caused by a thermal pulse. The model was validated by comparing model predictions with experimental results for a previously reported print head design. Then, the model was used to simulate the droplet ejection performance of the proposed inkjet print head. Effects of print head geometry including nozzle diameter, nozzle length, chamber size, heater dimensions and location, thermal conductivity of the passivation layer, operating conditions including total thermal energy and pulse width, properties of the ink including density, viscosity and surface tension on the performance of the inkjet device are investigated. The influence of these parameters on the drop volume and velocity, threshold energy and tail length of the ejected droplets is studied.

  9. Design and Integration of an All-Magnetic Attitude Control System for FASTSAT-HSV01's Multiple Pointing Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeKock, Brandon; Sanders, Devon; Vanzwieten, Tannen; Capo-Lugo, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    The FASTSAT-HSV01 spacecraft is a microsatellite with magnetic torque rods as it sole attitude control actuator. FASTSAT s multiple payloads and mission functions require the Attitude Control System (ACS) to maintain Local Vertical Local Horizontal (LVLH)-referenced attitudes without spin-stabilization, while the pointing errors for some attitudes be significantly smaller than the previous best-demonstrated for this type of control system. The mission requires the ACS to hold multiple stable, unstable, and non-equilibrium attitudes, as well as eject a 3U CubeSat from an onboard P-POD and recover from the ensuing tumble. This paper describes the Attitude Control System, the reasons for design choices, how the ACS integrates with the rest of the spacecraft, and gives recommendations for potential future applications of the work.

  10. Linking impulse response functions to reaction time: Rod and cone reaction time data and a computational model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dingcai; Zele, Andrew J.; Pokorny, Joel

    2007-01-01

    Reaction times for incremental and decremental stimuli were measured at five suprathreshold contrasts for six retinal illuminance levels where rods alone (0.002–0.2 Trolands), rods and cones (2–20 Trolands) or cones alone (200 Trolands) mediated detection. A 4-primary photostimulator allowed independent control of rod or cone excitations. This is the first report of reaction times to isolated rod or cone stimuli at mesopic light levels under the same adaptation conditions. The main findings are: 1) For rods, responses to decrements were faster than increments, but cone reaction times were closely similar. 2) At light levels where both systems were functional, rod reaction times were ~20 ms longer. The data were fitted with a computational model that incorporates rod and cone impulse response functions and a stimulus-dependent neural sensory component that triggers a motor response. Rod and cone impulse response functions were derived from published psychophysical two-pulse threshold data and temporal modulation transfer functions. The model fits were accomplished with a limited number of free parameters: two global parameters to estimate the irreducible minimum reaction time for each receptor type, and one local parameter for each reaction time versus contrast function. This is the first model to provide a neural basis for the variation in reaction time with retinal illuminance, stimulus contrast, stimulus polarity, and receptor class modulated. PMID:17346763

  11. Rod consolidation at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1986-12-01

    A rod consolidation demonstration with irradiated pressurized water reactor fuel was recently conducted by personnel from Nuclear Assurance Corporation and West Valley Nuclear Services Company at the West Valley Demonstration Project in West Valley, New York. The rod consolidation demonstration involved pulling all of the fuel rods from six fuel Assemblies. In general, the rod pulling proceeded smoothly. The highest compaction ratio attained was 1:8:1. Among the total of 1074 fuel rods were some known degraded rods (they had collapsed cladding, a result of in-reactor fuel densification), but no rods were broken or dropped during the demonstration. One aim was to gather information on the effect of rod consolidation operations on the integrity of the fuel rods during subsequent handling and storage. Another goal was to collect information on the condition and handling of intact, damaged, and failed fuel that has been in storage for an extended period. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Studying rod photoreceptor development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Morris, A.C.; Fadool, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The zebrafish has rapidly become a favored model vertebrate organism, well suited for studies of developmental processes using large-scale genetic screens. In particular, zebrafish morphological and behavioral genetic screens have led to the identification of genes important for development of the retinal photoreceptors. This may help clarify the genetic mechanisms underlying human photoreceptor development and dysfunction in retinal diseases. In this review, we present the advantages of zebrafish as a vertebrate model organism, summarize retinal and photoreceptor cell development in zebrafish, with emphasis on the rod photoreceptors, and describe zebrafish visual behaviors that can be used for genetic screens. We then describe some of the photoreceptor cell mutants that have been isolated in morphological and behavioral screens and discuss the limitations of current screening methods for uncovering mutations that specifically affect rod function. Finally, we present some alternative strategies to target the rod developmental pathway in zebrafish. PMID:16199068

  13. Fragmentation of an axially impacted slender rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, W.; Waas, A. M.

    2010-02-01

    Motivated by experimental results on the dynamic buckling and fragmentation of a vertical column impacted by a falling mass, results from an analytical model for dynamic buckling which considers the dynamic interaction between the axial column deformation and the out-of-plane buckling displacements are used to interpret the fragmentation process and the resulting fragment lengths. It is shown that a critical time exists for the rod to undergo fragmentation. At this critical time, the rod deforms in a modulated pattern of waves, setting up the stage for the ensuing fragmentation as a result of induced large curvatures that exceed the critical bending strain of the rod material. The resulting fragment length distributions, which show two characteristics peaks at \\frac{\\lambda}{2} and \\frac{\\lambda}{4} , where λ is a characteristic half-wavelength, are found to compare favorably with the experimental results.

