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Sample records for control rod trip

  1. Control rod trip failures. Salem 1: the cause, response and potential fixes

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.E.; Boccio, J.L.; Luckas, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although the failure to trip or scram represents a single class of initiators, the actual events of each transient are operationally unique and require individual human response. The operational team's reaction to the challenge can be successful, in very short response times, and without complete diagnosis of the event's root cause. This underscores the need for a better basic understanding of the team response patterns in such cases, to allow designs, procedures, and training to take advantage of it. In addition, as one analyzes the recent failure at the Salem 1 reactor, it becomes obvious that the optimization of test and maintenance practices are essential and the use of time dependent reliability analyses lend themselves nicely to such calculations.

  2. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.; Ross, H.V.

    1958-11-18

    A control rod is described for a nuclear reactor. In certaln reactor designs it becomes desirable to use a control rod having great width but relatively llttle thickness. This patent is addressed to such a need. The neutron absorbing material is inserted in a triangular tube, leaving volds between the circular insert and the corners of the triangular tube. The material is positioned within the tube by the use of dummy spacers to achleve the desired absorption pattern, then the ends of the tubes are sealed with suitable plugs. The tubes may be welded or soldered together to form two flat surfaces of any desired width, and covered with sheetmetal to protect the tubes from damage. This design provides a control member that will not distort under the action of outside forces or be ruptured by gases generated within the jacketed control member.

  3. Control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  4. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  5. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  6. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  7. COMPOSITE CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Rock, H.R.

    1963-12-24

    A composite control rod for use in controlling a nuclear reactor is described. The control rod is of sandwich construction in which finned dowel pins are utilized to hold together sheets of the neutron absorbing material and nonabsorbing structural material thereby eliminating the need for being dependent on the absorbing material for structural support. The dowel pins perform the function of absorbing the forces due to differential thermal expansion, seating further with the fins into the sheets of material and crushing before damage is done either to the absorbing or non-absorbing material. (AEC)

  8. Control rod driveline and grapple

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A control rod driveline and grapple is disclosed for placement between a control rod drive and a nuclear reactor control rod containing poison for parasitic neutron absorption required for reactor shutdown. The control rod is provided with an enlarged cylindrical handle which terminates in an upwardly extending rod to provide a grapple point for the driveline. The grapple mechanism includes a tension rod which receives the upwardly extending handle and is provided with a lower annular flange. A plurality of preferably six grapple segments surround and grip the control rod handle. Each grapple rod segment grips the flange on the tension rod at an interior upper annular indentation, bears against the enlarged cylindrical handle at an intermediate annulus and captures the upwardly flaring frustum shaped handle at a lower and complementary female segment. The tension rods and grapple segments are surrounded by and encased within a cylinder. The cylinder terminates immediately and outward extending annulus at the lower portion of the grapple segments. Excursion of the tension rod relative to the encasing cylinder causes rod release at the handle by permitting the grapple segments to pivot outwardly and about the annulus on the tension rod so as to open the lower defined frustum shaped annulus and drop the rod. Relative movement between the tension rod and cylinder can occur either due to electromagnetic release of the tension rod within defined limits of travel or differential thermal expansion as between the tension rod and cylinder as where the reactor exceeds design thermal limits.

  9. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  10. SAFETY SYSTEM FOR CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Paget, J.A.

    1963-05-14

    A structure for monitoring the structural continuity of a control rod foi a neutron reactor is presented. A electric conductor readily breakable under mechanical stress is fastened along the length of the control rod at a plurality of positions and forms a closed circuit with remote electrical components responsive to an open circuit. A portion of the conductor between the control rod and said components is helically wound to allow free and normally unrestricted movement of the segment of conductor secured to the control rod relative to the remote components. Any break in the circuit is indicative of control rod breakage. (AEC)

  11. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Peter T. K.

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  12. Hafnium stainless steel absorber rod for control rod

    SciTech Connect

    Charnley, J.E.; Cearley, J.E.; Dixon, R.C.; Izzo, K.R.; Aiello, L.L.

    1989-08-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a control rod having a stainless steel body for enclosing a neutron absorbing poison, the control rod having movement along an axial direction for insertion into and out of a nuclear reactor for controlling a nuclear reaction. The improvement comprising: a piece of hafnium; a piece of stainless steel joined to the hafnium by a thin diffusion interface created by friction welding. The hafnium and the stainless steel oriented serially in the axial direction with the thin diffusion interface disposed normal to the axial direction of the control rod movement; means for confining the hafnium to movement along the axial direction with the control rod; and means for attaching the piece of stainless steel to the remaining portion of the control rod to load the weld therebetween under compression or tension during the control rod movement. Whereby the thin diffusion interface is loaded in tension or compression only upon dynamic movement of the control rod.

  13. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD DRIVE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Oakes, L.C.; Walker, C.S.

    1959-12-15

    ABS>A suspension mechanism between a vertically movable nuclear reactor control rod and a rod extension, which also provides information for the operator or an automatic control signal, is described. A spring connects the rod extension to a drive shift. The extension of the spring indicates whether (1) the rod is at rest on the reactor, (2) the rod and extension are suspended, or (3) the extension alone is suspended, the spring controlling a 3-position electrical switch.

  15. Inverted Control Rod Lock-In Device

    DOEpatents

    Brussalis, W. G.; Bost, G. E.

    1962-12-01

    A mechanism which prevents control rods from dropping out of the reactor core in the event the vessel in which the reactor is mounted should capsize is described. The mechanism includes a pivoted toothed armature which engages the threaded control rod lead screw and prevents removal of the rod whenever the armature is not attracted by the provided electromagnetic means. (AEC)

  16. Fuel followed control rod installation at AFRRI

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Mark; Owens, Chris; Forsbacka, Matt

    1992-07-01

    Fuel Followed Control Rods (FFCRs) were installed at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute's 1 MW TRIGA Reactor. The procedures for obtaining, shipping, and installing the FFCRs is described. As part of the FFCR installation, the transient rod drive was relocated. Core performance due to the addition of the fuel followed control rods is discussed. (author)

  17. Control rods in LMFBRs: a physics assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, H.F.; Collins, P.J.

    1982-08-01

    This physics assessment is based on roughly 300 control rod worth measurements in ZPPR from 1972 to 1981. All ZPPR assemblies simulated mixed-oxide LMFBRs, representing sizes of 350, 700, and 900 MWe. Control rod worth measurements included single rods, various combinations of rods, and Ta and Eu rods. Additional measurements studied variations in B/sub 4/C enrichment, rod interaction effects, variations in rod geometry, neutron streaming in sodium-filled channels, and axial worth profiles. Analyses were done with design-equivalent methods, using ENDF/B Version IV data. Some computations for the sensitivities to approximations in the methods have been included. Comparisons of these analyses with the experiments have allowed the status of control rod physics in the US to be clearly defined.

  18. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  19. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  20. Control rod drive hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Ose, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    A hydraulic system for a control rod drive (CRD) includes a variable output-pressure CR pump operable in a charging mode for providing pressurized fluid at a charging pressure, and in a normal mode for providing the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure, less than the charging pressure. Charging and purge lines are disposed in parallel flow between the CRD pump and the CRD. A hydraulic control unit is disposed in flow communication in the charging line and includes a scram accumulator. An isolation valve is provided in the charging line between the CRD pump and the scram accumulator. A controller is operatively connected to the CRD pump and the isolation valve and is effective for opening the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a charging mode for charging the scram accumulator, and closing the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a normal mode for providing to the CRD through the purge line the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure lower than the charging pressure.

  1. Control Rod Malfunction at the NRAD Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas L. Maddock

    2010-05-01

    The neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) is a training, research, and isotope (TRIGA) reactor located at the INL. The reactor is normally shut down by the insertion of three control rods that drop into the core when power is removed from electromagnets. During a routine shutdown, indicator lights on the console showed that one of the control rods was not inserted. It was initially thought that the indicator lights were in error because of a limit switch that was out of adjustment. Through further testing, it was determined that the control rod did not drop when the scram switch was initially pressed. The control rod anomaly led to a six month shutdown of the reactor and an in depth investigation of the reactor protective system. The investigation looked into: scram switch operation, console modifications, and control rod drive mechanisms. A number of latent issues were discovered and corrected during the investigation. The cause of the control rod malfunction was found to be a buildup of corrosion in the control rod drive mechanism. The investigation resulted in modifications to equipment, changes to both operation and maintenance procedures, and additional training. No reoccurrences of the problem have been observed since corrective actions were implemented.

  2. Variable flow control for a nuclear reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, Richard D.; Bhattacharyya, Ajay

    1978-01-01

    A variable flow control for a control rod assembly of a nuclear reactor that depends on turbulent friction though an annulus. The annulus is formed by a piston attached to the control rod drive shaft and a housing or sleeve fitted to the enclosure housing the control rod. As the nuclear fuel is burned up and the need exists for increased reactivity, the control rods are withdrawn, which increases the length of the annulus and decreases the rate of coolant flow through the control rod assembly.

  3. Control rod for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Walter G.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1979-01-01

    A control rod assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed having a remotely disengageable coupling between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling is actuated by first lowering then raising the drive shaft. The described motion causes axial repositioning of a pin in a grooved rotatable cylinder, each being attached to different parts of the drive shaft which are axially movable relative to each other. In one embodiment, the relative axial motion of the parts of the drive shaft is used either to couple or to uncouple the connection by forcing resilient members attached to the drive shaft into or out of shouldered engagement, respectively, with an indentation formed in the control rod.

  4. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1986-01-01

    A magnetic reed switch assembly for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electromagnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  5. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-09-30

    A magnetic reed switch assembly is described for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electro-magnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  6. Nuclear reactor remote disconnect control rod coupling indicator

    DOEpatents

    Vuckovich, Michael

    1977-01-01

    A coupling indicator for use with nuclear reactor control rod assemblies which have remotely disengageable couplings between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling indicator indicates whether the control rod and the control rod drive shaft are engaged or disengaged. A resistive network, utilizing magnetic reed switches, senses the position of the control rod drive mechanism lead screw and the control rod position indicating tube, and the relative position of these two elements with respect to each other is compared to determine whether the coupling is engaged or disengaged.

  7. Regulatory perspective on incomplete control rod insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterton, M.

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete control rod insertions experienced at South Texas Unit 1 and Wolf Creek are of safety concern to the NRC staff because they represent potential precursors to loss of shutdown margin. Even before it was determined if these events were caused by the control rods or by the fuel there was an apparent correlation of the problem with high burnup fuel. It was determined that there was also a correlation between high burnup and high drag forces as well as with rod drop time histories and lack of rod recoil. The NRC staff initial actions were aimed at getting a perspective on the magnitude of the problem as far as the number of plants and the amount of fuel that could be involved, as well as the safety significance in terms of shutdown margin. As tests have been performed and data has been analyzed the focus has shifted more toward understanding the problem and the ways to eliminate it. At this time the staff`s understanding of the phenomena is that it was a combination of factors including burnup, power history and temperature. The problem appears to be very sensitive to these factors, the interaction of which is not clearly understood. The model developed by Westinghouse provides a possible explanation but there is not sufficient data to establish confidence levels and sensitivity studies involving the key parameters have not been done. While several fixes to the problem have been discussed, no definitive fixes have been proposed. Without complete understanding of the phenomena, or fixes that clearly eliminate the problem the safety concern remains. The safety significance depends on the amount of shutdown margin lost due to incomplete insertion of the control rods. Were the control rods to stick high in the core, the reactor could not be shutdown by the control rods and other means such as emergency boration would be required.

  8. Radiological characterization of spent control rod assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Pratt, S.L.; Haggard, D.L.

    1995-10-01

    This document represents the final report of an ongoing study to provide radiological characterizations, classifications, and assessments in support of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. This report describes the results of non-destructive and laboratory radionuclide measurements, as well as waste classification assessments, of BWR and PWR spent control rod assemblies. The radionuclide inventories of these spent control rods were determined by three separate methodologies, including (1) direct assay techniques, (2) calculational techniques, and (3) by sampling and laboratory radiochemical analyses. For the BWR control rod blade (CRB) and PWR burnable poison rod assembly (BPRA), {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni, present in the stainless steel cladding, were the most abundant neutron activation products. The most abundant radionuclide in the PWR rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) was {sup 108m}Ag (130 yr halflife) produced in the Ag-In-Cd alloy used as the neutron poison. This radionuclide will be the dominant contributor to the gamma dose rate for many hundreds of years. The results of the direct assay methods agree very well ({+-}10%) with the sampling/radiochemical measurements. The results of the calculational methods agreed fairly well with the empirical measurements for the BPRA, but often varied by a factor of 5 to 10 for the CRB and the RCCA assemblies. If concentration averaging and encapsulation, as allowed by 10CFR61.55, is performed, then each of the entire control assemblies would be classified as Class C low-level radioactive waste.

  9. Control rod drive for reactor shutdown

    DOEpatents

    McKeehan, Ernest R.; Shawver, Bruce M.; Schiro, Donald J.; Taft, William E.

    1976-01-20

    A means for rapidly shutting down or scramming a nuclear reactor, such as a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor, and serves as a backup to the primary shutdown system. The control rod drive consists basically of an in-core assembly, a drive shaft and seal assembly, and a control drive mechanism. The control rod is driven into the core region of the reactor by gravity and hydraulic pressure forces supplied by the reactor coolant, thus assuring that common mode failures will not interfere with or prohibit scramming the reactor when necessary.

  10. HIGH STRENGTH CONTROL RODS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Cohen, I.

    1961-07-11

    Nuclear reactor control rods comprised of highly compressed and sintered finely divided metal alloy panticles and fine metal oxide panticles substantially uniformly distributed theretbrough are described. The metal alloy consists essentially of silver, indium, cadmium, tin, and aluminum, the amount of each being present in centain percentages by weight. The oxide particles are metal oxides of the metal alloy composition, the amount of oxygen being present in certain percentages by weight and all the oxygen present being substantially in the form of metal oxide. This control rod is characterized by its high strength and resistance to creep at elevated temperatures.

  11. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  12. CONTROL ROD DRIVE MECHANISM FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.; Liederbach, F.J.; Lones, W.

    1963-05-14

    A lead-screw-type control rod drive featuring an electric motor and a fluid motor arranged to provide a selectably alternative driving means is described. The electric motor serves to drive the control rod slowly during normal operation, while the fluid motor, assisted by an automatic declutching of the electric motor, affords high-speed rod insertion during a scram. (AEC)

  13. Measurements of control rod efficiency in RBMK critical assembly upon dropping of the rods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhitarev, V. E. Kachanov, V. M.; Sergevnin, A. Yu.; Lebedev, G. V.

    2014-12-15

    The efficiency of control rods in the RBMK critical assembly was measured in the case where one manual-control rod (MCR) is dropped from a steady critical state, and several other MCRs were additionally dropped after 44 s. The measured number of neutrons in the assembly during and after dropping of the rods was used to calculate the efficiency values of the rods by solution of the system of point kinetics equations. A series of methods of the initial data treatment for determination of the desired values of reactivity without the calculated corrections were used.

  14. Rebirth of a control rod at the Phenix power plant

    SciTech Connect

    De Carvalho, Corinne; Vignau, Bernard; Masson, Marc

    2007-07-01

    This paper outlines the operations involved in cleaning the control rod for the complementary shutdown system in the Phenix Power Plant, the French sodium-cooled fast reactor. The Phenix reactor is controlled by six control rods and a complementary shutdown system. The latter comprises a control rod and a mechanism maintaining the rod in position by means of an electromagnet. The electromagnet is continuously supplied with power and holds the rod control assembly in position by magnetisation on a plane circular surface made from pure iron. The bearing capacity of the mechanism on the rod was initially 80 daN with a rod weight of 26.3 daN. This deteriorated progressively over time. The bearing surface of the rod and the electromagnet became contaminated with a deposit of sodium oxides and metallic particles, thus creating an air gap. This reached a figure of 36 daN in 2005 and was deemed not to be sufficient to prevent the rod from dropping at the wrong time during reactor operation. The Power Plant thus decided to replace the rod mechanism in the reactor in an initial phase, followed by the control rod itself. As the Phenix Power Plant had no spare control rods left, they initiated a 'salvage' plan, over two stages, for the rod removed from the reactor and placed in the fuel storage drum: - Inspection of the bearing surface of the rod by means of a borescope to check whether the rod could be salvaged, - A cleaning operation on the bearing face and checks on the bearing capacity of the rod. The operation is subject to very stringent requirements: the rod must not be taken out of the sodium to ensure that it can be reused in the reactor. The operation must thus take place in the fuel storage drum where there are no facilities for such an operation and where operating conditions are very hostile: high temperatures (the sodium in the fuel storage drum is at a temperature of 150 deg. C, high dose rate (3 mGy/h on the bearing surface) and the bearing surface is submerged

  15. Nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bilibin, Konstantin

    1988-01-01

    A temperature responsive, self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly 10. The upper end 18 of a lower drive line 17 fits within the lower end of an upper drive line 12. The lower end (not shown) of the lower drive line 17 is connected to a neutron absorber. During normal temperature conditions the lower drive line 17 is supported by detent means 22,26. When an overtemperature condition occurs thermal actuation means 34 urges ring 26 upwardly sufficiently to allow balls 22 to move radially outwardly thereby allowing lower drive line 17 to move downwardly toward the core of the nuclear reactor resulting in automatic reduction of the reactor powder.

  16. CONTROL ROD FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR AND METHOD OF PREPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Hausner, H.H.

    1958-12-30

    BS>An improved control rod is presented for a nuclear reactor. This control rod is comprised of a rare earth metal oxide or rare earth metal carbide such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium carbide, uniformly distributed in a metal matrix having a low cross sectional area of absorption for thermal neutrons, such as aluminum, beryllium, and zirconium.

  17. DEVICE FOR CONTROLLING INSERTION OF ROD

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, B.J.

    1958-10-14

    A device for rapidly inserting a safety rod into a nuclear reactor upon a given signal or in the event of a power failure in order to prevent the possibility of extensive damage caused by a power excursion is described. A piston is slidably mounted within a vertical cylinder with provision for an electromagnetic latch at the top of the cylinder. This assembly, with a safety rod attached to the piston, is mounted over an access port to the core region of the reactor. The piston is normally latched at the top of the cylinder with the safety rod clear of the core area, however, when the latch is released, the piston and rod drop by their own weight to insert the rod. Vents along the side of the cylinder permit the escape of the air entrapped under the piston over the greater part of the distance, however, at the end of the fall the entrapped air is compressed thereby bringing the safety rod gently to rest, thus providing for a rapid automatic insertion of the rod with a minimum of structural shock.

  18. COAXIAL CONTROL ROD DRIVE MECHANISM FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.J.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-04-14

    A drive mechanism is presented for the control rod or a nuclear reactor. In this device the control rod is coupled to a drive shaft which extends coaxially through the rotor of an electric motor for relative rotation with respect thereto. A gear reduction mehanism is coupled between the rotor and the drive shaft to convert the rotary motion of the motor into linear motion of the shaft with a comparatively great reduction in speed, thereby providing relatively glow linear movement of the shaft and control rod for control purposes.

  19. TOP OF MTR. CONTROL RODS AND GRID PLATE EMERGE FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP OF MTR. CONTROL RODS AND GRID PLATE EMERGE FROM REACTOR TANK. INL NEGATIVE NO. 6206. R.G. Larsen, Photographer, 6/27/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Remotely operated gripper provides vertical control rod movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutter, E.; Koch, L. J.

    1968-01-01

    Remote actuation of a gripper shaft affects vertical engagement between a drive shaft and control rod. A secondary function of the gripper is to provide remote indication of positive completion of the gripping or ungripping operation.

  1. Safety analysis forseismic motion of control rods accounting for rod misalignment

    SciTech Connect

    Osmin, W.L.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the results of three safety analyses performed by the SRL Safety Analysis Group (SAG) to assess the safety impact of control rod motion induced by a Design Basis Earthquake (DBE).

  2. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    A linear motion device, more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core, is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  3. ALLOY COMPOSITION FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL RODS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Snyder, H.J.; Eggleston, R.R.

    1963-01-22

    This invention relates to alloy compositons suitable as cortrol rod material consisting of, by weight, from 85% to 85% Ag, from 2% to 20% In, from up to 10% of Cd, from up to 5% Sn, and from up to 1.5% Al, the amount of each element employed being determined by the equation X + 2Y + 3Z + 3W + 4V = 1.4 and less, where X, Y, Z, W, and V represent the atom fractions of the elements Ag, Cd, In, Al and Sn. (AEC)

  4. Dysprosium titanate as an absorber material for control rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risovany, V. D.; Varlashova, E. E.; Suslov, D. N.

    2000-09-01

    Disprosium titanate is an attractive control rod material for the thermal neutron reactors. Its main advantages are: insignificant swelling, no out-gassing under neutron irradiation, rather high neutron efficiency, a high melting point (˜1870°C), non-interaction with the cladding at temperatures above 1000°C, simple fabrication and easily reprocessed non-radioactive waste. It can be used in control rods as pellets and powder. The disprosium titanate control rods have worked off in the MIR reactor for 17 years, in VVER-1000 - for 4 years without any operating problems. After post-irradiation examinations this type of control rod having high lifetime was recommended for the VVER and RBMK. The paper presents the examination results of absorber element dummies containing dysprosium titanate, irradiated in the SM reactor to the neutron fluence of 3.4×10 22 cm -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) and, also, the data on structure, thermal-physical properties of dysprosium titanate, efficiency of dysprosium titanate control rods.

  5. Horizontal displacement profiles in N Reactor horizontal control rod channels

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1988-12-01

    One of the potential results from N Reactor graphite moderator distortion is horizontal curvature of the horizontal control rod (HCR) channels. Mockup testing has identified two possible problem scenarios resulting from such curvature: slow scram times and rod abrasion due to rubbing of the rod on the side of the channel and subsequent displacement of T-blocks that form the sides of the channels. As a result of these potential events, surveillance tools (instrumentation) to measure HCR channel horizontal displacement was recently developed. Surveillance of HCR channel 65, performed on December 11, 1987, indicated a six inch rearward displacement near the center of the channel. This approximated the displacement which mockup testing has identified as a concern with regard to T-block movement. Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) observations indicate that T-block movement has not occurred in HCR channel 65, but that there has been some rubbing of the rod on the channel sides. Review of most recent rod hot scram times indicates normal performance for HCR 65. To further evaluate this concern, horizontal deflection and CCTV surveillance was scheduled in six HCR channels surrounding HCR channel 65. Inspection of the HCR rod tip was also performed. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  6. A robust and high-performance queue management controller for large round trip time networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshnevisan, Ladan; Salmasi, Farzad R.

    2016-05-01

    Congestion management for transmission control protocol is of utmost importance to prevent packet loss within a network. This necessitates strategies for active queue management. The most applied active queue management strategies have their inherent disadvantages which lead to suboptimal performance and even instability in the case of large round trip time and/or external disturbance. This paper presents an internal model control robust queue management scheme with two degrees of freedom in order to restrict the undesired effects of large and small round trip time and parameter variations in the queue management. Conventional approaches such as proportional integral and random early detection procedures lead to unstable behaviour due to large delay. Moreover, internal model control-Smith scheme suffers from large oscillations due to the large round trip time. On the other hand, other schemes such as internal model control-proportional integral and derivative show excessive sluggish performance for small round trip time values. To overcome these shortcomings, we introduce a system entailing two individual controllers for queue management and disturbance rejection, simultaneously. Simulation results based on Matlab/Simulink and also Network Simulator 2 (NS2) demonstrate the effectiveness of the procedure and verify the analytical approach.

  7. Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sease, J.D.

    1998-03-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD AND METHOD OF FABRICATION

    DOEpatents

    Porembka, S.W. Jr.

