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Sample records for control rod patterns

  1. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.; Ross, H.V.

    1958-11-18

    A control rod is described for a nuclear reactor. In certaln reactor designs it becomes desirable to use a control rod having great width but relatively llttle thickness. This patent is addressed to such a need. The neutron absorbing material is inserted in a triangular tube, leaving volds between the circular insert and the corners of the triangular tube. The material is positioned within the tube by the use of dummy spacers to achleve the desired absorption pattern, then the ends of the tubes are sealed with suitable plugs. The tubes may be welded or soldered together to form two flat surfaces of any desired width, and covered with sheetmetal to protect the tubes from damage. This design provides a control member that will not distort under the action of outside forces or be ruptured by gases generated within the jacketed control member.

  2. Optimization of boiling water reactor control rod patterns using linear search

    SciTech Connect

    Kiguchi, T.; Doi, K.; Fikuzaki, T.; Frogner, B.; Lin, C.; Long, A.B.

    1984-10-01

    A computer program for searching the optimal control rod pattern has been developed. The program is able to find a control rod pattern where the resulting power distribution is optimal in the sense that it is the closest to the desired power distribution, and it satisfies all operational constraints. The search procedure consists of iterative uses of two steps: sensitivity analyses of local power and thermal margins using a three-dimensional reactor simulator for a simplified prediction model; linear search for the optimal control rod pattern with the simplified model. The optimal control rod pattern is found along the direction where the performance index gradient is the steepest. This program has been verified to find the optimal control rod pattern through simulations using operational data from the Oyster Creek Reactor.

  3. Control Rod Pattern Planning of a BWR using Enhanced Nelder-Mead Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yoko Kobayashi; Eitaro Aiyoshi

    2004-07-01

    We propose a new optimization algorithm for the short-term planning of control rod patterns in an operating BWR. This algorithm is based on the enhanced Nelder-Mead simplex method in which convergence ability is improved for constrained problems in several ways. The main characteristic of this approach is it uses continuous values for the axial positions of control rods. Through calculations in an actual BWR plant, we showed that the new algorithm is effective for automation of short-term planning and reduction of the engineer's workload. (authors)

  4. A rule-based expert system for automatic control rod pattern generation for boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.S.; Lin, C. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on an expert system for generating control rod patterns that has been developed. The knowledge is transformed into IF-THEN rules. The inference engine uses the Rete pattern matching algorithm to match facts, and rule premises and conflict resolution strategies to make the system function intelligently. A forward-chaining mechanism is adopted in the inference engine. The system is implemented in the Common Lisp programming language. The three-dimensional core simulation model performs the core status and burnup calculations. The system is successfully demonstrated by generating control rod programming for the 2894-MW (thermal) Kuosheng nuclear power plant in Taiwan. The computing time is tremendously reduced compared to programs using mathematical methods.

  5. Control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  6. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  7. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  8. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  9. COMPOSITE CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Rock, H.R.

    1963-12-24

    A composite control rod for use in controlling a nuclear reactor is described. The control rod is of sandwich construction in which finned dowel pins are utilized to hold together sheets of the neutron absorbing material and nonabsorbing structural material thereby eliminating the need for being dependent on the absorbing material for structural support. The dowel pins perform the function of absorbing the forces due to differential thermal expansion, seating further with the fins into the sheets of material and crushing before damage is done either to the absorbing or non-absorbing material. (AEC)

  10. Control rod driveline and grapple

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A control rod driveline and grapple is disclosed for placement between a control rod drive and a nuclear reactor control rod containing poison for parasitic neutron absorption required for reactor shutdown. The control rod is provided with an enlarged cylindrical handle which terminates in an upwardly extending rod to provide a grapple point for the driveline. The grapple mechanism includes a tension rod which receives the upwardly extending handle and is provided with a lower annular flange. A plurality of preferably six grapple segments surround and grip the control rod handle. Each grapple rod segment grips the flange on the tension rod at an interior upper annular indentation, bears against the enlarged cylindrical handle at an intermediate annulus and captures the upwardly flaring frustum shaped handle at a lower and complementary female segment. The tension rods and grapple segments are surrounded by and encased within a cylinder. The cylinder terminates immediately and outward extending annulus at the lower portion of the grapple segments. Excursion of the tension rod relative to the encasing cylinder causes rod release at the handle by permitting the grapple segments to pivot outwardly and about the annulus on the tension rod so as to open the lower defined frustum shaped annulus and drop the rod. Relative movement between the tension rod and cylinder can occur either due to electromagnetic release of the tension rod within defined limits of travel or differential thermal expansion as between the tension rod and cylinder as where the reactor exceeds design thermal limits.

  11. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  12. SAFETY SYSTEM FOR CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Paget, J.A.

    1963-05-14

    A structure for monitoring the structural continuity of a control rod foi a neutron reactor is presented. A electric conductor readily breakable under mechanical stress is fastened along the length of the control rod at a plurality of positions and forms a closed circuit with remote electrical components responsive to an open circuit. A portion of the conductor between the control rod and said components is helically wound to allow free and normally unrestricted movement of the segment of conductor secured to the control rod relative to the remote components. Any break in the circuit is indicative of control rod breakage. (AEC)

  13. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Peter T. K.

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  14. Hafnium stainless steel absorber rod for control rod

    SciTech Connect

    Charnley, J.E.; Cearley, J.E.; Dixon, R.C.; Izzo, K.R.; Aiello, L.L.

    1989-08-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a control rod having a stainless steel body for enclosing a neutron absorbing poison, the control rod having movement along an axial direction for insertion into and out of a nuclear reactor for controlling a nuclear reaction. The improvement comprising: a piece of hafnium; a piece of stainless steel joined to the hafnium by a thin diffusion interface created by friction welding. The hafnium and the stainless steel oriented serially in the axial direction with the thin diffusion interface disposed normal to the axial direction of the control rod movement; means for confining the hafnium to movement along the axial direction with the control rod; and means for attaching the piece of stainless steel to the remaining portion of the control rod to load the weld therebetween under compression or tension during the control rod movement. Whereby the thin diffusion interface is loaded in tension or compression only upon dynamic movement of the control rod.

  15. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD DRIVE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Oakes, L.C.; Walker, C.S.

    1959-12-15

    ABS>A suspension mechanism between a vertically movable nuclear reactor control rod and a rod extension, which also provides information for the operator or an automatic control signal, is described. A spring connects the rod extension to a drive shift. The extension of the spring indicates whether (1) the rod is at rest on the reactor, (2) the rod and extension are suspended, or (3) the extension alone is suspended, the spring controlling a 3-position electrical switch.

  17. Inverted Control Rod Lock-In Device

    DOEpatents

    Brussalis, W. G.; Bost, G. E.

    1962-12-01

    A mechanism which prevents control rods from dropping out of the reactor core in the event the vessel in which the reactor is mounted should capsize is described. The mechanism includes a pivoted toothed armature which engages the threaded control rod lead screw and prevents removal of the rod whenever the armature is not attracted by the provided electromagnetic means. (AEC)

  18. Fuel followed control rod installation at AFRRI

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Mark; Owens, Chris; Forsbacka, Matt

    1992-07-01

    Fuel Followed Control Rods (FFCRs) were installed at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute's 1 MW TRIGA Reactor. The procedures for obtaining, shipping, and installing the FFCRs is described. As part of the FFCR installation, the transient rod drive was relocated. Core performance due to the addition of the fuel followed control rods is discussed. (author)

  19. Control rods in LMFBRs: a physics assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, H.F.; Collins, P.J.

    1982-08-01

    This physics assessment is based on roughly 300 control rod worth measurements in ZPPR from 1972 to 1981. All ZPPR assemblies simulated mixed-oxide LMFBRs, representing sizes of 350, 700, and 900 MWe. Control rod worth measurements included single rods, various combinations of rods, and Ta and Eu rods. Additional measurements studied variations in B/sub 4/C enrichment, rod interaction effects, variations in rod geometry, neutron streaming in sodium-filled channels, and axial worth profiles. Analyses were done with design-equivalent methods, using ENDF/B Version IV data. Some computations for the sensitivities to approximations in the methods have been included. Comparisons of these analyses with the experiments have allowed the status of control rod physics in the US to be clearly defined.

  20. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  1. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  2. Control rod drive hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Ose, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    A hydraulic system for a control rod drive (CRD) includes a variable output-pressure CR pump operable in a charging mode for providing pressurized fluid at a charging pressure, and in a normal mode for providing the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure, less than the charging pressure. Charging and purge lines are disposed in parallel flow between the CRD pump and the CRD. A hydraulic control unit is disposed in flow communication in the charging line and includes a scram accumulator. An isolation valve is provided in the charging line between the CRD pump and the scram accumulator. A controller is operatively connected to the CRD pump and the isolation valve and is effective for opening the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a charging mode for charging the scram accumulator, and closing the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a normal mode for providing to the CRD through the purge line the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure lower than the charging pressure.

  3. Control Rod Malfunction at the NRAD Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas L. Maddock

    2010-05-01

    The neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) is a training, research, and isotope (TRIGA) reactor located at the INL. The reactor is normally shut down by the insertion of three control rods that drop into the core when power is removed from electromagnets. During a routine shutdown, indicator lights on the console showed that one of the control rods was not inserted. It was initially thought that the indicator lights were in error because of a limit switch that was out of adjustment. Through further testing, it was determined that the control rod did not drop when the scram switch was initially pressed. The control rod anomaly led to a six month shutdown of the reactor and an in depth investigation of the reactor protective system. The investigation looked into: scram switch operation, console modifications, and control rod drive mechanisms. A number of latent issues were discovered and corrected during the investigation. The cause of the control rod malfunction was found to be a buildup of corrosion in the control rod drive mechanism. The investigation resulted in modifications to equipment, changes to both operation and maintenance procedures, and additional training. No reoccurrences of the problem have been observed since corrective actions were implemented.

  4. Variable flow control for a nuclear reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, Richard D.; Bhattacharyya, Ajay

    1978-01-01

    A variable flow control for a control rod assembly of a nuclear reactor that depends on turbulent friction though an annulus. The annulus is formed by a piston attached to the control rod drive shaft and a housing or sleeve fitted to the enclosure housing the control rod. As the nuclear fuel is burned up and the need exists for increased reactivity, the control rods are withdrawn, which increases the length of the annulus and decreases the rate of coolant flow through the control rod assembly.

  5. Control rod for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Walter G.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1979-01-01

    A control rod assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed having a remotely disengageable coupling between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling is actuated by first lowering then raising the drive shaft. The described motion causes axial repositioning of a pin in a grooved rotatable cylinder, each being attached to different parts of the drive shaft which are axially movable relative to each other. In one embodiment, the relative axial motion of the parts of the drive shaft is used either to couple or to uncouple the connection by forcing resilient members attached to the drive shaft into or out of shouldered engagement, respectively, with an indentation formed in the control rod.

  6. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1986-01-01

    A magnetic reed switch assembly for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electromagnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  7. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-09-30

    A magnetic reed switch assembly is described for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electro-magnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  8. Nuclear reactor remote disconnect control rod coupling indicator

    DOEpatents

    Vuckovich, Michael

    1977-01-01

    A coupling indicator for use with nuclear reactor control rod assemblies which have remotely disengageable couplings between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling indicator indicates whether the control rod and the control rod drive shaft are engaged or disengaged. A resistive network, utilizing magnetic reed switches, senses the position of the control rod drive mechanism lead screw and the control rod position indicating tube, and the relative position of these two elements with respect to each other is compared to determine whether the coupling is engaged or disengaged.

  9. Regulatory perspective on incomplete control rod insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterton, M.

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete control rod insertions experienced at South Texas Unit 1 and Wolf Creek are of safety concern to the NRC staff because they represent potential precursors to loss of shutdown margin. Even before it was determined if these events were caused by the control rods or by the fuel there was an apparent correlation of the problem with high burnup fuel. It was determined that there was also a correlation between high burnup and high drag forces as well as with rod drop time histories and lack of rod recoil. The NRC staff initial actions were aimed at getting a perspective on the magnitude of the problem as far as the number of plants and the amount of fuel that could be involved, as well as the safety significance in terms of shutdown margin. As tests have been performed and data has been analyzed the focus has shifted more toward understanding the problem and the ways to eliminate it. At this time the staff`s understanding of the phenomena is that it was a combination of factors including burnup, power history and temperature. The problem appears to be very sensitive to these factors, the interaction of which is not clearly understood. The model developed by Westinghouse provides a possible explanation but there is not sufficient data to establish confidence levels and sensitivity studies involving the key parameters have not been done. While several fixes to the problem have been discussed, no definitive fixes have been proposed. Without complete understanding of the phenomena, or fixes that clearly eliminate the problem the safety concern remains. The safety significance depends on the amount of shutdown margin lost due to incomplete insertion of the control rods. Were the control rods to stick high in the core, the reactor could not be shutdown by the control rods and other means such as emergency boration would be required.

  10. Radiological characterization of spent control rod assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Pratt, S.L.; Haggard, D.L.

    1995-10-01

    This document represents the final report of an ongoing study to provide radiological characterizations, classifications, and assessments in support of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. This report describes the results of non-destructive and laboratory radionuclide measurements, as well as waste classification assessments, of BWR and PWR spent control rod assemblies. The radionuclide inventories of these spent control rods were determined by three separate methodologies, including (1) direct assay techniques, (2) calculational techniques, and (3) by sampling and laboratory radiochemical analyses. For the BWR control rod blade (CRB) and PWR burnable poison rod assembly (BPRA), {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni, present in the stainless steel cladding, were the most abundant neutron activation products. The most abundant radionuclide in the PWR rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) was {sup 108m}Ag (130 yr halflife) produced in the Ag-In-Cd alloy used as the neutron poison. This radionuclide will be the dominant contributor to the gamma dose rate for many hundreds of years. The results of the direct assay methods agree very well ({+-}10%) with the sampling/radiochemical measurements. The results of the calculational methods agreed fairly well with the empirical measurements for the BPRA, but often varied by a factor of 5 to 10 for the CRB and the RCCA assemblies. If concentration averaging and encapsulation, as allowed by 10CFR61.55, is performed, then each of the entire control assemblies would be classified as Class C low-level radioactive waste.

  11. Control rod drive for reactor shutdown

    DOEpatents

    McKeehan, Ernest R.; Shawver, Bruce M.; Schiro, Donald J.; Taft, William E.

    1976-01-20

    A means for rapidly shutting down or scramming a nuclear reactor, such as a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor, and serves as a backup to the primary shutdown system. The control rod drive consists basically of an in-core assembly, a drive shaft and seal assembly, and a control drive mechanism. The control rod is driven into the core region of the reactor by gravity and hydraulic pressure forces supplied by the reactor coolant, thus assuring that common mode failures will not interfere with or prohibit scramming the reactor when necessary.

  12. Dynamics of rod eutectic growth patterns in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şerefoǧlu, Melis; Bottin-Rousseau, S.; Akamatsu, S.; Faivre, G.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of rod-like eutectics are examined using a directional solidification setup, which allows real-time observation of the whole solidification front in specimens of transparent eutectic alloys -here, succinonitrile-(D)camphor. In steady-state, rod eutectic growth patterns consist of triangular arrays, more or less disturbed by topological defects. In the absence of strong convection and of crystallographic anisotropy, the long-time evolution of the pattern is dominated by "imperfections" of the system, such as misalignment of the temperature gradient, and finite-size. In this study, we present experimental results on the finite-size effects on rod eutectics and show that a rod to lamella transition takes place as a result of finite-size effect only, at a given alloy concentration.

  13. HIGH STRENGTH CONTROL RODS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Cohen, I.

    1961-07-11

    Nuclear reactor control rods comprised of highly compressed and sintered finely divided metal alloy panticles and fine metal oxide panticles substantially uniformly distributed theretbrough are described. The metal alloy consists essentially of silver, indium, cadmium, tin, and aluminum, the amount of each being present in centain percentages by weight. The oxide particles are metal oxides of the metal alloy composition, the amount of oxygen being present in certain percentages by weight and all the oxygen present being substantially in the form of metal oxide. This control rod is characterized by its high strength and resistance to creep at elevated temperatures.

  14. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  15. CONTROL ROD DRIVE MECHANISM FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.; Liederbach, F.J.; Lones, W.

    1963-05-14

    A lead-screw-type control rod drive featuring an electric motor and a fluid motor arranged to provide a selectably alternative driving means is described. The electric motor serves to drive the control rod slowly during normal operation, while the fluid motor, assisted by an automatic declutching of the electric motor, affords high-speed rod insertion during a scram. (AEC)

  16. Measurements of control rod efficiency in RBMK critical assembly upon dropping of the rods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhitarev, V. E. Kachanov, V. M.; Sergevnin, A. Yu.; Lebedev, G. V.

    2014-12-15

    The efficiency of control rods in the RBMK critical assembly was measured in the case where one manual-control rod (MCR) is dropped from a steady critical state, and several other MCRs were additionally dropped after 44 s. The measured number of neutrons in the assembly during and after dropping of the rods was used to calculate the efficiency values of the rods by solution of the system of point kinetics equations. A series of methods of the initial data treatment for determination of the desired values of reactivity without the calculated corrections were used.

  17. Rebirth of a control rod at the Phenix power plant

    SciTech Connect

    De Carvalho, Corinne; Vignau, Bernard; Masson, Marc

    2007-07-01

    This paper outlines the operations involved in cleaning the control rod for the complementary shutdown system in the Phenix Power Plant, the French sodium-cooled fast reactor. The Phenix reactor is controlled by six control rods and a complementary shutdown system. The latter comprises a control rod and a mechanism maintaining the rod in position by means of an electromagnet. The electromagnet is continuously supplied with power and holds the rod control assembly in position by magnetisation on a plane circular surface made from pure iron. The bearing capacity of the mechanism on the rod was initially 80 daN with a rod weight of 26.3 daN. This deteriorated progressively over time. The bearing surface of the rod and the electromagnet became contaminated with a deposit of sodium oxides and metallic particles, thus creating an air gap. This reached a figure of 36 daN in 2005 and was deemed not to be sufficient to prevent the rod from dropping at the wrong time during reactor operation. The Power Plant thus decided to replace the rod mechanism in the reactor in an initial phase, followed by the control rod itself. As the Phenix Power Plant had no spare control rods left, they initiated a 'salvage' plan, over two stages, for the rod removed from the reactor and placed in the fuel storage drum: - Inspection of the bearing surface of the rod by means of a borescope to check whether the rod could be salvaged, - A cleaning operation on the bearing face and checks on the bearing capacity of the rod. The operation is subject to very stringent requirements: the rod must not be taken out of the sodium to ensure that it can be reused in the reactor. The operation must thus take place in the fuel storage drum where there are no facilities for such an operation and where operating conditions are very hostile: high temperatures (the sodium in the fuel storage drum is at a temperature of 150 deg. C, high dose rate (3 mGy/h on the bearing surface) and the bearing surface is submerged

  18. Nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bilibin, Konstantin

    1988-01-01

    A temperature responsive, self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly 10. The upper end 18 of a lower drive line 17 fits within the lower end of an upper drive line 12. The lower end (not shown) of the lower drive line 17 is connected to a neutron absorber. During normal temperature conditions the lower drive line 17 is supported by detent means 22,26. When an overtemperature condition occurs thermal actuation means 34 urges ring 26 upwardly sufficiently to allow balls 22 to move radially outwardly thereby allowing lower drive line 17 to move downwardly toward the core of the nuclear reactor resulting in automatic reduction of the reactor powder.

  19. CONTROL ROD FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR AND METHOD OF PREPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Hausner, H.H.

    1958-12-30

    BS>An improved control rod is presented for a nuclear reactor. This control rod is comprised of a rare earth metal oxide or rare earth metal carbide such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium carbide, uniformly distributed in a metal matrix having a low cross sectional area of absorption for thermal neutrons, such as aluminum, beryllium, and zirconium.

  20. DEVICE FOR CONTROLLING INSERTION OF ROD

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, B.J.

    1958-10-14

    A device for rapidly inserting a safety rod into a nuclear reactor upon a given signal or in the event of a power failure in order to prevent the possibility of extensive damage caused by a power excursion is described. A piston is slidably mounted within a vertical cylinder with provision for an electromagnetic latch at the top of the cylinder. This assembly, with a safety rod attached to the piston, is mounted over an access port to the core region of the reactor. The piston is normally latched at the top of the cylinder with the safety rod clear of the core area, however, when the latch is released, the piston and rod drop by their own weight to insert the rod. Vents along the side of the cylinder permit the escape of the air entrapped under the piston over the greater part of the distance, however, at the end of the fall the entrapped air is compressed thereby bringing the safety rod gently to rest, thus providing for a rapid automatic insertion of the rod with a minimum of structural shock.

  1. COAXIAL CONTROL ROD DRIVE MECHANISM FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.J.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-04-14

    A drive mechanism is presented for the control rod or a nuclear reactor. In this device the control rod is coupled to a drive shaft which extends coaxially through the rotor of an electric motor for relative rotation with respect thereto. A gear reduction mehanism is coupled between the rotor and the drive shaft to convert the rotary motion of the motor into linear motion of the shaft with a comparatively great reduction in speed, thereby providing relatively glow linear movement of the shaft and control rod for control purposes.

  2. TOP OF MTR. CONTROL RODS AND GRID PLATE EMERGE FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP OF MTR. CONTROL RODS AND GRID PLATE EMERGE FROM REACTOR TANK. INL NEGATIVE NO. 6206. R.G. Larsen, Photographer, 6/27/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Remotely operated gripper provides vertical control rod movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutter, E.; Koch, L. J.

    1968-01-01

    Remote actuation of a gripper shaft affects vertical engagement between a drive shaft and control rod. A secondary function of the gripper is to provide remote indication of positive completion of the gripping or ungripping operation.

  4. Safety analysis forseismic motion of control rods accounting for rod misalignment

    SciTech Connect

    Osmin, W.L.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the results of three safety analyses performed by the SRL Safety Analysis Group (SAG) to assess the safety impact of control rod motion induced by a Design Basis Earthquake (DBE).

  5. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    A linear motion device, more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core, is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  6. ALLOY COMPOSITION FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL RODS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Snyder, H.J.; Eggleston, R.R.

    1963-01-22

    This invention relates to alloy compositons suitable as cortrol rod material consisting of, by weight, from 85% to 85% Ag, from 2% to 20% In, from up to 10% of Cd, from up to 5% Sn, and from up to 1.5% Al, the amount of each element employed being determined by the equation X + 2Y + 3Z + 3W + 4V = 1.4 and less, where X, Y, Z, W, and V represent the atom fractions of the elements Ag, Cd, In, Al and Sn. (AEC)

  7. Analysis of enamel rod end patterns on tooth surface for personal identification--ameloglyphics.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, Krishnappa; Sivapathasundharam, Balasundharam; Saraswathi, Thillai R

    2012-05-01

    Ameloglyphics is the study of enamel rod end patterns on a tooth surface. Our aim was to study the in vivo analysis of enamel rod end patterns on tooth surfaces for personal identification. In this study, the maxillary left canine and 1st premolar of 30 men and 30 women were included. The cellulose acetate peel technique was used to record enamel rod endings on tooth surfaces. Photomicrographs of the acetate peel imprint were subjected to VeriFinger Standard SDK v5.0 software for obtaining enamel rod end patterns. All 120 enamel rod end patterns were subjected to visual analysis and biometric analysis. Biometric analysis revealed that the enamel rod end pattern is unique for each tooth in an individual. It shows both intra- and interindividual variation. Enamel rod end patterns were unique between the male and female subjects. Visual analysis showed that wavy branched subpattern was the predominant subpattern observed among examined teeth. Hence, ameloglyphics is a reliable technique for personal identification. PMID:22329965

  8. Dysprosium titanate as an absorber material for control rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risovany, V. D.; Varlashova, E. E.; Suslov, D. N.

    2000-09-01

    Disprosium titanate is an attractive control rod material for the thermal neutron reactors. Its main advantages are: insignificant swelling, no out-gassing under neutron irradiation, rather high neutron efficiency, a high melting point (˜1870°C), non-interaction with the cladding at temperatures above 1000°C, simple fabrication and easily reprocessed non-radioactive waste. It can be used in control rods as pellets and powder. The disprosium titanate control rods have worked off in the MIR reactor for 17 years, in VVER-1000 - for 4 years without any operating problems. After post-irradiation examinations this type of control rod having high lifetime was recommended for the VVER and RBMK. The paper presents the examination results of absorber element dummies containing dysprosium titanate, irradiated in the SM reactor to the neutron fluence of 3.4×10 22 cm -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) and, also, the data on structure, thermal-physical properties of dysprosium titanate, efficiency of dysprosium titanate control rods.

  9. Horizontal displacement profiles in N Reactor horizontal control rod channels

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1988-12-01

    One of the potential results from N Reactor graphite moderator distortion is horizontal curvature of the horizontal control rod (HCR) channels. Mockup testing has identified two possible problem scenarios resulting from such curvature: slow scram times and rod abrasion due to rubbing of the rod on the side of the channel and subsequent displacement of T-blocks that form the sides of the channels. As a result of these potential events, surveillance tools (instrumentation) to measure HCR channel horizontal displacement was recently developed. Surveillance of HCR channel 65, performed on December 11, 1987, indicated a six inch rearward displacement near the center of the channel. This approximated the displacement which mockup testing has identified as a concern with regard to T-block movement. Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) observations indicate that T-block movement has not occurred in HCR channel 65, but that there has been some rubbing of the rod on the channel sides. Review of most recent rod hot scram times indicates normal performance for HCR 65. To further evaluate this concern, horizontal deflection and CCTV surveillance was scheduled in six HCR channels surrounding HCR channel 65. Inspection of the HCR rod tip was also performed. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sease, J.D.

    1998-03-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD AND METHOD OF FABRICATION

    DOEpatents

    Porembka, S.W. Jr.

    1961-06-27

    A reactor control rod formed from a compacted powder dispersion is patented. The rod consists of titanium sheathed with a cladding alloy. The cladding alloy contains 1.3% to 1.6% by weight of tin, 0.07% to 0.12% by weight of chromium, 0.04% to 0.08% by weight of nickel, 0.09% to 0.16% by weight of iron, carbon not exceeding 0.05%, less than 0.5% by weight of incidental impurities, and the balance zirconium.

  12. VIEW OF CABLES AND TAPES ASSOCIATED WITH ADRIVE CONTROL ROD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CABLES AND TAPES ASSOCIATED WITH A-DRIVE CONTROL ROD SYSTEM, AT LEVEL +15’, DIRECTLY ABOVE PDP CONTROL ROOM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE CABLES FROM THE PDP ROOM GO THROUGH THE CONCRETE WALL, MAKE A RIGHT ANGLE TURN DOWNWARD, AND DESCEND INTO THE PDP CONTROL ROOM AS VERTICAL TAPES - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  13. Vortex patterns in a mesoscopic superconducting rod with a magnetic dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, Mauro M.; de C. Romaguera, Antonio R.; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-03-01

    We study a mesoscopic superconducting rod with a magnetic dot on its top having its moment oriented along the axis of symmetry. We study the dependence of the vortex pattern with the height and find that for very short and very long rods, the vortex pattern acquires a simple structure, consisting of giant and of multivortex states, respectively. In the long limit, the most stable configuration consists of two vortices, that reach the lateral surface of the rod diametrically opposed. The long rod shows reentrant behavior within some range of its radius and of the dot’s magnetic moment. Our results are obtained within the Ginzburg-Landau approach in the limit of no magnetic shielding.

  14. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.

    Disclosed is a linear motion device and more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core. The CRDM and method disclosed is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  15. Method and apparatus for monitoring the control rods of a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gravelle, A.; Marini, J.; Romy, D.

    1984-12-04

    Method and apparatus for monitoring the movement of the control rods of a nuclear reactor. The number of steps of movement in either direction of the rod from which the control rod is suspended is counted. According to the height of the step, an indication of the position of the suspension rod and of the control rod. The apparatus comprises devices for measuring the speed of movement of the control rod, for logging variations in speed higher than a given value, and for counting such variations according to their sign. The invention is particularly useful in pressurized water nuclear reactors.

  16. Visual inspections of N Reactor horizontal control rod channels

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1990-09-01

    Safety surveillance is performed in horizontal control rod (HCR) channels to locate conditions which could slow or block rod travel. The findings guide the application of preventive measures to assure eventual rod motion impairment will not occur. Borescopes and, more recently, miniaturized closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras have been used for these examinations. Inspections and measurement results are documented in annual surveillance reports, however reported CCTV observations have been limited to highlights. The objective of this report is to catalogue the CCTV recordings in a format suitable for analysis and interpretation and to ease the access to any desired location by noting tape counter readings corresponding with each tube block in view. Searching file tapes for conditions in a specific areas in the past required counting blocks as they passed the camera to determine the distance from a feature like the edge of the reflector or a steam vent gap. This report adds the observations from recent rod channel inspections (1987 and 1988) to a comprehensive survey of graphite conditions in the moderator and reflector regions of the N Reactor core. When completed, the stand-by status of graphite components will be available for use in restart or decommissioning deliberations.

  17. Reconstitutable control assembly having removable control rods with detachable split upper end plugs

    SciTech Connect

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Knott, R.P.; Sparrow, J.A.

    1989-12-19

    This patent describes, in a reconstitutable control assembly for use with a nuclear fuel assembly, the control assembly including a spider structure and at least one control rod, an attachment joint for detachable fastening the control rod to the spider structure. The attachment joint comprising: a hollow connecting finger on the spider structure; and an elongated detachable split upper end plug on the control rod having a pair of separate upper and lower plug portions, the upper plug portion having integrally-connected tandemly- arranged upper, middle and lower sections. The lower plug portion having integrally-connected tandemly-arranged upper, middle and lower segments.

  18. Implementation of CTRLPOS, a VENTURE module for control rod position criticality searches, control rod worth curve calculations, and general criticality searches

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.A.; Renier, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    A module in the VENTURE reactor analysis code system, CTRLPOS, is developed to position control rods and perform control rod position criticality searches. The module is variably dimensioned so that calculations can be performed with any number of control rod banks each having any number of control rods. CTRLPOS can also calculate control rod worth curves for a single control rod or a bank of control rods. Control rod depletion can be calculated to provide radiation source terms. These radiation source terms can be used to predict radiation doses to personnel and estimate the shielding and long-term storage requirements for spent control rods. All of these operations are completely automated. The numerous features of the module are discussed in detail. The necessary input data for the CTRLPOS module is explained. Several sample problems are presented to show the flexibility of the module. The results presented with the sample problems show that the CTRLPOS module is a powerful tool which allows a wide variety of calculations to be easily performed.

  19. Internal Control Rod Drive Mechanisms, Design Options for IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Petrovic, Bojan

    2004-07-01

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a medium-power (335 MWe) PWR with an integral, primary circuit configuration, where all the reactor coolant system components are contained within the reactor vessel. This integral configuration is a key reason for the success of IRIS' 'safety-by-design' approach, whereby accident initiators are eliminated or the accident consequences and/or frequency are reduced. The most obvious example of the IRIS safety by design approach is the elimination of large LOCA's, since the integral reactor coolant system has no large loop piping. Another serious accident scenario that is being addressed in IRIS is the postulated ejection of a reactor control cluster assembly (RCCA). This accident initiator can be eliminated by locating the RCCA drive mechanisms (CRDMs) inside the reactor vessel. This eliminates the mechanical drive rod penetration between the RCCA and the external CRDM, eliminating the potential for differential pressure across the pressure boundary, and thus eliminating 'by design' the possibility for rod ejection accident. Moreover, the elimination of the 'large' drive-rod penetrations and the external CRDM pressure housings decreases the likelihood of boric acid leakage and subsequent corrosion of the reactor pressure boundary (like the Davis-Besse incident). This paper will discuss the IRIS top level design requirements and objectives for internal CRDMs, and provide examples candidate designs and their specific performance characteristics. (authors)

  20. Control rod system useable for fuel handling in a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1976-11-30

    A control rod and its associated drive are used to elevate a complete stack of fuel blocks to a position above the core of a gas-cooled nuclear reactor. A fuel-handling machine grasps the control rod and the drive is unlatched from the rod. The stack and rod are transferred out of the reactor, or to a new location in the reactor, by the fuel-handling machine.

  1. Patterns of rod and cone dysfunction in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, S G; Borruat, F X; Apáthy, P P

    1990-06-15

    We studied visual function in 16 patients with the Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Visual acuity, kinetic perimetry, and electroretinography results indicated a severe loss of central and peripheral vision and rod and cone function by the second or third decade of life. Light- and dark-adapted static perimetry in patients 10 to 15 years of age with early involvement showed a parallel and marked loss of rod and cone sensitivity across the visual field. Patients with more advanced disease and no measurable peripheral visual field showed different patterns of central visual dysfunction: an island of only cone function centered in a bull's-eye lesion; patches of rod function surrounding geographic atrophy; or a central island of excellent rod sensitivity but severely impaired cones. In the two least-affected patients, a 13-year-old boy and the asymptomatic 45-year-old sibling of a patient, there were more rod than cone abnormalities as determined by electroretinography and static perimetry. PMID:2346197

  2. Decontamination of control rod housing from Palisades Nuclear Power Station.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M.D.; Nunez, L.; Purohit, A.

    1999-05-03

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a novel decontamination solvent for removing oxide scales formed on ferrous metals typical of nuclear reactor piping. The decontamination process is based on the properties of the diphosphonic acids (specifically 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid or HEDPA) coupled with strong reducing-agents (e.g., sodium formaldehyde sulfoxylate, SFS, and hydroxylamine nitrate, HAN). To study this solvent further, ANL has solicited actual stainless steel piping material that has been recently removed from an operating nuclear reactor. On March 3, 1999 ANL received segments of control rod housing from Consumers Energy's Palisades Nuclear Plant (Covert, MI) containing radioactive contamination from both neutron activation and surface scale deposits. Palisades Power plant is a PWR type nuclear generating plant. A total of eight segments were received. These segments were from control rod housing that was in service for about 6.5 years. Of the eight pieces that were received two were chosen for our experimentation--small pieces labeled Piece A and Piece B. The wetted surfaces (with the reactor's pressurized water coolant/moderator) of the pieces were covered with as a scale that is best characterized visually as a smooth, shiny, adherent, and black/brown in color type oxide covering. This tenacious oxide could not be scratched or removed except by aggressive mechanical means (e.g., filing, cutting).

  3. Countercurrent flow-limiting characteristics of a Savannah River Plant control rod septifoil

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.L.

    1992-07-01

    Experiments were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to investigate the counter-current flow limiting characteristics of a Savannah River Plant control rod septifoil assembly. These experiments were unheated, using air and water as the working fluids. Results are presented in terms of the Wallis flooding correlation for several different control rod configurations. Flooding was observed to occur in the vicinity of the inlet slots/holes of the septifoil, rather than within the rod bundle at the location of the minimum flow area. Nearly identical flooding characteristics of the septifoil were observed for configurations with zero, three, and four rods inserted, but significantly different results occurred with 5 rods inserted.

  4. Final Report: Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Rowsell, David Leon

    2015-06-01

    This report documents the Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation. The review followed the approved Plan of Action (POA) and Implementation Plan (IP) using the identified core requirements. The activity was limited scope focusing on the control rod drives functional isolation and fuel element movement. The purpose of this review is to ensure the facility's readiness to move fuel elements thus supporting inspection and functionally isolate the control rod drives to maintain the required shutdown margin.

  5. Pattern, Growth and Control

    PubMed Central

    Lander, Arthur D.

    2011-01-01

    The view of biology as goal-directed engineering has deep historical roots in developmental biology, a field currently benefitting from an influx of ideas and methods from systems biology. Systems biology draws on non-biological paradigms to explain developmental mechanisms of control, the specific type of regulation that achieves or maintains a desired end. This review highlights some of the current efforts designed to elucidate basic design principles underlying the engineering objectives of robustness, precision, and scaling that are required during developmental control of growth and pattern formation. Examples from vertebrate and invertebrate development are used to illustrate general principles including the value of integral feedback in achieving set-point control; the usefulness of self-organizing behavior; the importance of recognizing and appropriately handling noise; and the No Free Lunch theory. Through the examination of such principles, systems biology offers a functional framework to make sense of the mechanistic complexity of organismal development. PMID:21414486

  6. Radial brake assembly for a control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hekmati, A.; Gibo, E.Y.

    1992-04-07

    This patent describes a brake assembly for a control rod drive for selectively preventing travel of a control rod in a nuclear reactor vessel. It comprises a shaft having a longitudinal centerline axis; means for selectively rotating the shaft in a first direction and in a second direction, opposite to the first direction; a stationary housing having a central aperture receiving the shaft; a frame fixedly joined to the housing and having a guide hole; a rotor disc fixedly connected to the shaft for rotation therewith and having at least one rotor tooth extending radially outwardly from a perimeter thereof, the rotor tooth having a locking surface and an inclined surface extending therefrom in a circumferential direction; a brake member disposed adjacent to the rotor disc perimeter and including a base, at least one braking tooth having a locking surface extending therefrom in a circumferential direction, and a plunger extending radially outwardly from the base and slidably joined to the frame through the guide hole; the rotor tooth and the braking tooth being complementary to each other; and means for selectively positioning the brake member in a deployed position abutting the rotor disc perimeter for allowing the braking tooth locking surface to contact the rotor tooth locking surface for preventing rotation of the shaft in the first direction, and in a retracted position spaced radially away from the rotor disc for allowing the rotor disc and the shaft to rotate without restraint from the brake member, the positioning means including a tubular solenoid fixedly joined to the frame and having a central bore disposed around the brake member plunger and effective for sliding the brake member plunger relative to the frame for positioning the brake member in the deployed and retracted positions.

  7. Aging assessment of BWR control rod drive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the aging phenomena associated with boiling water reactor (BWR) control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and assess the merits of various methods of managing this aging. Information for this study was acquired from (1) the results of a special CRDM aging questionnaire distributed to each US BWR utility, (2) a first-of-its-kind workshop held to discuss CRDM aging and maintenance concerns, (3) an analysis of Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) failure cases attributed to the CRD system, and (4) personal information exchange with industry experts. As part of this study, nearly 3500 NPRDS failure reports have been analyzed to examine the prevailing failure trends for CRD system components. An investigation was conducted to summarize the occurrence frequency of these component failures, discovery methods, reported failure causes, their respective symptoms, and actions taken by utilities to restore component and system service. The results of this research have identified the predominant CRDM failure modes and causes. In addition, recommendations are presented that identify specific actions utilities can implement to mitigate CRDM aging. An evaluation has also been made of certain maintenance practices and tooling which have enabled some utilities to reduce ALARA exposures received from routine CRDM replacement and rebuilding activities. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Ultrasound control of magnet growing rod distraction in early onset scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Pérez Cervera, T; Lirola Criado, J F; Farrington Rueda, D M

    2016-01-01

    The growing rod technique is currently one of the most common procedures used in the management of early onset scoliosis. However, in order to preserve spine growth and control the deformity it requires frequent surgeries to distract the rods. Magnetically driven growing rods have recently been introduced with same treatment goal, but without the inconvenience of repeated surgical distractions. One of the limitations of this technical advance is an increase in radiation exposure due to the increase in distraction frequency compared to conventional growing rods. An improvement of the original technique is presented, proposing a solution to the inconvenience of multiple radiation exposure using ultrasound technology to control the distraction process of magnetically driven growing rods. PMID:25843064

  9. NDE Assessment of PWSCC in Control Rod Drive Mechanism Housings

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Rob V.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2006-11-01

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of Nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect?, 2) What did each technique miss?, 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data and through-wall leakage; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discuss the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology and a comparison of the degradation found by the destructive evaluation with the recorded NDE responses.

  10. Validation of neutron flux redistribution factors in JSI TRIGA reactor due to control rod movements.

    PubMed

    Kaiba, Tanja; Žerovnik, Gašper; Jazbec, Anže; Štancar, Žiga; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-10-01

    For efficient utilization of research reactors, such as TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, it is important to know neutron flux distribution in the reactor as accurately as possible. The focus of this study is on the neutron flux redistributions due to control rod movements. For analyzing neutron flux redistributions, Monte Carlo calculations of fission rate distributions with the JSI TRIGA reactor model at different control rod configurations have been performed. Sensitivity of the detector response due to control rod movement have been studied. Optimal radial and axial positions of the detector have been determined. Measurements of the axial neutron flux distribution using the CEA manufactured fission chambers have been performed. The experiments at different control rod positions were conducted and compared with the MCNP calculations for a fixed detector axial position. In the future, simultaneous on-line measurements with multiple fission chambers will be performed inside the reactor core for a more accurate on-line power monitoring system. PMID:26141293

  11. A hybrid attitude controller consisting of electromagnetic torque rods and an active fluid ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobari, Nona A.; Misra, Arun K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid actuation system for satellite attitude stabilization is proposed along with its feasibility analysis. The system considered consists of two magnetic torque rods and one fluid ring to produce the control torque required in the direction in which magnetic torque rods cannot produce torque. A mathematical model of the system dynamics is derived first. Then a controller is developed to stabilize the attitude angles of a satellite equipped with the abovementioned set of actuators. The effect of failure of the fluid ring or a magnetic torque rod is examined as well. It is noted that the case of failure of the magnetic torque rod whose torque is along the pitch axis is the most critical, since the coupling between the roll or yaw motion and the pitch motion is quite weak. The simulation results show that the control system proposed is quite fault tolerant.

  12. Fuel integrity consequences of a misaligned control rod incident: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Husser, D.L.; Delano, B.J.; Crist, S.H.; Mayer, J.T.; Lewis, L.Y.; Harris, K.L.

    1987-04-01

    During cycle 6 operation of the Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1 reactor, an unanticipated transient occurred as a result of the rapid withdrawal at full power of a misaligned (27% withdrawn) control rod assembly (CRA). In less than one hour, operators realigned the assembly with the remaining rods in its group. Since the removal of the misaligned CRA was known to have caused high local power changes, the preliminary assessment was that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) occurred in the rods directly affected by the withdrawal. The potentially affected fuel assembly and certain selected additional assemblies were inspected using the Babcock and Wilcox ECHO-330 System, which permits the identification of individual rod failures. Based on the data gathered during this project, the misalignment event resulted in no occurrences of SCC-related fuel rod failures. The absence of failed rods in the assembly most significantly affected by the withdrawal clearly eliminates the SCC failure mode from consideration. The details of the power transient should be sufficient as benchmark cases to develop and verify computer codes designed to model power shock events in Zircaloy-clad fuel rods. The project is applicable to both SCC failure modeling and to such areas as load-following and power recovery operations where significant control rod movement is required. The power shock event meets the project objectives by providing a no-failure case under conditions approaching or exceeding the power change and levels typically associated with the SCC failure mode. The event also confirms the ability of pressurized water reactor fuel rods to sustain large power shocks without adverse effects.

  13. Aerosol behavior during SIC control rod failure in QUENCH-13 test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Terttaliisa; Csordás, Anna Pintér; Nagy, Imre; Stuckert, Juri

    2010-02-01

    In a nuclear reactor severe accident, radioactive fission products as well as structural materials are released from the core by evaporation, and the released gases form particles by nucleation and condensation. In addition, aerosol particles may be generated by droplet formation and fragmentation of the core. In pressurized water reactors (PWR), a commonly used control rod material is silver-indium-cadmium (SIC) covered with stainless steel cladding. The control rod elements, Cd, In and Ag, have relatively low melting temperatures, and especially Cd has also a very low boiling point. Control rods are likely to fail early on in the accident due to melting of the stainless steel cladding which can be accelerated by eutectic interaction between stainless steel and the surrounding Zircaloy guide tube. The release of the control rod materials would follow the cladding failure thus affecting aerosol source term as well as fuel rod degradation. The QUENCH experimental program at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe investigates phenomena associated with reflood of a degrading core under postulated severe accident conditions. QUENCH-13 test was the first in this program to include a silver-indium-cadmium control rod of prototypic PWR design. To characterize the extent of aerosol release during the control rod failure, aerosol particle size distribution and concentration measurements in the off-gas pipe of the QUENCH facility were carried out. For the first time, it was possible to determine on-line the aerosol concentration and size distribution released from the core. These results are of prime importance for model development for the proper calculation of the source term resulting from control rod failure. The on-line measurement showed that the main aerosol release started at the bundle temperature maximum of T ˜ 1570 K at hottest bundle elevation. A very large burst of aerosols was detected 660 s later at the bundle temperature maximum of T ˜ 1650 K, followed by a relatively

  14. Joint-Angle Coordination Patterns Ensure Stabilization of a Body-Plus-Tool System in Point-to-Point Movements with a Rod

    PubMed Central

    Valk, Tim A.; Mouton, Leonora J.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2016-01-01

    When performing a goal-directed action with a tool, it is generally assumed that the point of control of the action system is displaced from the hand to the tool, implying that body and tool function as one system. Studies of how actions with tools are performed have been limited to studying either end-effector kinematics or joint-angle coordination patterns. Because joint-angle coordination patterns affect end-effector kinematics, the current study examined them together, with the aim of revealing how body and tool function as one system. Seated participants made point-to-point movements with their index finger, and with rods of 10, 20, and 30 cm attached to their index finger. Start point and target were presented on a table in front of them, and in half of the conditions a participant displacement compensated for rod length. Results revealed that the kinematics of the rod's tip showed higher peak velocity, longer deceleration time, and more curvature with longer rods. End-effector movements were more curved in the horizontal plane when participants were not displaced. Joint-angle trajectories were similar across rod lengths when participants were displaced, whereas more extreme joint-angles were used with longer rods when participants were not displaced. Furthermore, in every condition the end-effector was stabilized to a similar extent; both variability in joint-angle coordination patterns that affected end-effector position and variability that did not affect end-effector position increased in a similar way vis-à-vis rod length. Moreover, the increase was higher in those conditions, in which participants were not displaced. This suggests that during tool use, body and tool are united in a single system so as to stabilize the end-effector kinematics in a similar way that is independent of tool length. In addition, the properties of the actual trajectory of the end-effector, as well as the actual joint-angles used, depend on the length of the tool and the

  15. On-line monitoring of control rod integrity in BWRs using a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, I.; Loner, H.; Ammon, K.; Sihver, L.; Ledergerber, G.

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance of fuel and control rod integrity in the core of a boiling water reactor is essential for maintaining a safe and reliable operation. Control rods of a boiling water reactor are mainly filled with boron carbide as a neutron absorber. Due to the irradiation of boron with neutrons, a continuous production of lithium and helium will occur inside a control rod. Most of the created helium will be retained in the boron carbide lattice; however a small part will escape into the void volume of the control blade. Therefore the integrity of control rods during operation can efficiently be followed by on-line measurements of helium concentration in the reactor off-gas system using a mass spectrometer. Since helium is a fill gas in fuel rods, the same method is a useful early warning system for primary fuel failures. In this paper, we introduce an on-line helium detector system which is installed at the nuclear power plant in Leibstadt. Furthermore the measuring experiences of control rod failure detection at the plant are presented. Different causes of increased helium levels in the off-gas system have been distinguished. There are spontaneous helium releases as well as helium releases caused by changed conditions in the reactor (power reduction, control rod movement, etc.). Helium peaks can also be characterized according to the released amount of helium, the peak shape and the duration of the release, which leads to different interpretations of the release mechanisms. In addition, the measured amount of released helium from a 50 days period (280 l) is also compared to the calculated amount of produced helium from the washed out boron during the same time period (190 l).

  16. Rod electrical coupling is controlled by a circadian clock and dopamine in mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nan Ge; Chuang, Alice Z; Masson, Philippe J; Ribelayga, Christophe P

    2015-01-01

    Key points Rod photoreceptors play a key role in vision in dim light; in the mammalian retina, although rods are anatomically connected or coupled by gap junctions, a type of electrical synapse, the functional importance and regulation of rod coupling has remained elusive. We have developed a new technique in the mouse: perforated patch-clamp recording of rod inner segments in isolated intact retinae maintained by superfusion. We find that rod electrical coupling is controlled by a circadian clock and dopamine, and is weak during the day and stronger at night. The results also indicate that the signal-to-noise ratio for a dim light response is increased at night because of coupling. Our observations will provide a framework for understanding the daily variations in human vision as well as the basis of specific retinal malfunctions. Abstract Rod single-photon responses are critical for vision in dim light. Electrical coupling via gap junction channels shapes the light response properties of vertebrate photoreceptors, but the regulation of rod coupling and its impact on the single-photon response have remained unclear. To directly address these questions, we developed a perforated patch-clamp recording technique and recorded from single rod inner segments in isolated intact neural mouse retinae, maintained by superfusion. Experiments were conducted at different times of the day or under constant environmental conditions, at different times across the circadian cycle. We show that rod electrical coupling is regulated by a circadian clock and dopamine, so that coupling is weak during the day and strong at night. Altogether, patch-clamp recordings of single-photon responses in mouse rods, tracer coupling, receptive field measurements and pharmacological manipulations of gap junction and dopamine receptor activity provide compelling evidence that rod coupling is modulated in a circadian manner. These data are consistent with computer modelling. At night, single

  17. Controlling and engineering precipitation patterns.

    PubMed

    Lagzi, István

    2012-02-21

    Controlling and engineering chemical structures are the most important scientific challenges in material science. Precipitation patterns from ions or nanoparticles are promising candidates for designing bulk structure for catalysis, energy production, storage, and electronics. There are only a few procedures and techniques to control precipitation (Liesegang) patterns in gel media (e.g., using an electric field, varying the initial concentration of the electrolytes). However, those methods provide just a limited degree of freedom. Here, we provide a robust and transparent way to control and engineer Liesegang patterns by varying gel concentration and inducing impurity by addition of gelatin to agarose gel. Using this experimental method, different precipitation structures can be obtained with different width and spatial distribution of the formed bands. A new variant of a sol-coagulation model was developed to describe and understand the effect of the gel concentration and impurities on Liesegang pattern formation. PMID:22283626

  18. Method and means for remote removal of guide balls from nuclear reactor control rods

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.H.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of remotely removing guide balls from nuclear reactor control rods using a punch mechanism, comprising: (a) providing attachment means in the punch mechanism for attaching the punch mechanism to means for reversibly lowering the punch mechanism over the top of one of the control rods; (b) providing a die within the punch mechanism; (c) providing cylinder means within the punch mechanism operatively connected to the die for axially moving the die in a back-and-forth direction; (d) providing a die block within the punch mechanism cooperating with the die; (e) providing guide means within the punch mechanism for self-aligning the punch mechanism so that the die and the die block are automatically aligned with a first one of the guide balls therebetween when the punch mechanism is lowered over the top of the control rod; (f) lowering the punch mechanism over the control rod so that the die, the die block, and the first guide ball are in alignment; and (g) then operating the cylinder means so that the die advances into the die block, thereby removing the first guide ball from the control rod.

  19. Control rod calibration and reactivity effects at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Letícia Negrão; Gonnelli, Eduardo; Santos, Adimir dos

    2014-11-11

    Researches that aim to improve the performance of neutron transport codes and quality of nuclear cross section databases are very important to increase the accuracy of simulations and the quality of the analysis and prediction of phenomena in the nuclear field. In this context, relevant experimental data such as reactivity worth measurements are needed. Control rods may be made of several neutron absorbing materials that are used to adjust the reactivity of the core. For the reactor operation, these experimental data are also extremely important: with them it is possible to estimate the reactivity worth by the movement of the control rod, understand the reactor response at each rod position and to operate the reactor safely. This work presents a temperature correction approach for the control rod calibration problem. It is shown the control rod calibration data of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, the integral and differential reactivity curves and a theoretical analysis, performed by the MCNP-5 reactor physics code, developed and maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory, using the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library.

  20. Experience with incomplete control rod insertion in fuel with burnup exceeding approximately 40 GWD/MTU

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, E.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis and measurement experience with fuel assemblies having incomplete control rod insertion at burnups of approximately 40 GWD/MTU is presented. Control rod motion dynamics and simplified structural analyses are presented and compared to measurement data. Fuel assembly growth measurements taken with the plant Refueling Machine Z-Tape are described and presented. Bow measurements (including plug gauging) are described and potential improvements are suggested. The measurements described and analysis performed show that sufficient guide tube bow (either from creep or yield buckling) is present in some high burnup assemblies to stop the control rods before they reach their full limit of travel. Recommendations are made that, if implemented, could improve cost performance related to testing and analysis activities.

  1. Pattern formation of microtubules and motors: Inelastic interaction of polar rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor S.; Tsimring, Lev S.

    2005-05-01

    We derive a model describing spatiotemporal organization of an array of microtubules interacting via molecular motors. Starting from a stochastic model of inelastic polar rods with a generic anisotropic interaction kernel we obtain a set of equations for the local rods concentration and orientation. At large enough mean density of rods and concentration of motors, the model describes orientational instability. We demonstrate that the orientational instability leads to the formation of vortices and (for large density and/or kernel anisotropy) asters seen in recent experiments.

  2. Analysis of dose rates received around the storage pool for irradiated control rods in a BWR nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, J; Abarca, A; Gallardo, S

    2011-08-01

    BWR control rods are activated by neutron reactions in the reactor. The dose produced by this activity can affect workers in the area surrounding the storage pool, where activated rods are stored. Monte Carlo (MC) models for neutron activation and dose assessment around the storage pool have been developed and validated. In this work, the MC models are applied to verify the expected reduction of dose when the irradiated control rod is hanged in an inverted position into the pool. PMID:21093278

  3. Simulation of the electron diffraction patterns from needle/rod-like precipitates in Al-Mg-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li Kai; Song Min; Du Yong; Zhang Hong

    2011-09-15

    The origin of the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns from needle/rod-like metastable precipitates embedded in {alpha}-Al matrix in Al-Mg-Si alloys have been studied via an example of {beta}'' phase. In addition, the SAED pattern from {beta}'' phase has been simulated with significant improvement in comparison with the previous simulations. Three important factors, i.e. the 12 crystallographically equivalent variants of {beta}'' phase in the {alpha}-Al matrix due to the highly symmetric f.c.c. structure of {alpha}-Al, the coherence between {beta}'' phase and the {alpha}-Al matrix, and the double diffractions from the {alpha}-Al matrix and {beta}'' phase, are proved to contribute to the special square-shaped features in the SAED patterns from {beta}'' phase and thus fully taken into account in the simulation. An improved but simplified method for simulating the SAED patterns from needle/rod-like metastable precipitates has been developed. This method is further verified by simulating the SAED pattern from Q phase. The simulated SAED patterns from both {beta}'' and Q phases fit the experimentally determined patterns very well. - Highlights: {yields}An improved method has been developed to simulate the SADPs of Al alloys. {yields}The formation mechanism of SADPs of Al alloys has been systemically studied. {yields}Double diffraction contributes to the formation of the SADPs of Al alloys.

  4. An Analytical Study of Fuzzy Control of a Flexible Rod Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, D.; Lee, S. W.; Boghiu, D.

    1998-02-01

    The non-linear nature of very high speed, flexible rod mechanisms has been previously confirmed, both experimentally and analytically in reference [1]. Therefore, effective control system design for flexible mechanisms operating at very high speeds must consider the non-linearities when designing a controller for very high speeds. Active control via fuzzy logic is assessed as means to suppress the elastic transverse bending vibration of a flexible rod of a slider crank mechanism. Several pairs of piezoelectric elements are used to provide the control action. Sensor output of deflection is fed to the fuzzy controller, which determines the voltage input to the actuators. A three mode approximation is used in the simulation study. Computer simulation shows that fuzzy control can be used to suppress bending vibrations at high speeds, and even at speeds where the uncontrolled response would be unstable.

  5. Patterned control of human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Zago, Myrka

    2012-05-15

    There is much experimental evidence for the existence of biomechanical constraints which simplify the problem of control of multi-segment movements. In addition, it has been hypothesized that movements are controlled using a small set of basic temporal components or activation patterns, shared by several different muscles and reflecting global kinematic and kinetic goals. Here we review recent studies on human locomotion showing that muscle activity is accounted for by a combination of few basic patterns, each one timed at a different phase of the gait cycle. Similar patterns are involved in walking and running at different speeds, walking forwards or backwards, and walking under different loading conditions. The corresponding weights of distribution to different muscles may change as a function of the condition, allowing highly flexible control. Biomechanical correlates of each activation pattern have been described, leading to the hypothesis that the co-ordination of limb and body segments arises from the coupling of neural oscillators between each other and with limb mechanical oscillators. Muscle activations need only intervene during limited time epochs to force intrinsic oscillations of the system when energy is lost. PMID:22411012

  6. BWR feedwater nozzle and control-rod-drive return line nozzle cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    In its 1978 Annual Report to Congress, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission identified as an unresolved safety issue the appearance of cracks in feedwater nozzles at boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Later similar cracking, detected in return water lines for control-rod-drive systems at BWRs, was designated Part II of the issue. This article outlines the resolution of these cracking problems.

  7. Parallel Magnetic Flow Electromagnet for Movable Coil Control-rod Driving Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jige, Zhang

    2006-07-01

    The parallel magnetic flow electromagnet can effectively relax the saturation, which easily takes place in the single magnetic flow electromagnet, and accordingly can improve the drive capacity of the movable coil electromagnet drive mechanism for a mobile reactor control rod. (authors)

  8. Quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of a PWR control rod ejection accident

    SciTech Connect

    Pasichnyk, I.; Perin, Y.; Velkov, K.

    2013-07-01

    The paper describes the results of the quantitative Uncertainty and Sensitivity (U/S) Analysis of a Rod Ejection Accident (REA) which is simulated by the coupled system code ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX applying the GRS tool for U/S analysis SUSA/XSUSA. For the present study, a UOX/MOX mixed core loading based on a generic PWR is modeled. A control rod ejection is calculated for two reactor states: Hot Zero Power (HZP) and 30% of nominal power. The worst cases for the rod ejection are determined by steady-state neutronic simulations taking into account the maximum reactivity insertion in the system and the power peaking factor. For the U/S analysis 378 uncertain parameters are identified and quantified (thermal-hydraulic initial and boundary conditions, input parameters and variations of the two-group cross sections). Results for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are presented for safety important global and local parameters. (authors)

  9. Summary of dynamic analyses of the advanced neutron source reactor inner control rods

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrich, W.R.

    1995-08-01

    A summary of the structural dynamic analyses that were instrumental in providing design guidance to the Advanced Neutron source (ANS) inner control element system is presented in this report. The structural analyses and the functional constraints that required certain performance parameters were combined to shape and guide the design effort toward a prediction of successful and reliable control and scram operation to be provided by these inner control rods.