  14. Comparison Between Hot and Cool Ejections in CME/Flare Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, N. V.

    2001-05-01

    Comparison between hot and cool ejections in CME/flare events Nariaki Nitta (LMSAL) , Sachiko Akiyama (GUAS) We have shown that high-temperature ejections during the impulsive phase of flares as seen with Yohkoh/SXT are correlated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as seen by SOHO/LASCO. Since then we have collected a number of examples of ejections observed with TRACE. In this presentation, we compare ejections in soft X-rays with those in H-alpha and EUV, and study the sequence of processes (reconnection, mass motion, heating, etc.) involved in CMEs so that we can put more constraints on the models.

  15. Integrated modeling and parallel computation of laser-induced axisymmetric rod growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Hong

    2005-07-01

    To fully investigate a pyrolytic Laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) system for growing an axisymmetric rod, a novel integrated three-dimensional mathematical model was developed not only to describe the heat transport in the deposit and substrate, but also to simulate the gas-phase in the heated reaction zone and its effect on growth rate. The integrated model consists of three components: the substrate, rod, and gas-phase domains. Each component is a separate model and the three components are dynamically integrated into one model for simulating the iterative and complex process of rod deposition. The gas-phase reaction is modeled by the gas-phase component, an adaptive domain attached on the top part of the rod. Its size and mesh decomposition is dynamically determined by the rod temperature distribution and the chosen threshold. The temperature and molar ratio are predicted and used to adjust the growth rate, by taking into account the diffusion limited growth regime, and to improve the simulation of entire deposition process. The substrate component describes the heat flow into the substrate, and the substrate surface temperature can be used to predict the initial rod growth which may affect the successive growth of the rod. The rod growth process is simulated using a layer-by-layer axisymmetric model. For each layer, the rod grows along the outward normal direction at each point on the rod surface. This simplified model makes the process more predictable and easier to control by specifying the height of the rod and the number of total iterations. Finite difference schemes, iterative numerical methods, and parallel algorithms were developed for solving the model. The numerical computation is stable, convergent, and efficient. The model and numerical methods are implemented sequentially and in parallel using a standard C++ code and Message Passing Interface (MPI). The program can be easily installed and executed on different platforms, such as Unix

  16. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING FOR A FORMATION PROCESS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: INTERACTION BETWEEN AN EJECTING FLUX ROPE AND AN AMBIENT FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, Daikou; Kusano, Kanya; Miyoshi, Takahiro; Shibata, Kazunari

    2010-08-01

    We performed a magnetohydrodynamic simulation of a formation process of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), focusing on the interaction (reconnection) between an ejecting flux rope and its ambient field. We examined three cases with different ambient fields: one had no ambient field, while the other two had dipole fields with opposite directions, parallel and anti-parallel to that of the flux rope surface. We found that while the flux rope disappears in the anti-parallel case, in the other cases the flux ropes can evolve to CMEs and show different amounts of flux rope rotation. The results imply that the interaction between an ejecting flux rope and its ambient field is an important process for determining CME formation and CME orientation, and also show that the amount and direction of the magnetic flux within the flux rope and the ambient field are key parameters for CME formation. The interaction (reconnection) plays a significant role in the rotation of the flux rope especially with a process similar to 'tilting instability' in a spheromak-type experiment of laboratory plasma.

  17. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-09-17

    A reusable system is described for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. A locking cap is secured to the fuel rod and a locking strip is fastened to the support member. The locking cap has two opposing fingers shaped to form a socket having a body portion. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion. The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip causing the extension to temporarily deflect open the fingers to engage the socket's body portion. For removal, the process is reversed.

  18. Method for producing titanium aluminide weld rod

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing titanium aluminide weld rod comprising: attaching one end of a metal tube to a vacuum line; placing a means between said vacuum line and a junction of the metal tube to prevent powder from entering the vacuum line; inducing a vacuum within the tube; placing a mixture of titanium and aluminum powder in the tube and employing means to impact the powder in the tube to a filled tube; heating the tube in the vacuum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction between the titanium and aluminum; and lowering the temperature to ambient temperature to obtain a intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy weld rod.

  19. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Results Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Conclusions Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF. PMID:27594875

  20. Room temperature synthesis of rod-like FeC2O4·2H2O and its transition to maghemite, magnetite and hematite nanorods through controlled thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Tang, Kaibin; Zeng, Suyuan; Qi, Yunxia

    2008-02-01

    FeC2O4·2H2O nanorods with diameter of about 50 nm and length of up to several micrometers were synthesized at room temperature in a surfactant-assisted system, which was obtained by dissolving bis(2-ethylhexyl)sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) in a mixed solution composed of water and ethylene glycol (EG). The influence of reaction conditions on the morphology of FeC2O4·2H2O is discussed in detail. Through direct thermal decomposition of FeC2O4·2H2O under different calcination conditions, maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), magnetite (Fe3O4) and hematite (α-Fe2O3) can be selectively obtained, preserving the rod-like morphology. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) characterizations showed that the as-obtained iron oxide nanorods were composed of fine particles with different crystal orientations. The magnetic properties of the as-obtained iron oxide nanorods were systematically investigated.