    1961-06-27

    A reactor control rod formed from a compacted powder dispersion is patented. The rod consists of titanium sheathed with a cladding alloy. The cladding alloy contains 1.3% to 1.6% by weight of tin, 0.07% to 0.12% by weight of chromium, 0.04% to 0.08% by weight of nickel, 0.09% to 0.16% by weight of iron, carbon not exceeding 0.05%, less than 0.5% by weight of incidental impurities, and the balance zirconium.

  9. VIEW OF CABLES AND TAPES ASSOCIATED WITH ADRIVE CONTROL ROD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CABLES AND TAPES ASSOCIATED WITH A-DRIVE CONTROL ROD SYSTEM, AT LEVEL +15’, DIRECTLY ABOVE PDP CONTROL ROOM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE CABLES FROM THE PDP ROOM GO THROUGH THE CONCRETE WALL, MAKE A RIGHT ANGLE TURN DOWNWARD, AND DESCEND INTO THE PDP CONTROL ROOM AS VERTICAL TAPES - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  10. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.

    Disclosed is a linear motion device and more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core. The CRDM and method disclosed is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  11. Method and apparatus for monitoring the control rods of a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gravelle, A.; Marini, J.; Romy, D.

    1984-12-04

    Method and apparatus for monitoring the movement of the control rods of a nuclear reactor. The number of steps of movement in either direction of the rod from which the control rod is suspended is counted. According to the height of the step, an indication of the position of the suspension rod and of the control rod. The apparatus comprises devices for measuring the speed of movement of the control rod, for logging variations in speed higher than a given value, and for counting such variations according to their sign. The invention is particularly useful in pressurized water nuclear reactors.

  12. Visual inspections of N Reactor horizontal control rod channels

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1990-09-01

    Safety surveillance is performed in horizontal control rod (HCR) channels to locate conditions which could slow or block rod travel. The findings guide the application of preventive measures to assure eventual rod motion impairment will not occur. Borescopes and, more recently, miniaturized closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras have been used for these examinations. Inspections and measurement results are documented in annual surveillance reports, however reported CCTV observations have been limited to highlights. The objective of this report is to catalogue the CCTV recordings in a format suitable for analysis and interpretation and to ease the access to any desired location by noting tape counter readings corresponding with each tube block in view. Searching file tapes for conditions in a specific areas in the past required counting blocks as they passed the camera to determine the distance from a feature like the edge of the reflector or a steam vent gap. This report adds the observations from recent rod channel inspections (1987 and 1988) to a comprehensive survey of graphite conditions in the moderator and reflector regions of the N Reactor core. When completed, the stand-by status of graphite components will be available for use in restart or decommissioning deliberations.

  13. Reconstitutable control assembly having removable control rods with detachable split upper end plugs

    SciTech Connect

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Knott, R.P.; Sparrow, J.A.

    1989-12-19

    This patent describes, in a reconstitutable control assembly for use with a nuclear fuel assembly, the control assembly including a spider structure and at least one control rod, an attachment joint for detachable fastening the control rod to the spider structure. The attachment joint comprising: a hollow connecting finger on the spider structure; and an elongated detachable split upper end plug on the control rod having a pair of separate upper and lower plug portions, the upper plug portion having integrally-connected tandemly- arranged upper, middle and lower sections. The lower plug portion having integrally-connected tandemly-arranged upper, middle and lower segments.

  14. Implementation of CTRLPOS, a VENTURE module for control rod position criticality searches, control rod worth curve calculations, and general criticality searches

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.A.; Renier, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    A module in the VENTURE reactor analysis code system, CTRLPOS, is developed to position control rods and perform control rod position criticality searches. The module is variably dimensioned so that calculations can be performed with any number of control rod banks each having any number of control rods. CTRLPOS can also calculate control rod worth curves for a single control rod or a bank of control rods. Control rod depletion can be calculated to provide radiation source terms. These radiation source terms can be used to predict radiation doses to personnel and estimate the shielding and long-term storage requirements for spent control rods. All of these operations are completely automated. The numerous features of the module are discussed in detail. The necessary input data for the CTRLPOS module is explained. Several sample problems are presented to show the flexibility of the module. The results presented with the sample problems show that the CTRLPOS module is a powerful tool which allows a wide variety of calculations to be easily performed.

  15. Internal Control Rod Drive Mechanisms, Design Options for IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Petrovic, Bojan

    2004-07-01

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a medium-power (335 MWe) PWR with an integral, primary circuit configuration, where all the reactor coolant system components are contained within the reactor vessel. This integral configuration is a key reason for the success of IRIS' 'safety-by-design' approach, whereby accident initiators are eliminated or the accident consequences and/or frequency are reduced. The most obvious example of the IRIS safety by design approach is the elimination of large LOCA's, since the integral reactor coolant system has no large loop piping. Another serious accident scenario that is being addressed in IRIS is the postulated ejection of a reactor control cluster assembly (RCCA). This accident initiator can be eliminated by locating the RCCA drive mechanisms (CRDMs) inside the reactor vessel. This eliminates the mechanical drive rod penetration between the RCCA and the external CRDM, eliminating the potential for differential pressure across the pressure boundary, and thus eliminating 'by design' the possibility for rod ejection accident. Moreover, the elimination of the 'large' drive-rod penetrations and the external CRDM pressure housings decreases the likelihood of boric acid leakage and subsequent corrosion of the reactor pressure boundary (like the Davis-Besse incident). This paper will discuss the IRIS top level design requirements and objectives for internal CRDMs, and provide examples candidate designs and their specific performance characteristics. (authors)

  16. Control rod system useable for fuel handling in a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1976-11-30

    A control rod and its associated drive are used to elevate a complete stack of fuel blocks to a position above the core of a gas-cooled nuclear reactor. A fuel-handling machine grasps the control rod and the drive is unlatched from the rod. The stack and rod are transferred out of the reactor, or to a new location in the reactor, by the fuel-handling machine.

  17. Decontamination of control rod housing from Palisades Nuclear Power Station.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M.D.; Nunez, L.; Purohit, A.

    1999-05-03

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a novel decontamination solvent for removing oxide scales formed on ferrous metals typical of nuclear reactor piping. The decontamination process is based on the properties of the diphosphonic acids (specifically 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid or HEDPA) coupled with strong reducing-agents (e.g., sodium formaldehyde sulfoxylate, SFS, and hydroxylamine nitrate, HAN). To study this solvent further, ANL has solicited actual stainless steel piping material that has been recently removed from an operating nuclear reactor. On March 3, 1999 ANL received segments of control rod housing from Consumers Energy's Palisades Nuclear Plant (Covert, MI) containing radioactive contamination from both neutron activation and surface scale deposits. Palisades Power plant is a PWR type nuclear generating plant. A total of eight segments were received. These segments were from control rod housing that was in service for about 6.5 years. Of the eight pieces that were received two were chosen for our experimentation--small pieces labeled Piece A and Piece B. The wetted surfaces (with the reactor's pressurized water coolant/moderator) of the pieces were covered with as a scale that is best characterized visually as a smooth, shiny, adherent, and black/brown in color type oxide covering. This tenacious oxide could not be scratched or removed except by aggressive mechanical means (e.g., filing, cutting).

  18. Countercurrent flow-limiting characteristics of a Savannah River Plant control rod septifoil

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.L.

    1992-07-01

    Experiments were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to investigate the counter-current flow limiting characteristics of a Savannah River Plant control rod septifoil assembly. These experiments were unheated, using air and water as the working fluids. Results are presented in terms of the Wallis flooding correlation for several different control rod configurations. Flooding was observed to occur in the vicinity of the inlet slots/holes of the septifoil, rather than within the rod bundle at the location of the minimum flow area. Nearly identical flooding characteristics of the septifoil were observed for configurations with zero, three, and four rods inserted, but significantly different results occurred with 5 rods inserted.

  19. Final Report: Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Rowsell, David Leon

    2015-06-01

    This report documents the Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation. The review followed the approved Plan of Action (POA) and Implementation Plan (IP) using the identified core requirements. The activity was limited scope focusing on the control rod drives functional isolation and fuel element movement. The purpose of this review is to ensure the facility's readiness to move fuel elements thus supporting inspection and functionally isolate the control rod drives to maintain the required shutdown margin.

  20. Radial brake assembly for a control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hekmati, A.; Gibo, E.Y.

    1992-04-07

    This patent describes a brake assembly for a control rod drive for selectively preventing travel of a control rod in a nuclear reactor vessel. It comprises a shaft having a longitudinal centerline axis; means for selectively rotating the shaft in a first direction and in a second direction, opposite to the first direction; a stationary housing having a central aperture receiving the shaft; a frame fixedly joined to the housing and having a guide hole; a rotor disc fixedly connected to the shaft for rotation therewith and having at least one rotor tooth extending radially outwardly from a perimeter thereof, the rotor tooth having a locking surface and an inclined surface extending therefrom in a circumferential direction; a brake member disposed adjacent to the rotor disc perimeter and including a base, at least one braking tooth having a locking surface extending therefrom in a circumferential direction, and a plunger extending radially outwardly from the base and slidably joined to the frame through the guide hole; the rotor tooth and the braking tooth being complementary to each other; and means for selectively positioning the brake member in a deployed position abutting the rotor disc perimeter for allowing the braking tooth locking surface to contact the rotor tooth locking surface for preventing rotation of the shaft in the first direction, and in a retracted position spaced radially away from the rotor disc for allowing the rotor disc and the shaft to rotate without restraint from the brake member, the positioning means including a tubular solenoid fixedly joined to the frame and having a central bore disposed around the brake member plunger and effective for sliding the brake member plunger relative to the frame for positioning the brake member in the deployed and retracted positions.

  1. Optimization of boiling water reactor control rod patterns using linear search

    SciTech Connect

    Kiguchi, T.; Doi, K.; Fikuzaki, T.; Frogner, B.; Lin, C.; Long, A.B.

    1984-10-01

    A computer program for searching the optimal control rod pattern has been developed. The program is able to find a control rod pattern where the resulting power distribution is optimal in the sense that it is the closest to the desired power distribution, and it satisfies all operational constraints. The search procedure consists of iterative uses of two steps: sensitivity analyses of local power and thermal margins using a three-dimensional reactor simulator for a simplified prediction model; linear search for the optimal control rod pattern with the simplified model. The optimal control rod pattern is found along the direction where the performance index gradient is the steepest. This program has been verified to find the optimal control rod pattern through simulations using operational data from the Oyster Creek Reactor.

  2. Aging assessment of BWR control rod drive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the aging phenomena associated with boiling water reactor (BWR) control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and assess the merits of various methods of managing this aging. Information for this study was acquired from (1) the results of a special CRDM aging questionnaire distributed to each US BWR utility, (2) a first-of-its-kind workshop held to discuss CRDM aging and maintenance concerns, (3) an analysis of Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) failure cases attributed to the CRD system, and (4) personal information exchange with industry experts. As part of this study, nearly 3500 NPRDS failure reports have been analyzed to examine the prevailing failure trends for CRD system components. An investigation was conducted to summarize the occurrence frequency of these component failures, discovery methods, reported failure causes, their respective symptoms, and actions taken by utilities to restore component and system service. The results of this research have identified the predominant CRDM failure modes and causes. In addition, recommendations are presented that identify specific actions utilities can implement to mitigate CRDM aging. An evaluation has also been made of certain maintenance practices and tooling which have enabled some utilities to reduce ALARA exposures received from routine CRDM replacement and rebuilding activities. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Ultrasound control of magnet growing rod distraction in early onset scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Pérez Cervera, T; Lirola Criado, J F; Farrington Rueda, D M

    2016-01-01

    The growing rod technique is currently one of the most common procedures used in the management of early onset scoliosis. However, in order to preserve spine growth and control the deformity it requires frequent surgeries to distract the rods. Magnetically driven growing rods have recently been introduced with same treatment goal, but without the inconvenience of repeated surgical distractions. One of the limitations of this technical advance is an increase in radiation exposure due to the increase in distraction frequency compared to conventional growing rods. An improvement of the original technique is presented, proposing a solution to the inconvenience of multiple radiation exposure using ultrasound technology to control the distraction process of magnetically driven growing rods. PMID:25843064

  4. NDE Assessment of PWSCC in Control Rod Drive Mechanism Housings

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Rob V.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2006-11-01

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of Nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect?, 2) What did each technique miss?, 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data and through-wall leakage; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discuss the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology and a comparison of the degradation found by the destructive evaluation with the recorded NDE responses.

  5. TRIPPING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Lees, G.W.; McCormick, E.D.

    1962-05-22

    A tripping circuit employing a magnetic amplifier for tripping a reactor in response to power level, period, or instrument failure is described. A reference winding and signal winding are wound in opposite directions on the core. Current from an ion chamber passes through both windings. If the current increases at too fast a rate, a shunt circuit bypasses one or the windings and the amplifier output reverses polarity. (AEC)

  6. Validation of neutron flux redistribution factors in JSI TRIGA reactor due to control rod movements.

    PubMed

    Kaiba, Tanja; Žerovnik, Gašper; Jazbec, Anže; Štancar, Žiga; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-10-01

    For efficient utilization of research reactors, such as TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, it is important to know neutron flux distribution in the reactor as accurately as possible. The focus of this study is on the neutron flux redistributions due to control rod movements. For analyzing neutron flux redistributions, Monte Carlo calculations of fission rate distributions with the JSI TRIGA reactor model at different control rod configurations have been performed. Sensitivity of the detector response due to control rod movement have been studied. Optimal radial and axial positions of the detector have been determined. Measurements of the axial neutron flux distribution using the CEA manufactured fission chambers have been performed. The experiments at different control rod positions were conducted and compared with the MCNP calculations for a fixed detector axial position. In the future, simultaneous on-line measurements with multiple fission chambers will be performed inside the reactor core for a more accurate on-line power monitoring system. PMID:26141293

  7. A hybrid attitude controller consisting of electromagnetic torque rods and an active fluid ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobari, Nona A.; Misra, Arun K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid actuation system for satellite attitude stabilization is proposed along with its feasibility analysis. The system considered consists of two magnetic torque rods and one fluid ring to produce the control torque required in the direction in which magnetic torque rods cannot produce torque. A mathematical model of the system dynamics is derived first. Then a controller is developed to stabilize the attitude angles of a satellite equipped with the abovementioned set of actuators. The effect of failure of the fluid ring or a magnetic torque rod is examined as well. It is noted that the case of failure of the magnetic torque rod whose torque is along the pitch axis is the most critical, since the coupling between the roll or yaw motion and the pitch motion is quite weak. The simulation results show that the control system proposed is quite fault tolerant.

  8. Fuel integrity consequences of a misaligned control rod incident: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Husser, D.L.; Delano, B.J.; Crist, S.H.; Mayer, J.T.; Lewis, L.Y.; Harris, K.L.

    1987-04-01

    During cycle 6 operation of the Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1 reactor, an unanticipated transient occurred as a result of the rapid withdrawal at full power of a misaligned (27% withdrawn) control rod assembly (CRA). In less than one hour, operators realigned the assembly with the remaining rods in its group. Since the removal of the misaligned CRA was known to have caused high local power changes, the preliminary assessment was that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) occurred in the rods directly affected by the withdrawal. The potentially affected fuel assembly and certain selected additional assemblies were inspected using the Babcock and Wilcox ECHO-330 System, which permits the identification of individual rod failures. Based on the data gathered during this project, the misalignment event resulted in no occurrences of SCC-related fuel rod failures. The absence of failed rods in the assembly most significantly affected by the withdrawal clearly eliminates the SCC failure mode from consideration. The details of the power transient should be sufficient as benchmark cases to develop and verify computer codes designed to model power shock events in Zircaloy-clad fuel rods. The project is applicable to both SCC failure modeling and to such areas as load-following and power recovery operations where significant control rod movement is required. The power shock event meets the project objectives by providing a no-failure case under conditions approaching or exceeding the power change and levels typically associated with the SCC failure mode. The event also confirms the ability of pressurized water reactor fuel rods to sustain large power shocks without adverse effects.

  9. Aerosol behavior during SIC control rod failure in QUENCH-13 test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Terttaliisa; Csordás, Anna Pintér; Nagy, Imre; Stuckert, Juri

    2010-02-01

    In a nuclear reactor severe accident, radioactive fission products as well as structural materials are released from the core by evaporation, and the released gases form particles by nucleation and condensation. In addition, aerosol particles may be generated by droplet formation and fragmentation of the core. In pressurized water reactors (PWR), a commonly used control rod material is silver-indium-cadmium (SIC) covered with stainless steel cladding. The control rod elements, Cd, In and Ag, have relatively low melting temperatures, and especially Cd has also a very low boiling point. Control rods are likely to fail early on in the accident due to melting of the stainless steel cladding which can be accelerated by eutectic interaction between stainless steel and the surrounding Zircaloy guide tube. The release of the control rod materials would follow the cladding failure thus affecting aerosol source term as well as fuel rod degradation. The QUENCH experimental program at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe investigates phenomena associated with reflood of a degrading core under postulated severe accident conditions. QUENCH-13 test was the first in this program to include a silver-indium-cadmium control rod of prototypic PWR design. To characterize the extent of aerosol release during the control rod failure, aerosol particle size distribution and concentration measurements in the off-gas pipe of the QUENCH facility were carried out. For the first time, it was possible to determine on-line the aerosol concentration and size distribution released from the core. These results are of prime importance for model development for the proper calculation of the source term resulting from control rod failure. The on-line measurement showed that the main aerosol release started at the bundle temperature maximum of T ˜ 1570 K at hottest bundle elevation. A very large burst of aerosols was detected 660 s later at the bundle temperature maximum of T ˜ 1650 K, followed by a relatively

  10. Process Control Logic Modification to Mitigate Transient Following Tripping of a Primary Circulating Pump for a 540 MWe PHWR Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Contractor, Ankur D; Gaikwad, Avinash J.; Kumar, Rajesh; Chakraborty, G.; Vhora, S.F.

    2006-07-01

    The 540 MWe Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) incorporates many new features as compared to the earlier 220 MWe PHWRs. To evaluate the new design features like Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system configuration with two loops, four Primary Circulating Pumps (PCPs) and four passes through core, addition of a Pressurizer (surge Tank) in the PHT system along with Feed/Bleed system and their safety related implications, simulation model have been developed. A reactor step-back is proposed following one PCP trip. The corresponding PCP in the healthy loop is tripped to avoid asymmetrical flow and pressure distribution in the two identical loops. In spite of such elaborate provisions, the margins from high/low PHT pressure are small following tripping of one PCP. Mathematical models for all the major components and sub-systems of the proposed 540 MWe PHWR were developed based on the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy and equation of state. All the associated control systems are also modeled. The PHT system includes the reactor core with nuclear fuel, PCP, PHT system pressure controller with feed/bleed system and Pressurizer (Surge Tank). The secondary system includes mainly the Steam Generators (SGs), the SG level and pressure controllers, apart from the various steam cycle components. All these models are integrated together to form the Plant Transient Analysis Computer Code Dyna540. The scenario following one PCP trips leads to different states (high/low pressure in Reactor Outlet Header (ROH)) depending upon the banks in which the PCP trips. The pressurizer is connected to two ROHs on one side of the reactor. The system pressure is controlled based on average of four ROHs pressure. In the case of asymmetrical pump operation, this logic leads to a situation where individual ROH pressure goes very near the low/high PHT system pressure trip set point, even though the controlled average pressure is very close to the set pressure. The PHT high

  11. On-line monitoring of control rod integrity in BWRs using a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, I.; Loner, H.; Ammon, K.; Sihver, L.; Ledergerber, G.

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance of fuel and control rod integrity in the core of a boiling water reactor is essential for maintaining a safe and reliable operation. Control rods of a boiling water reactor are mainly filled with boron carbide as a neutron absorber. Due to the irradiation of boron with neutrons, a continuous production of lithium and helium will occur inside a control rod. Most of the created helium will be retained in the boron carbide lattice; however a small part will escape into the void volume of the control blade. Therefore the integrity of control rods during operation can efficiently be followed by on-line measurements of helium concentration in the reactor off-gas system using a mass spectrometer. Since helium is a fill gas in fuel rods, the same method is a useful early warning system for primary fuel failures. In this paper, we introduce an on-line helium detector system which is installed at the nuclear power plant in Leibstadt. Furthermore the measuring experiences of control rod failure detection at the plant are presented. Different causes of increased helium levels in the off-gas system have been distinguished. There are spontaneous helium releases as well as helium releases caused by changed conditions in the reactor (power reduction, control rod movement, etc.). Helium peaks can also be characterized according to the released amount of helium, the peak shape and the duration of the release, which leads to different interpretations of the release mechanisms. In addition, the measured amount of released helium from a 50 days period (280 l) is also compared to the calculated amount of produced helium from the washed out boron during the same time period (190 l).

  12. Rod electrical coupling is controlled by a circadian clock and dopamine in mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nan Ge; Chuang, Alice Z; Masson, Philippe J; Ribelayga, Christophe P

    2015-01-01

    Key points Rod photoreceptors play a key role in vision in dim light; in the mammalian retina, although rods are anatomically connected or coupled by gap junctions, a type of electrical synapse, the functional importance and regulation of rod coupling has remained elusive. We have developed a new technique in the mouse: perforated patch-clamp recording of rod inner segments in isolated intact retinae maintained by superfusion. We find that rod electrical coupling is controlled by a circadian clock and dopamine, and is weak during the day and stronger at night. The results also indicate that the signal-to-noise ratio for a dim light response is increased at night because of coupling. Our observations will provide a framework for understanding the daily variations in human vision as well as the basis of specific retinal malfunctions. Abstract Rod single-photon responses are critical for vision in dim light. Electrical coupling via gap junction channels shapes the light response properties of vertebrate photoreceptors, but the regulation of rod coupling and its impact on the single-photon response have remained unclear. To directly address these questions, we developed a perforated patch-clamp recording technique and recorded from single rod inner segments in isolated intact neural mouse retinae, maintained by superfusion. Experiments were conducted at different times of the day or under constant environmental conditions, at different times across the circadian cycle. We show that rod electrical coupling is regulated by a circadian clock and dopamine, so that coupling is weak during the day and strong at night. Altogether, patch-clamp recordings of single-photon responses in mouse rods, tracer coupling, receptive field measurements and pharmacological manipulations of gap junction and dopamine receptor activity provide compelling evidence that rod coupling is modulated in a circadian manner. These data are consistent with computer modelling. At night, single

  13. Method and means for remote removal of guide balls from nuclear reactor control rods

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.H.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of remotely removing guide balls from nuclear reactor control rods using a punch mechanism, comprising: (a) providing attachment means in the punch mechanism for attaching the punch mechanism to means for reversibly lowering the punch mechanism over the top of one of the control rods; (b) providing a die within the punch mechanism; (c) providing cylinder means within the punch mechanism operatively connected to the die for axially moving the die in a back-and-forth direction; (d) providing a die block within the punch mechanism cooperating with the die; (e) providing guide means within the punch mechanism for self-aligning the punch mechanism so that the die and the die block are automatically aligned with a first one of the guide balls therebetween when the punch mechanism is lowered over the top of the control rod; (f) lowering the punch mechanism over the control rod so that the die, the die block, and the first guide ball are in alignment; and (g) then operating the cylinder means so that the die advances into the die block, thereby removing the first guide ball from the control rod.