  10. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  11. Development and control of the process for the manufacture of zircaloy-4 tubing for LWBR fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The technical requirements for the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) fuel elements (fuel rods) imposed certain unique requirements for the low hafnium Zircaloy-4 tubing used as fuel rod cladding. This report describes, in detail, the tube manufacturing process, the product and process controls used, the inspections and tests performed, and the efforts involved in refining a commercial tube reducing process to produce tubes that would satisfy the requirements for LWBR fuel rod cladding.

  12. High Temperature Electromechanical Components for Control Rod Drive Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Thomas E.; Lazarus, Jonathan D.; Yaspo, Robert; Cole, Allan R.; Otwell, Robert L.; Schuster, Gary B.; Jaing, Thomas J.; Meyer, Raymond A.; Shukla, Jaikaran N.; Maldonado, Jerry

    1994-07-01

    The SP-100 power system converts heat generated within a compact fast spectrum nuclear reactor directly to electricity for spacecraft applications. The reactor control system contains the only moving mechanical and electromechanical components in the entire electrical generating system. The high temperature, vacuum environment presents unique challenges for these reactor control system components. This paper describes the environmental testing of these components that has been completed and that is in progress. The specific components and assemblies include electromagnetic (EM) coils, stepper motors, EM clutches, EM brakes, ball bearings, ball screw assemblies, constant torque spring motors, gear sets, position sensors, and very high temperature sliding bearings.

  13. Maintaining a Critical Spectra within Monteburns for a Gas-Cooled Reactor Array by Way of Control Rod Manipulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adigun, Babatunde John; Fensin, Michael Lorne; Galloway, Jack D.; Trellue, Holly Renee

    2016-06-07

    Our burnup study examined the effect of a predicted critical control rod position on the nuclide predictability of several axial and radial locations within a 4×4 graphite moderated gas cooled reactor fuel cluster geometry. To achieve this, a control rod position estimator (CRPE) tool was developed within the framework of the linkage code Monteburns between the transport code MCNP and depletion code CINDER90, and four methodologies were proposed within the tool for maintaining criticality. Two of the proposed methods used an inverse multiplication approach - where the amount of fissile material in a set configuration is slowly altered until criticalitymore » is attained - in estimating the critical control rod position. Another method carried out several MCNP criticality calculations at different control rod positions, then used a linear fit to estimate the critical rod position. The final method used a second-order polynomial fit of several MCNP criticality calculations at different control rod positions to guess the critical rod position. The results showed that consistency in prediction of power densities as well as uranium and plutonium isotopics was mutual among methods within the CRPE tool that predicted critical position consistently well. Finall, while the CRPE tool is currently limited to manipulating a single control rod, future work could be geared toward implementing additional criticality search methodologies along with additional features.« less

  14. Controlled self-assembly of conjugated rod-coil block copolymers for applications in organic optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuefei

    Organic electronics are of great interest in manufacturing light weight, mechanical flexible, and inexpensive large area devices. While significant improvements have been made over the last several years and it is now clear that morphology on the lengthscale of exciton diffusion (10nm) is of crucial importance, a clear relationship between structure and device properties has not emerged. This lack of understanding largely emerges from an inability to control morphology on this lengthscale. This thesis will center around an approach, based on block copolymer self-assembly, to generate equilibrium nanostructures on the 10 nm lengthscale of exciton diffusion and study their effects on device performance. Self-assembly of semiconducting block copolymers is complicated by the non-classical chain shape of conjugated polymers. Unlike classical polymers, the chains do not assume a Gaussian coil shape which is stretched near block copolymer interfaces, instead the chains are elongated and liquid crystalline. Previous work has demonstrated how these new molecular interactions and shapes control the phase diagram of so-called rod-coil block copolymers. Here, we will focus on controlling domain size, orientation, and chemical structure. While domain size can be controlled directly through molecular weight, this requires significant additional synthesis of domain size is to be varied. Here, the domain size is controlled by blending homopolymers into a self-assembling rod-coil block copolymer. When coil-like blocks are incorporated, the domains swell, as expected. When rod-like blocks are incorporated, they interdigitate with the rods of the block copolymers. This results in an increase in interfacial area which forces the coils to rearrange and an overall decrease in domain size with increasing rod content. Control over lamellar orientation is crucial in order to design and control charge transport pathways and exciton recombination or separation interfaces. While numerous

  15. Simulation and operation of the EBR-2 automatic control rod drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, W. K.; Larson, H. A.; Dean, E. M.; Christensen, L. J.

    An automatic control rod drive system (ACRDS) installed at EBR-II produces shaped power transients from 40% to full reactor power at a linear ramp rate of 4 MWt/s. A digital computer and modified control rod drive provides this capability. Simulation and analysis of ACRDS experiments establish the safety envelope for reactor transient operation. Tailored transients are required as part of USDOE operational reliability testing program for prototypic fast reactor fuel cladding breach behavior studies. After initial EBR-II driver fuel testing and system checkout, test subassemblies were subjected to both slow and fast transients. In addition, the ACRDS is used for steady state operation and will be qualified to control power ascent from initial critical to full power.

  16. Visual inspections of N Reactor horizontal control rod channels. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1990-09-01

    Safety surveillance is performed in horizontal control rod (HCR) channels to locate conditions which could slow or block rod travel. The findings guide the application of preventive measures to assure eventual rod motion impairment will not occur. Borescopes and, more recently, miniaturized closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras have been used for these examinations. Inspections and measurement results are documented in annual surveillance reports, however reported CCTV observations have been limited to highlights. The objective of this report is to catalogue the CCTV recordings in a format suitable for analysis and interpretation and to ease the access to any desired location by noting tape counter readings corresponding with each tube block in view. Searching file tapes for conditions in a specific areas in the past required counting blocks as they passed the camera to determine the distance from a feature like the edge of the reflector or a steam vent gap. This report adds the observations from recent rod channel inspections (1987 and 1988) to a comprehensive survey of graphite conditions in the moderator and reflector regions of the N Reactor core. When completed, the stand-by status of graphite components will be available for use in restart or decommissioning deliberations.

  17. Feasibility study of the University of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade in respect to control rod system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutic, Avdo

    The objectives of this thesis are twofold: to determine the highest achievable power levels of the current University of Utah TRIG Reactor (UUTR) core configuration with the existing three control rods, and to design the core for higher reactor power by optimizing the control rod worth. For the current core configuration, the maximum reactor power, eigenvalue keff, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity have been measured and calculated. These calculated estimates resulted from thermal power calibrations, and the control rod worth measurements at various power levels. The results were then used as a benchmark to verify the MCNP5 core simulations for the current core and then to design a core for higher reactor power. This study showed that the maximum achievable power with the current core configuration and control rod system is 150kW, which is 50kW higher than the licensed power of the UUTR. The maximum achievable UUTR core power with the existing fuel is determined by optimizing the core configuration and control rod worth, showing that a power upgrade of 500 kW is achievable. However, it requires a new control rod system consisting of a total of four control rods. The cost of such an upgrade is $115,000.

  18. Synthesis of iron oxide rods coated with polymer brushes and control of their assembly in thin films.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun; Ishige, Ryohei; Tsujii, Yoshinobu; Ohno, Kohji

    2015-01-27

    We investigated the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) using monodisperse rod-type particles of iron oxide, β-FeOOH. The slow hydrolysis of iron(III) chloride yielded monodisperse β-FeOOH rods with an average length-to-width ratio, L/W, of 6 (L = 210 nm and W = 35 nm on average). The surfaces of the β-FeOOH rods were modified with a triethoxysilane derivative as an ATRP-initiating site, namely, (2-bromo-2-methyl)propionyloxypropyl triethoxysilane. The SI-ATRP of MMA, mediated by a copper complex, was performed using the initiator-coated β-FeOOH rods in the presence of a "sacrificial" free initiator. Well-defined poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes with molecular weights of up to 700,000 could be grafted on the β-FeOOH rods with a surface density as high as 0.3 chains/nm(2). The resultant polymer-brush-afforded hybrid rods exhibited high dispersibility in various solvents for PMMA without forming aggregates. Thin films were prepared by dip-coating from a suspension of the hybrid rods, and the rods were oriented in a specific direction in the films. The arrangement of the rods could be controlled by varying the chain length of the polymer brush and the withdrawal speed during the dip-coating process. PMID:25552325

  19. Control rod absorber section fabrication by square tube configuration and dual laser welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, L.L.; Charnley, J.E.; Mees, J.A.; Dixon, R.C.

    1990-05-15

    This patent describes a process for the assembly of a planar section of a cruciform shaped control rod from tubes. It comprises: providing tubes, the tubes having cylindrical interior volumes for the containment of neutron absorbing poisons and having square external sections for being joined by welding in side-by-side relation; filling the cylindrical interior volumes with neutron absorbing poisons; plugging the tubes to seal the neutron absorbing poisons within the tubes: providing a jig for maintaining the tubes in side-by-side relation to form a planar section of the control rod, the jig having a leading end for holding the ends of the tubes in side-by-side relation and having a trailing end for holding the tubes in side-by-side relation.

  20. Factors influencing helium measurements for detection of control rod failures in BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, I.; Sihver, L.; Loner, H.; Ledergerber, G.; Schnurr, B.

    2012-07-01

    Much effort has been made to minimize the number and consequences of fuel failures at nuclear power plants. The consequences of control rod failures have also gained an increased attention. In this paper we introduce a system for on-line surveillance of control rod integrity which has several advantages comparing to the surveillance methods available today in boiling water reactors (BWRs). This system measures the helium released from failed control rods containing boron carbide (B4C). However, there are a number of factors that might influence measurements, which have to be taken into consideration when evaluating the measured data. These factors can be separated into two groups: 1) local adjustments, made on the sampling line connecting the detector to the off-gas system, and 2) plant operational parameters. The adjustments of the sample line conditions include variation of gas flow rate and gas pressure in the line. Plant operational factors that may influence helium measurements can vary from plant to plant. The factors studied at Leibstadt nuclear power plant (KKL) were helium impurities in injected hydrogen gas, variation of the total off-gas flow and regular water refill. In this paper we discuss these factors and their significance and present experimental results of measurements at KKL. (authors)

  1. Impact of the control rod consumption on the reactivity control of a SFR break-even core

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, D.; Fontaine, B.

    2012-07-01

    Current design studies on Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) differ from those performed in the past by the fact that design criteria are now those of the Generation IV reactors. In order to improve their safety, reactors with break-even cores are preferred because they minimize the needs in terms of reactivity control and limit the consequences of control rod withdrawal. Furthermore, as the reactivity control needs are low, break-even core enables the use of absorbing materials with reduced efficiency (natural boron, hafnium...). Nevertheless, the use of control rods with few absorbing materials may present the disadvantage of a non-negligible ({approx}10%) loss of efficiency due to their consumption under irradiation. This paper presents a methodology to calculate accurately and analyze this consumption. (authors)

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of a research reactor with nominal power of 7 MW to design new control safety rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoushtari, M. K.; Kakavand, T.; Sadat Kiai, S. M.; Ghaforian, H.

    2010-03-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation has been established for a research reactor with nominal power of 7 MW. A detailed model of the reactor core was employed including standard and control fuel elements, reflectors, irradiation channels, control rods, reactor pool and thermal column. The following physical parameters of reactor core were calculated for the present LEU core: core reactivity ( ρ), control rod (CR) worth, thermal and epithermal neutron flux distributions, shutdown margin and delayed neutron fraction. Reduction of unfavorable effects of blockage probability of control safety rod (CSR)s in their interiors because of not enough space in their sites, and lack of suitable capabilities to fabricate very thin plates for CSR cladding, is the main aim of the present study. Making the absorber rod thinner and CSR cladding thicker by introducing a better blackness absorbing material and a new stainless steel alloy, respectively, are two studied ways to reduce the effects of mentioned problems.

  3. Rodding Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rods can be made of stainless steel or titanium. Regular rods do not expand. They have many ... v regular), the rod materials (stainless steel v titanium) and the age for a first rodding surgery. ...

  4. Test-fuel power-coupling dependence on TREAT control-rod positions

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, L.J.; Klotzkin, G.; Hart, P.R.; Swanson, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    The Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) is a graphite moderated, UO/sub 2/ fueled test reactor located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and operated by Argonne National Laboratory. Test fuel is placed in containment vessels in the center of the reactor and subjected to computer-controlled transient irradiations which can result in experimental fuel melting or even vaporizing. The reactor was designed to have a strong negative temperature coefficient and to operate adiabatically. Consequently large reactivity insertions, up to 6.2% ..delta..k/k, may be required during a transient as the core temperature increases as much as 570/sup 0/C. This reactivity insertion is accomplished typically over 10 to 20 seconds by hydraulically actuated transient control rods. Evaluation of empirical data has indicated that control-rod-position changes cause power-coupling changes during a transient and usually are the primary factor in determining the ratio of the transient-averaged to steady-state test-fuel power coupling.

  5. Rapid-L Operator-Free Fast Reactor Concept Without Any Control Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Tsunoda, Hirokazu; Mishima, Kaichiro; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2003-07-15

    The 200-kW(electric) uranium-nitride-fueled lithium-cooled fast reactor concept 'RAPID-L' to achieve highly automated reactor operation has been demonstrated. RAPID-L is designed for a lunar base power system. It is one of the variants of the RAPID (Refueling by All Pins Integrated Design) fast reactor concept, which enables quick and simplified refueling. The essential feature of the RAPID concept is that the reactor core consists of an integrated fuel assembly instead of conventional fuel subassemblies. In this small-size reactor core, 2700 fuel pins are integrated and encased in a fuel cartridge. Refueling is conducted by replacing a fuel cartridge. The reactor can be operated without refueling for up to 10 yr.Unique challenges in reactivity control systems design have been addressed in the RAPID-L concept. The reactor has no control rod but involves the following innovative reactivity control systems: lithium expansion modules (LEM) for inherent reactivity feedback, lithium injection modules (LIM) for inherent ultimate shutdown, and lithium release modules (LRM) for automated reactor startup. All these systems adopt {sup 6}Li as a liquid poison instead of B{sub 4}C rods. In combination with LEMs, LIMs, and LRMs, RAPID-L can be operated without an operator. This reactor concept is also applicable to the terrestrial fast reactors. In this paper, the RAPID-L reactor concept and its transient characteristics are presented.

  6. Detection and sizing of defects in control rod drive mechanism penetrations using eddy current and ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Light, G.M.; Fisher, J.L.; Tennis, R.F.; Stolte, J.S.; Hendrix, G.J.

    1996-08-01

    Over the last two years, concern has been generated about the capabilities of performing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of the closure-head penetrations in nuclear-reactor pressure vessels. These penetrations are primarily for instrumentation and control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and are usually thick-walled Inconel tubes, which are shrink-fitted into the steel closure head. The penetrations are then welded between the outside surface of the penetration and the inside surface of the closure head. Stress corrosion cracks initiating at the inner surface of the penetration have been reported at several plants. Through-wall cracks in the CRDM penetration or CRDM weld could lead to loss of coolant in the reactor vessel. The CRDM penetration presents a complex inspection geometry for conventional NDE techniques. A thermal sleeve, through which pass the mechanical linkages for operating the control rods, is inserted into the penetration in such a way that only a small annulus (nominally 3 mm) exists between the thermal sleeve and inside surface of the penetration. Ultrasonic (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) techniques that could be used to provide defect detection and sizing capability were investigated. This paper describes the ET and UT techniques, the probes developed, and the results obtained using these probes and techniques on CRDM penetration mock-ups.

  7. Effect of aging upon CE and B and W control rod drives

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, E.; Gunther, W.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of aging upon the Babcock Wilcox (B W) and Combustion Engineering (CE) Control Rod Drive (CRD) systems has been evaluated as part of the US NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Operating experience data for the 1980--1990 time period was reviewed to identify predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. These results, in conjunction with an assessment of component materials and operating environment, conclude that both systems are susceptible to age degradation. System failures have resulted in significant plant effects, including power reductions, plant shutdowns, scrams, and Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) actuation. Current industry inspection and maintenance practices were assessed. Some of these practices effectively address aging, while others do not.

  8. Effect of aging upon CE and B and W control rod drives

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, E.; Gunther, W.

    1992-05-01

    The effect of aging upon the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and Combustion Engineering (CE) Control Rod Drive (CRD) systems has been evaluated as part of the US NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Operating experience data for the 1980--1990 time period was reviewed to identify predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. These results, in conjunction with an assessment of component materials and operating environment, conclude that both systems are susceptible to age degradation. System failures have resulted in significant plant effects, including power reductions, plant shutdowns, scrams, and Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) actuation. Current industry inspection and maintenance practices were assessed. Some of these practices effectively address aging, while others do not.

  9. Research relative to an advanced rod control system for quadrupole mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, George R.

    1987-01-01

    The design of a suitable amplifier output stage using available transistors and passive components is summarized. All of the analysis and calculation confirm that it is feasible to design the amplifier and quadrupole coupling circuit needed for the Advanced Rod Control System. The progress obtained so far concerning the three frequency tank circuits to be used in the oscillator for the mass spectrometer of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) project is presented. Results from this study look promising. However, it is not known what minimum impedance levels are required to make it possible for the oscillator to work properly. Therefore, it is necessary to construct a prototype circuit in the laboratory which can be measured and tested in an oscillator circuit. Continued attempts will be made to develop a useful inductor motor with better characteristics than the one being used at the moment. It is important that such a model be found if computer simulation is to reflect reality more closely.

  10. STABILIZED RARE EARTH OXIDES FOR A CONTROL ROD AND METHOD OF PREPARATION

    DOEpatents

    McNees, R.A.; Potter, R.A.

    1964-01-14

    A method is given for preparing mixed oxides of the formula MR/sub x/O/ sub 12/ wherein M is tungsten or molybdenum and R is a rare earth in the group consisting of samarium, europium, dysprosium, and gadolinium and x is 4 to 5. Oxides of this formula, and particularly the europiumcontaining species, are useful as control rod material for water-cooled nuclear reactors owing to their stability, favorable nuclear properties, and resistance to hydration. These oxides may be utilized as a dispersion in a stainlesssteel matrix. Preparation of these oxides is effected by blending tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide with a rare earth oxide, compressing the mixture, and firing at an elevated temperature in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. (AEC)

  11. Controlling synchronous patterns in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Weijie; Fan, Huawei; Wang, Ying; Ying, Heping; Wang, Xingang

    2016-04-01

    Although the set of permutation symmetries of a complex network could be very large, few of them give rise to stable synchronous patterns. Here we present a general framework and develop techniques for controlling synchronization patterns in complex network of coupled chaotic oscillators. Specifically, according to the network permutation symmetry, we design a small-size and weighted network, namely the control network, and use it to control the large-size complex network by means of pinning coupling. We argue mathematically that for any of the network symmetries, there always exists a critical pinning strength beyond which the unstable synchronous pattern associated to this symmetry can be stabilized. The feasibility of the control method is verified by numerical simulations of both artificial and real-world networks and demonstrated experimentally in systems of coupled chaotic circuits. Our studies show the controllability of synchronous patterns in complex networks of coupled chaotic oscillators.

  12. Nuclear Data Library Effects on Fast to Thermal Flux Shapes Around PWR Control Rod Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, A.; Ferroukhi, H.; Zhu, T.; Pautz, A.

    2014-04-01

    The development of a high-fidelity computational scheme to estimate the accumulated fluence at the tips of PWR control rods (CR) has been initiated at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Both the fluence from high-energy (E>1 MeV) neutrons as well as for the thermal range (E<0.625 eV) are required as these affect the CR integrity through stresses/strains induced by coupled clad embrittlement / absorber swelling phenomena. The concept of the PSI scheme under development is to provide from validated core analysis models, the volumetric neutron source to a full core MCNPX model that is then used to compute the neutron fluxes. A particular aspect that needs scrutiny is the ability of the MCNPX-based calculation methodology to accurately predict the flux shapes along the control rod surfaces, especially for fully withdrawn CRs. In that case, the tip is located a short distance above the core/reflector interface and since this situation corresponds to a large part of reactor operation, the accumulated fluence will highly depend on the achieved calculation accuracy and precision in this non-fueled zone. The objective of the work presented in this paper is to quantify the influence of nuclear data on the calculated fluxes at the CR tips by (1) conducting a systematic comparison of modern neutron cross-section libraries, including JENDL-4.0, JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0, and (2) by quantifying the uncertainties in the neutron flux calculations with the help of available neutron cross-section variances/covariances data. For completeness, the magnitude of these nuclear data-based uncertainties is also assessed in relation to the influence from other typical sources of modeling uncertainties/biases.

  13. Reduction of ahead of schedule anodes through anode rod quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, F.; Menard, Y.; Perron, C.; Proulx, A.L.

    1996-10-01

    One of the major causes of ahead of schedule anodes reported in recent years by the P155 potroom operation was related to the inherent weakness in the rod welded joints. The development and implementation of an apparatus and procedure to measure, detect and reject the faulty rods prior to anode rodding, will be presented and discussed. The technology has not only significantly reduced the number of ahead of schedule anodes, it has also provided useful information concerning other process improvements.

  14. Frizzled6 controls hair patterning in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Nini; Hawkins, Charles; Nathans, Jeremy

    2004-06-22

    Hair whorls and other macroscopic hair patterns are found in a variety of mammalian species, including humans. We show here that Frizzled6 (Fz6), one member of a large family of integral membrane Wnt receptors, controls macroscopic hair patterning in the mouse. Fz6 is expressed in the skin and hair follicles, and targeted deletion of the Fz6 gene produces stereotyped whorls on the hind feet, variable whorls and tufts on the head, and misorientation of hairs on the torso. Embryo chimera experiments imply that Fz6 acts locally to control or propagate the macroscopic hair pattern and that epithelial cells rather than melanocytes are the source of Fz6-dependent signaling. The Fz6 phenotype strongly resembles the wing-hair and bristle patterning defects observed in Drosophila frizzled mutants. These data imply that hair patterning in mammals uses a Fz-dependent tissue polarity system similar to the one that patterns the Drosophila cuticle. PMID:15169958

  15. Lacking control increases illusory pattern perception.

    PubMed

    Whitson, Jennifer A; Galinsky, Adam D

    2008-10-01

    We present six experiments that tested whether lacking control increases illusory pattern perception, which we define as the identification of a coherent and meaningful interrelationship among a set of random or unrelated stimuli. Participants who lacked control were more likely to perceive a variety of illusory patterns, including seeing images in noise, forming illusory correlations in stock market information, perceiving conspiracies, and developing superstitions. Additionally, we demonstrated that increased pattern perception has a motivational basis by measuring the need for structure directly and showing that the causal link between lack of control and illusory pattern perception is reduced by affirming the self. Although these many disparate forms of pattern perception are typically discussed as separate phenomena, the current results suggest that there is a common motive underlying them. PMID:18832647

  16. Relational Control Patterns in Families of Schizophrenics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarrick, Anne; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined patterning of relational control in families of schizophrenic patients, and relationship between control in the family and the course of the illness. Transcripts of conversations among 17 schizophrenic outpatients and their families were coded into Relational Control Coding System. Found rigid, one-up messages from family members to…

  17. Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel Experiencing a Fast Control Rod Ejection Transient

    SciTech Connect

    Ortensi, J.; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    A rapid increase of the temperature and the mechanical stress is expected in TRISO coated particle fuel that experiences a fast Total Control Rod Ejection (CRE) transient event. During this event the reactor power in the pebble bed core increases significantly for a short time interval. The power is deposited instantly and locally in the fuel kernel. This could result in a rapid increase of the pressure in the buffer layer of the coated fuel particle and, consequently, in an increase of the coating stresses. These stresses determine the mechanical failure probability of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). A new calculation procedure has been implemented at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), which analyzes the transient fuel performance behavior of TRISO fuel particles in PBRs. This early capability can easily be extended to prismatic designs, given the availability of neutronic and thermal-fluid solvers. The full-core coupled neutronic and thermal-fluid analysis has been modeled with CYNOD-THERMIX. The temperature fields for the fuel kernel and the particle coatings, as well as the gas pressures in the buffer layer, are calculated with the THETRIS module explicitly during the transient calculation. Results from this module are part of the feedback loop within the neutronic-thermal fluid iterations performed for each time step. The temperature and internal pressure values for each pebble type in each region of the core are then input to the PArticle STress Analysis (PASTA) code, which determines the particle coating stresses and the fraction of failed particles. This paper presents an investigation of a Total Control Rod Ejection (TCRE) incident in the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular reactor design using the above described calculation procedure. The transient corresponds to a reactivity insertion of $3 (~2000 pcm) reaching 35 times the nominal power in 0.5 seconds. For each position in the core

  18. Development of a HTSMA-Actuated Surge Control Rod for High-Temperature Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II; Noebe, Ronald; Bigelow, Glen; Culley, Dennis; Stevens, Mark; Penney, Nicholas; Gaydosh, Darrell; Quackenbush, Todd; Carpenter, Bernie

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, a demand for compact, lightweight, solid-state actuation systems has emerged, driven in part by the needs of the aeronautics industry. However, most actuation systems used in turbomachinery require not only elevated temperature but high-force capability. As a result, shape memory alloy (SMA) based systems have worked their way to the forefront of a short list of viable options to meet such a technological challenge. Most of the effort centered on shape memory systems to date has involved binary NiTi alloys but the working temperatures required in many aeronautics applications dictate significantly higher transformation temperatures than the binary systems can provide. Hence, a high temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) based on NiTiPdPt, having a transformation temperature near 300 C, was developed. Various thermo-mechanical processing schemes were utilized to further improve the dimensional stability of the alloy and it was later extruded/drawn into wire form to be more compatible with envisioned applications. Mechanical testing on the finished wire form showed reasonable work output capability with excellent dimensional stability. Subsequently, the wire form of the alloy was incorporated into a benchtop system, which was shown to provide the necessary stroke requirements of approx.0.125 inches for the targeted surge-control application. Cycle times for the actuator were limited to 4 seconds due to control and cooling constraints but this cycle time was determined to be adequate for the surge control application targeted as the primary requirement was initial actuation of a surge control rod, which could be completed in approximately one second.

  19. Controlling Neurite Outgrowth with Patterned Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, In Hong; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2011-01-01

    In vivo, neurons form neurites, one of which develops into the axon while others become dendrites. While this neuritogenesis process is well programmed in vivo, there are limited methods to control the number and location of neurite extension in vitro. Here we report a method to control neuritogenesis by confining neurons in specific regions using cell resistant poly(oligoethyleneglycol methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid (OEGMA-co-MA)) or poly(ethyleneglycol-block-lactic acid) PEG-PLA. Line patterned substrates reduce multiple extension of neurites and stimulate bi-directional neurite budding for PC12 and cortical neurons. PC12 cells on 20 and 30 µm line patterns extended one neurite in each direction along the line pattern while cortical neuron on 20 and 30 µm line patterns extended one or two neurites in each direction along the line pattern. Statistical analysis of neurite lengths revealed that PC12 cells and cortical neurons on line patterns extend longer neurites. The ability to guide formation of neurites on patterned substrates is useful for generating neural networks and promoting neurite elongation. PMID:21484989

  20. A tetrachromatic display for the spatiotemporal control of rod and cone stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Florian S; Paulun, Vivian C; Weiss, David; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2015-08-01

    We present an apparatus that allows independent stimulation of rods and short (S)-, middle (M)-, and long (L)-wavelength-sensitive cones. Previously presented devices allow rod and cone stimulation independently, but only for a spatially invariant stimulus design (Pokorny, Smithson, & Quinlan, 2004; Sun, Pokorny, & Smith, 2001b). We overcame this limitation by using two spectrally filtered projectors with overlapping projections. This approach allows independent rod and cone stimulation in a dynamic two-dimensional scene with appropriate resolution in the spatial, temporal, and receptor domains. Modulation depths were ±15% for M-cones and L-cones, ±20% for rods, and ±50% for S-cones, all with respect to an equal-energy mesopic background at 3.4 cd/m2. Validation was provided by radiometric measures and behavioral data from two trichromats, one protanope, one deuteranope, and one night-blind observer. PMID:26305863

  1. Controlling chaos based on a novel intelligent integral terminal sliding mode control in a rod-type plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safa, Khari; Zahra, Rahmani; Behrooz, Rezaie

    2016-05-01

    An integral terminal sliding mode controller is proposed in order to control chaos in a rod-type plasma torch system. In this method, a new sliding surface is defined based on a combination of the conventional sliding surface in terminal sliding mode control and a nonlinear function of the integral of the system states. It is assumed that the dynamics of a chaotic system are unknown and also the system is exposed to disturbance and unstructured uncertainty. To achieve a chattering-free and high-speed response for such an unknown system, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system is utilized in the next step to approximate the unknown part of the nonlinear dynamics. Then, the proposed integral terminal sliding mode controller stabilizes the approximated system based on Lyapunov’s stability theory. In addition, a Bee algorithm is used to select the coefficients of integral terminal sliding mode controller to improve the performance of the proposed method. Simulation results demonstrate the improvement in the response speed, chattering rejection, transient response, and robustness against uncertainties.

  2. Dynamic Simulation of Trapping and Controlled Rotation of a Microscale Rod Driven by Line Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghshenas-Jaryani, Mahdi; Bowling, Alan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2013-03-01

    Since the invention of optical tweezers, several biological and engineering applications, especially in micro-nanofluid, have been developed. For example, development of optically driven micromotors, which has an important role in microfluidic applications, has vastly been considered. Despite extensive experimental studies in this field, there is a lack of theoretical work that can verify and analyze these observations. This work develops a dynamic model to simulate trapping and controlled rotation of a microscale rod under influence of the optical trapping forces. The laser beam, used in line optical tweezers with a varying trap's length, was modeled based on a ray-optics approach. Herein, the effects of viscosity of the surrounding fluid (water), gravity, and buoyancy were included in the proposed model. The predicted results are in overall agreement with the experimental observation, which make the theoretical model be a viable tool for investigating the dynamic behavior of small size objects manipulated by optical tweezers in fluid environments. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. MCB-1148541.

  3. Disposal Of Irradiated Cadmium Control Rods From The Plumbrook Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Posivak, E.J.; Berger, S.R.; Freitag, A.A.

    2008-07-01

    Innovative mixed waste disposition from NASA's Plum Brook Reactor Facility was accomplished without costly repackaging. Irradiated characteristic hardware with contact dose rates as high as 8 Sv/hr was packaged in a HDPE overpack and stored in a Secure Environmental Container during earlier decommissioning efforts, awaiting identification of a suitable pathway. WMG obtained regulatory concurrence that the existing overpack would serve as the macro-encapsulant per 40CFR268.45 Table 1.C. The overpack vent was disabled and the overpack was placed in a stainless steel liner to satisfy overburden slumping requirements. The liner was sealed and placed in shielded shoring for transport to the disposal site in a US DOT Type A cask. Disposition via this innovative method avoided cost, risk, and dose associated with repackaging the high dose irradiated characteristic hardware. In conclusion: WMG accomplished what others said could not be done. Large D and D contractors advised NASA that the cadmium control rods could only be shipped to the proposed Yucca mountain repository. NASA management challenged MOTA to find a more realistic alternative. NASA and MOTA turned to WMG to develop a methodology to disposition the 'hot and nasty' waste that presumably had no path forward. Although WMG lead a team that accomplished the 'impossible', the project could not have been completed with out the patient, supportive management by DOE-EM, NASA, and MOTA. (authors)

  4. Lifetime of PWR silver-indium-cadmium control rods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sipush, P.J.; Woodcock, J.; Chickering, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    A hot cell examination was performed on selected rodlets of a lead rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) which had experienced eleven cycles of operation in Point Beach Unit 1. The principal purpose of the program was to evaluate the performance of RCCAs. The hot cell examination of the rodlets involved detailed visual inspections, profilometry, metallography, cladding chemistry, dosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, corrosion tests, microhardness tests, absorber density measurements, and cladding tensile tests. Wear scars and a hairline crack in the cladding were evaluated. The results of the examinations and analysis of WEPCO site photographs led to an estimate of the service life for RCCAs which are used in Westinghouse 14 x 14 fuel assemblies. Also, wear scar widths were correlated with wear scar depths. The correlation may be used to estimate wear scar depths based on site photographs of wear scars for 14 x 14 RCCAs. The results of the program may be used as guidelines for RCCAs for 15 x 15 and 17 x 17 Westinghouse fuel designs. 10 refs., 89 figs., 26 tabs.

  5. Variable pattern contamination control under positive pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Philippi, H.M.

    1997-08-01

    Airborne contamination control in nuclear and biological laboratories is traditionally achieved by directing the space ventilation air at subatmospheric pressures in one fixed flow pattern. However, biological and nuclear contamination flow control in the new Biological Research Facility, to be commissioned at the Chalk River Laboratories in 1996, will have the flexibility to institute a number of contamination control patterns, all achieved at positive (above atmospheric) pressures. This flexibility feature, made possible by means of a digitally controlled ventilation system, changes the facility ventilation system from being a relatively rigid building service operated by plant personnel into a flexible building service which can be operated by the facility research personnel. This paper focuses on and describes the application of these unique contamination control features in the design of the new Biological Research Facility. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Genetic algorithm based active vibration control for a moving flexible smart beam driven by a pneumatic rod cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Shi, Ming-li; Wang, Bin; Xie, Zhuo-wei

    2012-05-01

    A rod cylinder based pneumatic driving scheme is proposed to suppress the vibration of a flexible smart beam. Pulse code modulation (PCM) method is employed to control the motion of the cylinder's piston rod for simultaneous positioning and vibration suppression. Firstly, the system dynamics model is derived using Hamilton principle. Its standard state-space representation is obtained for characteristic analysis, controller design, and simulation. Secondly, a genetic algorithm (GA) is applied to optimize and tune the control gain parameters adaptively based on the specific performance index. Numerical simulations are performed on the pneumatic driving elastic beam system, using the established model and controller with tuned gains by GA optimization process. Finally, an experimental setup for the flexible beam driven by a pneumatic rod cylinder is constructed. Experiments for suppressing vibrations of the flexible beam are conducted. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed pneumatic drive scheme and the adopted control algorithms are feasible. The large amplitude vibration of the first bending mode can be suppressed effectively.

  7. Controlled synthesis of ZnO from nanospheres to micro-rods and its gas sensing studies.

    PubMed

    Navale, Shalaka C; Gosavi, S W; Mulla, I S

    2008-06-15

    1D ZnO rods are synthesized using less explored hydrazine method. Here we find, besides being combustible hydrazine can also be used as a structure-directing agent. The ratio of zinc nitrate (ZN) to hydrazine is found to control the morphology of ZnO. At lower concentration of ZN as compared with hydrazine the morphology of ZnO is found to be spherical. As we increase the hydrazine content the morphology changes from spherical (diameter approximately 100 nm) to the elongated structures including shapes like Y, T as well dumbbell (diameter approximately 40 nm and length approximately 150 nm). Interestingly for more than 50% of hydrazine ZnO micro-rods are formed. Such rods are of diameter approximately 120 nm having length of about 1 microm for ZN to hydrazine ratio of 1:9, isolated as well as bundle of rods are seen in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals the phase formation with average particle size of 37 nm as calculated using Scherrer's formula. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is also done to confirm the d-spacing in ZnO. Gas sensing study for these samples shows high efficiency and selectivity towards LPG at all operating temperatures. Photoluminescence (PL) study for these samples is performed at room temperature to find potential application as photoelectric material. PMID:18585218

  8. CD bias control on hole pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Kyohei; Hara, Arisa; Natori, Sakurako; Yamauchi, Shohei; Yamato, Masatoshi; Oyama, Kenichi; Yaegashi, Hidetami

    2016-03-01

    Gridded design rules[1] is major process in configuring logic circuit used 193-immersion lithography. In the scaling of grid patterning, we can make 10nm order line and space pattern by using multiple patterning techniques such as self-aligned multiple patterning (SAMP) and litho-etch- litho-etch (LELE)[2][3][5] . On the other hand, Line cut process has some error parameters such as pattern defect, placement error, roughness and X-Y CD bias with the decreasing scale. Especially roughness and X-Y CD bias are paid attention because it cause cut error and pattern defect. In this case, we applied some smoothing process to care hole roughness[4]. Each smoothing process showed different effect on X-Y CD bias. In this paper, we will report the pattern controllability comparison of trench and block + inverse. It include X-Y CD bias, roughness and process usability. Furthermore we will discuss optimum method focused on X-Y CD bias when we use additional process such as smoothing and shrink etching .

  9. Changing Throwing Pattern: Instruction and Control Parameter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Dan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of instruction and scaling up a control parameter (velocity of throw) on changes in throwing pattern. Sixty adult female throwers (ages 20-26 years) were randomly placed into one of four practice conditions: (a) scale up on velocity with no instruction, (b) maintain constant velocity with no…

  10. Analysis of the dose rate produced by control rods discharged from a BWR into the irradiated fuel pool.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, J; Gallardo, S; Abarca, A; Juan, V

    2010-01-01

    BWR control rods become activated by neutron reactions into the reactor. Therefore, when they are withdrawn from the reactor, they must be stored into the storage pool for irradiated fuel at a certain depth under water. Dose rates on the pool surface and the area surrounding the pool should be lower than limits for workers. The MCNP code based on the Monte Carlo method has been applied to model this situation and to calculate dose rates at points of interest. PMID:19836252

  11. Ordering stripe structures of nanoscale rods in diblock copolymer scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2002-05-01

    We report a simulation on the formation of ordered stripe structures of nanoscale rods driven by symmetric diblock copolymer melts. Due to the preferential adsorption of one species of the diblock onto the mobile rods, the phase ordering process will couple with the movement of rods. We find that the self-assembly of rods on the copolymer scaffold produces the highly ordered nanowires of rods, and copolymer blends in turn form the well-oriented lamellar structure. This is due to the interplay among the micro-phase separating dynamics in the diblock copolymer, the wetting interaction between rods and diblock copolymer, and the nematic ordering dynamics of rods. We examine the influence of the domain size, the wetting strength, and the rod number density on the formation of such a nanoscale structure. Additionally, we indicate that the orientation of the pattern can be well controlled by external fields acting on the rods. The results suggest that our model system may provide a novel and simple way to control and design the ordering nanowire structure.

  12. Vortices in vibrated granular rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neicu, Toni; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2002-03-01

    We report the first experimental observation of vortex patterns in granular rods inside a container that is vibrated vertically . The experiments were carried out with an anodized aluminum circular container which is rigidly attached to an electromagnetic shaker and the patterns are imaged using a high-frame rate digital camera. At low rod numbers and driving amplitudes, the rods are observed to lie horizontally. Above a critical number or packing fraction of rods, moving domains of vertical rods are spontaneously observed to form which coexist with horizontal rods. These small domains of vertical rods coarsen over time to form a few large vortices. The size of the vortices increases with the number of rods. We are able to track the ends of the vertical rods and obtain the velocity fields of the vortices. The mean azimuthal velocity as a function of distance from the center of the vortex is obtained as a function of the packing fraction. We will report the phase diagram of the various patterns observed as function of number of rods and driving amplitude. The mechanism for the formation and motion of the domains of vertical rods will be also discussed.

  13. Pattern recognition and control in manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Tomovic, R.

    1976-01-01

    A new approach to the use of sensors in manipulator or robot control is discussed. The concept addresses the problem of contact or near-contact type of recognition of three-dimensional forms of objects by proprioceptive and/or exteroceptive sensors integrated with the terminal device. This recognition of object shapes both enhances and simplifies the automation of object handling. Several examples have been worked out for the 'Belgrade hand' and for a parallel jaw terminal device, both equipped with proprioceptive (position) and exteroceptive (proximity) sensors. The control applications are discussed in the framework of a multilevel man-machine system control. The control applications create interesting new issues which, in turn, invite novel theoretical considerations. An important issue is the problem of stability in control when the control is referenced to patterns.

  14. Nondestructive Examination of Possible PWSCC in Control Rod Drive Mechanism Housings

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Rob V.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect? 2) What did each technique miss? and 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data and through-wall leakage; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discuss the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology and a comparison of the degradation found by the destructive evaluation with the recorded NDE responses.

  15. NDE of Possible Service-Induced PWSCC in Control Rod Drive Mechanism Housings Removed from Service

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Robert V.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2006-09-22

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are being performed to assess the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques on removed-from-service control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and the associated J-groove attachment welds. This work is being performed to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE techniques such as ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), and visual testing (VT) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. The basic NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory-based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper describes the NDE measurements that were employed on the two CRDMs to detect and characterize the indications and the analysis of these indications. The two CRDM assemblies were removed from service from the North Anna 2 vessel head, including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material. One nozzle contains suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the second contains evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, although this was unconfirmed. A destructive test plan is being developed to directly characterize the indications found using nondestructive testing. The results of this destructive testing will be included when the destructive testing is completed.

  16. Calculation of the Phenix end-of-life test 'Control Rod Withdrawal' with the ERANOS code

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, V.

    2012-07-01

    The Inst. of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) acts as technical support to French public authorities. As such, IRSN is in charge of safety assessment of operating and under construction reactors, as well as future projects. In this framework, one current objective of IRSN is to evaluate the ability and accuracy of numerical tools to foresee consequences of accidents. Neutronic studies step in the safety assessment from different points of view among which the core design and its protection system. They are necessary to evaluate the core behavior in case of accident in order to assess the integrity of the first barrier and the absence of a prompt criticality risk. To reach this objective one main physical quantity has to be evaluated accurately: the neutronic power distribution in core during whole reactor lifetime. Phenix end of life tests, carried out in 2009, aim at increasing the experience feedback on sodium cooled fast reactors. These experiments have been done in the framework of the development of the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. Ten tests have been carried out: 6 on neutronic and fuel aspects, 2 on thermal hydraulics and 2 for the emergency shutdown. Two of them have been chosen for an international exercise on thermal hydraulics and neutronics in the frame of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project. Concerning neutronics, the Control Rod Withdrawal test is relevant for safety because it allows evaluating the capability of calculation tools to compute the radial power distribution on fast reactors core configurations in which the flux field is very deformed. IRSN participated to this benchmark with the ERANOS code developed by CEA for fast reactors studies. This paper presents the results obtained in the framework of the benchmark activity. A relatively good agreement was found with available measures considering the approximations done in the modeling. The work underlines the importance of burn-up calculations in order to have a fine

  17. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Mohammad K; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M

    2014-10-14

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  18. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Mohammad K.; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  19. Reliable and Affordable Control Systems Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, Bob; Tomondi, Chris; McGinley, Ray

    2004-01-01

    Active, closed-loop control of combustor pattern factor is a cooperative effort between Honeywell (formerly AlliedSignal) Engines and Systems and the NASA Glenn Research Center to reduce emissions and turbine-stator vane temperature variations, thereby enhancing engine performance and life, and reducing direct operating costs. Total fuel flow supplied to the engine is established by the speed/power control, but the distribution to individual atomizers will be controlled by the Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control (ACPFC). This system consist of three major components: multiple, thin-film sensors located on the turbine-stator vanes; fuel-flow modulators for individual atomizers; and control logic and algorithms within the electronic control.

  20. Contact-line Mechanics for Pattern Control

    SciTech Connect

    Miquelard-Garnier, Guillaume; Croll, Andrew B.; Davis, Chelsea S.; Crosby, Alfred J.

    2009-01-01

    Wrinkled surfaces are ubiquitous in Nature and can be used in a large range of applications such as improved adhesives, microfluidic patterns, or as metrology instruments. Despite wide-ranging applications, existing methods do not permit local pattern control since all existing methods impose extensive compressive strains. In this article, we describe a new process that exploits the local deformation of a soft substrate as it stretches to form an adhesive interface with a thin polymer film. The wrinkle pattern is effectively a measurement of the strain-field created during the adhesion process, which shows a strong dependence on the speed of attachment. We develop simple scaling arguments to describe this velocity dependence and a critical velocity above which wrinkles do not form. Notably, our approach allows us to define the surface pattern “wrinkle-by-wrinkle”, thus permitting the creation of single wrinkles. Intricate patterns on laterally extensive length scales can also be produced by exploiting the shape of the contact line between the film and the substrate. This level of control—the placement of single features of prescribed trajectory—which is not present in any other method of thin film wrinkling, is absolutely necessary for any realistic, scalable application.

  1. Graphite patterning in a controlled gas environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joonkyu; Kim, K. B.; Park, Jun-Young; Choi, T.; Seo, Yongho

    2011-08-01

    Although a number of methods using scanning probe lithography to pattern graphene have already been introduced, the fabrication of real devices still faces limitations. We report graphite patterning using scanning probe lithography with control of the gas environment. Patterning processes using scanning probe lithography of graphite or graphene are normally performed in air because water molecules forming the meniscus between the tip and the sample mediate the etching reaction. This water meniscus, however, may prevent uniform patterning due to its strong surface tension or large contact angle on surfaces. To investigate this side effect of water, our experiment was performed in a chamber where the gas environment was controlled with methyl alcohol, oxygen or isopropanol gases. We found that methyl alcohol facilitates graphite etching, and a line width as narrow as 3 nm was achieved as methyl alcohol also contains an oxygen atom which gives rise to the required oxidation. Due to its low surface tension and highly adsorptive behavior, methyl alcohol has advantages for a narrow line width and high speed etching conditions.

  2. Antenna pattern control using impedence surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1991-01-01

    During this research period, September 16, 1990 to March 15, 1991, a design method for selecting a low-loss impedance material coating for a horn antenna pattern control has been developed. This method and the stepped waveguide technique can be employed to accurately compute the electromagnetic wave phenomenon inside the transition region of the horn antenna, with or without the impedance surfaces, from the feed to the radiating aperture. For moment method solutions of the electric and magnetic current distributions on the radiating aperture and the outer surface of the horn antenna, triangular surface-patch modes are introduced to replace the sinusoidal surface-patch modes as expansion and testing functions to provide a more physical expansion of the current distributions. In the synthesis problem, a numerical optimization process is formulated to minimize the error function between the desired waveguide modes and the modes provided by the horn transition with impedance surfaces. Since the modes generated by the horn transition with impedance surface are computed by analytical techniques, the computational error involved in the synthesis of the antenna pattern is minimum. Therefore, the instability problem can be avoided. A preliminary implementation of the techniques has demonstrated that the developed theory of the horn antenna pattern control using the impedance surfaces is realizable.

  3. Antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng; Tirkas, Panayiotis A.

    1993-01-01

    During the period of this research project, a comprehensive study of pyramidal horn antennas was conducted. Full-wave analytical and numerical techniques were developed to analyze horn antennas with or without impedance surfaces. Based on these full-wave analytic techniques, research was conducted on the use of impedance surfaces on the walls of the horn antennas to control the antenna radiation patterns without a substantial loss of antenna gain. It was found that the use of impedance surfaces could modify the antenna radiation patterns. In addition to the analytical and numerical models, experimental models were also constructed and they were used to validate the predictions. Excellent agreement between theoretical predictions and the measured data was obtained for pyramidal horns with perfectly conducting surfaces. Very good comparisons between numerical and experimental models were also obtained for horns with impedance surfaces.

  4. Rapid quenching of molten lithium-aluminum jets in water under loss-of-control-rod-cooling conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.; Schwarz, C.E.; Allison, D.K.; Hyder, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    A series of fifteen tests were performed to investigate the thermal interactions between molten LiAl control rod material and water under conditions prototypic of the loss-of-control-rod-cooling (LCRC) accident scenario. The experimental parameters such as melt mass, stream diameter, melt temperature and flowrate, water depth and water temperature were controlled or varied to agree with analytically determined conditions, thus insuring prototypicality of the experiments and applicability of the results. Experiments were performed in an actual Q-septifoil with web insert; the test section was one meter tall. Natural triggers were investigated in selected tests, to evaluate the self-triggering potential of this system. The self-triggering mechanisms that were investigated were thermal stratification of the water pool, two-phase flow in the water pool, and simultaneous drop of a control rod in parallel channel. Only benign interactions were observed during these tests with some evidence of pressurization in the tests with deepest and hottest water pools. There was no evidence of any explosive interactions in any of the tests, even those with natural triggers. The molten LiAl jets was found to undergo jet breakup and fragmentation; in some cases the debris hung up in the web, in other cases the debris settled into a loose debris bed at the bottom of the septifoil. It is concluded from these tests that molten lithium-aluminum alloy injected into water under conditions prototypic of LCRC conditions will not self-trigger to a steam explosion nor can it be triggered by naturally occurring triggers. The mode of interaction is benign jet breakup and fragmentation, followed by debris solidification. Explosive events did not occur and may not even be possible under these conditions. As a result, the LCRC accident cannot propagate damage and should not be a power-limiting concern in the K-reactor.

  5. Nondestructive and Destructive Examination Studies on Removed-from-Service Control Rod Drive Mechanism Penetrations

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Crawford, Susan L.; Doctor, Steven R.; Seffens, Rob J.; Schuster, George J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Harris, Robert V.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2007-06-07

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objectives of this work are to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. Two CRDM assemblies were removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE and destructive examination (DE) measurements; this report addresses the following questions: 1) What did each NDE technique detect? 2) What did each NDE technique miss? 3) How accurately did each NDE technique characterize the detected flaws? 4) Why did the NDE techniques perform or not perform? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. This report focuses on a CRDM assembly that contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data and through-wall leakage. The NDE measurements used to examine the CRDM assembly followed standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. These techniques included eddy current testing (ET), time-of-flight diffraction ultrasound, and penetrant testing. In addition, laboratory-based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assembly with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. These techniques included volumetric ultrasonic inspection of the J-groove weld metal and visual testing via replicant material of the J-groove weld. The results from these NDE studies were used to

  6. cAMP controls rod photoreceptor sensitivity via multiple targets in the phototransduction cascade

    PubMed Central

    Astakhova, Luba A.; Samoiliuk, Evgeniia V.; Govardovskii, Victor I.

    2012-01-01

    In early studies, both cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cGMP were considered as potential secondary messengers regulating the conductivity of the vertebrate photoreceptor plasma membrane. Later discovery of the cGMP specificity of cyclic nucleotide–gated channels has shifted attention to cGMP as the only secondary messenger in the phototransduction cascade, and cAMP is not considered in modern schemes of phototransduction. Here, we report evidence that cAMP may also be involved in regulation of the phototransduction cascade. Using a suction pipette technique, we recorded light responses of isolated solitary rods from the frog retina in normal solution and in the medium containing 2 µM of adenylate cyclase activator forskolin. Under forskolin action, flash sensitivity rose more than twofold because of a retarded photoresponse turn-off. The same concentration of forskolin lead to a 2.5-fold increase in the rod outer segment cAMP, which is close to earlier reported natural day/night cAMP variations. Detailed analysis of cAMP action on the phototransduction cascade suggests that several targets are affected by cAMP increase: (a) basal dark phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity decreases; (b) at the same intensity of light background, steady background-induced PDE activity increases; (c) at light backgrounds, guanylate cyclase activity at a given fraction of open channels is reduced; and (d) the magnitude of the Ca2+ exchanger current rises 1.6-fold, which would correspond to a 1.6-fold elevation of [Ca2+]in. Analysis by a complete model of rod phototransduction suggests that an increase of [Ca2+]in might also explain effects (b) and (c). The mechanism(s) by which cAMP could regulate [Ca2+]in and PDE basal activity is unclear. We suggest that these regulations may have adaptive significance and improve the performance of the visual system when it switches between day and night light conditions. PMID:23008435

  7. RAPID-L Highly Automated Fast Reactor Concept Without Any Control Rods (1) Reactor concept and plant dynamics analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Tsunoda, Hirokazu; Mishima, Kaichiro; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2002-07-01

    The 200 kWe uranium-nitride fueled lithium cooled fast reactor concept 'RAPID-L' to achieve highly automated reactor operation has been demonstrated. RAPID-L is designed for Lunar base power system. It is one of the variants of RAPID (Refueling by All Pins Integrated Design), fast reactor concept, which enable quick and simplified refueling. The essential feature of RAPID concept is that the reactor core consists of an integrated fuel assembly instead of conventional fuel subassemblies. In this small size reactor core, 2700 fuel pins are integrated altogether and encased in a fuel cartridge. Refueling is conducted by replacing a fuel cartridge. The reactor can be operated without refueling for up to 10 years. Unique challenges in reactivity control systems design have been attempted in RAPID-L concept. The reactor has no control rod, but involves the following innovative reactivity control systems: Lithium Expansion Modules (LEM) for inherent reactivity feedback, Lithium Injection Modules (LIM) for inherent ultimate shutdown, and Lithium Release Modules (LRM) for automated reactor startup. All these systems adopt lithium-6 as a liquid poison instead of B{sub 4}C rods. In combination with LEMs, LIMs and LRMs, RAPID-L can be operated without operator. This is the first reactor concept ever established in the world. This reactor concept is also applicable to the terrestrial fast reactors. In this paper, RAPID-L reactor concept and its transient characteristics are presented. (authors)

  8. Automatic safety rod for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1988-01-01

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  9. Controlled rolling process for dual phase steels and application to rod, wire, sheet and other shapes

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, G.; Ahn, J.H.; Kim, N.J.

    1986-10-28

    An improved, energy efficient, hot rolling method for direct production of cold formable dual-phase steel is provided. The steel is heated to completely austenitize it and then continuously hot rolled and cooled down into the ferrite-austenite two phase region to a temperature which is just below the effective Ar[sub 3] temperature. The hot rolled steel is then rapidly quenched to provide an alloy containing strong, tough lath martensite (fibers) in a ductile soft ferrite matrix. The method is particularly useful for providing rods in which form the alloy is capable of being drawn into high strength wire or the like in a cold drawing operation without any intermediate annealing or patenting, and has excellent strength, ductility and fatigue characteristics. 3 figs.

  10. Controlled rolling process for dual phase steels and application to rod, wire, sheet and other shapes

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Ahn, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Nack-Joon

    1986-01-01

    An improved, energy efficient, hot rolling method for direct production of cold formable dual-phase steel is provided. The steel is heated to completely austenitize it and then continuously hot rolled and cooled down into the ferrite-austenite two phase region to a temperature which is just below the effective Ar.sub.3 temperature. The hot rolled steel is then rapidly quenched to provide an alloy containing strong, tough lath martensite (fibers) in a ductile soft ferrite matrix. The method is particularly useful for providing rods in which form the alloy is capable of being drawn into high strength wire or the like in a cold drawing operation without any intermediate annealing or patenting, and has excellent strength, ductility and fatigue characteristics.

  11. Shape-Controlled Paclitaxel Nanoparticles with Multiple Morphologies: Rod-Shaped, Worm-Like, Spherical, and Fingerprint-Like

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although many nanocarriers have been developed to encapsulate paclitaxel (PTX), the drug loading and circulation time in vivo always are not ideal because of its rigid “brickdust” molecular structure. People usually concentrate their attention on the spherical nanocarriers, here paclitaxel nanoparticles with different geometries were established through the chemical modification of PTX, nanoprecipitation, and core-matched cargos. Previously we have developed rod-shape paclitaxel nanocrystals using block copolymer, pluronic F127. Unfortunately, the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of PTX nanocrystals is very poor. However, when PTX was replaced by its prodrug, the geometry of the nanoparticles changed from rod-shaped to worm-like. The worm-like nanoparticles can be further changed to spherical nanoparticles using the nanoprecipitation method, and changed to fingerprint-like nanoparticles upon the addition of the core-matched PTX. The nanoparticles with nonspherical morphologies, including worm-like nanoparticles and fingerprint-like nanoparticles, offer significant advantages in regards to key PK parameters in vivo. More important, in this report the application of the core-matching technology in creating a core-matched environment capable of controlling the in vivo PK of paclitaxel was demonstrated, and it revealed a novel technique platform to construct nanoparticles and improve the poor PK profiles of the drugs. PMID:25188586

  12. Making Highly Pure Glass Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed quasi-containerless method for making glass rods or fibers minimizes contact between processing equipment and product. Method allows greater range of product sizes and shapes than achieved in experiments on containerless processing. Molten zone established in polycrystalline rod. Furnace sections separated, and glass rod solidifies between them. Clamp supports solid glass as it grows in length. Pulling clamp rapidly away from melt draws glass fiber. Fiber diameter controlled by adjustment of pulling rate.

  13. Evaluation and Repair of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Alloy 600/182 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Charles R.; Arey, Melvin L. Jr.; Robinson, Michael R.; Whitaker, David E.

    2002-07-01

    In February 2001, a routine visual inspection of the reactor vessel head of Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 3 identified boric acid crystals at nine of sixty-nine locations where control rod drive mechanism housings (CRDM nozzles) penetrate the head. The boric acid deposits resulted from primary coolant leaking from cracks in the nozzle attachment weld and from through-thickness cracks in the nozzle wall. A general overview of the inspection and repair process is presented and results of the metallurgical analysis are discussed in more detail. The analysis confirmed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is the mechanism of failure of both the Alloy 182 weld filler material and the alloy 600 wrought base material. (authors)

  14. Benchmark of Atucha-2 PHWR RELAP5-3D control rod model by Monte Carlo MCNP5 core calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Pecchia, M.; D'Auria, F.; Mazzantini, O.