  1. Method and means of packaging nuclear fuel rods for handling

    DOEpatents

    Adam, Milton F.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear fuel rods, especially spent nuclear fuel rods that may show physical distortion, are encased within a metallic enclosing structure by forming a tube about the fuel rod. The tube has previously been rolled to form an overlapping tubular structure and then unrolled and coiled about an axis perpendicular to the tube. The fuel rod is inserted into the tube as the rolled tube is removed from a coiled strip and allowed to reassume its tubular shape about the fuel rod. Rollers support the coiled strip in an open position as the coiled strip is uncoiled and allowed to roll about the fuel rod.

  2. Modeling and simulation performance of sucker rod beam pump

    SciTech Connect

    Aditsania, Annisa; Rahmawati, Silvy Dewi Sukarno, Pudjo; Soewono, Edy

    2015-09-30

    Artificial lift is a mechanism to lift hydrocarbon, generally petroleum, from a well to surface. This is used in the case that the natural pressure from the reservoir has significantly decreased. Sucker rod beam pumping is a method of artificial lift. Sucker rod beam pump is modeled in this research as a function of geometry of the surface part, the size of sucker rod string, and fluid properties. Besides its length, sucker rod string also classified into tapered and un-tapered. At the beginning of this research, for easy modeling, the sucker rod string was assumed as un-tapered. The assumption proved non-realistic to use. Therefore, the tapered sucker rod string modeling needs building. The numerical solution of this sucker rod beam pump model is computed using finite difference method. The numerical result shows that the peak of polished rod load for sucker rod beam pump unit C-456-D-256-120, for non-tapered sucker rod string is 38504.2 lb, while for tapered rod string is 25723.3 lb. For that reason, to avoid the sucker rod string breaks due to the overload, the use of tapered sucker rod beam string is suggested in this research.

  3. Modeling and simulation performance of sucker rod beam pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aditsania, Annisa; Rahmawati, Silvy Dewi; Sukarno, Pudjo; Soewono, Edy

    2015-09-01

    Artificial lift is a mechanism to lift hydrocarbon, generally petroleum, from a well to surface. This is used in the case that the natural pressure from the reservoir has significantly decreased. Sucker rod beam pumping is a method of artificial lift. Sucker rod beam pump is modeled in this research as a function of geometry of the surface part, the size of sucker rod string, and fluid properties. Besides its length, sucker rod string also classified into tapered and un-tapered. At the beginning of this research, for easy modeling, the sucker rod string was assumed as un-tapered. The assumption proved non-realistic to use. Therefore, the tapered sucker rod string modeling needs building. The numerical solution of this sucker rod beam pump model is computed using finite difference method. The numerical result shows that the peak of polished rod load for sucker rod beam pump unit C-456-D-256-120, for non-tapered sucker rod string is 38504.2 lb, while for tapered rod string is 25723.3 lb. For that reason, to avoid the sucker rod string breaks due to the overload, the use of tapered sucker rod beam string is suggested in this research.

  4. Quiet Sun mini-coronal mass ejections activated by supergranular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, D. E.; Genetelli, A.; Attie, R.; Potts, H. E.

    2009-02-01

    Context: The atmosphere of the quiet Sun is controlled by photospheric flows sweeping up concentrations of mixed polarity magnetic field. Along supergranule boundaries and junctions, there is a strong correlation between magnetic flux and bright chromospheric and transition region emission. Aims: The aim is to investigate the relationship between photospheric flows and small flare-like brightenings seen in Extreme Ultraviolet images. Methods: We describe observations of small eruptions seen in quiet Sun images taken with the Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) on STEREO. The photospheric flows during the eruption build-up phase are investigated by tracking granules in high resolution MDI continuum images. Results: Eruptions with characteristics of small coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occur at the junctions of supergranular cells. The eruptions produce brightening at the onset site, dark cloud or small filament ejections, and faint waves moving with plane-of-sky speeds up to 100 km s-1. In the two examples studied, they appear to be activated by converging and rotating supergranular flows, twisting small concentrations of opposite polarity magnetic field. An estimate of the occurrence rate is about 1400 events per day over the whole Sun. One third of these events seem to be associated with waves. Typically, the waves last for about 30 min and travel a distance of 80 Mm, so at any one time they cover 1/50th of the lower corona. Movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Electrostatics and depletion determine competition between 2D nematic and 3D bundled phases of rod-like DNA nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Young; Fygenson, Deborah K; Saleh, Omar A

    2016-06-21

    Rod-like particles form solutions of technological and biological importance. In particular, biofilaments such as actin and microtubules are known to form a variety of phases, both in vivo and in vitro, whose appearance can be controlled by depletion, confinement, and electrostatic interactions. Here, we utilize DNA nanotubes to undertake a comprehensive study of the effects of those interactions on two particular rod-like phases: a 2D nematic phase consisting of aligned rods pressed against a glass surface, and a 3D bundled network phase. We experimentally measure the stability of these two phases over a range of depletant concentrations and ionic strengths, finding that the 2D phase is slightly more stable than the 3D phase. We formulate a quantitative model of phase stability based on consideration of pairwise rod-rod and rod-surface interactions; notably, we include a careful accounting of solution electrostatics interactions using an effective-charge strategy. The model is relatively simple and contains no free parameters, yet predicts phase boundaries in good agreement with the experiment. Our results indicate that electrostatic interactions, rather than depletion, are largely responsible for the enhanced stability of the 2D phase. This work provides insight into the polymorphism of rod-like solutions, indicating why certain phases appear, and providing a means (and a predictive model) for controlling those phases. PMID:27126684

  6. Piston rod seal for a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.

    1984-01-31

    In a piston rod seal for a Stirling engine, a hydrostatic bearing and differential pressure regulating valve are utilized to provide for a low pressure differential across a rubbing seal between the hydrogen and oil so as to reduce wear on the seal. 3 figs.