  14. Control rod calibration and reactivity effects at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Letícia Negrão; Gonnelli, Eduardo; Santos, Adimir dos

    2014-11-11

    Researches that aim to improve the performance of neutron transport codes and quality of nuclear cross section databases are very important to increase the accuracy of simulations and the quality of the analysis and prediction of phenomena in the nuclear field. In this context, relevant experimental data such as reactivity worth measurements are needed. Control rods may be made of several neutron absorbing materials that are used to adjust the reactivity of the core. For the reactor operation, these experimental data are also extremely important: with them it is possible to estimate the reactivity worth by the movement of the control rod, understand the reactor response at each rod position and to operate the reactor safely. This work presents a temperature correction approach for the control rod calibration problem. It is shown the control rod calibration data of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, the integral and differential reactivity curves and a theoretical analysis, performed by the MCNP-5 reactor physics code, developed and maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory, using the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library.

  15. Experience with incomplete control rod insertion in fuel with burnup exceeding approximately 40 GWD/MTU

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, E.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis and measurement experience with fuel assemblies having incomplete control rod insertion at burnups of approximately 40 GWD/MTU is presented. Control rod motion dynamics and simplified structural analyses are presented and compared to measurement data. Fuel assembly growth measurements taken with the plant Refueling Machine Z-Tape are described and presented. Bow measurements (including plug gauging) are described and potential improvements are suggested. The measurements described and analysis performed show that sufficient guide tube bow (either from creep or yield buckling) is present in some high burnup assemblies to stop the control rods before they reach their full limit of travel. Recommendations are made that, if implemented, could improve cost performance related to testing and analysis activities.

  16. Control Rod Pattern Planning of a BWR using Enhanced Nelder-Mead Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yoko Kobayashi; Eitaro Aiyoshi

    2004-07-01

    We propose a new optimization algorithm for the short-term planning of control rod patterns in an operating BWR. This algorithm is based on the enhanced Nelder-Mead simplex method in which convergence ability is improved for constrained problems in several ways. The main characteristic of this approach is it uses continuous values for the axial positions of control rods. Through calculations in an actual BWR plant, we showed that the new algorithm is effective for automation of short-term planning and reduction of the engineer's workload. (authors)

  17. Analysis of dose rates received around the storage pool for irradiated control rods in a BWR nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, J; Abarca, A; Gallardo, S

    2011-08-01

    BWR control rods are activated by neutron reactions in the reactor. The dose produced by this activity can affect workers in the area surrounding the storage pool, where activated rods are stored. Monte Carlo (MC) models for neutron activation and dose assessment around the storage pool have been developed and validated. In this work, the MC models are applied to verify the expected reduction of dose when the irradiated control rod is hanged in an inverted position into the pool. PMID:21093278

  18. An Analytical Study of Fuzzy Control of a Flexible Rod Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, D.; Lee, S. W.; Boghiu, D.

    1998-02-01

    The non-linear nature of very high speed, flexible rod mechanisms has been previously confirmed, both experimentally and analytically in reference [1]. Therefore, effective control system design for flexible mechanisms operating at very high speeds must consider the non-linearities when designing a controller for very high speeds. Active control via fuzzy logic is assessed as means to suppress the elastic transverse bending vibration of a flexible rod of a slider crank mechanism. Several pairs of piezoelectric elements are used to provide the control action. Sensor output of deflection is fed to the fuzzy controller, which determines the voltage input to the actuators. A three mode approximation is used in the simulation study. Computer simulation shows that fuzzy control can be used to suppress bending vibrations at high speeds, and even at speeds where the uncontrolled response would be unstable.

  19. BWR feedwater nozzle and control-rod-drive return line nozzle cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    In its 1978 Annual Report to Congress, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission identified as an unresolved safety issue the appearance of cracks in feedwater nozzles at boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Later similar cracking, detected in return water lines for control-rod-drive systems at BWRs, was designated Part II of the issue. This article outlines the resolution of these cracking problems.

  20. Parallel Magnetic Flow Electromagnet for Movable Coil Control-rod Driving Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jige, Zhang

    2006-07-01

    The parallel magnetic flow electromagnet can effectively relax the saturation, which easily takes place in the single magnetic flow electromagnet, and accordingly can improve the drive capacity of the movable coil electromagnet drive mechanism for a mobile reactor control rod. (authors)

  1. Quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of a PWR control rod ejection accident

    SciTech Connect

    Pasichnyk, I.; Perin, Y.; Velkov, K.

    2013-07-01

    The paper describes the results of the quantitative Uncertainty and Sensitivity (U/S) Analysis of a Rod Ejection Accident (REA) which is simulated by the coupled system code ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX applying the GRS tool for U/S analysis SUSA/XSUSA. For the present study, a UOX/MOX mixed core loading based on a generic PWR is modeled. A control rod ejection is calculated for two reactor states: Hot Zero Power (HZP) and 30% of nominal power. The worst cases for the rod ejection are determined by steady-state neutronic simulations taking into account the maximum reactivity insertion in the system and the power peaking factor. For the U/S analysis 378 uncertain parameters are identified and quantified (thermal-hydraulic initial and boundary conditions, input parameters and variations of the two-group cross sections). Results for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are presented for safety important global and local parameters. (authors)

  2. Summary of dynamic analyses of the advanced neutron source reactor inner control rods

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrich, W.R.

    1995-08-01

    A summary of the structural dynamic analyses that were instrumental in providing design guidance to the Advanced Neutron source (ANS) inner control element system is presented in this report. The structural analyses and the functional constraints that required certain performance parameters were combined to shape and guide the design effort toward a prediction of successful and reliable control and scram operation to be provided by these inner control rods.

  3. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  4. Development and control of the process for the manufacture of zircaloy-4 tubing for LWBR fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The technical requirements for the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) fuel elements (fuel rods) imposed certain unique requirements for the low hafnium Zircaloy-4 tubing used as fuel rod cladding. This report describes, in detail, the tube manufacturing process, the product and process controls used, the inspections and tests performed, and the efforts involved in refining a commercial tube reducing process to produce tubes that would satisfy the requirements for LWBR fuel rod cladding.

  5. High Temperature Electromechanical Components for Control Rod Drive Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Thomas E.; Lazarus, Jonathan D.; Yaspo, Robert; Cole, Allan R.; Otwell, Robert L.; Schuster, Gary B.; Jaing, Thomas J.; Meyer, Raymond A.; Shukla, Jaikaran N.; Maldonado, Jerry

    1994-07-01

    The SP-100 power system converts heat generated within a compact fast spectrum nuclear reactor directly to electricity for spacecraft applications. The reactor control system contains the only moving mechanical and electromechanical components in the entire electrical generating system. The high temperature, vacuum environment presents unique challenges for these reactor control system components. This paper describes the environmental testing of these components that has been completed and that is in progress. The specific components and assemblies include electromagnetic (EM) coils, stepper motors, EM clutches, EM brakes, ball bearings, ball screw assemblies, constant torque spring motors, gear sets, position sensors, and very high temperature sliding bearings.

  6. Maintaining a Critical Spectra within Monteburns for a Gas-Cooled Reactor Array by Way of Control Rod Manipulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adigun, Babatunde John; Fensin, Michael Lorne; Galloway, Jack D.; Trellue, Holly Renee

    2016-06-07

    Our burnup study examined the effect of a predicted critical control rod position on the nuclide predictability of several axial and radial locations within a 4×4 graphite moderated gas cooled reactor fuel cluster geometry. To achieve this, a control rod position estimator (CRPE) tool was developed within the framework of the linkage code Monteburns between the transport code MCNP and depletion code CINDER90, and four methodologies were proposed within the tool for maintaining criticality. Two of the proposed methods used an inverse multiplication approach - where the amount of fissile material in a set configuration is slowly altered until criticalitymore » is attained - in estimating the critical control rod position. Another method carried out several MCNP criticality calculations at different control rod positions, then used a linear fit to estimate the critical rod position. The final method used a second-order polynomial fit of several MCNP criticality calculations at different control rod positions to guess the critical rod position. The results showed that consistency in prediction of power densities as well as uranium and plutonium isotopics was mutual among methods within the CRPE tool that predicted critical position consistently well. Finall, while the CRPE tool is currently limited to manipulating a single control rod, future work could be geared toward implementing additional criticality search methodologies along with additional features.« less

  7. Controlled self-assembly of conjugated rod-coil block copolymers for applications in organic optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuefei

    Organic electronics are of great interest in manufacturing light weight, mechanical flexible, and inexpensive large area devices. While significant improvements have been made over the last several years and it is now clear that morphology on the lengthscale of exciton diffusion (10nm) is of crucial importance, a clear relationship between structure and device properties has not emerged. This lack of understanding largely emerges from an inability to control morphology on this lengthscale. This thesis will center around an approach, based on block copolymer self-assembly, to generate equilibrium nanostructures on the 10 nm lengthscale of exciton diffusion and study their effects on device performance. Self-assembly of semiconducting block copolymers is complicated by the non-classical chain shape of conjugated polymers. Unlike classical polymers, the chains do not assume a Gaussian coil shape which is stretched near block copolymer interfaces, instead the chains are elongated and liquid crystalline. Previous work has demonstrated how these new molecular interactions and shapes control the phase diagram of so-called rod-coil block copolymers. Here, we will focus on controlling domain size, orientation, and chemical structure. While domain size can be controlled directly through molecular weight, this requires significant additional synthesis of domain size is to be varied. Here, the domain size is controlled by blending homopolymers into a self-assembling rod-coil block copolymer. When coil-like blocks are incorporated, the domains swell, as expected. When rod-like blocks are incorporated, they interdigitate with the rods of the block copolymers. This results in an increase in interfacial area which forces the coils to rearrange and an overall decrease in domain size with increasing rod content. Control over lamellar orientation is crucial in order to design and control charge transport pathways and exciton recombination or separation interfaces. While numerous

  8. Simulation and operation of the EBR-2 automatic control rod drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, W. K.; Larson, H. A.; Dean, E. M.; Christensen, L. J.

    An automatic control rod drive system (ACRDS) installed at EBR-II produces shaped power transients from 40% to full reactor power at a linear ramp rate of 4 MWt/s. A digital computer and modified control rod drive provides this capability. Simulation and analysis of ACRDS experiments establish the safety envelope for reactor transient operation. Tailored transients are required as part of USDOE operational reliability testing program for prototypic fast reactor fuel cladding breach behavior studies. After initial EBR-II driver fuel testing and system checkout, test subassemblies were subjected to both slow and fast transients. In addition, the ACRDS is used for steady state operation and will be qualified to control power ascent from initial critical to full power.

  9. Visual inspections of N Reactor horizontal control rod channels. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1990-09-01

    Safety surveillance is performed in horizontal control rod (HCR) channels to locate conditions which could slow or block rod travel. The findings guide the application of preventive measures to assure eventual rod motion impairment will not occur. Borescopes and, more recently, miniaturized closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras have been used for these examinations. Inspections and measurement results are documented in annual surveillance reports, however reported CCTV observations have been limited to highlights. The objective of this report is to catalogue the CCTV recordings in a format suitable for analysis and interpretation and to ease the access to any desired location by noting tape counter readings corresponding with each tube block in view. Searching file tapes for conditions in a specific areas in the past required counting blocks as they passed the camera to determine the distance from a feature like the edge of the reflector or a steam vent gap. This report adds the observations from recent rod channel inspections (1987 and 1988) to a comprehensive survey of graphite conditions in the moderator and reflector regions of the N Reactor core. When completed, the stand-by status of graphite components will be available for use in restart or decommissioning deliberations.

  10. Feasibility study of the University of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade in respect to control rod system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutic, Avdo

    The objectives of this thesis are twofold: to determine the highest achievable power levels of the current University of Utah TRIG Reactor (UUTR) core configuration with the existing three control rods, and to design the core for higher reactor power by optimizing the control rod worth. For the current core configuration, the maximum reactor power, eigenvalue keff, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity have been measured and calculated. These calculated estimates resulted from thermal power calibrations, and the control rod worth measurements at various power levels. The results were then used as a benchmark to verify the MCNP5 core simulations for the current core and then to design a core for higher reactor power. This study showed that the maximum achievable power with the current core configuration and control rod system is 150kW, which is 50kW higher than the licensed power of the UUTR. The maximum achievable UUTR core power with the existing fuel is determined by optimizing the core configuration and control rod worth, showing that a power upgrade of 500 kW is achievable. However, it requires a new control rod system consisting of a total of four control rods. The cost of such an upgrade is $115,000.

  11. Synthesis of iron oxide rods coated with polymer brushes and control of their assembly in thin films.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun; Ishige, Ryohei; Tsujii, Yoshinobu; Ohno, Kohji

    2015-01-27

    We investigated the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) using monodisperse rod-type particles of iron oxide, β-FeOOH. The slow hydrolysis of iron(III) chloride yielded monodisperse β-FeOOH rods with an average length-to-width ratio, L/W, of 6 (L = 210 nm and W = 35 nm on average). The surfaces of the β-FeOOH rods were modified with a triethoxysilane derivative as an ATRP-initiating site, namely, (2-bromo-2-methyl)propionyloxypropyl triethoxysilane. The SI-ATRP of MMA, mediated by a copper complex, was performed using the initiator-coated β-FeOOH rods in the presence of a "sacrificial" free initiator. Well-defined poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes with molecular weights of up to 700,000 could be grafted on the β-FeOOH rods with a surface density as high as 0.3 chains/nm(2). The resultant polymer-brush-afforded hybrid rods exhibited high dispersibility in various solvents for PMMA without forming aggregates. Thin films were prepared by dip-coating from a suspension of the hybrid rods, and the rods were oriented in a specific direction in the films. The arrangement of the rods could be controlled by varying the chain length of the polymer brush and the withdrawal speed during the dip-coating process. PMID:25552325

  12. A rule-based expert system for automatic control rod pattern generation for boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.S.; Lin, C. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on an expert system for generating control rod patterns that has been developed. The knowledge is transformed into IF-THEN rules. The inference engine uses the Rete pattern matching algorithm to match facts, and rule premises and conflict resolution strategies to make the system function intelligently. A forward-chaining mechanism is adopted in the inference engine. The system is implemented in the Common Lisp programming language. The three-dimensional core simulation model performs the core status and burnup calculations. The system is successfully demonstrated by generating control rod programming for the 2894-MW (thermal) Kuosheng nuclear power plant in Taiwan. The computing time is tremendously reduced compared to programs using mathematical methods.

  13. Control rod absorber section fabrication by square tube configuration and dual laser welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, L.L.; Charnley, J.E.; Mees, J.A.; Dixon, R.C.

    1990-05-15

    This patent describes a process for the assembly of a planar section of a cruciform shaped control rod from tubes. It comprises: providing tubes, the tubes having cylindrical interior volumes for the containment of neutron absorbing poisons and having square external sections for being joined by welding in side-by-side relation; filling the cylindrical interior volumes with neutron absorbing poisons; plugging the tubes to seal the neutron absorbing poisons within the tubes: providing a jig for maintaining the tubes in side-by-side relation to form a planar section of the control rod, the jig having a leading end for holding the ends of the tubes in side-by-side relation and having a trailing end for holding the tubes in side-by-side relation.

  14. Factors influencing helium measurements for detection of control rod failures in BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, I.; Sihver, L.; Loner, H.; Ledergerber, G.; Schnurr, B.

    2012-07-01

    Much effort has been made to minimize the number and consequences of fuel failures at nuclear power plants. The consequences of control rod failures have also gained an increased attention. In this paper we introduce a system for on-line surveillance of control rod integrity which has several advantages comparing to the surveillance methods available today in boiling water reactors (BWRs). This system measures the helium released from failed control rods containing boron carbide (B4C). However, there are a number of factors that might influence measurements, which have to be taken into consideration when evaluating the measured data. These factors can be separated into two groups: 1) local adjustments, made on the sampling line connecting the detector to the off-gas system, and 2) plant operational parameters. The adjustments of the sample line conditions include variation of gas flow rate and gas pressure in the line. Plant operational factors that may influence helium measurements can vary from plant to plant. The factors studied at Leibstadt nuclear power plant (KKL) were helium impurities in injected hydrogen gas, variation of the total off-gas flow and regular water refill. In this paper we discuss these factors and their significance and present experimental results of measurements at KKL. (authors)

  15. Field Trips. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Sally; Aronson, Susan S.; Stacey, Susan; Winbush, Olga

    2001-01-01

    Five articles highlight benefits and organization of field trips: (1) "Field Trips Promote Child Learning at Its Best"; (2) "Planning for Maximum Benefit, Minimum Risk"; (3) "Coaching Community Hosts"; (4) "The Story of a Field Trip: Trash and Its Place within Children's Learning and Community"; and (5) "Field Trip Stories and Perspectives" (from…

  16. Impact of the control rod consumption on the reactivity control of a SFR break-even core

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, D.; Fontaine, B.

    2012-07-01

    Current design studies on Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) differ from those performed in the past by the fact that design criteria are now those of the Generation IV reactors. In order to improve their safety, reactors with break-even cores are preferred because they minimize the needs in terms of reactivity control and limit the consequences of control rod withdrawal. Furthermore, as the reactivity control needs are low, break-even core enables the use of absorbing materials with reduced efficiency (natural boron, hafnium...). Nevertheless, the use of control rods with few absorbing materials may present the disadvantage of a non-negligible ({approx}10%) loss of efficiency due to their consumption under irradiation. This paper presents a methodology to calculate accurately and analyze this consumption. (authors)

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of a research reactor with nominal power of 7 MW to design new control safety rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoushtari, M. K.; Kakavand, T.; Sadat Kiai, S. M.; Ghaforian, H.

    2010-03-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation has been established for a research reactor with nominal power of 7 MW. A detailed model of the reactor core was employed including standard and control fuel elements, reflectors, irradiation channels, control rods, reactor pool and thermal column. The following physical parameters of reactor core were calculated for the present LEU core: core reactivity ( ρ), control rod (CR) worth, thermal and epithermal neutron flux distributions, shutdown margin and delayed neutron fraction. Reduction of unfavorable effects of blockage probability of control safety rod (CSR)s in their interiors because of not enough space in their sites, and lack of suitable capabilities to fabricate very thin plates for CSR cladding, is the main aim of the present study. Making the absorber rod thinner and CSR cladding thicker by introducing a better blackness absorbing material and a new stainless steel alloy, respectively, are two studied ways to reduce the effects of mentioned problems.

  18. Rodding Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rods can be made of stainless steel or titanium. Regular rods do not expand. They have many ... v regular), the rod materials (stainless steel v titanium) and the age for a first rodding surgery. ...

  19. Test-fuel power-coupling dependence on TREAT control-rod positions

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, L.J.; Klotzkin, G.; Hart, P.R.; Swanson, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    The Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) is a graphite moderated, UO/sub 2/ fueled test reactor located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and operated by Argonne National Laboratory. Test fuel is placed in containment vessels in the center of the reactor and subjected to computer-controlled transient irradiations which can result in experimental fuel melting or even vaporizing. The reactor was designed to have a strong negative temperature coefficient and to operate adiabatically. Consequently large reactivity insertions, up to 6.2% ..delta..k/k, may be required during a transient as the core temperature increases as much as 570/sup 0/C. This reactivity insertion is accomplished typically over 10 to 20 seconds by hydraulically actuated transient control rods. Evaluation of empirical data has indicated that control-rod-position changes cause power-coupling changes during a transient and usually are the primary factor in determining the ratio of the transient-averaged to steady-state test-fuel power coupling.

  20. Rapid-L Operator-Free Fast Reactor Concept Without Any Control Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Tsunoda, Hirokazu; Mishima, Kaichiro; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2003-07-15

    The 200-kW(electric) uranium-nitride-fueled lithium-cooled fast reactor concept 'RAPID-L' to achieve highly automated reactor operation has been demonstrated. RAPID-L is designed for a lunar base power system. It is one of the variants of the RAPID (Refueling by All Pins Integrated Design) fast reactor concept, which enables quick and simplified refueling. The essential feature of the RAPID concept is that the reactor core consists of an integrated fuel assembly instead of conventional fuel subassemblies. In this small-size reactor core, 2700 fuel pins are integrated and encased in a fuel cartridge. Refueling is conducted by replacing a fuel cartridge. The reactor can be operated without refueling for up to 10 yr.Unique challenges in reactivity control systems design have been addressed in the RAPID-L concept. The reactor has no control rod but involves the following innovative reactivity control systems: lithium expansion modules (LEM) for inherent reactivity feedback, lithium injection modules (LIM) for inherent ultimate shutdown, and lithium release modules (LRM) for automated reactor startup. All these systems adopt {sup 6}Li as a liquid poison instead of B{sub 4}C rods. In combination with LEMs, LIMs, and LRMs, RAPID-L can be operated without an operator. This reactor concept is also applicable to the terrestrial fast reactors. In this paper, the RAPID-L reactor concept and its transient characteristics are presented.

  1. Detection and sizing of defects in control rod drive mechanism penetrations using eddy current and ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Light, G.M.; Fisher, J.L.; Tennis, R.F.; Stolte, J.S.; Hendrix, G.J.

    1996-08-01

    Over the last two years, concern has been generated about the capabilities of performing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of the closure-head penetrations in nuclear-reactor pressure vessels. These penetrations are primarily for instrumentation and control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and are usually thick-walled Inconel tubes, which are shrink-fitted into the steel closure head. The penetrations are then welded between the outside surface of the penetration and the inside surface of the closure head. Stress corrosion cracks initiating at the inner surface of the penetration have been reported at several plants. Through-wall cracks in the CRDM penetration or CRDM weld could lead to loss of coolant in the reactor vessel. The CRDM penetration presents a complex inspection geometry for conventional NDE techniques. A thermal sleeve, through which pass the mechanical linkages for operating the control rods, is inserted into the penetration in such a way that only a small annulus (nominally 3 mm) exists between the thermal sleeve and inside surface of the penetration. Ultrasonic (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) techniques that could be used to provide defect detection and sizing capability were investigated. This paper describes the ET and UT techniques, the probes developed, and the results obtained using these probes and techniques on CRDM penetration mock-ups.

  2. Effect of aging upon CE and B and W control rod drives

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, E.; Gunther, W.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of aging upon the Babcock Wilcox (B W) and Combustion Engineering (CE) Control Rod Drive (CRD) systems has been evaluated as part of the US NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Operating experience data for the 1980--1990 time period was reviewed to identify predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. These results, in conjunction with an assessment of component materials and operating environment, conclude that both systems are susceptible to age degradation. System failures have resulted in significant plant effects, including power reductions, plant shutdowns, scrams, and Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) actuation. Current industry inspection and maintenance practices were assessed. Some of these practices effectively address aging, while others do not.

  3. Effect of aging upon CE and B and W control rod drives

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, E.; Gunther, W.

    1992-05-01

    The effect of aging upon the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and Combustion Engineering (CE) Control Rod Drive (CRD) systems has been evaluated as part of the US NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Operating experience data for the 1980--1990 time period was reviewed to identify predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. These results, in conjunction with an assessment of component materials and operating environment, conclude that both systems are susceptible to age degradation. System failures have resulted in significant plant effects, including power reductions, plant shutdowns, scrams, and Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) actuation. Current industry inspection and maintenance practices were assessed. Some of these practices effectively address aging, while others do not.

  4. Research relative to an advanced rod control system for quadrupole mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, George R.

    1987-01-01

    The design of a suitable amplifier output stage using available transistors and passive components is summarized. All of the analysis and calculation confirm that it is feasible to design the amplifier and quadrupole coupling circuit needed for the Advanced Rod Control System. The progress obtained so far concerning the three frequency tank circuits to be used in the oscillator for the mass spectrometer of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) project is presented. Results from this study look promising. However, it is not known what minimum impedance levels are required to make it possible for the oscillator to work properly. Therefore, it is necessary to construct a prototype circuit in the laboratory which can be measured and tested in an oscillator circuit. Continued attempts will be made to develop a useful inductor motor with better characteristics than the one being used at the moment. It is important that such a model be found if computer simulation is to reflect reality more closely.