    2012-07-01

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and peculiarities require the adoption of advanced Monte Carlo codes for performing realistic neutronic simulations. Therefore core models of Atucha-2 PHWR were developed using MCNP5. In this work a methodology was set up to collect the flux in the hexagonal mesh by which the Atucha-2 core is represented. The scope of this activity is to evaluate the effect of obliquely inserted control rod on neutron flux in order to validate the RELAP5-3D{sup C}/NESTLE three dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic model, applied by GRNSPG/UNIPI for performing selected transients of Chapter 15 FSAR of Atucha-2. (authors)

  15. Morphology and Pattern Control of Diphenylalanine Self-Assembly via Evaporative Dewetting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiarui; Qin, Shuyu; Wu, Xinglong; Chu, And Paul K

    2016-01-26

    Self-assembled peptide nanostructures have unique physical and biological properties and promising applications in electrical devices and functional molecular recognition. Although solution-based peptide molecules can self-assemble into different morphologies, it is challenging to control the self-assembly process. Herein, controllable self-assembly of diphenylalanine (FF) in an evaporative dewetting solution is reported. The fluid mechanical dimensionless numbers, namely Rayleigh, Marangoni, and capillary numbers, are introduced to control the interaction between the solution and FF molecules in the self-assembly process. The difference in the film thickness reflects the effects of Rayleigh and Marangoni convection, and the water vapor flow rate reveals the role of viscous fingering in the emergence of aligned FF flakes. By employing dewetting, various FF self-assembled patterns, like concentric and spokelike, and morphologies, like strips and hexagonal tubes/rods, can be produced, and there are no significant lattice structural changes in the FF nanostructures. PMID:26654935

  16. Control of bacterial adhesion and growth on honeycomb-like patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Ding, Yonghui; Ge, Xiang; Leng, Yang

    2015-11-01

    It is a great challenge to construct a persistent bacteria-resistant surface even though it has been demonstrated that several surface features might be used to control bacterial behavior, including surface topography. In this study, we develop micro-scale honeycomb-like patterns of different sizes (0.5-10 μm) as well as a flat area as the control on a single platform to evaluate the bacterial adhesion and growth. Bacteria strains, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with two distinct shapes (rod and sphere) are cultured on the platforms, with the patterned surface-up and surface-down in the culture medium. The results demonstrate that the 1 μm patterns remarkably reduce bacterial adhesion and growth while suppressing bacterial colonization when compared to the flat surface. The selective adhesion of the bacterial cells on the patterns reveals that the bacterial adhesion is cooperatively mediated by maximizing the cell-substrate contact area and minimizing the cell deformation, from a thermodynamic point of view. Moreover, study of bacterial behaviors on the surface-up vs. surface-down samples shows that gravity does not apparently affect the spatial distribution of the adherent cells although it indeed facilitates bacterial adhesion. Furthermore, the experimental results suggest that two major factors, i.e. the availability of energetically favorable adhesion sites and the physical confinements, contribute to the anti-bacterial nature of the honeycomb-like patterns. PMID:26302067

  17. Composite Lightning Rods for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Charles F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Composite, lightweight sacrificial tip with graphite designed reduces lightning-strike damage to composite parts of aircraft and dissipates harmful electrical energy. Device consists of slender composite rod fabricated from highly-conductive unidirectional reinforcing fibers in matrix material. Rods strategically installed in trailing edges of aircraft wings, tails, winglets, control surfaces, and rearward-most portion of aft fuselage.

  18. Rhodopsin kinase and arrestin binding control the decay of photoactivated rhodopsin and dark adaptation of mouse rods.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Nymark, Soile; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Berry, Justin D; Adler, Leopold; Koutalos, Yiannis; Kefalov, Vladimir J; Cornwall, M Carter

    2016-07-01

    Photoactivation of vertebrate rhodopsin converts it to the physiologically active Meta II (R*) state, which triggers the rod light response. Meta II is rapidly inactivated by the phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues by G-protein receptor kinase (Grk1) and subsequent binding of arrestin 1 (Arr1). Meta II exists in equilibrium with the more stable inactive form of rhodopsin, Meta III. Dark adaptation of rods requires the complete thermal decay of Meta II/Meta III into opsin and all-trans retinal and the subsequent regeneration of rhodopsin with 11-cis retinal chromophore. In this study, we examine the regulation of Meta III decay by Grk1 and Arr1 in intact mouse rods and their effect on rod dark adaptation. We measure the rates of Meta III decay in isolated retinas of wild-type (WT), Grk1-deficient (Grk1(-/-)), Arr1-deficient (Arr1(-/-)), and Arr1-overexpressing (Arr1(ox)) mice. We find that in WT mouse rods, Meta III peaks ∼6 min after rhodopsin activation and decays with a time constant (τ) of 17 min. Meta III decay slows in Arr1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼27 min), whereas it accelerates in Arr1(ox) rods (τ of ∼8 min) and Grk1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼13 min). In all cases, regeneration of rhodopsin with exogenous 11-cis retinal is rate limited by the decay of Meta III. Notably, the kinetics of rod dark adaptation in vivo is also modulated by the levels of Arr1 and Grk1. We conclude that, in addition to their well-established roles in Meta II inactivation, Grk1 and Arr1 can modulate the kinetics of Meta III decay and rod dark adaptation in vivo. PMID:27353443

  19. Pattern curvature to control pore shape and its ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guiduk; Shin, Kyusoon

    2013-03-01

    Triangular pore in inverse-hexagonal packing was fabricated by anodizing Al with convex pattern in hexagonal packing. The convexly patterned Al was prepared via replication of the concave structure formed in self-assembled anodized aluminum oxide (AAO). Self-assembled AAO without pre-patterning produces hexagonal packing circular pores. Exploitation of the inversed structure was found to create well-defined triangular pores in inverse-hexagonal packing. Anisotropic pore feature was discussed to come from the alternating distance between the pits and the curvature of the pattern. Also, by controlling the topography of the convex pattern around pits, we investigated the effect of pattern topography on pore initiation.

  20. Gibberellins control fruit patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Girin, Thomas; Sorefan, Karim; Fuentes, Sara; Wood, Thomas A.; Lawrenson, Tom; Sablowski, Robert; Østergaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The Arabidopsis basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) proteins INDEHISCENT (IND) and ALCATRAZ (ALC) specify tissues required for fruit opening that have major roles in seed dispersal and plant domestication. Here, we show that synthesis of the phytohormone gibberellin is a direct and necessary target of IND, and that ALC interacts directly with DELLA repressors, which antagonize ALC function but are destabilized by gibberellin. Thus, the gibberellin/DELLA pathway has a key role in patterning the Arabidopsis fruit, and the interaction between DELLA and bHLH proteins, previously shown to connect gibberellin and light responses, is a versatile regulatory module also used in tissue patterning. PMID:20889713

  1. Gibberellins control fruit patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Girin, Thomas; Sorefan, Karim; Fuentes, Sara; Wood, Thomas A; Lawrenson, Tom; Sablowski, Robert; Østergaard, Lars

    2010-10-01

    The Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins INDEHISCENT (IND) and ALCATRAZ (ALC) specify tissues required for fruit opening that have major roles in seed dispersal and plant domestication. Here, we show that synthesis of the phytohormone gibberellin is a direct and necessary target of IND, and that ALC interacts directly with DELLA repressors, which antagonize ALC function but are destabilized by gibberellin. Thus, the gibberellin/DELLA pathway has a key role in patterning the Arabidopsis fruit, and the interaction between DELLA and bHLH proteins, previously shown to connect gibberellin and light responses, is a versatile regulatory module also used in tissue patterning. PMID:20889713

  2. Pupil Control As an Institutional Pattern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Paul

    This study of pupil control attitudes was based on the assumption that public school teachers and college education instructors hold divergent views on pupil control. These divergent views would then be imposed on the preservice teachers. The Pupil Control Ideology (PCI) Scale and the Dogmatism Scale, Form E, were randomly distributed to 100…

  3. Control rod trip failures. Salem 1: the cause, response and potential fixes

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.E.; Boccio, J.L.; Luckas, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although the failure to trip or scram represents a single class of initiators, the actual events of each transient are operationally unique and require individual human response. The operational team's reaction to the challenge can be successful, in very short response times, and without complete diagnosis of the event's root cause. This underscores the need for a better basic understanding of the team response patterns in such cases, to allow designs, procedures, and training to take advantage of it. In addition, as one analyzes the recent failure at the Salem 1 reactor, it becomes obvious that the optimization of test and maintenance practices are essential and the use of time dependent reliability analyses lend themselves nicely to such calculations.

  4. Antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid numerical technique is developed for electrically large pyramidal horn antennas radiating in free space. A stepped-waveguide method is used to analyze the interior surfaces of the horn transition. The Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE) is employed on the outer surfaces of the pyramidal horn including the radiating aperture. Meanwhile, the Magnetic Field Integral Equation (MFIE) is used on the aperture to relate the aperture fields and those in the horn transition. The resultant hybrid field integral equation (HFIE) is solved numerically by the method of moments. This formulation is both accurate and numerically stable so that high-gain microwave pyramidal horns can be analyzed rigorously. Far-field radiation patterns, both computed and measured, are presented for three electrically-large x-band horn antennas. The comparisons demonstrate that this method is accurate enough to predict the fine pattern structure at wide angles and in the back region. Computed far-field patterns and aperture field distribution of two smaller x-band horns are also presented along with a discussion on the validity of the approximate aperture field distributions routinely used in the analysis and design of pyramidal horns.

  5. Pupil Control as an Institutional Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Paul

    1974-01-01

    Differences in attitudes toward pupil control between university educators and cooperating pupil school teachers were measured to determine if student teachers might be receiving conflicting sets of expectations. The results of the study confirm that college supervisors have a more humanistic attitude toward pupil control than cooperating teachers…

  6. Peptidic ligands to control the three-dimensional self-assembly of quantum rods in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Bizien, Thomas; Even-Hernandez, Pascale; Postic, Marie; Mazari, Elsa; Chevance, Soizic; Bondon, Arnaud; Hamon, Cyrille; Troadec, David; Largeau, Ludovic; Dupuis, Christophe; Gosse, Charlie; Artzner, Franck; Marchi, Valérie

    2014-09-24

    The use of peptidic ligands is validated as a generic chemical platform allowing one to finely control the organization in solid phase of semiconductor nanorods originally dispersed in an aqueous media. An original method to generate, on a macroscopic scale and with the desired geometry, three-dimensional supracrystals composed of quantum rods is introduced. In a first step, nanorods are transferred in an aqueous phase thanks to the substitution of the original capping layer by peptidic ligands. Infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy data prove that the exchange is complete; fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrates that the emitter optical properties are not significantly altered; electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering experiments assess the good colloidal stability of the resulting aqueous suspension. In a second step, water evaporation in a microstructured environment yields superstructures with a chosen geometry and in which nanorods obey a smectic B arrangement, as shown by electron microscopy. Incidentally, bulk drying in a capillary tube generates a similar local order, as evidenced by small angle X-ray scattering. PMID:24864008

  7. Core design study of a supercritical light water reactor with double row fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    An equilibrium core for supercritical light water reactor has been designed. A novel type of fuel assembly with dual rows of fuel rods between water rods is chosen and optimized to get more uniform assembly power distributions. Stainless steel is used for fuel rod cladding and structural material. Honeycomb structure filled with thermal isolation is introduced to reduce the usage of stainless steel and to keep moderator temperature below the pseudo critical temperature. Water flow scheme with ascending coolant flow in inner regions is carried out to achieve high outlet temperature. In order to enhance coolant outlet temperature, the radial power distributions needs to be as flat as possible through operation cycle. Fuel loading pattern and control rod pattern are optimized to flatten power distribution at inner regions. Axial fuel enrichment is divided into three parts to control axial power peak, which affects maximum cladding surface temperature. (authors)

  8. Plastid control of abaxial-adaxial patterning

    PubMed Central

    Mateo-Bonmatí, Eduardo; Casanova-Sáez, Rubén; Quesada, Víctor; Hricová, Andrea; Candela, Héctor; Micol, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Translational regulation, exerted by the cytosolic ribosome, has been shown to participate in the establishment of abaxial-adaxial polarity in Arabidopsis thaliana: many hypomorphic and null alleles of genes encoding proteins of the cytosolic ribosome enhance the leaf polarity defects of asymmetric leaves1 (as1) and as2 mutants. Here, we report the identification of the SCABRA1 (SCA1) nuclear gene, whose loss-of-function mutations also enhance the polarity defects of the as2 mutants. In striking contrast to other previously known enhancers of the phenotypes caused by the as1 and as2 mutations, we found that SCA1 encodes a plastid-type ribosomal protein that functions as a structural component of the 70S plastid ribosome and, therefore, its role in abaxial-adaxial patterning was not expected. PMID:26522839

  9. Antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1992-09-01

    During this research period, we have effectively transferred existing computer codes from CRAY supercomputer to work station based systems. The work station based version of our code preserved the accuracy of the numerical computations while giving a much better turn-around time than the CRAY supercomputer. Such a task relieved us of the heavy dependence of the supercomputer account budget and made codes developed in this research project more feasible for applications. The analysis of pyramidal horns with impedance surfaces was our major focus during this research period. Three different modeling algorithms in analyzing lossy impedance surfaces were investigated and compared with measured data. Through this investigation, we discovered that a hybrid Fourier transform technique, which uses the eigen mode in the stepped waveguide section and the Fourier transformed field distributions across the stepped discontinuities for lossy impedances coating, gives a better accuracy in analyzing lossy coatings. After a further refinement of the present technique, we will perform an accurate radiation pattern synthesis in the coming reporting period.

  10. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kasada, R.; Ha, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Sakamoto, K.

    2016-01-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test. PMID:27161666

  11. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kasada, R; Ha, Y; Higuchi, T; Sakamoto, K

    2016-01-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test. PMID:27161666

  12. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasada, R.; Ha, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Sakamoto, K.

    2016-05-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test.

  13. CONTROL ROD ROTATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Baumgarten, A.; Karalis, A.J.

    1961-11-28

    A threaded rotatable shaft is provided which rotates in response to linear movement of a nut, the shaft being surrounded by a pair of bellows members connected to either side of the nut to effectively seal the reactor from leakage and also to store up energy to shut down the reactor in the event of a power failure. (AEC)

  14. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1958-04-22

    An electromagnetic apparatus for moving a rod-like member in small steps in either direction is described. The invention has particular application in the reactor field where the reactor control rods must be moved only a small distance and where the use of mechanical couplings is impractical due to the high- pressure seals required. A neutron-absorbing rod is mounted in a housing with gripping uaits that engage the rod, and coils for magnetizing the gripping units to make them grip, shift, and release the rod are located outside the housing.

  15. Controlling adsorbate interactions for advanced chemical patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra Garcia, Hector M.

    Molecules designed to have specific interactions were used to influence the structural, physical, and chemical properties of self-assembled monolayers. In the case of 1-adamantanethiolate monolayers, the molecular structure influences lability, enabling alkanethiol molecules in solution to displace the 1-adamantanethiolate monolayers, ultimately leading to complete molecular exchange. The similar Au-S bond environments measured for both n-alkanethiolate and 1-adamantanethiolate monolayers indicate that displacement is not a result of weakened Au-S bonds. Instead, it was hypothesized that the density differences in the two monolayers provide a substantial enthalpic driver, aided by differences in van der Waals forces, ultimately leading to complete displacement of the 1-adamantenthiol molecules. Additionally, it was discovered that displacement occurs via fast insertion of n-dodecanethiolate at the defects in the original 1-adamantanethiolate monolayer, which nucleates an island growth phase and is followed by slow ordering of the n-dodecanethiolate domains into a denser and more crystalline form. Langmuir-based kinetics, which describe alkanethiolate adsorption on bare Au{111}, fail to model this displacement reaction. Instead, a model of perimeter-dependent island growth yields good agreement with kinetic data over a 100-fold variation in n-dodecanethiol concentration. Rescaling the growth rate at each concentration collapses all the data onto a single universal curve, suggesting that displacement is a scale-free process. Exploiting the knowledge gained by studying 1-adamantethiolate monolayer displacement, a reversible molecular resist was developed, in which displacement is controlled via external stimuli. This methodology for the fabrication of controllably displaceable monolayers relies on carboxyl-functionalized self-assembled monolayers and in-situ Fischer esterification. Using an 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid monolayer as a model system, it was shown that in

  16. Decentralized reinforcement-learning control and emergence of motion patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svinin, Mikhail; Yamada, Kazuyaki; Okhura, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Kanji

    1998-10-01

    In this paper we propose a system for studying emergence of motion patterns in autonomous mobile robotic systems. The system implements an instance-based reinforcement learning control. Three spaces are of importance in formulation of the control scheme. They are the work space, the sensor space, and the action space. Important feature of our system is that all these spaces are assumed to be continuous. The core part of the system is a classifier system. Based on the sensory state space analysis, the control is decentralized and is specified at the lowest level of the control system. However, the local controllers are implicitly connected through the perceived environment information. Therefore, they constitute a dynamic environment with respect to each other. The proposed control scheme is tested under simulation for a mobile robot in a navigation task. It is shown that some patterns of global behavior--such as collision avoidance, wall-following, light-seeking--can emerge from the local controllers.

  17. Control chart pattern recognition using a back propagation neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoerre, Julie K.; Perry, Marcus B.

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, control chart pattern recognition using artificial neural networks is presented. An important motivation of this research is the growing interest in intelligent manufacturing systems, specifically in the area of Statistical Process Control (SPC). On-line automated process analysis is an important area of research since it allows the interfacing of process control with Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) techniques. A back propagation artificial neural network is used to model X-bar quality control charts and identify process instability situations as specified by the Western Electric Statistical Quality Control handbook. Results indicate that the performance of the back propagation neural network is very accurate in identifying these control chart patterns. This work is significant in that the neural network output can serve as a link to process parameters in a closed-loop control system. In this way, adjustments to the process can be made on-line and quality problems averted.

  18. Automatic safety rod for reactors. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-03-23

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  19. Microstructures fabricated by dynamically controlled femtosecond patterned vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Cai, Meng-Qiang; Li, Ping-Ping; Feng, Dan; Pan, Yue; Qian, Sheng-Xia; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-04-01

    We have presented and demonstrated a method for the fabrication of various complicated microstructures based on dynamically controlled patterned vector optical fields (PVOFs). We design and generate dynamic PVOFs by loading patterned holograms displayed on the spatial light modulator and moving traces of focuses with different patterns. We experimentally fabricate the various microstructures in z-cut lithium niobate plates. The method we present has some benefits such as no motion of the fabricated samples and high efficiency due to its parallel feature. Moreover, our approach is able to fabricate three-dimensional microstructures. PMID:27192265

  20. Auditory orientation in crickets: Pattern recognition controls reactive steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, James F. A.; Hedwig, Berthold

    2005-10-01

    Many groups of insects are specialists in exploiting sensory cues to locate food resources or conspecifics. To achieve orientation, bees and ants analyze the polarization pattern of the sky, male moths orient along the females' odor plume, and cicadas, grasshoppers, and crickets use acoustic signals to locate singing conspecifics. In comparison with olfactory and visual orientation, where learning is involved, auditory processing underlying orientation in insects appears to be more hardwired and genetically determined. In each of these examples, however, orientation requires a recognition process identifying the crucial sensory pattern to interact with a localization process directing the animal's locomotor activity. Here, we characterize this interaction. Using a sensitive trackball system, we show that, during cricket auditory behavior, the recognition process that is tuned toward the species-specific song pattern controls the amplitude of auditory evoked steering responses. Females perform small reactive steering movements toward any sound patterns. Hearing the male's calling song increases the gain of auditory steering within 2-5 s, and the animals even steer toward nonattractive sound patterns inserted into the speciesspecific pattern. This gain control mechanism in the auditory-to-motor pathway allows crickets to pursue species-specific sound patterns temporarily corrupted by environmental factors and may reflect the organization of recognition and localization networks in insects. localization | phonotaxis

  1. Boiling on spatially controlled heterogeneous surfaces: Wettability patterns on microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, HangJin; Yu, Dong In; Noh, Hyunwoo; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2015-05-01

    We investigated nucleate boiling heat transfer with precisely controlled wetting patterns and micro-posts, to gain insights into the impact of surface heterogeneity. To create heterogeneous wetting patterns, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were spatially patterned. Even at a contact angle <90°, bubble nucleation and bubble frequency were accelerated on SAM patterns, since this contact angle is larger than that found on plain surfaces. Micro-posts were also fabricated on the surface, which interrupted the expansion of generated bubbles. This surface structuring induced smaller bubbles and higher bubble frequency than the plain surface. The resistance provided by surface structures to bubble expansion broke the interface between the vapor mushroom and the heating surface, and water could therefore be continuously supplied through these spaces at high heat flux. To induce synergistic effects with wetting patterns and surface structures on boiling, we fabricated SAM patterns onto the heads of micro-posts. On this combined surface, bubble nucleation was induced from the head of the micro-posts, and bubble growth was influenced by both the SAM pattern and the micro-post structures. In particular, separation of the vapor path on the SAM patterns and the liquid path between micro-post structures resulted in high heat transfer performance without critical heat flux deterioration.

  2. Patterning of dispenser cathode surfaces to a controlled porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles E.; Deininger, William D.; Gibson, John; Thomas, Richard

    1989-01-01

    A process to pattern slots approximately 1.25 microns in width into 25-micron-thick W films that have been deposited onto flat or concave surfaces is discussed. A 25-micron-thick W film with a high degree of (100) orientation is chemically vapor deposited (CVD) onto a flat or concave Mo mandrel. A 5-micron-thick Al film is deposited onto the CVD W, followed by 2 microns of photoresist. On concave cathodes, XeCl2 laser ablation or X-ray lithography is used to pattern the photoresist, whereas on flat cathodes deep UV lithography can be used. The patterned photoresist serves as the mask in a Cl ion-beam-assisted etching (IBAE) process to pattern the Al. An alternative process is to deposit Al2O3 films onto the W and pattern the Al2O3 using laser ablation. The W film is then patterned to 3-6-micron slot widths using IBAE + ClF3 with the patterned Al or Al2O3 as the mask. Finally, a sputter deposition step is required to close up the slots to approximately 1 micron. The process described is capable of patterning concave dispenser cathodes to a controlled and precise porosity.

  3. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small button'' in the latch mechanism had broken off of the lock plunger'' and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  4. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small ``button`` in the latch mechanism had broken off of the ``lock plunger`` and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  5. FUEL ROD ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1959-09-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods aod a tubular casing through which a coolant flows in heat-change contact with the ruel rods are described. The casting is of trefoil section and carries the fuel rods, each of which has two fin engaging the serrated fins of the other two fuel rods, whereby the fuel rods are held in the casing and are interlocked against relative longitudinal movement.

  6. Pattern recognition control outperforms conventional myoelectric control in upper limb patients with targeted muscle reinnervation.

    PubMed

    Hargrove, Levi J; Lock, Blair A; Simon, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Pattern recognition myoelectric control shows great promise as an alternative to conventional amplitude based control to control multiple degree of freedom prosthetic limbs. Many studies have reported pattern recognition classification error performances of less than 10% during offline tests; however, it remains unclear how this translates to real-time control performance. In this contribution, we compare the real-time control performances between pattern recognition and direct myoelectric control (a popular form of conventional amplitude control) for participants who had received targeted muscle reinnervation. The real-time performance was evaluated during three tasks; 1) a box and blocks task, 2) a clothespin relocation task, and 3) a block stacking task. Our results found that pattern recognition significantly outperformed direct control for all three performance tasks. Furthermore, it was found that pattern recognition was configured much quicker. The classification error of the pattern recognition systems used by the patients was found to be 16% ±(1.6%) suggesting that systems with this error rate may still provide excellent control. Finally, patients qualitatively preferred using pattern recognition control and reported the resulting control to be smoother and more consistent. PMID:24110008

  7. Microtubule teardrop patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeyoshi, Kosuke; Kawamura, Ryuzo; Yoshida, Ryo; Osada, Yoshihito

    2015-03-01

    Several strategies for controlling microtubule patterns are developed because of the rigidity determined from the molecular structure and the geometrical structure. In contrast to the patterns in co-operation with motor proteins or associated proteins, microtubules have a huge potential for patterns via their intrinsic flexural rigidity. We discover that a microtubule teardrop pattern emerges via self-assembly under hydrodynamic flow from the parallel bundles without motor proteins. In the growth process, the bundles ultimately bend according to the critical bending curvature. Such protein pattern formation utilizing the intrinsic flexural rigidity will provide broad understandings of self-assembly of rigid rods, not only in biomolecules, but also in supramolecules.

  8. Who's the Boss? Patterns of Perceived Control in Adolescents' Friendships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Helms, Heather M.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.; Thayer, Shawna M.; Sales, Lara H.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the nature and correlates of different patterns of perceived control in adolescents' relationships with their best friends. Participants included firstborn adolescents (M = 14.94 years), their younger siblings (M = 12.44 years) and both their mothers and fathers in 163 families as well as a best friend of each adolescent (M =…

  9. A Destructive Validation of NDE Responses of Service-Induced PWSCC Found in North Anna 2 Control Rod Drive Nozzle 31

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Robert V.; Crawford, Susan L.; Seffens, Rob J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Moyer, C.

    2009-07-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies.

  10. Locus of control patterns in headaches and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez-Franco, Luis; López-Jiménez, Ana María

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Locus of control (LOC) is related to the impact of headaches and chronic pain; however, literature evidence regarding LOC is not always consistent. Several authors consider this to be due, in part, to the separate interpretation of LOC factors, during which the interaction among them is ignored. In 1982, Wallston and Wallston proposed eight possible LOC health patterns depending on whether the individual scored high or low in each of three dimensions. OBJECTIVE: To identify these LOC patterns in patients with headaches and chronic pain, and to validate them in terms of their association with a selection of the main pain indicators. METHODS: A total of 228 individuals were recruited at three public centres in Seville, Spain. Participants completed a semistructured clinical interview and several questionnaires assessing psychological variables related to pain. The main statistical analyses used were two-step cluster analysis and ANCOVA. RESULTS: The six-cluster solution was optimal. The patterns observed coincided with: the believer in control; the yea-sayer; the pure chance; the pure internal; the pure professional; and the nay-sayer clusters. The double external or type VI clusters were not observed. Clusters could be classified from the best to the worst adjustment to chronic pain. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the empirical validity of the theoretical model of LOC patterns proposed in 1982 by Wallston and Wallston among a chronic pain population. The analysis of patterns provides more accurate information regarding the adjustment to pain compared with analysis of the LOC factors separately. PMID:23936894

  11. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways. PMID:26718442

  12. Heartbeat control in leeches. II. Fictive motor pattern.

    PubMed

    Wenning, Angela; Hill, Andrew A V; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2004-01-01

    The rhythmic beating of the tube-like hearts in the medicinal leech is driven and coordinated by rhythmic activity in segmental heart motor neurons. The motor neurons are controlled by rhythmic inhibitory input from a network of heart interneurons that compose the heartbeat central pattern generator. In the preceding paper, we described the constriction pattern of the hearts in quiescent intact animals and showed that one heart constricts in a rear-to-front wave (peristaltic coordination mode), while the other heart constricts in near unison over its length (synchronous coordination mode) and that they regularly switch coordination modes. Here we analyze intersegmental and side-to-side-coordination of the fictive motor pattern for heartbeat in denervated nerve cords. We show that the intersegmental phase relations among heart motor neurons in both coordination modes are independent of heartbeat period. This finding enables us to combine data from different experiments to form a detailed analysis of the relative phases, duty cycle, and intraburst spike frequency of the bursts of the segmental heart motor neurons. The fictive motor pattern and the constriction pattern seen in intact leeches closely match in their intersegmental and side-to-side coordination, indicating that sensory feedback is not necessary for properly phased intersegmental coordination. Moreover, the regular switches in coordination mode of the fictive motor pattern mimic those seen in intact animals indicating that these switches likely arise by a central mechanism. PMID:13679405

  13. Patterns of Weight Control Behavior among 15 year old Girls

    PubMed Central

    Balantekin, Katherine N.; Birch, Leann L.; Savage, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objectives were to identify and predict patterns of weight control behavior in 15 year old (yo) girls and to examine weight control group differences in energy intake. Method Subjects included 166 girls assessed every 2 years (ys) from age 5 to 15. Latent class analysis was used to identify patterns of weight control behaviors. Antecedent variables (e.g. inhibitory control at 7ys), and concurrent variables (e.g. BMI and dietary intake at 15ys) were included as predictors. Assessments were a combination of survey, interview, and laboratory measures. Results LCA identified four classes of weight control behaviors, Non-dieters (26%), and three dieting groups: Lifestyle (16%), Dieters (43%), and Extreme Dieters (17%). Levels of restraint, weight concerns, and dieting frequency increased across groups, from Non-dieters to Extreme Dieters. BMI at 5ys and inhibitory control at 7ys predicted weight control group at 15ys; e.g. with every one-point decrease in inhibitory control, girls were twice as likely to be Extreme Dieters than Non-dieters. Girls in the Extreme Dieters group were mostly classified as under-reporters, and had the lowest self-reported intake, but ate significantly more in the laboratory. Discussion Among 15yo girls, “dieting” includes a range of both healthy and unhealthy behaviors. Risk factors for membership in a weight control groups are present as early as 5ys. Patterns of intake in the laboratory support the view that lower reported energy intake by Extreme Dieters is likely due under-reporting as an intent to decrease intake, not actual decreased intake. PMID:26284953

  14. Investigation of combined free and forced convection in a 2 x 6 rod bundle during controlled flow transients

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.M.; Khan, E.U.

    1980-10-01

    An experimental study was performed to obtain local fluid velocity and temperature measurements in the mixed (combined free and forced) convection regime for specific flow coastdown transients. A brief investigation of steady-state flows for the purely free-convection regime was also completed. The study was performed using an electrically heated 2 x 6 rod bundle contained in a flow housing. In addition a transient data base was obtained for evaluating the COBRA-WC thermal-hydraulic computer program (a modified version of the COBRA-IV code).

  15. Controlling Pattern Formation in Nanoparticle Assemblies via Directed Solvent Dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christopher P.; Blunt, Matthew O.; Pauliac-Vaujour, Emmanuelle; Stannard, Andrew; Moriarty, Philip; Vancea, Ioan; Thiele, Uwe

    2007-09-01

    We have achieved highly localized control of pattern formation in two-dimensional nanoparticle assemblies by direct modification of solvent dewetting dynamics. A striking dependence of nanoparticle organization on the size of atomic force microscope-generated surface heterogeneities is observed and reproduced in numerical simulations. Nanoscale features induce a rupture of the solvent-nanoparticle film, causing the local flow of solvent to carry nanoparticles into confinement. Microscale heterogeneities instead slow the evaporation of the solvent, producing a remarkably abrupt interface between different nanoparticle patterns.

  16. Controlling pattern formation in nanoparticle assemblies via directed solvent dewetting.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher P; Blunt, Matthew O; Pauliac-Vaujour, Emmanuelle; Stannard, Andrew; Moriarty, Philip; Vancea, Ioan; Thiele, Uwe

    2007-09-14

    We have achieved highly localized control of pattern formation in two-dimensional nanoparticle assemblies by direct modification of solvent dewetting dynamics. A striking dependence of nanoparticle organization on the size of atomic force microscope-generated surface heterogeneities is observed and reproduced in numerical simulations. Nanoscale features induce a rupture of the solvent-nanoparticle film, causing the local flow of solvent to carry nanoparticles into confinement. Microscale heterogeneities instead slow the evaporation of the solvent, producing a remarkably abrupt interface between different nanoparticle patterns. PMID:17930453

  17. Design and control of patterns in reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanag, Vladimir K.; Epstein, Irving R.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the design of reaction-diffusion systems that display a variety of spatiotemporal patterns. We also consider how these patterns may be controlled by external perturbation, typically using photochemistry or temperature. Systems treated include the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid and chlorine dioxide-malonic acid-iodine reactions, and the BZ-AOT system, i.e., the BZ reaction in a water-in-oil reverse microemulsion stabilized by the surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT).

  18. Design and control of patterns in reaction-diffusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vanag, Vladimir K.; Epstein, Irving R.

    2008-06-15

    We discuss the design of reaction-diffusion systems that display a variety of spatiotemporal patterns. We also consider how these patterns may be controlled by external perturbation, typically using photochemistry or temperature. Systems treated include the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid and chlorine dioxide-malonic acid-iodine reactions, and the BZ-AOT system, i.e., the BZ reaction in a water-in-oil reverse microemulsion stabilized by the surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)

  19. Food consumption pattern in cervical carcinoma patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Labani, Lakshmi; Andallu, B.; Meera, M.; Asthana, S.; Satyanarayana, L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The uterine cervix is the second most common site of cancer among Indian women.Though the human papillomavirus has been demonstrated to be a causative agent for this cancer, a variety of other risk factors are in play, such as sexual and reproductive patterns, socioeconomic, hygienic practices, and diet. The accumulated evidence suggests that cervical cancer is preventable and is highly suitable for primary prevention. The dietary intake of antioxidants and vitamins like vitamin A, carotenoids, vitamin C, folacin and tocopherol is found to have protective effects against cancer of the cervix. Dietary data regarding cervical cancer are still scanty. Objective: The present study was therefore undertaken to study the dietary pattern among uterine cervical cancer patients and normal controls. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 consecutive patients and 60 controls were enrolled from a referral hospital during the year 2004. A schedule inclusive of the food frequency pattern and 24-h dietary recall along with the general information was administered to all the enrolled subjects to describe findings on the food consumption pattern along with other important factors. Results: The mean intake of energy, protein, vitamins, etc., between the cases and controls was not significantly different except for the vitamin C level. Serum vitamin E was found to have lower average in patients as compared to controls. The nutrient intake of cervical cancer patients and controls was grossly deficient in the socioeconomic group studied. With regard to the macronutrient intake, calorie and protein intakes showed a deficit of around 50% when compared to RDA. Conclusion: The food consumption profile was not significantly different between cervical cancer patients and normal controls. PMID:20596306

  20. Control of crystal nucleation by patterned self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizenberg, Joanna; Black, Andrew J.; Whitesides, George M.

    1999-04-01

    An important requirement in the fabrication of advanced inorganic materials, such as ceramics and semiconductors, is control over crystallization. In principle, the synthetic growth of crystals can be guided by molecular recognition at interfaces. But it remains a practical challenge to control simultaneously the density and pattern of nucleation events, and the sizes and orientations of the growing crystals. Here we report a route to crystal formation, using micropatterned self-assembled monolayers,, which affords control over all these parameters. We begin with a metal substrate patterned with a self-assembled monolayer having areas of different nucleating activity-in this case, an array of acid-terminated regions separated by methyl-terminated regions. By immersing the patterned substrates in a calcium chloride solution and exposing them to carbon dioxide, we achieve ordered crystallization of calcite in the polar regions, where the rate of nucleation is fastest; crystallization can be completely suppressed elsewhere by a suitable choice of array spacing, which ensures that the solution is undersaturated in the methyl-terminated regions. The nucleation density (the number of crystals formed per active site) may be controlled by varying the area and distribution of the polar regions, and we can manipulate the crystallographic orientation by using different functional groups and substrates.

  1. Executive control and learning pattern on the CVLT.

    PubMed

    Lebowitz, Brian K; Touradji, Pegah; Jonen, Lynn; Belanger, Heather G; Curtiss, Glenn; Vanderploeg, Rodney D

    2006-10-01

    We evaluated a 23 year-old man after recovery from encephalitis. In contrast to the expected pattern of increasingly better acquisition across the 5 learning trials of the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT-2), he produced a "J-shaped" curve (Trials 1-5: 8,6,6,9,11). Because he also demonstrated excessive levels of proactive interference as well as poor divided attention, we hypothesized that his atypical learning pattern was due to a build-up of proactive interference secondary to executive dyscontrol. Using a large sample of 4462 healthy adult men, we identified four groups exhibiting various learning patterns. We found that a learning pattern similar to this patient (i.e., a drop after trial 1 followed by recovery) was rare (1.1% of the sample). Individuals with this learning pattern demonstrated increased perseverative responses, as well as greater difficulty maintaining cognitive set on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, decreased attentional control on the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, and greater levels of proactive interference on the CVLT. Taken together, the results of the study suggest that an early drop, followed by a recovery in learning trial performance, is associated with executive dyscontrol. PMID:16840246

  2. A unique stylopod patterning mechanism by Shox2-controlled osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenduo; Song, Yingnan; Huang, Zhen; Osterwalder, Marco; Ljubojevic, Anja; Xu, Jue; Bobick, Brent; Abassah-Oppong, Samuel; Ruan, Ningsheng; Shamby, Ross; Yu, Diankun; Zhang, Lu; Cai, Chen-Leng; Visel, Axel; Zhang, Yanding; Cobb, John; Chen, YiPing

    2016-07-15

    Vertebrate appendage patterning is programmed by Hox-TALE factor-bound regulatory elements. However, it remains unclear which cell lineages are commissioned by Hox-TALE factors to generate regional specific patterns and whether other Hox-TALE co-factors exist. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional mechanisms controlled by the Shox2 transcriptional regulator in limb patterning. Harnessing an osteogenic lineage-specific Shox2 inactivation approach we show that despite widespread Shox2 expression in multiple cell lineages, lack of the stylopod observed upon Shox2 deficiency is a specific result of Shox2 loss of function in the osteogenic lineage. ChIP-Seq revealed robust interaction of Shox2 with cis-regulatory enhancers clustering around skeletogenic genes that are also bound by Hox-TALE factors, supporting a lineage autonomous function of Shox2 in osteogenic lineage fate determination and skeleton patterning. Pbx ChIP-Seq further allowed the genome-wide identification of cis-regulatory modules exhibiting co-occupancy of Pbx, Meis and Shox2 transcriptional regulators. Integrative analysis of ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq data and transgenic enhancer assays indicate that Shox2 patterns the stylopod as a repressor via interaction with enhancers active in the proximal limb mesenchyme and antagonizes the repressive function of TALE factors in osteogenesis. PMID:27287812

  3. Piston rod seal

    DOEpatents

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  4. Effect of rod gap spacing on a suction panel for laminar flow and noise control in supersonic wind tunnels. M.S. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of a coordinated experimental and theoretical study of a sound shield concept which aims to provide a means of noise reduction in the test section of supersonic wind tunnels at high Reynolds numbers. The model used consists of a planar array of circular rods aligned with the flow, with adjustable gaps between them for boundary layer removal by suction, i.e., laminar flow control. One of the basic requirements of the present sound shield concept is to achieve sonic cross flow through the gaps in order to prevent lee-side flow disturbances from penetrating back into the shielded region. Tests were conducted at Mach 6 over a local unit Reynolds number range from about 1.2 x 10 to the 6th power to 13.5 x 10 to the 6th power per foot. Measurements of heat transfer, static pressure, and sound levels were made to establish the transition characteristics of the boundary layer on the rod array and the sound shielding effectiveness.

  5. Morphological and biochemical studies of canine progressive rod-cone degeneration. /sup 3/H-fucose autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, G.; O'Brien, P.

    1986-05-01

    Visual cell pathology and rod outer segment renewal were investigated in normal and PRCD-affected miniature poodles using /sup 3/H-fucose autoradiography. Twenty-four hours following the intravitreal injection of /sup 3/H-fucose, label accumulated diffusely over cone OS and in a banded pattern at the rod OS base. In normal rods, the band of /sup 3/H-label was displaced sclerad with time. PRCD-affected rods in the early stages of the disease (stages 0-1) also showed a similar /sup 3/H-label pattern but a significantly (P less than 0.001) reduced renewal rate (control = 2.35 +/- 0.43 mu/24 hr; affected = 0.99 +/- mu/24 hr). This abnormal renewal rate was present in central, equatorial, and peripheral visual cells and was not associated with the presence or density of pigment in the RPE cell layer. Biochemical studies indicated that the /sup 3/H-label was present as an integral membrane component in the rod OS and confirmed that canine rhodopsin is a fucosylated glycoprotein. The /sup 3/H-band in the rod OS layer disappeared in stage 2 of the disease; diffuse label now was present over rod OS that had decreased length and were reduced in number. At this stage of the disease, interphotoreceptor space was invaded by phagocytic cells, and photoreceptor nuclei were lost from the outer nuclear layer. These late degenerative changes were more extensive in the superior and inferior retinal meridians.

  6. Nanoantenna-controlled radiation pattern of the third-harmonic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiehm, Torsten; Kern, Johannes; Jürgensen, Marius; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Steffen; Bratschitsch, Rudolf

    2016-05-01

    We present the third-harmonic emission pattern of single and multiple gold nanoantennas excited by few-cycle infrared laser pulses. The angular distribution of the nonlinear emission is measured by back focal plane imaging with a high-numerical-aperture objective lens. The third-harmonic emission of a single-rod antenna has a dipole-like radiation pattern modified at the air-glass interface. Simultaneous excitation of multiple antennas under the same laser focus results in interferences of the far-field third-harmonic radiation, which can be well explained using a dipole model.

  7. Adaptive myoelectric pattern recognition toward improved multifunctional prosthesis control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie

    2015-04-01

    The non-stationary property of electromyography (EMG) signals in real life settings usually hinders the clinical application of the myoelectric pattern recognition for prosthesis control. The classical EMG pattern recognition approach consists of two separate steps: training and testing, without considering the changes between training and testing data induced by electrode shift, fatigue, impedance changes and psychological factors, and often results in performance degradation. The aim of this study was to develop an adaptive myoelectric pattern recognition system, aiming to retrain the classifier online with the testing data without supervision, providing a self-correction mechanism for suppressing misclassifications. This paper presents an adaptive unsupervised classifier based on support vector machine (SVM) to improve the classification performance. Experimental data from 15 healthy subjects were used to evaluate performance. Preliminary study on intra-session and inter-session EMG data was conducted to verify the performance of the unsupervised adaptive SVM classifier. The unsupervised adaptive SVM classifier outperformed the conventional SVM by 3.3% and 8.0% for the combination of time-domain and autoregressive features in the intra-session and inter-session tests, respectively. The proposed approach is capable of incorporating the useful information in testing data to the classification model by taking into account the overtime changes in the testing data with respect to the training data to retrain the original classifier, therefore providing a self-correction mechanism for suppressing misclassifications. PMID:25749182

  8. Electric field controlled columnar and planar patterning of cholesteric colloids.

    PubMed

    D'Adamo, G; Marenduzzo, D; Micheletti, C; Orlandini, E

    2015-05-01

    We study how dispersions of colloidal particles in a cholesteric liquid crystal behave under a time-dependent electric field. By controlling the amplitude and shape of the applied field wave, we show that the system can be reproducibly driven out of equilibrium through different kinetic pathways and navigated through a glassylike free energy landscape encompassing many competing metastable equilibria. Such states range from simple Saturn rings to complex structures featuring amorphous defect networks, or stacks of disclination loops. A nonequilibrium electric field can also trigger the alignment of particles into columnar arrays, through defect-mediated force impulses, or their repositioning within a plane. Our results are promising in terms of providing new avenues towards controlled patterning and self-assembly of soft colloid-liquid crystal composite materials. PMID:25978263

  9. Model of visual contrast gain control and pattern masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, A. B.; Solomon, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    We have implemented a model of contrast gain and control in human vision that incorporates a number of key features, including a contrast sensitivity function, multiple oriented bandpass channels, accelerating nonlinearities, and a devisive inhibitory gain control pool. The parameters of this model have been optimized through a fit to the recent data that describe masking of a Gabor function by cosine and Gabor masks [J. M. Foley, "Human luminance pattern mechanisms: masking experiments require a new model," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 1710 (1994)]. The model achieves a good fit to the data. We also demonstrate how the concept of recruitment may accommodate a variant of this model in which excitatory and inhibitory paths have a common accelerating nonlinearity, but which include multiple channels tuned to different levels of contrast.

  10. Spatial Periodic Forcing Can Displace Patterns It Is Intended to Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, Yair; Hagberg, Aric; Meron, Ehud

    2012-07-01

    Spatial periodic forcing of pattern-forming systems is an important, but lightly studied, method of controlling patterns. It can be used to control the amplitude and wave number of one-dimensional periodic patterns, to stabilize unstable patterns, and to induce them below instability onset. We show that, although in one spatial dimension the forcing acts to reinforce the patterns, in two dimensions it acts to destabilize or displace them by inducing two-dimensional rectangular and oblique patterns.

  11. Pull rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1988-04-21

    A pull rod assembly comprising a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring, said piston device being mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  12. E-beam-patterned hydrogels to control nanoscale surface bioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krsko, P.; Saaem, I.; Clancy, R.; Geller, H.; Soteropoulos, P.; Libera, M.

    2005-11-01

    We are interested in controlling the spatial distribution of proteins on surfaces at cellular and subcellular length scales. To do this, we use a variation of e-beam lithography in a field-emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) to radiation crosslink thin films of water- soluble polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] and poly (carboxylic acids). We can simultaneously pattern the resulting hydrogels on silicon or glass surfaces with nanoscale and microscale feature sizes. Using hydroxy-terminated PEG 6800 we create gels with swell ratios between unity and fifteen depending on the degree of radiation crosslinking, and the swelling properties can be interpreted in terms of the Flory-Rehner formulation modified for one-dimensional swelling. While lightly-crosslinked PEG gels resist protein adsorption and cell adhesion as expected, highly crosslinked PEG gels adsorb such proteins as fibronectin and laminin and consequently become adhesive to fibroblasts, macrophages, and neurons. By spatially modulating the degree of crosslinking, we can localize these cells on surfaces and, for example, direct neurite outgrowth. If instead of using hydroxy-terminated PEG we use amine- terminated PEG, we introduce the additional flexibility of creating high-swelling PEG gels that resist nonspecific protein adsorption but to which specific proteins can be covalently bound. These can be surface patterned at submicron spacings, and we can pattern 7500 nanohydrogels in a 100 micron diameter arrays in 10 seconds. This is an areal density ~104 times greater than a modern DNA/protein chip, and the required bioreagents for chip fabrication and processing are proportionately less. We can bind fibronectin and laminin to different arrays, and we show that these proteins maintain their biospecificity after binding to the nanohydrogels with high fidelity. Looking to applications in next-generation protein-chip technology, our most recent experiments compare the performance of nanohydrogel

  13. Control of the saturation temperature in magnetic heating by using polyethylene-glycol-coated rod-shaped nickel-ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Yousaf; Bae, Hongsub; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook

    2016-02-01

    Polyethylene-glycol (PEG)-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles were prepared for magnetic hyperthermia applications by using the co-precipitation method. The PEG coating occurred during the synthesis of the nanoparticles. The coated nanoparticles were rod-shaped with an average length of 16 nm and an average diameter of 4.5 nm, as observed using transmission electron microscopy. The PEG coating on the surfaces of the nanoparticles was confirmed from the Fourier-transform infrared spectra. The nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic characteristics with negligible coercive force. Further, magnetic heating effects were observed in aqueous solutions of the coated nanoparticles. The saturation temperature could be controlled at 42 ℃ by changing the concentration of the nanoparticles in the aqueous solution. Alternately, the saturation temperature could be controlled for a given concentration of nanoparticles by changing the intensity of the magnetic field. The Curie temperature of the nanoparticles was estimated to be 495 ℃. These results for the PEG-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles showed the possibility of utilizing them for controlled magnetic hyperthermia at 42 ℃.

  14. FUEL ROD CLUSTERS

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, A.B.

    1959-08-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods and a tubular casing therefor through which a coolant flows in heat-exchange contact with the fuel rods is described. The fuel rcds are held in the casing by virtue of the compressive force exerted between longitudinal ribs of the fuel rcds and internal ribs of the casing or the internal surfaces thereof.

  15. Rod Photoreceptors Detect Rapid Flicker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, J. D.; MacLeod, Donald I. A.

    1977-01-01

    Rod-isolation techniques show that light-adapted human rods detect flicker frequencies as high as 28 hertz, and that the function relating rod critical flicker frequency to stimulus intensity contains two distinct branches. (MLH)

  16. Precuring implant photoresists for shrink and patterning control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winroth, Gustaf; Rosseel, Erik; Delvaux, Christie; Altamirano Sanchez, Efrain; Ercken, Monique

    2013-03-01

    Polymeric photoresists are readily being used as the stopping layer for ions during implantation processes in manufacturing of integrated circuitry. In order to be compatible for standard optical lithography with deep ultraviolet exposures, the state-of-the-art resists are chemically amplified; as they are for photoresists for etch patterning. Partially deprotected, including patterned, photoresists contain a range of small molecular weight species that are prone to escape the resist if the resist was to be irradiated by additional UV-light, electron beams or ion bombardment. For implant processes in device integration this is becoming progressively the most topical issue for aggressive nodes, where 193 nm compatible resists are progressively turning out to be the new platform for implant lithography. These will shrink significantly during the ion implantation and subsequently produce undesired doping gradients on a length scale comparable to the target feature width. In addition, conventional UV-flood exposure that is common for 248 nm resist platforms is not directly transferrable to 193 nm resists. In this paper, we explore the precuring options available for state-of-the-art implant photoresists for 193 nm lithography, in which we target to reduce the shrinkage during implantation for trench critical dimensions that are relevant for nodes below 20 nm. We present an extensive study comprising of different approaches, including laser-, ion- and electronbased treatments. Each treatment is individually investigated with the aim not only to find a valid pretreatment for shrinkage control during implantation, but also to fundamentally understand what effect alternative pretreatments have on the profile and dimensions of thick photoresists used as implant stopping layers. We find that there are viable options for further process optimization in order to integrate them into device process flows. To this extent, we show the shrink behavior after pretreatment and compare

  17. Altered motor control patterns in whiplash and chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Woodhouse, Astrid; Vasseljen, Ottar

    2008-01-01

    Background Persistent whiplash associated disorders (WAD) have been associated with alterations in kinesthetic sense and motor control. The evidence is however inconclusive, particularly for differences between WAD patients and patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain. The aim of this study was to investigate motor control deficits in WAD compared to chronic non-traumatic neck pain and healthy controls in relation to cervical range of motion (ROM), conjunct motion, joint position error and ROM-variability. Methods Participants (n = 173) were recruited to three groups: 59 patients with persistent WAD, 57 patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain and 57 asymptomatic volunteers. A 3D motion tracking system (Fastrak) was used to record maximal range of motion in the three cardinal planes of the cervical spine (sagittal, frontal and horizontal), and concurrent motion in the two associated cardinal planes relative to each primary plane were used to express conjunct motion. Joint position error was registered as the difference in head positions before and after cervical rotations. Results Reduced conjunct motion was found for WAD and chronic neck pain patients compared to asymptomatic subjects. This was most evident during cervical rotation. Reduced conjunct motion was not explained by current pain or by range of motion in the primary plane. Total conjunct motion during primary rotation was 13.9° (95% CI; 12.2–15.6) for the WAD group, 17.9° (95% CI; 16.1–19.6) for the chronic neck pain group and 25.9° (95% CI; 23.7–28.1) for the asymptomatic group. As expected, maximal cervical range of motion was significantly reduced among the WAD patients compared to both control groups. No group differences were found in maximal ROM-variability or joint position error. Conclusion Altered movement patterns in the cervical spine were found for both pain groups, indicating changes in motor control strategies. The changes were not related to a history of neck trauma, nor

  18. Epigenomic landscapes of retinal rods and cones

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Alisa; Luo, Chongyuan; Davis, Fred P; Mukamel, Eran A; Henry, Gilbert L; Nery, Joseph R; Urich, Mark A; Picard, Serge; Lister, Ryan; Eddy, Sean R; Beer, Michael A; Ecker, Joseph R; Nathans, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptors are highly similar in many respects but they have important functional and molecular differences. Here, we investigate genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation and chromatin accessibility in mouse rods and cones and correlate differences in these features with gene expression, histone marks, transcription factor binding, and DNA sequence motifs. Loss of NR2E3 in rods shifts their epigenomes to a more cone-like state. The data further reveal wide differences in DNA methylation between retinal photoreceptors and brain neurons. Surprisingly, we also find a substantial fraction of DNA hypo-methylated regions in adult rods that are not in active chromatin. Many of these regions exhibit hallmarks of regulatory regions that were active earlier in neuronal development, suggesting that these regions could remain undermethylated due to the highly compact chromatin in mature rods. This work defines the epigenomic landscapes of rods and cones, revealing features relevant to photoreceptor development and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11613.001 PMID:26949250

  19. Six1 controls patterning of the mouse otic vesicle.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hidenori; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Funahashi, Jun-ichi; Ikeda, Keiko; Yamada, Gen; Tokano, Hisashi; Okamura, Hiro-oki; Kitamura, Ken; Muto, Shigeaki; Kotaki, Hayato; Sudo, Katsuko; Horai, Reiko; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2004-02-01

    Six1 is a member of the Six family homeobox genes, which function as components of the Pax-Six-Eya-Dach gene network to control organ development. Six1 is expressed in otic vesicles, nasal epithelia, branchial arches/pouches, nephrogenic cords, somites and a limited set of ganglia. In this study, we established Six1-deficient mice and found that development of the inner ear, nose, thymus, kidney and skeletal muscle was severely affected. Six1-deficient embryos were devoid of inner ear structures, including cochlea and vestibule, while their endolymphatic sac was enlarged. The inner ear anomaly began at around E10.5 and Six1 was expressed in the ventral region of the otic vesicle in the wild-type embryos at this stage. In the otic vesicle of Six1-deficient embryos, expressions of Otx1, Otx2, Lfng and Fgf3, which were expressed ventrally in the wild-type otic vesicles, were abolished, while the expression domains of Dlx5, Hmx3, Dach1 and Dach2, which were expressed dorsally in the wild-type otic vesicles, expanded ventrally. Our results indicate that Six1 functions as a key regulator of otic vesicle patterning at early embryogenesis and controls the expression domains of downstream otic genes responsible for respective inner ear structures. In addition, cell proliferation was reduced and apoptotic cell death was enhanced in the ventral region of the otic vesicle, suggesting the involvement of Six1 in cell proliferation and survival. In spite of the similarity of otic phenotypes of Six1- and Shh-deficient mice, expressions of Six1 and Shh were mutually independent. PMID:14695375

  20. Characterization of Visual Scanning Patterns in Air Traffic Control

    PubMed Central

    McClung, Sarah N.; Kang, Ziho

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of air traffic controllers' (ATCs') visual scanning strategies is a challenging issue due to the dynamic movement of multiple aircraft and increasing complexity of scanpaths (order of eye fixations and saccades) over time. Additionally, terminologies and methods are lacking to accurately characterize the eye tracking data into simplified visual scanning strategies linguistically expressed by ATCs. As an intermediate step to automate the characterization classification process, we (1) defined and developed new concepts to systematically filter complex visual scanpaths into simpler and more manageable forms and (2) developed procedures to map visual scanpaths with linguistic inputs to reduce the human judgement bias during interrater agreement. The developed concepts and procedures were applied to investigating the visual scanpaths of expert ATCs using scenarios with different aircraft congestion levels. Furthermore, oculomotor trends were analyzed to identify the influence of aircraft congestion on scan time and number of comparisons among aircraft. The findings show that (1) the scanpaths filtered at the highest intensity led to more consistent mapping with the ATCs' linguistic inputs, (2) the pattern classification occurrences differed between scenarios, and (3) increasing aircraft congestion caused increased scan times and aircraft pairwise comparisons. The results provide a foundation for better characterizing complex scanpaths in a dynamic task and automating the analysis process. PMID:27239190

  1. Characterization of Visual Scanning Patterns in Air Traffic Control.

    PubMed

    McClung, Sarah N; Kang, Ziho

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of air traffic controllers' (ATCs') visual scanning strategies is a challenging issue due to the dynamic movement of multiple aircraft and increasing complexity of scanpaths (order of eye fixations and saccades) over time. Additionally, terminologies and methods are lacking to accurately characterize the eye tracking data into simplified visual scanning strategies linguistically expressed by ATCs. As an intermediate step to automate the characterization classification process, we (1) defined and developed new concepts to systematically filter complex visual scanpaths into simpler and more manageable forms and (2) developed procedures to map visual scanpaths with linguistic inputs to reduce the human judgement bias during interrater agreement. The developed concepts and procedures were applied to investigating the visual scanpaths of expert ATCs using scenarios with different aircraft congestion levels. Furthermore, oculomotor trends were analyzed to identify the influence of aircraft congestion on scan time and number of comparisons among aircraft. The findings show that (1) the scanpaths filtered at the highest intensity led to more consistent mapping with the ATCs' linguistic inputs, (2) the pattern classification occurrences differed between scenarios, and (3) increasing aircraft congestion caused increased scan times and aircraft pairwise comparisons. The results provide a foundation for better characterizing complex scanpaths in a dynamic task and automating the analysis process. PMID:27239190

  2. Ultrasonic Phased Array Assessment of the Interference Fit and Leak Path of the North Anna Unit 2 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzle 63 with Destructive Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Hanson, Brady D.; Mathews, Royce

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasonic testing (UT) for primary water leak path assessments of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) upper head penetrations. Operating reactors have experienced leakage when stress corrosion cracking of nickel-based alloy penetrations allowed primary water into the annulus of the interference fit between the penetration and the low-alloy steel RPV head. In this investigation, UT leak path data were acquired for an Alloy 600 control rod drive mechanism nozzle penetration, referred to as Nozzle 63, which was removed from the North Anna Unit 2 reactor when the RPV head was replaced in 2002. In-service inspection prior to the head replacement indicated that Nozzle 63 had a probable leakage path through the interference fit region. Nozzle 63 was examined using a phased-array UT probe with a 5.0-MHz, eight-element annular array. Immersion data were acquired from the nozzle inner diameter surface. The UT data were interpreted by comparing to responses measured on a mockup penetration with known features. Following acquisition of the UT data, Nozzle 63 was destructively examined to determine if the features identified in the UT examination, including leakage paths and crystalline boric acid deposits, could be visually confirmed. Additional measurements of boric acid deposit thickness and low-alloy steel wastage were made to assess how these factors affect the UT response. The implications of these findings for interpreting UT leak path data are described.