  7. Dark Current and Photocurrent in Retinal Rods

    PubMed Central

    Hagins, W. A.; Penn, R. D.; Yoshikami, S.

    1970-01-01

    The interstitial voltages, currents, and resistances of the receptor layer of the isolated rat retina have been investigated with arrays of micropipette electrodes inserted under direct visual observation by infrared microscopy. In darkness a steady current flows inward through the plasma membrane of the rod outer segments. It is balanced by equal outward current distributed along the remainder of each rod. Flashes of light produce a photocurrent which transiently reduces the dark current with a waveform resembling the PII and a-wave components of the electroretinogram. The photocurrent is produced by a local action of light within 12 μm of its point of absorption in the outer segments. The quantum current gain of the photocurrent is greater than 106. The electrical space constant of rat rods is greater than 25 μm, so that the electrical effects of the photocurrent are large enough at the rod synapses to permit single absorbed photons to be detected by the visual system. The photocurrent is apparently the primary sensory consequence of light absorption by rhodopsin. ImagesFigure 3Figure 8Figure 14 PMID:5439318

  8. Image analysis for measuring rod network properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongjae; Choi, Jungkyu; Nam, Jaewook

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, metallic nanowires have been attracting significant attention as next-generation flexible transparent conductive films. The performance of films depends on the network structure created by nanowires. Gaining an understanding of their structure, such as connectivity, coverage, and alignment of nanowires, requires the knowledge of individual nanowires inside the microscopic images taken from the film. Although nanowires are flexible up to a certain extent, they are usually depicted as rigid rods in many analysis and computational studies. Herein, we propose a simple and straightforward algorithm based on the filtering in the frequency domain for detecting the rod-shape objects inside binary images. The proposed algorithm uses a specially designed filter in the frequency domain to detect image segments, namely, the connected components aligned in a certain direction. Those components are post-processed to be combined under a given merging rule in a single rod object. In this study, the microscopic properties of the rod networks relevant to the analysis of nanowire networks were measured for investigating the opto-electric performance of transparent conductive films and their alignment distribution, length distribution, and area fraction. To verify and find the optimum parameters for the proposed algorithm, numerical experiments were performed on synthetic images with predefined properties. By selecting proper parameters, the algorithm was used to investigate silver nanowire transparent conductive films fabricated by the dip coating method.

  9. A Cambrian origin for vertebrate rods

    PubMed Central

    Asteriti, Sabrina; Grillner, Sten; Cangiano, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrates acquired dim-light vision when an ancestral cone evolved into the rod photoreceptor at an unknown stage preceding the last common ancestor of extant jawed vertebrates (∼420 million years ago Ma). The jawless lampreys provide a unique opportunity to constrain the timing of this advance, as their line diverged ∼505 Ma and later displayed high-morphological stability. We recorded with patch electrodes the inner segment photovoltages and with suction electrodes the outer segment photocurrents of Lampetra fluviatilis retinal photoreceptors. Several key functional features of jawed vertebrate rods are present in their phylogenetically homologous photoreceptors in lamprey: crucially, the efficient amplification of the effect of single photons, measured by multiple parameters, and the flow of rod signals into cones. These results make convergent evolution in the jawless and jawed vertebrate lines unlikely and indicate an early origin of rods, implying strong selective pressure toward dim-light vision in Cambrian ecosystems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07166.001 PMID:26095697

  10. Monodisperse hard rods in external potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhti, Benaoumeur; Karbach, Michael; Maass, Philipp; Müller, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    We consider linear arrays of cells of volume Vc populated by monodisperse rods of size σ Vc,σ =1 ,2 ,... , subject to hardcore exclusion interaction. Each rod experiences a position-dependent external potential. In one application we also examine effects of contact forces between rods. We employ two distinct methods of exact analysis with complementary strengths and different limits of spatial resolution to calculate profiles of pressure and density on mesoscopic and microscopic length scales at thermal equilibrium. One method uses density functionals and the other statistically interacting vacancy particles. The applications worked out include gravity, power-law traps, and hard walls. We identify oscillations in the profiles on a microscopic length scale and show how they are systematically averaged out on a well-defined mesoscopic length scale to establish full consistency between the two approaches. The continuum limit, realized as Vc→0 ,σ →∞ at nonzero and finite σ Vc , connects our highest-resolution results with known exact results for monodisperse rods in a continuum. We also compare the pressure profiles obtained from density functionals with the average microscopic pressure profiles derived from the pair distribution function.

  11. Piston rod seal for a Stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal for a Stirling engine, a hydrostatic bearing and differential pressure regulating valve are utilized to provide for a low pressure differential across a rubbing seal between the hydrogen and oil so as to reduce wear on the seal.

  12. Baroreflex Activation Therapy in Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction: Available Data and Future Perspective.