  5. STABILIZED RARE EARTH OXIDES FOR A CONTROL ROD AND METHOD OF PREPARATION

    DOEpatents

    McNees, R.A.; Potter, R.A.

    1964-01-14

    A method is given for preparing mixed oxides of the formula MR/sub x/O/ sub 12/ wherein M is tungsten or molybdenum and R is a rare earth in the group consisting of samarium, europium, dysprosium, and gadolinium and x is 4 to 5. Oxides of this formula, and particularly the europiumcontaining species, are useful as control rod material for water-cooled nuclear reactors owing to their stability, favorable nuclear properties, and resistance to hydration. These oxides may be utilized as a dispersion in a stainlesssteel matrix. Preparation of these oxides is effected by blending tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide with a rare earth oxide, compressing the mixture, and firing at an elevated temperature in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. (AEC)

  6. Nuclear Data Library Effects on Fast to Thermal Flux Shapes Around PWR Control Rod Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, A.; Ferroukhi, H.; Zhu, T.; Pautz, A.

    2014-04-01

    The development of a high-fidelity computational scheme to estimate the accumulated fluence at the tips of PWR control rods (CR) has been initiated at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Both the fluence from high-energy (E>1 MeV) neutrons as well as for the thermal range (E<0.625 eV) are required as these affect the CR integrity through stresses/strains induced by coupled clad embrittlement / absorber swelling phenomena. The concept of the PSI scheme under development is to provide from validated core analysis models, the volumetric neutron source to a full core MCNPX model that is then used to compute the neutron fluxes. A particular aspect that needs scrutiny is the ability of the MCNPX-based calculation methodology to accurately predict the flux shapes along the control rod surfaces, especially for fully withdrawn CRs. In that case, the tip is located a short distance above the core/reflector interface and since this situation corresponds to a large part of reactor operation, the accumulated fluence will highly depend on the achieved calculation accuracy and precision in this non-fueled zone. The objective of the work presented in this paper is to quantify the influence of nuclear data on the calculated fluxes at the CR tips by (1) conducting a systematic comparison of modern neutron cross-section libraries, including JENDL-4.0, JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0, and (2) by quantifying the uncertainties in the neutron flux calculations with the help of available neutron cross-section variances/covariances data. For completeness, the magnitude of these nuclear data-based uncertainties is also assessed in relation to the influence from other typical sources of modeling uncertainties/biases.

  7. Reduction of ahead of schedule anodes through anode rod quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, F.; Menard, Y.; Perron, C.; Proulx, A.L.

    1996-10-01

    One of the major causes of ahead of schedule anodes reported in recent years by the P155 potroom operation was related to the inherent weakness in the rod welded joints. The development and implementation of an apparatus and procedure to measure, detect and reject the faulty rods prior to anode rodding, will be presented and discussed. The technology has not only significantly reduced the number of ahead of schedule anodes, it has also provided useful information concerning other process improvements.

  8. Trade, TRIPS, and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard D; Correa, Carlos; Oh, Cecilia

    2009-02-21

    The World Trade Organization's Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) set global minimum standards for the protection of intellectual property, substantially increasing and expanding intellectual-property rights, and generated clear gains for the pharmaceutical industry and the developed world. The question of whether TRIPS generates gains for developing countries, in the form of increased exports, is addressed in this paper through consideration of the importance of pharmaceuticals in health-care trade, outlining the essential requirements, implications, and issues related to TRIPS, and TRIPS-plus, in which increased restrictions are imposed as part of bilateral free-trade agreements. TRIPS has not generated substantial gains for developing countries, but has further increased pharmaceutical trade in developed countries. The unequal trade between developed and developing countries (ie, exporting and importing high-value patented drugs, respectively) raises the issue of access to medicines, which is exacerbated by TRIPS-plus provisions, although many countries have not even enacted provision for TRIPS flexibilities. Therefore this paper focuses on options that are available to the health community for negotiation to their advantage under TRIPS, and within the presence of TRIPS-plus. PMID:19167054

  9. Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gail; Cooper, Garry

    The Internet field trips in this directory allow teachers to take students almost anywhere--without the usual ordeals associated with field trips. Organized by subject and cross-referenced for quick and easy access, this book leads educators and students to the most exciting, educational, and innovative Web sites on the Internet. Chapters cover…

  10. A Classroom Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Rita

    1977-01-01

    A description of a week-long, vicarious trip to France in a high school French class. The "trip" required students to do all the things a tourist does, and it utilized the four skills for communication purposes. Techniques for facilitating the process and for student evaluation are described. (AMH)

  11. A Biomes Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, William H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a field trip designed to give students opportunities to experience relevant data leading to concepts in biogeography. Suggests that teachers (including college instructors) adapt the areas studied and procedures used to their own locations. Includes a suggested field trip handout. (JN)

  12. Field Trip Fundamentals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to prepare for and conduct a safe and worry-free educational experience. She shares a few tips that will ensure field trips will be fun, safe, engaging, and productive. She stresses that with proper planning, field trips can be unique ways to explore the world with students.

  13. Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel Experiencing a Fast Control Rod Ejection Transient

    SciTech Connect

    Ortensi, J.; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    A rapid increase of the temperature and the mechanical stress is expected in TRISO coated particle fuel that experiences a fast Total Control Rod Ejection (CRE) transient event. During this event the reactor power in the pebble bed core increases significantly for a short time interval. The power is deposited instantly and locally in the fuel kernel. This could result in a rapid increase of the pressure in the buffer layer of the coated fuel particle and, consequently, in an increase of the coating stresses. These stresses determine the mechanical failure probability of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). A new calculation procedure has been implemented at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), which analyzes the transient fuel performance behavior of TRISO fuel particles in PBRs. This early capability can easily be extended to prismatic designs, given the availability of neutronic and thermal-fluid solvers. The full-core coupled neutronic and thermal-fluid analysis has been modeled with CYNOD-THERMIX. The temperature fields for the fuel kernel and the particle coatings, as well as the gas pressures in the buffer layer, are calculated with the THETRIS module explicitly during the transient calculation. Results from this module are part of the feedback loop within the neutronic-thermal fluid iterations performed for each time step. The temperature and internal pressure values for each pebble type in each region of the core are then input to the PArticle STress Analysis (PASTA) code, which determines the particle coating stresses and the fraction of failed particles. This paper presents an investigation of a Total Control Rod Ejection (TCRE) incident in the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular reactor design using the above described calculation procedure. The transient corresponds to a reactivity insertion of $3 (~2000 pcm) reaching 35 times the nominal power in 0.5 seconds. For each position in the core

  14. Fast online corrections of tripping responses.

    PubMed

    Potocanac, Zrinka; de Bruin, Janneke; van der Veen, Susanne; Verschueren, Sabine; van Dieën, Jaap; Duysens, Jacques; Pijnappels, Mirjam

    2014-11-01

    Tripping over obstacles is one of the main causes of falls. One potential hazard to actually fall when tripped is inadequate foot landing. Adequate landing is required to control the body's angular momentum, while avoiding dangerous surfaces (slippery patch, uneven ground). To avoid such dangers, foot trajectory needs to be controlled by inhibiting and adjusting the initiated recovery foot path during a tripping reaction. We investigated whether such adjustments can be made without jeopardizing balance recovery. Sixteen healthy young adults (25.1 ± 3.2 years) walked at their comfortable speed over a walkway equipped with 14 hidden obstacles. Participants were tripped 10 times in between a random number of normal walking trials; five trips included a projection of a forbidden zone (FZ, 30 × 50 cm) at the subject's preferred landing position. Participants were instructed to land their recovery foot outside the FZ, if the FZ was presented. Responses were evaluated in terms of foot position and body angular momentum at and following recovery foot landing. Participants successfully landed their recovery foot outside the FZ in 80% of trials, using strategies of either shortening their recovery steps (84%) or side stepping (16%). Their performance improved over trials, and some participants switched strategies. Angular momenta of the adjusted steps remained small at and following recovery foot landing. Young adults can quickly change foot trajectory after tripping by using different strategies, and without detrimental consequences on balance recovery, in terms of the angular momentum. These results open possibilities for training of tripping reactions. PMID:25070085

  15. Development of a HTSMA-Actuated Surge Control Rod for High-Temperature Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II; Noebe, Ronald; Bigelow, Glen; Culley, Dennis; Stevens, Mark; Penney, Nicholas; Gaydosh, Darrell; Quackenbush, Todd; Carpenter, Bernie

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, a demand for compact, lightweight, solid-state actuation systems has emerged, driven in part by the needs of the aeronautics industry. However, most actuation systems used in turbomachinery require not only elevated temperature but high-force capability. As a result, shape memory alloy (SMA) based systems have worked their way to the forefront of a short list of viable options to meet such a technological challenge. Most of the effort centered on shape memory systems to date has involved binary NiTi alloys but the working temperatures required in many aeronautics applications dictate significantly higher transformation temperatures than the binary systems can provide. Hence, a high temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) based on NiTiPdPt, having a transformation temperature near 300 C, was developed. Various thermo-mechanical processing schemes were utilized to further improve the dimensional stability of the alloy and it was later extruded/drawn into wire form to be more compatible with envisioned applications. Mechanical testing on the finished wire form showed reasonable work output capability with excellent dimensional stability. Subsequently, the wire form of the alloy was incorporated into a benchtop system, which was shown to provide the necessary stroke requirements of approx.0.125 inches for the targeted surge-control application. Cycle times for the actuator were limited to 4 seconds due to control and cooling constraints but this cycle time was determined to be adequate for the surge control application targeted as the primary requirement was initial actuation of a surge control rod, which could be completed in approximately one second.

  16. A tetrachromatic display for the spatiotemporal control of rod and cone stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Florian S; Paulun, Vivian C; Weiss, David; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2015-08-01

    We present an apparatus that allows independent stimulation of rods and short (S)-, middle (M)-, and long (L)-wavelength-sensitive cones. Previously presented devices allow rod and cone stimulation independently, but only for a spatially invariant stimulus design (Pokorny, Smithson, & Quinlan, 2004; Sun, Pokorny, & Smith, 2001b). We overcame this limitation by using two spectrally filtered projectors with overlapping projections. This approach allows independent rod and cone stimulation in a dynamic two-dimensional scene with appropriate resolution in the spatial, temporal, and receptor domains. Modulation depths were ±15% for M-cones and L-cones, ±20% for rods, and ±50% for S-cones, all with respect to an equal-energy mesopic background at 3.4 cd/m2. Validation was provided by radiometric measures and behavioral data from two trichromats, one protanope, one deuteranope, and one night-blind observer. PMID:26305863

  17. Controlling chaos based on a novel intelligent integral terminal sliding mode control in a rod-type plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safa, Khari; Zahra, Rahmani; Behrooz, Rezaie

    2016-05-01

    An integral terminal sliding mode controller is proposed in order to control chaos in a rod-type plasma torch system. In this method, a new sliding surface is defined based on a combination of the conventional sliding surface in terminal sliding mode control and a nonlinear function of the integral of the system states. It is assumed that the dynamics of a chaotic system are unknown and also the system is exposed to disturbance and unstructured uncertainty. To achieve a chattering-free and high-speed response for such an unknown system, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system is utilized in the next step to approximate the unknown part of the nonlinear dynamics. Then, the proposed integral terminal sliding mode controller stabilizes the approximated system based on Lyapunov’s stability theory. In addition, a Bee algorithm is used to select the coefficients of integral terminal sliding mode controller to improve the performance of the proposed method. Simulation results demonstrate the improvement in the response speed, chattering rejection, transient response, and robustness against uncertainties.

  18. Dynamic Simulation of Trapping and Controlled Rotation of a Microscale Rod Driven by Line Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghshenas-Jaryani, Mahdi; Bowling, Alan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2013-03-01

    Since the invention of optical tweezers, several biological and engineering applications, especially in micro-nanofluid, have been developed. For example, development of optically driven micromotors, which has an important role in microfluidic applications, has vastly been considered. Despite extensive experimental studies in this field, there is a lack of theoretical work that can verify and analyze these observations. This work develops a dynamic model to simulate trapping and controlled rotation of a microscale rod under influence of the optical trapping forces. The laser beam, used in line optical tweezers with a varying trap's length, was modeled based on a ray-optics approach. Herein, the effects of viscosity of the surrounding fluid (water), gravity, and buoyancy were included in the proposed model. The predicted results are in overall agreement with the experimental observation, which make the theoretical model be a viable tool for investigating the dynamic behavior of small size objects manipulated by optical tweezers in fluid environments. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. MCB-1148541.

  19. Disposal Of Irradiated Cadmium Control Rods From The Plumbrook Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Posivak, E.J.; Berger, S.R.; Freitag, A.A.

    2008-07-01

    Innovative mixed waste disposition from NASA's Plum Brook Reactor Facility was accomplished without costly repackaging. Irradiated characteristic hardware with contact dose rates as high as 8 Sv/hr was packaged in a HDPE overpack and stored in a Secure Environmental Container during earlier decommissioning efforts, awaiting identification of a suitable pathway. WMG obtained regulatory concurrence that the existing overpack would serve as the macro-encapsulant per 40CFR268.45 Table 1.C. The overpack vent was disabled and the overpack was placed in a stainless steel liner to satisfy overburden slumping requirements. The liner was sealed and placed in shielded shoring for transport to the disposal site in a US DOT Type A cask. Disposition via this innovative method avoided cost, risk, and dose associated with repackaging the high dose irradiated characteristic hardware. In conclusion: WMG accomplished what others said could not be done. Large D and D contractors advised NASA that the cadmium control rods could only be shipped to the proposed Yucca mountain repository. NASA management challenged MOTA to find a more realistic alternative. NASA and MOTA turned to WMG to develop a methodology to disposition the 'hot and nasty' waste that presumably had no path forward. Although WMG lead a team that accomplished the 'impossible', the project could not have been completed with out the patient, supportive management by DOE-EM, NASA, and MOTA. (authors)

  20. Lifetime of PWR silver-indium-cadmium control rods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sipush, P.J.; Woodcock, J.; Chickering, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    A hot cell examination was performed on selected rodlets of a lead rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) which had experienced eleven cycles of operation in Point Beach Unit 1. The principal purpose of the program was to evaluate the performance of RCCAs. The hot cell examination of the rodlets involved detailed visual inspections, profilometry, metallography, cladding chemistry, dosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, corrosion tests, microhardness tests, absorber density measurements, and cladding tensile tests. Wear scars and a hairline crack in the cladding were evaluated. The results of the examinations and analysis of WEPCO site photographs led to an estimate of the service life for RCCAs which are used in Westinghouse 14 x 14 fuel assemblies. Also, wear scar widths were correlated with wear scar depths. The correlation may be used to estimate wear scar depths based on site photographs of wear scars for 14 x 14 RCCAs. The results of the program may be used as guidelines for RCCAs for 15 x 15 and 17 x 17 Westinghouse fuel designs. 10 refs., 89 figs., 26 tabs.

  1. Genetic algorithm based active vibration control for a moving flexible smart beam driven by a pneumatic rod cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Shi, Ming-li; Wang, Bin; Xie, Zhuo-wei

    2012-05-01

    A rod cylinder based pneumatic driving scheme is proposed to suppress the vibration of a flexible smart beam. Pulse code modulation (PCM) method is employed to control the motion of the cylinder's piston rod for simultaneous positioning and vibration suppression. Firstly, the system dynamics model is derived using Hamilton principle. Its standard state-space representation is obtained for characteristic analysis, controller design, and simulation. Secondly, a genetic algorithm (GA) is applied to optimize and tune the control gain parameters adaptively based on the specific performance index. Numerical simulations are performed on the pneumatic driving elastic beam system, using the established model and controller with tuned gains by GA optimization process. Finally, an experimental setup for the flexible beam driven by a pneumatic rod cylinder is constructed. Experiments for suppressing vibrations of the flexible beam are conducted. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed pneumatic drive scheme and the adopted control algorithms are feasible. The large amplitude vibration of the first bending mode can be suppressed effectively.

  2. Controlled synthesis of ZnO from nanospheres to micro-rods and its gas sensing studies.

    PubMed

    Navale, Shalaka C; Gosavi, S W; Mulla, I S

    2008-06-15

    1D ZnO rods are synthesized using less explored hydrazine method. Here we find, besides being combustible hydrazine can also be used as a structure-directing agent. The ratio of zinc nitrate (ZN) to hydrazine is found to control the morphology of ZnO. At lower concentration of ZN as compared with hydrazine the morphology of ZnO is found to be spherical. As we increase the hydrazine content the morphology changes from spherical (diameter approximately 100 nm) to the elongated structures including shapes like Y, T as well dumbbell (diameter approximately 40 nm and length approximately 150 nm). Interestingly for more than 50% of hydrazine ZnO micro-rods are formed. Such rods are of diameter approximately 120 nm having length of about 1 microm for ZN to hydrazine ratio of 1:9, isolated as well as bundle of rods are seen in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals the phase formation with average particle size of 37 nm as calculated using Scherrer's formula. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is also done to confirm the d-spacing in ZnO. Gas sensing study for these samples shows high efficiency and selectivity towards LPG at all operating temperatures. Photoluminescence (PL) study for these samples is performed at room temperature to find potential application as photoelectric material. PMID:18585218

  3. Field Trips: Tradition in Jeopardy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Ginger

    2011-01-01

    The school field trip: something fun, different, exciting, exhausting--a break from the school day grind. But the field trip has ramifications beyond just getting out of school for the day. For students, the field trip is to the classroom what the big game is to athletes. For museums and other attractions, the field trip is a way to cultivate…

  4. Analysis of the dose rate produced by control rods discharged from a BWR into the irradiated fuel pool.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, J; Gallardo, S; Abarca, A; Juan, V

    2010-01-01

    BWR control rods become activated by neutron reactions into the reactor. Therefore, when they are withdrawn from the reactor, they must be stored into the storage pool for irradiated fuel at a certain depth under water. Dose rates on the pool surface and the area surrounding the pool should be lower than limits for workers. The MCNP code based on the Monte Carlo method has been applied to model this situation and to calculate dose rates at points of interest. PMID:19836252

  5. Nondestructive Examination of Possible PWSCC in Control Rod Drive Mechanism Housings

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Rob V.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect? 2) What did each technique miss? and 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data and through-wall leakage; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discuss the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology and a comparison of the degradation found by the destructive evaluation with the recorded NDE responses.

  6. NDE of Possible Service-Induced PWSCC in Control Rod Drive Mechanism Housings Removed from Service

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Robert V.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2006-09-22

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are being performed to assess the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques on removed-from-service control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and the associated J-groove attachment welds. This work is being performed to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE techniques such as ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), and visual testing (VT) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. The basic NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory-based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper describes the NDE measurements that were employed on the two CRDMs to detect and characterize the indications and the analysis of these indications. The two CRDM assemblies were removed from service from the North Anna 2 vessel head, including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material. One nozzle contains suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the second contains evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, although this was unconfirmed. A destructive test plan is being developed to directly characterize the indications found using nondestructive testing. The results of this destructive testing will be included when the destructive testing is completed.

  7. Calculation of the Phenix end-of-life test 'Control Rod Withdrawal' with the ERANOS code

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, V.

    2012-07-01

    The Inst. of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) acts as technical support to French public authorities. As such, IRSN is in charge of safety assessment of operating and under construction reactors, as well as future projects. In this framework, one current objective of IRSN is to evaluate the ability and accuracy of numerical tools to foresee consequences of accidents. Neutronic studies step in the safety assessment from different points of view among which the core design and its protection system. They are necessary to evaluate the core behavior in case of accident in order to assess the integrity of the first barrier and the absence of a prompt criticality risk. To reach this objective one main physical quantity has to be evaluated accurately: the neutronic power distribution in core during whole reactor lifetime. Phenix end of life tests, carried out in 2009, aim at increasing the experience feedback on sodium cooled fast reactors. These experiments have been done in the framework of the development of the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. Ten tests have been carried out: 6 on neutronic and fuel aspects, 2 on thermal hydraulics and 2 for the emergency shutdown. Two of them have been chosen for an international exercise on thermal hydraulics and neutronics in the frame of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project. Concerning neutronics, the Control Rod Withdrawal test is relevant for safety because it allows evaluating the capability of calculation tools to compute the radial power distribution on fast reactors core configurations in which the flux field is very deformed. IRSN participated to this benchmark with the ERANOS code developed by CEA for fast reactors studies. This paper presents the results obtained in the framework of the benchmark activity. A relatively good agreement was found with available measures considering the approximations done in the modeling. The work underlines the importance of burn-up calculations in order to have a fine

  8. The Effects of Autonomy-Supportive vs. Controlling Guidance on Learners' Motivational and Cognitive Achievement in a Structured Field Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basten, Melanie; Meyer-Ahrens, Inga; Fries, Stefan; Wilde, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Field trips can provide unique opportunities for authentic, meaningful, and self-determined learning. Capitalizing on these opportunities requires that field trips be structured. A common way to do this is through the use of educational materials such as worksheets. The extent to which the guide's or teacher's autonomy-supportive or…

  9. Rapid quenching of molten lithium-aluminum jets in water under loss-of-control-rod-cooling conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.; Schwarz, C.E.; Allison, D.K.; Hyder, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    A series of fifteen tests were performed to investigate the thermal interactions between molten LiAl control rod material and water under conditions prototypic of the loss-of-control-rod-cooling (LCRC) accident scenario. The experimental parameters such as melt mass, stream diameter, melt temperature and flowrate, water depth and water temperature were controlled or varied to agree with analytically determined conditions, thus insuring prototypicality of the experiments and applicability of the results. Experiments were performed in an actual Q-septifoil with web insert; the test section was one meter tall. Natural triggers were investigated in selected tests, to evaluate the self-triggering potential of this system. The self-triggering mechanisms that were investigated were thermal stratification of the water pool, two-phase flow in the water pool, and simultaneous drop of a control rod in parallel channel. Only benign interactions were observed during these tests with some evidence of pressurization in the tests with deepest and hottest water pools. There was no evidence of any explosive interactions in any of the tests, even those with natural triggers. The molten LiAl jets was found to undergo jet breakup and fragmentation; in some cases the debris hung up in the web, in other cases the debris settled into a loose debris bed at the bottom of the septifoil. It is concluded from these tests that molten lithium-aluminum alloy injected into water under conditions prototypic of LCRC conditions will not self-trigger to a steam explosion nor can it be triggered by naturally occurring triggers. The mode of interaction is benign jet breakup and fragmentation, followed by debris solidification. Explosive events did not occur and may not even be possible under these conditions. As a result, the LCRC accident cannot propagate damage and should not be a power-limiting concern in the K-reactor.

  10. Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Virginia A.