  3. Differential Phosphorylation Provides a Switch to Control How α-Arrestin Rod1 Down-regulates Mating Pheromone Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Alvaro, Christopher G; Aindow, Ann; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are integral membrane proteins that initiate stimulus-dependent activation of cognate heterotrimeric G-proteins, triggering ensuing downstream cellular responses. Tight regulation of GPCR-evoked pathways is required because prolonged stimulation can be detrimental to an organism. Ste2, a GPCR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that mediates response of MATa haploids to the peptide mating pheromone α-factor, is down-regulated by both constitutive and agonist-induced endocytosis. Efficient agonist-stimulated internalization of Ste2 requires its association with an adaptor protein, the α-arrestin Rod1/Art4, which recruits the HECT-domain ubiquitin ligase Rsp5, allowing for ubiquitinylation of the C-terminal tail of the receptor and its engagement by the clathrin-dependent endocytic machinery. We previously showed that dephosphorylation of Rod1 by calcineurin (phosphoprotein phosphatase 2B) is required for optimal Rod1 function in Ste2 down-regulation. We show here that negative regulation of Rod1 by phosphorylation is mediated by two distinct stress-activated protein kinases, Snf1/AMPK and Ypk1/SGK1, and demonstrate both in vitro and in vivo that this phospho-regulation impedes the ability of Rod1 to promote mating pathway desensitization. These studies also revealed that, in the absence of its phosphorylation, Rod1 can promote adaptation independently of Rsp5-mediated receptor ubiquitinylation, consistent with recent evidence that α-arrestins can contribute to cargo recognition by both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent mechanisms. However, in cells lacking a component (formin Bni1) required for clathrin-independent entry, Rod1 derivatives that are largely unphosphorylated and unable to associate with Rsp5 still promote efficient adaptation, indicating a third mechanism by which this α-arrestin promotes desensitization of the pheromone-response pathway. PMID:26920760

  4. Differential Phosphorylation Provides a Switch to Control How α-Arrestin Rod1 Down-regulates Mating Pheromone Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, Christopher G.; Aindow, Ann; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are integral membrane proteins that initiate stimulus-dependent activation of cognate heterotrimeric G-proteins, triggering ensuing downstream cellular responses. Tight regulation of GPCR-evoked pathways is required because prolonged stimulation can be detrimental to an organism. Ste2, a GPCR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that mediates response of MATa haploids to the peptide mating pheromone α-factor, is down-regulated by both constitutive and agonist-induced endocytosis. Efficient agonist-stimulated internalization of Ste2 requires its association with an adaptor protein, the α-arrestin Rod1/Art4, which recruits the HECT-domain ubiquitin ligase Rsp5, allowing for ubiquitinylation of the C-terminal tail of the receptor and its engagement by the clathrin-dependent endocytic machinery. We previously showed that dephosphorylation of Rod1 by calcineurin (phosphoprotein phosphatase 2B) is required for optimal Rod1 function in Ste2 down-regulation. We show here that negative regulation of Rod1 by phosphorylation is mediated by two distinct stress-activated protein kinases, Snf1/AMPK and Ypk1/SGK1, and demonstrate both in vitro and in vivo that this phospho-regulation impedes the ability of Rod1 to promote mating pathway desensitization. These studies also revealed that, in the absence of its phosphorylation, Rod1 can promote adaptation independently of Rsp5-mediated receptor ubiquitinylation, consistent with recent evidence that α-arrestins can contribute to cargo recognition by both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent mechanisms. However, in cells lacking a component (formin Bni1) required for clathrin-independent entry, Rod1 derivatives that are largely unphosphorylated and unable to associate with Rsp5 still promote efficient adaptation, indicating a third mechanism by which this α-arrestin promotes desensitization of the pheromone-response pathway. PMID:26920760

  5. Patterns and controls on nitrogen cycling of biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barger, Nichole N.; Zaady, Eli; Weber, Bettina; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Belnap, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Biocrusts play a significant role in the nitrogen [N ] cycle within arid and semi-arid ecosystems, as they contribute major N inputs via biological fixation and dust capture, harbor internal N transformation processes, and direct N losses via N dissolved, gaseous and erosional loss processes (Fig. 1). Because soil N availability in arid and semi-arid ecosystems is generally low and may limit net primary production (NPP), especially during periods when adequate water is available, understanding the mechanisms and controls of N input and loss pathways in biocrusts is critically important to our broader understanding of N cycling in dryland environments. In particular, N cycling by biocrusts likely regulates short-term soil N availability to support vascular plant growth, as well as long-term N accumulation and maintenance of soil fertility. In this chapter, we review the influence of biocrust nutrient input, internal cycling, and loss pathways across a range of biomes. We examine linkages between N fixation capabilities of biocrust organisms and spatio-temporal patterns of soil N availability that may influence the longer-term productivity of dryland ecosystems. Lastly, biocrust influence on N loss pathways such as N gas loss, leakage of N compounds from biocrusts, and transfer in wind and water erosion are important to understand the maintenance of dryland soil fertility over longer time scales. Although great strides have been made in understanding the influence of biocrusts on ecosystem N cycling, there are important knowledge gaps in our understanding of the influence of biocrusts on ecosystem N cycling that should be the focus of future studies. Because work on the interaction of N cycling and biocrusts was reviewed in Belnap and Lange (2003), this chapter will focus primarily on research findings that have emerged over the last 15 years (2000-2015).

  6. Understanding flame rods

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, J.A. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The flame rod is probably the least understood method of flame detection. Although it is not recommended for oilfired equipment, it is very common on atmospheric, or {open_quotes}in-shot,{close_quotes} gas burners. It is also possible, although not common, to have an application with a constant gas pilot, monitored by a flame rod, and maintaining an oil main flame. Regardless of the application, chances are that flame rods will be encountered during the course of servicing. The technician today must be versatile and able to work on many different types of equipment. One must understand the basic principles of flame rods, and how to correct potential problems. The purpose of a flame detection system is two-fold: (1) to prove there is no flame when there shouldn`t be one, and (2) to prove there is a flame when there should be one. Flame failure response time is very important. This is the amount of time it takes to realize there is a loss of flame, two to four seconds is typical today. Prior to flame rods, either bi-metal or thermocouple type flame detectors were common. The response time for these detectors was up to three minutes, seldom less than one minute.

  7. Fragmentation of an axially impacted slender rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, W.; Waas, A. M.

    2010-02-01

    Motivated by experimental results on the dynamic buckling and fragmentation of a vertical column impacted by a falling mass, results from an analytical model for dynamic buckling which considers the dynamic interaction between the axial column deformation and the out-of-plane buckling displacements are used to interpret the fragmentation process and the resulting fragment lengths. It is shown that a critical time exists for the rod to undergo fragmentation. At this critical time, the rod deforms in a modulated pattern of waves, setting up the stage for the ensuing fragmentation as a result of induced large curvatures that exceed the critical bending strain of the rod material. The resulting fragment length distributions, which show two characteristics peaks at \\frac{\\lambda}{2} and \\frac{\\lambda}{4} , where λ is a characteristic half-wavelength, are found to compare favorably with the experimental results.

  8. Intramedullary rodding in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Mulpuri, K; Joseph, B

    2000-01-01

    The results of intramedullary rodding of long bones of 16 children with osteogenesis imperfecta, over a 10-year period, were analyzed. Sheffield elongating rods or non-elongating rods were used. The frequency of fractures was dramatically reduced after implantation of either type of rod, and the ambulatory status improved in all instances. The results were significantly better after Sheffield rodding with regard to the frequency of complications requiring reoperations and the longevity of the rods. Migration of the rods, encountered frequently, appears to be related to improper placement of the rods in the bone. It seems likely that if care is taken to ensure precise placement of a rod of appropriate size, several of these complications may be avoided. PMID:10739296

  9. Rod Control Assemblies Wear Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczorowski, Damien; Georges, Jean-Mary; Bec, Sandrine; Vannes, Andre-Bernard; Tonck, Andre; Vernot, Jean-Philippe

    2002-07-01

    In nuclear power plants, slender tubular components are subjected to vibrations in a PHTW environment. As a result, the two contacting surfaces, tubes and their guides undergo impact at low contact pressures. The components are usually made of stainless steel and it was found that the influence of the PHTW, combined with other actions (such as corrosion, erosion, squeeze film effect, third body effect and cavitation) leads to a particular wear of the material. Therefore, this paper aims to show that the colloidal oxides, formed on the steel surfaces in PHTW, play a principal role in the wear of the surfaces. Actually, due to the specific kinematic conditions of the contact, the flow of compacted oxides abrades the surfaces. (authors)

  10. Abiotic and biotic controls of spatial pattern at alpine treeline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malanson, George P.; Xiao, Ningchuan; Alftine, K.J.; Bekker, Mathew; Butler, David R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Cairns, David M.; Fagre, Daniel; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    At alpine treeline, trees and krummholz forms affect the environment in ways that increase their growth and reproduction. We assess the way in which these positive feedbacks combine in spatial patterns to alter the environment in the neighborhood of existing plants. The research is significant because areas of alpine tundra are susceptible to encroachment by woody species as climate changes. Moreover, understanding the general processes of plant invasion is important. The importance of spatial pattern has been recognized, but the spatial pattern of positive feedbacks per se has not been explored in depth. We present a linked set of models of vegetation change at an alpine forest-tundra ecotone. Our aim is to create models that are as simple as possible in order to test specific hypotheses. We present results from a model of the resource averaging hypothesis and the positive feedback switch hypothesis of treelines. We compare the patterns generated by the models to patterns observed in fine scale remotely sensed data.

  11. Control of Oscillation Patterns in a Symmetric Coupled Biological Oscillator System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Tanaka, Reiko; Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2003-08-01

    A chain of three-oscillator system was constructed with living biological oscillators of phasmodial slime mold, Physarum polycehalum and the oscillation patterns were analyzed by the symmetric Hopf bifurcation theory using group theory. Multi-stability of oscillation patterns was observed, even when the coupling strength was fixed. This suggests that the coupling strength is not an effective parameter to obtain a desired oscillation pattern among the multiple patterns. Here we propose a method to control oscillation patterns using resonance to external stimulus and demonstrate pattern switching induced by frequency resonance given to only one of oscillators in the system.

  12. Soil respiration patterns and controls in limestone cedar glades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Hui, Dafeng

    2015-01-01

    Soil depth, SOM, and vegetation cover were important drivers of Rs in limestone cedar glades. Seasonal Rs patterns reflected those for mesic temperate grasslands more than for semi-arid ecosystems, in that Rs primarily tracked temperature for most of the year.

  13. Patient training for functional use of pattern recognition–controlled prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ann M.; Lock, Blair A.; Stubblefield, Kathy A.

    2012-01-01

    Pattern recognition control systems have the potential to provide better, more reliable myoelectric prosthesis control for individuals with an upper-limb amputation. However, proper patient training is essential. We begin user training by teaching the concepts of pattern recognition control and progress to teaching how to control, use, and maintain prostheses with one or many degrees of freedom. Here we describe the training stages, with relevant case studies, and highlight several tools that can be used throughout the training process, including prosthesis-guided training (PGT)—a self-initiated, simple method of recalibrating a pattern recognition–controlled prosthesis. PGT may lengthen functional use times, potentially increasing prosthesis wear time. Using this training approach, we anticipate advancing pattern recognition control from the laboratory to the home environment and finally realizing the full potential of these control systems. PMID:22563231

  14. Global feedback control of Turing patterns in network-organized activator-inhibitor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, S.; Nakao, H.; Mikhailov, A. S.

    2012-06-01

    Results of the first systematic study on feedback control of nonequilibrium pattern formation in networks are reported. Effects of global feedback control on Turing patterns in network-organized activator-inhibitor system have been investigated. The feedback signal was introduced into one of the parameters of the system and was proportional to the amplitude of the developing Turing pattern. Without the control, the Turing instability corresponded to a subcritical bifurcation and hysteresis effects were observed. Sufficiently strong feedback control rendered, however, the bifurcation supercritical and eliminated the hysteresis effects.

  15. Anchor for Fiberglas Guy Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Solution to problem of anchoring fiberglas guy rods to install nut with threads on outer circumference, followed by aluminum sleeve. Sleeve has opening oval at upper and round at bottom end. End of rod is split so fiberglas wedge can be inserted to form V-shaped end. Spread end of rod fits into tapered hole in sleeve and threaded aluminum coupling is put over rod and sleeve.

  16. Environmental Controllability and Social Attributions: Codeterminants of Unassertive Communication Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugental, Daphne B.; And Others

    Sixty undergraduate women interacted in dyads with female experimental confederates in a study of the interactive effects of social attributions and environmental controllability on interpersonal assertion. The environment was systematically varied on two dimensions of social power or control: (1) social responsiveness of the confederate, and (2)…

  17. Biomechanical study comparing a new combined rod-plate system with conventional dual-rod and plate systems.

    PubMed

    Sha, Mo; Ding, Zheng-Qi; Ting, Hu S; Kang, Liang-Qi; Zhai, Wen-Liang; Liu, Hui

    2013-02-01

    Most anterior spinal instrumentation systems are designed as either a plate or dual-rod system and have corresponding limitations. Dual-rod designs may offer greater adjustability; however, this system also maintains a high profile and lacks a locking design. Plate systems are designed to be stiffer, but the fixed configuration is not adaptable to the variety of vertebral body shapes. The authors designed a new combined rod-plate system (D-rod) to overcome these limitations and compared its biomechanical performance with the conventional dual-rod and plate system. Eighteen pig spinal specimens were divided into 3 groups (6 per group). An L1 corpectomy was performed and fixed with the D-rod (group A; n=6), Z-plate (Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee) (group B; n=6), or Ventrofix (Synthes, Paoli, Pennsylvania) (group C; n=6) system. T13-L2 range of motion was measured with a 6 degrees of freedom (ie, flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation) spine simulator under pure moments of 6.0 Nm. The D-rod and Ventrofix specimens were significantly stiffer than the Z-plate specimens (P<.05) based on results obtained from lateral bending and flexion-extension tests. The D-rod and Z-plate specimens were significantly stiffer than the Ventrofix specimens (P<.05) in axial rotation. The D-rod combines the advantages of the plate and dual-rod systems, where the anterior rod exhibits the design of a low-profile locking plate, enhanced stability, and decreased interference of the surrounding vasculature. The posterior rods function in compression and distraction, and the dual-rod system offers greater adjustability and control over screw placement. The results indicate that it may provide adequate stability for anterior thoracolumbar reconstruction. PMID:23383624

  18. Formation and control of Turing patterns in a coherent quantum fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ardizzone, Vincenzo; Lewandowski, Przemyslaw; Luk, M. H.; Tse, Y. C.; Kwong, N. H.; Lücke, Andreas; Abbarchi, Marco; Baudin, Emmanuel; Galopin, Elisabeth; Bloch, Jacqueline; Lemaitre, Aristide; Leung, P. T.; Roussignol, Philippe; Binder, Rolf; Tignon, Jerome; Schumacher, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Nonequilibrium patterns in open systems are ubiquitous in nature, with examples as diverse as desert sand dunes, animal coat patterns such as zebra stripes, or geographic patterns in parasitic insect populations. A theoretical foundation that explains the basic features of a large class of patterns was given by Turing in the context of chemical reactions and the biological process of morphogenesis. Analogs of Turing patterns have also been studied in optical systems where diffusion of matter is replaced by diffraction of light. The unique features of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities allow us to go one step further and to study Turing patterns in an interacting coherent quantum fluid. We demonstrate formation and control of these patterns. We also demonstrate the promise of these quantum Turing patterns for applications, such as low-intensity ultra-fast all-optical switches. PMID:24145394

  19. Formation and control of Turing patterns in a coherent quantum fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardizzone, Vincenzo; Lewandowski, Przemyslaw; Luk, M. H.; Tse, Y. C.; Kwong, N. H.; Lücke, Andreas; Abbarchi, Marco; Baudin, Emmanuel; Galopin, Elisabeth; Bloch, Jacqueline; Lemaitre, Aristide; Leung, P. T.; Roussignol, Philippe; Binder, Rolf; Tignon, Jerome; Schumacher, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Nonequilibrium patterns in open systems are ubiquitous in nature, with examples as diverse as desert sand dunes, animal coat patterns such as zebra stripes, or geographic patterns in parasitic insect populations. A theoretical foundation that explains the basic features of a large class of patterns was given by Turing in the context of chemical reactions and the biological process of morphogenesis. Analogs of Turing patterns have also been studied in optical systems where diffusion of matter is replaced by diffraction of light. The unique features of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities allow us to go one step further and to study Turing patterns in an interacting coherent quantum fluid. We demonstrate formation and control of these patterns. We also demonstrate the promise of these quantum Turing patterns for applications, such as low-intensity ultra-fast all-optical switches.

  20. Analysis of the in-vessel control rod guide tube and subpile room shielding design for the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Bucholz, J.A.; Engle, W.W. Jr.; Williams, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    An extensive sheilding analysis of the control rod guide tube (CRGT) and the subpile room was performed for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. A two-dimensional model for the CRGT and subpile room was developed. Coupled 39 neutron group and 44 gamma group calculations with the multigroup DORT discrete originates transport code were done using cross sections from the ANSL-V library including photoneutron production. Different shield designs were investigated with a shield thickness of 10 to 15 mm. None of the shields affected the neutron dose rate and gamma dose rate at the top of the subpile room, which were 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 5} mrem/h and 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 3} mrem/h, respectively. An L-shaped cylindrical boral shield positioned around the core pressure boundary tube at the bottom of the reflector vessel with the horizontal part extended over the whole bottom of the reflector vessel reduced the maximal displacements per atom (DPA) level and helium production level in the primary coolant supply adapter and its flange after 40 years of reactor operation from 1 and 500 appm to 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -2} and 2 {center_dot} 10{sup -2} appm compared with the unshielded arrangement. Shields of boral and hafnium with the horizontal part of the shield restricted to a radius of 485 mm gave a maximal DPA of 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -2} and a helium production of up to 20 appm. Heat loads of up to 70 W{center_dot}cm{sup -3} were calculated at the most exposed parts of the shield both for boral and hafnium shields. A depletion/activation analysis of the hafnium shield showed that at the most exposed part of the shield, the naturally occurring isotope {sup 177}Hf is 34% depleted at the end of two years of reactor operation. This high burnup is somewhat balanced by a subsequent buildup of {sup 178}Hf, {sup 179}Hf, and {sup 180}Hf. In all other parts of the shield, the burnup is much smaller.

  1. Crystal phase-controlled synthesis of rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals for in vivo imaging in the near-infrared wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Tatsuya; Ishigami, Yujiro; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Shimada, Taisuke; Baba, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu; Torimoto, Tsukasa

    2016-03-01

    Rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals (NCs) exhibiting intense near-band edge photoluminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelength region, were successfully prepared by the thermal reaction of metal acetates and Te precursors in 1-dodecanethiol. Increasing the reaction temperature resulted in the formation of larger AgInTe2 NCs with crystal structures varying from hexagonal to tetragonal at reaction temperatures of 280 °C or higher. The energy gap was increased from 1.13 to 1.20 eV with a decrease in rod width from 8.3 to 5.6 nm, accompanied by a blue shift in the photoluminescence (PL) peak wavelength from 1097 to 1033 nm. The optimal PL quantum yield was approximately 18% for AgInTe2 NCs with rod widths of 5.6 nm. The applicability of AgInTe2 NCs as a NIR-emitting material for in vivo biological imaging was examined by injecting AgInTe2 NC-incorporated liposomes into the back of a C57BL/6 mouse, followed by in vivo photoluminescence imaging in the NIR region.Rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals (NCs) exhibiting intense near-band edge photoluminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelength region, were successfully prepared by the thermal reaction of metal acetates and Te precursors in 1-dodecanethiol. Increasing the reaction temperature resulted in the formation of larger AgInTe2 NCs with crystal structures varying from hexagonal to tetragonal at reaction temperatures of 280 °C or higher. The energy gap was increased from 1.13 to 1.20 eV with a decrease in rod width from 8.3 to 5.6 nm, accompanied by a blue shift in the photoluminescence (PL) peak wavelength from 1097 to 1033 nm. The optimal PL quantum yield was approximately 18% for AgInTe2 NCs with rod widths of 5.6 nm. The applicability of AgInTe2 NCs as a NIR-emitting material for in vivo biological imaging was examined by injecting AgInTe2 NC-incorporated liposomes into the back of a C57BL/6 mouse, followed by in vivo photoluminescence imaging in the NIR region. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  2. Plasma microcontact patterning (PμCP): a technique for the precise control of surface patterning at small-scale.

    PubMed

    Picone, Remigio; Baum, Buzz; McKendry, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Plasma microcontact patterning (PμCP) is a simple, efficient, and cost-effective method for the precise patterning of molecules on surfaces. It combines the use of low-pressure plasma with an elastomeric 3D mask to spatially control the removal of molecules, such as proteins, from a surface. The entire PμCP process is subdivided into three main steps: surface precoating, plasma micropatterning, and a surface postcoating step. Surfaces are first precoated with a molecular species and then placed in close contact with the 3D mask. This allows the formation of two distinct regions: an un-masked open-region which is accessible to the plasma, from which the surface layer is removed, and, a contact region which is physically protected from exposure to the plasma. In the final step, a second molecule is added to back-fill the pattern generated through plasma-treatment. The PμCP technique allows the patterning of virtually any organic molecules on different surface materials and geometries (e.g., flat, curved surfaces, and 3D microstructures). Moreover, it is a simple and robust procedure. The main advantages of this approach over traditional microcontact printing are twofold: The stability of molecule binding to plasma-treated surfaces, and the separation of the surface functionalization step from the actual micropatterning step, which enables the precise control of concentration and uniformity of patterned molecules. In conclusion, PμCP is a simple way to generate surface patterns that are highly reproducible, stable and uniform, making it a useful method for many applications. PMID:24439280

  3. Improvement in Jc performance below liquid nitrogen temperature for SmBa2Cu3Oy superconducting films with BaHfO3 nano-rods controlled by low-temperature growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, S.; Yoshida, Y.; Ichino, Y.; Xu, Q.; Matsumoto, K.; Ichinose, A.; Awaji, S.

    2016-01-01

    For use in high-magnetic-field coil-based applications, the critical current density (Jc) of REBa2Cu3Oy (REBCO, where RE = rare earth) coated conductors must be isotropically improved, with respect to the direction of the magnetic field; these improvements must be realized at the operating conditions of these applications. In this study, improvement of the Jc for various applied directions of magnetic field was achieved by controlling the morphology of the BaHfO3 (BHO) nano-rods in a SmBCO film. We fabricated the 3.0 vol. % BHO-doped SmBCO film at a low growth temperature of 720 °C, by using a seed layer technique (Ts = 720 °C film). The low-temperature growth resulted in a morphological change in the BHO nano-rods. In fact, a high number density of (3.1 ± 0.1) × 103 μm-2 of small (diameter: 4 ± 1 nm), discontinuous nano-rods that grew in various directions, was obtained. In Jc measurements, the Jc of the Ts = 720 °C film in all directions of the applied magnetic field was higher than that of the non-doped SmBCO film. The Jcmin (6.4 MA/cm2) of the former was more than 6 times higher than that (1.0 MA/cm2) of the latter at 40 K, under 3 T. The aforementioned results indicated that the discontinuous BHO nano-rods, which occurred with a high number density, exerted a 3D-like flux pinning at the measurement conditions considered. Moreover, at 4.2 K and under 17 T, a flux pinning force density of 1.6 TN/m3 was realized; this value was comparable to the highest value recorded, to date.

  4. Integrated Insect Control May Alter Pesticide Use Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of predators, parasites, bacteria, viruses, hormones, pheromones, and sterile-male release and insect-resistance imparting techniques in pest control. Concludes with comments from chemical pesticide companies as popular attitudes toward the integrated pest management. (CC)

  5. Controllable Airy-like beams induced by tunable phase patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Qian, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and experimentally observe a novel family of Airy-like beams. First, we theoretically investigate the physical generation of our proposed controllable Airy-like beams by introducing a rotation angle factor into the phase function, which can regulate and flexibly control the beam wavefront. Meanwhile we can also readily control the main lobes of these beams to follow appointed parabolic trajectories using the rotation angle factor. We also demonstrate that the controllable Airy-like beams lack the properties of being diffraction-free and self-healing. The experiments are performed and the results are in accord with the theoretical simulations. We believe that the intriguing characteristics of our proposed Airy-like beams could provide more degrees of freedom, and are likely to give rise to new applications and lend versatility to the emerging field.

  6. COUP-TFII controls amygdala patterning by regulating neuropilin expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ke; Rubenstein, John L R; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2012-05-01

    The development of the progenitor zones in the pallium, lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) and medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) in the subpallium has been well studied; however, so far the role of the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), a posterior subpallial domain, in telencephalon patterning remains poorly understood. COUP-TFII, an orphan nuclear receptor, is preferentially expressed in the CGE. We generated COUP-TFII mouse mutants, using Rx-Cre (RxCre;COUP-TFII(F/F)), to study its function in telencephalon development. In these mutants, we found severe defects in the formation of the amygdala complex, including the lateral (LA), basolateral (BLA) and basomedial (BMA) amygdala nuclei. Molecular analysis provided evidence that the migration of CGE-derived Pax6(+) cells failed to settle into the BMA nucleus, owing to reduced expression of neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) and Nrp2, two semaphorin receptors that regulate neuronal cell migration and axon guidance. Our ChIP assays revealed that Nrp1 and Nrp2 genes are the direct targets of COUP-TFII in the telencephalon in vivo. Furthermore, our results showed that the coordinated development between the CGE originated subpallial population (Pax6(+) cells) and pallial populations (Tbr1(+) and Lhx2(+) cells) was essential for patterning the amygdala assembly. Our study presented novel genetic evidence that the caudal ganglionic eminence, a distinct subpallial progenitor zone, contributes cells to the basal telencephalon, such as the BMA nucleus. PMID:22492355

  7. Crystal phase-controlled synthesis of rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals for in vivo imaging in the near-infrared wavelength region.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Tatsuya; Ishigami, Yujiro; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Shimada, Taisuke; Baba, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu; Torimoto, Tsukasa

    2016-03-01

    Rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals (NCs) exhibiting intense near-band edge photoluminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelength region, were successfully prepared by the thermal reaction of metal acetates and Te precursors in 1-dodecanethiol. Increasing the reaction temperature resulted in the formation of larger AgInTe2 NCs with crystal structures varying from hexagonal to tetragonal at reaction temperatures of 280 °C or higher. The energy gap was increased from 1.13 to 1.20 eV with a decrease in rod width from 8.3 to 5.6 nm, accompanied by a blue shift in the photoluminescence (PL) peak wavelength from 1097 to 1033 nm. The optimal PL quantum yield was approximately 18% for AgInTe2 NCs with rod widths of 5.6 nm. The applicability of AgInTe2 NCs as a NIR-emitting material for in vivo biological imaging was examined by injecting AgInTe2 NC-incorporated liposomes into the back of a C57BL/6 mouse, followed by in vivo photoluminescence imaging in the NIR region. PMID:26899620

  8. Locked-wrap fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Samuel; Chertock, Alan J.; Punches, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for spacing fast reactor fuel rods using a wire wrapper improved by orienting the wire-wrapped fuel rods in a unique manner which introduces desirable performance characteristics not attainable by previous wire-wrapped designs. Use of this method in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor results in: (a) improved mechanical performance, (b) improved rod-to-rod contact, (c) reduced steel volume, and (d) improved thermal-hydraulic performance. The method produces a "locked wrap" design which tends to lock the rods together at each of the wire cluster locations.

  9. Dendritic connectivity controls biodiversity patterns in experimental metacommunities

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Francesco; Altermatt, Florian; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Biological communities often occur in spatially structured habitats where connectivity directly affects dispersal and metacommunity processes. Recent theoretical work suggests that dispersal constrained by the connectivity of specific habitat structures, such as dendrites like river networks, can explain observed features of biodiversity, but direct evidence is still lacking. We experimentally show that connectivity per se shapes diversity patterns in microcosm metacommunities at different levels. Local dispersal in isotropic lattice landscapes homogenizes local species richness and leads to pronounced spatial persistence. On the contrary, dispersal along dendritic landscapes leads to higher variability in local diversity and among-community composition. Although headwaters exhibit relatively lower species richness, they are crucial for the maintenance of regional biodiversity. Our results establish that spatially constrained dendritic connectivity is a key factor for community composition and population persistence. PMID:22460788

  10. Shape and feature size control of colloidal crystal-based patterns using stretched polydimethylsiloxane replica molds.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hong Kyoon; Im, Sang Hyuk; Park, O Ok

    2009-10-20

    In this work, we fabricated various patterns using colloidal crystals as master molds via the soft lithography method. Even though colloidal crystals consist of spherical colloidal particles, nonspherical shaped patterns such as rectangular or elongated hexagonal shaped patterns can be fabricated using a stretched polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replica mold. The pattern shape and feature size can be easily controlled by changing the stretching axis and ratio of the PDMS replica mold. The deformations of the PDMS mold were simulated using the finite element method, and they are consistent with experimental results. The elongated patterns were used as templates to offer new types of colloidal crystal superlattice structures. A proposed pattern-control method will significantly expand the usefulness and diversity of micro/nanopatterning technology. PMID:19821618

  11. Groundwater, biogeomorphic succession and controls on river channel pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bätz, N.; Colombini, P.; Cherubini, P.; Lane, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Strong feedbacks between river braiding and vegetation processes are now well-recognised. Recently, this has been illustrated in the notion of biogeomorphic succession, the transition from pioneer vegetation establishment to a fully-developed floodplain forest ecosystem. This succession also results in important vegetation-mediated feedbacks, through bank stabilisation and the capture of organic matter and fine sediments, stimulating soil formation and further enhancing the succession process itself. However, there are few studies that have addressed what this succession might mean for the evolution of channel planform, and almost no studies that have considered how this succession rates might be mediated by groundwater. The latter is a key concern for gravel-bed rivers with low water retention capacity. Here, we present results from a 2 km length of braiding-wandering river system in Switzerland (Allondon River). We show that the spatio-temporal dynamics of the groundwater table drives the biogeomorphic succession process at different rates, leading to very different river channel pattern responses. In the upper braiding-anastomosing part of the reach, the groundwater table is deeper. Here, dendrochronological data show that rates of pioneer vegetation growth are strongly dependent upon groundwater table fluctuations. Bank resistance modelling shows that vegetation-reinforcement of bank resistance is below its maximum. In the meandering lower part of the reach, with a mature floodplain forest, tree growth rates are independent of groundwater fluctuations, because trees can almost always access the higher groundwater table. Bank resistance is at its maximum. Through time, in response to disturbance frequency, the meandering tendency has migrated upstream. Thus, our results suggest that groundwater access modulates biogeomorphic succession processes in ways that determine the resultant river channel pattern.

  12. Spatial patterns and predictors of trophic control in marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Daniel G; Frank, Kenneth T; Worm, Boris; Leggett, William C

    2015-10-01

    A key question in ecology is under which conditions ecosystem structure tends to be controlled by resource availability vs. consumer pressure. Several hypotheses derived from theory, experiments and observational field studies have been advanced, yet a unified explanation remains elusive. Here, we identify common predictors of trophic control in a synthetic analysis of 52 observational field studies conducted within marine ecosystems across the Northern Hemisphere and published between 1951 and 2014. Spatial regression analysis of 45 candidate variables revealed temperature to be the dominant predictor, with unimodal effects on trophic control operating both directly (r(2) = 0.32; P < 0.0001) and indirectly through influences on turnover rate and quality of primary production, biodiversity and omnivory. These findings indicate that temperature is an overarching determinant of the trophic dynamics of marine ecosystems, and that variation in ocean temperature will affect the trophic structure of marine ecosystems through both direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:26252155

  13. APPARATUS FOR SHEATHING RODS

    DOEpatents

    Ford, W.K.; Wyatt, M.; Plail, S.

    1961-08-01

    An arrangement is described for sealing a solid body of nuclear fuel, such as a uranium metal rod, into a closelyfitting thin metallic sheath with an internal atmosphere of inert gas. The sheathing process consists of subjecting the sheath, loaded with the nuclear fuel body, to the sequential operations of evacuation, gas-filling, drawing (to entrap inert gas and secure close contact between sheath and body), and sealing. (AEC)

  14. Robot Control Through Brain Computer Interface For Patterns Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belluomo, P.; Bucolo, M.; Fortuna, L.; Frasca, M.

    2011-09-01

    A Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system processes and translates neuronal signals, that mainly comes from EEG instruments, into commands for controlling electronic devices. This system can allow people with motor disabilities to control external devices through the real-time modulation of their brain waves. In this context an EEG-based BCI system that allows creative luminous artistic representations is here presented. The system that has been designed and realized in our laboratory interfaces the BCI2000 platform performing real-time analysis of EEG signals with a couple of moving luminescent twin robots. Experiments are also presented.

  15. The evaluation of corrosion resistant rod end rolling element bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Braza, J.F.; Giuntoli, K.; Imundo, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    Recent developments on carburizing grades of stainless steels have provided new materials to produce corrosion resistant airframe control bearings. This paper presents the application of one of these new carburizing grades of stainless steel to rod end ball bearings. The outer ring of the rod end bearing is made out of carburized stainless steel, while the inner ring and balls are made out of through-hardened stainless steel. The stainless steel rod end bearings were evaluated according to various ASTM and Military specifications for performance and corrosion resistance. The stainless steel rod end bearings exceeded the performance requirements of standard rod end bearings (which are comprised of a carburized 8620 steel outer ring and 52100 steel inner ring and balls) in accordance with MIL-B-6039. The rod end bearings were evaluated in the radial fracture load, axial fracture load, and radial dynamic load tests. Also, salt spray and alternate immersion corrosion tests (ASTM B 117-85 and G 44-88, respectively) were conducted on the stainless steel rod end bearings. The stainless steel rod end bearings exhibited superior corrosion resistance to the standard 8620/52100 steel rod end bearings.

  16. Superhydrophobic PDMS surfaces with three-dimensional (3D) pattern-dependent controllable adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Jiale; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Dongshi; Du, Guangqing; Bian, Hao; Si, Jinhai; Yun, Feng; Hou, Xun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an effective approach for the three-dimensional (3D) pattern-structured superhydrophobic PDMS surfaces with controllable adhesion by using femtosecond laser etching method. By combining different laser power with a multi-layered etching way, various 3D patterns can be fabricated (for example, convex triangle array, round pit array, cylindrical array, convex rhombus array and concave triangle-cone array). The as-prepared surfaces with 3D patterns show superhydrophobic character and water controllable adhesion that range from ultralow to ultrahigh by designing different 3D patterns, on which the sliding angle can be controlled from 1° to 90° (the water droplet is firmly pinned on the superhydrophobic surface without any movement at any tilted angles). The 3D pattern-dependent adhesive property is attributed to the different contact modes. This work will provide a facile and promising strategy for the adhesion adjustment on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  17. Building beauty: the genetic control of floral patterning

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann, J. U., and Weigel, D.

    2002-02-01

    OAK-B135 Floral organ identity is controlled by combinatorial action of homeotic genes expressed in different territories within the emerging flower. This review discusses recent progress in our understanding of floral homeotic genes, with an emphasis on how their region-specific expression is regulated.

  18. Flexible growing rods: a pilot study to determine if polymer rod constructs may provide stability to skeletally immature spines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical treatments for early onset scoliosis (EOS), including growing rod constructs, involve many complications. Some are due to biomechanical factors. A construct that is more flexible than current instrumentation systems may reduce complications. The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine spine range of motion (ROM) after implantation of simulated growing rod constructs with a range of clinically relevant structural properties. The hypothesis was that ROM of spines instrumented with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods would be greater than metal rods and lower than noninstrumented controls. Further, adjacent segment motion was expected to be lower with polymer rods compared to conventional systems. Methods Biomechanical tests were conducted on 6 skeletally immature porcine thoracic spines (domestic swine, 35-40 kg). Spines were harvested after death from swine that had been utilized for other studies (IACUC approved) which had not involved the spine. Paired pedicle screws were used as anchors at proximal and distal levels. Specimens were tested under the following conditions: control, then dual rods of PEEK (6.25 mm), titanium (4 mm), and CoCr (5 mm) alloy. Lateral bending (LB) and flexion-extension (FE) moments of ±5 Nm were applied. Vertebral rotations were measured using video. Differences were determined by two-tailed t-tests and Bonferroni correction with four primary comparisons: PEEK vs control and PEEK vs CoCr, in LB and FE (α=0.05/4). Results In LB, ROM of specimens with PEEK rods was lower than control at each instrumented level. ROM was greater for PEEK rods than both Ti and CoCr at every instrumented level. Mean ROM at proximal and distal noninstrumented levels was lower for PEEK than for Ti and CoCr. In FE, mean ROM at proximal and distal noninstrumented levels was lower for PEEK than for metal. Combining treated levels, in LB, ROM for PEEK rods was 35% of control (p<0.0001) and 270% of CoCr rods (p<0.01). In FE, ROM with PEEK

  19. Allowing Learners to Choose: Self-Controlled Practice Schedules for Learning Multiple Movement Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Will F. W.; Magill, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    For this study, we investigated the effects of self-controlled practice on learning multiple motor skills. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to self-control or yoked conditions. Participants learned a three-keystroke pattern with three different relative time structures. Those in the self-control group chose one of three relative time…

  20. Water Control on Vegetation Growth Pattern in Eurasia from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, G.; Velicogna, I.; Kimball, J. S.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    High latitude ecosystem productivity is constrained by cold temperature and moisture limitations to plant growth, while these environmental restrictions may be changing with global warming. Satellite data driven assessments indicate that over the past three decades, rapid warming in the northern high latitudes has resulted in earlier and longer potential growing seasons and widespread greening, due to general relaxation of cold temperature constraints to vegetation productivity. However, warming may have also increased water stress limitations to growth. In this study, we use GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) derived total water storage (TWS), 2-m air temperature (T) from ERA-interim reanalysis, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data from MODIS (Collection 5) and satellite data driven vegetation gross primary productivity (GPP) estimates as surrogates for vegetation growth, for the period August 2002-December 2013 to evaluate terrestrial water supply controls to vegetation growth changes over the three major river basins of northern Eurasia. We find that during the analyzed period, the apparent growth response follows regional vegetation, moisture and temperature gradients and is spatially complex. In the drier southwest characterized by grassland, vegetation growth is mainly controlled by TWS availability. In the central region, dominated by cold temperature and water limited boreal forest, T is the main control on vegetation growth. In the Lena basin, where vegetation includes both boreal forest and water limited grassland, both T and TWS impact vegetation growth. We suggest that GRACE TWS estimates provide reliable observational constraints on water availability to vegetation that supplement sparse soil moisture observations and satellite precipitation estimates with unknown bias.

  1. Phytophthora infestans specific phosphorylation patterns and new putative control targets.

    PubMed

    Frades, Itziar; Andreasson, Erik

    2016-04-01

    In this study we applied biomathematical searches of gene regulatory mechanisms to learn more about oomycete biology and to identify new putative targets for pesticides or biological control against Phytophthora infestans. First, oomycete phylum-specific phosphorylation motifs were found by discriminative n-gram analysis. We found 11.600 P. infestans specific n-grams, mapping 642 phosphoproteins. The most abundant group among these related to phosphatidylinositol metabolism. Due to the large number of possible targets found and our hypothesis that multi-level control is a sign of usefulness as targets for intervention, we identified overlapping targets with a second screen. This was performed to identify proteins dually regulated by small RNA and phosphorylation. We found 164 proteins to be regulated by both sRNA and phosphorylation and the dominating functions where phosphatidylinositol signalling/metabolism, endocytosis, and autophagy. Furthermore we performed a similar regulatory study and discriminative n-gram analysis of proteins with no clear orthologs in other species and proteins that are known to be unique to P. infestans such as the RxLR effectors, Crinkler (CRN) proteins and elicitins. We identified CRN proteins with specific phospho-motifs present in all life stages. PITG_12626, PITG_14042 and PITG_23175 are CRN proteins that have species-specific phosphorylation motifs and are subject to dual regulation. PMID:27020162

  2. An optimized resistor pattern for temperature gradient control in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selva, Bertrand; Marchalot, Julien; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of generating high-temperature gradients with a linear temperature profile when heating is provided in situ. Thanks to improved optimization algorithms, the shape of resistors, which constitute the heating source, is optimized by applying the genetic algorithm NSGA-II (acronym for the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm) (Deb et al 2002 IEEE Trans. Evol. Comput. 6 2). Experimental validation of the linear temperature profile within the cavity is carried out using a thermally sensitive fluorophore, called Rhodamine B (Ross et al 2001 Anal. Chem. 73 4117-23, Erickson et al 2003 Lab Chip 3 141-9). The high level of agreement obtained between experimental and numerical results serves to validate the accuracy of this method for generating highly controlled temperature profiles. In the field of actuation, such a device is of potential interest since it allows for controlling bubbles or droplets moving by means of thermocapillary effects (Baroud et al 2007 Phys. Rev. E 75 046302). Digital microfluidics is a critical area in the field of microfluidics (Dreyfus et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 14) as well as in the so-called lab-on-a-chip technology. Through an example, the large application potential of such a technique is demonstrated, which entails handling a single bubble driven along a cavity using simple and tunable embedded resistors.

  3. Integument pattern formation involves genetic and epigenetic controls: feather arrays simulated by digital hormone models.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall B; Shen, Wei-Min; Will, Peter; Wu, Da-Yu; Lin, Chih-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    Pattern formation is a fundamental morphogenetic process. Models based on genetic and epigenetic control have been proposed but remain controversial. Here we use feather morphogenesis for further evaluation. Adhesion molecules and/or signaling molecules were first expressed homogenously in feather tracts (restrictive mode, appear earlier) or directly in bud or inter-bud regions ( de novo mode, appear later). They either activate or inhibit bud formation, but paradoxically colocalize in the bud. Using feather bud reconstitution, we showed that completely dissociated cells can reform periodic patterns without reference to previous positional codes. The patterning process has the characteristics of being self-organizing, dynamic and plastic. The final pattern is an equilibrium state reached by competition, and the number and size of buds can be altered based on cell number and activator/inhibitor ratio, respectively. We developed a Digital Hormone Model which consists of (1) competent cells without identity that move randomly in a space, (2) extracellular signaling hormones which diffuse by a reaction-diffusion mechanism and activate or inhibit cell adhesion, and (3) cells which respond with topological stochastic actions manifested as changes in cell adhesion. Based on probability, the results are cell clusters arranged in dots or stripes. Thus genetic control provides combinational molecular information which defines the properties of the cells but not the final pattern. Epigenetic control governs interactions among cells and their environment based on physical-chemical rules (such as those described in the Digital Hormone Model). Complex integument patterning is the sum of these two components of control and that is why integument patterns are usually similar but non-identical. These principles may be shared by other pattern formation processes such as barb ridge formation, fingerprints, pigmentation patterning, etc. The Digital Hormone Model can also be applied to

  4. Bond of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) rods to concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Zahrani, M.M.; Nanni, A.; Al-Dulaijan, S.U.; Bakis, C.E.

    1996-11-01

    The bond behavior between FRP rods and concrete is one of the most important aspects to predicting the short- and long-term performance of FRP reinforced concrete structures including development and transfer length. In this research, the direct pull-out test was used to study the FRP/concrete bond behavior. This method allows measurement of the loaded- and free-end slip of the FRP rod and placement of a strain probe inside the rod to measure internal strain distribution in both axial and radial directions along the bonded length without affecting the FRP/concrete interface. Knowledge of strain distribution is necessary to study the load transfer mechanism between FRP rod and concrete. The scope of this paper include experimental results obtained with the direct pull-out test using 12.7 mm glass and carbon FRP rods with smooth and axisymmetrical deformed surfaces. The typical results are given as nominal bond and shear stress vs. free- and loaded-end slip. Experimental results obtained from strain probes used during pull-out tests are also presented as nominal bond and shear stress vs. strain. For smooth rods, friction is the main controlling factor. For deformed rods, bond tends to be controlled by strength and mechanical action of the axisymmetrical deformations rather than adhesion and friction. The strength of concrete appears to have no effect on the bond strength and failure mechanism of these particular machined FRP rods when concrete splitting is avoided.

  5. Comparing Single Versus Double Screw-Rod Anterior Instrumentation for Treating Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures with Incomplete Neurological Deficit: A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu; Wang, Juan; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Following a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TCBF), anterior screw-rods apply pressure upon the graft site. However, there is limited evidence comparing single screw-rod anterior instrumentation (SSRAI) to double screw-rod anterior instrumentation (DSRAI) for TCBFs. Our objective was to compare SSRAI versus DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 51 participants with T11-L2 TCBFs (AO classification: A3) were randomly assigned to receive SSRAI or DSRAI. Key preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative data were collected. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine the independent factors associated with inferior clinical outcomes, as well as the comparative efficacy of SSRAI and DSRAI. RESULTS There were no significant differences in the key demographic and clinical characteristics between the two groups (all p>0.05). Smoking status was significantly associated with inferior three-month and six-month Denis pain scores (Wald statistic=4.246, p=0.039). Both SSRAI and DSRAI were significantly effective in improving three-month and six-month postoperative degree of kyphosis, three-month and six-month postoperative ASIA impairment scale scores, three-month and six-month postoperative Denis pain score, and three-month and six-month postoperative Denis work score (all p<0.001). Although there were no significant differences between DSRAI and SSRAI with respect to all outcomes (all p>0.05), DSRAI displayed significantly longer operating times, as well as significantly larger operative blood losses (both p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS SSRAI may be preferable over DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit due to its lower operating time and amount of operative blood loss. PMID:27197020

  6. Comparing Single Versus Double Screw-Rod Anterior Instrumentation for Treating Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures with Incomplete Neurological Deficit: A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yu; Wang, Juan; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TCBF), anterior screw-rods apply pressure upon the graft site. However, there is limited evidence comparing single screw-rod anterior instrumentation (SSRAI) to double screw-rod anterior instrumentation (DSRAI) for TCBFs. Our objective was to compare SSRAI versus DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit. Material/Methods A total of 51 participants with T11-L2 TCBFs (AO classification: A3) were randomly assigned to receive SSRAI or DSRAI. Key preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative data were collected. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine the independent factors associated with inferior clinical outcomes, as well as the comparative efficacy of SSRAI and DSRAI. Results There were no significant differences in the key demographic and clinical characteristics between the two groups (all p>0.05). Smoking status was significantly associated with inferior three-month and six-month Denis pain scores (Wald statistic=4.246, p=0.039). Both SSRAI and DSRAI were significantly effective in improving three-month and six-month postoperative degree of kyphosis, three-month and six-month postoperative ASIA impairment scale scores, three-month and six-month postoperative Denis pain score, and three-month and six-month postoperative Denis work score (all p<0.001). Although there were no significant differences between DSRAI and SSRAI with respect to all outcomes (all p>0.05), DSRAI displayed significantly longer operating times, as well as significantly larger operative blood losses (both p<0.001). Conclusions SSRAI may be preferable over DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit due to its lower operating time and amount of operative blood loss. PMID:27197020

  7. Dietary patterns and benign breast diseases: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Tiznobeyk, Zeinab; Sheikhi Mobarakeh, Zahra; Qorbani, Mostafa; Koohdani, Fariba; Sotoudeh, Gity; Khajehnasiri, Farahnaz; Khosravi, Shahla; Doostan, Farideh

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have investigated the relation between benign breast diseases (BBD) and food intake. However, dietary patterns of these patients have not been taken into consideration up to now. The aim of this study is to determine the association between dietary patterns and BBD. In this case-control study, ninety-six patients with BBD and seventy controls were selected from women attending the Iranian Center for Breast Cancer affiliated with Academic Center for Education, Culture and Research. Demographic, physical activity and semi-quantitative FFQ were completed. The main dietary patterns were extracted by factor analysis. Two major dietary patterns emerged: Healthy dietary pattern including fish, poultry, eggs, low-fat dairy products, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds, whole grains, oil and mayonnaise, olives, fruits; and Unhealthy dietary pattern including red meats, organ and processed meats, high-fat dairy products, refined grains, sweets and desserts, animal and solid fats. After adjustment for age, BMI and energy intake, the participants in the highest tertile of Healthy dietary pattern (OR 0·44; 95 % CI 0·20, 0·99) were less likely to have BBD compared with those in the first tertile. After adjustment for other confounding variables, this relationship still remained close to significant level. However, higher consumption of Unhealthy dietary pattern was not associated with the risk of BBD. In conclusion, Healthy dietary pattern might be inversely associated with the risk of BBD; however, this result should be interpreted with caution. Future studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:27198589

  8. Structural vibration control by tuned mass damper using central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iba, Daisuke; Hongu, Junichi

    2011-04-01

    This paper proposes a new control method for active mass dampers using a Central Pattern Generator in vibration mitigation. The active mass dampers (or active dynamic absorbers) have been applied to structural vibration control of high-rise buildings, bridges and so on. In this case, the mass of the active mass damper must oscillate in an appropriate phase in relation to the control object, and generally, the damper has been designed by linear control theory as pole placement method, optimal control method or H infinity control method, and all the rest. On the other hand, on walking of animate beings like mammals or insects, both side feet have appropriate phase relations; moreover, it is possible to keep moving on irregular ground. That is, algorithms for the walking would be embedded into the animate beings to control the complicated and redundant bodies with ease and robustness. In biological study, the Central Pattern Generators in bodies playing a significant role in the walking have been learned over the last few decades, and some studies said that some animate beings are able to control their feet by using the generators without their brains in the walking. Moreover, mathematical models of the pattern generators have been proposed, and some researchers have been studying to realize walking of biped-robots using the pattern generators embedded in a computer. In this study, the algorithm is installed into a controller for the active mass damper; furthermore, validation of the controller is performed by numerical simulation.

  9. Complexity and Self-Organization in Large Arrays of Elastic Rods in an Air Cross-Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Masaharu; Moon, Francis C.

    2002-07-01

    Experiments on spatio-temporal dynamics in large arrays of cantilevered elastic-rods in uniform and stationary wind-tunnel cross-flow have been carried out. From 90 to 1000 steel and polycarbonate rods with gap ratios ranging from 1.0 to 2.5 are used. As the Reynolds number (based on the rod diameter) increases, a pattern with the characteristics of spatio-temporal chaos emerges in the global behavior of the array of elastic rods. There are local and global patterns. The local patterns are composed of transient rest, linear motions and elliptical motions. In the 90-rod experiments, a cluster-pattern entropy measure is introduced based on these three patterns as a quantitative measure of the local complexity. Below a threshold wind velocity, no significant dynamics appears. Video images reveal that at first each rod moves individually, then clusters consisting of several rods emerge and finally global wave-like motion takes place with higher flow velocities. Spatial patterns in the rod-density distribution appear as more rods suffer impacts with nearest neighbors. Furthermore, these collective nonlinear motions of rods are observed and categorized into several global modes. Using accelerometer data, the rod impact rate versus flow velocity shows a power-law scaling relation. This phenomenon may have application to plant-wind dynamics and damage as well as fluid-structure heat exchange systems. This experiment may also be a two dimensional analog of the impact dynamics of granular materials in a flow.

  10. Colloidal crystal based plasma polymer patterning to control Pseudomonas aeruginosa attachment to surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pingle, Hitesh; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Thissen, Helmut; McArthur, Sally; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation on medical implants and subsequent infections are a global problem. A great deal of effort has focused on developing chemical contrasts based on micro- and nanopatterning for studying and controlling cells and bacteria at surfaces. It has been known that micro- and nanopatterns on surfaces can influence biomolecule adsorption, and subsequent cell and bacterial adhesion. However, less focus has been on precisely controlling patterns to study the initial bacterial attachment mechanisms and subsequently how the patterning influences the role played by biomolecular adsorption on biofilm formation. In this work, the authors have used colloidal self-assembly in a confined area to pattern surfaces with colloidal crystals and used them as masks during allylamine plasma polymer (AAMpp) deposition to generate highly ordered patterns from the micro- to the nanoscale. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-aldehyde was grafted to the plasma regions via "cloud point" grafting to prevent the attachment of bacteria on the plasma patterned surface regions, thereby controlling the adhesive sites by choice of the colloidal crystal morphology. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was chosen to study the bacterial interactions with these chemically patterned surfaces. Scanning electron microscope, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, and epifluorescence microscopy were used for pattern characterization, surface chemical analysis, and imaging of attached bacteria. The AAMpp influenced bacterial attachment because of the amine groups displaying a positive charge. XPS results confirm the successful grafting of PEG on the AAMpp surfaces. The results showed that PEG patterns can be used as a surface for bacterial patterning including investigating the role of biomolecular patterning on bacterial attachment. These types of patterns are easy to fabricate and could be useful in further applications in biomedical research. PMID:26634448

  11. Variability of sap flow on forest hillslopes: patterns and controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Sibylle; Blume, Theresa

    2013-04-01

    Sap flow in trees is an essential variable in integrated studies of hydrologic fluxes. It gives indication of transpiration rates for single trees and, with a suitable method of upscaling, for whole stands. This information is relevant for hydrologic and climate models, especially for the prediction of change in water fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum under climate change. To this end, we do not only need knowledge concerning the response of sapflow to atmospheric forcing but also an understanding of the main controls on its spatial variability. Our study site consists of several subcatchments of the Attert basin in Luxembourg underlain by schists of the Ardennes massif. Within these subcatchments we measure sap flow in more than 20 trees on a range of forested hillslopes covered by a variety of temperate deciduous tree species such as beech, oak, hornbeam and maple as well as conifers such as firs. Our sap flow sensors are based on the heat pulse velocity method and consist of three needles, one needle acting as the heating device and the other two holding three thermistors each, enabling us to simultaneously measure sap flow velocity at three different depths within the tree. In close proximity to the trees we collect additional data on soil moisture, matric potential and groundwater levels. First results show that the sensor design seems promising for an upscaling of the measured sap flow velocities to sap flow at the tree level. The maximum depth of actively used sapwood as well as the decrease in sap flow velocity with increasing depth in the tree can be determined by way of the three thermistors. Marked differences in sap flow velocity profiles are visible between the different species, resulting in differences in sap flow for trees of similar diameter. We examine the range of tree sap flow values and variation due to species, size class, slope position and exposition and finally relate them to the dynamics of soil moisture conditions with the

  12. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  13. Dietary patterns and risk of colorectal cancer in Tehran Province: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third and fourth leading cause of cancer incidence and mortality among men and women, respectively in Iran. However, the role of dietary factors that could contribute to this high cancer incidence remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine major dietary patterns and its relationship with colorectal cancer. Methods This case–control study was conducted in four hospitals in Tehran city of Iran. A total of 71 patients (35 men and 36 women, aged 40–75 years) with incident clinically confirmed colorectal cancer (CRC) and 142 controls (70 men and 72 women, aged 40–75 years) admitted to hospital for acute, non-neoplastic diseases were recruited and interviewed. Dietary data were assessed by 125-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between dietary patterns and risk of colorectal cancer. Results Two major dietary patterns (Healthy pattern and Western pattern) were derived using principal component analysis. Each dietary pattern explained 11.9% (Healthy pattern) and 10.3% (Western pattern) of the variation in food intake, respectively. After adjusting for confounding factors, the Healthy dietary pattern was significantly associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (OR= 0.227; 95% CI=0.108–0.478) while an increased risk of colorectal cancer was observed with the Western dietary pattern (OR=2.616; 95% CI= 1.361-5.030). Conclusion Specific dietary patterns, which include healthy and western patterns, may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. This diet-disease relationship can be used for developing interventions that aim to promote healthy eating for the prevention of chronic disease, particularly colorectal cancer in the Iranian population. PMID:23497250

  14. Healthy and unhealthy dietary patterns are related to pre-diabetes: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Fariba; Siassi, Fereydoun; Koohdani, Fariba; Mahaki, Behzad; Qorbani, Mostafa; Yavari, Parvaneh; Shaibu, Osman Mohammed; Sotoudeh, Gity

    2016-09-01

    Pre-diabetes increases the risk of diabetes and CVD. Several studies have investigated the relationship between food intake and pre-diabetes morbidity, but the dietary patterns of pre-diabetes subjects were not taken into consideration. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between dietary patterns and pre-diabetes. In this regard, 150 pre-diabetic subjects and 150 healthy controls, who attended the diabetes screening centre in Shahreza, Iran, were matched for age group and sex. The weight, height, waist circumference, physical activity, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and blood glucose levels of all participants were measured. Dietary information was collected using a semi-quantitative FFQ. Using factor analysis, two dietary patterns were identified: the vegetables, fruits and legumes (VFL) dietary pattern and the sweet, solid fat, meat and mayonnaise (SSMM) dietary pattern. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between pre-diabetes and dietary patterns. After adjusting for age, education, physical activity, BMI and energy intake, the VFL dietary pattern was found to be negatively associated with lower pre-diabetes (OR 0·16; 95 % CI 0·10, 0·26). Furthermore, the SSMM dietary pattern was positively associated with pre-diabetes (OR 5·45; 95 % CI 3·22, 9·23). In conclusion, the VFL dietary pattern is inversely related to pre-diabetes, whereas the SSMM dietary pattern is associated with increased risk of pre-diabetes. PMID:27451983

  15. Precuring implant photoresists for shrink and patterning control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winroth, Gustaf; Rosseel, Erik; Delvaux, Christie; Sanchez, Efrain Altamirano; Ercken, Monique

    2013-10-01

    193-nm compatible photoresists are turning out to be the new platform for implant lithography, due to the increasing requirements in both resolution and overlay. Shrinkage of such resists is becoming progressively the most topical issue for aggressive nodes, where conventional pretreatments from older resist platforms, such as ultraviolet flood exposures, are not directly transferable to (meth-)acrylate-type resists. The precuring options available for state-of-the-art implant photoresists for 193-nm lithography is explored, in which we target to reduce the shrinkage during implantation for trenching critical dimensions (CDs) that are relevant for nodes <20 nm. An extensive study comprising different approaches, including laser-, ion-, and electron-based treatments, is presented. Each treatment is individually investigated with the aim to find not only a valid pretreatment for shrinkage control during implantation, but also to understand what effect alternative pretreatments have on the morphology and the CDs of thick photoresists used as implant stopping layers. Viable options for further process optimization in order to integrate them into device process flows are found. To this extent, the shrink behavior after pretreatment is shown, and the additional shrink dynamics after implantation are compared.

  16. Controlled degradation pattern of hydroxyapatite/calcium carbonate composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ning; Zhong, Qiwei; Zhou, Ying; Kundu, Subhas C; Yao, Juming; Cai, Yurong

    2016-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is widely used in clinic due to its good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity except for its slow degradation speed. In the present study, spherical calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) is fabricated in the presence of silk protein sericin, which is transmuted into HAP microsphere in phosphate solution with the assistance of microwave irradiation. The effect of reaction conditions on the conversion of CaCO3 is investigated including reaction time, chemical composition of phosphate solution, and microwave power to get a series of HAP/CaCO3 composites. The degradation property of the composites is evaluated in vitro. Results show the degradation speed of the composite with higher HAP content is slower. The degradation rate of the composite could be changed effectively by modulating the proportion of HAP and CaCO3 . This work provides a feasible method for the preparation of spherical HAP/CaCO3 composite with controllable degradability. The composite thus obtained may be an ideal material for bone tissue engineering application. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:518-524, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27037606

  17. Realtime Control of Multiple-focus Phased Array Heating Patterns Based on Noninvasive Ultrasound Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Andrew; Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2011-01-01

    A system for the realtime generation and control of multiple-focus ultrasound phased-array heating patterns is presented. The system employs a 1-MHz, 64-element array and driving electronics capable of fine spatial and temporal control of the heating pattern. The driver is integrated with a realtime 2D temperature imaging system implemented on a commercial scanner. The coordinates of the temperature control points are defined on B-mode guidance images from the scanner, together with the temperature set points and controller parameters. The temperature at each point is controlled by an independent proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) controller that determines the focal intensity at that point. Optimal multiple-focus synthesis is applied to generate the desired heating pattern at the control points. The controller dynamically reallocates the power available among the foci from the shared power supply upon reaching the desired temperature at each control point. Furthermore, anti-windup compensation is implemented at each control point to improve the system dynamics. In vitro experiments in tissue-mimicking phantom demonstrate the robustness of the controllers for short (2 – 5 sec) and longer multiple-focus HIFU exposures. Thermocouple measurements in the vicinity of the control points confirm the dynamics of the temperature variations obtained through noninvasive feedback. PMID:21768037

  18. System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module

    DOEpatents

    Matchett, R.L.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Bacvinsicas, W.S.; Roof, D.R.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1988-07-28

    A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system. 7 figs.