    PubMed

    Halbach, Marcel; Fritz, Thorsten; Madershahian, Navid; Pfister, Roman; Reuter, Hannes

    2016-04-01

    Progression of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is promoted by sympathovagal imbalance. Baroreflex activation therapy, i.e., electrical stimulation of baroreceptors at the carotid sinus, can restore sympathovagal balance. Large animal studies of baroreflex activation therapy revealed improvements in cardiac function, susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias, and a survival benefit as compared to untreated controls. Recently, the first randomized and controlled trial of optimal medical and device therapy alone or plus baroreflex activation therapy in patients suffering from HFrEF was published. It demonstrated a reasonable safety profile in this severely ill patient population. Moreover, the study found significant improvements in New York Heart Association class, quality of life, 6-min walk distance, and NT-proBNP levels. This review provides an overview on baroreflex activation therapy for the treatment of HFrEF-from the concept and preclinical findings to most recent clinical data and upcoming trials. PMID:26879389

  13. EPISODIC EJECTION FROM ACTIVE ASTEROID 311P/PANSTARRS

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David; Agarwal, Jessica; Weaver, Harold; Mutchler, Max; Larson, Stephen

    2015-01-10

    We examine the development of the active asteroid 311P/PANSTARRS (formerly, 2013 P5) in the period from 2013 September to 2014 February using high resolution images from the Hubble Space Telescope. This multi-tailed object is characterized by a single, reddish nucleus of absolute magnitude H ≥ 18.98 ± 0.10, corresponding to an equal-area sphere of radius ≤200 ± 20 m (for assumed geometric albedo 0.29 ± 0.09). We set an upper limit to the radii of possible companion nuclei at ∼10 m. The nucleus ejected debris in nine discrete episodes, spread irregularly over a nine month interval, each time forming a distinct tail. Particles in the tails range from about 10 μm to at least 80 mm in radius, and were ejected at speeds <1 m s{sup –1}. The ratio of the total ejected dust mass to the nucleus mass is ∼3×10{sup –5}, corresponding to a global surface layer ∼2 mm thick, or to a deeper layer covering a smaller fraction of the surface. The observations are incompatible with an origin of the activity by impact or by the sublimation of entrapped ice. This object appears to be shedding its regolith by rotational (presumably YORP-driven) instability. Long-term fading of the photometry (months) is attributed to gradual dissipation of near-nucleus dust. Photometric variations on short timescales (<0.7 hr) are probably caused by fast rotation of the nucleus. However, because of limited time coverage and dilution of the nucleus signal by near-nucleus dust, we have not been able to determine the rotation period.

  14. Stimulus-evoked outer segment changes in rod photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Thapa, Damber; Wang, Benquan; Lu, Yiming; Gai, Shaoyan; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-06-01

    Rod-dominated transient retinal phototropism (TRP) has been recently observed in freshly isolated mouse and frog retinas. Comparative confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography revealed that the TRP was predominantly elicited from the rod outer segment (OS). However, the biophysical mechanism of rod OS dynamics is still unknown. Mouse and frog retinal slices, which displayed a cross-section of retinal photoreceptors and other functional layers, were used to test the effect of light stimulation on rod OSs. Time-lapse microscopy revealed stimulus-evoked conformational changes of rod OSs. In the center of the stimulated region, the length of the rod OS shrunk, while in the peripheral region, the rod OS swung toward the center region. Our experimental observation and theoretical analysis suggest that the TRP may reflect unbalanced rod disc-shape changes due to localized visible light stimulation.

  15. Reprogramming of adult rod photoreceptors prevents retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Montana, Cynthia L.; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Shen, Susan Q.; Myers, Connie A.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    A prime goal of regenerative medicine is to direct cell fates in a therapeutically useful manner. Retinitis pigmentosa is one of the most common degenerative diseases of the eye and is associated with early rod photoreceptor death followed by secondary cone degeneration. We hypothesized that converting adult rods into cones, via knockdown of the rod photoreceptor determinant Nrl, could make the cells resistant to the effects of mutations in rod-specific genes, thereby preventing secondary cone loss. To test this idea, we engineered a tamoxifen-inducible allele of Nrl to acutely inactivate the gene in adult rods. This manipulation resulted in reprogramming of rods into cells with a variety of cone-like molecular, histologic, and functional properties. Moreover, reprogramming of adult rods achieved cellular and functional rescue of retinal degeneration in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. These findings suggest that elimination of Nrl in adult rods may represent a unique therapy for retinal degeneration. PMID:23319618

  16. 5. DETAIL OF ROD MILL BASE AND CONVEYOR BELT SUPPORT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF ROD MILL BASE AND CONVEYOR BELT SUPPORT, EAST VIEW. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Grinding Rod Mill, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  17. 32 CFR 989.21 - Record of decision (ROD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the signator. A ROD (40 CFR 1505.2) is a concise public document stating what an agency's decision is... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.21 Record of decision (ROD). (a) The proponent and the...

  18. 32 CFR 989.21 - Record of decision (ROD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the signator. A ROD (40 CFR 1505.2) is a concise public document stating what an agency's decision is... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.21 Record of decision (ROD). (a) The proponent and the...