    1997-01-01

    Virtual field trips can provide experiences beyond the reach of average K-12 students. Describes multimedia products for school use: Africa Trail, Dinosaur Hunter, Louvre Museum, Magic School Bus Explores the Rainforest, and Up to the Himalayas: Kingdoms in the Clouds and provides book and Internet connections for additional learning, highlighting…

  11. Science Activities for School Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quint, Walter C.

    1980-01-01

    Describes ways in which physics-learning activity packets can be used by high school students participating in trips organized by other departments. Provides an example of physics activities incorporated into an airplane trip to Disney World. (CS)

  12. Real-World Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsworthy, Richard

    1997-01-01

    In addition to virtual field trips, technology can play a role in planning for real-world field trips. Describes how students at the Woodbridge Academy in Lexington, Kentucky planned a field trip to Washington, DC, using the Internet and computer software to research, administer, and report their experiences. Provides the addresses of related Web…

  13. Computer Based Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Kenneth F.; Hosticka, Alice; Schriver, Martha; Bedell, Jackie

    This paper discusses computer based virtual field trips that use technologies commonly found in public schools in the United States. The discussion focuses on the advantages of both using and creating these field trips for an instructional situation. A virtual field trip to Cumberland Island National Seashore, St. Marys, Georgia is used as a point…

  14. Nondestructive and Destructive Examination Studies on Removed-from-Service Control Rod Drive Mechanism Penetrations

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Crawford, Susan L.; Doctor, Steven R.; Seffens, Rob J.; Schuster, George J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Harris, Robert V.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2007-06-07

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objectives of this work are to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. Two CRDM assemblies were removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE and destructive examination (DE) measurements; this report addresses the following questions: 1) What did each NDE technique detect? 2) What did each NDE technique miss? 3) How accurately did each NDE technique characterize the detected flaws? 4) Why did the NDE techniques perform or not perform? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. This report focuses on a CRDM assembly that contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data and through-wall leakage. The NDE measurements used to examine the CRDM assembly followed standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. These techniques included eddy current testing (ET), time-of-flight diffraction ultrasound, and penetrant testing. In addition, laboratory-based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assembly with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. These techniques included volumetric ultrasonic inspection of the J-groove weld metal and visual testing via replicant material of the J-groove weld. The results from these NDE studies were used to

  15. cAMP controls rod photoreceptor sensitivity via multiple targets in the phototransduction cascade

    PubMed Central

    Astakhova, Luba A.; Samoiliuk, Evgeniia V.; Govardovskii, Victor I.

    2012-01-01

    In early studies, both cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cGMP were considered as potential secondary messengers regulating the conductivity of the vertebrate photoreceptor plasma membrane. Later discovery of the cGMP specificity of cyclic nucleotide–gated channels has shifted attention to cGMP as the only secondary messenger in the phototransduction cascade, and cAMP is not considered in modern schemes of phototransduction. Here, we report evidence that cAMP may also be involved in regulation of the phototransduction cascade. Using a suction pipette technique, we recorded light responses of isolated solitary rods from the frog retina in normal solution and in the medium containing 2 µM of adenylate cyclase activator forskolin. Under forskolin action, flash sensitivity rose more than twofold because of a retarded photoresponse turn-off. The same concentration of forskolin lead to a 2.5-fold increase in the rod outer segment cAMP, which is close to earlier reported natural day/night cAMP variations. Detailed analysis of cAMP action on the phototransduction cascade suggests that several targets are affected by cAMP increase: (a) basal dark phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity decreases; (b) at the same intensity of light background, steady background-induced PDE activity increases; (c) at light backgrounds, guanylate cyclase activity at a given fraction of open channels is reduced; and (d) the magnitude of the Ca2+ exchanger current rises 1.6-fold, which would correspond to a 1.6-fold elevation of [Ca2+]in. Analysis by a complete model of rod phototransduction suggests that an increase of [Ca2+]in might also explain effects (b) and (c). The mechanism(s) by which cAMP could regulate [Ca2+]in and PDE basal activity is unclear. We suggest that these regulations may have adaptive significance and improve the performance of the visual system when it switches between day and night light conditions. PMID:23008435

  16. RAPID-L Highly Automated Fast Reactor Concept Without Any Control Rods (1) Reactor concept and plant dynamics analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Tsunoda, Hirokazu; Mishima, Kaichiro; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2002-07-01

    The 200 kWe uranium-nitride fueled lithium cooled fast reactor concept 'RAPID-L' to achieve highly automated reactor operation has been demonstrated. RAPID-L is designed for Lunar base power system. It is one of the variants of RAPID (Refueling by All Pins Integrated Design), fast reactor concept, which enable quick and simplified refueling. The essential feature of RAPID concept is that the reactor core consists of an integrated fuel assembly instead of conventional fuel subassemblies. In this small size reactor core, 2700 fuel pins are integrated altogether and encased in a fuel cartridge. Refueling is conducted by replacing a fuel cartridge. The reactor can be operated without refueling for up to 10 years. Unique challenges in reactivity control systems design have been attempted in RAPID-L concept. The reactor has no control rod, but involves the following innovative reactivity control systems: Lithium Expansion Modules (LEM) for inherent reactivity feedback, Lithium Injection Modules (LIM) for inherent ultimate shutdown, and Lithium Release Modules (LRM) for automated reactor startup. All these systems adopt lithium-6 as a liquid poison instead of B{sub 4}C rods. In combination with LEMs, LIMs and LRMs, RAPID-L can be operated without operator. This is the first reactor concept ever established in the world. This reactor concept is also applicable to the terrestrial fast reactors. In this paper, RAPID-L reactor concept and its transient characteristics are presented. (authors)

  17. How to Conduct a Research Field Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wacker, David G.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the three phases of a three-day intensive research study field trip: planning and pre-trip training; actual trip; and post-trip report, research and data organization, and final trip evaluation. Included is a sample program of the limnology field trip taken by the Grafton High School, Wisconsin. (CC)

  18. Automatic safety rod for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1988-01-01

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  19. Experimental Evaluation of Field Trips on Instruction in Vocational Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaslin, Norval L.

    To determine the effect of field trips on student achievement in each of four subject matter areas in vocational agriculture, 12 schools offering approved programs were randomly selected and divided into a treatment group and a control group. Uniform teaching outlines and reference materials were provided to each group. While no field trips were…

  20. Controlled rolling process for dual phase steels and application to rod, wire, sheet and other shapes

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, G.; Ahn, J.H.; Kim, N.J.

    1986-10-28

    An improved, energy efficient, hot rolling method for direct production of cold formable dual-phase steel is provided. The steel is heated to completely austenitize it and then continuously hot rolled and cooled down into the ferrite-austenite two phase region to a temperature which is just below the effective Ar[sub 3] temperature. The hot rolled steel is then rapidly quenched to provide an alloy containing strong, tough lath martensite (fibers) in a ductile soft ferrite matrix. The method is particularly useful for providing rods in which form the alloy is capable of being drawn into high strength wire or the like in a cold drawing operation without any intermediate annealing or patenting, and has excellent strength, ductility and fatigue characteristics. 3 figs.

  1. Controlled rolling process for dual phase steels and application to rod, wire, sheet and other shapes

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Ahn, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Nack-Joon

    1986-01-01

    An improved, energy efficient, hot rolling method for direct production of cold formable dual-phase steel is provided. The steel is heated to completely austenitize it and then continuously hot rolled and cooled down into the ferrite-austenite two phase region to a temperature which is just below the effective Ar.sub.3 temperature. The hot rolled steel is then rapidly quenched to provide an alloy containing strong, tough lath martensite (fibers) in a ductile soft ferrite matrix. The method is particularly useful for providing rods in which form the alloy is capable of being drawn into high strength wire or the like in a cold drawing operation without any intermediate annealing or patenting, and has excellent strength, ductility and fatigue characteristics.

  2. Driving following Kava Use and Road Traffic Injuries: A Population-Based Case-Control Study in Fiji (TRIP 14)

    PubMed Central

    Wainiqolo, Iris; Kafoa, Berlin; Kool, Bridget; Robinson, Elizabeth; Herman, Josephine; McCaig, Eddie; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between kava use and the risk of four-wheeled motor vehicle crashes in Fiji. Kava is a traditional beverage commonly consumed in many Pacific Island Countries. Herbal anxiolytics containing smaller doses of kava are more widely available. Methods Data for this population-based case-control study were collected from drivers of ‘case’ vehicles involved in serious injury-involved crashes (where at least one road user was killed or admitted to hospital for 12 hours or more) and ‘control’ vehicles representative of ‘driving time’ in the study base. Structured interviewer administered questionnaires collected self-reported participant data on demographic characteristics and a range of risk factors including kava use and potential confounders. Unconditional logistic regression models estimated odds ratios relating to the association between kava use and injury-involved crash risk. Findings Overall, 23% and 4% of drivers of case and control vehicles, respectively, reported consuming kava in the 12 hours prior to the crash or road survey. After controlling for assessed confounders, driving following kava use was associated with a four-fold increase in the odds of crash involvement (Odds ratio: 4.70; 95% CI: 1.90–11.63). The related population attributable risk was 18.37% (95% CI: 13.77–22.72). Acknowledging limited statistical power, we did not find a significant interaction in this association with concurrent alcohol use. Conclusion In this study conducted in a setting where recreational kava consumption is common, driving following the use of kava was associated with a significant excess of serious-injury involved road crashes. The precautionary principle would suggest road safety strategies should explicitly recommend avoiding driving following kava use, particularly in communities where recreational use is common. PMID:26930404

  3. Shape-Controlled Paclitaxel Nanoparticles with Multiple Morphologies: Rod-Shaped, Worm-Like, Spherical, and Fingerprint-Like

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although many nanocarriers have been developed to encapsulate paclitaxel (PTX), the drug loading and circulation time in vivo always are not ideal because of its rigid “brickdust” molecular structure. People usually concentrate their attention on the spherical nanocarriers, here paclitaxel nanoparticles with different geometries were established through the chemical modification of PTX, nanoprecipitation, and core-matched cargos. Previously we have developed rod-shape paclitaxel nanocrystals using block copolymer, pluronic F127. Unfortunately, the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of PTX nanocrystals is very poor. However, when PTX was replaced by its prodrug, the geometry of the nanoparticles changed from rod-shaped to worm-like. The worm-like nanoparticles can be further changed to spherical nanoparticles using the nanoprecipitation method, and changed to fingerprint-like nanoparticles upon the addition of the core-matched PTX. The nanoparticles with nonspherical morphologies, including worm-like nanoparticles and fingerprint-like nanoparticles, offer significant advantages in regards to key PK parameters in vivo. More important, in this report the application of the core-matching technology in creating a core-matched environment capable of controlling the in vivo PK of paclitaxel was demonstrated, and it revealed a novel technique platform to construct nanoparticles and improve the poor PK profiles of the drugs. PMID:25188586

  4. Nuclear reactor control

    SciTech Connect

    Ingham, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor has power setback means for use in an emergency. On initiation of a trip-signal a control rod is injected into the core in two stages, firstly, by free fall to effect an immediate power-set back to a safe level and, secondly, by controlled insertion. Total shut-down of the reactor under all emergencies is avoided. 4 claims.

  5. Making Highly Pure Glass Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed quasi-containerless method for making glass rods or fibers minimizes contact between processing equipment and product. Method allows greater range of product sizes and shapes than achieved in experiments on containerless processing. Molten zone established in polycrystalline rod. Furnace sections separated, and glass rod solidifies between them. Clamp supports solid glass as it grows in length. Pulling clamp rapidly away from melt draws glass fiber. Fiber diameter controlled by adjustment of pulling rate.

  6. 49 CFR 236.531 - Trip arm; height and distance from rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Trip arm; height and distance from rail. 236.531... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.531 Trip arm; height and distance from rail. Trip arm of automatic train stop device when in the stop position shall...

  7. 49 CFR 236.531 - Trip arm; height and distance from rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Trip arm; height and distance from rail. 236.531... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.531 Trip arm; height and distance from rail. Trip arm of automatic train stop device when in the stop position shall...

  8. 49 CFR 236.531 - Trip arm; height and distance from rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trip arm; height and distance from rail. 236.531... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.531 Trip arm; height and distance from rail. Trip arm of automatic train stop device when in the stop position shall...

  9. 49 CFR 236.531 - Trip arm; height and distance from rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Trip arm; height and distance from rail. 236.531... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.531 Trip arm; height and distance from rail. Trip arm of automatic train stop device when in the stop position shall...

  10. 49 CFR 236.531 - Trip arm; height and distance from rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Trip arm; height and distance from rail. 236.531... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.531 Trip arm; height and distance from rail. Trip arm of automatic train stop device when in the stop position shall...

  11. Evaluation and Repair of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Alloy 600/182 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Charles R.; Arey, Melvin L. Jr.; Robinson, Michael R.; Whitaker, David E.

    2002-07-01

    In February 2001, a routine visual inspection of the reactor vessel head of Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 3 identified boric acid crystals at nine of sixty-nine locations where control rod drive mechanism housings (CRDM nozzles) penetrate the head. The boric acid deposits resulted from primary coolant leaking from cracks in the nozzle attachment weld and from through-thickness cracks in the nozzle wall. A general overview of the inspection and repair process is presented and results of the metallurgical analysis are discussed in more detail. The analysis confirmed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is the mechanism of failure of both the Alloy 182 weld filler material and the alloy 600 wrought base material. (authors)

  12. Benchmark of Atucha-2 PHWR RELAP5-3D control rod model by Monte Carlo MCNP5 core calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Pecchia, M.; D'Auria, F.; Mazzantini, O.

    2012-07-01

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and peculiarities require the adoption of advanced Monte Carlo codes for performing realistic neutronic simulations. Therefore core models of Atucha-2 PHWR were developed using MCNP5. In this work a methodology was set up to collect the flux in the hexagonal mesh by which the Atucha-2 core is represented. The scope of this activity is to evaluate the effect of obliquely inserted control rod on neutron flux in order to validate the RELAP5-3D{sup C}/NESTLE three dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic model, applied by GRNSPG/UNIPI for performing selected transients of Chapter 15 FSAR of Atucha-2. (authors)

  13. Elementary school children's science learning from school field trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Marilyn Petty

    This research examines the impact of classroom anchoring activities on elementary school students' science learning from a school field trip. Although there is prior research demonstrating that students can learn science from school field trips, most of this research is descriptive in nature and does not examine the conditions that enhance or facilitate such learning. The current study draws upon research in psychology and education to create an intervention that is designed to enhance what students learn from school science field trips. The intervention comprises of a set of "anchoring" activities that include: (1) Orientation to context, (2) Discussion to activate prior knowledge and generate questions, (3) Use of field notebooks during the field trip to record observations and answer questions generated prior to field trip, (4) Post-visit discussion of what was learned. The effects of the intervention are examined by comparing two groups of students: an intervention group which receives anchoring classroom activities related to their field trip and an equivalent control group which visits the same field trip site for the same duration but does not receive any anchoring classroom activities. Learning of target concepts in both groups was compared using objective pre and posttests. Additionally, a subset of students in each group were interviewed to obtain more detailed descriptive data on what children learned through their field trip.

  14. Field Trips Within Easy Reach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Charles P.

    1983-01-01

    Provides suggestions for conducting field trips at the local school site. Points of interest might include building materials, evidence of chemical/physical weathering, variations in soil type, changes in elevation on school ground, and others. Three simple field trips are described. (JN)

  15. Composite Lightning Rods for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Charles F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Composite, lightweight sacrificial tip with graphite designed reduces lightning-strike damage to composite parts of aircraft and dissipates harmful electrical energy. Device consists of slender composite rod fabricated from highly-conductive unidirectional reinforcing fibers in matrix material. Rods strategically installed in trailing edges of aircraft wings, tails, winglets, control surfaces, and rearward-most portion of aft fuselage.

  16. Squishy Physics Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, Eric R.; Cianci, Gianguido; Habdas, Piotr

    2008-03-01

    Our laboratory studies soft condensed matter, which means we investigate squishy materials such as foams, emulsions, and colloidal suspensions. These materials include common things such as peanut butter, toothpaste, mayonnaise, shampoo, and shaving cream. We have conducted several field trips for grade school students, where they come to our laboratory and play with squishy materials. They do both hands-on table-top projects and also look at samples with a microscope. We have also developed some of these activities into labs appropriate for first-year college students. Our first goal for these activities is to show students that science is fun, and the second goal is to get them intrigued by the idea that there are more phases than just solids, liquids, and gases.

  17. Rhodopsin kinase and arrestin binding control the decay of photoactivated rhodopsin and dark adaptation of mouse rods.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Nymark, Soile; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Berry, Justin D; Adler, Leopold; Koutalos, Yiannis; Kefalov, Vladimir J; Cornwall, M Carter

    2016-07-01

    Photoactivation of vertebrate rhodopsin converts it to the physiologically active Meta II (R*) state, which triggers the rod light response. Meta II is rapidly inactivated by the phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues by G-protein receptor kinase (Grk1) and subsequent binding of arrestin 1 (Arr1). Meta II exists in equilibrium with the more stable inactive form of rhodopsin, Meta III. Dark adaptation of rods requires the complete thermal decay of Meta II/Meta III into opsin and all-trans retinal and the subsequent regeneration of rhodopsin with 11-cis retinal chromophore. In this study, we examine the regulation of Meta III decay by Grk1 and Arr1 in intact mouse rods and their effect on rod dark adaptation. We measure the rates of Meta III decay in isolated retinas of wild-type (WT), Grk1-deficient (Grk1(-/-)), Arr1-deficient (Arr1(-/-)), and Arr1-overexpressing (Arr1(ox)) mice. We find that in WT mouse rods, Meta III peaks ∼6 min after rhodopsin activation and decays with a time constant (τ) of 17 min. Meta III decay slows in Arr1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼27 min), whereas it accelerates in Arr1(ox) rods (τ of ∼8 min) and Grk1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼13 min). In all cases, regeneration of rhodopsin with exogenous 11-cis retinal is rate limited by the decay of Meta III. Notably, the kinetics of rod dark adaptation in vivo is also modulated by the levels of Arr1 and Grk1. We conclude that, in addition to their well-established roles in Meta II inactivation, Grk1 and Arr1 can modulate the kinetics of Meta III decay and rod dark adaptation in vivo. PMID:27353443

  18. Peptidic ligands to control the three-dimensional self-assembly of quantum rods in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Bizien, Thomas; Even-Hernandez, Pascale; Postic, Marie; Mazari, Elsa; Chevance, Soizic; Bondon, Arnaud; Hamon, Cyrille; Troadec, David; Largeau, Ludovic; Dupuis, Christophe; Gosse, Charlie; Artzner, Franck; Marchi, Valérie

    2014-09-24

    The use of peptidic ligands is validated as a generic chemical platform allowing one to finely control the organization in solid phase of semiconductor nanorods originally dispersed in an aqueous media. An original method to generate, on a macroscopic scale and with the desired geometry, three-dimensional supracrystals composed of quantum rods is introduced. In a first step, nanorods are transferred in an aqueous phase thanks to the substitution of the original capping layer by peptidic ligands. Infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy data prove that the exchange is complete; fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrates that the emitter optical properties are not significantly altered; electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering experiments assess the good colloidal stability of the resulting aqueous suspension. In a second step, water evaporation in a microstructured environment yields superstructures with a chosen geometry and in which nanorods obey a smectic B arrangement, as shown by electron microscopy. Incidentally, bulk drying in a capillary tube generates a similar local order, as evidenced by small angle X-ray scattering. PMID:24864008

  19. Using a Field Trip Inventory to Determine If Listening to Elementary School Students' Conversations, While on a Zoo Field Trip, Enhances Preservice Teachers' Abilities to Plan Zoo Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Patricia; Mathews, Cathy; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated whether listening to spontaneous conversations of elementary students and their teachers/chaperones, while they were visiting a zoo, affected preservice elementary teachers' conceptions about planning a field trip to the zoo. One hundred five preservice elementary teachers designed field trips prior to and after listening to students' conversations during a field trip to the zoo. In order to analyze the preservice teachers' field trip designs, we conducted a review of the literature on field trips to develop the field trip inventory (FTI). The FTI focussed on three major components of field trips: cognitive, procedural, and social. Cognitive components were subdivided into pre-visit, during-visit, and post-visit activities and problem-solving. Procedural components included information about the informal science education facility (the zoo) and the zoo staff and included advanced organizers. Social components on student groups, fun, control during the zoo visit, and control of student learning. The results of the investigation showed that (a) the dominant topic in conversations among elementary school groups at the zoo was management, (b) procedural components were mentioned least often, (c) preservice teachers described during-visit activities more often than any other characteristic central to field trip design, (d) seven of the nine characteristics listed in the FTI were noted more frequently in the preservice teachers' field trip designs after they listened to students' conversations at the zoo, and (e) preservice teachers thought that students were not learning and that planning was important.

  20. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kasada, R.; Ha, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Sakamoto, K.

    2016-01-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test. PMID:27161666

  1. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kasada, R; Ha, Y; Higuchi, T; Sakamoto, K

    2016-01-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test. PMID:27161666

  2. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasada, R.; Ha, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Sakamoto, K.

    2016-05-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test.

  3. CONTROL ROD ROTATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Baumgarten, A.; Karalis, A.J.

    1961-11-28

    A threaded rotatable shaft is provided which rotates in response to linear movement of a nut, the shaft being surrounded by a pair of bellows members connected to either side of the nut to effectively seal the reactor from leakage and also to store up energy to shut down the reactor in the event of a power failure. (AEC)

  4. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1958-04-22

    An electromagnetic apparatus for moving a rod-like member in small steps in either direction is described. The invention has particular application in the reactor field where the reactor control rods must be moved only a small distance and where the use of mechanical couplings is impractical due to the high- pressure seals required. A neutron-absorbing rod is mounted in a housing with gripping uaits that engage the rod, and coils for magnetizing the gripping units to make them grip, shift, and release the rod are located outside the housing.

  5. 49 CFR 236.586 - Daily or after trip test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Inspection and Tests; Locomotive § 236.586 Daily or after trip test..., each locomotive equipped with an automatic cab signal or train stop or train control device...

  6. Automatic safety rod for reactors. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-03-23

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  7. Learning from a Bike Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koren, Mike

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a bike trip which marks the culmination of a unit reviewing map-reading capabilities. In seventh grade, students develop various map skills, including cardinal and intermediate directions, how to measure distance on a map using a scale of miles, how to interpret the legend of a map, and how to locate places…

  8. Mobile Collector for Field Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravcik, Milos; Kaibel, Andreas; Specht, Marcus; Terrenghi, Lucia

    2004-01-01

    Current e-Learning is based on learning management systems that provide certain standard services--course authoring and delivery, tutoring, administration and collaboration facilities. Rapid development of mobile technologies opens a new area of m-Learning to enhance the current educational opportunities. Field trips are a relevant part of the…

  9. Katimavik Out-Trip Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OPCAN, Montreal (Quebec).

    A supplement to the active leisure learning student manual for Katimavik (the 9-month volunteer community service and experiential learning program for 17-21 year old Canadians) provides in greater detail the procedure for preparing and implementing the Outdoor Wilderness Trip. Sections presented are definition of terms, national training,…

  10. A Nontraditional Geology Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, William Willard

    1989-01-01

    Describes the design and logistics of a one-month, 1600 km bicycle tour field trip in which the travel, not the stops, is the major teaching tool. Provides a map and a summarized itinerary of the geology experience of southern California and Nevada. (RT)

  11. Urban Awareness; A Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    A description of a Title III funded project is presented in this paper. The project, Urban Awareness, involves an urban field trip for high school students from suburban areas. Every year, at least five classes from suburban Hamilton spend a school day in Boston's North End and Roxbury districts as a means of studying the city and its ethnic…

  12. The Field Trip: Frill or Essential?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Research reviewed by David Berliner indicates that field trips help students retain and supplement knowledge gained from a unit of study. Ursula Casanova Pinero offers suggestions for making the most out of field trips. (CB)

  13. Factors that influence learning during a scientific field trip in a natural environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orion, Nir; Hofstein, Avi

    This study deals with the educational effectiveness of field trips. The main purpose was to obtain insight concerning factors that might influence the ability of students to learn during a scientific field trip in a natural environment. The research was conducted in the context of a 1-day geologic field trip by 296 students in Grades 9 through 11 in high schools in Israel. The study combined qualitative and quantitative research methods. Data were collected from three different sources (student, teacher, and outside observer) in three stages (before, after, and during the field trip). Using observations and questionnaires we investigated: a) the nature of student learning during the field trip, b) student attitudes toward the field trip, and c) changes in student knowledge and attitudes after the field trip. Our findings suggest that the educational effectiveness of a field trip is controlled by two major factors: the field trip quality and the Novelty space (or Familiarity Index). The educational quality of a field trip is determined by its structure, learning materials, and teaching method, and the ability to direct learning to a concrete interaction with the environment. The novelty space consists of three prefield variables: cognitive, psychological, and geographic. The learning performance of students whose Novelty Space was reduced before the field trip was significantly higher than that of students whose Novelty Space had not been so reduced. Thus, the former group gained significantly higher achievement and attitude levels. It is suggested that a field trip should occur early in the concrete part of the curriculum, and should be preceded by a relatively short preparatory unit that focuses on increasing familiarity with the learning setting of the field trip, thereby limiting the Novelty Space factors.Received: 23 March 1993; Revised: 24 January 1994;

  14. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small button'' in the latch mechanism had broken off of the lock plunger'' and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  15. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small ``button`` in the latch mechanism had broken off of the ``lock plunger`` and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  16. FUEL ROD ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1959-09-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods aod a tubular casing through which a coolant flows in heat-change contact with the ruel rods are described. The casting is of trefoil section and carries the fuel rods, each of which has two fin engaging the serrated fins of the other two fuel rods, whereby the fuel rods are held in the casing and are interlocked against relative longitudinal movement.