  19. System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module

    DOEpatents

    Matchett, Richard L.; Roof, David R.; Kikta, Thomas J.; Wilczynski, Rosemarie; Nilsen, Roy J.; Bacvinskas, William S.; Fodor, George

    1990-01-01

    A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system.

  20. 26. A typical outer rod room, or rack room, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. A typical outer rod room, or rack room, showing the racks for the nine horizontal control rods (HCRs) that would be inserted or withdrawn from the pile to control the rate of reaction. In this case, it is the 105-F Reactor in February 1945. The view is looking away from the pile, which is out of the picture on the left. Several of the cooling water hose reels for the rods can be seen at the end of the racks near the wall. D-8323 - B Reactor, Richland, Benton County, WA

  1. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N.

    1983-11-01

    Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

  2. Investigating the optical XNOR gate using plasmonic nano-rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Majid; Kaboli, Milad

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a coherent perfect absorption (CPA)-type XNOR gate based on plasmonic nano particle is proposed. It consists of two plasmonic nano rod arrays on top of two parallel arms with quartz substrate. The operation principle is based on the absorbable formation of a conductive path in the dielectric layer of a plasmonic nano-particles waveguide. Since the CPA efficiency depends strongly on the number of plasmonic nano-rod and the nano rod location, an efficient binary optimization method based the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is used to design an optimized array of the plasmonic nano-rod in order to achieve the maximum absorption coefficient in the 'off' state and the minimum absorption coefficient in the 'on' state. In Binary PSO (BPSO), a group of birds consists a matrix with binary entries, control the presence ('1‧) or the absence ('0‧) of nano rod in the array.

  3. Methodology of the Westinghouse dynamic rod worth measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.A.; Chapman, D.M.; Easter, M.E.; Hill, D.J.; Hoerner, J.A. ); Kurtz, P.N. )

    1992-01-01

    During zero-power physics testing, plant operations personnel use one of various techniques to measure the reactivity worth of the control rods to confirm shutdown margin. A simple and fast procedure for measuring rod worths called dynamic rod worth measurement (DRWM) has been developed at Westinghouse. This procedure was tested at the recent startups of Point Beach Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 cycle 20 and Unit 2 cycle 18. The results of these tests show that DRWM measures rod worths with accuracy comparable to that of both boron dilution and rod bank exchange measurements. The DRWM procedure is a fast process of measuring the reactivity worth of individual banks by inserting and withdrawing the bank continuously at the maximum stepping speed without changing the boron concentration and recording the signals of the ex-core detectors.

  4. Piston and connecting rod assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor); Chatten, John K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A piston and connecting rod assembly includes a piston crown, a piston skirt, a connecting rod, and a bearing insert. The piston skirt is a component separate from the piston crown and is connected to the piston crown to provide a piston body. The bearing insert is a component separate from the piston crown and the piston skirt and is fixedly disposed within the piston body. A bearing surface of a connecting rod contacts the bearing insert to thereby movably associate the connecting rod and the piston body.

  5. Modeling how shark and dolphin skin patterns control transitional wall-turbulence vorticity patterns using spatiotemporal phase reset mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Hellum, Aren M.

    2014-10-01

    Many slow-moving biological systems like seashells and zebrafish that do not contend with wall turbulence have somewhat organized pigmentation patterns flush with their outer surfaces that are formed by underlying autonomous reaction-diffusion (RD) mechanisms. In contrast, sharks and dolphins contend with wall turbulence, are fast swimmers, and have more organized skin patterns that are proud and sometimes vibrate. A nonlinear spatiotemporal analytical model is not available that explains the mechanism underlying control of flow with such proud patterns, despite the fact that shark and dolphin skins are major targets of reverse engineering mechanisms of drag and noise reduction. Comparable to RD, a minimal self-regulation model is given for wall turbulence regeneration in the transitional regime--laterally coupled, diffusively--which, although restricted to pre-breakdown durations and to a plane close and parallel to the wall, correctly reproduces many experimentally observed spatiotemporal organizations of vorticity in both laminar-to-turbulence transitioning and very low Reynolds number but turbulent regions. We further show that the onset of vorticity disorganization is delayed if the skin organization is treated as a spatiotemporal template of olivo-cerebellar phase reset mechanism. The model shows that the adaptation mechanisms of sharks and dolphins to their fluid environment have much in common.

  6. Modeling how shark and dolphin skin patterns control transitional wall-turbulence vorticity patterns using spatiotemporal phase reset mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Hellum, Aren M.

    2014-01-01

    Many slow-moving biological systems like seashells and zebrafish that do not contend with wall turbulence have somewhat organized pigmentation patterns flush with their outer surfaces that are formed by underlying autonomous reaction-diffusion (RD) mechanisms. In contrast, sharks and dolphins contend with wall turbulence, are fast swimmers, and have more organized skin patterns that are proud and sometimes vibrate. A nonlinear spatiotemporal analytical model is not available that explains the mechanism underlying control of flow with such proud patterns, despite the fact that shark and dolphin skins are major targets of reverse engineering mechanisms of drag and noise reduction. Comparable to RD, a minimal self-regulation model is given for wall turbulence regeneration in the transitional regime—laterally coupled, diffusively—which, although restricted to pre-breakdown durations and to a plane close and parallel to the wall, correctly reproduces many experimentally observed spatiotemporal organizations of vorticity in both laminar-to-turbulence transitioning and very low Reynolds number but turbulent regions. We further show that the onset of vorticity disorganization is delayed if the skin organization is treated as a spatiotemporal template of olivo-cerebellar phase reset mechanism. The model shows that the adaptation mechanisms of sharks and dolphins to their fluid environment have much in common. PMID:25338940

  7. Modeling how shark and dolphin skin patterns control transitional wall-turbulence vorticity patterns using spatiotemporal phase reset mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R; Hellum, Aren M

    2014-01-01

    Many slow-moving biological systems like seashells and zebrafish that do not contend with wall turbulence have somewhat organized pigmentation patterns flush with their outer surfaces that are formed by underlying autonomous reaction-diffusion (RD) mechanisms. In contrast, sharks and dolphins contend with wall turbulence, are fast swimmers, and have more organized skin patterns that are proud and sometimes vibrate. A nonlinear spatiotemporal analytical model is not available that explains the mechanism underlying control of flow with such proud patterns, despite the fact that shark and dolphin skins are major targets of reverse engineering mechanisms of drag and noise reduction. Comparable to RD, a minimal self-regulation model is given for wall turbulence regeneration in the transitional regime--laterally coupled, diffusively--which, although restricted to pre-breakdown durations and to a plane close and parallel to the wall, correctly reproduces many experimentally observed spatiotemporal organizations of vorticity in both laminar-to-turbulence transitioning and very low Reynolds number but turbulent regions. We further show that the onset of vorticity disorganization is delayed if the skin organization is treated as a spatiotemporal template of olivo-cerebellar phase reset mechanism. The model shows that the adaptation mechanisms of sharks and dolphins to their fluid environment have much in common. PMID:25338940

  8. Control Patterns in Dyadic Systems: Marital Group Psychotherapy as Change Agent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarrick, Anne K.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Examined changes in response control patterns exhibited by five married couples who participated in two brief psychotherapy groups. Used the Ericson-Rogers Relational Coding System to score the control direction of interactions between group members. Found individual flexibility increased for each of these relationships over the course of group…

  9. Relaxation of rod misalignment technical specification requirements: An increased operational flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    John, G.; Leipner-Gomes, C.I.; Johansen, B.J.

    1995-12-31

    The pressurized water reactor technical specification (T/S) limiting condition for operation (LCO) for rod misalignment and rod position indication (RPI) typically requires all rod cluster control assemblies to be positioned with {+-}12 steps of the group demand position. The LCO is approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for use by all Westinghouse plants, and the core design incorporates a peaking factor uncertainty to accommodate potential rod misalignments within this approved LCO. Also, the LCO requires all RPI channels and the demand position indicator system to be operable and capable of determining the control rod position within {+-}12 steps.

  10. Coiling Spaghetti: Deposition of a Thin Rod onto a Moving Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Pedro; Joo, Jungseock; Mannent, Josephine; Marthelot, Joel; Kaufman, Danny; Grinspun, Eitan

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the oscillatory coiling patterns obtained when a thin elastic rod is deposited onto a moving solid boundary (conveyor belt). Through a combination of well controlled desktop experiments and numerics, we explore the phase diagram of this coiling process and identify the underlying physical ingredients. Our novel numerical method implements a discrete notion of bending and twist based on ideas ported from differential geometry, and exhibits excellent performance and robustness. This enables us to carry out predictive direct simulations of the large deformations of the thin elastic rod interacting with the moving substrate, that are in excellent agreement with our experiments. Applications of this coiling process range from the coiling of nanotubes to the laying down of transoceanic cable and pipelines in the ocean bed.

  11. Morphology-Patterned Anisotropic Wetting Surface for Fluid Control and Gas-Liquid Separation in Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuli; Yu, Nianzuo; Wang, Tieqiang; Ge, Peng; Ye, Shunsheng; Xue, Peihong; Liu, Wendong; Shen, Huaizhong; Zhang, Junhu; Yang, Bai

    2016-05-25

    This article shows morphology-patterned stripes as a new platform for directing flow guidance of the fluid in microfluidic devices. Anisotropic (even unidirectional) spreading behavior due to anisotropic wetting of the underlying surface is observed after integrating morphology-patterned stripes with a Y-shaped microchannel. The anisotropic wetting flow of the fluid is influenced by the applied pressure, dimensions of the patterns, including the period and depth of the structure, and size of the channels. Fluids with different surface tensions show different flowing anisotropy in our microdevice. Moreover, the morphology-patterned surfaces could be used as a microvalve, and gas-water separation in the microchannel was realized using the unidirectional flow of water. Therefore, benefiting from their good performance and simple fabrication process, morphology-patterned surfaces are good candidates to be applied in controlling the fluid behavior in microfluidics. PMID:27128986

  12. Control chart pattern recognition using K-MICA clustering and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimzadeh, Ataollah; Addeh, Jalil; Rahmani, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    Automatic recognition of abnormal patterns in control charts has seen increasing demands nowadays in manufacturing processes. This paper presents a novel hybrid intelligent method (HIM) for recognition of the common types of control chart pattern (CCP). The proposed method includes two main modules: a clustering module and a classifier module. In the clustering module, the input data is first clustered by a new technique. This technique is a suitable combination of the modified imperialist competitive algorithm (MICA) and the K-means algorithm. Then the Euclidean distance of each pattern is computed from the determined clusters. The classifier module determines the membership of the patterns using the computed distance. In this module, several neural networks, such as the multilayer perceptron, probabilistic neural networks, and the radial basis function neural networks, are investigated. Using the experimental study, we choose the best classifier in order to recognize the CCPs. Simulation results show that a high recognition accuracy, about 99.65%, is achieved. PMID:22035774

  13. Healthy and Unhealthy Dietary Patterns Are Related to Depression: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Maryam; Majdzadeh, Reza; Nejati, Somayeh; Darabi, Samaneh; Raisi, Firoozeh; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Sorayani, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objective Major depressive disorder is the leading cause of disability around the world. The relationship between depression and dietary patterns has been reported in a few studies but with controversial results. This study aimed to investigate this relationship in an Iranian population. Methods In our study, 330 depressed patients (cases) and healthy people (controls) (1:2) were individually matched according to age, sex and area of residence. New cases of depression were recruited from two psychiatric clinics in Tehran. Interviewers went to each patient's residential area, and invited qualified individuals to participate in the study as controls. Food intake over the past year was collected using a validated semi quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Dietary patterns were determined by the principal components method. Binary logistic regression was used to test the effect of dietary patterns on depression. Results We identified two major dietary patterns by using factor analysis: the healthy and unhealthy dietary patterns. We categorized the scores of these patterns to quartiles. After adjusting for non-depression drug use, job, marital status, children number, and body mass index, the relations of depression and quartiles of two dietary patterns are significant (p=0.04 & p=0.01, respectively). Compared with participants in the lowest quartile, those in the highest quartile had significantly lower odds ratio (OR) for depression in healthy dietary pattern, and higher OR for depression in unhealthy dietary pattern. Conclusion This study indicates that healthy and unhealthy dietary patterns may be associated with the risk of depression. The results can be used for developing interventions that aim to promote healthy eating for the prevention of depression. PMID:26508953

  14. Controlling the adhesion of conducting polymer films with patterned self-assembled monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, L.F.; Wrighton, M.S.

    1996-02-01

    A photosensitive self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is selectively irradiated to fabricate a pattern on an Au electrode, and a thin film of aniline or 3-methylthiophene is deposited on it by electopolymerization. Adhesion of the polymer films can be controlled by the monolayer terminal group. Applying tape to the sample and peeling it away selectively removes the conducting polymer film to the tape in a near-micron resolution pattern. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  15. DOOCS patterns: reusable software components for FPGA-based RF GUN field controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucyk, Piotr

    2006-10-01

    Modern accelerator technology combines software and hardware solutions to provide distributed, high efficiency digital systems for High Energy Physics experiments. Providing flexible, maintainable software is crucial for ensuring high availability of the whole system. In order to fulfill all these requirements, appropriate design and development techniques have to be used. Software patterns are well known solution for common programming issues, providing proven development paradigms, which can help to avoid many design issues. DOOCS patterns introduces new concepts of reusable software components for control system algorithms development and implementation in DOOCS framework. Chosen patterns have been described and usage examples have been presented in this paper.

  16. 2D spatially controlled polymer micro patterning for cellular behavior studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, V.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Paraico, I.; Lippert, T.; Wokaun, A.; Dinescu, M.

    2011-04-01

    A simple and effective method to functionalize glass surfaces that enable polymer micropatterning and subsequent spatially controlled adhesion of cells is reported in this paper. The method involves the application of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) to achieve polymer patterning in a single step onto cell repellent substrates (i.e. polyethyleneglycol (PEG)). This approach was used to produce micron-size polyethyleneimine (PEI)-patterns alternating with cell-repellent areas. The focus of this work is the ability of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells to orient, migrate, and produce organized cellular arrangements on laser generated PEI patterns.

  17. A new paradigm for in-line detection and control of patterning defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunsche, Stefan; Jochemsen, Marinus; Jain, Vivek; Zhou, Xinjian; Chen, Frank; Vellanki, Venu; Spence, Chris; Halder, Sandip; van den Heuvel, Dieter; Truffert, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    With continuously shrinking design rules and corresponding low-k1 lithography, defectivity and yield are increasingly dominated by systematic patterning defects. The size of these yield-limiting defects is shrinking along with feature size, making their detection and verification more difficult. We discuss a novel, holistic approach to pattern defect detection and control, which integrates full chip layout analysis and hybrid wafer metrology data to predict wafer locations with highest probability for defect occurrence. We assess the various components of this flow by an experimental study on a 10 nm BEOL process at IMEC, using state-of-the-art negative tone development (NTD) and triple Litho-Etch patterning process.

  18. Controlled mud-crack patterning and self-organized cracking of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Seghir, Rian; Arscott, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting pattern formation – such as that observed in nature – in the context of micro/nanotechnology could have great benefits if coupled with the traditional top-down lithographic approach. Here, we demonstrate an original and simple method to produce unique, localized and controllable self-organised patterns on elastomeric films. A thin, brittle silica-like crust is formed on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using oxygen plasma. This crust is subsequently cracked via the deposition of a thin metal film – having residual tensile stress. The density of the mud-crack patterns depends on the plasma dose and on the metal thickness. The mud-crack patterning can be controlled depending on the thickness and shape of the metallization – ultimately leading to regularly spaced cracks and/or metal mesa structures. Such patterning of the cracks indicates a level of self-organization in the structuring and layout of the features – arrived at simply by imposing metallization boundaries in proximity to each other, separated by a distance of the order of the critical dimension of the pattern size apparent in the large surface mud-crack patterns. PMID:26437880

  19. LETTER: Self-organized pattern formation and noise-induced control based on particle computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohlf, Thimo; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2005-12-01

    We propose a new non-equilibrium model for spatial pattern formation based on local information transfer. Unlike most standard models of pattern formation it is not based on the Turing instability or initially laid down morphogen gradients. Information is transmitted through the system via particle-like excitations whose collective dynamics results in pattern formation and control. Here, a simple problem of domain formation is addressed by means of this model in an implementation as stochastic cellular automata, and then generalized to a system of coupled dynamical networks. One observes stable pattern formation, even in the presence of noise and cell flow. Noise contributes through the production of quasi-particles to de novo pattern formation as well as to robust control of the domain boundary position. Pattern proportions are scale independent as regards system size. The dynamics of pattern formation is stable over large parameter ranges, with a discontinuity at vanishing noise and a second-order phase transition at increased cell flow.

  20. Controlled mud-crack patterning and self-organized cracking of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghir, Rian; Arscott, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Exploiting pattern formation - such as that observed in nature - in the context of micro/nanotechnology could have great benefits if coupled with the traditional top-down lithographic approach. Here, we demonstrate an original and simple method to produce unique, localized and controllable self-organised patterns on elastomeric films. A thin, brittle silica-like crust is formed on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using oxygen plasma. This crust is subsequently cracked via the deposition of a thin metal film - having residual tensile stress. The density of the mud-crack patterns depends on the plasma dose and on the metal thickness. The mud-crack patterning can be controlled depending on the thickness and shape of the metallization - ultimately leading to regularly spaced cracks and/or metal mesa structures. Such patterning of the cracks indicates a level of self-organization in the structuring and layout of the features - arrived at simply by imposing metallization boundaries in proximity to each other, separated by a distance of the order of the critical dimension of the pattern size apparent in the large surface mud-crack patterns.

  1. Rod Climbing of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Wang, Xiaorong

    We wish to report an unexpected effect observed for particle suspensions sucked to pass through a vertical pipe. Above a critical concentration, the suspension on the outside of the pipe may climb along the outside wall of the pipe and then display a surprising rod-climbing effect. Our study shows that the phenomenon is influenced mainly by the suspension composition, the pipe dimension and the suction speed. The effects of the pipe materials of different kinds are negligible. Increasing the suction force and the concentration increases the climbing height. Increasing the pipe diameter and wall thickness reduces the climbing effect. This behavior may be relevant to that the suspensions of the type described are all displaying markedly shear-thickening.

  2. Using chemically patterns with different anchoring behavior to control the orientation of nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Armas Perez, Julio; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose Adrian; Xie, Helou; de Pablo, Juan; Nealey, Paul

    2015-03-01

    We present experimental and theoretical study of nematic liquid crystal (5CB) confined to a thin cell between homeotropic anchoring top surface and chemically patterned planar/homeotropic anchoring bottom substrates. The chemically patterned substrate with different dimensions and ~ 4 nm depth topography induce the 5CB to align as the pattern direction as non-degenerate behavior, until the width of the straight line pattern is too wide to confine the 5CB to one direction and back to degenerate behavior. By changing the width of the straight line pattern, a brightness change of the intensity is shown by their corresponding crossed polarizer images. This change is mainly due to a discontinuity of the average angle between the molecules and the surface in function of line width, which is in excellent agreement with the Landan-de Gennes theory when the balance between the elastic deformation in the bulk and orientation of molecules close to the surface is simulated for different pattern dimensions. An elastic free energy transition is also observed from the numerical analysis when the strong planar anchoring for presented experiments is changed to weak. This 3D confinement by chemically patterns and small depth topography offers a new way to generate any geometry pattern controllable non-degenerate orientation, achieving switchable optical properties.

  3. Biomaterial Surface patterning of self assembled monolayers for controlling neuronal cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Ramalingam; Molnar, Peter; Rao, Koritala P.; Hickman, James J.

    2009-01-01

    Control of the position, growth and subsequent function of living cells is a fundamental problem in tissue and cellular engineering. The development of a generation of ‘smart’ biomaterial substrates requires strict control over the material’s surface properties, because the initial response of the cultured cells to the biomaterials mainly depends upon the surface characteristics of the engineered material. Since most of the cells in the body are arranged in distinct patterns during development, it would be beneficial if one could create patterned environments in-vitro for regulating cell behavior, for applications in vivo, in particular for CNS neurons. Accordingly, in this article, we provide design strategies and methodologies developed for nano- and micro-scale surface patterning and the subsequent control of cellular responses in-vitro. PMID:20174479

  4. Controllable 3D alginate hydrogel patterning via visible-light induced electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Dai, Gaole; Wan, Wenfeng; Zhao, Yuliang; Wang, Zixun; Li, Wenjun; Shi, Peng; Shen, Yajing

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of alginate hydrogel in 3D has recently received increasing attention owing to its distinct efficacy as biocompatible scaffold for 3D cell culture, biomedical and tissue engineering. We report a controllable 3D alginate hydrogel patterning method by developing a visible-light induced electrodeposition chip. The chip mainly consists of a photoconductive titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) anode plate, an indium tin oxide (ITO) cathode plate and the mixed solution (1% sodium alginate and 0.25% CaCO3 nano particles) between them. After a designed visible-light pattern is projected onto the TiOPc plate, the produced H(+) by electrolysis will trigger Ca(2+) near the anode (illuminated area), and then the gelation of calcium alginate patterns, as desired, happens controllably. In addition, we further establish an exponential model to elucidate the gel growth v.s. time and current density. The results indicate that the proposed method is able to fabricate various 3D alginate hydrogel patterns in a well controllable manner, and maintain the laden cells at high survival rate (>98% right after gel formation). This research paves an alternative way for 3D alginate hydrogel patterning with high controllability and productivity, which would benefit the research in biomedical and tissue engineering. PMID:27108617

  5. Controlled single-cell deposition and patterning by highly flexible hollow cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Vincent; Forró, Csaba; Weydert, Serge; Aebersold, Mathias J; Dermutz, Harald; Guillaume-Gentil, Orane; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vörös, János; Demkó, László

    2016-04-26

    Single-cell patterning represents a key approach to decouple and better understand the role and mechanisms of individual cells of a given population. In particular, the bottom-up approach of engineering neuronal circuits with a controlled topology holds immense promises to perceive the relationships between connectivity and function. In order to accommodate these efforts, highly flexible SU-8 cantilevers with integrated microchannels have been fabricated for both additive and subtractive patterning. By directly squeezing out single cells onto adhesive surfaces, controlled deposition with a spatial accuracy of 5 μm could be achieved, while subtractive patterning has been realized by selective removal of targeted single cells. Complex cell patterns were created on substrates pre-patterned with cell-adhesive and repulsive areas, preserving the original pattern geometry for long-term studies. For example, a circular loop with a diameter of 530 μm has been realized using primary hippocampal neurons, which were fully connected to their respective neighbors along the loop. Using the same cantilevers, the versatility of the technique has also been demonstrated via in situ modification of already mature neuronal cultures by both detaching individual cells of the population and adding fresh ones, incorporating them into the culture. PMID:27046017

  6. Surface Patterning: Controlling Fluid Flow Through Dolphin and Shark Skin Biomimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, Lawren; Lang, Amy; Bradshaw, Michael; McVay, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Dolphin skin is characterized by circumferential ridges, perpendicular to fluid flow, present from the crest of the head until the tail fluke. When observing a cross section of skin, the ridges have a sinusoidal pattern. Sinusoidal grooves have been proven to induce vortices in the cavities that can help control flow separation which can reduce pressure drag. Shark skin, however, is patterned with flexible scales that bristle up to 50 degrees with reversed flow. Both dolphin ridges and shark scales are thought to help control fluid flow and increase swimming efficiency by delaying the separation of the boundary layer. This study investigates how flow characteristics can be altered with bio-inspired surface patterning. A NACA 4412 hydrofoil was entirely patterned with transverse sinusoidal grooves, inspired by dolphin skin but scaled so the cavities on the model have the same Reynolds number as the cavities on a swimming shark. Static tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of approximately 100,000 and at varying angles of attack. The results were compared to the smooth hydrofoil case. The flow data was quantified using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The results of this study demonstrated that the patterned hydrofoil experienced greater separation than the smooth hydrofoil. It is hypothesize that this could be remediated if the pattern was placed only after the maximum thickness of the hydrofoil. Funding through NSF REU grant 1062611 is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. In die mask overlay control for 14nm double-patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, William; Cheng, James; Tseng, Alex C. P.; Wu, J. K.; Chang, Chin Kuei; Cheng, Jeffrey; Lee, Adder; Huang, Chain Ting; Peng, N. T.; Hsu, Simon C. C.; Yu, Chun Chi; Lu, Colbert; Yu, Julia; Craig, Peter; Pollock, Chuck; Ham, Young; McMurran, Jeff

    2015-10-01

    According to the ITRS roadmap, semiconductor industry drives the 193nm lithography to its limits, using techniques like Double Pattern Technology (DPT), Source Mask Optimization (SMO) and Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT). In terms of considering the photomask metrology, full in-die measurement capability is required for registration and overlay control with challenging specifications for repeatability and accuracy. Double patterning using 193nm immersion lithography has been adapted as the solution to enable 14nm technology nodes. The overlay control is one of the key figures for the successful realization of this technology. In addition to the various error contributions from the wafer scanner, the reticles play an important role in terms of considering lithographic process contributed errors. Accurate pattern placement of the features on reticles with a registration error below 4nm is mandatory to keep overall photomask contributions to overlay of sub 20nm logic within the allowed error budget. In this paper, we show in-die registration errors using 14nm DPT product masks, by measuring in-die overlay patterns comparing with regular registration patterns. The mask measurements are used to obtain an accurate model to predict mask contribution on wafer overlay of double patterning technology.

  8. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1957-08-20

    An electromagnetic device for moving an object in a linear path by increments is described. The device is specifically adapted for moving a neutron absorbing control rod into and out of the core of a reactor and consists essentially of an extension member made of magnetic material connected to one end of the control rod and mechanically flexible to grip the walls of a sleeve member when flexed, a magnetic sleeve member coaxial with and slidable between limit stops along the flexible extension, electromagnetic coils substantially centrally located with respect to the flexible extension to flex the extension member into gripping engagement with the sleeve member when ener gized, moving electromagnets at each end of the sleeve to attract the sleeve when energized, and a second gripping electromagnet positioned along the flexible extension at a distance from the previously mentioned electromagnets for gripping the extension member when energized. In use, the second gripping electromagnet is deenergized, the first gripping electromagnet is energized to fix the extension member in the sleeve, and one of the moving electromagnets is energized to attract the sleeve member toward it, thereby moving the control rod.

  9. Regenerative hyperpolarization in rods.

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, F S

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical properties of the rods in Necturus maculosus were studied at the cell body and the outer segments in dark and light under current and voltage clamp with a pair of intracellular electrodes separated by about 1 mum. 2. The membrane resistance in the dark was voltage- and time-dependent both for the cell body and the outer segment. Slight depolarizations in the cell body reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 10 M omega with a time constant of about 1 sec. Polarization in either direction, at the outer segment, when greater than about 20 mV, reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 30 M omega. The dark potential in the cell body was typically -30 to -35 m V; at the outer segment it was typically only -10 to -15 mV. 3. The light-elicited voltage response in both the cell body and the outer segment was largest with the membrane near the dark potential level. In both regions, the response was reduced when the membrane was polarized in either direction. 4. Under voltage-clamp conditions, a reversal potential for the light response near + 10 mV was measured at the outer segment. At the cell body no reversal potential for the light response was measured; there the clamping current required during the light response was almost of the same magnitude at all potential levels. 5. When the membrane at the cell body was hyperpolarized in the dark under voltage clamp, a transient outward current, typically about one-half the magnitude of the initial inward clamping current was required to maintain the membrane at the clamped potential level. This outward current transient was associated with a decrease in membrane resistance with similar time course. The transient outward current reversed and became inward when the membrane was clamped to potentials more negative than -80 mV. Thus, the transient outward current appears to involve a transient activation initiated by hyperpolarization. I is regenerative in that it is initiated by hyperpolarization and tends to

  10. Western dietary pattern is related to premenstrual syndrome: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Farasati, Negin; Siassi, Fereydoun; Koohdani, Fariba; Qorbani, Mostafa; Abashzadeh, Karolin; Sotoudeh, Gity

    2015-12-28

    Although premenstrual syndrome (PMS) affects a large number of women of reproductive age, the aetiology of this disorder has not yet been fully elucidated. The relationship between food intake and PMS morbidity has been investigated in several studies, but dietary patterns of PMS patients have not been taken into consideration up to now. We examined dietary patterns of 320 nurses with (n 160) and without (n 160) PMS in a case-control study. Food intakes over the past year were determined using semi-quantitative FFQ. Factor analysis was used to identify the main dietary patterns, and logistic regression was used to model the relationship between dietary patterns and PMS morbidity. Three dietary patterns were identified in the analysis: healthy, Western and traditional. After adjustment for age, BMI, menstrual cycles, physical activity and energy intake, participants in the second (OR 2·53; 95 % CI 1·18, 5·43) and third (OR 4·39; 95 % CI 1·97, 9·81) quintiles of the Western dietary pattern were more likely to experience PMS compared with those in the first quintile. The study findings therefore reveal that Western dietary pattern might be associated with PMS morbidity. However, this result should be interpreted with caution as there was no evidence of a dose-response relationship. Future studies are needed to confirm our findings in other populations. PMID:26459000

  11. Control strategies of 3-cell Central Pattern Generator via global stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Álvaro; Rodríguez, Marcos; Barrio, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The study of the synchronization patterns of small neuron networks that control several biological processes has become an interesting growing discipline. Some of these synchronization patterns of individual neurons are related to some undesirable neurological diseases, and they are believed to play a crucial role in the emergence of pathological rhythmic brain activity in different diseases, like Parkinson’s disease. We show how, with a suitable combination of short and weak global inhibitory and excitatory stimuli over the whole network, we can switch between different stable bursting patterns in small neuron networks (in our case a 3-neuron network). We develop a systematic study showing and explaining the effects of applying the pulses at different moments. Moreover, we compare the technique on a completely symmetric network and on a slightly perturbed one (a much more realistic situation). The present approach of using global stimuli may allow to avoid undesirable synchronization patterns with nonaggressive stimuli. PMID:27021970

  12. Control strategies of 3-cell Central Pattern Generator via global stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Álvaro; Rodríguez, Marcos; Barrio, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    The study of the synchronization patterns of small neuron networks that control several biological processes has become an interesting growing discipline. Some of these synchronization patterns of individual neurons are related to some undesirable neurological diseases, and they are believed to play a crucial role in the emergence of pathological rhythmic brain activity in different diseases, like Parkinson’s disease. We show how, with a suitable combination of short and weak global inhibitory and excitatory stimuli over the whole network, we can switch between different stable bursting patterns in small neuron networks (in our case a 3-neuron network). We develop a systematic study showing and explaining the effects of applying the pulses at different moments. Moreover, we compare the technique on a completely symmetric network and on a slightly perturbed one (a much more realistic situation). The present approach of using global stimuli may allow to avoid undesirable synchronization patterns with nonaggressive stimuli.

  13. Microscale Control of Cell Contact and Spacing via Three-Component Surface Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Elliot E.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of micropatterned cell constructs has been limited by difficulties in patterning more than two surface components on a culture substrate. Photolithography using multiple aligned masks is well established for generalized multicomponent patterning, but is often too harsh for biomolecules. We report a two-mask photolithographic process that is tuned to preserve bioactivity in patterns composed of covalently coupled polyethylene glycol (PEG), adsorbed extracellular matrix protein (e.g. collagen I), and adsorbed serum proteins (e.g. vitronectin). Thereby, we pattern two cell types—primary hepatocytes and 3T3 fibroblasts—demonstrating control over contact and spacing (20–200 μm) between the two cell types for over one week. This method is applicable to the study of intercellular communication in cell biology and tissue engineering. PMID:17243746

  14. Spatially controlled simultaneous patterning of multiple growth factors in three-dimensional hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Ryan G.; Ahsan, Shoeb; Aizawa, Yukie; Maxwell, Karen L.; Morshead, Cindi M.; Shoichet, Molly S.

    2011-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) protein-patterned scaffolds provide a more biomimetic environment for cell culture than traditional two-dimensional surfaces, but simultaneous 3D protein patterning has proved difficult. We developed a method to spatially control the immobilization of different growth factors in distinct volumes in 3D hydrogels, and to specifically guide differentiation of stem/progenitor cells therein. Stem-cell differentiation factors sonic hedgehog (SHH) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) were simultaneously immobilized using orthogonal physical binding pairs, barnase-barstar and streptavidin-biotin, respectively. Barnase and streptavidin were sequentially immobilized using two-photon chemistry for subsequent concurrent complexation with fusion proteins barstar-SHH and biotin-CNTF, resulting in bioactive 3D patterned hydrogels. The technique should be broadly applicable to the patterning of a wide range of proteins.

  15. Status of rod consolidation, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    It is estimated that the spent fuel storage pools at some domestic light-water reactors will run out of space before 2003, the year that the US Department of Energy currently predicts it will have a repository available. Of the methods being studied to alleviate the problem, rod consolidation is one of the leading candidates for achieving more efficient use of existing space in spent fuel storage pools. Rod consolidation involves mechanically removing all the fuel rods from the fuel assembly hardware (i.e., the structural components) and placing the fuel rods in a close-packed array in a canister without space grids. A typical goal of rod consolidation systems is to insert the fuel rods from two fuel assemblies into a canister that has the same exterior dimensions as one standard fuel assembly (i.e., to achieve a consolidation or compaction ratio of 2:1) and to compact the nonfuel-bearing structural components from those two fuel assemblies by a factor of 10 to 20. This report provides an overview of the current status of rod consolidation in the United States and a small amount of information on related activities in other countries. 85 refs., 36 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Patterns of exposure to sexually explicit material among sex offenders, child molesters, and controls.

    PubMed

    Nutter, D E; Kearns, M E

    1993-01-01

    The Meese Commission Report claimed exposure to sexually explicit material leads to sex offenses and recommended examining developmental patterns and pornography experiences of offenders. This second phase of our study examines developmental patterns and sexually explicit material experiences of sex offenders, a subgroup of child molesters, and controls. Results indicate sex offenders (but not the child molester subgroup) began masturbating at a significantly younger age than controls. Sexually explicit material was used during the first masturbatory experience of 33.3% of sex offenders and 14% of controls. Child molesters were significantly older than controls when exposed to sexually explicit material. Frequency of adult use of sexually explicit material does not differ significantly among groups. PMID:8468712

  17. Development of an Adaptively Controlled Telescope with Star-Pattern Recognition Pointing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sick, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a 32-cm f/5 Newtonian telescope intended for use by amateur astronomers in producing scientifically useful observations through high-accuracy computer control. The telescope is designed to achieve a 10-arcsecond pointing accuracy through the use of a star-pattern recognition algorithm. This star-pattern recognition pointing algorithm allows pointing errors such as tube flexure and mount misalignment to be intuitively identified and corrected without the need for calibrating positional encoders. This star-pattern recognition algorithm is based on comparing the shapes of visible patterns of six stars in any given field of view to a pre-compiled catalog of star-patterns that is generated by a software package called Star Field Simulator. A second-generation algorithm is presented in this paper that features an empirical image appearance prediction system, which adds photometric measurements to the star-pattern recognition. This allows the effects of unresolvable clusters of stars, and the presence of non-stellar objects to be included in the star-pattern recognition process through the prediction of an object's pixel brightness and point spread function. Testing with pointing camera images has shown that star appearance on a CCD can be predicted with high accuracy. The telescope hardware features a unique fiberglass and metal composite construction technique for precision component placement. An innovative placement of the autoguiding camera at the Newtonian prime focus through an on-axis tracking platform is also featured. The telescope is controlled with real-time software, on a laptop computer, using modified Firewire video cameras to provide pointing and tracking data. To test the accuracy of the control algorithms and simulate the effects of errors from environmental and mechanical sources, a software application was written. Results from this and other tests have shown that this telescope can operate within the preset

  18. Synchronization and control in time-delayed complex networks and spatio-temporal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S.; Kurths, J.; Schöll, E.

    2016-02-01

    This special topics issue is a collection of contributions on the recent developments of control and synchronization in time delayed systems and space time chaos. The various articles report interesting results on time delayed complex networks; fractional order delayed models; dynamics of spatio-temporal patterns; stochastic models etc. Experimental analysis on synchronization, dynamics and control of chaos are also well investigated using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), circuit realizations and chemical reactions.

  19. Spacer multi-patterning control strategy with optical CD metrology on device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongsu; Lee, Byoung-Hoon; Ma, Won-Kwang; Han, Sang-Jun; Kim, Young-Sik; Kwak, Noh-Jung; Theeuwes, Thomas; Guo, Wei; Song, Yi; Wisse, Baukje; Kruijswijk, Stefan; Cramer, Hugo; Welch, Steven; Verma, Alok; Zhang, Rui; Chai, Yvon; Hsu, Sharon; Miceli, Giacomo; Sun, Kyu-Tae; Byun, Jin-Moo

    2016-03-01

    Spacer multi patterning process continues to be a key enabler of future design shrinks in DRAM and NAND process flows. Improving Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) for main features remains high priority for multi patterning technology and requires improved metrology and control solutions. In this paper Spacer Patterning Technology is evaluated using an angle resolved scatterometry tool for both intra field control of the core CD after partition etch (S1) and interfield pitch-walking control after final etch (S1-S2). The intrafield measurements were done directly on device using dense sampling. The inter-field corrections were based on sparse full wafer measurements on biased OCD targets. The CDU improvement after partition-etch was verified by direct scatterometer and CD-SEM measurement on device. The final etch performance across wafer was verified with scatterometer on OCD target. The scatterometer metrology in combination with the control strategy demonstrated a consistent CDU improvement of core (S1) intrafield CD after partition etch between 23-39% and 47-53% on interfield pitch-walking (S1-S2) after final etch. To confirm these improvements with CD-SEM, oversampling of more than 16 times is needed compared to scatterometer. Based on the results it is concluded that scatterometry in combination with the evaluated metrology and control strategy in principle qualifies for a spacer process CDU control loop in a manufacturing environment.

  20. An Analysis of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Hand Muscle EMG for Improved Pattern Recognition Control.

    PubMed

    Adewuyi, Adenike A; Hargrove, Levi J; Kuiken, Todd A

    2016-04-01

    Pattern recognition control combined with surface electromyography (EMG) from the extrinsic hand muscles has shown great promise for control of multiple prosthetic functions for transradial amputees. There is, however, a need to adapt this control method when implemented for partial-hand amputees, who possess both a functional wrist and information-rich residual intrinsic hand muscles. We demonstrate that combining EMG data from both intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles to classify hand grasps and finger motions allows up to 19 classes of hand grasps and individual finger motions to be decoded, with an accuracy of 96% for non-amputees and 85% for partial-hand amputees. We evaluated real-time pattern recognition control of three hand motions in seven different wrist positions. We found that a system trained with both intrinsic and extrinsic muscle EMG data, collected while statically and dynamically varying wrist position increased completion rates from 73% to 96% for partial-hand amputees and from 88% to 100% for non-amputees when compared to a system trained with only extrinsic muscle EMG data collected in a neutral wrist position. Our study shows that incorporating intrinsic muscle EMG data and wrist motion can significantly improve the robustness of pattern recognition control for application to partial-hand prosthetic control. PMID:25955989

  1. Statistical properties of a folded elastic rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Deboeuf, Stéphanie; Boué, Laurent; Corson, Francis; Boudaoud, Arezki; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    2010-03-01

    A large variety of elastic structures naturally seem to be confined into environments too small to accommodate them; the geometry of folded structures span a wide range of length-scales. The elastic properties of these confined systems are further constrained by self-avoidance as well as by the dimensionality of both structures and container. To mimic crumpled paper, we devised an experimental setup to study the packing of a dimensional elastic object in 2D geometries: an elastic rod is folded at the center of a circular Hele-Shaw cell by a centripetal force. The initial configuration of the rod and the acceleration of the rotating disk allow to span different final folded configurations while the final rotation speed controls the packing intensity. Using image analysis we measure geometrical and mechanical properties of the folded configurations, focusing on length, curvature and energy distributions.

  2. Geophysical Evidence for Abiotic Controls on Peatland Patterning at Multiple Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, J.; Slater, L.; Glaser, P.; Comas, X.; O'Brien, M.

    2007-12-01

    The autogenic and allogenic controls on the formation of distinctive and dramatic vegetation patterning found in northern peatlands remain unclear. Groundwater model studies and investigations using point measurements lack intensive data over multiple scales, primarily due to the intensive time required and difficult logistics required to work in these remote ecosystems. We provide geophysical evidence that lithological controls on vegetation patterning exist at multiple scales in ombrotrophic peatlands of northern Minnesota and Maine. Surveys using electrical imaging methods (including resistivity, induced polarization, and ground penetrating radar) at sites in the Red Lake Peatland Complex (160 km2), as well as Kanokolus Bog (1.65 km2) and the Caribou Bog Peatland Complex (22 km2) in Maine reveal sharp vegetation gradients coinciding with changes in the mineral soil lithology. In contrast, large-scale, continuous, patterned zones found in the Red lake Complex coincide with strikingly uniform mineral soil lithology as inferred from the geophysical images. Small-scale (0.3 km2) vegetation patterns observed in Caribou Bog also coincide with small scale lithologic changes in both the mineral and organic deposits. These results provide evidence that the subsurface hydrogeologic framework regulates vegetation patterning in peatlands across multiple scales, presumably by regulating (1) the supply of mineral solutes to the surface vegetation water, and (2) water levels within the organic soil.

  3. Controlled neuronal cell patterning and guided neurite growth on micropatterned nanofiber platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkoc, Veysi; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Nelson, Tyler; Lannutti, John J.; Hansford, Derek J.

    2015-12-01

    Patterning neuronal cells and guiding neurite growth are important for applications such as prosthetics, cell based biosensors, and tissue engineering. In this paper, a microdevice is presented that provides neuronal cell patterning and guided neurite growth on a collagen coated gelatin/PCL nanofiber mat. The pattern consisted of a grid of polystyrene microwells/nodes to confine the cell bodies and orthogonal grooves to guide neurite growth from each node. Vacuum assisted cell seeding was used to localize cell bodies in the microwells and physically separate the cells during seeding. The electrospun nanofiber mats under the polystyrene microstructures were coated with collagen to enhance the cellular attachment and enhance differentiation. We evaluated the performance of our device using adhesion, viability, and differentiation assays of neuron-like PC12 cells compared to controls for vacuum seeding, spatial isolation and guidance, and collagen coating of the fibers. The device provided PC12 cell patterning with increased adhesion, differentiation, and guided neurite outgrowth compared to controls, demonstrating its potential for in vitro neuronal cell patterning studies.

  4. Formation and all-optical control of optical patterns in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, R.; Tsang, C. Y.; Tse, Y. C.; Luk, M. H.; Kwong, N. H.; Chan, Chris K. P.; Leung, P. T.; Lewandowski, P.; Schumacher, Stefan; Lafont, O.; Baudin, E.; Tignon, J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor microcavities offer a unique way to combine transient all-optical manipulation of GaAs quantum wells with the benefits of structural advantages of microcavities. In these systems, exciton-polaritons have dispersion relations with very small effective masses. This has enabled prominent effects, for example polaritonic Bose condensation, but it can also be exploited for the design of all-optical communication devices. The latter involves non-equilibrium phase transitions in the spatial arrangement of exciton-polaritons. We consider the case of optical pumping with normal incidence, yielding a spatially homogeneous distribution of exciton-polaritons in optical cavities containing the quantum wells. Exciton-exciton interactions can trigger instabilities if certain threshold behavior requirements are met. Such instabilities can lead, for example, to the spontaneous formation of hexagonal polariton lattices (corresponding to six-spot patterns in the far field), or to rolls (corresponding to two-spot far field patterns). The competition among these patterns can be controlled to a certain degree by applying control beams. In this paper, we summarize the theory of pattern formation and election in microcavities and illustrate the switching between patterns via simulation results.

  5. Controlled Formation of Surface Patterns in Metal Films Deposited on Elasticity-Gradient PDMS Substrates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Senjiang; Sun, Yadong; Ni, Yong; Zhang, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Controlled surface patterns are useful in a wide range of applications including flexible electronics, elastomeric optics, fluidic channels, surface engineering, measurement technique, biological templates, stamps, and sensors. In this work, we report on the controlled formation of surface patterns in metal films deposited on elasticity-gradient polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. Because of the temperature gradient during the curing process, the PDMS substrate in each sample successively changes from a purely liquid state at one side to a purely elastic state at the opposite side. It is found that surface folds appear in the liquid or viscous PDMS region while wrinkles form in the elastic region. In the transition region from the liquid to elastic PDMS, a nested pattern (i.e., the coexisting of folds and wrinkles) can be observed. The folding wave is triggered by the intrinsic stress during the film deposition and its wavelength is independent of the film thickness. The wrinkling wave is induced by the thermal compression after deposition and its wavelength is proportional to the film thickness. The report in this work could promote better understanding of the effect of substrate elasticity on the surface patterns and fabrication of such patterns (folds and wrinkles) by tuning the substrate property. PMID:26859513

  6. Fluorescent colloidal silica rods - synthesis and phase behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Although the experimental study of spherical colloids has been extensive, similar studies on rod-like particles are rare because suitable model systems are scarce. To fulfill this need, we present the synthesis of monodisperse rod-like silica colloids with tunable dimensions. Rods were produced with diameters of 200 nm and larger and lengths up to 10 µm, which resulted in aspect ratios ranging from 1 to 25. The growth mechanism of these rods involves emulsion droplets of water in pentanol, inside which silica condensation takes place. Since the silica nucleus is attached to the water/pentanol interface, the supply of reactants to the nucleus is anisotropic, causing it to grow on one side only, which results in rod formation. The rods were made suitable for quantitative real-space studies by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Several methods of fluorescent labeling are presented that resulted in constant fluorescence levels, gradients from one rod-end to the other, and even patterns of two colors. Single particle imaging was achieved by creating core-shell rods that had a fluorescent core and a non-fluorescent shell. Alternatively, the rods could be dispersed in a solvent with a low dielectric constant to induce micron-sized double layers. To enable quantitative measurements, a tracking algorithm was developed that identifies the rods' positions and orientations. The newly developed model system was used to study the phase behavior of rods. By combining real-space confocal laser scanning microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering methods, a phase diagram depending on concentration and aspect ratio was constructed, which shows good qualitative agreement with simulation results in literature. This phase diagram includes nematic and smectic phases for the higher aspect ratios. Also, the effect of external fields (electric fields, shear and templates) on the phase behavior was studied. In an electric field, rods aligned themselves with the applied field due to an

  7. Hopf solitons and elastic rods

    SciTech Connect

    Harland, Derek; Sutcliffe, Paul; Speight, Martin

    2011-03-15

    Hopf solitons in the Skyrme-Faddeev model are stringlike topological solitons classified by the integer-valued Hopf charge. In this paper we introduce an approximate description of Hopf solitons in terms of elastic rods. The general form of the elastic rod energy is derived from the field theory energy and is found to be an extension of the classical Kirchhoff rod energy. Using a minimal extension of the Kirchhoff energy, it is shown that a simple elastic rod model can reproduce many of the qualitative features of Hopf solitons in the Skyrme-Faddeev model. Features that are captured by the model include the buckling of the charge three solution, the formation of links at charges five and six, and the minimal energy trefoil knot at charge seven.

  8. Dietary patterns and risk of oesophageal cancers: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Hughes, Maria Celia; Whiteman, David C; Webb, Penelope M

    2012-04-01

    Epidemiological studies investigating the association between dietary intake and oesophageal cancer have mostly focused on nutrients and food groups instead of dietary patterns. We conducted a population-based case-control study, which included 365 oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), 426 oesophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma (OGJAC) and 303 oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cases, with frequency matched on age, sex and geographical location to 1580 controls. Data on demographic, lifestyle and dietary factors were collected using self-administered questionnaires. We used principal component analysis to derive three dietary patterns: 'meat and fat', 'pasta and pizza' and 'fruit and vegetable', and unconditional logistic regression models to estimate risks of OAC, OGJAC and OSCC associated with quartiles (Q) of dietary pattern scores. A high score on the meat-and-fat pattern was associated with increased risk of all three cancers: multivariable-adjusted OR 2·12 (95 % CI 1·30, 3·46) for OAC; 1·88 (95% CI 1·21, 2·94) for OGJAC; 2·84 (95% CI 1·67, 4·83) for OSCC (P-trend <0·01 for all three cancers). A high score on the pasta-and-pizza pattern was inversely associated with OSCC risk (OR 0·58, 95 % CI 0·36, 0·96, P for trend=0·009); and a high score on the fruit-and-vegetable pattern was associated with a borderline significant decreased risk of OGJAC (OR for Q4 v. Q1 0·66, 95% CI 0·42, 1·04, P=0·07) and significantly decreased risk of OSCC (OR 0·41, 95% CI 0·24, 0·70, P for trend=0·002). High-fat dairy foods appeared to play a dominant role in the association between the meat-and-fat pattern and risk of OAC and OGJAC. Further investigation in prospective studies is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:21899799

  9. Self-rolled nanotubes with controlled hollow interiors by patterned grafts.

    PubMed

    Han, Minwoo; Hyun, Jungin; Sim, Eunji

    2015-05-14

    By patterning surface grafts, we propose a simple and systematic method to form tubular structures for which two-dimensional grafted sheets are programmed to self-roll into hollow tubes with a desired size of the internal cavity. The repeating pattern of grafts utilizing defect sites causes anisotropy in the surface-grafted nanosheet, which spontaneously transforms into a curved secondary architecture and, thus, becomes a potential tool with which to form and control the curvature of nanotubes. In fact, the degree and the type of graft defect allow control of the internal cavity size and shape of the resulting nanotubes. By performing dissipative particle dynamics simulations on coarse-grained sheets, we found that the inner cavity size is inversely proportional to the graft-defect density, the difference in the graft densities between the two surface sides of the layer, regardless of whether the defects are patterned or random. While a random distribution of defects gives rise to a non-uniform local curvature and often leads to twisted tubes, regular patterns of graft defects ensure uniform local curvature throughout the sheet, which is important to generate monodisperse nanotubes. At a low graft-defect density, the sheet-to-tube transformation is governed by the layer anisotropy, which induces spontaneous scrolling along the long edge of the sheet, resulting in short tubes. Thus, the curve formation rate and the cavity diameter are independent of the pattern of the graft defects. At a high graft-defect density, however, the scroll direction owing to the graft pattern may conflict with that due to the layer anisotropy. To produce monodisperse nanotubes, two factors are important: (1) a graft-defect pattern parallel to the short edge of the layer, and (2) a graft-defect area wider than half of the graft coil length. PMID:25833200

  10. Increased monolayer domain size and patterned growth of tungsten disulfide through controlling surface energy of substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Kyle; Kang, Kyungnam; Fu, Shichen; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2016-08-01

    We report a surface energy-controlled low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of WS2 monolayers on SiO2 using pre-growth oxygen plasma treatment of substrates, facilitating increased monolayer surface coverage and patterned growth without lithography. Oxygen plasma treatment of the substrate caused an increase in the average domain size of WS2 monolayers by 78%  ±  2% while having a slight reduction in nucleation density, which translates to increased monolayer surface coverage. This substrate effect on growth was exploited to grow patterned WS2 monolayers by patterned plasma treatment on patterned substrates and by patterned source material with resolutions less than 10 µm. Contact angle-based surface energy measurements revealed a dramatic increase in polar surface energy. A growth model was proposed with lowered activation energies for growth and increased surface diffusion length consistent with the range of results observed. WS2 samples grown with and without oxygen plasma were similar high quality monolayers verified through transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, Raman, and photoluminescence measurements. This technique enables the production of large-grain size, patterned WS2 without a post-growth lithography process, thereby providing clean surfaces for device applications.

  11. Biomimetic design of elastomer surface pattern for friction control under wet conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolei

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an observation on the toe pad of a newt was carried out. It was found that the pad surface is covered with an array of polygonal cells separated by channels, similar to those of a tree frog's pad. With this micro-structure, a newt can move on wet and smooth surfaces without slipping. Inspired by the surface structure of newt toe pads, elastic micro-patterned surfaces were fabricated to understand the function of such micro-structures in friction systems. The tribological performance of the patterned surfaces was evaluated using a tribometer. Different tribological performances between micro-dimple and -pillar patterned surfaces were observed. The area density (r) of the micro-pattern is crucial for controlling the friction of the elastic surface. Distinguished from unpatterned and micro-dimple patterned surfaces, the pillar patterned surface with high area density can remain high friction at high sliding speed. It could be one of the reasons of such polygonal structures on newt's toe pads. PMID:23999795

  12. Controlling elastic wave propagation in a soft bilayer system via wrinkling-induced stress patterns.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Yang; Zheng, Yang; Cao, Yanping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Zhang, Wanyu

    2016-05-14

    Compression of a film/substrate bilayer system with different surface/interfacial structures can lead to diverse buckling patterns including sinusoidal wrinkles, ridges, folds, creases and tilted sawteeth wrinkles. In this paper, we show that elastic wave band gaps in the film/substrate bilayer system largely depend on the wrinkling patterns. More interestingly, we find that different wrinkling patterns investigated here can coexist and evolve in one bilayer system and the elastic wave propagation behaviors can be controlled by manipulating the hybrid wrinkling patterns. Our analysis also reveals that the periodic stress pattern plays a dominant role in tuning the bandgap structures in comparison to geometrical patterns caused by surface instability. A careful investigation of the transmission spectra of the composite systems has validated the main findings given by the analysis based on the Bloch wave theory. Potential use of the method and materials reported here to gain wide attenuation frequency ranges and the design of nesting Fibonacci superlattices have been demonstrated. PMID:27074161

  13. Control of Turing patterns and their usage as sensors, memory arrays, and logic gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzika, František; Schreiber, Igor

    2013-10-01

    We study a model system of three diffusively coupled reaction cells arranged in a linear array that display Turing patterns with special focus on the case of equal coupling strength for all components. As a suitable model reaction we consider a two-variable core model of glycolysis. Using numerical continuation and bifurcation techniques we analyze the dependence of the system's steady states on varying rate coefficient of the recycling step while the coupling coefficients of the inhibitor and activator are fixed and set at the ratios 100:1, 1:1, and 4:5. We show that stable Turing patterns occur at all three ratios but, as expected, spontaneous transition from the spatially uniform steady state to the spatially nonuniform Turing patterns occurs only in the first case. The other two cases possess multiple Turing patterns, which are stabilized by secondary bifurcations and coexist with stable uniform periodic oscillations. For the 1:1 ratio we examine modular spatiotemporal perturbations, which allow for controllable switching between the uniform oscillations and various Turing patterns. Such modular perturbations are then used to construct chemical computing devices utilizing the multiple Turing patterns. By classifying various responses we propose: (a) a single-input resettable sensor capable of reading certain value of concentration, (b) two-input and three-input memory arrays capable of storing logic information, (c) three-input, three-output logic gates performing combinations of logical functions OR, XOR, AND, and NAND.

  14. Novel control method of bimodal ultrasonic motor based on wavelet differential pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Congyu; Yu, Xiaofen; Fan, Wei

    2006-11-01

    In view of bimodal piezoelectricity ceramics ultrasonic motor (USM), which is excited by the first order longitudinal vibrations modality and the first order bending vibrations modality, can not be actuated at a slower speed and its actuation sensitivity can not reach nanometer's magnitude under the AC actuation pattern of USM, this paper proposes a novel control technology, which realizes the functions of the step-by-step control and differential control of USM under the original AC actuation pattern through the synthesis of wavelet actuation wave composed of several periods of sine voltage waves whose amplitudes are altered according to a certain regularity. The experiment shows that the speed of USM could be smoothly lowered by reducing the output numbers of wavelet actuation waves within a period of time combined with adopting the differential control pattern of USM, the elliptical trajectory of the actuation head of USM was altered by changing the synchronized control voltage's difference across the two electrodes of USM, by which the actuation sensitivity of USM was improved greatly and therefore the actuation of nanometer's magnitude was achieved .