  19. 11. Detail showing stay rods and westerly Samson post; view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail showing stay rods and westerly Samson post; view to west. Note slackness of stay rods while draw-span is closed. - Summer Street Bridge, Spanning Reserved Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  20. Exercise physiology in heart failure and preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Haykowsky, Mark J; Kitzman, Dalane W

    2014-07-01

    Recent advances in the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) suggest that noncardiac peripheral factors contribute to the reduced peak V(o2) (peak exercise oxygen uptake) and to its improvement after endurance exercise training. A greater understanding of the peripheral skeletal muscle vascular adaptations that occur with physical conditioning may allow for tailored exercise rehabilitation programs. The identification of specific mechanisms that improve whole body and peripheral skeletal muscle oxygen uptake could establish potential therapeutic targets for medical therapies and a means to follow therapeutic response. PMID:24975908

  1. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction - unwinding the diagnosis mystique

    PubMed Central

    Asrar ul Haq, Muhammad; Mutha, Vivek; Rudd, Nima; Hare, David L; Wong, Chiew

    2014-01-01

    A precise diagnosis of diastolic dysfunction is often difficult and requires invasive techniques to determine left ventricular volume, relaxation, and compliance properties. At this current point of time there is no single non-invasive index available to adequately reflect diastolic function, perhaps because of the numerous factors that can alter diastolic function. In most clinical settings, diastolic function is estimated using Doppler echocardiography. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is yet another emerging modality for diastolic function analysis. Here we present a comprehensive review of the various parameters used to assess diastolic function as part of diagnosis of clinical syndrome “Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF)”. PMID:25360388

  2. Flux-Rope Structure of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Hidalgo, M.; Zhang, J.; Riley, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Mandrini, C. H.

    2013-01-01

    This Topical Issue (TI) of Solar Physics, devoted to the study of flux-rope structure in coronal mass ejections (CMEs), is based on two Coordinated Data Analysis Workshops (CDAWs) held in 2010 (20-23 September in Dan Diego, California, USA) and 2011 (5-9 September in Alcala, Spain). The primary purpose of the CDAWs was to address the question whether all CMEs have a flux rope structure. Each CDAW was attended by about 50 scientists interested in the origin, propagation, and interplanetary manifestation of CME phenomena.

  3. The Expansion and Radial Speeds of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Dal Lago, A.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.

    We show the relation between radial (V_{rad}) and expansion (V_{exp}) speeds of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) depends on the CME width. As CME width increases, {V_{rad}/V_{exp}} decreases from a value >1 to <1. For widths approaching 180°, the ratio approaches 0 if the cone has a flat base, while it approaches 0.5 if the base has a bulge (ice cream cone). The speed difference between the limb and disk halos and the spherical expansion of super fast CMEs can be explained by the width dependence.

  4. Degeneracy effects of neutrino mass ejection in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurek, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    A neutrino mechanism is discussed in order to explain supernovae in massive stars. An argument is presented for supernova mass ejection through leptonic neutrino transport characteristics suppressed by the arbitrary zero chemical potential condition. Results show that lepton conservation effects may be important in supernova neutrino transport. At low temperature and density the diffusion approximation becomes less precise because of the long mean free paths of low energy neutrinos. The amount of equilibrium neutrino spectrum affected here is small over most of the collapsing supernova structure.

  5. From SOHO to STEREO: Understanding Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2011-12-01

    Direct comparison between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from near the Sun and their solar wind counterparts became possible roughly a decade after the discovery of CMEs (Lindsay et al. 1999). This comparison revealed that fast CMEs decelerate and slow CMEs accelerate due to the interaction with the solar wind. Gopalswamy et al. (2000) quantified this interaction as an interplanetary acceleration which is useful in predicting the arrival time and speed of CMEs at 1 AU. The interplanetary acceleration is essentially due to the aerodynamic drag between the CME and the solar wind because the propelling force and the solar gravity are effective only near the Sun. Combined remote-sensing and in situ observations from SOHO and Wind/ACE have helped us estimate the influence of the solar wind on the propagation of CMEs. However, these measurements have severe limitations because the remote-sensed and in-situ observations correspond to different portions of the CME. Furthermore, the true speeds of Earth-directed CMEs cannot be measured accurately from a spacecraft located along the Sun-Earth line. There have been attempts to model the CME as a cone and get the space speed of the CME, which did improve the travel time predictions. Instruments on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission were able to provide observations of Earth-arriving CMEs without projection effects, while the same CMEs were observed at Sun-Earth L1 by Wind and ACE spacecraft. The quadrature between STEREO and L1 spacecraft presented an ideal situation to study the interplanetary evolution of CMEs and test earlier model results. The quadrature observations did improve the CME travel time predictions, but additional factors such as the unusually slow solar wind, CME cannibalism, and coronal-hole deflection need to be considered to reconcile the difference between observed and predicted travel times. This point is illustrated using the 2011 February 15 CME. References Gopalswamy, N

  6. Mass-spectrometric observation of ion ejection from clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrikov, A. A.; Dubov, D. Iu.; Gileva, V. P.

    1989-08-01

    Results of mass spectrometry measurements in clustered molecular beams of water and nitrogen oxide are reported. The clusters were formed under conditions of free expansion of N2O and superheated steam through a sonic nozzle. It is found that, for a mean cluster size of less than 100, the true cluster concentration in the beam is distorted by the evaporation of molecules from ionized clusters. The evaporation intensity depends to a large degree on the ionizing electron energy. For the cluster sizes investigated (100 or less), the observed density of the microcluster ions is found to be related to ion ejection from the clusters.