  17. Real Students and Virtual Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Bailey, J. E.; Schott, R. C.; Treves, R.; Scientific Team Of Www. Digitalplanet. Org

    2010-12-01

    Field trips have always been one of the major attractions of geoscience education, distinguishing courses in geology, geography, oceanography, etc., from laboratory-bound sciences such as nuclear physics or biochemistry. However, traditional field trips have been limited to regions with educationally useful exposures and to student populations with the necessary free time and financial resources. Two-year or commuter colleges serving worker-students cannot realistically insist on completion of field assignments and even well-endowed universities cannot take students to more than a handful of the best available field localities. Many instructors have attempted to bring the field into the classroom with the aid of technology. So-called Virtual Field Trips (VFTs) cannot replace the real experience for those that experience it but they are much better than nothing at all. We have been working to create transformative improvements in VFTs using four concepts: (i) self-drive virtual vehicles that students use to navigate the virtual globe under their own control; (ii) GigaPan outcrops that reveal successively more details views of key locations; (iii) virtual specimens scanned from real rocks, minerals, and fossils; and (iv) embedded assessment via logging of student actions. Students are represented by avatars of their own choosing and travel either together in a virtual field vehicle, or separately. When they approach virtual outcrops, virtual specimens become collectable and can be examined using Javascript controls that change magnification and orientation. These instructional resources are being made available via a new server under the domain name www.DigitalPlanet.org. The server will log student progress and provide immediate feedback. We aim to disseminate these resources widely and welcome feedback from instructors and students.

  18. One-trip drum operating instruction

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, D.T.

    1994-10-01

    The one trip system is a bagless transfer system for egress of waste from gloveboxes into 55 gallon one-trip drums. The contents of this document give an overview of the assembly, loading, and handling of the one-trip drum for use in the WRAP-1 plant.

  19. 30 CFR 57.14162 - Trip lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trip lights. 57.14162 Section 57.14162 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14162 Trip lights. On underground rail haulage, trip...

  20. 30 CFR 57.14162 - Trip lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trip lights. 57.14162 Section 57.14162 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14162 Trip lights. On underground rail haulage, trip...

  1. 30 CFR 57.14162 - Trip lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trip lights. 57.14162 Section 57.14162 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14162 Trip lights. On underground rail haulage, trip...

  2. 30 CFR 57.14162 - Trip lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trip lights. 57.14162 Section 57.14162 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14162 Trip lights. On underground rail haulage, trip...

  3. 30 CFR 57.14162 - Trip lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trip lights. 57.14162 Section 57.14162 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14162 Trip lights. On underground rail haulage, trip...

  4. A Destructive Validation of NDE Responses of Service-Induced PWSCC Found in North Anna 2 Control Rod Drive Nozzle 31

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Robert V.; Crawford, Susan L.; Seffens, Rob J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Moyer, C.

    2009-07-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies.

  5. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways. PMID:26718442

  6. Venus round trip using solar sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, KaiJian; Zhang, RongZhi; Xu, Dong; Wang, JiaSong; Li, ShaoMin

    2012-08-01

    Trajectory optimization and simulation is performed for Venus round trip (VeRT) mission using solar sail propulsion. Solar gravity is included but atmospheric drag and shadowing effects are neglected in the planet-centered escape and capture stages. The spacecraft starts from the Geostationary orbit (GEO) at a predetermined time to prepare a good initial condition for the Earth-Venus transfer, although the launch window is not an issue for spacecraft with solar sails. The Earth-Venus phase and the return trip are divided into three segments. Two methods are adopted to maintain the mission trajectory for the VeRT mission and then compared through a numerical simulation. According to the first approach, Planet-centered and heliocentric maneuvers are modeled using a set of blended analytical control laws instead of the optimal control techniques. The second procedure is the Direct Attitude Angle Optimization in which the attitude angles of the solar sail are adopted as the optimization variables during the heliocentric transfer. Although neither of the two methods guarantees a globally optimal trajectory, they are more efficient and will produce a near-optimal solution if employed properly. The second method has produced a better result for the minimum-time transfer of the VeRT mission demonstrating the effectiveness of the methods in the preliminary design of the complex optimal interplanetary orbit transfers.

  7. Investigation of combined free and forced convection in a 2 x 6 rod bundle during controlled flow transients

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.M.; Khan, E.U.

    1980-10-01

    An experimental study was performed to obtain local fluid velocity and temperature measurements in the mixed (combined free and forced) convection regime for specific flow coastdown transients. A brief investigation of steady-state flows for the purely free-convection regime was also completed. The study was performed using an electrically heated 2 x 6 rod bundle contained in a flow housing. In addition a transient data base was obtained for evaluating the COBRA-WC thermal-hydraulic computer program (a modified version of the COBRA-IV code).

  8. Generation of transversal envelope soliton in polymeric and wooden rods.

    PubMed

    de Billy, M; Hladky-Hennion, A C

    2014-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the probing of the transversal envelope solitons propagation in circular waveguides when a set of requirements (non-linearity and dispersion) are fulfilled in the waveguide and balanced. The basic idea is to analyze the shape of an acoustic pulse after it has traveled one or few trips through samples constituted of a rod and two ended beads. The dispersive behavior is associated to the bounded medium (rod) and the contacts between the elements of the specimens are assumed being described by non-linear Hertz' law type. The experimental data are obviously material dependent and have pointed out the existence of common properties on the formation and propagation properties of the envelope solitons whatever is the material (polymers, carbon fibers and wood) of the rods and spheres. Peculiar behaviors were also observed for specific material (woods) probably caused by the anisotropy of this kind of rod material leading to a double envelope soliton. PMID:24576600

  9. Piston rod seal

    DOEpatents

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  10. Effect of rod gap spacing on a suction panel for laminar flow and noise control in supersonic wind tunnels. M.S. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of a coordinated experimental and theoretical study of a sound shield concept which aims to provide a means of noise reduction in the test section of supersonic wind tunnels at high Reynolds numbers. The model used consists of a planar array of circular rods aligned with the flow, with adjustable gaps between them for boundary layer removal by suction, i.e., laminar flow control. One of the basic requirements of the present sound shield concept is to achieve sonic cross flow through the gaps in order to prevent lee-side flow disturbances from penetrating back into the shielded region. Tests were conducted at Mach 6 over a local unit Reynolds number range from about 1.2 x 10 to the 6th power to 13.5 x 10 to the 6th power per foot. Measurements of heat transfer, static pressure, and sound levels were made to establish the transition characteristics of the boundary layer on the rod array and the sound shielding effectiveness.

  11. Pull rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1988-04-21

    A pull rod assembly comprising a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring, said piston device being mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  12. Creating Enrichment Trips for Your Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Robert M.; Parker, James L. F.

    The paper describes "enrichment trips" in which disadvantaged handicapped students travel to various parts of the country to broaden students' awareness. Students had to earn their way through regular attendance, appropriate school behavior, academic achievement, and active participation in fund raising for the trip. Students and teachers worked…

  13. Reflections on a Trip: Two Decades Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis-Berman, Jennifer; Berman, Dene

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a longitudinal qualitative study that involves the interviews of four adults who participated in one of two 10-day wilderness therapy trips 25 years ago. Using qualitative data collection techniques, we conducted in-depth interviews. Respondents were asked to reflect on their lives, the wilderness therapy trip, and the…

  14. What? A Field Trip on the Playground?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbutt, Barb

    1983-01-01

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: In this day and age of budget problems, school districts are cutting back on many programs, one of which is field trips. Why worry? There must be dozens of trips that can be made on the playground of your school. Let's look into activities that can be accomplished there. SOIL STUDIES: Have you ever…

  15. Peach Bottom BWR Turbine Trip Benchmark Analyses with RETRAN-3D and CORETRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Barten, W.; Ferroukhi, H.; Coddington, P.

    2004-10-15

    This paper presents results from Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) on the three phases of the Peach Bottom Boiling Water Reactor Turbine Trip Benchmark. The first part of the paper presents the PSI analysis using RETRAN-3D of Phase 1, where the system pressure is predicted based on a predefined core power distribution. These calculations elucidate the importance of accurate modeling of the steam separator region and of nonequilibrium effects. In the second part, the CORETRAN results of Phase 2 are summarized and the core 3-D response to the pressurization transient prior to SCRAM is discussed. The CORETRAN results show a slight axial flux redistribution toward the top of the core, while radially a flux redistribution is observed toward core regions with assemblies that are initially moderately voided and where the axial power shape is increasingly top-peaked. The impact of the control rod configuration as well as the assembly coolant inventory dynamics on the 3-D flux redistribution is also discussed. The third part presents results of the Phase 3 calculation using RETRAN-3D, which is a culmination of the analytical work of Phases 1 and 2.

  16. NEWS: A trip to CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, A. D.

    2000-07-01

    the canteen. Over lunch we mixed with physicists of many different nationalities and backgrounds. Figure 1 Figure 1. In the afternoon we visited Microcosm, the CERN visitors centre, and the LEP control room and also the SPS. Here the students learned new applications for much of the physics of standing waves and resonance that they had been taught in the classroom. Later that night, we visited a bowling alley where momentum and collision theory were put into practice. The following morning we returned to CERN and visited the large magnet testing facility. Here again physics was brought to life. We saw superconducting magnets being assembled and tested and the students gained a real appreciation of the problems and principles involved. The afternoon was rounded off by a visit to a science museum in Geneva - well worth a visit, as some of us still use some of the apparatus on display. Friday was our last full day so we visited Chamonix in the northern Alps. In the morning, we ascended the Aiguille de Midi - by cable car. Twenty minutes and 3842 m later we emerged into 50 km h-1 winds and -10 °C temperature, not counting the -10 °C wind chill factor. A crisp packet provided an unusual demonstration of the effects of air pressure (figure 2). Figure 2 Figure 2. The views from the summit were very spectacular though a few people experienced mild altitude sickness. That afternoon the party went to the Mer de Glace. Being inside a 3 million year-old structure moving down a mountain at 3 cm per day was an interesting experience, as was a tot of whisky with 3 million year-old water. Once again the local scenery was very photogenic and the click and whirr of cameras was a constant background noise. Saturday morning saw an early start for the long drive home. Most students - and some staff - took the opportunity to catch up on their sleep. Thanks are due to many people without whom the trip would never have taken place. Anne Craige, Stuart Williams

  17. Driver sleepiness and risk of motor vehicle crash injuries: A population-based case control study in Fiji (TRIP 12)☆

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Josephine; Kafoa, Berlin; Wainiqolo, Iris; Robinson, Elizabeth; McCaig, Eddie; Connor, Jennie; Jackson, Rod; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Published studies investigating the role of driver sleepiness in road crashes in low and middle-income countries have largely focused on heavy vehicles. We investigated the contribution of driver sleepiness to four-wheel motor vehicle crashes in Fiji, a middle-income Pacific Island country. Method The population-based case control study included 131 motor vehicles involved in crashes where at least one person died or was hospitalised (cases) and 752 motor vehicles identified in roadside surveys (controls). An interviewer-administered questionnaire completed by drivers or proxies collected information on potential risks for crashes including sleepiness while driving, and factors that may influence the quantity or quality of sleep. Results Following adjustment for confounders, there was an almost six-fold increase in the odds of injury-involved crashes for vehicles driven by people who were not fully alert or sleepy (OR 5.7, 95%CI: 2.7, 12.3), or those who reported less than 6 h of sleep during the previous 24 h (OR 5.9, 95%CI: 1.7, 20.9). The population attributable risk for crashes associated with driving while not fully alert or sleepy was 34%, and driving after less than 6 h sleep in the previous 24 h was 9%. Driving by people reporting symptoms suggestive of obstructive sleep apnoea was not significantly associated with crash risk. Conclusion Driver sleepiness is an important contributor to injury-involved four-wheel motor vehicle crashes in Fiji, highlighting the need for evidence-based strategies to address this poorly characterised risk factor for car crashes in less resourced settings. PMID:23830198

  18. Control of the saturation temperature in magnetic heating by using polyethylene-glycol-coated rod-shaped nickel-ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Yousaf; Bae, Hongsub; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook

    2016-02-01

    Polyethylene-glycol (PEG)-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles were prepared for magnetic hyperthermia applications by using the co-precipitation method. The PEG coating occurred during the synthesis of the nanoparticles. The coated nanoparticles were rod-shaped with an average length of 16 nm and an average diameter of 4.5 nm, as observed using transmission electron microscopy. The PEG coating on the surfaces of the nanoparticles was confirmed from the Fourier-transform infrared spectra. The nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic characteristics with negligible coercive force. Further, magnetic heating effects were observed in aqueous solutions of the coated nanoparticles. The saturation temperature could be controlled at 42 ℃ by changing the concentration of the nanoparticles in the aqueous solution. Alternately, the saturation temperature could be controlled for a given concentration of nanoparticles by changing the intensity of the magnetic field. The Curie temperature of the nanoparticles was estimated to be 495 ℃. These results for the PEG-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles showed the possibility of utilizing them for controlled magnetic hyperthermia at 42 ℃.

  19. FUEL ROD CLUSTERS

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, A.B.

    1959-08-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods and a tubular casing therefor through which a coolant flows in heat-exchange contact with the fuel rods is described. The fuel rcds are held in the casing by virtue of the compressive force exerted between longitudinal ribs of the fuel rcds and internal ribs of the casing or the internal surfaces thereof.

  20. Giving Students Control over Their Learning; from Self-guided Museum Visits and Field Trips to Using Scanning Technology to Link Content to Earth Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, K. C.; Phipps, M.

    2011-12-01

    While it may seem counterintuitive, sometimes stepping back is one of the more effective pedagogical approaches instructors can make. On museum visits, an instructor's presence fundamentally alters students' experiences and can curtail student learning by limiting questions or discouraging students from exploring their own interests. Students often rely on the instructor and become passive observers, rather than engaged learners. As an alternative to instructor-led visits, self-guided student explorations of museum exhibits proved to be both popular and pedagogically effective. On pre-instruction and post-instruction surveys, these ungraded, self-guided explorations match or exceed the efficacy of traditional graded lab instruction and completely eclipse gains normally achieved by traditional lecture instruction. In addition, these explorations achieve the remarkable goal of integrating undergraduate earth science instruction into students' social lives. Based on the success of the self-guided museum explorations, this fall saw the debut of an attempt to expand this concept to field experiences. A self-guided student field exploration of Saint Anthony Falls focuses on the intersections of geological processes with human history. Students explore the waterfalls' evolution, its early interpretation by 18th and 19th century Dakota and Euro-America societies, and its subsequent social and economic impacts on Upper Midwest societies. Self-guided explorations allow students to explore field settings on their own or with friends and family in a more relaxed manner. At the same time, these explorations give students control over, and responsibility for, their own learning - a powerful pedagogical approach. Student control over their learning is also the goal of an initiative to use scanning technologies, such as linear bar codes, 2D barcodes and radio-frequency identification (RFID), to revolutionize sample identification and study. Scanning technology allows students to

  1. Fellows in the Middle: Fabulous Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Mary Lou

    2008-05-01

    Montclair State University's NSF GK-12 Program focuses on grades 7 and 8 in five urban public school districts in northern New Jersey. Each year four fieldtrips are taken by the students, middle school teachers, and graduate student Fellows. Many interdisciplinary hands-on lessons are written for use before, during and after each trip with this year's theme of Earth history. The Sterling Hill Mine trip evoked lessons on geology, economics, crystal structure, density, and pH. A virtual trip (webcam link) to scientists in the rainforest of Panama prompted critical thinking, categorizing layers and animals, and construction of model food webs. In the field trip to the NJ School of Conservation the students will build model aquifers, measure tree heights, and measure stream flow to compare to their Hackensack River. Finally the students will travel to MSU for a Math/Science Day with research talks, lab tours, hands-on activities, and a poster session. In January 2008 seventeen teachers, Fellows, and grant personnel took a field trip to China to set up collaborations with researchers and schools in Beijing and Xi'an, including the Beijing Ancient Observatory. All field trips are fabulous! Next year (IYA) our theme will be planetary science and will feature field trips to the Newark Museum's Dreyfuss Planetarium, BCC Buehler Challenger & Science Center, and star parties. We look forward to invigorating middle school science and mathematics with exciting astronomy. Funded by NSF #0638708

  2. Development of a cause analysis system for a CPCS trip by using the rule-base deduction method.

    PubMed

    Park, Je-Yun; Koo, In-Soo; Sohn, Chang-Ho; Kim, Jung-Seon; Cho, Gi-Ho; Park, Hee-Seok

    2009-07-01

    A Core Protection Calculator System (CPCS) was developed to initiate a Reactor Trip under the circumstance of certain transients by a Combustion Engineering Company. The major function of the Core Protection Calculator System is to generate contact outputs for the Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) Trip and a Local Power Density (LPD) Trip. But in a Core Protection Calculator System, a trip cause cannot be identified, thus only trip signals are transferred to the Plant Protection System (PPS) and only the trip status is displayed. It could take a considerable amount of time and effort for a plant operator to analyze the trip causes of a Core Protection Calculator System. So, a Cause Analysis System for a Core Protection Calculator System (CASCPCS) has been developed by using the rule-base deduction method to assist operators in a Nuclear Power Plant. CASCPCS consists of three major parts. Inference engine has a role of controlling the searching knowledge base, executing the rules and tracking the inference process by using the depth-first searching method. Knowledge base consists of four major parts: rules, data base constants, trip buffer variables and causes. And a user interface is implemented by using menu-driven and window display techniques. The advantage of CASCPCS is that it saves time and effort to diagnose the trip causes of a Core Protection Calculator System, it increases a plant's availability and reliability, and it makes it easy to manage CASCPCS because of using only a cursor control. PMID:19249777

  3. Rod Photoreceptors Detect Rapid Flicker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, J. D.; MacLeod, Donald I. A.

    1977-01-01

    Rod-isolation techniques show that light-adapted human rods detect flicker frequencies as high as 28 hertz, and that the function relating rod critical flicker frequency to stimulus intensity contains two distinct branches. (MLH)

  4. TRIP-Br1 oncoprotein inhibits autophagy, apoptosis, and necroptosis under nutrient/serum-deprived condition

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jingjing; Lee, Soonduck; Kim, Kyeri; Park, Yeonji; Yang, Young; Kim, Keun-Il; Lim, Jong-Seok; Cheon, Chung-Il; Kang, Young-Sook; Lee, Myeong-Sok

    2015-01-01

    TRIP-Br1 oncogenic protein has been shown to have multiple biological functions in cells. In this study, we demonstrate that TRIP-Br1 functions as an oncoprotein by inhibiting autophagy, apoptosis, and necroptosis of cancer cells and eventually helping them to survive under the nutrient/serum starved condition. TRIP-Br1 expression level was significantly increased in conditions with low levels of nutrients. Nutrient depleted conditions were induced by culturing cancer cells until they were overcrowded with high cell density or in media deprived of glucose, amino acids, or serum. Among them, serum starvation significantly enhanced the expression of TRIP-Br1 only in all tested breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, MDA-MB-231, T47D, MDA-MB-435, Hs578D, BT549, and MDA-MB-435) but not in the three normal cell lines (MCF10A, HfCH8, and NIH3T3). As compared with the control cells, the introduction of TRIP-Br1 silencing siRNA into MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells accelerated cell death by inducing apoptosis and necroptosis. In this process, TRIP-Br1 confers resistance to serum starvation-induced cell deaths by stabilizing the XIAP protein and inhibiting cellular ROS production. Moreover, our data also show that the intracellular increase of TRIP-Br1 protein resulting from serum starvation seems to occur in part through the blockage of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:26334958

  5. A Field Trip with a New Twist!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Eileen B.

    1980-01-01

    In an individualized field trip approach, office procedures students identify an organization in their field of interest and observe an employee on the job to gain insight into job skills and clarify their career goals. (SK)

  6. Ambient and Microenvironmental Particles and Exhaled Nitric Oxide Before and After a Group Bus Trip

    PubMed Central

    Adar, Sara Dubowsky; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Gold, Diane R.; Schwartz, Joel; Coull, Brent A.; Suh, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Airborne particles have been linked to pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation. Because these effects may be particularly great for traffic-related particles, we examined associations between particle exposures and exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) in a study of 44 senior citizens, which involved repeated trips aboard a diesel bus. Methods Samples of FENO collected before and after the trips were regressed against microenvironmental and ambient particle concentrations using mixed models controlling for subject, day, trip, vitamins, collection device, mold, pollen, room air nitric oxide, apparent temperature, and time to analysis. Although ambient concentrations were collected at a fixed location, continuous group-level personal samples characterized microenvironmental exposures throughout facility and trip periods. Results In pre-trip samples, both microenvironmental and ambient exposures to fine particles were positively associated with FENO. For example, an interquartile increase of 4 μg/m3 in the daily microenvironmental PM2.5 concentration was associated with a 13% [95% confidence interval (CI), 2–24%) increase in FENO. After the trips, however, FENO concentrations were associated pre-dominantly with microenvironmental exposures, with significant associations for concentrations measured throughout the whole day. Associations with exposures during the trip also were strong and statistically significant with a 24% (95% CI, 15–34%) increase in FENO predicted per interquartile increase of 9 μg/m3 in PM2.5. Although pre-trip findings were generally robust, our post-trip findings were sensitive to several influential days. Conclusions Fine particle exposures resulted in increased levels of FENO in elderly adults, suggestive of increased airway inflammation. These associations were best assessed by microenvironmental exposure measurements during periods of high personal particle exposures. PMID:17450216

  7. 28 CFR 570.41 - Medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical escorted trips. 570.41 Section... COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.41 Medical escorted trips. (a) Medical escorted trips are intended to provide an inmate with medical treatment not available within the institution. There are two...

  8. Field Trips as Valuable Learning Experiences in Geography Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krakowka, Amy Richmond

    2012-01-01

    Field trips have been acknowledged as valuable learning experiences in geography. This article uses Kolb's (1984) experiential learning model to discuss how students learn and how field trips can help enhance learning. Using Kolb's experiential learning theory as a guide in the design of field trips helps ensure that field trips contribute to…

  9. 28 CFR 570.41 - Medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical escorted trips. 570.41 Section... COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.41 Medical escorted trips. (a) Medical escorted trips are intended to provide an inmate with medical treatment not available within the institution. There are two...

  10. 28 CFR 570.42 - Non-medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Non-medical escorted trips. 570.42... RELEASE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.42 Non-medical escorted trips. (a) Non-medical escorted trips allow an inmate to leave the institution under staff escort for approved, non-medical...

  11. 28 CFR 570.42 - Non-medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Non-medical escorted trips. 570.42... RELEASE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.42 Non-medical escorted trips. (a) Non-medical escorted trips allow an inmate to leave the institution under staff escort for approved, non-medical...