  15. An Analysis of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Hand Muscle EMG for Improved Pattern Recognition Control

    PubMed Central

    Adewuyi, Adenike A.; Hargrove, Levi J.; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Pattern recognition control combined with surface electromyography (EMG) from the extrinsic hand muscles has shown great promise for control of multiple prosthetic functions for transradial amputees. There is, however, a need to adapt this control method when implemented for partial-hand amputees, who possess both a functional wrist and information-rich residual intrinsic hand muscles. We demonstrate that combining EMG data from both intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles to classify hand grasps and finger motions allows up to 19 classes of hand grasps and individual finger motions to be decoded, with an accuracy of 96% for non-amputees and 85% for partial-hand amputees. We evaluated real-time pattern recognition control of three hand motions in seven different wrist positions. We found that a system trained with both intrinsic and extrinsic muscle EMG data, collected while statically and dynamically varying wrist position increased completion rates from 73% to 96% for partial-hand amputees and from 88% to 100% for non-amputees when compared to a system trained with only extrinsic muscle EMG data collected in a neutral wrist position. Our study shows that incorporating intrinsic muscle EMG data and wrist motion can significantly improve the robustness of pattern recognition control for partial-hand applications. PMID:25955989

  16. Temperature-dependent variation in gas exchange patterns and spiracular control in Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Erica; Bradley, Timothy

    2014-08-01

    Insects display an array of respiratory behaviors, including the use of discontinuous gas exchange. This pattern is characterized by periods of spiracular closure, micro-openings (flutter), and complete openings during which the majority of gas exchange takes place. A current model of insect spiracular control suggests that spiracles are controlled by two interacting feedback loops, which produce the discontinuous pattern. The flutter period is thought to be initiated by a critically low partial pressure of oxygen, while the open period is initiated by a critically high CO2 threshold. The goal of our study was to test this control model under conditions of feeding-induced or temperature-induced changes in metabolic rate. We manipulated the metabolic rate of the insect Rhodnius prolixus using two discrete mechanisms: (1) feeding the insects a bloodmeal or (2) exposing them to a range of temperatures (18-38°C). Examining the variation in the gas exchange patterns produced by insects in each of these treatments allowed us to determine whether spiracular control is sensitive to metabolic rate and/or temperature. We found that increases in temperature caused significant decreases in open phase burst volumes and premature abandonment of discontinuous gas exchange cycles. These effects were not observed in fed individuals maintained at a single temperature despite their higher metabolic rates. Our results indicate that some part of the spiracular control mechanism is temperature sensitive, suggesting a possible role for pH in CO2 sensing. PMID:25079894

  17. Magnetoactive Sponges for Dynamic Control of Microfluidic Flow Patterns in Microphysiological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ringo; Chan, Hon Fai; Leong, Kam W; Truskey, George A; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2014-01-01

    We developed a microfluidic flow-control system capable of dynamically generating various flow patterns on demand. The flow-control system is based on novel magnetoactive sponges embedded in microfluidic flow channels. Applying a non-uniform magnetic field compresses the magnetoactive sponge, significantly reducing porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Tuning the applied magnetic field can dynamically vary the flow rate in the microfluidic channel. Pulsatile and physiological flow patterns with frequency between 1 and 3 Hz, flow rates between 0.5 and 10 μL/min and duration over 3 weeks have been achieved. Smooth muscle cells in engineered blood vessels perfused for 7 days aligned perpendicular to the flow direction under pulsatile but not steady flow, similar to the in vivo orientation. Owing to its various advantages over traditional flow-control methods, the new system potentially has important applications in microfluidic-based microphysiological systems to simulate the physiological nature of blood flow. PMID:24310854

  18. Extremum-seeking control of the beam pattern of a reconfigurable holographic metamaterial antenna.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mikala C; Brunton, Steven L; Kundtz, Nathan B; Kutz, Nathan J

    2016-01-01

    Robust, continuous, and software-defined beam pattern control of holographic metamaterial antennas is necessary to realize the potential of these low-power-consumption, thin, lightweight, inexpensive antennas for consumer usage of satellite communication. We present a complete feedback control approach that enables adaptive control of the radiation pattern for the electronically scanned metamaterial antenna that is robust to measurement noise and is able to continuously optimize performance throughout changing environmental conditions and antenna characteristics. The physical size, weight, and cost advantages of the metamaterial antenna make it an attractive technology when paired with robust and adaptive on-board software strategies to optimize antenna performance and self-tune for various environmental conditions. PMID:26831586

  19. A real-time pattern recognition based myoelectric control usability study implemented in a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Hargrove, L; Losier, Y; Lock, B; Englehart, K; Hudgins, B

    2007-01-01

    Pattern recognition based myoelectric control systems have been well researched; however very few systems have been implemented in a clinical environment. Although classification accuracy or classification error is the metric most often reported to describe how well these control systems perform, very little work research has been conducted to relate this measure to the usability of the system. This work presents a virtual clothespin usability test to assess the performance of pattern recognition based myoelectric control systems. The results suggest that users can complete the virtual task in reasonable time frames when using systems with high classification accuracies. Additionally, results indicate that a clinically-supported classifier training approach (inclusion of the transient potion of contraction signals) may reduce classification accuracy but increase real-time performance. PMID:18003090

  20. Controllable synthesis of CuS-P(AM-co-MAA) composite microspheres with patterned surface structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Liu, Huijin; Zhao, Ya; Fang, Yu

    2008-09-15

    Copper sulfide-poly(acrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) (CuS-P(AM-co-MAA)) composite microspheres with patterned surface structures have been synthesized in a controllable manner by means of the polymer microgel template method. The formation of CuS particles can be regulated by controlling the decomposition of thioacetamide (TAA) in acidic solution. Compared with the microgel template, the surface morphologies of the composite microspheres are characterized by compact and creased textures. The surface morphology of the composite microspheres has been found to be mainly influenced by the amount of copper sulfide precipitated and hence by the rate of H(2)S gas generation. This study might provide a potential route for controlling the synthesis of various metal sulfide-polymer composites with patterned surface structures. PMID:18649893

  1. Locus of control in couples with different patterns of alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Natera, G; Herrejón, M E; Casco, M

    1988-12-01

    A sample of 175 individuals were interviewed and divided in three subgroups of couples: (1) the husband was in an Anonymous Alcoholics program, (2) the husband had been diagnosed as alcoholic and (3) the husband had a regular pattern of high alcohol consumption. In personal interviews by specialized personnel the following instruments were used: the Internal-External (I-E) Locus of control scale; the Health Dailing Living (HDL) questionnaire about alcohol-related problems and patterns. The results showed a trend towards internal locus of control in both spouses for the three subgroups. Nevertheless, there is evidence of a higher internal locus in husbands and wives with regular but light alcohol consumption. As has been reported elsewhere alcohol users who had less problems in their functioning have no problems due to their alcohol use pattern. In order to know to a fuller extent the meaning of internality, a factorial analysis was applied to the I-E scale, obtaining four factors: social system control, personal failure, fatalism and personal attainment. The latter three were more capable to differentiate between the samples with different alcohol use patterns. PMID:3234240

  2. Coherent control of radiation patterns of nonlinear multiphoton processes in nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Papoff, Francesco; McArthur, Duncan; Hourahine, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the coherent control of light waves and currents in metallic nanospheres which applies independently of the nonlinear multiphoton processes at the origin of waves and currents. We derive conditions on the external control field which enable us to change the radiation pattern and suppress radiative losses or to reduce absorption, enabling the particle to behave as a perfect scatterer or as a perfect absorber. The control introduces narrow features in the response of the particles that result in high sensitivity to small variations in the local environment, including subwavelength spatial shifts. PMID:26155833

  3. Method for improving the electrostatics perforation pattern using power controlled discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzón, C.; Miranda, E.; Martínez-Cisneros, C.; Alonso, J.; García-García, J.

    2011-06-01

    The aims of this work are to show the influence of adding a series resistance at the output of a discharge generator circuit and to point out that this component can be used to control the spark energy in electrostatic perforation systems. Analysis of the experimental results reveals that there exists a close connection between the resistor value and the obtained perforation pattern both in hole density and size. The use of a series resistor has a strong influence on the material porosity, which is an important industrial parameter for assessing the pattern perforation quality.

  4. Orientation detection of a single molecule using pupil filter with electrically controllable polarization pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Mamoru; Yoshiki, Keisuke; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a system for measuring the orientation of single molecules using a conventional wide-field fluorescence microscope with a polarization filter consisting of a polarizer and a compact polarization mode converter. The polarization filter electrically controls the pattern of polarization filtering. Since the polarization of the fluorescence from a single molecule highly depends on the angle between the observation direction and the molecular direction, polarization pattern filtering at the pupil plane of the objective lens allows the orientation of a single molecule to be visualized. Using this system, we demonstrated the orientation detection of single molecules.

  5. Multiplicative Noise-Induced Electrohydrodynamic Pattern Formations by Controlling Electric Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    We report multiplicative noise impacts on electroconvections (ECs) in a nematic liquid crystal. By controlling the intensity and cutoff frequency of a superposed electric noise (on a sinusoidal field for ECs), we investigate the variation in the characteristics of ECs such as thresholds and pattern diagrams in high-conductivity cells (σ ˜ 10-6 Ω-1 m-1), in comparison with that in usual conventional cells (σ ˜ 10-8 - 10-7 Ω-1 m-1). Unpredictable threshold behaviors, unknown pattern formations such as isotropic liquid bubbles and EC-sustained phases, and undesirable dielectric breakdown induced by thermal focusing are found in high-conductivity cells.

  6. Nuclear design of Helical Cruciform Fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to increase the power density of current and new light water reactor designs, the Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods are proposed. The HCF rods are equivalent to a cylindrical rod, with the fuel in a cruciform shaped, twisted axially. The HCF rods increase the surface area to volume ratio and inter-subchannel mixing behavior due to their cruciform and helical shapes, respectively. In a previous study, the HCF rods have shown the potential to up-rate existing PWRs by 50% and BWRs by 25%. However, HCF rods do display different neutronics modeling and performance. The cruciform cross section of HCF rods creates radially asymmetric heat generation and temperature distribution. The nominal HCF rod's beginning of life reactivity is reduced, compared to a cylindrical rod with the same fuel volume, by 500 pcm, due to increase in absorption in cladding. The rotation of these rods accounts for reactivity changes, which depends on the H/HM ratio of the pin cell. The HCF geometry shows large sensitivities to U{sup 235} or gadolinium enrichments compared to a cylindrical geometry. In addition, the gadolinium-containing HCF rods show a stronger effect on neighboring HCF rods than in case of cylindrical rods, depending on the orientation of the HCF rods. The helical geometry of the rods introduces axial shadowing of about 600 pcm, not seen in typical cylindrical rods. (authors)

  7. Process-based tolerance assessment of connecting rod machining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G. V. S. S.; Rao, P. Srinivasa; Surendra Babu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Process tolerancing based on the process capability studies is the optimistic and pragmatic approach of determining the manufacturing process tolerances. On adopting the define-measure-analyze-improve-control approach, the process potential capability index ( C p) and the process performance capability index ( C pk) values of identified process characteristics of connecting rod machining process are achieved to be greater than the industry benchmark of 1.33, i.e., four sigma level. The tolerance chain diagram methodology is applied to the connecting rod in order to verify the manufacturing process tolerances at various operations of the connecting rod manufacturing process. This paper bridges the gap between the existing dimensional tolerances obtained via tolerance charting and process capability studies of the connecting rod component. Finally, the process tolerancing comparison has been done by adopting a tolerance capability expert software.

  8. The Target Achievement Control Test: Evaluating real-time myoelectric pattern recognition control of a multifunctional upper-limb prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ann M.; Hargrove, Levi J.; Lock, Blair A.; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite high classification accuracies (~95%) of myoelectric control systems based on pattern recognition, it is unclear how well offline measures translate to real-time closed-loop control. Recently, a real-time virtual test analyzed how well subjects completed motions using a multiple–degree of freedom (DOF) classifier. Although this test provided real-time performance metrics, the required task was oversimplified: motion speeds were normalized and unintended movements were ignored. We included these considerations in a new, more challenging virtual test, the Target Achievement Control (TAC) Test. Users attempted to move a virtual arm into a target posture using myoelectric pattern recognition. Five transradial amputees performed the test with various classifier (one vs. three DOF) and task complexities (one vs. three required motions per posture). No significant difference was found in classification accuracy between the one- and three- DOF classifiers (97.2%±2.0% and 94.1%±3.1%, respectively) (p=0.14). Subjects completed 31% fewer trials in significantly more time using the three-DOF classifier. Subjects took 3.6±0.8 times longer to reach a three-motion posture compared to a one-motion posture. The results highlight the need for closed-loop performance measures and demonstrate that the TAC Test provides a useful and more challenging tool to test real-time pattern recognition performance. PMID:21938650

  9. Development of Fractal Pattern Making Application using L-System for Enhanced Machine Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Alexander A. S.; Linggarjati, Jimmy; Wijaya, Yandi

    2014-03-01

    One big issue facing the industry today is an automated machine lack of flexibility for customization because it is designed by the manufacturers based on certain standards. In this research, it is developed customized application software for CNC (Computer Numerically Controlled) machines using open source platform. The application is enable us to create designs by means of fractal patterns using L-System, developed by turtle geometry interpretation and Python programming languages. The result of the application is the G-Code of fractal pattern formed by the method of L-System. In the experiment on the CNC machine, the G-Code of fractal pattern which involving the branching structure has been able to run well.

  10. Controlling droplet-based deposition uniformity of long silver nanowires by micrometer scale substrate patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Nandita; Cross, Graham L. W.

    2015-12-01

    We report control of droplet-deposit uniformity of long silver nanowires suspended in solutions by microscopic influence of the liquid contact line. Substrates with microfabricated line patterns with a pitch far smaller than mean wire length lead to deposit thickness uniformity compared to unpatterned substrates. For high boiling-point solvents, two significant effects were observed: The substrate patterns suppressed coffee ring staining, and the wire deposits exhibited a common orientation lying perpendicular over top the lines. The latter result is completely distinct from previously reported substrate groove channeling effects. This work shows that microscopic influence of the droplet contact line geometry including the contact angle by altered substrate wetting allows significant and advantageous influence of deposition patterns of wire-like solutes as the drop dries.

  11. Controlling droplet-based deposition uniformity of long silver nanowires by micrometer scale substrate patterning.

    PubMed

    Basu, Nandita; Cross, Graham L W

    2015-12-01

    We report control of droplet-deposit uniformity of long silver nanowires suspended in solutions by microscopic influence of the liquid contact line. Substrates with microfabricated line patterns with a pitch far smaller than mean wire length lead to deposit thickness uniformity compared to unpatterned substrates. For high boiling-point solvents, two significant effects were observed: The substrate patterns suppressed coffee ring staining, and the wire deposits exhibited a common orientation lying perpendicular over top the lines. The latter result is completely distinct from previously reported substrate groove channeling effects. This work shows that microscopic influence of the droplet contact line geometry including the contact angle by altered substrate wetting allows significant and advantageous influence of deposition patterns of wire-like solutes as the drop dries. PMID:26559042

  12. Three-dimensional patterning of multiple cell populations through orthogonal genetic control of cell motility

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Joanna L.; Sood, Anshum

    2013-01-01

    The ability to independently assemble multiple cell types within a three-dimensional matrix would be a powerful enabling tool for modeling and engineering complex tissues. Here we introduce a strategy to dynamically pattern distinct subpopulations of cells through genetic regulation of cell motility. We first describe glioma cell lines that were genetically engineered to stably express constitutively active or dominant negative Rac1 GTPase mutants under the control of either a doxycycline-inducible or cumate-inducible promoter. We culture each population as multicellular spheroids and show that by adding or withdrawing the appropriate inducer at specific times, we can control the timing and extent of Rac1-dependent cell migration into three-dimensional collagen matrices. We then report results with mixed spheroids in which one subpopulation of cells expresses dominant negative Rac1 under a doxycycline-inducible promoter and the other expresses dominant negative Rac1 under a cumate-inducible promoter. Using this system, we demonstrate that doxycycline and cumate addition suppress Rac1-dependent motility in a subpopulation-specific and temporally-controlled manner. This allows us to orthogonally control the motility of each subpopulation and spatially assemble the cells into radially symmetric three-dimensional patterns through the synchronized addition and removal of doxycycline and cumate. This synthetic biology-inspired strategy offers a novel means of spatially organizing multiple cell populations in conventional matrix scaffolds and complements the emerging suite of technologies that seek to pattern cells by engineering extracellular matrix properties. PMID:24622945

  13. Root Water Uptake and Soil Moisture Pattern Dynamics - Capturing Connections, Controls and Causalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, T.; Heidbuechel, I.; Hassler, S. K.; Simard, S.; Guntner, A.; Stewart, R. D.; Weiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    We hypothesize that there is a shift in controls on landscape scale soil moisture patterns when plants become active during the growing season. Especially during the summer soil moisture patterns are not only controlled by soils, topography and related abiotic site characteristics but also by root water uptake. Root water uptake influences soil moisture patterns both in the lateral and vertical direction. Plant water uptake from different soil depths is estimated based on diurnal fluctuations in soil moisture content and was investigated with a unique setup of 46 field sites in Luxemburg and 15 field sites in Germany. These sites cover a range of geologies, soils, topographic positions and types of vegetation. Vegetation types include pasture, pine forest (young and old) and different deciduous forest stands. Available data at all sites includes information at high temporal resolution from 3-5 soil moisture and soil temperature profiles, matrix potential, piezometers and sapflow sensors as well as standard climate data. At sites with access to a stream, discharge or water level is also recorded. The analysis of soil moisture patterns over time indicates a shift in regime depending on season. Depth profiles of root water uptake show strong differences between different forest stands, with maximum depths ranging between 50 and 200 cm. Temporal dynamics of signal strength within the profile furthermore suggest a locally shifting spatial distribution of root water uptake depending on water availability. We will investigate temporal thresholds (under which conditions spatial patterns of root water uptake become most distinct) as well as landscape controls on soil moisture and root water uptake dynamics.

  14. Independently Controlled Wing Stroke Patterns in the Fruit Fly Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Soma; Bartussek, Jan; Fry, Steven N.; Zapotocky, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Flies achieve supreme flight maneuverability through a small set of miniscule steering muscles attached to the wing base. The fast flight maneuvers arise from precisely timed activation of the steering muscles and the resulting subtle modulation of the wing stroke. In addition, slower modulation of wing kinematics arises from changes in the activity of indirect flight muscles in the thorax. We investigated if these modulations can be described as a superposition of a limited number of elementary deformations of the wing stroke that are under independent physiological control. Using a high-speed computer vision system, we recorded the wing motion of tethered flying fruit flies for up to 12 000 consecutive wing strokes at a sampling rate of 6250 Hz. We then decomposed the joint motion pattern of both wings into components that had the minimal mutual information (a measure of statistical dependence). In 100 flight segments measured from 10 individual flies, we identified 7 distinct types of frequently occurring least-dependent components, each defining a kinematic pattern (a specific deformation of the wing stroke and the sequence of its activation from cycle to cycle). Two of these stroke deformations can be associated with the control of yaw torque and total flight force, respectively. A third deformation involves a change in the downstroke-to-upstroke duration ratio, which is expected to alter the pitch torque. A fourth kinematic pattern consists in the alteration of stroke amplitude with a period of 2 wingbeat cycles, extending for dozens of cycles. Our analysis indicates that these four elementary kinematic patterns can be activated mutually independently, and occur both in isolation and in linear superposition. The results strengthen the available evidence for independent control of yaw torque, pitch torque, and total flight force. Our computational method facilitates systematic identification of novel patterns in large kinematic datasets. PMID:25710715

  15. Analysis of Double-encapsulated Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, Jason Dean; Medvedev, Pavel G; Novascone, Stephen Rhead; Perez, Danielle Marie; Williamson, Richard L

    2014-09-01

    In an LWR fuel rod, the cladding encapsulates the fuel, contains fission products, and transfers heat directly to the water coolant. In some situations, it may be advantageous to separate the cladding from the coolant through use of a secondary cladding or capsule. This may be done to increase confidence that the fuel or fission products will not mix with the coolant, to provide a mechanism for controlling the rod temperature, or to place multiple experimental rodlets within a single housing. With an axisymmetric assumption, it is possible to derive closed-form expressions for the temperature profile in a fuel rod using radially-constant thermal conductivity in the fuel. This is true for both a traditional fuel-cladding rod and a double-encapsulated fuel (fuel, cladding, capsule) configuration. Likewise, it is possible to employ a fuel performance code to analyse both a traditional and a double-encapsulated fuel. In the case of the latter, two sets of gap heat transfer conditions must be imposed. In this work, we review the equations associated with radial heat transfer in a cylindrical system, present analytic and computational results for a postulated power and gas mixture history for IFA-744, and describe the analysis of the AFC-2A, 2B metallic fuel alloy experiments at the Advanced Test Reactor, including the effect of a release of fission products into the cladding-capsule gap. The computational results for these two cases were obtained using BISON, a fuel performance code under development at Idaho National Laboratory.

  16. Controlled patterning of peptide nanotubes and nanospheres using inkjet printing technology.

    PubMed

    Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2008-02-01

    Peptide nanostructures are expected to serve as a major tool in future nanotechnological applications owing to their excellent self-assembly properties, biological and chemical flexibility and structural simplicity. Yet one of the limiting factors for the integration of peptide assemblies into functional electro-organic hybrid devices is the controlled patterning of their assemblies. Here we report the use of inkjet technology for the application of peptide nanostructures on nonbiological surfaces. The aromatic dipeptides nanotubes (ADNT) which readily self-assemble in solution were used as an 'ink' and patterned on transparency foil and ITO plastic surfaces using a commercial inkjet printer. While inkjet technology was used in the past for the patterning of carbon nanotubes, it was not used for the deposition of biomolecular nanostructures. Furthermore, during the development of the application we were able to produce two types of nanostructures, i.e. nanotubes and nanospheres by the self-assembly of the same aromatic dipeptide, tertbutoxycarbonyl-Phe-Phe-OH (Boc-Phe-Phe-OH), under different conditions. Both spherical and tubular structures could be efficiently patterned on surfaces into predesigned patterns. The applications of such technology are discussed. PMID:18035858

  17. Bio-inspired direct patterning functional nanothin microlines: controllable liquid transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianbin; Meng, Qingan; Wang, Pengwei; Liu, Huan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-04-28

    Developing a general and low-cost strategy that enables direct patterning of microlines with nanometer thickness from versatile liquid-phase functional materials and precise positioning of them on various substrates remains a challenge. Herein, with inspiration from the oriental wisdom to control ink transfer by Chinese brushes, we developed a facile and general writing strategy to directly pattern various functional microlines with homogeneous distribution and nanometer-scale thickness. It is demonstrated that the width and thickness of the microlines could be well-controlled by tuning the writing method, providing guidance for the adaptation of this technique to various systems. It is also shown that various functional liquid-phase materials, such as quantum dots, small molecules, polymers, and suspensions of nanoparticles, could directly write on the substrates with intrinsic physicochemical properties well-preserved. Moreover, this technique enabled direct patterning of liquid-phase materials on certain microdomains, even in multiple layered style, thus a microdomain localized chemical reaction and the patterned surface chemical modification were enabled. This bio-inspired direct writing device will shed light on the template-free printing of various functional micropatterns, as well as the integrated functional microdevices. PMID:25845024

  18. Effects produced by CDU improvement of resist pattern with PEB temperature control for wiring resistance variation reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, Masahide; Shinozuka, Shinichi; Ogata, Kunie; Morimoto, Tamotsu

    2008-03-01

    Semiconductor manufacturing technology has shifted towards finer design rules, and demands for critical dimension uniformity (CDU) of resist patterns have become greater than ever. One of the methods for improving CDU of resist pattern is to control the temperature of post-exposure bake (PEB). When ArF resist is used, there is a certain relationship between critical dimension (CD) and PEB temperature. By utilizing this relationship, Resist Pattern CDU can be improved through control of within-wafer temperature distribution in the PEB process. We have already applied this method to Resist Pattern CDU improvement and have achieved these results. In this evaluation, we aim at: 1. Clarifying the relationship between the improvement in Resist Pattern CDU through PEB temperature control and the improvement in Etching Pattern CDU. 2. Verifying whether Resist Pattern CDU improvement through PEB temperature control has any effect on the reduction in wiring resistance variation. The evaluation procedure is: 1. Preparation of wafers with base film of doped Poly-Si (D-Poly). 2. Creation of two sets of samples on the base, a set of samples with good Resist Pattern CDU and a set of samples with poor Resist Pattern CDU. 3. Etching of the two sets under the same conditions. 4. Measurements of CD and wiring resistance. We used Optical CD Measurement (OCD) for measurement of resist pattern and etching pattern for the reason that OCD is minimally affected by Line Edge Roughness (LER). As a result, we found that; 1. The improvement in Resist Pattern CDU leads to the improvement in Etching Pattern CDU . 2. The improvement in Resist Pattern CDU has an effect on the reduction in wiring resistance variation. There is a cause-and-effect relationship between wiring resistance variation and transistor characteristics. From this relationship, we expect that the improvement in Resist Pattern CDU through PEB temperature control can contribute to device performance improvement.

  19. Effective impedance boundary optimization and its contribution to dipole radiation and radiation pattern control.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Zhong, Xu; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen; Johnson, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Radiation pattern control has generated much interest recently due to its potential applications. Here we report the observation of high-efficiency dipole-like radiation of sound with broad bandwidth through a decorated plate with periodical two-dimensional Helmholtz resonators on both sides and a single slit at the centre. The decorated plate was optimally designed to adjust the effective impedance of the boundary, and the underlying mechanism of radiation pattern control is attributed to wave vector tailoring. The high radiation efficiency is due to the Fabry-Perot resonances associated with waveguide modes in the centre slit. The method to obtain a collimated beam without any sidelobes is also provided. Our findings should have an impact on acoustic applications. PMID:24458333

  20. Control of Rewriteable Doping Patterns in Graphene/Boron Nitride Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Salman; Velasco, Jairo, Jr.; Wong, Dillon; Lee, Juwon; Tsai, Hsin Zon; Ju, Long; Jiang, Lili; Shi, Zhiwen; Ashby, Paul; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael

    Spatial control of charge doping in 2D materials is a promising technique for designing future electronic devices and understanding novel physics. Electrostatic gating and chemical doping are common methods to achieve control of charge doping in 2D materials. However, these approaches suffer from complicated fabrication processes that introduce impurities, change material properties irreversibly, and lack flexibility. Here, we introduce a new method for patterning rewriteable doping profiles with local interface charge transfer from defects in a tunable BN substrate into an adjacent layer of graphene. We characterize these spatial doping patterns through local probe and transport techniques. This technique enables many novel device designs for 2D materials, including atomically thin p-n junctions and rewriteable memory devices.

  1. Control chart pattern recognition using an optimized neural network and efficient features.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimzadeh, Ata; Ranaee, Vahid

    2010-07-01

    Automatic recognition of abnormal patterns in control charts has seen increasing demands nowadays in manufacturing processes. This study investigates the design of an accurate system for control chart pattern (CCP) recognition from two aspects. First, an efficient system is introduced that includes two main modules: the feature extraction module and the classifier module. The feature extraction module uses the entropies of the wavelet packets. These are applied for the first time in this area. In the classifier module several neural networks, such as the multilayer perceptron and radial basis function, are investigated. Using an experimental study, we choose the best classifier in order to recognize the CCPs. Second, we propose a hybrid heuristic recognition system based on particle swarm optimization to improve the generalization performance of the classifier. The results obtained clearly confirm that further improvements in terms of recognition accuracy can be achieved by the proposed recognition system. PMID:20403598

  2. Controlling graphene plasmons with resonant metal antennas and spatial conductivity patterns.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, P; Nikitin, A Y; Golmar, F; Centeno, A; Pesquera, A; Vélez, S; Chen, J; Navickaite, G; Koppens, F; Zurutuza, A; Casanova, F; Hueso, L E; Hillenbrand, R

    2014-06-20

    Graphene plasmons promise unique possibilities for controlling light in nanoscale devices and for merging optics with electronics. We developed a versatile platform technology based on resonant optical antennas and conductivity patterns for launching and control of propagating graphene plasmons, an essential step for the development of graphene plasmonic circuits. We launched and focused infrared graphene plasmons with geometrically tailored antennas and observed how they refracted when passing through a two-dimensional conductivity pattern, here a prism-shaped bilayer. To that end, we directly mapped the graphene plasmon wavefronts by means of an imaging method that will be useful in testing future design concepts for nanoscale graphene plasmonic circuits and devices. PMID:24855026

  3. Phylogeographic patterns and evolution of the mitochondrial DNA control region in two neotropical cats (Mammalia, felidae).

    PubMed

    Eizirik, E; Bonatto, S L; Johnson, W E; Crawshaw, P G; Vié, J C; Brousset, D M; O'Brien, S J; Salzano, F M

    1998-11-01

    The ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) and margay (L. wiedii) are sister-species of Neotropical cats which evolved from a lineage that migrated into South America during the formation of the Panamanian land bridge 3-5 million years ago. Patterns of population genetic divergence of each species were studied by phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences in individuals sampled across the distribution of these taxa. Abundant genetic diversity and remarkably concordant phylogeographic partitions for both species were observed, identifying parallel geographic regions which likely reflect historical faunal barriers. Inferred aspects of phylogeography, population genetic structure, and demographic history were used to formulate conservation recommendations for these species. In addition, observed patterns of sequence variation provided insight into the molecular evolution of the mtDNA control region in closely related felids. PMID:9797412

  4. Expression pattern of immediate early genes in the cerebellum of D1R KO, D2R KO, and wild type mice under vestibular-controlled activity.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toru; Sato, Asako; Kitsukawa, Takashi; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the different motor abilities of D1R knockout (KO), D2R KO and wild-type (WT) mice. To understand the interaction between the cerebellum and the striatal direct and indirect pathways, we examined the expression patterns of immediate early genes (IEG) in the cerebellum of these three genotypes of mice. In the WT naive mice, there was little IEG expression. However, we observed a robust expression of c-fos mRNA in the vermis and hemisphere after running rota-rod tasks. In the vermis, c-fos was expressed throughout the lobules except lobule 7, and also in crus 1 of the ansiform lobule (Crus1), copula of the pyramis (Cop) and most significantly in the flocculus in the hemisphere. jun-B was much less expressed but more preferentially expressed in Purkinje cells. In addition, we observed significant levels of c-fos and jun-B expressions after handling mice, and after the stationary rota-rod task in naive mice. Surprisingly, we observed significant expression of c-fos and jun-B even 30 min after single weighing. Nonetheless, certain additional c-fos and jun-B expressions were observed in three genotypes of the mice that experienced several sessions of motor tasks 24 h after stationary rota-rod task and on days 1 and 5 after rota-rod tasks, but no significant differences in expressions after the running rota-rod tasks were observed among the three genotypes. In addition, there may be some differences 24 h after the stationary rota-rod task between the naive mice and the mice that experienced several sessions of motor tasks. PMID:26137459

  5. Use of a twin dataset to identify AMD-related visual patterns controlled by genetic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quellec, Gwénolé; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Russell, Stephen R.

    2010-03-01

    The mapping of genotype to the phenotype of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is expected to improve the diagnosis and treatment of the disease in a near future. In this study, we focused on the first step to discover this mapping: we identified visual patterns related to AMD which seem to be controlled by genetic factors, without explicitly relating them to the genes. For this purpose, we used a dataset of eye fundus photographs from 74 twin pairs, either monozygotic twins, who have the same genotype, or dizygotic twins, whose genes responsible for AMD are less likely to be identical. If we are able to differentiate monozygotic twins from dizygotic twins, based on a given visual pattern, then this pattern is likely to be controlled by genetic factors. The main visible consequence of AMD is the apparition of drusen between the retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch's membrane. We developed two automated drusen detectors based on the wavelet transform: a shape-based detector for hard drusen, and a texture- and color- based detector for soft drusen. Forty visual features were evaluated at the location of the automatically detected drusen. These features characterize the texture, the shape, the color, the spatial distribution, or the amount of drusen. A distance measure between twin pairs was defined for each visual feature; a smaller distance should be measured between monozygotic twins for visual features controlled by genetic factors. The predictions of several visual features (75.7% accuracy) are comparable or better than the predictions of human experts.

  6. Songbird Respiration is Controlled by Multispike Patterns at Millisecond Temporal Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Caroline; Srivastava, Kyle; Vellema, Michiel; Elemans, Coen; Nemenman, Ilya; Sober, Samuel

    Although the importance of precise timing of neural action potentials (spikes) is well known in sensory systems, approaches to motor control have focused almost exclusively on firing rates. Here we examined whether precise timing of spikes in multispike patterns has an effect on the motor output in the respiratory system of the Bengalese finch, a songbird. By recording from single motor neurons and the muscle fibers they innervate in freely behaving birds, we find that the spike trains are significantly non-Poisson, suggesting that the precise timing of spikes is tightly controlled. We further find that even a one millisecond shift of an individual spike in a multispike pattern predicts a significantly different air sac pressure. Finally, we provide evidence for the causal relation between precise spike timing and the motor output in this organism by stimulating the motor system with precisely timed patterns of electrical impulses. We observe that shifting a single pulse by as little as two milliseconds elicits differences in resulting air sac pressure. These results demonstrate that the precise timing of spikes does play a role in motor control. This work was partially supported by NSF Grant IOS/1208126, NIH Grant 5R90DA033462 , NIH Grant R01NS084844, and NIH Grant F31DC013753.

  7. Psychosocial Factors of Different Health Behaviour Patterns in Adolescents: Association with Overweight and Weight Control Behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Veloso, Susana M.; Matos, Margarida G.; Carvalho, Marina; Diniz, José A.

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity, nutrition, and sedentary behaviour combine to influence the risk of overweight among adolescents. This paper aims to identify psychosocial factors of different health behaviour patterns in adolescents and its association with overweight and weight control behaviours. The 3069 adolescents of both genders (average of 14.8 years old) from the 2010 Portuguese survey of Health Behaviour School-Aged Children (HBSC) answered the 2010 HBSC self-reported questionnaire. It used the cluster k-means (nonhierarchy method), qui-square, one-way ANOVA, and logistic regression. Three clusters with different behavioural patterns (physical activity, sedentary, and eating) composed the results obtained. The sedentary group (34%) had lower self-regulation, body satisfaction, health and wellness, family and classmates relationships, communication with the father than the other two groups. The active gamers (25%) had a smaller BMI but used more unhealthy weight control strategies than the other two groups. The healthy group (41%) was more motivated and more satisfied with school but was not different than the active gamers in most psychosocial variables. Differences were found between clusters for weight control behaviours and psychosocial variables. Different strategies for different patterns were necessary in order to promote obesity prevention and, simultaneously, target healthy lifestyle and wellbeing in adolescents. PMID:22811890

  8. Controllable spiking patterns in long-wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for neuromorphic photonics systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Antonio; Javaloyes, Julien

    2015-12-14

    Multiple controllable spiking patterns are achieved in a 1310 nm Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) in response to induced perturbations and for two different cases of polarized optical injection, namely, parallel and orthogonal. Furthermore, reproducible spiking responses are demonstrated experimentally at sub-nanosecond speed resolution and with a controlled number of spikes fired. This work opens therefore exciting research avenues for the use of VCSELs in ultrafast neuromorphic photonic systems for non-traditional computing applications, such as all-optical binary-to-spiking format conversion and spiking information encoding.

  9. A Brief Adherence Intervention that Improved Glycemic Control: Mediation by Patterns of Adherence

    PubMed Central

    de Vries McClintock, Heather F.; Morales, Knashawn H.; Small, Dylan S.; Bogner, Hillary R.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether longitudinal adherence profiles mediated the relationship between a brief adherence intervention and glycemic control among patients with Type 2 diabetes. Adherence was assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Longitudinal analysis via growth curve mixture modeling was carried out to classify patients according to patterns of adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) assays were used to measure glycemic control as the clinical outcome. Across the whole sample, longitudinal adherence profiles mediated 35.2% (13.2%, 81.0%) of the effect of a brief adherence intervention on glycemic control (from odds ratio (OR) = 8.48, 95% CI (3.24, 22.2) to 4.00, 95% CI (1.34, 11.93)). Our results suggest that patients in the intervention had better glycemic control largely due to their greater likelihood of adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents. PMID:24913600

  10. An Advanced Electrospinning Method of Fabricating Nanofibrous Patterned Architectures with Controlled Deposition and Desired Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasel, Sheikh Md

    We introduce a versatile advanced method of electrospinning for fabricating various kinds of nanofibrous patterns along with desired alignment, controlled amount of deposition and locally variable density into the architectures. In this method, we employed multiple electrodes whose potentials have been altered in milliseconds with the help of microprocessor based control system. Therefore, key success of this method was that the electrical field as well as charge carrying fibers could be switched shortly from one electrode's location to another, as a result, electrospun fibers could be deposited on the designated areas with desired alignment. A wide range of nanofibrous patterned architectures were constructed using proper arrangement of multiple electrodes. By controlling the concurrent activation time of two adjacent electrodes, we demonstrated that amount of fibers going into the pattern can be adjusted and desired alignment in electrospun fibers can be obtained. We also revealed that the deposition density of electrospun fibers in different areas of patterned architectures can be varied. We showed that by controlling the deposition time between two adjacent electrodes, a number of functionally graded patterns can be generated with uniaxial alignment. We also demonstrated that this handy method was capable of producing random, aligned, and multidirectional nanofibrous mats by engaging a number of electrodes and switching them in desired patterns. A comprehensive study using finite element method was carried out to understand the effects of electrical field. Simulation results revealed that electrical field strength alters shortly based on electrode control switch patterns. Nanofibrous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds and its composite reinforced with wollastonite and wood flour were fabricated using rotating drum electrospinning technique. Morphological, mechanical, and thermal, properties were characterized on PVA/wollastonite and PVA/wood flour nanocomposites

  11. Synthesis and Liquid-Crystal Behavior of Bent Colloidal Silica Rods.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Chen, Guangdong; Martinez-Miranda, Luz J; Yu, Hua; Liu, Kun; Nie, Zhihong

    2016-01-13

    The design and assembly of novel colloidal particles are of both academic and technological interest. We developed a wet-chemical route to synthesize monodisperse bent rigid silica rods by controlled perturbation of emulsion-templated growth. The bending angle of the rods can be tuned in a range of 0-50° by varying the strength of perturbation in the reaction temperature or pH in the course of rod growth. The length of each arm of the bent rods can be individually controlled by adjusting the reaction time. For the first time we demonstrated that the bent silica rods resemble banana-shaped liquid-crystal molecules and assemble into ordered structures with a typical smectic B2 phase. The bent silica rods could serve as a visualizable mesoscopic model for exploiting the phase behaviors of bent molecules which represent a typical class of liquid-crystal molecules. PMID:26700616

  12. Vibrational Power Flow Analysis of Rods and Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlever, James Christopher; Bernhard, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method to model vibrational power flow and predict the resulting energy density levels in uniform rods and beams is investigated. This method models the flow of vibrational power in a manner analogous to the flow of thermal power in a heat conduction problem. The classical displacement solutions for harmonically excited, hysteretically damped rods and beams are used to derive expressions for the vibrational power flow and energy density in the rod and beam. Under certain conditions, the power flow in these two structural elements will be shown to be proportional to the energy density gradient. Using the relationship between power flow and energy density, an energy balance on differential control volumes in the rod and beam leads to a Poisson's equation which models the energy density distribution in the rod and beam. Coupling the energy density and power flow solutions for rods and beams is also discussed. It is shown that the resonant behavior of finite structures complicates the coupling of solutions, especially when the excitations are single frequency inputs. Two coupling formulations are discussed, the first based on the receptance method, and the second on the travelling wave approach used in Statistical Energy Analysis. The receptance method is the more computationally intensive but is capable of analyzing single frequency excitation cases. The traveling wave approach gives a good approximation of the frequency average of energy density and power flow in coupled systems, and thus, is an efficient technique for use with broadband frequency excitation.

  13. Fission gas release restrictor for breached fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kadambi, N. Prasad; Tilbrook, Roger W.; Spencer, Daniel R.; Schwallie, Ambrose L.

    1986-01-01

    In the event of a breach in the cladding of a rod in an operating liquid metal fast breeder reactor, the rapid release of high-pressure gas from the fission gas plenum may result in a gas blanketing of the breached rod and rods adjacent thereto which impairs the heat transfer to the liquid metal coolant. In order to control the release rate of fission gas in the event of a breached rod, the substantial portion of the conventional fission gas plenum is formed as a gas bottle means which includes a gas pervious means in a small portion thereof. During normal reactor operation, as the fission gas pressure gradually increases, the gas pressure interiorly of and exteriorly of the gas bottle means equalizes. In the event of a breach in the cladding, the gas pervious means in the gas bottle means constitutes a sufficient restriction to the rapid flow of gas therethrough that under maximum design pressure differential conditions, the fission gas flow through the breach will not significantly reduce the heat transfer from the affected rod and adjacent rods to the liquid metal heat transfer fluid flowing therebetween.

  14. LWR fuel rod bundle behavior under severe fuel damage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuczera, B. Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.

    1988-01-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) safety research and development activities conducted at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe have recently been reorganized with a concentrated mission under the LWR safety project group. The topics treated relate mainly to severe-accident analysis research and source term assessment as well as to source term mitigation measures. A major part of the investigations concerns the early phase of a severe core meltdown accident, specifically LWR rod assembly behavior under sever fuel damage (SFD) conditions. To determine the extent of fuel rod damage, including the relocation behavior of molten reaction products, damage propagation, time-dependent H{sub 2} generation from clad oxidation, and fragmentation of oxygen-embrittled materials during cooldown and quenching, extensive out-of-pile rod bundle experiments have been initiated in the new CORA test facility. The bundle parameters, such as rod dimensions, rod pitch, and grid spacer, can be adjusted to both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions. Currently, the test program consists of 15 experiments in which the influence of Inconel grid spacer, (Ag,In,Cd)-absorber rods (PWR) and of B{sub 4}C control blades (BWR) on fuel damage initiation and damage propagation are being investigated for different boundary conditions. As of June 1988, four bundle tests had been successfully carried out for PWR accident conditions.

  15. Differential effects of GABAA receptor antagonists in the control of respiratory neuronal discharge patterns.

    PubMed

    Dogas, Z; Krolo, M; Stuth, E A; Tonkovic-Capin, M; Hopp, F A; McCrimmon, D R; Zuperku, E J

    1998-11-01

    To ascertain the role of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in shaping and controlling the phasic discharge patterns of medullary respiratory premotor neurons, localized pressure applications of the competitive GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (BIC) and the noncompetitive GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin (PIC) were studied. Multibarrel micropipettes were used in halothane anesthetized, paralyzed, ventilated, vagotomized dogs to record single unit activity from inspiratory and expiratory neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group and to picoeject GABAA receptor antagonists. The moving time average of phrenic nerve activity was used to determine respiratory phase durations and to synchronize cycle-triggered histograms of discharge patterns. Picoejection of BIC and PIC had qualitatively different effects on the discharge patterns of respiratory neurons. BIC caused an increase in the discharge rate during the neuron's active phase without inducing activity during the neuron's normally silent phase. The resulting discharge patterns were amplified replicas (x2-3) of the underlying preejection phasic patterns. In contrast, picoejection of PIC did not increase the peak discharge rate during the neuron's active phase but induced a tonic level of activity during the neuron's normally silent phase. The maximum effective BIC dose (15 +/- 1.8 pmol/min) was considerably smaller than that for PIC (280 +/- 53 pmol/min). These findings suggest that GABAA receptors with differential pharmacology mediate distinct functions within the same neuron, 1) gain modulation that is BIC sensitive but PIC insensitive and 2) silent-phase inhibition blocked by PIC. These studies also suggest that the choice of an antagonist is an important consideration in the determination of GABA receptor function within the respiratory motor control system. PMID:9819249

  16. Dietary patterns, food groups and myocardial infarction: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lockheart, Michael S K; Steffen, Lyn M; Rebnord, Hege Møklebust; Fimreite, Ragnhild Lekven; Ringstad, Jetmund; Thelle, Dag S; Pedersen, Jan I; Jacobs, David R

    2007-08-01

    Certain dietary patterns may be related to the risk of CVD. We hypothesised that a plant-centred dietary pattern would be associated with a reduced risk of first myocardial infarction (MI). A case-control study of Norwegian men and postmenopausal women (age 45-75 years) was performed. A FFQ was administered, generally within 3 d after incident MI (n 106 cases). Controls (n 105) were frequency matched on sex, age and geographic location. On the FFQ, 190 items were categorised into thirty-five food groups and an a priori healthy diet pattern score was created. We estimated OR using logistic regression with adjustment for energy intake, family history of heart disease, marital status, current smoking, education and age. Among food groups, the risk of MI was significantly higher per SD of butter and margarine (OR 1.66 (95 % CI 1.12, 2.46)), and lower per SD of tomatoes (OR 0.53 (95 % CI 0.35, 0.79)), high-fat fish (OR 0.57 (95 % CI 0.38, 0.86)), wine (OR 0.58 (95 % CI 0.41, 0.83)), salad (OR 0.59 (95 % CI 0.40, 0.87)), whole grain breakfast cereals (OR 0.64 (95 % CI 0.45, 0.90)), cruciferous vegetables (OR 0.66 (95 % CI 0.47, 0.93)) and non-hydrogenated vegetable oil (OR 0.68 (95 % CI 0.49, 0.95)). An abundance of cases were found to have a low a priori healthy diet pattern score. A dietary pattern emphasising nutrient-rich plant foods and high-fat fish and low in trans fatty acids was associated with decreased risk of MI among Norwegians. PMID:17391555

  17. Tumbling of a rigid rod in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, J. M. J.; Blöte, H. W. J.

    2014-09-01

    The tumbling of a rigid rod in a shear flow is analyzed in the high viscosity limit. Following Burgers, the Master Equation is derived for the probability distribution of the orientation of the rod. The equation contains one dimensionless number, the Weissenberg number, which is the ratio of the shear rate and the orientational diffusion constant. The equation is solved for the stationary state distribution for arbitrary Weissenberg numbers, in particular for the limit of high Weissenberg numbers. The stationary state gives an interesting flow pattern for the orientation of the rod, showing the interplay between flow due to the driving shear force and diffusion due to the random thermal forces of the fluid. The average tumbling time and tumbling frequency is calculated as a function of the Weissenberg number. A simple crossover function is proposed which covers the whole regime from small to large Weissenberg numbers.

  18. Comparing dietary patterns of depressed patients versus healthy people in a case control protocol

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Maryam; Sotoudeh, Gity; Raisi, Firoozeh; Majdzadeh, Reza; Foroughifar, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Major depressive disorder is the leading cause of disability around the world. Because of the high rate of medication discontinuation by patients and the risk of recurrence, factors such as nutrition could be useful for the prevention or treatment of depression. The relationship between depression and dietary patterns has been reported in a few studies but with controversial results. Therefore, we have decided to study the possible effects of cultural, social, racial, geographic and environmental conditions on this relationship in an Iranian population. Methods and analysis In our case control protocol, 110 cases and 220 controls will be individually matched based on age, sex and area of residence. New cases of depression, based on the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV), will be recruited from two psychiatric clinics in Tehran. Interviewers will then go to each patient's home and invite qualified individuals to participate in the study as controls. Food intakes of all participants will be obtained by semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires covering the past year; these will be transformed into actual food intake (g/day). Dietary patterns will be determined by the principal components method. Conditional logistic regression, as a multivariate analysis, will be used for assessing the relationship between dietary patterns and depression, taking into consideration the potential role of different variables. The results may help to identify differences in dietary patterns between depressed and healthy people. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol has been approved by ethics committee of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. At the beginning of the study, a written informed consent form will be signed and dated by subjects and investigators. The results will be published in due time. PMID:24525387

  19. Stuck fuel rod capping sleeve

    DOEpatents

    Gorscak, Donald A.; Maringo, John J.; Nilsen, Roy J.

    1988-01-01

    A stuck fuel rod capping sleeve to be used during derodding of spent fuel assemblies if a fuel rod becomes stuck in a partially withdrawn position and, thus, has to be severed. The capping sleeve has an inner sleeve made of a lower work hardening highly ductile material (e.g., Inconel 600) and an outer sleeve made of a moderately ductile material (e.g., 304 stainless steel). The inner sleeve may be made of an epoxy filler. The capping sleeve is placed on a fuel rod which is then severed by using a bolt cutter device. Upon cutting, the capping sleeve deforms in such a manner as to prevent the gross release of radioactive fuel material

  20. Phototropic growth control of nanoscale pattern formation in photoelectrodeposited Se–Te films

    PubMed Central

    Sadtler, Bryce; Burgos, Stanley P.; Batara, Nicolas A.; Beardslee, Joseph A.; Atwater, Harry A.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2013-01-01

    Photoresponsive materials that adapt their morphologies, growth directions, and growth rates dynamically in response to the local incident electromagnetic field would provide a remarkable route to the synthesis of complex 3D mesostructures via feedback between illumination and the structure that develops under optical excitation. We report the spontaneous development of ordered, nanoscale lamellar patterns in electrodeposited selenium–tellurium (Se–Te) alloy films grown under noncoherent, uniform illumination on unpatterned substrates in an isotropic electrolyte solution. These inorganic nanostructures exhibited phototropic growth in which lamellar stripes grew toward the incident light source, adopted an orientation parallel to the light polarization direction with a period controlled by the illumination wavelength, and showed an increased growth rate with increasing light intensity. Furthermore, the patterns responded dynamically to changes during growth in the polarization, wavelength, and angle of the incident light, enabling the template-free and pattern-free synthesis, on a variety of substrates, of woodpile, spiral, branched, or zigzag structures, along with dynamically directed growth toward a noncoherent, uniform intensity light source. Full-wave electromagnetic simulations in combination with Monte Carlo growth simulations were used to model light–matter interactions in the Se–Te films and produced a model for the morphological evolution of the lamellar structures under phototropic growth conditions. The experiments and simulations are consistent with a phototropic growth mechanism in which the optical near-field intensity profile selects and reinforces the dominant morphological mode in the emergent nanoscale patterns. PMID:24218617

  1. Long-Range Ordering of Block Copolymers on Well-Controlled Patterned Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Eun; Kim, Nam-Kyun; Park, Jina; Lee, Donghyun

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we achieved long-range ordering of block copolymers (BCPs) by combining solvent-annealing process and well-controlled patterned substrates. Nano-lines of poly(tetrafluoro ethylene) (PTFE) were firstly fabricated in large area as a PTFE bar was rubbed on Si substrates at 340 °C. The amplitude and pitch distance of PTFE nanolines were around 17 nm and 150 nm, respectively. Then, asymmetric polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) copolymers (PS- b-P2VP) were subsequently spin-coated on the patterned substrates after a thin layer of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) was prepared on the PTFE patterned substrates to enhance the wettability of BCP thin films. As BCP thin films were solvent-annealed in vapor of organic solvents, highly ordered BCP nanostructures oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the surface were generated in large area. In addition, the nanopatterns were successfully transferred to the underlying PVA layer or Si substrate by dry etching. Thus, the resulting nanopatterns were utilized as templates to synthesize inorganic nanofeatures. The ordering behavior of BCP thin films on the patterned substrates was characterized by using AFM, SEM and GI-SAXS.

  2. Nanoscale Control of Rewriteable Doping Patterns in Pristine Graphene/Boron Nitride Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Jairo; Ju, Long; Wong, Dillon; Kahn, Salman; Lee, Juwon; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Germany, Chad; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Lu, Jiong; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael F

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale control of charge doping in two-dimensional (2D) materials permits the realization of electronic analogs of optical phenomena, relativistic physics at low energies, and technologically promising nanoelectronics. Electrostatic gating and chemical doping are the two most common methods to achieve local control of such doping. However, these approaches suffer from complicated fabrication processes that introduce contamination, change material properties irreversibly, and lack flexible pattern control. Here we demonstrate a clean, simple, and reversible technique that permits writing, reading, and erasing of doping patterns for 2D materials at the nanometer scale. We accomplish this by employing a graphene/boron nitride heterostructure that is equipped with a bottom gate electrode. By using electron transport and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we demonstrate that spatial control of charge doping can be realized with the application of either light or STM tip voltage excitations in conjunction with a gate electric field. Our straightforward and novel technique provides a new path toward on-demand graphene p-n junctions and ultrathin memory devices. PMID:26852622

  3. Morphogenetic fields in embryogenesis, regeneration, and cancer: Non-local control of complex patterning

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Establishment of shape during embryonic development, and the maintenance of shape against injury or tumorigenesis, requires constant coordination of cell behaviors toward the patterning needs of the host organism. Molecular cell biology and genetics have made great strides in understanding the mechanisms that regulate cell function. However, generalized rational control of shape is still largely beyond our current capabilities. Significant instructive signals function at long range to provide positional information and other cues to regulate organism-wide systems properties like anatomical polarity and size control. Is complex morphogenesis best understood as the emergent property of local cell interactions, or as the outcome of a computational process that is guided by a physically-encoded map or template of the final goal state? Here I review recent data and molecular mechanisms relevant to morphogenetic fields: large-scale systems of physical properties that have been proposed to store patterning information during embryogenesis, regenerative repair, and cancer suppression that ultimately controls anatomy. Placing special emphasis on the role of endogenous bioelectric signals as an important component of the morphogenetic field, I speculate on novel approaches for the computational modeling and control of these fields with applications to synthetic biology, regenerative medicine, and evolutionary developmental biology. PMID:22542702

  4. Topographic cell instructive patterns to control cell adhesion, polarization and migration

    PubMed Central

    Ventre, Maurizio; Natale, Carlo Fortunato; Rianna, Carmela; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Topographic patterns are known to affect cellular processes such as adhesion, migration and differentiation. However, the optimal way to deliver topographic signals to provide cells with precise instructions has not been defined yet. In this work, we hypothesize that topographic patterns may be able to control the sensing and adhesion machinery of cells when their interval features are tuned on the characteristic lengths of filopodial probing and focal adhesions (FAs). Features separated by distance beyond the length of filopodia cannot be readily perceived; therefore, the formation of new adhesions is discouraged. If, however, topographic features are separated by a distance within the reach of filopodia extension, cells can establish contact between adjacent topographic islands. In the latter case, cell adhesion and polarization rely upon the growth of FAs occurring on a specific length scale that depends on the chemical properties of the surface. Topographic patterns and chemical properties may interfere with the growth of FAs, thus making adhesions unstable. To test this hypothesis, we fabricated different micropatterned surfaces displaying feature dimensions and adhesive properties able to interfere with the filopodial sensing and the adhesion maturation, selectively. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to exert a potent control on cell adhesion, elongation and migration by tuning topographic features’ dimensions and surface chemistry. PMID:25253035

  5. Tonic GABAA conductance bidirectionally controls interneuron firing pattern and synchronization in the CA3 hippocampal network

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Ivan; Savtchenko, Leonid P.; Song, Inseon; Koo, Jaeyeon; Pimashkin, Alexey; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Semyanov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    The spiking output of interneurons is key for rhythm generation in the brain. However, what controls interneuronal firing remains incompletely understood. Here we combine dynamic clamp experiments with neural network simulations to understand how tonic GABAA conductance regulates the firing pattern of CA3 interneurons. In baseline conditions, tonic GABAA depolarizes these cells, thus exerting an excitatory action while also reducing the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) amplitude through shunting. As a result, the emergence of weak tonic GABAA conductance transforms the interneuron firing pattern driven by individual EPSPs into a more regular spiking mode determined by the cell intrinsic properties. The increased regularity of spiking parallels stronger synchronization of the local network. With further increases in tonic GABAA conductance the shunting inhibition starts to dominate over excitatory actions and thus moderates interneuronal firing. The remaining spikes tend to follow the timing of suprathreshold EPSPs and thus become less regular again. The latter parallels a weakening in network synchronization. Thus, our observations suggest that tonic GABAA conductance can bidirectionally control brain rhythms through changes in the excitability of interneurons and in the temporal structure of their firing patterns. PMID:24344272

  6. Nanostructure Formation by controlled dewetting on patterned substrates: A combined theoretical, modeling and experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Liang-Xing; Wang, Ying-Min; Srinivasan, Bharathi Madurai; Asbahi, Mohamed; Yang, Joel K. W.; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We perform systematic two-dimensional energetic analysis to study the stability of various nanostructures formed by dewetting solid films deposited on patterned substrates. Our analytical results show that by controlling system parameters such as the substrate surface pattern, film thickness and wetting angle, a variety of equilibrium nanostructures can be obtained. Phase diagrams are presented to show the complex relations between these system parameters and various nanostructure morphologies. We further carry out both phase field simulations and dewetting experiments to validate the analytically derived phase diagrams. Good agreements between the results from our energetic analyses and those from our phase field simulations and experiments verify our analysis. Hence, the phase diagrams presented here provide guidelines for using solid-state dewetting as a tool to achieve various nanostructures. PMID:27580943

  7. Control of Rewriteable Doping Patterns in Graphene/Boron Nitride Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Salman; Velasco, Jairo, Jr.; Wong, Dillon; Lee, Juwon; Tsai, Hsin Zon; Ju, Long; Jiang, Lili; Shi, Zhiwen; Ashby, Paul; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael

    Spatial control of charge doping in 2D materials is a prerequisite for designing future electronic devices and understanding novel physics. Electrostatic gating and chemical doping are two of the most common methods to achieve this. However, these approaches suffer from complicated fabrication processes that introduce impurities, change material properties irreversibly, and lack flexibility. Here we introduce a new method for patterning rewriteable doping profiles using an STM tip by way of local tip-voltage-induced ionization of defects in a BN substrate. We characterize these spatial doping patterns through local probe and transport techniques. This technique enables many novel device designs for 2D materials, including atomically thin p-n junctions and rewriteable memory devices.

  8. Pattern formation and control in polymeric systems: From Minkowski measures to in situ AFM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Thin liquid polymer films are not only of great technical importance, they also exhibit a variety of dynamical instabilities. Some of them may be desired, some rather not. To analyze and finally control pattern formation, modern thin film theories are as vital as techniques to characterize the morphologies and structures in and on the films. Examples for the latter are atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as scattering techniques. The talk will introduce into the practical applications of Minkowski measures to characterize patterns and explain what thin film properties (e.g. capillary number, solid/liquid boundary condition, glass transition temperature, chain mobility) can further be extracted including new technical possibilities by AFM and scattering techniques.

  9. Climatic controls on hurricane patterns: a 1200-y near-annual record from Lighthouse Reef, Belize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denommee, K. C.; Bentley, S. J.; Droxler, A. W.

    2014-01-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are powerful agents of destruction, and understanding climatic controls on TC patterns is of great importance. Over timescales of seasons to several decades, relationships among TC track, frequency, intensity and basin-scale climate changes are well documented by instrumental records. Over centuries to millennia, climate-shift influence on TC regimes remains poorly constrained. To better understand these relationships, records from multiple locations of TC strikes spanning millennia with high temporal resolution are required, but such records are rare. Here we report on a highly detailed sedimentary proxy record of paleo-TC strikes from the Blue Hole of Lighthouse Reef, Belize. Our findings provide an important addition to other high-resolution records, which collectively demonstrate that shifts between active and inactive TC regimes have occurred contemporaneously with shifts hemispheric-scale oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns such as MDR SSTs and NAO mode, rather than with changes in local climate phenomena as has previously been suggested.

  10. Nanostructure Formation by controlled dewetting on patterned substrates: A combined theoretical, modeling and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liang-Xing; Wang, Ying-Min; Srinivasan, Bharathi Madurai; Asbahi, Mohamed; Yang, Joel K W; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We perform systematic two-dimensional energetic analysis to study the stability of various nanostructures formed by dewetting solid films deposited on patterned substrates. Our analytical results show that by controlling system parameters such as the substrate surface pattern, film thickness and wetting angle, a variety of equilibrium nanostructures can be obtained. Phase diagrams are presented to show the complex relations between these system parameters and various nanostructure morphologies. We further carry out both phase field simulations and dewetting experiments to validate the analytically derived phase diagrams. Good agreements between the results from our energetic analyses and those from our phase field simulations and experiments verify our analysis. Hence, the phase diagrams presented here provide guidelines for using solid-state dewetting as a tool to achieve various nanostructures. PMID:27580943

  11. Spectral pattern recognition of controlled substances in street samples using artificial neural network system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poryvkina, Larisa; Aleksejev, Valeri; Babichenko, Sergey M.; Ivkina, Tatjana

    2011-04-01

    The NarTest fluorescent technique is aimed at the detection of analyte of interest in street samples by recognition of its specific spectral patterns in 3-dimentional Spectral Fluorescent Signatures (SFS) measured with NTX2000 analyzer without chromatographic or other separation of controlled substances from a mixture with cutting agents. The illicit drugs have their own characteristic SFS features which can be used for detection and identification of narcotics, however typical street sample consists of a mixture with cutting agents: adulterants and diluents. Many of them interfere the spectral shape of SFS. The expert system based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) has been developed and applied for such pattern recognition in SFS of street samples of illicit drugs.