  7. Rod phototransduction modulated by bicarbonate in the frog retina: roles of carbonic anhydrase and bicarbonate exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Donner, K; Hemilä, S; Kalamkarov, G; Koskelainen, A; Shevchenko, T

    1990-01-01

    1. Effects on rod phototransduction following manipulation of retinal CO2-HCO3- and H+ fluxes were studied in dark-adapted retinas of the frog and the tiger salamander. 2. Rod photoresponses to brief flashes of light were recorded from the isolated sensory retina as electroretinogram mass receptor potentials and from isolated rods by the suction-pipette technique. The experimental treatments were: (1) varying [CO2] + [HCO3-] in the perfusion fluid: (2) applying acetazolamide (AAA), which inhibits the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA); and (3) applying 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) which blocks exchange mechanisms transporting HCO3- across cell membranes. 3. The concentration of the internal transmitter of the rods, cyclic GMP, was biochemically determined from the rod outer segment layer of retinas that had been incubated in the same solutions as were used for perfusion in the electrophysiological experiments. 4. The introduction of 6 mM-sodium bicarbonate to replace half the buffer of a nominally CO2-HCO3(-)-free (12 mM-phosphate or HEPES, [Na+] constant) Ringer solution doubled the cyclic GMP concentration in the rod outer segment layer and increased the saturating response amplitude and the relative sensitivity of rods in the intact retina. 5. The introduction of 0.5 mM-AAA into bicarbonate-containing Ringer solution accelerated the growth of saturated responses and sensitivity. Incubation of the retina in AAA-bicarbonate Ringer solution elevated the concentration of cyclic GMP ninefold compared with the phosphate control. 6. No effects of switching to bicarbonate-AAA Ringer solution were observed in the photocurrent of isolated rods drawn into suction pipettes with only the outer segment protruding into the perfusion fluid. The target of AAA is probably the CA-containing Müller cell. 7. The introduction of DIDS into the perfusate (at normal pH 7.5) set off a continuous decay of photoresponses which finally abolished light sensitivity

  8. F-16 pilot experience with combat ejections during the Persian Gulf War.

    PubMed

    Williams, C S

    1993-09-01

    Most experience with ejections from modern fighter aircraft has occurred outside of true combat operations. During Operation Desert Storm, the 401st Fighter Wing, Torrejon Air Base, Spain, lost four F-16C aircraft while on combat missions, with all four pilots ejecting safely. Since the circumstances of a combat vs. peacetime ejection are likely different and many combat mishaps and ejections cannot be extensively investigated (three out of these four), a questionnaire was developed to recall and review pilot ejection experiences. Questions ranged from recalling the parameters of egress to conscious recollections of the event and assessment of how well the system worked. Each of the four ejections occurred under different parameters, and no one suffered significant injury. Two of the ejections occurred at high altitude, previously rare in the F-16. This was one of the first times that experience was obtained with the F-16's ACES-II egress system under combat operations and, in the experience of these four pilots, the system was life-saving in combat. Finally, the overall ejection survival rate for U.S. Air Force fighter/attack combat ejections during Operation Desert Storm was similar to the peacetime rate. It is the author's hypothesis that the reason for this may correlate with a quicker, more predetermined decision to eject from an aircraft disabled by combat fire. PMID:8216147

  9. 13. SOUTHEAST TO SUCKER ROD WORK BENCH AND WOODEN SUCKER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SOUTHEAST TO SUCKER ROD WORK BENCH AND WOODEN SUCKER ROD STORAGE RACKS ALONG EAST WALL OF FACTORY INTERIOR. AT THIS BENCH WORKERS RIVETED THREADED WROUGHT IRON CONNECTORS TO THE ENDS OF 20' LONG WOODEN SUCKER RODS (THE RODS WHICH EXTEND DOWNWARD IN THE WELL FROM THE GROUND SURFACE TO PISTON DISPLACEMENT PUMPS WHICH ACTUALLY ELEVATE WATER TO THE SURFACE). ROZNOR HEATER AT THE FAR RIGHT WAS ADDED CIRCA 1960. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  10. Evaluation of rodded BWR assembly pin powers with simulate

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadir, T.; Lindahl, S. Oe.

    2012-07-01

    In the development of Studsvik's nodal code SIMULATE5, special attention has been given to the accurate description of pin powers. The code solves the multi-group diffusion or simplified P3 equations with high spatial resolution. A short description is given of the handling of material heterogeneities in the axial and radial directions - the axial re-homogenization and the radial sub-mesh model, respectively. Furthermore, two models which are of special importance in the presence of control rods, and hence on the pellet clad interaction (PCI) phenomenon, are described; the quarter-assembly thermal-hydraulic treatment and the depletion of absorber material. A numerical example for a real core shows that while the impact of the fine grained description is negligible on global parameters such as k{sub eff}, the effect on pin powers may be substantial. For a deeply inserted and highly depleted control rod, the difference in pin powers caused by neglecting the advanced models of SIMULATE5, may be as high as 15 %. (authors)

  11. Viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, R.; Gottlieb, M.; Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures by adopting the Thomas relations for spheres and Milliken`s for randomly oriented rods with aspect ratio of 20. The relative viscosity of a mixed suspension may now be calculated for any combination of rods (of aspect ratio 20) and spheres.

  12. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intramedullary fixation rod. 888.3020 Section 888.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3020 Intramedullary fixation rod. (a) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intramedullary fixation rod. 888.3020 Section 888.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3020 Intramedullary fixation rod. (a) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod...