  12. 28 CFR 570.41 - Medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical escorted trips. 570.41 Section... COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.41 Medical escorted trips. (a) Medical escorted trips are intended to provide an inmate with medical treatment not available within the institution. There are two...

  13. Cybertrips in Social Studies. Online Field Trips for All Ages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Scott

    The Internet can take students on virtual field trips to anywhere earth, under the seas, out in space, or back in time. This book demonstrates how teachers can use the Internet to take students on field trips. Composed of two parts, part 1, "Preparing for the Trip," discusses the background of virtual field trips what they are, and why they are…

  14. Ultrasonic Phased Array Assessment of the Interference Fit and Leak Path of the North Anna Unit 2 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzle 63 with Destructive Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Hanson, Brady D.; Mathews, Royce

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasonic testing (UT) for primary water leak path assessments of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) upper head penetrations. Operating reactors have experienced leakage when stress corrosion cracking of nickel-based alloy penetrations allowed primary water into the annulus of the interference fit between the penetration and the low-alloy steel RPV head. In this investigation, UT leak path data were acquired for an Alloy 600 control rod drive mechanism nozzle penetration, referred to as Nozzle 63, which was removed from the North Anna Unit 2 reactor when the RPV head was replaced in 2002. In-service inspection prior to the head replacement indicated that Nozzle 63 had a probable leakage path through the interference fit region. Nozzle 63 was examined using a phased-array UT probe with a 5.0-MHz, eight-element annular array. Immersion data were acquired from the nozzle inner diameter surface. The UT data were interpreted by comparing to responses measured on a mockup penetration with known features. Following acquisition of the UT data, Nozzle 63 was destructively examined to determine if the features identified in the UT examination, including leakage paths and crystalline boric acid deposits, could be visually confirmed. Additional measurements of boric acid deposit thickness and low-alloy steel wastage were made to assess how these factors affect the UT response. The implications of these findings for interpreting UT leak path data are described.

  15. Differential Phosphorylation Provides a Switch to Control How α-Arrestin Rod1 Down-regulates Mating Pheromone Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Alvaro, Christopher G; Aindow, Ann; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are integral membrane proteins that initiate stimulus-dependent activation of cognate heterotrimeric G-proteins, triggering ensuing downstream cellular responses. Tight regulation of GPCR-evoked pathways is required because prolonged stimulation can be detrimental to an organism. Ste2, a GPCR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that mediates response of MATa haploids to the peptide mating pheromone α-factor, is down-regulated by both constitutive and agonist-induced endocytosis. Efficient agonist-stimulated internalization of Ste2 requires its association with an adaptor protein, the α-arrestin Rod1/Art4, which recruits the HECT-domain ubiquitin ligase Rsp5, allowing for ubiquitinylation of the C-terminal tail of the receptor and its engagement by the clathrin-dependent endocytic machinery. We previously showed that dephosphorylation of Rod1 by calcineurin (phosphoprotein phosphatase 2B) is required for optimal Rod1 function in Ste2 down-regulation. We show here that negative regulation of Rod1 by phosphorylation is mediated by two distinct stress-activated protein kinases, Snf1/AMPK and Ypk1/SGK1, and demonstrate both in vitro and in vivo that this phospho-regulation impedes the ability of Rod1 to promote mating pathway desensitization. These studies also revealed that, in the absence of its phosphorylation, Rod1 can promote adaptation independently of Rsp5-mediated receptor ubiquitinylation, consistent with recent evidence that α-arrestins can contribute to cargo recognition by both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent mechanisms. However, in cells lacking a component (formin Bni1) required for clathrin-independent entry, Rod1 derivatives that are largely unphosphorylated and unable to associate with Rsp5 still promote efficient adaptation, indicating a third mechanism by which this α-arrestin promotes desensitization of the pheromone-response pathway. PMID:26920760

  16. Differential Phosphorylation Provides a Switch to Control How α-Arrestin Rod1 Down-regulates Mating Pheromone Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, Christopher G.; Aindow, Ann; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are integral membrane proteins that initiate stimulus-dependent activation of cognate heterotrimeric G-proteins, triggering ensuing downstream cellular responses. Tight regulation of GPCR-evoked pathways is required because prolonged stimulation can be detrimental to an organism. Ste2, a GPCR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that mediates response of MATa haploids to the peptide mating pheromone α-factor, is down-regulated by both constitutive and agonist-induced endocytosis. Efficient agonist-stimulated internalization of Ste2 requires its association with an adaptor protein, the α-arrestin Rod1/Art4, which recruits the HECT-domain ubiquitin ligase Rsp5, allowing for ubiquitinylation of the C-terminal tail of the receptor and its engagement by the clathrin-dependent endocytic machinery. We previously showed that dephosphorylation of Rod1 by calcineurin (phosphoprotein phosphatase 2B) is required for optimal Rod1 function in Ste2 down-regulation. We show here that negative regulation of Rod1 by phosphorylation is mediated by two distinct stress-activated protein kinases, Snf1/AMPK and Ypk1/SGK1, and demonstrate both in vitro and in vivo that this phospho-regulation impedes the ability of Rod1 to promote mating pathway desensitization. These studies also revealed that, in the absence of its phosphorylation, Rod1 can promote adaptation independently of Rsp5-mediated receptor ubiquitinylation, consistent with recent evidence that α-arrestins can contribute to cargo recognition by both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent mechanisms. However, in cells lacking a component (formin Bni1) required for clathrin-independent entry, Rod1 derivatives that are largely unphosphorylated and unable to associate with Rsp5 still promote efficient adaptation, indicating a third mechanism by which this α-arrestin promotes desensitization of the pheromone-response pathway. PMID:26920760

  17. Self-guided field trips for students of environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, G.; Kerr, Roger; Hadgraft, Roger

    2011-05-01

    In many learning institutions around the world, there is a trend towards larger classes, more flexible learning pathways and reduced teaching resources. Experiential learning is often used in the form of site visits or field trips for students studying engineering, natural resource management, geography and similar disciplines. Providing opportunities for students to undertake field trips without the traditional support mechanism is one of the more challenging issues for subject designers. How can large cohorts of students gain practical exposure to various aspects of the natural or built environment? Although this is typically done using traditional site visits and fieldwork with a high staff/student ratio, the goal has been to use action research to design and develop resources to enable small groups (three or four) to make self-guided visits to sites close to campus. Multimedia resources to examine and interpret aspects of the site that relate to their on-campus learning guide the students. One critical issue in the success of these activities has been proper risk assessment and control procedures. The outcome of this research is a framework to provide a safe, active learning experience by way of self-guided field trips that is suitable for implementation with large classes.

  18. Understanding flame rods

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, J.A. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The flame rod is probably the least understood method of flame detection. Although it is not recommended for oilfired equipment, it is very common on atmospheric, or {open_quotes}in-shot,{close_quotes} gas burners. It is also possible, although not common, to have an application with a constant gas pilot, monitored by a flame rod, and maintaining an oil main flame. Regardless of the application, chances are that flame rods will be encountered during the course of servicing. The technician today must be versatile and able to work on many different types of equipment. One must understand the basic principles of flame rods, and how to correct potential problems. The purpose of a flame detection system is two-fold: (1) to prove there is no flame when there shouldn`t be one, and (2) to prove there is a flame when there should be one. Flame failure response time is very important. This is the amount of time it takes to realize there is a loss of flame, two to four seconds is typical today. Prior to flame rods, either bi-metal or thermocouple type flame detectors were common. The response time for these detectors was up to three minutes, seldom less than one minute.

  19. Intramedullary rodding in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Mulpuri, K; Joseph, B

    2000-01-01

    The results of intramedullary rodding of long bones of 16 children with osteogenesis imperfecta, over a 10-year period, were analyzed. Sheffield elongating rods or non-elongating rods were used. The frequency of fractures was dramatically reduced after implantation of either type of rod, and the ambulatory status improved in all instances. The results were significantly better after Sheffield rodding with regard to the frequency of complications requiring reoperations and the longevity of the rods. Migration of the rods, encountered frequently, appears to be related to improper placement of the rods in the bone. It seems likely that if care is taken to ensure precise placement of a rod of appropriate size, several of these complications may be avoided. PMID:10739296

  20. Rod Control Assemblies Wear Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczorowski, Damien; Georges, Jean-Mary; Bec, Sandrine; Vannes, Andre-Bernard; Tonck, Andre; Vernot, Jean-Philippe

    2002-07-01

    In nuclear power plants, slender tubular components are subjected to vibrations in a PHTW environment. As a result, the two contacting surfaces, tubes and their guides undergo impact at low contact pressures. The components are usually made of stainless steel and it was found that the influence of the PHTW, combined with other actions (such as corrosion, erosion, squeeze film effect, third body effect and cavitation) leads to a particular wear of the material. Therefore, this paper aims to show that the colloidal oxides, formed on the steel surfaces in PHTW, play a principal role in the wear of the surfaces. Actually, due to the specific kinematic conditions of the contact, the flow of compacted oxides abrades the surfaces. (authors)

  1. Notes for Brazil sampling frame evaluation trip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, R. (Principal Investigator); Hicks, D. R. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    Field notes describing a trip conducted in Brazil are presented. This trip was conducted for the purpose of evaluating a sample frame developed using LANDSAT full frame images by the USDA Economic and Statistics Service for the eventual purpose of cropland production estimation with LANDSAT by the Foreign Commodity Production Forecasting Project of the AgRISTARS program. Six areas were analyzed on the basis of land use, crop land in corn and soybean, field size and soil type. The analysis indicated generally successful use of LANDSAT images for purposes of remote large area land use stratification.

  2. Field Trips For Children Under Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leipzig, Judith

    1984-01-01

    This article offers suggestions on planning field trip experiences for young children. Rules should be set and enforced, strollers available, and enough care givers present to manage the group. Grocery stores, fire stations, bookstores, and barbershops are some of the places children enjoy. (DF)

  3. Virtual Field Trips through Video Conferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pachnowski, Lynne M.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of videoconferencing for field trips in elementary and secondary education. Discusses how it works, videoconferencing providers, time involved, costs, amount of interactivity, supplemental hands-on material, content standards, technical support, class preparation, and the need for back-up plans in case of technical difficulties.…

  4. 9 Tips for Affordable Student Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The trick to having a successful and affordable trip is planning ahead and planning thoroughly. Keep the spirits high and the costs low by following a well-traveled ensemble director's suggestions as presented in this article. These tips include finding local attractions that are unique to the city that the group will be visiting, looking at…

  5. School Trips: Are They Worth the Effort?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Even the most basic of school trips will require booking places, arranging transport, writing to parents, collecting payments, planning activities, producing worksheets and, of course, endless risk assessments. It always leaves teachers wondering: "is it really worth all this effort?" Robert Johnston believes that every teacher should…

  6. Memorable Experiences of a Science Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Doug

    2000-01-01

    Attempts to learn more about memorable experiences associated with science field trips by conducting a 1-month and an 18-month evaluation of elementary school students who had participated in an environmental science program at a community park in a Midwestern city. Concludes that students' memories were nonspecific and disassociated from…

  7. A Trip to Europe; A Multimedia Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Samuel B., Jr.

    Green Chimneys School, a private school, used its summer session to take an imaginary trip to Europe. In each subject students took part in activities related to travel and European countries. For example, mathematics classes dealt with the monetary system, latitude, longitude, units of measurement, and conversion of money for the countries being…

  8. WIPP site and vicinity geological field trip

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, L.

    1980-10-01

    The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is conducting an assessment of the radiological health risks to people from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). As a part of this work, EEG is making an effort to improve the understanding of those geological issues concerning the WIPP site which may affect the radiological consequences of the proposed repository. One of the important geological issues to be resolved is the timing and the nature of the dissolution processes which may have affected the WIPP site. EEG organized a two-day conference of geological scientists, titled Geotechnical Considerations for Radiological Hazard Assessment of WIPP on January 17-18, 1980. During this conference, it was realized that a field trip to the site would further clarify the different views on the geological processes active at the site. The field trip of June 16-18, 1980 was organized for this purpose. This report provides a summary of the field trip activities along with the participants post field trip comments. Important field stops are briefly described, followed by a more detailed discussion of critical geological issues. The report concludes with EEG's summary and recommendations to the US Department of Energy for further information needed to more adequately resolve concerns for the geologic and hydrologic integrity of the site.

  9. Reconceptualizing Electronic Field Trips: A Deweyian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassady, Jerrell C.; Mullen, Laurie J.

    2006-01-01

    Electronic field tripping is a relatively new form of large-scale distance education that attempts to provide contextually rich learning materials embedded within a coherent educational content base. Using Dewey's (1943) framework for the natural learning impulses of children, we describe the potential pedagogical benefits afforded by electronic…

  10. On the Merits of "Unusual Field Trips."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howarth, Dean E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the organization and completion of a scientific field trip for a group of high school physics students that was organized primarily around a study of the Manhattan Project. The group visited the Trinity site, Los Alamos, several museums, and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array. Contact information for the various…

  11. Class Trips in Cyberspace: No Passports Required.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzberg, Carol S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes examples of electronic field trips for elementary and secondary school students taking place during the 1996-97 school year. Topics include Mayan civilization, wildlife migration, geothermal hot spots, Antarctica, sailboat voyages, baseball and math, viruses, Hong Kong, and offerings from National Geographic. (LRW)

  12. The Educational Value of Field Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jay P.; Kisida, Brian; Bowen, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The school field trip has a long history in American public education. For decades, students have piled into yellow buses to visit a variety of cultural institutions, including art, natural history, and science museums, as well as theaters, zoos, and historical sites. Schools gladly endured the expense and disruption of providing field trips…

  13. Guidebook for Field Trips in Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exline, Joseph D., Ed.

    Presented is geological information and site descriptions for teachers to use in planning and conducting earth science field trips in Virginia. Among the topics included are: (1) Geology, Soils and Land Use in Central Virginia; (2) Using Coastal Plain Stratigraphy Near Fredericksburg, Virginia as a Teaching Tool; and (3) The Culpepper Basin of the…

  14. Field Trip to a Rocky Shore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Univ., Orono. Cooperative Extension Service.

    Field trip activities designed for use on Maine's coast are provided, with brief definitions of the major physical zones to be found in this area. An introduction to the study of zonation of plants and animals living on the rocky shore is presented along with a list of the materials needed and the procedures to be followed when making a study of…

  15. Trip Leaders Guide. Outdoor Expeditions and Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leister, Bob

    Written to help teachers or leaders plan and lead field trips, excursions, or expeditions which stimulate a motivation to positive action, this pamphlet provides assistance in conducting learning experiences outside the classroom. Topics and subtopics discussed include: (1) Campsites: selection; firebuilding; knives, axes, saws; neat campsites;…

  16. Anchor for Fiberglas Guy Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Solution to problem of anchoring fiberglas guy rods to install nut with threads on outer circumference, followed by aluminum sleeve. Sleeve has opening oval at upper and round at bottom end. End of rod is split so fiberglas wedge can be inserted to form V-shaped end. Spread end of rod fits into tapered hole in sleeve and threaded aluminum coupling is put over rod and sleeve.

  17. Ordering stripe structures of nanoscale rods in diblock copolymer scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2002-05-01

    We report a simulation on the formation of ordered stripe structures of nanoscale rods driven by symmetric diblock copolymer melts. Due to the preferential adsorption of one species of the diblock onto the mobile rods, the phase ordering process will couple with the movement of rods. We find that the self-assembly of rods on the copolymer scaffold produces the highly ordered nanowires of rods, and copolymer blends in turn form the well-oriented lamellar structure. This is due to the interplay among the micro-phase separating dynamics in the diblock copolymer, the wetting interaction between rods and diblock copolymer, and the nematic ordering dynamics of rods. We examine the influence of the domain size, the wetting strength, and the rod number density on the formation of such a nanoscale structure. Additionally, we indicate that the orientation of the pattern can be well controlled by external fields acting on the rods. The results suggest that our model system may provide a novel and simple way to control and design the ordering nanowire structure.

  18. Biomechanical study comparing a new combined rod-plate system with conventional dual-rod and plate systems.

    PubMed

    Sha, Mo; Ding, Zheng-Qi; Ting, Hu S; Kang, Liang-Qi; Zhai, Wen-Liang; Liu, Hui

    2013-02-01

    Most anterior spinal instrumentation systems are designed as either a plate or dual-rod system and have corresponding limitations. Dual-rod designs may offer greater adjustability; however, this system also maintains a high profile and lacks a locking design. Plate systems are designed to be stiffer, but the fixed configuration is not adaptable to the variety of vertebral body shapes. The authors designed a new combined rod-plate system (D-rod) to overcome these limitations and compared its biomechanical performance with the conventional dual-rod and plate system. Eighteen pig spinal specimens were divided into 3 groups (6 per group). An L1 corpectomy was performed and fixed with the D-rod (group A; n=6), Z-plate (Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee) (group B; n=6), or Ventrofix (Synthes, Paoli, Pennsylvania) (group C; n=6) system. T13-L2 range of motion was measured with a 6 degrees of freedom (ie, flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation) spine simulator under pure moments of 6.0 Nm. The D-rod and Ventrofix specimens were significantly stiffer than the Z-plate specimens (P<.05) based on results obtained from lateral bending and flexion-extension tests. The D-rod and Z-plate specimens were significantly stiffer than the Ventrofix specimens (P<.05) in axial rotation. The D-rod combines the advantages of the plate and dual-rod systems, where the anterior rod exhibits the design of a low-profile locking plate, enhanced stability, and decreased interference of the surrounding vasculature. The posterior rods function in compression and distraction, and the dual-rod system offers greater adjustability and control over screw placement. The results indicate that it may provide adequate stability for anterior thoracolumbar reconstruction. PMID:23383624

  19. Analysis of the in-vessel control rod guide tube and subpile room shielding design for the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Bucholz, J.A.; Engle, W.W. Jr.; Williams, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    An extensive sheilding analysis of the control rod guide tube (CRGT) and the subpile room was performed for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. A two-dimensional model for the CRGT and subpile room was developed. Coupled 39 neutron group and 44 gamma group calculations with the multigroup DORT discrete originates transport code were done using cross sections from the ANSL-V library including photoneutron production. Different shield designs were investigated with a shield thickness of 10 to 15 mm. None of the shields affected the neutron dose rate and gamma dose rate at the top of the subpile room, which were 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 5} mrem/h and 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 3} mrem/h, respectively. An L-shaped cylindrical boral shield positioned around the core pressure boundary tube at the bottom of the reflector vessel with the horizontal part extended over the whole bottom of the reflector vessel reduced the maximal displacements per atom (DPA) level and helium production level in the primary coolant supply adapter and its flange after 40 years of reactor operation from 1 and 500 appm to 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -2} and 2 {center_dot} 10{sup -2} appm compared with the unshielded arrangement. Shields of boral and hafnium with the horizontal part of the shield restricted to a radius of 485 mm gave a maximal DPA of 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -2} and a helium production of up to 20 appm. Heat loads of up to 70 W{center_dot}cm{sup -3} were calculated at the most exposed parts of the shield both for boral and hafnium shields. A depletion/activation analysis of the hafnium shield showed that at the most exposed part of the shield, the naturally occurring isotope {sup 177}Hf is 34% depleted at the end of two years of reactor operation. This high burnup is somewhat balanced by a subsequent buildup of {sup 178}Hf, {sup 179}Hf, and {sup 180}Hf. In all other parts of the shield, the burnup is much smaller.

  20. Crystal phase-controlled synthesis of rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals for in vivo imaging in the near-infrared wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Tatsuya; Ishigami, Yujiro; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Shimada, Taisuke; Baba, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu; Torimoto, Tsukasa

    2016-03-01

    Rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals (NCs) exhibiting intense near-band edge photoluminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelength region, were successfully prepared by the thermal reaction of metal acetates and Te precursors in 1-dodecanethiol. Increasing the reaction temperature resulted in the formation of larger AgInTe2 NCs with crystal structures varying from hexagonal to tetragonal at reaction temperatures of 280 °C or higher. The energy gap was increased from 1.13 to 1.20 eV with a decrease in rod width from 8.3 to 5.6 nm, accompanied by a blue shift in the photoluminescence (PL) peak wavelength from 1097 to 1033 nm. The optimal PL quantum yield was approximately 18% for AgInTe2 NCs with rod widths of 5.6 nm. The applicability of AgInTe2 NCs as a NIR-emitting material for in vivo biological imaging was examined by injecting AgInTe2 NC-incorporated liposomes into the back of a C57BL/6 mouse, followed by in vivo photoluminescence imaging in the NIR region.Rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals (NCs) exhibiting intense near-band edge photoluminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelength region, were successfully prepared by the thermal reaction of metal acetates and Te precursors in 1-dodecanethiol. Increasing the reaction temperature resulted in the formation of larger AgInTe2 NCs with crystal structures varying from hexagonal to tetragonal at reaction temperatures of 280 °C or higher. The energy gap was increased from 1.13 to 1.20 eV with a decrease in rod width from 8.3 to 5.6 nm, accompanied by a blue shift in the photoluminescence (PL) peak wavelength from 1097 to 1033 nm. The optimal PL quantum yield was approximately 18% for AgInTe2 NCs with rod widths of 5.6 nm. The applicability of AgInTe2 NCs as a NIR-emitting material for in vivo biological imaging was examined by injecting AgInTe2 NC-incorporated liposomes into the back of a C57BL/6 mouse, followed by in vivo photoluminescence imaging in the NIR region. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  1. Mars rapid round trip mission design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzi Amade', Nicola

    The present research is divided in two parts. The first part is a well defined mathematical problem, with exact rules and results, in which the basic constraints for interplanetary round trip travels are used to calculate an interplanetary train schedule (ITS) of missions to Mars, in the general case of orbits with non-zero eccentricity and non-zero inclination. Several possible options for round trip travels to Mars are considered. In particular, options at high energy, which allow rapid round trip missions, are discussed. These options have important applications for human travels to Mars. The second part of the research is about systems engineering aspects, which are intrinsically less exact, since they can change with time due, for example, to technology development or economic and political factors. For the case of a selected human rapid round trip mission to Mars, the development of a mission architecture, an assessment of the masses involved in the mission (such as the initial masses required in LEO), an estimate of the necessary number of launches, and a preliminary analysis of the radiation protection requirements, are performed. The main problem that justifies the existence of basic constraints for round trip missions is that by increasing the DeltaV of a mission, in general the total round trip time does not vary much, because a higher DeltaV can only reduce the transfer time and it simply increases the stay-time on the target planet. However, if the DeltaV is increased beyond a well-defined level, the total round trip time has a sudden drop in duration that makes fast round trips possible. This is due to the fact that the traveler can go back before the home planet makes one extra revolution around the Sun. For a sufficiently high DeltaV, a round trip to Mars can change in duration from 2.7 years to about 5 months. For Mars missions, the round trip times are calculated for different DeltaV's and for different transfer trajectories (T1, T2, etc.). An

  2. 28 CFR 570.42 - Non-medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., father, brother, sister, spouse, children, step-parents, and foster parents. (2) Non-emergency, non... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Non-medical escorted trips. 570.42... RELEASE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.42 Non-medical escorted trips. (a) Non-medical...

  3. Geography via Aerial Field Trips: Do It This Way, 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richason, Benjamin F., Jr.; Guell, Carl E.