  12. Theory and design of "shortened" multiantenna microwave applicators with controllable SAR patterns.

    PubMed

    Leybovich, L B; Nussbaum, G H; Straube, W L; Emami, B N

    1991-01-01

    A "shortened" multiantenna hyperthermia applicator has been designed and tested at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at Washington University School of Medicine. By shortening the distance from antenna to aperture, an applicator is obtained that produces an SAR pattern that is essentially the same as produced by a monopole antenna. By placing several properly spaced probe antennas into the same "shortened" applicator, an applicator is obtained that produces a SAR distribution that is essentially a composite of small overlapping SAR patterns produced by weakly interacting incoherently driven antennas. Such a design significantly improves the applicator's lateral heating efficiency and allows the independent control of temperatures in certain tumor areas by changing the input power to the respective antennas. PMID:2046602

  13. Construction of DNA nanotubes with controllable diameters and patterns using hierarchical DNA sub-tiles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaolong; Wu, Xiaoxu; Song, Tao; Li, Xin

    2016-08-21

    The design of DNA nanotubes is a promising and hot research branch in structural DNA nanotechnology, which is rapidly developing as a versatile method for achieving subtle nanometer scale materials and molecular diagnostic/curative devices. Multifarious methods have been proposed to achieve varied DNA nanotubes, such as using square tiles and single-stranded tiles, but it is still a challenge to develop a bottom-up assembly way to build DNA nanotubes with different diameters and patterns using certain universal DNA nanostructures. This work addresses the challenge by assembling three types of spatial DNA nanotubes with different diameters and patterns from the so-called "basic bricks", i.e., hierarchical DNA sub-tiles. A high processing rate and throughput synthesis of DNA nanotubes are observed and analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Experimental observations and data analysis suggests the stability and controllability of DNA nanotubes assembled by hierarchical DNA sub-tiles. PMID:27444699

  14. Long term stability of surface EMG pattern classification for prosthetic control.

    PubMed

    Amsüss, Sebastian; Paredes, Liliana P; Rudigkeit, Nina; Graimann, Bernhard; Herrmann, Michael J; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Long-term functioning of a hand prosthesis is crucial for its acceptance by patients with upper limb deficit. In this study the reliability over days of the performance of pattern classification approaches based on surface electromyography (sEMG) signal for the control of upper limb prostheses was investigated. Recordings of sEMG from the forearm muscles were obtained across five consecutive days from five healthy subjects. It was demonstrated that the classification performance decreased monotonically on average by 4.1% per day. It was also found that the accumulated error was confined to three of the eight movement classes investigated. This contribution gives insight on the long term behavior of pattern classification, which is crucial for commercial viability. PMID:24110514

  15. One-step substrate nanofabrication and patterning of nanoparticles by lithographically controlled etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, M.; Limones Herrero, D.; Valle, F.; Greco, P.; Ingo, G. M.; Kaciulis, S.; Biscarini, F.; Cavallini, M.

    2011-09-01

    We propose an integrated top-down and bottom-up approach to single-step nanofabrication of complex nanostructures made of different materials. The process, termed lithographically controlled etching (LCE), starts with a drop of an etching solution cast on the surface to be patterned. By placing a polymeric mold on the substrate, the stamp protrusions come into contact with the surface, thus protecting it, whereas the surface beneath the mold recesses is exposed to a thin layer of etching solution, allowing the surface to be etched. By dispersing nanoparticles into the etching solution, these can be deposited and self-organize in the recesses on the substrate as these are excavated. We demonstrate here the fabrication of complex structures and nanowires 30 nm wide. Moreover, by exploiting capillary forces, it is possible to deposit nanoparticles at precise positions with respect to optically addressable microstructures, thus realizing a multiscale functional pattern.

  16. Construction of DNA nanotubes with controllable diameters and patterns using hierarchical DNA sub-tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaolong; Wu, Xiaoxu; Song, Tao; Li, Xin

    2016-08-01

    The design of DNA nanotubes is a promising and hot research branch in structural DNA nanotechnology, which is rapidly developing as a versatile method for achieving subtle nanometer scale materials and molecular diagnostic/curative devices. Multifarious methods have been proposed to achieve varied DNA nanotubes, such as using square tiles and single-stranded tiles, but it is still a challenge to develop a bottom-up assembly way to build DNA nanotubes with different diameters and patterns using certain universal DNA nanostructures. This work addresses the challenge by assembling three types of spatial DNA nanotubes with different diameters and patterns from the so-called ``basic bricks'', i.e., hierarchical DNA sub-tiles. A high processing rate and throughput synthesis of DNA nanotubes are observed and analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Experimental observations and data analysis suggests the stability and controllability of DNA nanotubes assembled by hierarchical DNA sub-tiles.

  17. Site controlled red-yellow-green light emitting InGaN quantum discs on nano-tipped GaN rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, M.; Li, H.; Kusch, G.; Zhao, C.; Ooi, B.; Edwards, P. R.; Martin, R. W.; Holmes, J. D.; Parbrook, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips' broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD's confinement dimensions, rather than significantly increasing the In%. This article details the easily controlled method of manipulating the QDs dimensions producing high crystal quality InGaN without complicated growth conditions needed for strain relaxation and alloy compositional changes seen for bulk planar GaN templates.We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips' broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD

  18. Temporal changes of spatial soil moisture patterns: controlling factors explained with a multidisciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Edoardo; Wollschläger, Ute; Kögler, Simon; Behrens, Thorsten; Dietrich, Peter; Reinstorf, Frido; Schmidt, Karsten; Weiler, Markus; Werban, Ulrike; Zacharias, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Characterizing the spatial patterns of soil moisture is critical for hydrological and meteorological models, as soil moisture is a key variable that controls matter and energy fluxes and soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange processes. Deriving detailed process understanding at the hillslope scale is not trivial, because of the temporal variability of local soil moisture dynamics. Nevertheless, it remains a challenge to provide adequate information on the temporal variability of soil moisture and its controlling factors. Recent advances in wireless sensor technology allow monitoring of soil moisture dynamics with high temporal resolution at varying scales. In addition, mobile geophysical methods such as electromagnetic induction (EMI) have been widely used for mapping soil water content at the field scale with high spatial resolution, as being related to soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa). The objective of this study was to characterize the spatial and temporal pattern of soil moisture at the hillslope scale and to infer the controlling hydrological processes, integrating well established and innovative sensing techniques, as well as new statistical methods. We combined soil hydrological and pedological expertise with geophysical measurements and methods from digital soil mapping for designing a wireless soil moisture monitoring network. For a hillslope site within the Schäfertal catchment (Central Germany), soil water dynamics were observed during 14 months, and soil ECa was mapped on seven occasions whithin this period of time using an EM38-DD device. Using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient, we described the temporal persistence of a dry and a wet characteristic state of soil moisture as well as the switching mechanisms, inferring the local properties that control the observed spatial patterns and the hydrological processes driving the transitions. Based on this, we evaluated the use of EMI for mapping the spatial pattern of soil moisture under

  19. Dietary Pattern and Risk of Hodgkin Lymphoma in a Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Mara M.; Chang, Ellen T.; Zhang, Yawei; Fung, Teresa T.; Batista, Julie L.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Mueller, Nancy E.; Birmann, Brenda M.

    2015-01-01

    Classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) has few known modifiable risk factors, and the relationship between diet and cHL risk is unclear. We performed the first investigation of an association between dietary pattern and cHL risk in 435 cHL cases and 563 population-based controls from Massachusetts and Connecticut (1997–2000) who completed baseline diet questionnaires. We identified 4 major dietary patterns (“vegetable,” “high meat,” “fruit/low-fat dairy,” “desserts/sweets”) using principal components analysis. We computed multivariable odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations of dietary pattern score (quartiles) with younger-adult (age <50 years), older-adult (age ≥50 years), and overall cHL risk. Secondary analyses examined associations by histological subtype and tumor Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status. A diet high in desserts/sweets was associated with younger-adult (odds ratio(quartile 4 vs. quartile 1) = 1.60, 95% confidence interval: 1.05, 2.45; Ptrend = 0.008) and EBV-negative, younger-adult (odds ratio = 2.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.31, 3.41; Ptrend = 0.007) cHL risk. A high meat diet was associated with older-adult (odds ratio = 3.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 10.91; Ptrend = 0.04) and EBV-negative, older-adult (odds ratio = 4.64, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 20.86; Ptrend = 0.04) cHL risk. Other dietary patterns were not clearly associated with cHL. We report the first evidence for a role of dietary pattern in cHL etiology. Diets featuring high intake of meat or desserts and sweets may increase cHL risk. PMID:26182945

  20. Evaluation of Ultrasonic Time-of-Flight Diffraction Data for Selected Control Rod Drive Nozzles from Davis Besse Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2011-04-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) examined ultrasonic (UT) time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) data from ten (10) nozzles in the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Plant reactor closure head. The TOFD data was acquired by AREVA after a bare metal visual examination of the pressure vessel head indicated potential leakage in at least one nozzle. A detailed analysis of the UT data shows that Nozzle 4 has three indications consistent with cracking in the penetration tube. One of the indications starts at the wetted side of the weld and progresses to the annulus. In addition, examination of UT data from the annulus region of Nozzle 4 displays an irregular pattern that could be associated with boric acid deposits and leakage/wastage in the interference fit. The review of TOFD data for the other nine nozzles resulted in several indications being detected in the weld region and near the inner diameter (ID) and outer diameter (OD) surfaces of the penetration tube, but no other indications that are consistent with cracking that may have resulted in leakage were observed. A review of the back-wall reflections in the other nine nozzles also did not show strong indications of leakage, although Nozzle 67 displayed an irregularly-shaped region of high ultrasonic transmission near 180 degrees on the interference fit.

  1. Site controlled red-yellow-green light emitting InGaN quantum discs on nano-tipped GaN rods.

    PubMed

    Conroy, M; Li, H; Kusch, G; Zhao, C; Ooi, B; Edwards, P R; Martin, R W; Holmes, J D; Parbrook, P J

    2016-06-01

    We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips' broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD's confinement dimensions, rather than significantly increasing the In%. This article details the easily controlled method of manipulating the QDs dimensions producing high crystal quality InGaN without complicated growth conditions needed for strain relaxation and alloy compositional changes seen for bulk planar GaN templates. PMID:27174084

  2. Excess signal transmission with dimming control pattern in indoor visible light communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; You, Xiaodi; Zheng, Huanhuan; Yu, Changyuan

    2014-10-01

    In traditional dimming control system using pulse width modulation (PWM) combined with M-QAM OFDM scheme, OFDM signal is only transmitted during "on" period. To guarantee the communication quality, reduction of duty cycle will cause increased symbol rate or added LED power. This means system BER performance degradation and power consumption. In order to solve the defects of the traditional dimming scheme, we propose a new dimming control scheme in indoor visible light communication, which combines OFDM signal and multi-pulse position modulation (MPPM) light pulse well with each other. By means of dividing traditional PWM pulses into MPPM pulses with the same duty cycle, the pattern effect of MPPM pulses is utilized, which makes excess signal transmission possible. Simulation results show that when reducing the brightness of LED the achievable symbol rate using dimming control patterns is not higher than the traditional PWM scheme and the LED power is also reduced, which satisfies both system reliability and energy effectiveness under constant high data rate and BER less than 10-3.

  3. Nonprincipal plane scattering of flat plates and pattern control of horn antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1989-01-01

    Using the geometrical theory of diffraction, the traditional method of high frequency scattering analysis, the prediction of the radar cross section of a perfectly conducting, flat, rectangular plate is limited to principal planes. Part A of this report predicts the radar cross section in nonprincipal planes using the method of equivalent currents. This technique is based on an asymptotic end-point reduction of the surface radiation integrals for an infinite wedge and enables nonprincipal plane prediction. The predicted radar cross sections for both horizontal and vertical polarizations are compared to moment method results and experimental data from Arizona State University's anechoic chamber. In part B, a variational calculus approach to the pattern control of the horn antenna is outlined. The approach starts with the optimization of the aperture field distribution so that the control of the radiation pattern in a range of directions can be realized. A control functional is thus formulated. Next, a spectral analysis method is introduced to solve for the eigenfunctions from the extremal condition of the formulated functional. Solutions to the optimized aperture field distribution are then obtained.

  4. Hierarchical controls on patterns of habitat and species diversity in river networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechie, T.; Pess, G.

    2007-12-01

    Patterns of habitat heterogeneity and species diversity in river networks are constrained by a nested hierarchy of physical controls. Large-scale, long-term controls set bounds for habitat and biological expression, whereas short-term and smaller-scale processes determine conditions at a point in time. At the river basin scale, geologic and topographic controls constrain reach attributes such as channel slope and channel confinement, which in turn constrains finer scale habitat structure. Overlain on this geologic template are down-valley trends in relative sediment supply that cause a systematic shift in channel-floodplain dynamics. At the reach-scale, channel slope is a primary control on habitat types (e.g., pools, riffles, ponds) in single thread channels, but local bed load and wood supply influence local habitat diversity. In floodplain reaches, diversity of habitat types is controlled mainly by the rate of lateral channel movement and floodplain turnover, which decrease down-valley with decreasing bed load supply. These controls drive two important aspects of environmental complexity, which in turn drive biological diversity in river networks: diversity of patch ages, and diversity of patch types. Ecological theory suggests that floodplain forest communities will be most diverse in floodplain reaches with intermediate rates of floodplain turnover, and reach-level aquatic communities will be most diverse in mid-network where habitat heterogeneity is highest.

  5. Control Theoretic Modeling and Generated Flow Patterns of a Fish-Tail Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Brian; Morgansen, Kristi; Dabiri, Dana

    2003-11-01

    Many real-world engineering problems involve understanding and manipulating fluid flows. One of the challenges to further progress in the area of active flow control is the lack of appropriate models that are amenable to control-theoretic studies and algorithm design and also incorporate reasonably realistic fluid dynamic effects. We focus here on modeling and model-verification of bio-inspired actuators (fish-fin type structures) used to control fluid dynamic artifacts that will affect speed, agility, and stealth of Underwater Autonomous Vehicles (UAVs). Vehicles using fish-tail type systems are more maneuverable, can turn in much shorter and more constrained spaces, have lower drag, are quieter and potentially more efficient than those using propellers. We will present control-theoretic models for a simple prototype coupled fluid and mechanical actuator where fluid effects are crudely modeled by assuming only lift, drag, and added mass, while neglecting boundary effects. These models will be tested with different control input parameters on an experimental fish-tail robot with the resulting flow captured with DPIV. Relations between the model, the control function choices, the obtained thrust and drag, and the corresponding flow patterns will be presented and discussed.

  6. Patterns of Success: Online Self-Monitoring in a Web-Based Behavioral Weight Control Program

    PubMed Central

    Krukowski, Rebecca A.; Harvey-Berino, Jean; Bursac, Zoran; Ashikaga, Taka; West, Delia Smith

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Online weight control technologies could reduce barriers to treatment, including increased ease and convenience of self-monitoring. Self-monitoring consistently predicts outcomes in behavioral weight loss programs; however, little is known about patterns of self-monitoring associated with success. Methods The current study examines 161 participants (93% female; 31% African-American; mean BMI=35.7±5.7) randomized to a 6-month online behavioral weight control program which offered weekly group “chat” sessions and online self-monitoring. Self-monitoring log-ins were continuously monitored electronically during treatment and examined in association with weight change and demographics. Weekend and weekday log-ins were examined separately and length of periods of continuous self-monitoring were examined. Results We found that 91% of participants logged in to the self-monitoring webpage at least once. Over 6 months, these participants monitored on an average of 28% of weekdays and 17% of weekend days, with most log-ins earlier in the program. Women were less likely to log-in, and there were trends for greater self-monitoring by older participants. Race, education and marital status were not significant predictors of self-monitoring. Both weekday and weekend log-ins were significant independent predictors of weight loss. Patterns of consistent self-monitoring emerged early for participants who went on to achieve greater than a five percent weight loss. Conclusions Patterns of online self-monitoring were strongly associated with weight loss outcomes. These results suggest a specific focus on consistent self-monitoring early in a behavioral weight control program might be beneficial for achieving clinically significant weight losses. PMID:22545978

  7. Hydraulic lock for displacer rod drive mechanism (DRDM) and method of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, E.D.

    1990-12-18

    This paper describes a drive rod latch in combination with a nuclear reactor having a drive rod disposed in a rod housing characterized in that the drive rod has one end selectively exposed to a first, relatively low pressure zone of the reactor and another end thereof in communication with a second, relatively high pressure zone of the reactor. The drive rod further having disposed on an end thereof a valve member and the rod housing having disposed thereon a corresponding valve seat, and a control valve for selectively establishing communication between the housing and the first zone of the reactor whereby a pressure differential is created across the piston. The pressure differential being sufficient to seat the valve member against the valve seat to thereby establish a pressure boundary.

  8. Orbital Processing of Eutectic Rod-Like Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, David J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The eutectic is one of only three solidification classes that exist. The others are isostructural and peritectic-class reactions, respectively. Simplistically, in a binaryeutectic phase diagram, a single liquid phase isothermally decomposes to two solid phases in a cooperative manner. The melting point minimum at the eutectic composition, isothermal solidification temperature, near-isocompositional solidification and refined solidification microstructure lend themselves naturally to such applications as brazing and soldering; industries that eutectic alloys dominate. Interest in direct process control of microstructures has led, more recently, to in-situ eutectic directional solidification with applications in electro-magnetics and electro-optics. In these cases, controlled structural refinement and the high aspect ratio and regularity of the distributed eutectic phases is highly significant to the fabrication and application of these in-situ natural composites. The natural pattern formation and scaling of the dispersed phase on a sub-micron scale has enormous potential application, since fabricating bulk materials on this scale mechanically has proven to be particularly difficult. It is thus of obvious importance to understand the solidification of eutectic materials since they are of great commercial significance. The dominant theory that describes eutectic solidification was derived for diffusion-controlled growth of alloys where both solid eutectic phases solidify metallically, i.e. without faceting at the solidification interface. Both high volume fraction (lamellar) and low volume fraction (rod-like) regular metallic arrays are treated by this theory. Many of the useful solders and brazements, however, and most of the regular in-situ composites are characterized by solidification reactions that are faceted/non-faceted in nature, rather than doubly non-faceted (metallic). Further, diffusion-controlled growth conditions are atypical terrestrially since

  9. Process development and fabrication for sphere-pac fuel rods. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Welty, R.K.; Campbell, M.H.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium fuel rods containing sphere-pac fuel have been fabricated for in-reactor tests and demonstrations. A process for the development, qualification, and fabrication of acceptable sphere-pac fuel rods is described. Special equipment to control fuel contamination with moisture or air and the equipment layout needed for rod fabrication is described and tests for assuring the uniformity of the fuel column are discussed. Fuel retainers required for sphere-pac fuel column stability and instrumentation to measure fuel column smear density are described. Results of sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication campaigns are reviewed and recommended improvements for high throughput production are noted.

  10. Efficacy of various materials in recording enamel rod endings on tooth surface for personal identification

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, K; Sivapathasundharam, B; Saraswathi, TR

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To analyze efficacy of cellulose acetate film, cellophane tape, and light body impression material in recording enamel rod endings on tooth surface for personal identification. Materials and Methods: Surface enamel rod endings of 30 extracted teeth were recorded from the same area of the same tooth for two times using cellulose acetate film, cellophane tape, and light body impression material. Photomicrographs of enamel rod endings were taken and subjected to Verifinger standard SDK version 5.0 software for analysis. Minutiae scores of all enamel rod end patterns obtained using these three imprint materials were statistically analyzed. Results: Cellulose acetate film imprint showed complete enamel rod end patterns and the software was able to identify the particular tooth with the same previous identification number in subsequent recordings as well. Cellophane tape and light body rubber-base impression material imprint showed incomplete enamel rod end patterns and the software failed to identify the particular tooth with the same previous identification number in subsequent recordings. Statistical analysis revealed that cellulose acetate film recorded more number of minutiae points compared with the other imprint materials. Conclusion: Cellulose acetate film is a reliable material for recording enamel rod endings on tooth surface for personal identification compared with cellophane tape and light body rubber-base impression material. PMID:22408324

  11. Three-Rod Linear Ion Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, Gary R.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1993-01-01

    Three-parallel-rod electrode structures proposed for use in linear ion traps and possibly for electrostatic levitation of macroscopic particles. Provides wider viewing angle because they confine ions in regions outside rod-electrode structures.

  12. Regularity in an environment produces an internal torque pattern for biped balance control.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Haruhisa

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, we present a control method for achieving biped static balance under unknown periodic external forces whose periods are only known. In order to maintain static balance adaptively in an uncertain environment, it is essential to have information on the ground reaction forces. However, when the biped is exposed to a steady environment that provides an external force periodically, uncertain factors on the regularity with respect to a steady environment are gradually clarified using learning process, and finally a torque pattern for balancing motion is acquired. Consequently, static balance is maintained without feedback from ground reaction forces and achieved in a feedforward manner. PMID:15789225

  13. Polarization mode control of long-wavelength VCSELs by intracavity patterning

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Long, Christopher Michael; Mickovic, Zlatko; Dwir, Benjamin; Caliman, Andrei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Mereuta, Alexandru; Sirbu, Alexei; Kapon, Eli

    2016-04-26

    Polarization mode control is enhanced in wafer-fused vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers emitting at 1310 nm wavelength by etching two symmetrically arranged arcs above the gain structure within the laser cavity. The intracavity patterning introduces birefringence and dichroism, which discriminates between the two polarization states of the fundamental transverse modes. We find that the cavity modifications define the polarization angle at threshold with respect to the crystal axes, and increase the gain anisotropy and birefringence on average, leading to an increase in the polarization switching current. As a result, experimental measurements are explained using the spin-flip model of VCSEL polarization dynamics.

  14. Dual Window Pattern Recognition Classifier for Improved Partial-Hand Prosthesis Control

    PubMed Central

    Earley, Eric J.; Hargrove, Levi J.; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2016-01-01

    Although partial-hand amputees largely retain the ability to use their wrist, it is difficult to preserve wrist motion while using a myoelectric partial-hand prosthesis without severely impacting control performance. Electromyogram (EMG) pattern recognition is a well-studied control method; however, EMG from wrist motion can obscure myoelectric finger control signals. Thus, to accommodate wrist motion and to provide high classification accuracy and minimize system latency, we developed a training protocol and a classifier that switches between long and short EMG analysis window lengths. Seventeen non-amputee and two partial-hand amputee subjects participated in a study to determine the effects of including EMG from different arm and hand locations during static and/or dynamic wrist motion in the classifier training data. We evaluated several real-time classification techniques to determine which control scheme yielded the highest performance in virtual real-time tasks using a three-way ANOVA. We found significant interaction between analysis window length and the number of grasps available. Including static and dynamic wrist motion and intrinsic hand muscle EMG with extrinsic muscle EMG significantly reduced pattern recognition classification error by 35%. Classification delay or majority voting techniques significantly improved real-time task completion rates (17%), selection (23%), and completion (11%) times, and selection attempts (15%) for non-amputee subjects, and the dual window classifier significantly reduced the time (8%) and average number of attempts required to complete grasp selections (14%) made in various wrist positions. Amputee subjects demonstrated improved task timeout rates, and made fewer grasp selection attempts, with classification delay or majority voting techniques. Thus, the proposed techniques show promise for improving control of partial-hand prostheses and more effectively restoring function to individuals using these devices. PMID

  15. Gene expression changes during retinal development and rod specification

    PubMed Central

    Carrigan, Matthew; Hokamp, Karsten; Farrar, G. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) typically results from individual mutations in any one of >70 genes that cause rod photoreceptor cells to degenerate prematurely, eventually resulting in blindness. Gene therapies targeting individual RP genes have shown efficacy at clinical trial; however, these therapies require the surviving photoreceptor cells to be viable and functional, and may be economically feasible for only the more commonly mutated genes. An alternative potential treatment strategy, particularly for late stage disease, may involve stem cell transplants into the photoreceptor layer of the retina. Rod progenitors from postnatal mouse retinas can be transplanted and can form photoreceptors in recipient adult retinas; optimal numbers of transplantable cells are obtained from postnatal day 3–5 (P3–5) retinas. These cells can also be expanded in culture; however, this results in the loss of photoreceptor potential. Gene expression differences between postnatal retinas, cultured retinal progenitor cells (RPCs), and rod photoreceptor precursors were investigated to identify gene expression patterns involved in the specification of rod photoreceptors. Methods Microarrays were used to investigate differences in gene expression between cultured RPCs that have lost photoreceptor potential, P1 retinas, and fresh P5 retinas that contain significant numbers of transplantable photoreceptors. Additionally, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) sorted Rho-eGFP-expressing rod photoreceptor precursors were compared with Rho-eGFP-negative cells from the same P5 retinas. Differential expression was confirmed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR). Results Analysis of the microarray data sets, including the use of t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE) to identify expression pattern neighbors of key photoreceptor specific genes, resulted in the identification of 636 genes differentially regulated during rod specification. Forty-four of these

  16. Solid-state-laser-rod holder

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.; Barnes, N.P.; Griggs, J.E.

    1981-08-11

    The disclosure relates to a solid state laser rod holder comprising Invar, copper tubing, and epoxy joints. Materials and coefficients of expansion of the components of the holder combine with the rod to produce a joint which will give before the rod itself will. The rod may be lased at about 70 to 80/sup 0/K and returned from such a temperature to room temperature repeatedly without its or the holder's destruction.

  17. Molecular bioelectricity: how endogenous voltage potentials control cell behavior and instruct pattern regulation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In addition to biochemical gradients and transcriptional networks, cell behavior is regulated by endogenous bioelectrical cues originating in the activity of ion channels and pumps, operating in a wide variety of cell types. Instructive signals mediated by changes in resting potential control proliferation, differentiation, cell shape, and apoptosis of stem, progenitor, and somatic cells. Of importance, however, cells are regulated not only by their own Vmem but also by the Vmem of their neighbors, forming networks via electrical synapses known as gap junctions. Spatiotemporal changes in Vmem distribution among nonneural somatic tissues regulate pattern formation and serve as signals that trigger limb regeneration, induce eye formation, set polarity of whole-body anatomical axes, and orchestrate craniofacial patterning. New tools for tracking and functionally altering Vmem gradients in vivo have identified novel roles for bioelectrical signaling and revealed the molecular pathways by which Vmem changes are transduced into cascades of downstream gene expression. Because channels and gap junctions are gated posttranslationally, bioelectrical networks have their own characteristic dynamics that do not reduce to molecular profiling of channel expression (although they couple functionally to transcriptional networks). The recent data provide an exciting opportunity to crack the bioelectric code, and learn to program cellular activity at the level of organs, not only cell types. The understanding of how patterning information is encoded in bioelectrical networks, which may require concepts from computational neuroscience, will have transformative implications for embryogenesis, regeneration, cancer, and synthetic bioengineering. PMID:25425556

  18. Microchannel Wetting for Controllable Patterning and Alignment of Silver Nanowire with High Resolution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo-Ru; Cao, Wu; Liu, Gui-Shi; Chen, Hui-Jiuan; Noh, Yong-Young; Minari, Takeo; Hsiao, Hsiang-Chih; Lee, Chia-Yu; Shieh, Han-Ping D; Liu, Chuan

    2015-09-30

    Patterning and alignment of conductive nanowires are essential for good electrical isolation and high conductivity in various applications. Herein a facile bottom-up, additive technique is developed to pattern and align silver nanowires (AgNWs) by manipulating wetting of dispersions in microchannels. By forming hydrophobic/hydrophilic micropatterns down to 8 μm with fluoropolymer (Cytop) and SiO2, the aqueous AgNW dispersions with the optimized surface tension and viscosity self-assemble into microdroplets and then dry to form anisotropic AgNW networks. The alignment degree characterized by the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) can be well-controlled from 39.8° to 84.1° by changing the width of microchannels. A mechanism is proposed and validated by statistical analysis on AgNW alignment, and a static model is proposed to guide the patterning of general NWs. The alignment reduced well the electrical resistivity of AgNW networks by a factor of 5 because of the formation of efficient percolation path for carrier conduction. PMID:26340378

  19. Controlled Chemical Patterns with ThermoChemical NanoLithography (TCNL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Keith; Giordano, Anthony; Wang, Debin; Kodali, Vamsi; King, W. P.; Marder, S. R.; Riedo, E.; Curtis, J. E.

    2012-02-01

    Many research areas, both fundamental and applied, rely upon the ability to organize non-trivial assemblies of molecules on surfaces. In this work, we introduce a significant extension of ThermoChemical NanoLithography (TCNL), a high throughput chemical patterning technique that uses temperature-driven chemical reactions localized near the tip of a thermal cantilever. By combining a chemical kinetics based model with experiments, we have developed a protocol for varying the concentration of surface bound molecules. The result is an unprecedented ability to fabricate extremely complex patterns comprised of varying chemical concentrations, as demonstrated by sinusoidal patterns of amine groups with varying pitches (˜5-15 μm) and the replication of Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa with dimensions of ˜30 x 40 μm^2. Programmed control of the chemical reaction rate should have widespread applications for a technique which has already been shown to nanopattern various substrates including graphene nanowires, piezoelectric crystals, and optoelectronic materials.

  20. Characterization of recovered walking patterns and motor control after contusive spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Christopher N; Linklater, William; Santiago, Raquel; Fisher, Lesley C; Moran, Stephanie; Buford, John A; Michele Basso, D

    2012-01-01

    Currently, complete recovery is unattainable for most individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Instead, recovery is typically accompanied by persistent sensory and motor deficits. Restoration of preinjury function will likely depend on improving plasticity and integration of these impaired systems. Eccentric muscle actions require precise integration of sensorimotor signals and are predominant during the yield (E2) phase of locomotion. Motor neuron activation and control during eccentric contractions is impaired across a number of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, but remains unexamined after SCI. Therefore, we characterized locomotor recovery after contusive SCI using hindlimb (HL) kinematics and electromyographic (EMG) recordings with specific consideration of eccentric phases of treadmill (TM) walking. Deficits in E2 and a caudal shift of locomotor subphases persisted throughout the 3-week recovery period. EMG records showed notable deficits in the semitendinosus (ST) during yield. Unlike other HL muscles, recruitment of ST changed with recovery. At 7 days, the typical dual-burst pattern of ST was lost and the second burst (ST2) was indistinct. By 21 days, the dual-burst pattern returned, but latencies remained impaired. We show that ST2 burst duration is highly predictive of open field Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) scores. Moreover, we found that simple changes in locomotor specificity which enhance eccentric actions result in new motor patterns after SCI. Our findings identify a caudal shift in stepping kinematics, irregularities in E2, and aberrant ST2 bursting as markers of incomplete recovery. These residual impairments may provide opportunities for targeted rehabilitation. PMID:23139900

  1. Generation of obliquely incident ions using phase-shifted RF voltages applied on rod electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ui, Akio; Sato, Yosuke; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Sakai, Itsuko; Hayashi, Hisataka

    2016-06-01

    A new method of generating obliquely incident ions has been investigated. A plasma system with a cathode consisting of a repetition of a group of four electrode rods connected to their respective RF power supplies is proposed. The ion angular distribution (IAD) is controlled by modulating the phase shift of the four RF powers. The IAD of an argon high-density plasma was analyzed on the basis of transient plasma simulation. When the RF voltages are controlled so that the phase shift is π/2, a convex-shaped plasma sheath corresponding to each group of four rods appears and propagates parallel to the wafer with time. By propagating this “wavy” sheath, a bimodal IAD consisting of ions obliquely incident mainly from two directions are obtained nearly uniformly across the wafer. This method is capable of generating obliquely incident ions, which is expected to be effective as an additional knob for precise profile control in fine-pattern reactive-ion etching (RIE).

  2. Mental Health Treatment Patterns in Perinatally HIV-Infected Youth and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Chernoff, Miriam; Nachman, Sharon; Williams, Paige; Brouwers, Pim; Heston, Jerry; Hodge, Janice; Di Poalo, Vinnie; Deygoo, Nagamah Sandra; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Youths perinatally infected with HIV often receive psychotropic medication and behavioral treatment for emotional and behavioral symptoms. We describe patterns of intervention for HIV-positive youth and youth in a control group in the United States. METHODS Three hundred nineteen HIV-positive youth and 256 controls, aged 6 to 17 years, enrolled in the International Maternal Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials 1055, a prospective, 2-year observational study of psychiatric symptoms. One hundred seventy-four youth in the control group were perinatally exposed to HIV, and 82 youth were uninfected children living in households with HIV-positive members. Youth and their primary caregivers completed Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition-referenced symptom-rating scales. Children's medication and behavioral psychiatric intervention histories were collected at entry. We evaluated the association of past or current psychiatric treatment with HIV status, baseline symptoms, and impairment by using multiple logistic regression, controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS HIV-positive youth and youth in the control group had a similar prevalence of psychiatric symptoms (61%) and impairment (14% to 15%). One hundred four (18%) participants received psychotropic medications (stimulants [14%], antidepressants [6%], and neuroleptic agents [4%]), and 127 (22%) received behavioral treatment. More HIV-positive youth than youth in the control group received psychotropic medication (23% vs 12%) and behavioral treatment (27% vs 17%). After adjusting for symptom class and confounders, HIV-positive children had twice the odds of children in the control group of having received stimulants and >4 times the odds of having received antidepressants. Caregiver-reported symptoms or impairment were associated with higher odds of intervention than reports by children alone. CONCLUSIONS HIV-positive children are more likely to receive mental health

  3. Optimal coordinated control of energy extraction in LES of wind farms: effect of turbine arrangement patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Johan; Munters, Wim; Goit, Jay

    2015-11-01

    We investigate optimal control of wind-farm boundary layers, considering the individual wind turbines as flow actuators. By controlling the thrust coefficients of the turbines as function of time, the energy extraction can be dynamically regulated with the aim to optimally influence the flow field and the vertical energy transport. To this end, we use Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of wind-farm boundary layers in a receding-horizon optimal control framework. Recently, the approach was applied to fully developed wind-farm boundary layers in a 7D by 6D aligned wind-turbine arrangement. For this case, energy extraction increased up to 16%, related to improved wake mixing by slightly anti-correlating the turbine thrust coefficient with the local wind speed at the turbine level. Here we discuss optimal control results for finite wind farms that are characterized by entrance effects and a developing internal boundary layer above the wind farm. Both aligned and staggered arrangement patterns are considered, and a range of different constraints on the controls is included. The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (FP7-Ideas, grant no. 306471). Simulations were performed on the infrastructure of the Flemish Supercomputer Center, funded by the Hercules Foundation and the Flemish Governement.

  4. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  5. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  6. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  7. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  8. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  9. Initial results on fault diagnosis of DSN antenna control assemblies using pattern recognition techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, P.; Mellstrom, J.

    1990-01-01

    Initial results obtained from an investigation using pattern recognition techniques for identifying fault modes in the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70 m antenna control loops are described. The overall background to the problem is described, the motivation and potential benefits of this approach are outlined. In particular, an experiment is described in which fault modes were introduced into a state-space simulation of the antenna control loops. By training a multilayer feed-forward neural network on the simulated sensor output, classification rates of over 95 percent were achieved with a false alarm rate of zero on unseen tests data. It concludes that although the neural classifier has certain practical limitations at present, it also has considerable potential for problems of this nature.

  10. Patterns of Control over the Teaching-Studying-Learning Process and Classrooms as Complex Dynamic Environments: A Theoretical Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harjunen, Elina

    2012-01-01

    In this theoretical paper the role of power in classroom interactions is examined in terms of a dominance continuum to advance a theoretical framework justifying the emergence of three ways of distributing power when it comes to dealing with the control over the teaching-studying-learning (TSL) "pattern of teacher domination," "pattern of…

  11. Mechanoresponsive change in photoluminescent color of rod-like liquid-crystalline compounds and control of molecular orientation on photoaligned layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Mizuho; Miura, Seiya; Okumoto, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Mayuko; Fukae, Ryohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we reported novel liquid-crystalline luminophore that switches its photoluminescent color by mechanically grinding. Mechanochromic luminescence (MCL) is expected for mechanical sensor, cellular imaging, detection of microenvironmental changes, and optical memory. In this work, we focused on liquid-crystalline MCL compounds on alignment layer. Controlling the molecular alignment of MCL compounds with photoalignment layer have potential to succeed in functional MCL film such as polarized micropatterned MCL and directional detection of mechanical stimuli. Herein, we prepared asymmetric rodlike MCL compounds containing cyano- and pyridyl molecular terminal and explored their photoluminescence behavior under mechanical stimulus. The cyano terminated compound showed a nematic phase and tuned its photoluminescent color from green to yellow upon grinding, while the pyridyl-terminated compounds that show no mesophase changed its photoluminescent color from blue to green and reverted to its initial color by heating above its melting point. The cyano-terminated MCL was aligned along the orientation direction of photoalignment layer and pyridyl-terminated MCL exhibited uniaxial alignment when it coated on photoaligned film containing carboxylic acid.

  12. Control of spectral interference patterns in broad Rabi sidebands toward quasi-comb structures.

    PubMed

    Romanov, D A; Filin, A I; Levis, R J

    2015-03-01

    The pattern of spectral interference fringes in broad dynamic Rabi sidebands allows for a considerable degree of control by shaping the picosecond driving pulse. We demonstrate experimental evidence of such control and report an analytic and numerical investigation of possibilities to control the fringe pattern to produce a comb-like optical structure. The temporal phase and amplitude shaping of a picosecond driving pulse influence the spectrum envelope, fringe contrast, and fringe spacing variation in the sideband spectra. The sideband spectrum envelope depends on the sharpness of the driving pulse, that is, on the rate at which the temporal distance between the leading and trailing edges grows away from the pulse maximum. Increasing this parameter reduces the variation of the envelope amplitude across the sideband. The fringe contrast, defined by the maximum-to-minimum difference, depends strongly on the asymmetry of the driving pulse. The imbalance between the leading and trailing edges leads to a decrease of the contrast. The variation of interpeak distance within a sideband was controlled using the temporal shape of the driving pulse. In the particular case of a blue-shifted sideband emitted by excited oxygen atoms driven by a picosecond pulse of 800 nm carrier wavelength and ∼5×10¹⁰ W cm⁻² intensity, a Gaussian pulse shape results in an interpeak distance increasing almost five times over the interval from 1.60 to 1.66 eV, whereas a super-Gaussian shape leads to almost equidistant fringes producing a comb-like spectrum. PMID:25723415

  13. Effects of battery technologies, driving patterns, and climate comfort control on the performance of electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, W.W.; Wang, M.Q.; Santini, D.J.

    1994-05-15

    A computer software package, EAGLES, has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to analyze electric vehicle (EV) performance. In this paper, we present EAGLES predictions of EV driving range, acceleration rate, and energy consumption under various driving patterns, with different battery technologies, and with assumptions concerning use of air conditioners and/or heaters for climate comfort control. The specifications of a baseline, four-passenger EV for given design performance requirements are established, assuming urban driving conditions represented by the Los Angeles 92 (LA-92) driving cycle and using battery characteristics similar to those of the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) midterm battery performance goals. To examine the impacts of driving patterns, energy consumption is simulated under three different driving cycles: the New York City Cycle, the Los Angeles 92 Cycle, and the ECE-15 Cycle. To test the impacts of battery technologies, performance attributes of an advanced lead-acid battery, the USABC midterm battery goals, and the USABC long-term battery goals are used. Finally, EV energy consumption from use of air conditioners and/or heaters under different climates is estimated and the associated driving range penalty for one European city (Paris) and two United States cities (Chicago and Los Angeles) is predicted. The results of this paper show the importance of considering various effects, such as battery technology, driving pattern, and climate comfort control, in the determination of EV performances. Electric vehicle energy consumption decreases more than 20% when a battery with characteristics similar to the USABC long-term goals is used instead of an advanced lead-acid battery.

  14. Synaptic transmission from rods to rod-dominated bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Yang, X L; Wu, S M

    1993-06-11

    Synaptic transmission between photoreceptors and bipolar cells was studied in dark-adapted tiger salamander retinas. Based on the relative light sensitivity, bipolar cells, either depolarizing (DBC) or hyperpolarizing (HBC), fell into two groups: one receives inputs primarily from rods (rod-dominated bipolar cells, DBCR and HBCR) and the other receives inputs primarily from cones (cone-dominated bipolar cells, DBCC and HBCC). The input-output relations of the rod-DBCR and rod-HBCR synapses were determined by plotting the voltage responses of the rod and DBCR (or HBCR) to dim 500-nm light steps, which polarizes only the rods but not the cones. The slope gains of both synapses were the highest near the dark rod voltage (-2.5 for the rod-DBCR synapse and 4.0 for the rod-HBCR synapse), and they (the absolute values) became progressively smaller at more hyperpolarized rod voltages. PMID:8186975

  15. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 2: Role of seasonality and associated process controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Yaeger, M. A.; Coopersmith, E.; Cheng, L.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the process controls underpinning regional patterns of variations of runoff regime behavior, i.e., the mean seasonal variation of runoff within the year, across the continental United States. The ultimate motivation is to use the resulting process understanding to generate insights into the physical controls of Flow Duration Curves, in view of the close connection between these two alternative signatures of runoff variability. To achieve these aims a top-down modeling approach is adopted; we start with a simple two-stage bucket model, which is systematically enhanced through addition of new processes on the basis of model performance assessment in relation to observations, using rainfall-runoff data from 197 United States catchments belonging to the MOPEX dataset. Exploration of dominant processes and the determination of required model complexity are carried out through model-based sensitivity analyses, guided by a performance metric. Results indicated systematic regional trends in dominant processes: snowmelt was a key process control in cold mountainous catchments in the north and north-west, whereas snowmelt and vegetation cover dynamics were key controls in the north-east; seasonal vegetation cover dynamics (phenology and interception) were important along the Appalachian mountain range in the east. A simple two-bucket model (with no other additions) was found to be adequate in warm humid catchments along the west coast and in the south-east, with both regions exhibiting strong seasonality, whereas much more complex models are needed in the dry south and south-west. Agricultural catchments in the mid-west were found to be difficult to predict with the use of simple lumped models, due to the strong influence of human activities. Overall, these process controls arose from general east-west (seasonality) and north-south (aridity, temperature) trends in climate (with some exceptions), compounded by complex dynamics of

  16. Patterns of chemical use and exposure control in the Semiconductor Health Study.

    PubMed

    Hallock, M F; Hammond, S K; Hines, C J; Woskie, S R; Schenker, M B

    1995-12-01

    Information on chemical use and exposure control between 1986 and 1990 was collected from 14 companies participating in the Semiconductor Health Study. Questionnaires and site visits provided data used to develop exposure categories for three epidemiological studies: prospective, historical, and cross-sectional. Patterns of use of target chemicals were compiled for 82 silicon-wafer fabrication rooms (fabs), including 47 from which subjects were selected for study. Chemical use was examined by operation, year, and epidemiological component. Target agents for epidemiological analyses were present in more than 50% of fabs. Use of these agents was fairly constant from 1986 to 1990, except for a moderate increase in use of propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate, a solvent being substituted for ethylene-based glycol ethers (EGE) in photoresists. The distribution of personal protective equipment, engineering controls, and other factors potentially affecting employee exposure was also examined. Controls designed to manage processes or high acute toxicity were present in most fabs; their prevalence remained unchanged from 1986 through 1990. Controls designed to reduce exposures to chemicals with low acute toxicity were less widely distributed; their prevalence increased moderately from 1986 to 1990. PMID:8588557

  17. Rod cluster having improved vane configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Shockling, L.A.; Francis, T.A.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes a pressurized water reactor vessel, the vessel defining a predetermined axial direction of the flow of coolant therewithin and having plural spider assemblies supporting, for vertical movement within the vessel, respective clusters of rods in spaced, parallel axial relationship, parallel to the predetermined axial direction of coolant flow, and a rod guide for each spider assembly and respective cluster of rods. The rod guide having horizontally oriented support plates therewithin, each plate having an interior opening for accommodating axial movement therethrough of the spider assembly and respective cluster of rods. The opening defining plural radially extending channels and corresponding parallel interior wall surfaces of the support plate.

  18. Exploiting rod technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-06-01

    ROD development was proceeding apace until recent budgetary decisions caused funding support for ROD development to be drastically reduced. The funding which was originally provided by DARPA and the Balanced Technology Initiative (BTI) Office has been cut back to zero from $800K. To determine the aeroballistic coefficients of a candidate dart, ARDEC is currently supporting development out of its own 6.2 funds at about $100K. ARDEC has made slow progress toward achieving this end because of failures in the original dart during testing. It appears that the next dart design to be tested will diverge from the original concept visualized by DARPA and Science and Technology Associates (STA). STA, the design engineer, takes exception to these changes on the basis of inappropriate test conditions and insufficient testing. At this time, the full resolution of this issue will be difficult because of the current management structure, which separates the developer (ARDEC) from the designer (STA).

  19. Water and Nutrient Export Patterns of Urban Watersheds with Stormwater Control Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, C.; McMillan, S. K.; Clinton, S. M.; Jefferson, A.; Tague, C.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrologic patterns of undeveloped ecosystems are altered by urbanization. Stream discharge rapidly responds to precipitation with elevated concentrations of nutrients, sediment and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that have the potential to adversely affect stream ecosystem function. The goal of this research was to understand the timing and magnitude of water and solute export during storm events in two urban and two suburban watersheds with stormwater control measures (SCMs) in Charlotte, NC. We sampled X storms from June 2010 - December 2011 to characterize hydrologic response and a subset of X storms were sampled intensively to identify export patterns of five environmentally reactive solutes (soluble reactive phosphorous (SRP), ammonium, nitrate, DOC, total dissolved nitrogen (TDN)). Key environmental variables, including temperature, magnitude and intensity of precipitation and antecedent moisture conditions were measured concurrently with instream response to develop predictive relationships and conceptual models for solute export. Similar chemograph response of nitrate, DOC and TDN at all sites support the hypothesis that these solutes come from the same source in each watershed. These three constituents displayed a 'flushing pattern' in which concentration increased with stream discharge. However, complex storms with multiple hydrograph peaks revealed a flushing response during the first peak followed by dilution in the second, which was attributed to varying nutrient concentrations from impervious surface runoff. Additionally, it was observed that the event mean concentration of all nitrogen species monitored was greatest at the site with the most urban development, whereas SRP was highest at the watershed with the least. Differences in timing of peak concentrations of each solute supports the hypothesis that multiple water sources contribute to instream concentrations different times during a rain event. Future work on this systems is focused on

  20. Hydrologic regime controls pattern and architecture of woody debris in mountain streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, L. A.; Grant, G.; Lewis, S.

    2015-12-01

    differences in flow-dictated wood architecture control channel stability and key channel structures. Understanding how flow regimes control wood accumulations and patterns is therefore fundamental to properly interpreting the geomorphic and ecologic role of wood in streams.

  1. Monsoonal versus Anthropogenic Controls on Erosion Patterns and Sediment Flux in the Song Gianh, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clift, Peter; Jonell, Tara; Carter, Andrew; Van Hoang, Long; Böning, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    The Song Gianh is a small drainage on the northern central coast of Vietnam that delivers sediment into the Gulf of Tonkin. The basin provides the opportunity to evaluate what surface processes control continental erosion rates and patterns because there is a strong monsoonal precipitation gradient from the SW to NE. We apply several complimentary provenance methods to modern siliciclastic sediments of the Song Gianh to pinpoint regions of focused sediment generation and evaluate how sediment is mixed downstream and delivered to the ocean. We find that detrital zircon populations of Song Gianh main channel change radically downstream of the confluence with the northern Rao Tro tributary, which is dominated by 100-300 Ma grains eroded from granite bedrock. This tributary provides almost as much zircon to the main channel as all the headwater tributaries combined, despite being a much smaller, drier, and flatter sub-basin. In contrast, bulk sediment Nd and Sr isotopes indicate that most sediment is derived from the wetter headwater tributaries. Contribution from the southern tributaries to the net siliciclastic river flux is negligible. Precipitation and topography do not appear to modulate zircon production in the modern river although regions controlling bulk Nd and Sr compositions are wetter and have higher local relief. This apparent contrast in regions of sediment production suggests disequilibrium and differential travel times for zircon and mineral phases rich in Nd and Sr. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating of alluvial terraces on the main channel show that the valleys aggraded rapidly from ~7-9 ka during a period of strong summer monsoon, suggesting that heavy rainfall generated large sediment volumes. Younger terraces dated to 500-1000 yrs BP are interpreted to reflect erosion and aggradation driven by extensive human agriculture. We speculate that agriculture, together with bedrock compositions, are the most likely control on producing the

  2. Changing the patterns of failure for high-risk prostate cancer patients by optimizing local control

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Richard G. . E-mail: richard.stock@msnyuhealth.org; Ho, Alice; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Standard therapies for high-risk prostate cancer have resulted in suboptimal outcomes with both local and distant failures. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and distant metastases rates as well as biopsy outcomes are reported after a regimen of trimodality therapy with hormonal, radioactive seed, and external beam radiation therapy to demonstrate how patterns of failure are changed when local control is optimized. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 2003, a total of 360 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with trimodality therapy. Patients were defined as being at high risk if they possessed at least one of the following high-risk features: Gleason score 8 to 10, PSA >20, clinical stage t2c to t3, or two or more intermediate risk features: Gleason score 7, PSA >10 to 20, or stage t2b. Patients were followed for a median of 4.25 years (range, 2 to 10 years). Results: The actuarial 7-year freedom from PSA failure and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM) rates were 83% and 89% respectively. Patients (n = 51) developing PSA failure exhibited aggressive disease behavior with short PSA doubling times (median, 5 months) and a 7-year freedom from distant metastases rate of 48%. Local control was high. The last posttreatment biopsy results were negative in 97% of cases (68 of 70 patients). In multivariate analysis, only PSA >20 predicted biochemical failure (p = 0.04), and only seminal vesicle status predicted developing distant failure (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Trimodality therapy results in excellent local control that alters patterns of failure, resulting in similar actuarial biochemical and distant failure rates. Most failures appear to be distant and exhibit biologically aggressive behavior.

  3. The role of attractive interactions in rod-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Antypov, Dmytro; Cleaver, Douglas J

    2004-06-01

    We present a computer simulation study of binary mixtures of prolate Gay-Berne particles and Lennard-Jones spheres. Results are presented for three such rod-sphere systems which differ from each other only in the interaction between unlike particles. Both the mixing-demixing behavior and the transitions between the isotropic and any liquid crystalline phases are studied for each system, as a function of temperature and concentration ratio. For systems which show macroscopic demixing, the rod-sphere interaction is shown to give direct control over interfacial anchoring properties, giving rise to the possibility of micellar phase formation in the case of homeotropic anchoring. Additionally, it is shown that on incorporating high concentrations of spheres into a system of rods with weak demixing properties, microphase-separated structures can be induced, including bicontinuous and lamellar arrangements. PMID:15268056

  4. Tribe kills fuel rod proposal

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-13

    This article is a review of nuclear utilities` efforts to find a repository of spent fuel rods. The rejection by the Mescalero Apaches of plans to build a waste repository on tribal lands has left a number of utilities scrambling to find interim solutions. Prairie Island will have to close before the end of the year unless a solution is found, and the Hope Creek/Salem units, exhausting there storage capacity within ten years, are considering dry-cask storage.

  5. RECOVERY OF ROD PHOTORESPONSES IN ABCR-DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Ambarish S.; Qtaishat, Nasser M.; Little, Deborah M.; Pepperberg, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose ABCR protein in the rod outer segment is thought to facilitate movement of the all-trans retinal photoproduct of rhodopsin bleaching out of the disk lumen. We investigated the extent to which ABCR deficiency affects post-bleach recovery of the rod photoresponse in ABCR-deficient (abcr−/−) mice. Methods Electroretinographic (ERG) a-wave responses were recorded from abcr−/− mice and two control strains. Using a bright probe flash, we examined the course of rod recovery following fractional rhodopsin bleaches of ~10−6, ~3×10−5, ~0.03 and ~0.30–0.40. Results Dark-adapted abcr−/− mice and controls exhibited similar normalized near-peak amplitudes of the paired-flash-ERG-derived, weak-flash response. Response recovery following ~10−6 bleaching exhibited an average exponential time constant of 319, 171 and 213 ms, respectively, in the abcr−/− and the two control strains. Recovery time constants determined for ~3×10−5 bleaching did not differ significantly among strains. However, those determined for the ~0.03 bleach indicated significantly faster recovery in abcr−/− (2.34 ± 0.74 min) than in the controls (5.36 ± 2.20 min, and 5.92 ± 2.44 min). Following ~0.30–0.40 bleaching, the initial recovery in the abcr−/− was on average faster than in controls. Conclusions By comparison with controls, abcr−/− mice exhibit faster rod recovery following a bleach of ~0.03. The data suggest that ABCR in normal rods may directly or indirectly prolong all-trans retinal clearance from the disk lumen over a significant bleaching range, and that the essential function of ABCR may be to promote the clearance of residual amounts of all-trans retinal that remain in the disks long after bleaching. PMID:18263807

  6. Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment

    DOEpatents

    Donck, Harry A.; Veca, Anthony R.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

  7. Electric Fuel Rod Simulator Fabrication at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Larry J.; McCulloch, Reg

    2004-02-04

    Commercial vendors could not supply the high-quality, highly instrumented electric fuel rod simulators (FRS) required for large thermal-hydraulic safety-oriented experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1970s and early 1980s. Staff at ORNL designed, developed, and manufactured the simulators utilized in these safety experiments. Important FRS design requirements include (1) materials of construction, (2) test power requirements and availability, (3) experimental test objectives, (4) supporting thermal analyses, and (5) extensive quality control throughout all phases of FRS fabrication. This paper will present an overview of these requirements (design, analytics, and quality control) as practiced at ORNL to produce a durable high-quality FRS.

  8. Electric Fuel Rod Simulator Fabrication at ORNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Larry J.; McCulloch, Reg

    2004-02-01

    Commercial vendors could not supply the high-quality, highly instrumented electric fuel rod simulators (FRS) required for large thermal-hydraulic safety-oriented experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1970s and early 1980s. Staff at ORNL designed, developed, and manufactured the simulators utilized in these safety experiments. Important FRS design requirements include (1) materials of construction, (2) test power requirements and availability, (3) experimental test objectives, (4) supporting thermal analyses, and (5) extensive quality control throughout all phases of FRS fabrication. This paper will present an overview of these requirements (design, analytics, and quality control) as practiced at ORNL to produce a durable high-quality FRS.

  9. Detecting spatio-temporal controls on depth distributions of root water uptake using soil moisture patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Theresa; Heidbüchel, Ingo; Simard, Sonia; Güntner, Andreas; Weiler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Landscape scale soil moisture patterns show a pronounced shift when plants become active during the growing season. Soil moisture patterns are then not only controlled by soils, topography and related abiotic site characteristics as well as site characteristic throughfall patterns but also by root water uptake. In this study root water uptake from different soil depths is estimated based on diurnal fluctuations in soil moisture content and was investigated with a setup of 15 field sites in a forest in northeastern Germany. These sites cover different topographic positions and forest stands. Vegetation types include pine forest (young and old) and different deciduous forest stands. Available data at all sites includes information at high temporal resolution from 5 soil moisture and soil temperature profiles, matric potential, piezometers and sapflow sensors as well as standard climate data. The resulting comprehensive data set of depth distributed root water uptake shows differences in overall amounts as well as in uptake depth distributions between different forest stands, but also related to slope position and thus depth to groundwater. Temporal dynamics of signal strength within the profile suggest a locally shifting spatial distribution of root water uptake depending on water availability. The relative contributions of the different depths to overall root water uptake shift as the summer progresses. However, the relationship of these depth resolved uptake rates to overall soil water availability varies considerably between tree species. This unique data set of depth specific contributions to root water uptake down to a depth of 2 m allows a much more detailed analysis of tree response to water availability than the more common transpiration estimates generated by sapflow or eddy flux measurements.

  10. Vibration Pattern Imager (VPI): A control and data acquisition system for scanning laser vibrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Brown, Donald E.; Shaffer, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    The Vibration Pattern Imager (VPI) system was designed to control and acquire data from scanning laser vibrometer sensors. The PC computer based system uses a digital signal processing (DSP) board and an analog I/O board to control the sensor and to process the data. The VPI system was originally developed for use with the Ometron VPI Sensor, but can be readily adapted to any commercially available sensor which provides an analog output signal and requires analog inputs for control of mirror positioning. The sensor itself is not part of the VPI system. A graphical interface program, which runs on a PC under the MS-DOS operating system, functions in an interactive mode and communicates with the DSP and I/O boards in a user-friendly fashion through the aid of pop-up menus. Two types of data may be acquired with the VPI system: single point or 'full field.' In the single point mode, time series data is sampled by the A/D converter on the I/O board (at a user-defined sampling rate for a selectable number of samples) and is stored by the PC. The position of the measuring point (adjusted by mirrors in the sensor) is controlled via a mouse input. The mouse input is translated to output voltages by the D/A converter on the I/O board to control the mirror servos. In the 'full field' mode, the measurement point is moved over a user-selectable rectangular area. The time series data is sampled by the A/D converter on the I/O board (at a user-defined sampling rate for a selectable number of samples) and converted to a root-mean-square (rms) value by the DSP board. The rms 'full field' velocity distribution is then uploaded for display and storage on the PC.