  14. Carbon Inverse Opal Rods for Nonenzymatic Cholesterol Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qifeng; Xie, Zhuoying; Ding, Haibo; Zhu, Cun; Yang, Zixue; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-11-18

    Carbon inverse opal rods made from silica photonic crystal rods are used for nonenzymatic cholesterol sensing. The characteristic reflection peak originating from the physical periodic structure works as sensing signals for quantitatively estimating cholesterol concentrations. Carbon inverse opal rods work both in cholesterol standard solutions and human serum. They are suitable for practical use in clinical diagnose. PMID:26415111

  15. Rod Has High Tensile Strength And Low Thermal Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Everton, R. L.; Howe, E.; O'Malley, M.

    1996-01-01

    Thoriated tungsten extension rod fabricated to replace stainless-steel extension rod attached to linear variable-differential transformer in gap-measuring gauge. Threads formed on end of rod by machining with special fixtures and carefully chosen combination of speeds and feeds.

  16. Measurement of the Speed of Sound in a Metal Rod.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Se-yuen; Ng, Yee-kong; Wu, Kam-wah

    2000-01-01

    Suggests two improved methods to measure the speed of sound in a metal rod. One employs a fast timer to measure the time required for a compression pulse to travel along the rod from end to end, and a second uses a microphone to measure the frequency of the fundamental mode of a freely suspending singing rod. (Author/ASK)

  17. Analysis of a rod withdrawal in a PWR core with the neutronic- thermalhydraulic coupled code RELAP/PARCS and RELAP/VALKIN

    SciTech Connect

    Miro, R.; Maggini, F.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.; Gomez, A.; Ortego, A.; Murillo, J. C.

    2006-07-01

    The Reactor Ejection Accident (REA) belongs to the Reactor Initiated Accidents (RIA) category of accidents and it is part of the licensing basis accident analyses required for pressure water reactors (PWR). The REA at hot zero power (HZP) is characterized by a single rod ejection from a core position with a very low power level. The evolution consists basically of a continuous reactivity insertion. The main feature limiting the consequences of the accident in a PWR is the Doppler Effect. To check the performance of the coupled code RELAP5/PARCS2.5 and RELAP5/VALKIN a REA in Trillo NPP is simulated. These analyses will allow knowing more accurately the PWR real plant phenomenology in the RIA most limiting conditions. (authors)

  18. Biomarkers in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Meijers, W C; van der Velde, A R; de Boer, R A

    2016-04-01

    Biomarkers are widely used and studied in heart failure. Most studies have described the utility and performance of biomarkers in sub-studies of randomised clinical trials, where the vast majority of the patients suffered from heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), and not with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). As a result, there is a scarcity of data describing the levels, dynamics, clinical and biochemical correlates, and biology of biomarkers in patients suffering from HFpEF, whereas HFpEF is in fact a very frequent clinical entity. This article discusses the value of different biomarkers in HFpEF. We describe various aspects of natriuretic peptide measurements in HFpEF patients, with a focus on diagnosis, prognosis and the risk prediction of developing heart failure. Further, we will discuss several emerging biomarkers such as galectin-3 and suppression of tumorigenicity 2, and recently discovered ones such as growth differentiation factor-15 and syndecan-1. PMID:26942916

  19. Study on metal ejection under laser shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianting, Xin; Yuqiu, Gu

    2013-06-01

    Dynamic response of metal to shock loading plays an important role in the fields of civil engineering, aeronautics etc. The loading method of intense laser driven shock wave has many advantages to study the ejection process. The present work is devoted to laser-shock experiments in metal ejection, and get access to fragments recovery and post-test evaluation of the fragment-size distribution. The experiments were carried out on the SGIII laser facility, the samples are tin foil of 106 μm and 260 μm. Two high power pulsed laser beams of 0.532 μm wavelength are focused onto the target, the laser beams were homogenized by cpp, and the irradiated spot is quasi circular with 2mm diameter. The dynamic fragmentation were recovered by CH foam with 200 mg/cm3 density. One dimensional simulations were performed with HYADES code, and the pressures near the free surface of the targets driven by laser in experiments are 13 Gpa, 27 Gpa, 42 Gpa and 50 Gpa respectively. We observed the fragments in the CH foam tube by X-ray radiographs and CT image reconstruction. The total number and characteristic size of fragments have been detected.

  20. Interactive visualization of solar mass ejection imager (SMEI) volumetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Hick, P. P.; Jackson, Bernard V.

    2005-08-01

    We present a volume rendering system developed for the real time visualization and manipulation of 3D heliospheric volumetric solar wind density and velocity data obtained from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) velocities over the same time period. Our system exploits the capabilities of the VolumePro 1000 board from TeraRecon, Inc., a low-cost 64-bit PCI board capable of rendering up to a 512-cubed array of volume data in real time at up to 30 frames per second on a standard PC. Many volume-rendering operations have been implemented with this system such as stereo/perspective views, animations of time-sequences, and determination of coronal mass ejection (CME) volumes and masses. In these visualizations we highlight one time period where a halo CMEs was observed by SMEI to engulf Earth on October 29, 2003. We demonstrate how this system is used to measure the distribution of structure and provide 3D mass for individual CME features, including the ejecta associated with the large prominence viewed moving to the south of Earth following the late October CME. Comparisons with the IPS velocity volumetric data give pixel by pixel and total kinetic energies for these events.