  11. Age and Cohort Patterns of Medical and Nonmedical Use of Controlled Medication Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Austic, Elizabeth; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Stoddard, Sarah; Ngo, Quyen Epstein; Boyd, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We identified peak annual incidence rates for medical and nonmedical use of prescription opioid analgesics, stimulants, sedatives and anxiolytics (controlled medication), and explored cohort effects on age of initiation. Methods Data were gathered retrospectively between 2009–2012 from Detroit area students (n=5185). Modal age at last assessment was 17 years. A meta-analytic approach produced age-, year-, and cohort-specific risk estimates of first-time use of controlled medication. Cox regression models examined cohort patterns in age of initiation for medical and nonmedical use with any of four classes of controlled medication (opioid analgesics, stimulants, sedatives or anxiolytics). Results Peak annual incidence rates were observed at age 16, when 11.3% started medical use, and 3.4% started using another person’s prescription for a controlled medication (i.e., engaged in nonmedical use). In the more recent birth cohort group (1996–2000), 82% of medical users and 76% of nonmedical users reported initiating such use by age 12. In contrast, in the less recent birth cohort group (1991–1995), 42% of medical users and 35% of nonmedical users initiated such use by age 12. Time to initiation was 2.6 times less in the more recent birth cohort group (medical use: adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]=2.57 [95% confidence interval (CI)= 2.32, 2.85]; nonmedical use: aHR=2.57 [95% CI=2.17, 3.03]). Conclusions Peak annual incidence rates were observed at age 16 for medical and nonmedical use. More recent cohorts reported initiating both types of use at younger ages. Earlier interventions may be needed to prevent adolescent nonmedical use of controlled medication. PMID:26291544

  12. Volume Changes After Stereotactic LINAC Radiotherapy in Vestibular Schwannoma: Control Rate and Growth Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Langenberg, Rick van de; Dohmen, Amy J.C.; Bondt, Bert J. de; Nelemans, Patty J.; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Stokroos, Robert J.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the control rate of vestibular schwannomas (VS) after treatment with linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or radiotherapy (SRT) by using a validated volumetric measuring tool. Volume-based studies on prognosis after LINAC-based SRS or SRT for VS are reported scarcely. In addition, growth patterns and risk factors predicting treatment failure were analyzed. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively, 37 VS patients treated with LINAC based SRS or SRT were analyzed. Baseline and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were analyzed with volume measurements on contrast enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Absence of intervention after radiotherapy was defined as 'no additional intervention group, ' absence of radiological growth was defined as 'radiological control group. ' Significant growth was defined as a volume change of 19.7% or more, as calculated in a previous study. Results: The cumulative 4-year probability of no additional intervention was 96.4% {+-} 0.03; the 4-year radiological control probability was 85.4% {+-} 0.1). The median follow-up was 40 months. Overall, shrinkage was seen in 65%, stable VS in 22%, and growth in 13%. In 54% of all patients, transient swelling was observed. No prognostic factors were found regarding VS growth. Previous treatment and SRS were associated with transient swelling significantly. Conclusions: Good control rates are reported for LINAC based SRS or SRT in VS, in which the lower rate of radiological growth control is attributed to the use of the more sensitive volume measurements. Transient swelling after radiosurgery is a common phenomenon and should not be mistaken for treatment failure. Previous treatment and SRS were significantly associated with transient swelling.

  13. Pressure distributions and oil-flow patterns for a swept circulation-control wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Wood, Norman J.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure distributions and photographs of oil flow patterns are presented for a circulation control wing. The model was an aspect ratio four semispan wing mounted on the side wall of the NASA Ames Transonic Wind Tunnel. The airfoil was a 20 percent thick ellipse, modified with circular leading and trailing edges of 4 percent radius, and had a 25.4 cm constant chord. This configuration does not represent a specific wing design, but is generic. A full span, tangetial, rearward blowing, circulation control slot was incorporated ahead of the trailing edge on the upper surface. The wing was tested at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.75 at sweep angle of 0 to 45 deg with internal to external pressure ratios of 1.0 to 3.0. Lift and pitching momemt coefficients were obtained from measured pressure distributions at five span stations. When the conventional corrections resulting from sweep angle are applied to the lift and moment of circulation control sections, no additional corrections are necessary to account for changes in blowing efficiency. This is demonstrated for an aft sweep angle of 45 deg. An empirical technique for estimating the downwash distribution of a swept wing was validated.

  14. Patterns of Brain Activation in Foster Children and Nonmaltreated Children During an Inhibitory Control Task

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Jacqueline; Fisher, Philip A.; Graham, Alice M.; Moore, William E.; Peake, Shannon J.; Mannering, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    Children in foster care have often encountered a range of adverse experiences, including neglectful and/or abusive care and multiple caregiver transitions. Prior research findings suggest that such experiences negatively affect inhibitory control and the underlying neural circuitry. In the current study, event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was employed during a go/no go task that assesses inhibitory control to compare the behavioral performance and brain activation of foster children and nonmaltreated children. The sample included two groups of 9- to 12-year-old children: 11 maltreated foster children and 11 nonmaltreated children living with their biological parents. There were no significant group differences on behavioral performance on the task. In contrast, patterns of brain activation differed by group. The nonmaltreated children demonstrated stronger activation than the foster children across several regions including the right anterior cingulate cortex, middle frontal gyrus, and right lingual gyrus during correct no go trials, whereas the foster children displayed stronger activation than the nonmaltreated children in the left inferior parietal lobule and right superior occipital cortex including the lingual gyrus and cuneus during incorrect no go trials. These results provide preliminary evidence that the early adversity experienced by foster children impacts the neural substrates of inhibitory control. PMID:24229540

  15. Control of patterning, growth, and differentiation by floral organ identity genes.

    PubMed

    Sablowski, Robert

    2015-02-01

    In spite of the different morphologies of sepals, petals, stamens, and carpels, all these floral organs are believed to be modified versions of a ground-state organ similar to the leaf. Modifications of the ground-state developmental programme are orchestrated by different combinations of MADS-domain transcription factors encoded by floral organ identity genes. In recent years, much has been revealed about the gene regulatory networks controlled by the floral organ identity genes and about the genetic pathways that control leaf development. This review examines how floral organ identity is connected with the control of morphogenesis and differentiation of shoot organs, focusing on the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Direct links have emerged between floral organ identity genes and genes involved in abaxial-adaxial patterning, organ boundary formation, tissue growth, and cell differentiation. In parallel, predictive models have been developed to explain how the activity of regulatory genes can be coordinated by intercellular signalling and constrained by tissue mechanics. When combined, these advances provide a unique opportunity for revealing exactly how leaf-like organs have been 'metamorphosed' into floral organs during evolution and showing crucial regulatory points in the generation of plant form. PMID:25609826

  16. Patterns of brain activation in foster children and nonmaltreated children during an inhibitory control task.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jacqueline; Fisher, Philip A; Graham, Alice M; Moore, William E; Peake, Shannon J; Mannering, Anne M

    2013-11-01

    Children in foster care have often encountered a range of adverse experiences, including neglectful and/or abusive care and multiple caregiver transitions. Prior research findings suggest that such experiences negatively affect inhibitory control and the underlying neural circuitry. In the current study, event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging was employed during a go/no go task that assesses inhibitory control to compare the behavioral performance and brain activation of foster children and nonmaltreated children. The sample included two groups of 9- to 12-year-old children: 11 maltreated foster children and 11 nonmaltreated children living with their biological parents. There were no significant group differences on behavioral performance on the task. In contrast, patterns of brain activation differed by group. The nonmaltreated children demonstrated stronger activation than did the foster children across several regions, including the right anterior cingulate cortex, the middle frontal gyrus, and the right lingual gyrus, during correct no go trials, whereas the foster children displayed stronger activation than the nonmaltreated children in the left inferior parietal lobule and the right superior occipital cortex, including the lingual gyrus and cuneus, during incorrect no go trials. These results provide preliminary evidence that the early adversity experienced by foster children impacts the neural substrates of inhibitory control. PMID:24229540

  17. Control of high-order harmonics for attoscience using a static-electric-field pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Serrat, Carles

    2011-12-15

    Quantum control in high-order-harmonic generation is considered theoretically by using a spatial distribution of static electric fields along the propagation direction of the driving field. It is shown that the trajectories of the electrons during its acceleration by the laser field in the high-harmonics-generation process can be controlled by periodically distributed static electric fields, which conveniently shape the driving laser field during propagation. Applying this mechanism, a quasi-phase-matching scheme that leads to filtered enhanced high harmonics is achieved. The harmonics in the plateau region are enhanced due to periodical phase variations in the long quantum trajectories as a consequence of the faster change experienced by the intensity-dependent phase along the longer electron trajectories. This effect should be observed in all quasi-phase-matching schemes based on perturbation of the microscopic quantum phase. The richness of adding a static-electric-field spatial pattern in the interaction region suggests a general scheme for feedback loop control in high-order-harmonic generation.

  18. Community control and pricing patterns of nonprofit hospitals: An antitrust analysis.

    PubMed

    Young, G J; Desai, K R; Hellinger, F J

    2000-12-01

    Traditional control of nonprofit hospitals by the communities they serve has been offered as justification for restraining antitrust enforcement of mergers that involve nonprofit hospitals. The community is arguably a constraint on a nonprofit's inclination to exercise market power in the form of higher prices; however, community control is likely to be attenuated for hospitals that through merger or acquisition become members of hospital systems--particularly those that operate on a regional or multiregional basis. We report findings from a study in which we examined empirically the relationship between market concentration and pricing patterns for three types of nonprofit hospitals that are distinguishable based on degree of community control: an independent hospital, a member of a local hospital system, and a member of a nonlocal hospital system. Study results indicated that when conditions existed to create a more concentrated market, (1) all three types of nonprofit hospitals exercised market power in the form of higher prices, and (2) hospitals that were members of nonlocal systems were more aggressive in exercising market power than were either independent or local system hospitals. The results have important implications for antitrust enforcement policy. PMID:11142052

  19. Patterned surface with controllable wettability for inkjet printing of flexible printed electronics.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong Q M; Yeo, Lip-Pin; Lok, Boon-Keng; Lam, Yee-Cheong

    2014-03-26

    Appropriate control of substrate surface properties prior to inkjet printing could be employed to improve the printing quality of fine resolution structures. In this paper, novel methods to fabricate patterned surfaces with a combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties are investigated. The results of inkjet printing of PEDOT/PSS conductive ink on these modified surfaces are presented. Selective wetting was achieved via a two-step hydrophilic-hydrophobic coating of 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS) and 3M electronic grade chemical respectively on PET surfaces; this was followed by a selective hydrophilic treatment (either atmospheric O2/Ar plasma or UV/ozone surface treatment) with the aid of a Nickel stencil. Hydrophobic regions with water contact angle (WCA) of 105° and superhydrophilic regions with WCA <5° can be achieved on a single surface. During inkjet printing of the treated surfaces, PEDOT/PSS ink spread spontaneously along the hydrophilic areas while avoiding the hydrophobic regions. Fine features smaller than the inkjet droplet size (approximately 55 μm in diameter) can be successfully printed on the patterned surface with high wettability contrast. PMID:24571607

  20. Temporal patterning of neuroblasts controls Notch-mediated cell survival through regulation of Hid or Reaper

    PubMed Central

    Bertet, Claire; Li, Xin; Erclik, Ted; Cavey, Matthieu; Wells, Brent; Desplan, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Temporal patterning of neural progenitors is one of the core mechanisms generating neuronal diversity in the central nervous system. Here, we show that in the tips of the outer proliferation center (tOPC) of the developing Drosophila optic lobes, a unique temporal series of transcription factors not only governs the sequential production of distinct neuronal subtypes, but also controls the mode of progenitor division as well as the selective apoptosis of NotchOFF or NotchON neurons during binary cell fate decisions. Within a single lineage, intermediate precursors initially do not divide and generate only one neuron; subsequently, precursors divide but their NotchON progeny systematically die through Reaper activity whereas later, their NotchOFF progeny die through Hid activity. These mechanisms dictate how the tOPC produces neurons for three different optic ganglia. We conclude that temporal patterning generates neuronal diversity by specifying both the identity and survival/death of each unique neuronal subtype. PMID:25171415

  1. Sand dune patterns on Titan controlled by long-term climate cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Ryan C.; Hayes, Alex G.; Lucas, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Linear sand dunes cover the equatorial latitudes of Saturn's moon Titan and are shaped by global wind patterns. These dunes are thought to reflect present-day diurnal, tidal and seasonal winds, but climate models have failed to reproduce observed dune morphologies with these wind patterns. Dunes diagnostic of a specific wind or formative timescale have remained elusive. Here we analyse radar imagery from NASA's Cassini spacecraft and identify barchan, star and reoriented dunes in sediment-limited regions of Titan's equatorial dune fields that diverge by 23° on average from the orientation of linear dunes. These morphologies imply shifts in wind direction and sediment availability. Using a numerical model, we estimate that the observed reorientation of dune crests to a change in wind direction would have taken around 3,000 Saturn years (1 Saturn year ~ 29.4 Earth years) or longer--a timescale that exceeds diurnal, seasonal or tidal cycles. We propose that shifts in winds and sediment availability are the product of long-term climate cycles associated with variations in Saturn's orbit. Orbitally controlled landscape evolution--also proposed to explain the distribution of Titan's polar lakes--implies a dune-forming climate on equatorial Titan that is analogous to Earth.

  2. Cell Death-Associated Molecular-Pattern Molecules: Inflammatory Signaling and Control

    PubMed Central

    Sangiuliano, Beatriz; Pérez, Nancy Marcela; Moreira, Dayson F.; Belizário, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis, necroptosis, and pyroptosis are different cellular death programs characterized in organs and tissues as consequence of microbes infection, cell stress, injury, and chemotherapeutics exposure. Dying and death cells release a variety of self-proteins and bioactive chemicals originated from cytosol, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. These endogenous factors are named cell death-associated molecular-pattern (CDAMP), damage-associated molecular-pattern (DAMP) molecules, and alarmins. Some of them cooperate or act as important initial or delayed inflammatory mediators upon binding to diverse membrane and cytosolic receptors coupled to signaling pathways for the activation of the inflammasome platforms and NF-κB multiprotein complexes. Current studies show that the nonprotein thiols and thiol-regulating enzymes as well as highly diffusible prooxidant reactive oxygen and nitrogen species released together in extracellular inflammatory milieu play essential role in controlling pro- and anti-inflammatory activities of CDAMP/DAMP and alarmins. Here, we provide an overview of these emerging concepts and mechanisms of triggering and maintenance of tissue inflammation under massive death of cells. PMID:25140116

  3. Controllable synthesis of Cu2O petalody octahedral microcrystals and multi-patterned evolution.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanbo; Ge, Dengteng; Yang, Lili; Li, Zhenyu; Xin, Wuhong; Li, Yao; Wu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Jiupeng

    2013-02-15

    The fabrication of cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O) with various morphologies has attracted extensive interest due to its applications in solar energy conversion, electrode materials, sensors, and catalysts. Herein, we report a facile controllable route for Cu(2)O microcrystals with various architectures via a hydrothermal method without using templates or surfactants. Six types of Cu(2)O microcrystals including petalody octahedral, concave truncated octahedron, truncated octahedron, octahedron, sphere-like, and sphere are obtained accompanying with Cu precipitation or urchin-like CuO particles due to the modifying of pH values. The petalody octahedral pattern of Cu(2)O is for the first time found here under the condition of pH 7-8. Additionally, possible growth mechanism for multi-patterned Cu(2)O and compositional evolution is discussed via preferential growths induced by selective absorption of acrylic acid and decomposition of lactic acid in the present reaction system. These experimental results prove a versatile and facile strategy for Cu(2)O microcrystals with special and complex architectures, which may highlights their potential applications due to the improved surface activity, catalytic, or photoelectric performance. PMID:23127874

  4. Climatic controls on hurricane patterns: a 1200-y near-annual record from Lighthouse Reef, Belize.

    PubMed

    Denommee, K C; Bentley, S J; Droxler, A W

    2014-01-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are powerful agents of destruction, and understanding climatic controls on TC patterns is of great importance. Over timescales of seasons to several decades, relationships among TC track, frequency, intensity and basin-scale climate changes are well documented by instrumental records. Over centuries to millennia, climate-shift influence on TC regimes remains poorly constrained. To better understand these relationships, records from multiple locations of TC strikes spanning millennia with high temporal resolution are required, but such records are rare. Here we report on a highly detailed sedimentary proxy record of paleo-TC strikes from the Blue Hole of Lighthouse Reef, Belize. Our findings provide an important addition to other high-resolution records, which collectively demonstrate that shifts between active and inactive TC regimes have occurred contemporaneously with shifts hemispheric-scale oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns such as MDR SSTs and NAO mode, rather than with changes in local climate phenomena as has previously been suggested. PMID:24464265

  5. A New Method to Measure Temperature and Burner Pattern Factor Sensing for Active Engine Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The determination of the temperatures of extended surfaces which exhibit non-uniform temperature variation is very important for a number of applications including the "Burner Pattern Factor" (BPF) of turbine engines. Exploratory work has shown that use of BPF to control engine functions can result in many benefits, among them reduction in engine weight, reduction in operating cost, increase in engine life, while attaining maximum engine efficiency. Advanced engines are expected to operate at very high temperature to achieve high efficiency. Brief exposure of engine components to higher than design temperatures due to non-uniformity in engine burner pattern can reduce engine life. The engine BPF is a measure of engine temperature uniformity. Attainment of maximum temperature uniformity and high temperatures is key to maximum efficiency and long life. A new approach to determine through the measurement of just one radiation spectrum by a multiwavelength pyrometer is possible. This paper discusses a new temperature sensing approach and its application to determine the BPF.

  6. Opportunities and challenges for optical CD metrology in double patterning process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wack, Daniel C.; Hench, John; Poslavsky, Leonid; Fielden, John; Zhuang, Vera; Mieher, Walter; Dziura, Ted

    2008-03-01

    We review early challenges and opportunities for optical CD metrology (OCD) arising from the potential insertion of double patterning technology (DPT) processes for critical layer semiconductor production. Due to the immaturity of these new processes, simulations are crucial for mapping performance trends and identifying potential metrology gaps. With an analysis methodology similar in spirit to the recent NIST OCD extendability study1, but with aperture and noise models pertinent to current or projected production metrology systems, we use advanced simulation tools to forecast OCD precision performance of key structural parameters (eg., CD, sidewall angle) at litho (ADI) and etch (ACI) steps for a variety of mainstream optical measurement schemes, such as spectroscopic or angle-resolved, to identify strengths and weaknesses of OCD metrology for patterning process control at 32 and 22nm technology nodes. Test case geometries and materials for the simulated periodic metrology targets are derived from published DPT process flows, with ITRS-style scaling rules, as well as rather standard scanner qualification use cases. Consistent with the NIST study, we find encouraging evidence of OCD extendability through 22nm node dense geometries, a surprising and perhaps unexpected result, given the near-absence of published results for the inverse optical scattering problem for periodic structures in the deep sub-wavelength regime.

  7. Scattering from coated structures and antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces, part A/B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1990-01-01

    The scattering from coated, conducting structures, specifically the coated dihedral corner reflector configuration and the coated strip/plate configuration is examined. The formulation uses impedance-wedge Uniform Theory of Diffraction scattering coefficients to calculate the diffracted fields. A finite-thickness coating is approximated using the impedance boundary condition to arrive at an equivalent impedance for the coating. The formulation of the impedance wedge coefficients is outlined. Far-field, perfectly conducting approximations are discussed. Problems with the present dihedral corner reflector model for certain angles of incidence and observation are discussed along with a potentially rectifying modification. Also, the capacity to measure the electromagnetic properties of lossy materials was developed. The effects of using multiple material coatings on the radiation pattern of the horn antenna were studied. Numerous computations were devoted toward the inverse problem of synthesizing desired radiation patterns using the impedance surfaces. Stabilizing the equivalent sheet impedance using the linear control condition was attempted, and it was found to be a very difficult task.

  8. Patterns of Life Events Preceding the Suicide in Rural Young Chinese: A Case Control Study1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Ma, Zhenyu

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies on the Chinese suicide found some life events prior to the suicide different from those in the West, but there is a lack of summary of the Chinese life event patterns to better understand the effects of the social structure on Chinese suicide. Aim We tried to identify the life events that precede the Chinese rural youth suicides and compare them with what found in the West, so as to find the patterns that are particularly true in the Chinese culture contexts. Methods Suicide cases were investigated with a psychological autopsy study in rural China, and local community living controls were also interviewed with the same protocol. Results We collapsed 64 negative life events into six categories: (1) Marriage/Love, (2) Family/Home, (3) Work/Business, (4) Health/Hospital, (5) Law/Legal, (6) Friend/Relationship. About 92.3% of the suicides studied had experienced at least one type of negative life events. The three most common negative life events categories in the past one year were Family/Home (60.7%), Health/Hospital (53.8%) and Marriage/Love (51.3%) in the rural young suicide victims. Conclusions Among the negative life events, those related to family relations, love affairs, and marital issues were most likely to precede a suicide of rural suicides in China, and it is especially true of rural young women. Family is an important social institution in rural China for suicide prevention efforts. PMID:22595373

  9. Frequency and pattern of heteroplasmy in the control region of human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cristina; Sierra, Blanca; Alvarez, Luis; Ramos, Amanda; Fernández, Elisabet; Nogués, Ramón; Aluja, Maria Pilar

    2008-08-01

    In this work, we present the results of the screening of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy in the control region of mtDNA from 210 unrelated Spanish individuals. Both hypervariable regions of mtDNA were amplified and sequenced in order to identify and quantify point and length heteroplasmy. Of the 210 individuals analyzed, 30% were fully homoplasmic and the remaining presented point and/or length heteroplasmy. The prevalent form of heteroplasmy was length heteroplasmy in the poly(C) tract of the hypervariable region II (HVRII), followed by length heteroplasmy in the poly(C) tract of hypervariable region I (HVRI) and, finally, point heteroplasmy, which was found in 3.81% of the individuals analyzed. Moreover, no significant differences were found in the proportions of the different kinds of heteroplasmy in the population when blood and buccal cell samples were compared. The pattern of heteroplasmy in HVRI and HVRII presents important differences. Moreover, the mutational profile in heteroplasmy seems to be different from the mutational pattern detected in population. The results suggest that a considerable number of mutations and, particularly, transitions that appear in heteroplasmy are probably eliminated by drift and/or by selection acting at different mtDNA levels of organization. Taking as a whole the results reported in this work, it is mandatory to perform a broad-scale screening of heteroplasmy to better establish the heteroplasmy profile which would be important for medical, evolutionary, and forensic proposes. PMID:18618067

  10. Control of the Diurnal Pattern of Methane Emission from Emergent Aquatic Macrophytes by Gas Transport Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, Gary J.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    1995-01-01

    Methane emissions from Typha latifolia (L.) showed a large mid-morning transient peak associated with rising light levels. This peak was also associated with a steep decline in lacunal CH, concentrations near the stem base. This pattern contrasted sharply with emissions from Peltandra virginica (L.) that gradually rose to a peak in the mid-afternoon corresponding to elevated air temperatures. Internal CH4 concentrations within P. virginica stems did not change significantly over the diurnal period. Stomatal conductance appeared to correlate directly with light levels in both plant types and were not associated with peak CH4 emission events in either plant. These patterns are consistent with a convective throughflow and diffusive gas ventilation systems for Typha and Peltandra, respectively. Further effects of the convective throughflow in T. latifolia were evident in the elevated CH4 concentrations measured within brown leaves as contrasted to the near ambient levels measured within live green leaves. Experimental manipulation of elevated and reduced CO2 levels in the atmosphere surrounding the plants and of light/dark periods suggested that stomatal aperture has little or no control of methane emissions from T. latifolia.

  11. Climatic controls on hurricane patterns: a 1200-y near-annual record from Lighthouse Reef, Belize

    PubMed Central

    Denommee, K. C.; Bentley, S. J.; Droxler, A. W.

    2014-01-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are powerful agents of destruction, and understanding climatic controls on TC patterns is of great importance. Over timescales of seasons to several decades, relationships among TC track, frequency, intensity and basin-scale climate changes are well documented by instrumental records. Over centuries to millennia, climate-shift influence on TC regimes remains poorly constrained. To better understand these relationships, records from multiple locations of TC strikes spanning millennia with high temporal resolution are required, but such records are rare. Here we report on a highly detailed sedimentary proxy record of paleo-TC strikes from the Blue Hole of Lighthouse Reef, Belize. Our findings provide an important addition to other high-resolution records, which collectively demonstrate that shifts between active and inactive TC regimes have occurred contemporaneously with shifts hemispheric-scale oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns such as MDR SSTs and NAO mode, rather than with changes in local climate phenomena as has previously been suggested. PMID:24464265

  12. Restoration of Vision with Ectopic Expression of Human Rod Opsin.

    PubMed

    Cehajic-Kapetanovic, Jasmina; Eleftheriou, Cyril; Allen, Annette E; Milosavljevic, Nina; Pienaar, Abigail; Bedford, Robert; Davis, Katherine E; Bishop, Paul N; Lucas, Robert J

    2015-08-17

    Many retinal dystrophies result in photoreceptor loss, but the inner retinal neurons can survive, making them potentially amenable to emerging optogenetic therapies. Here, we show that ectopically expressed human rod opsin, driven by either a non-selective or ON-bipolar cell-specific promoter, can function outside native photoreceptors and restore visual function in a mouse model of advanced retinal degeneration. Electrophysiological recordings from retinal explants and the visual thalamus revealed changes in firing (increases and decreases) induced by simple light pulses, luminance increases, and naturalistic movies in treated mice. These responses could be elicited at light intensities within the physiological range and substantially below those required by other optogenetic strategies. Mice with rod opsin expression driven by the ON-bipolar specific promoter displayed behavioral responses to increases in luminance, flicker, coarse spatial patterns, and elements of a natural movie at levels of contrast and illuminance (≈50-100 lux) typical of natural indoor environments. These data reveal that virally mediated ectopic expression of human rod opsin can restore vision under natural viewing conditions and at moderate light intensities. Given the inherent advantages in employing a human protein, the simplicity of this intervention, and the quality of vision restored, we suggest that rod opsin merits consideration as an optogenetic actuator for treating patients with advanced retinal degeneration. PMID:26234216

  13. Restoration of Vision with Ectopic Expression of Human Rod Opsin

    PubMed Central

    Cehajic-Kapetanovic, Jasmina; Eleftheriou, Cyril; Allen, Annette E.; Milosavljevic, Nina; Pienaar, Abigail; Bedford, Robert; Davis, Katherine E.; Bishop, Paul N.; Lucas, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many retinal dystrophies result in photoreceptor loss, but the inner retinal neurons can survive, making them potentially amenable to emerging optogenetic therapies. Here, we show that ectopically expressed human rod opsin, driven by either a non-selective or ON-bipolar cell-specific promoter, can function outside native photoreceptors and restore visual function in a mouse model of advanced retinal degeneration. Electrophysiological recordings from retinal explants and the visual thalamus revealed changes in firing (increases and decreases) induced by simple light pulses, luminance increases, and naturalistic movies in treated mice. These responses could be elicited at light intensities within the physiological range and substantially below those required by other optogenetic strategies. Mice with rod opsin expression driven by the ON-bipolar specific promoter displayed behavioral responses to increases in luminance, flicker, coarse spatial patterns, and elements of a natural movie at levels of contrast and illuminance (≈50–100 lux) typical of natural indoor environments. These data reveal that virally mediated ectopic expression of human rod opsin can restore vision under natural viewing conditions and at moderate light intensities. Given the inherent advantages in employing a human protein, the simplicity of this intervention, and the quality of vision restored, we suggest that rod opsin merits consideration as an optogenetic actuator for treating patients with advanced retinal degeneration. PMID:26234216

  14. Magnetization control for bit pattern formation of spinel ferromagnetic oxides by Kr ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kazuya Z.; Liu, Yang; Utsumi, Yuji; Morishita, Jumpei; Oshima, Daiki; Kato, Takeshi; Niizeki, Tomohiko; Mibu, Ko; Yanagihara, Hideto

    2014-05-01

    As a first step toward the development of bit-patterned magnetic media made of oxides, we investigated the effectiveness of magnetism control by Kr implantation in a typical spinel ferromagnetic oxide, Fe3O4. We implanted Kr ions accelerated at 30 kV on 13-nm-thick Fe3O4 thin films at dosages of (1-40) × 1014 ions/cm2. Magnetization decreased with increase in ion dosages and disappeared when irradiation was greater than 2 × 1015 ions/cm2 of Kr ions. These dosages are more than ten times smaller than that used in the N2 implantation for metallic and oxide ferromagnets. Both the temperature dependence of magnetization and the Mössbauer study suggest that the transition of Fe3O4 from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic took place sharply due to Kr ion irradiation, which produces two-phase separation—ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic with insufficient dosage of Kr ions.

  15. Extraembryonic signals under the control of MGA, Max, and Smad4 are required for dorsoventral patterning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhua; Tseng, Wei-Chia; Fan, Xiang; Ball, Rebecca; Dougan, Scott T

    2014-02-10

    In vertebrates, extraembryonic tissues can act as signaling centers that impose a reproducible pattern of cell types upon the embryo. Here, we show that the zebrafish yolk syncytial layer (YSL) secretes a ventralizing signal during gastrulation. This activity is mediated by Bmp2b/Swirl (Swr) expressed under the control of Max's giant associated protein (MGA) and its binding partners, Max and Smad4. MGA coimmunoprecipitates with both Max and Smad4 in embryo extracts, and the three proteins form a complex in vitro. Furthermore, all three proteins bind to a DNA fragment upstream of the bmp2b transcription start site. Targeted depletion of MGA, its binding partners, or Bmp2b/Swr from the YSL reduces BMP signaling throughout the embryo, resulting in a mildly dorsalized phenotype. We conclude that MGA, Max, and Smad4 act in the extraembryonic YSL to initiate a positive feedback loop of Bmp signaling within the embryo. PMID:24525188

  16. Adult plant development in triticale (× triticosecale wittmack) is controlled by dynamic genetic patterns of regulation.

    PubMed

    Würschum, Tobias; Liu, Wenxin; Alheit, Katharina V; Tucker, Matthew R; Gowda, Manje; Weissmann, Elmar A; Hahn, Volker; Maurer, Hans Peter

    2014-09-01

    Many biologically and agronomically important traits are dynamic and show temporal variation. In this study, we used triticale (× Triticosecale Wittmack) as a model crop to assess the genetic dynamics underlying phenotypic plasticity of adult plant development. To this end, a large mapping population with 647 doubled haploid lines derived from four partially connected families from crosses among six parents was scored for developmental stage at three different time points. Using genome-wide association mapping, we identified main effect and epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) at all three time points. Interestingly, some of these QTL were identified at all time points, whereas others appear to only contribute to the genetic architecture at certain developmental stages. Our results illustrate the temporal contribution of QTL to the genetic control of adult plant development and more generally, the temporal genetic patterns of regulation that underlie dynamic traits. PMID:25237110

  17. Dual-Use Partnership Addresses Performance Problems with "Y" Pattern Control Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, John W.

    2004-01-01

    A Dual-Use Cooperative Agreement between the Propulsion Test Directorate (PTD) at Stennis Space Center (SSC) and Oceaneering Reflange, Inc. of Houston, TX has produced an improved 'Y' pattern split-body control valve for use in the propulsion test facilities at Stennis Space Center. The split-body, or clamped bonnet technology, provides for a 'cleaner' valve design featuring enhanced performance and increased flow capacity with extended life expectancy. Other points addressed by the partnership include size, weight and costs. Overall size and weight of each valve will be reduced by 50% compared to valves currently in use at SSC. An initial procurement of two 10 inch valves will result in an overall cost reduction of 15% or approximately $50,000 per valve.

  18. Printing Highly Controlled Suspended Carbon Nanotube Network on Micro-patterned Superhydrophobic Flexible Surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Wang, Xin; Jung, Hyun Young; Kim, Young Lae; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Zalalutdinov, Maxim; Hong, Sanghyun; Hao, Ji; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Wan, Kai-Tak; Jung, Yung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) offer unique functionalities for electronic and electromechanical systems. Due to their outstanding flexible nature, suspended SWCNT architectures have great potential for integration into flexible electronic systems. However, current techniques for integrating SWCNT architectures with flexible substrates are largely absent, especially in a manner that is both scalable and well controlled. Here, we present a new nanostructured transfer paradigm to print scalable and well-defined suspended nano/microscale SWCNT networks on 3D patterned flexible substrates with micro- to nanoscale precision. The underlying printing/transfer mechanism, as well as the mechanical, electromechanical, and mechanical resonance properties of the suspended SWCNTs are characterized, including identifying metrics relevant for reliable and sensitive device structures. Our approach represents a fast, scalable and general method for building suspended nano/micro SWCNT architectures suitable for flexible sensing and actuation systems. PMID:26511284

  19. Printing Highly Controlled Suspended Carbon Nanotube Network on Micro-patterned Superhydrophobic Flexible Surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Wang, Xin; Jung, Hyun Young; Kim, Young Lae; Robinson, Jeremy T; Zalalutdinov, Maxim; Hong, Sanghyun; Hao, Ji; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Wan, Kai-Tak; Jung, Yung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) offer unique functionalities for electronic and electromechanical systems. Due to their outstanding flexible nature, suspended SWCNT architectures have great potential for integration into flexible electronic systems. However, current techniques for integrating SWCNT architectures with flexible substrates are largely absent, especially in a manner that is both scalable and well controlled. Here, we present a new nanostructured transfer paradigm to print scalable and well-defined suspended nano/microscale SWCNT networks on 3D patterned flexible substrates with micro- to nanoscale precision. The underlying printing/transfer mechanism, as well as the mechanical, electromechanical, and mechanical resonance properties of the suspended SWCNTs are characterized, including identifying metrics relevant for reliable and sensitive device structures. Our approach represents a fast, scalable and general method for building suspended nano/micro SWCNT architectures suitable for flexible sensing and actuation systems. PMID:26511284

  20. Printing Highly Controlled Suspended Carbon Nanotube Network on Micro-patterned Superhydrophobic Flexible Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Wang, Xin; Jung, Hyun Young; Kim, Young Lae; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Zalalutdinov, Maxim; Hong, Sanghyun; Hao, Ji; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Wan, Kai-Tak; Jung, Yung Joon

    2015-10-01

    Suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) offer unique functionalities for electronic and electromechanical systems. Due to their outstanding flexible nature, suspended SWCNT architectures have great potential for integration into flexible electronic systems. However, current techniques for integrating SWCNT architectures with flexible substrates are largely absent, especially in a manner that is both scalable and well controlled. Here, we present a new nanostructured transfer paradigm to print scalable and well-defined suspended nano/microscale SWCNT networks on 3D patterned flexible substrates with micro- to nanoscale precision. The underlying printing/transfer mechanism, as well as the mechanical, electromechanical, and mechanical resonance properties of the suspended SWCNTs are characterized, including identifying metrics relevant for reliable and sensitive device structures. Our approach represents a fast, scalable and general method for building suspended nano/micro SWCNT architectures suitable for flexible sensing and actuation systems.

  1. Statistical properties in Young's interference pattern formed with a radially polarized beam with controllable spatial coherence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shijun; Wang, Fei; Chen, Yahong; Li, Zhenhua; Cai, Yangjian

    2014-11-17

    Experimental generation of a radially polarized (RP) beam with controllable spatial coherence (i.e., partially coherent RP beam) was reported recently [Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 051108 (2012)]. In this paper, we carry out theoretical and experimental studies of the statistical properties in Young's two-slit interference pattern formed with a partially coherent RP beam. An approximate analytical expression for the cross-spectral density matrix of a partially coherent RP beam in the observation plane is obtained, and it is found that the statistical properties, such as the intensity, the degree of coherence and the degree of polarization, are strongly affected by the spatial coherence of the incident beam. Our experimental results are consistent with the theoretical predictions, and may be useful in some applications, where light field with special statistical properties are required. PMID:25402110

  2. Roles of dorsomedial hypothalamic cholecystokinin signaling in the controls of meal patterns and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangjing; Yan, Jianqun; Smith, Wanli W; Moran, Timothy H; Bi, Sheng

    2012-01-18

    A role for dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) cholecystokinin (CCK) signaling in feeding control has been proposed. Administration of CCK into the DMH reduces food intake and OLETF rats lacking CCK1 receptors (CCK1R) become hyperphagic and obese. We hypothesized that site specific replenishment of CCK1R in the DMH of OLETF rats would attenuate aspects of their feeding deficits. Recombinant vectors of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated expression of CCK1R (AAVCCK1R) were bilaterally delivered into the DMH of OLETF. OLETF rats with AAVCCK1R injections demonstrated a 65% replenishment of Cck1r mRNA expression in the DMH relative to lean LETO control rats. Although this level of replenishment did not significantly affect overall food intake or body weight through 14 weeks following viral injections, meal patterns were partially normalized in OLETF rats receiving AAVCCK1R with a significant decrease in dark cycle meal size and a small but significant decrease in daily food intake in the meal analysis chambers. Importantly, the elevation in blood glucose level of OLETF rats was attenuated by the AAVCCK1R injections (p=0.03), suggesting a role for DMH CCK signaling in glucose homeostasis. In support of this role, administration of CCK into the DMH of intact rats enhanced glucose tolerance, as this occurred through activation of CCK1R but not CCK2R signaling. In conclusion, partial replenishment of CCK1R in the DMH of OLETF rats, although insufficient for altering overall food intake and body weight, normalizes meal pattern changes and reduces blood glucose levels. Our study also shows a novel role of DMH CCK signaling in glucose homeostasis. PMID:21871472

  3. LSD1-Mediated Demethylation of H3K4me2 Is Required for the Transition from Late Progenitor to Differentiated Mouse Rod Photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Popova, Evgenya Y; Pinzon-Guzman, Carolina; Salzberg, Anna C; Zhang, Samuel Shao-Min; Barnstable, Colin J

    2016-09-01

    Epigenetic modifiers can work in concert with transcription factors to control the transition of cells from proliferating progenitors into quiescent terminally differentiated cells. This transition involves changes in histone methylation and one of the key regulators of this is the H3K4me2/1 histone demethylase LSD1. Here, we show that the highest expression of LSD1 occurs in postmitotic retinal cells during the peak period of rod photoreceptor differentiation. Pharmacological inhibition of LSD1 in retinal explants cultured from PN1 to PN8 had three major effects. It prevented the normal decrease in expression of genes associated with progenitor function, it blocked rod photoreceptor development, and it increased expression of genes associated with other retinal cell types. The maintained expression of progenitor genes was associated with a maintained level of H3K4me2 over the gene and its promoter. Among the genes whose expression was maintained was Hes1, a repressor known to block rod photoreceptor development. The inhibition of rod photoreceptor gene expression occurred in spite of the normal expression of transcription factors CRX and NRL, and the normal accumulation of H3K4me2 marks over the promoter and gene body. We suggest that LSD1 acts in concert with a series of nuclear receptors to modify chromatin structure and repress progenitor genes as well as to inhibit ectopic patterns of gene expression in the differentiating postmitotic retinal cells. PMID:26298666

  4. Surface EMG pattern recognition for real-time control of a wrist exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals have been used in numerous studies for the classification of hand gestures and movements and successfully implemented in the position control of different prosthetic hands for amputees. sEMG could also potentially be used for controlling wearable devices which could assist persons with reduced muscle mass, such as those suffering from sarcopenia. While using sEMG for position control, estimation of the intended torque of the user could also provide sufficient information for an effective force control of the hand prosthesis or assistive device. This paper presents the use of pattern recognition to estimate the torque applied by a human wrist and its real-time implementation to control a novel two degree of freedom wrist exoskeleton prototype (WEP), which was specifically developed for this work. Methods Both sEMG data from four muscles of the forearm and wrist torque were collected from eight volunteers by using a custom-made testing rig. The features that were extracted from the sEMG signals included root mean square (rms) EMG amplitude, autoregressive (AR) model coefficients and waveform length. Support Vector Machines (SVM) was employed to extract classes of different force intensity from the sEMG signals. After assessing the off-line performance of the used classification technique, the WEP was used to validate in real-time the proposed classification scheme. Results The data gathered from the volunteers were divided into two sets, one with nineteen classes and the second with thirteen classes. Each set of data was further divided into training and testing data. It was observed that the average testing accuracy in the case of nineteen classes was about 88% whereas the average accuracy in the case of thirteen classes reached about 96%. Classification and control algorithm implemented in the WEP was executed in less than 125 ms. Conclusions The results of this study showed that classification of EMG signals by

  5. Stability and failure analysis of steering tie-rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, GongFeng; Zhang, YiLiang; Xu, XueDong; Ding, DaWei

    2008-11-01

    A new car in operation of only 8,000 km, because of malfunction, resulting in lost control and rammed into the edge of the road, and then the basic vehicle scrapped. According to the investigation of the site, it was found that the tie-rod of the car had been broken. For the subjective analysis of the accident and identifying the true causes of rupture of the tierod, a series of studies, from the angle of theory to experiment on the bended broken tie-rod, were conducted. The mechanical model was established; the stability of the defective tie-rod was simulated based on ANSYS software. Meanwhile, the process of the accident was simulated considering the effect of destabilization of different vehicle speed and direction of the impact. Simultaneously, macro graphic test, chemical composition analysis, microstructure analysis and SEM analysis of the fracture were implemented. The results showed that: 1) the toughness of the tie-rod is at a normal level, but there is some previous flaws. One quarter of the fracture surface has been cracked before the accident. However, there is no relationship between the flaw and this incident. The direct cause is the dynamic instability leading to the large deformation of impact loading. 2) The declining safety factor of the tie-rod greatly due to the previous flaws; the result of numerical simulation shows that previous flaw is the vital factor of structure instability, on the basis of the comparison of critical loads of the accident tie-rod and normal. The critical load can decrease by 51.3% when the initial defect increases 19.54% on the cross-sectional area, which meets the Theory of Koiter.

  6. Controls on morphological variability and role of stream power distribution pattern, Yamuna River, western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawa, Nupur; Jain, Vikrant; Shekhar, Shashank; Kumar, Niraj; Jyani, Vikas

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the controls on the morphological variability of river systems constitutes one of the fundamental questions in geomorphic investigation. Channel morphology is an important indicator of river processes and is of significance for mapping the hydrology-ecologic connectivity in a river system and for predicting the future trajectory of river health in response to external forcings. This paper documents the spatial morphological variability and its natural and anthropogenic controls for the Yamuna River, a major tributary of the Ganga River, India. The Yamuna River runs through a major urban centre i.e. Delhi National Capital Region. The Yamuna River was divided into eight geomorphically distinct reaches on the basis of the assemblages of geomorphic units and the association of landscape, valley and floodplain settings. The morphological variability was analysed through stream power distribution and sediment load data at various stations. Stream power distribution of the Yamuna River basin is characterised by a non-linear pattern that was used to distinguish (a) high energy ‘natural' upstream reaches, (b) ‘anthropogenically altered', low energy middle stream reaches, and (c) ‘rejuvenated' downstream reaches again with higher stream power. The relationship between stream power and channel morphology in these reaches was integrated with sediment load data to define the maximum flow efficiency (MFE) as the threshold for geomorphic transition. This analysis supports the continuity of river processes and the significance of a holistic, basin-scale approach rather than isolated local scale analysis in river studies.

  7. Designing materials for advanced microelectronic patterning applications using controlled polymerization RAFT technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Michael T.; Farnham, William B.; Chambers, Charles R.; Tran, Hoang V.; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Brun, Yefim; Romberger, Matthew L.; Sounik, James R.

    2011-04-01

    Reversible Addition Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization technology enables the production of polymers possessing low polydispersity (PD) in high yield for many applications. RAFT technology also enables control over polymer architecture. With synthetic control over these polymer characteristics, a variety of polymers can be designed and manufactured for use in advanced electronic applications. By matching the specific RAFT reagent and monomer combinations, we can accommodate monomer reactivity and optimize acrylate or methacrylate polymerizations (193 and 193i photoresist polymers) or optimize styrenic monomer systems (248 nm photoresist polymers) to yield polymers with PD as low as 1.05. For 193i lithography, we have used RAFT technology to produce block copolymers comprising of a random "resist" block with composition and size based on conventional dry photoresist materials and a "low surface energy" block The relative block lengths and compositions may be varied to tune solution migration behavior, surface energy, contact angles, and solubility in developer. Directed self assembly is proving to be an interesting and innovative method to make 2- and even 3-dimensional periodic, uniform patterns. Two keys to acceptable performance of directed self assembly from block copolymers are the uniformity and the purity of the materials will be discussed.

  8. Land cover variation and West Nile virus prevalence: Patterns, processes, and implications for disease control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ezenwa, V.O.; Milheim, L.E.; Coffey, M.F.; Godsey, M.S.; King, R.J.; Guptill, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    Identifying links between environmental variables and infectious disease risk is essential to understanding how human-induced environmental changes will effect the dynamics of human and wildlife diseases. Although land cover change has often been tied to spatial variation in disease occurrence, the underlying factors driving the correlations are often unknown, limiting the applicability of these results for disease prevention and control. In this study, we described associations between land cover composition and West Nile virus (WNV) infection prevalence, and investigated three potential processes accounting for observed patterns: (1) variation in vector density; (2) variation in amplification host abundance; and (3) variation in host community composition. Interestingly, we found that WNV infection rates among Culex mosquitoes declined with increasing wetland cover, but wetland area was not significantly associated with either vector density or amplification host abundance. By contrast, wetland area was strongly correlated with host community composition, and model comparisons suggested that this factor accounted, at least partially, for the observed effect of wetland area on WNV infection risk. Our results suggest that preserving large wetland areas, and by extension, intact wetland bird communities, may represent a valuable ecosystem-based approach for controlling WNV outbreaks. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  9. Broader pattern of tandem repeats in the mitochondrial control region of Perciformes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yuan; Chu, Ka Hou

    2010-07-01

    Perciformes, the largest order of vertebrates with 20 suborders, is the most diverse fish order that dominates vertebrate ocean life. The complete mitochondrial control region (CR) of Trichiurus japonicus (Trichiuridae, Scombroidei) and Pampus sp. (Stromateidae, Stromateoidei) were amplified and sequenced. Together with data from GenBank, the tandem repeats in the mitochondrial CR from 48 species, which covered nine suborders of Perciformes, are reported in this study. The tandem repeats tend to be long in the suborder Percoidei and Stromateoidei. The identical repeats in 21 species of Cichlidae suggest a common origin and have existed before species divergence. Larimichthys crocea shows tandem repeats instead of the typical structure of the central conserved sequence blocks, which was first reported in Perciformes and vertebrates. This might have resulted from interruption of the polymerase activity during the H-strand synthesis. The four broader patterns presented here for the tandem repeats, including those in both the 5' and 3' ends, only in the either 5' or 3' end, and in the central conserved domain of the control region, will be useful for understanding the evolution of species.

  10. Causal relationships vs. emergent patterns in the global controls of fire frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistinas, I.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.; Pereira, J. M. C.

    2014-03-01

    Global controls on month-by-month fractional burnt area (2000-2005) were investigated by fitting a generalized linear model to Global Fire Emissions Database data with 11 predictor variables representing vegetation, climate, land use and potential ignition sources. Burnt area is shown to increase with annual net primary production (NPP), number of dry days, maximum temperature, grazing-land area, grass/shrub cover and diurnal temperature range, and to decrease with soil moisture, cropland area and population density. Lightning showed an apparent (weak) negative influence, but this disappeared when pure seasonal-cycle effects were taken into account. The model predicts observed geographic and seasonal patterns, and the emergent relationships seen when burnt area is plotted against each variable separately. Unimodal relationships to mean annual temperature and precipitation, population density and gross domestic product (GDP) are reproduced too, and thus shown to be secondary consequences of correlations among different controls (e.g. high NPP with high precipitation; low NPP with low population density and GDP). These findings have major implications for the design of global fire models, as several assumptions in current models - most notably, the widely assumed dependence of fire frequency on ignition rates - are evidently incorrect.

  11. Causal relationships versus emergent patterns in the global controls of fire frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistinas, I.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.; Pereira, J. M. C.

    2014-09-01

    Global controls on month-by-month fractional burnt area (2000-2005) were investigated by fitting a generalised linear model (GLM) to Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED) data, with 11 predictor variables representing vegetation, climate, land use and potential ignition sources. Burnt area is shown to increase with annual net primary production (NPP), number of dry days, maximum temperature, grazing-land area, grass/shrub cover and diurnal temperature range, and to decrease with soil moisture, cropland area and population density. Lightning showed an apparent (weak) negative influence, but this disappeared when pure seasonal-cycle effects were taken into account. The model predicts observed geographic and seasonal patterns, as well as the emergent relationships seen when burnt area is plotted against each variable separately. Unimodal relationships with mean annual temperature and precipitation, population density and gross domestic product (GDP) are reproduced too, and are thus shown to be secondary consequences of correlations between different controls (e.g. high NPP with high precipitation; low NPP with low population density and GDP). These findings have major implications for the design of global fire models, as several assumptions in current models - most notably, the widely assumed dependence of fire frequency on ignition rates - are evidently incorrect.

  12. Comparison of muscle activity patterns of transfemoral amputees and control subjects during walking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Only few studies have looked at electromyography (EMG) during prosthetic gait. Differences in EMG between normal and prosthetic gait for stance and swing phase were never separately analyzed. These differences can give valuable information if and how muscle activity changes in prosthetic gait. Methods In this study EMG activity during gait of the upper leg muscles of six transfemoral amputees, measured inside their own socket, was compared to that of five controls. On and off timings for stance and swing phase were determined together with the level of co-activity and inter-subject variability. Results and conclusions Gait phase changes in amputees mainly consisted of an increased double support phase preceding the prosthetic stance phase. For the subsequent (pre) swing phase the main differences were found in muscle activity patterns of the prosthetic limb, more muscles were active during this phase and/or with prolonged duration. The overall inter-subject variability was larger in amputees compared to controls. PMID:23914785

  13. A test of a dual central pattern generator hypothesis for subcortical control of locomotion.

    PubMed

    Guadagnoli, M A; Etnyre, B; Rodrigue, M L

    2000-08-01

    This study was designed to examine the nature of neural circuits involved in subcortical inter-limb coordination and reflex modulation mechanisms of locomotion. These circuits, called central pattern generators (CPGs), are believed to receive tonic input and generate rhythmically alternating sets of commands. Although CPGs have been theorized to exist in humans, their potential dual role in inter-limb coordination and reflex modulation is unclear. In the present study, nine participants walked on a treadmill, timing their heel-strikes to a metronome which varied the phase lag from 0.5 to 1.0 pi radians (0.1 pi intervals). A stimulus was delivered to the sural nerve and reflexes were measured in the ipsilateral and contralateral lower extremities through electromyography. The similarity between phase lag conditions for both temporal coordination (i.e., relative timing aspects between muscles and/or limbs) and reflex intensities suggested that they may be controlled by the same subcortical circuitry. Two plausible explanations exist: (1) a single CPG coordinates muscular contractions and phasically alters proprioceptive reflex modulation, as well as cutaneous input, using feed-forward control; (2) two separate circuits are strongly entrained, producing synchronous outputs for inter-limb coordination and reflex modulation. The out-of-phase task used in this study was limited in discerning such a difference, if it exists. PMID:10969197

  14. A framework for the Subaru Telescope observation control system based on the command design pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Eric; Bon, Bruce; Inagaki, Takeshi; Streeper, Sam

    2008-08-01

    Subaru Telescope is developing a second-generation Observation Control System that specifically addresses some of the deficiencies of the current Subaru OCS. One area of concern is better extensibility: the current system uses a custom language for implementing commands with a complex macro processing subsystem written in C. It is laborious to improve the language and awkward for scientists to extend and use standard programming techniques. Our Generation 2 OCS provides a lightweight, object-oriented task framework based on the Command design pattern. The framework provides a base task class that abstracts services for processing status and other common infrastructure activities. Upon this are built and provided a set of "atomic" tasks for telescope and instrument commands. A set of "container" tasks based on common sequential and concurrent command processing paradigms is also included. Since all tasks share the same exact interface, it is straightforward to build up compound tasks by plugging simple tasks into container tasks and container tasks into other containers, and so forth. In this way various advanced astronomical workflows can be readily created, with well controlled behaviors. In addition, since tasks are written in Python, it is easy for astronomers to subclass and extend the standard observatory tasks with their own custom extensions and behaviors, in a high-level, full-featured programming language. In this talk we will provide an overview of the task framework design and present preliminary results on the use of the framework during two separate engineering runs.

  15. Quantifying the drivers of larval density patterns in two tropical mosquito species to maximize control efficiency.

    PubMed

    De Little, Siobhan C; Bowman, David M J S; Whelan, Peter I; Brook, Barry W; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2009-08-01

    Understanding the contributions of environmental variation and density feedbacks to changes in vector populations is essential for designing effective vector control. We analyzed monitoring datasets describing larval densities over 7 yr of the two dominant mosquito species, Aedes vigilax (Skuse) and Culex annulirostris (Skuse), of the greater Darwin area (Northern Territory, Australia). Using generalized linear and linear mixed-effects models, we tested hypotheses regarding the environmental determinants of spatio-temporal patterns in relative larval abundance in both species. The most important spatial drivers of Ae. vigilax and Cx. annulirostris larval densities were elevation and water presence. Ae. vigilax density correlates negatively with elevation, whereas there was a positive relationship between Cx. annulirostris density and elevation. These results show how larval habitats used by the saltwater-influenced breeder Ae. vigilax and the obligate freshwater breeder Cx. annulirostris are separated in a tidally influenced swamp. The models examining temporal drivers of larval density also identified this discrimination between freshwater and saltwater habitats. Ae. vigilax larval densities were positively related to maximum tide height and high tide frequency, whereas Cx. annulirostris larval densities were positively related to elevation and rainfall. Adult abundance in the previous month was the most important temporal driver of larval densities in both species, providing a clear dynamical link between the two main life phases in mosquito development. This study shows the importance of considering both spatial and temporal drivers, and intrinsic population dynamics, when planning vector control strategies to reduce larval density, adult population density, and disease transmission effectively. PMID:19689879

  16. The immunoproteasome controls the availability of the cardioprotective pattern recognition molecule Pentraxin3.

    PubMed

    Paeschke, Anna; Possehl, Anna; Klingel, Karin; Voss, Martin; Voss, Karolin; Kespohl, Meike; Sauter, Martina; Overkleeft, Hermen S; Althof, Nadine; Garlanda, Cecilia; Voigt, Antje

    2016-03-01

    Cardiomyocyte death as a result of viral infection is an excellent model for dissecting the inflammatory stress response that occurs in heart tissue. We reported earlier that a specific proteasome isoform, the immunoproteasome, prevents exacerbation of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced myocardial destruction and preserves cell vitality in heart tissue inflammation. Following the aim to decipher molecular targets of immunoproteasome-dependent proteolysis, we investigated the function and regulation of the soluble PRR Pentraxin3 (PTX3). We show that the ablation of PTX3 in mice aggravated CVB3-triggered inflammatory injury of heart tissue, without having any significant effect on viral titers. Thus, there might be a role of PTX3 in preventing damage-associated molecular pattern-induced cell death. We found that the catalytic activity of the immunoproteasome subunit LMP7 regulates the timely availability of factors controlling PTX3 production. We report on immunoproteasome-dependent alteration of ERK1/2 and p38MAPKs, which were both found to be involved in PTX3 expression control. Our finding of a cardioprotective function of immunoproteasome-dependent PTX3 expression revealed a crucial mechanism of the stress-induced damage response in myocardial inflammation. In addition to antigen presentation and cytokine production, proteolysis by the immunoproteasome can also regulate the innate immune response during viral infection. PMID:26578407

  17. Controls of Lithospheric Mechanical Strength on the Deformation Pattern of Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Xiong, X.; Zheng, Y.; Hu, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Tien Shan is an outstanding example of intracontinental mountain belt, which was built rapidly and formed far away from plate boundaries. It exhibits 300~500 km in width and extends ~2000 km EW, located in central Asia. The Tien Shan is a key area for solution of the problems relating to intracontinental geodynamics. During last decades, despite a large amount of results based on various geological, geophysical and geodetic data about the Tien Shan, however, deformation mechanism remains controversial and other several principal problems related to its structure and evolution also have not been completely resolved. As for patterns of continental deformation, they are always controlled by both the forces applied to the lithosphere and by lithospheric resistance to the forces. The latter is often measured by the mechanical strength of lithosphere. The lateral variation of strength of lithosphere has been recognized to be an important factor controlling the spatial construction and temporal evolution of continent. In this study, we investigate the mechanical strength (Te) of lithosphere in the Tien Shan using wavelet coherency between Bouguer anomaly and topography. The patterns of Te variations are closely related to major tectonic boundaries and blocks. Mechanical strength exhibits a weak zone (Te~5-20km) beneath the Tien Shan while its surrounding blocks including Tarim Basin, Junggar Basin and Kazakh platform are characterized by a strong lithosphere (Te>40km). The lateral variations in mechanical strength and velocity field of horizontal movement with GPS demonstrate that strain localization appears at the margins of Tarim Basin, which is also the strong lithospheric domain. It is suggested that the weak lithosphere allows the crustal stress accumulation and the strong lithosphere helps to stress transfer. There is also a good agreement between mechanical strength and shear wave velocity structure in upper mantle. It indicates a strong domain located in the

  18. CONTROL FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lichtenberger, H.V.; Cameron, R.A.

    1959-03-31

    S>A control rod operating device in a nuclear reactor of the type in which the control rod is gradually withdrawn from the reactor to a position desired during stable operation is described. The apparatus is comprised essentially of a stop member movable in the direction of withdrawal of the control rod, a follower on the control rod engageable with the stop and means urging the follower against the stop in the direction of withdrawal. A means responsive to disengagement of the follower from the stop is provided for actuating the control rod to return to the reactor shut-down position.

  19. Temperature control of pattern formation in the Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)-catalyzed BZ-AOT system.

    PubMed

    McIlwaine, Rachel; Vanag, Vladimir K; Epstein, Irving R

    2009-03-14

    Using temperature as a control parameter, we observe a transition from stationary Turing patterns at T = 15-20 degrees C to traveling waves at T = 50 degrees C (and above) in the Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction incorporated into the water nanodroplets of a water-in-oil aerosol OT (AOT) microemulsion. At constant chemical composition, molar ratio and droplet fraction, the transition takes place via a series of stable patterns, including oscillatory Turing patterns (at 35-40 degrees C) and reversed oscillatory Turing patterns (at 50 degrees C). We attribute the pattern transitions to a temperature-induced percolation transition of the BZ-AOT microemulsion, implying a change from isolated water nanodroplets to a system-spanning network of water channels. PMID:19240935

  20. Acoustic signalling for mate attraction in crickets: Abdominal ganglia control the timing of the calling song pattern.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Pedro F; Hedwig, Berthold

    2016-08-01

    Decoding the neural basis of behaviour requires analysing how the nervous system is organised and how the temporal structure of motor patterns emerges from its activity. The stereotypical patterns of the calling song behaviour of male crickets, which consists of chirps and pulses, is an ideal model to study this question. We applied selective lesions to the abdominal nervous system of field crickets and performed long-term acoustic recordings of the songs. Specific lesions to connectives or ganglia abolish singing or reliably alter the temporal features of the chirps and pulses. Singing motor control appears to be organised in a modular and hierarchically fashion, where more posterior ganglia control the timing of the chirp pattern and structure and anterior ganglia the timing of the pulses. This modular organisation may provide the substrate for song variants underlying calling, courtship and rivalry behaviour and for the species-specific song patterns in extant crickets. PMID:27109338