    To provide guidance for geography teachers, this booklet presents information on how to plan and execute aerial field trips. The aerial field trip can be employed as an effective visual aid technique in the teaching of geography, especially for presenting earth generalizations and interrelationships. The benefits of an aerial field trip are…

  4. A Trip to the Zoo: Children's Words and Photographs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMarie, Darlene

    Field trips are a regular part of many programs for young children. Field trips can serve a variety of purposes, such as exposing children to new things or helping children to see familiar things in new ways. The purpose of this study was to learn the meaning children gave to a field trip. Cameras were made available to each of the children in a…

  5. Probabilistic methods in a study of trip setpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Kaulitz, D. E.

    2012-07-01

    Most early vintage Boiling Water Reactors have a high head and high capacity High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) pump to keep the core covered following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). However, the protection afforded by the HPCI pump for mitigating a LOCA introduces the potential that a spurious start of the HPCI pump could oversupply the reactor vessel and lead to an automatic trip of the main turbine due to high water level. A turbine trip and associated increase in moderator density could challenge the bases of fuel integrity operating limits. To prevent turbine trip during spurious operation of the HPCI pump, the reactor protection system includes instrumentation and logic to sense high water level and automatically trip the HPCI pump prior to reaching the turbine trip setpoint. This paper describes an analysis that was performed to determine if existing reactor vessel water level trip instrumentation, logic and setpoints result in a high probability that the HPCI pump will trip prior to actuation of the turbine trip. Using nominal values for the initial water level and for the HPCI pump and turbine trip setpoints, and using the probability distribution functions for measurement uncertainty in these setpoints, a Monte Carlo simulation was employed to determine probabilities of successfully tripping the HPCI pump prior to tripping of the turbine. The results of the analysis established that the existing setpoints, instrumentation and logic would be expected to reliably prevent a trip of the main turbine. (authors)

  6. Teachers' Sources of Knowledge for Field Trip Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebar, Bryan M.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers draw from many personal and professional experiences when organising and leading field trips. In order to identify the influences on teachers' field trip practices, I used surveys, interviews, artifacts and observations gathered from teachers who led trips to an aquarium. Findings clarified the types of influence and the impact that these…

  7. A Field Trip Planning Guide for Early Childhood Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sylvia S.; Seevers, Randy L.

    2003-01-01

    This article provides a guide for planning field trips for educational engagement of all children in early childhood education settings. Based on interviews, environmental assessments, and evaluations of activities, it includes field trip considerations and a field trip planning guide that includes the teacher, the parents, and the field site…

  8. Revisiting Virtual Field Trips: Perspectives of College Science Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    Field trips are an important component of upper undergraduate and graduate-level science courses, especially in the fields of biology, geoscience, and environmental science. Field trips can provide a new perspective to a course's content and quality. Science field trips can facilitate active student learning, yet often can be constrained by time,…

  9. Improvement in Jc performance below liquid nitrogen temperature for SmBa2Cu3Oy superconducting films with BaHfO3 nano-rods controlled by low-temperature growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, S.; Yoshida, Y.; Ichino, Y.; Xu, Q.; Matsumoto, K.; Ichinose, A.; Awaji, S.

    2016-01-01

    For use in high-magnetic-field coil-based applications, the critical current density (Jc) of REBa2Cu3Oy (REBCO, where RE = rare earth) coated conductors must be isotropically improved, with respect to the direction of the magnetic field; these improvements must be realized at the operating conditions of these applications. In this study, improvement of the Jc for various applied directions of magnetic field was achieved by controlling the morphology of the BaHfO3 (BHO) nano-rods in a SmBCO film. We fabricated the 3.0 vol. % BHO-doped SmBCO film at a low growth temperature of 720 °C, by using a seed layer technique (Ts = 720 °C film). The low-temperature growth resulted in a morphological change in the BHO nano-rods. In fact, a high number density of (3.1 ± 0.1) × 103 μm-2 of small (diameter: 4 ± 1 nm), discontinuous nano-rods that grew in various directions, was obtained. In Jc measurements, the Jc of the Ts = 720 °C film in all directions of the applied magnetic field was higher than that of the non-doped SmBCO film. The Jcmin (6.4 MA/cm2) of the former was more than 6 times higher than that (1.0 MA/cm2) of the latter at 40 K, under 3 T. The aforementioned results indicated that the discontinuous BHO nano-rods, which occurred with a high number density, exerted a 3D-like flux pinning at the measurement conditions considered. Moreover, at 4.2 K and under 17 T, a flux pinning force density of 1.6 TN/m3 was realized; this value was comparable to the highest value recorded, to date.

  10. Crystal phase-controlled synthesis of rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals for in vivo imaging in the near-infrared wavelength region.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Tatsuya; Ishigami, Yujiro; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Shimada, Taisuke; Baba, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu; Torimoto, Tsukasa

    2016-03-01

    Rod-shaped AgInTe2 nanocrystals (NCs) exhibiting intense near-band edge photoluminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelength region, were successfully prepared by the thermal reaction of metal acetates and Te precursors in 1-dodecanethiol. Increasing the reaction temperature resulted in the formation of larger AgInTe2 NCs with crystal structures varying from hexagonal to tetragonal at reaction temperatures of 280 °C or higher. The energy gap was increased from 1.13 to 1.20 eV with a decrease in rod width from 8.3 to 5.6 nm, accompanied by a blue shift in the photoluminescence (PL) peak wavelength from 1097 to 1033 nm. The optimal PL quantum yield was approximately 18% for AgInTe2 NCs with rod widths of 5.6 nm. The applicability of AgInTe2 NCs as a NIR-emitting material for in vivo biological imaging was examined by injecting AgInTe2 NC-incorporated liposomes into the back of a C57BL/6 mouse, followed by in vivo photoluminescence imaging in the NIR region. PMID:26899620

  11. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Mohammad K; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M

    2014-10-14

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  12. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Mohammad K.; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  13. Locked-wrap fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Samuel; Chertock, Alan J.; Punches, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for spacing fast reactor fuel rods using a wire wrapper improved by orienting the wire-wrapped fuel rods in a unique manner which introduces desirable performance characteristics not attainable by previous wire-wrapped designs. Use of this method in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor results in: (a) improved mechanical performance, (b) improved rod-to-rod contact, (c) reduced steel volume, and (d) improved thermal-hydraulic performance. The method produces a "locked wrap" design which tends to lock the rods together at each of the wire cluster locations.

  14. Using Virtual Field Trips to Connect Students with University Scientists: Core Elements and Evaluation of zipTrips[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedokun, Omolola A.; Hetzel, Kristin; Parker, Loran Carleton; Loizzo, Jamie; Burgess, Wilella D.; Robinson, J. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Physical field trips to scientists' work places have been shown to enhance student perceptions of science, scientists and science careers. Although virtual field trips (VFTs) have emerged as viable alternatives (or supplements) to traditional physical fieldtrips, little is known about the potential of virtual field trips to provide the same or…

  15. APPARATUS FOR SHEATHING RODS

    DOEpatents

    Ford, W.K.; Wyatt, M.; Plail, S.

    1961-08-01

    An arrangement is described for sealing a solid body of nuclear fuel, such as a uranium metal rod, into a closelyfitting thin metallic sheath with an internal atmosphere of inert gas. The sheathing process consists of subjecting the sheath, loaded with the nuclear fuel body, to the sequential operations of evacuation, gas-filling, drawing (to entrap inert gas and secure close contact between sheath and body), and sealing. (AEC)

  16. Vortices in vibrated granular rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neicu, Toni; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2002-03-01

    We report the first experimental observation of vortex patterns in granular rods inside a container that is vibrated vertically . The experiments were carried out with an anodized aluminum circular container which is rigidly attached to an electromagnetic shaker and the patterns are imaged using a high-frame rate digital camera. At low rod numbers and driving amplitudes, the rods are observed to lie horizontally. Above a critical number or packing fraction of rods, moving domains of vertical rods are spontaneously observed to form which coexist with horizontal rods. These small domains of vertical rods coarsen over time to form a few large vortices. The size of the vortices increases with the number of rods. We are able to track the ends of the vertical rods and obtain the velocity fields of the vortices. The mean azimuthal velocity as a function of distance from the center of the vortex is obtained as a function of the packing fraction. We will report the phase diagram of the various patterns observed as function of number of rods and driving amplitude. The mechanism for the formation and motion of the domains of vertical rods will be also discussed.

  17. The evaluation of corrosion resistant rod end rolling element bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Braza, J.F.; Giuntoli, K.; Imundo, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    Recent developments on carburizing grades of stainless steels have provided new materials to produce corrosion resistant airframe control bearings. This paper presents the application of one of these new carburizing grades of stainless steel to rod end ball bearings. The outer ring of the rod end bearing is made out of carburized stainless steel, while the inner ring and balls are made out of through-hardened stainless steel. The stainless steel rod end bearings were evaluated according to various ASTM and Military specifications for performance and corrosion resistance. The stainless steel rod end bearings exceeded the performance requirements of standard rod end bearings (which are comprised of a carburized 8620 steel outer ring and 52100 steel inner ring and balls) in accordance with MIL-B-6039. The rod end bearings were evaluated in the radial fracture load, axial fracture load, and radial dynamic load tests. Also, salt spray and alternate immersion corrosion tests (ASTM B 117-85 and G 44-88, respectively) were conducted on the stainless steel rod end bearings. The stainless steel rod end bearings exhibited superior corrosion resistance to the standard 8620/52100 steel rod end bearings.

  18. Rod internal pressure quantification and distribution analysis using Frapcon

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, Ryan N; Jessee, Matthew Anderson; Wieselquist, William A

    2015-09-01

    This report documents work performed supporting the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) under work breakdown structure element 1.02.08.10, ST Analysis. In particular, this report fulfills the M4 milestone M4FT- 15OR0810036, Quantify effects of power uncertainty on fuel assembly characteristics, within work package FT-15OR081003 ST Analysis-ORNL. This research was also supported by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (http://www.casl.gov), an Energy Innovation Hub (http://www.energy.gov/hubs) for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. The discharge rod internal pressure (RIP) and cladding hoop stress (CHS) distributions are quantified for Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 1 (WBN1) fuel rods by modeling core cycle design data, operation data (including modeling significant trips and downpowers), and as-built fuel enrichments and densities of each fuel rod in FRAPCON-3.5. A methodology is developed which tracks inter-cycle assembly movements and assembly batch fabrication information to build individual FRAPCON inputs for each evaluated WBN1 fuel rod. An alternate model for the amount of helium released from the zirconium diboride (ZrB2) integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) layer is derived and applied to FRAPCON output data to quantify the RIP and CHS for these types of fuel rods. SCALE/Polaris is used to quantify fuel rodspecific spectral quantities and the amount of gaseous fission products produced in the fuel for use in FRAPCON inputs. Fuel rods with ZrB2 IFBA layers (i.e., IFBA rods) are determined to have RIP predictions that are elevated when compared to fuel rod without IFBA layers (i.e., standard rods) despite the fact that IFBA rods often have reduced fill pressures and annular fuel pellets. The primary contributor to elevated RIP predictions at burnups less than and greater than 30 GWd

  19. Flexible growing rods: a pilot study to determine if polymer rod constructs may provide stability to skeletally immature spines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical treatments for early onset scoliosis (EOS), including growing rod constructs, involve many complications. Some are due to biomechanical factors. A construct that is more flexible than current instrumentation systems may reduce complications. The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine spine range of motion (ROM) after implantation of simulated growing rod constructs with a range of clinically relevant structural properties. The hypothesis was that ROM of spines instrumented with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods would be greater than metal rods and lower than noninstrumented controls. Further, adjacent segment motion was expected to be lower with polymer rods compared to conventional systems. Methods Biomechanical tests were conducted on 6 skeletally immature porcine thoracic spines (domestic swine, 35-40 kg). Spines were harvested after death from swine that had been utilized for other studies (IACUC approved) which had not involved the spine. Paired pedicle screws were used as anchors at proximal and distal levels. Specimens were tested under the following conditions: control, then dual rods of PEEK (6.25 mm), titanium (4 mm), and CoCr (5 mm) alloy. Lateral bending (LB) and flexion-extension (FE) moments of ±5 Nm were applied. Vertebral rotations were measured using video. Differences were determined by two-tailed t-tests and Bonferroni correction with four primary comparisons: PEEK vs control and PEEK vs CoCr, in LB and FE (α=0.05/4). Results In LB, ROM of specimens with PEEK rods was lower than control at each instrumented level. ROM was greater for PEEK rods than both Ti and CoCr at every instrumented level. Mean ROM at proximal and distal noninstrumented levels was lower for PEEK than for Ti and CoCr. In FE, mean ROM at proximal and distal noninstrumented levels was lower for PEEK than for metal. Combining treated levels, in LB, ROM for PEEK rods was 35% of control (p<0.0001) and 270% of CoCr rods (p<0.01). In FE, ROM with PEEK

  20. TRIPS-plus and access to medicines in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Nie, Xiaoyan; Yao, Peng; Shi, Luwen

    2013-05-01

    Ample evidence shows that Trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights (TRIPS)-plus provisions have seriously affected access to and availability of drugs in the developing countries. In recent years, developed countries have pressured many developing countries to implement TRIPS with stronger intellectual property (IP) protection than required by the TRIPS Agreement. The stronger provisions are called TRIPS-Plus provisions. This article focuses on IP and the health implications of limited access to medicines in China, explores the TRIPS-plus arrangements in Chinese IP laws and regulations, and makes suggestions for China's negotiation strategy in resisting pressure from developed countries to tighten IP laws and regulations. PMID:23552834

  1. Obtaining a TRIP microstructure by thermomechanical treatment without isothermal holding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masek, B.; Jirkova, H.; Kucerova, L.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2016-03-01

    The contemporary development of technological processes for the production of modern multiphase steels can be characterized by the need for precise control of their technological parameters. The design of modern technological processes that allow sophisticated microstructures to be obtained usually cannot be carried out on real production equipment for technical as well as economical reasons. Therefore, new processes and test devices are continuously being developed to make it possible to simulate and model thermomechanical treatments on small specimens with precise control and monitoring of process parameters. A simulator for experimental modelling of thermomechanical processes has been developed at the University of West Bohemia. In this paper, to demonstrate the feasibility of simulating thermomechanical treatments with this setup on a lab scale, we discuss the thermomechanical treatment of TRIP steels without isothermal holding - a processing route that is difficult to handle and thus poses several technological as well as economic problems. The realistic processing of wire rolling with different cooling strategies is tested on the TRIP CMnSiNb steel. Our results show that the processing route without isothermal holding allows to obtain multiphase microstructures with a tensile strength of up to 835 MPa and a ductility A5mm = 25%.

  2. The Return Trip Is Felt Shorter Only Postdictively: A Psychophysiological Study of the Return Trip Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Ryosuke; Fujii, Keisuke; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    The return trip often seems shorter than the outward trip even when the distance and actual time are identical. To date, studies on the return trip effect have failed to confirm its existence in a situation that is ecologically valid in terms of environment and duration. In addition, physiological influences as part of fundamental timing mechanisms in daily activities have not been investigated in the time perception literature. The present study compared round-trip and non-round-trip conditions in an ecological situation. Time estimation in real time and postdictive estimation were used to clarify the situations where the return trip effect occurs. Autonomic nervous system activity was evaluated from the electrocardiogram using the Lorenz plot to demonstrate the relationship between time perception and physiological indices. The results suggest that the return trip effect is caused only postdictively. Electrocardiographic analysis revealed that the two experimental conditions induced different responses in the autonomic nervous system, particularly in sympathetic nervous function, and that parasympathetic function correlated with postdictive timing. To account for the main findings, the discrepancy between the two time estimates is discussed in the light of timing strategies, i.e., prospective and retrospective timing, which reflect different emphasis on attention and memory processes. Also each timing method, i.e., the verbal estimation, production or comparative judgment, has different characteristics such as the quantification of duration in time units or knowledge of the target duration, which may be responsible for the discrepancy. The relationship between postdictive time estimation and the parasympathetic nervous system is also discussed. PMID:26061138

  3. Field trips along the Geological Transpyrenean Road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgio, Marion; Dekeyser, Dominique; Richert, Jean Paul; Gruneisen, Pierre; Vazquez-Prada, Diego; Lacazedieu, Annie

    2015-04-01

    GeolVal association, www.geolval.fr , in collaboration with Geoambiente association, created a serie of pedagogical explanations about Pyrenees landscapes along the road from France to Spain, linking the towns of Pau, Oloron,Jaca and Mallos de Riglos. It was a ten years work that lasted in 2008. http://www.routetranspyreneenne.com/home_f.php We can now use this "treasure" with tourists, students and mix some landscapes explanations from a road site with a little field trip along mountain in order to "touch" the rocks. We are working about the importance of field in the way the students understand geosciences and try to organize field trips that aim to simplify and make concrete some key concepts. We also began an interactive software version of this work, presented through a pilot application, made in collaboration with Total petroleum firm.

  4. Scrutinized: The TRIPS Agreement and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Subhan, Junaid

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY The World Trade Organization’s (WTO’s) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) of 1994 seeks to implement a uniform set of intellectual property protection across member nations to provide greater stability in international economic relations. Critics argue that the TRIPS agreement provides unnecessarily strong protection of intellectual property rights which serves to prevent the ill in developing nations from having access to affordable essential medications. The first recommendation that this paper makes is to provide two sets of intellectual property protection, one that applies to essential medications such as AIDS drugs and certain antibiotics and another that applies to drugs that treat non-life threatening conditions. The second recommendation builds upon the first recommendation: if two sets of intellectual property protection legislation are enacted, patents on essential medications should be restricted to patents on processes rather than the product itself. The third recommendation seeks to amend the language of the TRIPS agreement to make it obligatory for member nations to implement provisions on compulsory licensing within their domestic legislation. PMID:18523624

  5. Fast round-trip Mars trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Sam

    1990-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of limiting the overall duration or else the one-way flight time of a round trip to Mars, as reflected in the sum of impulsive velocity increments required of the spacecraft propulsion system. Ignition-to-burnout mass ratios for a hypothetical single stage spacecraft, obtained from the rocket equation by combining these delta-V sums with appropriate values of specific impulse, are used to evaluate the relative effectiveness of four high-thrust propulsion alternatives. If the flight crew goes to the surface of Mars and stays there for the duration of their stopover, it is much cheaper (in terms of delta-V) to minimize their zero-g exposure by limiting the interplanetary transit time of a conjunction-class mission (round trip time = 800-1000 days, Mars stopover = 450-700 days) than to impose the same limit on an opposition-class mission (round trip time less than 600 days, stopover = 40 days). Using solid-core nuclear thermal propulsion to fly a conjunction-class mission, for a moderate mass penalty the interplanetary transit time (each way) probably could be limited to something in the range of 4 to 6 months, depending on the launch year.

  6. Scrutinized: the TRIPS agreement and public health.

    PubMed

    Subhan, Junaid

    2006-07-01

    The World Trade Organization's (WTO's) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) of 1994 seeks to implement a uniform set of intellectual property protection across member nations to provide greater stability in international economic relations. Critics argue that the TRIPS agreement provides unnecessarily strong protection of intellectual property rights which serves to prevent the ill in developing nations from having access to affordable essential medications. The first recommendation that this paper makes is to provide two sets of intellectual property protection, one that applies to essential medications such as AIDS drugs and certain antibiotics and another that applies to drugs that treat non-life threatening conditions. The second recommendation builds upon the first recommendation: if two sets of intellectual property protection legislation are enacted, patents on essential medications should be restricted to patents on processes rather than the product itself. The third recommendation seeks to amend the language of the TRIPS agreement to make it obligatory for member nations to implement provisions on compulsory licensing within their domestic legislation. PMID:18523624

  7. Bond of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) rods to concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Zahrani, M.M.; Nanni, A.; Al-Dulaijan, S.U.; Bakis, C.E.

    1996-11-01

    The bond behavior between FRP rods and concrete is one of the most important aspects to predicting the short- and long-term performance of FRP reinforced concrete structures including development and transfer length. In this research, the direct pull-out test was used to study the FRP/concrete bond behavior. This method allows measurement of the loaded- and free-end slip of the FRP rod and placement of a strain probe inside the rod to measure internal strain distribution in both axial and radial directions along the bonded length without affecting the FRP/concrete interface. Knowledge of strain distribution is necessary to study the load transfer mechanism between FRP rod and concrete. The scope of this paper include experimental results obtained with the direct pull-out test using 12.7 mm glass and carbon FRP rods with smooth and axisymmetrical deformed surfaces. The typical results are given as nominal bond and shear stress vs. free- and loaded-end slip. Experimental results obtained from strain probes used during pull-out tests are also presented as nominal bond and shear stress vs. strain. For smooth rods, friction is the main controlling factor. For deformed rods, bond tends to be controlled by strength and mechanical action of the axisymmetrical deformations rather than adhesion and friction. The strength of concrete appears to have no effect on the bond strength and failure mechanism of these particular machined FRP rods when concrete splitting is avoided.

  8. Comparing Single Versus Double Screw-Rod Anterior Instrumentation for Treating Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures with Incomplete Neurological Deficit: A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu; Wang, Juan; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Following a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TCBF), anterior screw-rods apply pressure upon the graft site. However, there is limited evidence comparing single screw-rod anterior instrumentation (SSRAI) to double screw-rod anterior instrumentation (DSRAI) for TCBFs. Our objective was to compare SSRAI versus DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 51 participants with T11-L2 TCBFs (AO classification: A3) were randomly assigned to receive SSRAI or DSRAI. Key preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative data were collected. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine the independent factors associated with inferior clinical outcomes, as well as the comparative efficacy of SSRAI and DSRAI. RESULTS There were no significant differences in the key demographic and clinical characteristics between the two groups (all p>0.05). Smoking status was significantly associated with inferior three-month and six-month Denis pain scores (Wald statistic=4.246, p=0.039). Both SSRAI and DSRAI were significantly effective in improving three-month and six-month postoperative degree of kyphosis, three-month and six-month postoperative ASIA impairment scale scores, three-month and six-month postoperative Denis pain score, and three-month and six-month postoperative Denis work score (all p<0.001). Although there were no significant differences between DSRAI and SSRAI with respect to all outcomes (all p>0.05), DSRAI displayed significantly longer operating times, as well as significantly larger operative blood losses (both p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS SSRAI may be preferable over DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit due to its lower operating time and amount of operative blood loss. PMID:27197020

  9. Comparing Single Versus Double Screw-Rod Anterior Instrumentation for Treating Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures with Incomplete Neurological Deficit: A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yu; Wang, Juan; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TCBF), anterior screw-rods apply pressure upon the graft site. However, there is limited evidence comparing single screw-rod anterior instrumentation (SSRAI) to double screw-rod anterior instrumentation (DSRAI) for TCBFs. Our objective was to compare SSRAI versus DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit. Material/Methods A total of 51 participants with T11-L2 TCBFs (AO classification: A3) were randomly assigned to receive SSRAI or DSRAI. Key preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative data were collected. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine the independent factors associated with inferior clinical outcomes, as well as the comparative efficacy of SSRAI and DSRAI. Results There were no significant differences in the key demographic and clinical characteristics between the two groups (all p>0.05). Smoking status was significantly associated with inferior three-month and six-month Denis pain scores (Wald statistic=4.246, p=0.039). Both SSRAI and DSRAI were significantly effective in improving three-month and six-month postoperative degree of kyphosis, three-month and six-month postoperative ASIA impairment scale scores, three-month and six-month postoperative Denis pain score, and three-month and six-month postoperative Denis work score (all p<0.001). Although there were no significant differences between DSRAI and SSRAI with respect to all outcomes (all p>0.05), DSRAI displayed significantly longer operating times, as well as significantly larger operative blood losses (both p<0.001). Conclusions SSRAI may be preferable over DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit due to its lower operating time and amount of operative blood loss. PMID:27197020

  10. Pin Wire Coating Trip Report

    SciTech Connect

    Spellman, G P

    2004-03-18

    A meeting to discuss the current pin wire coating problems was held at the Reynolds plant in Los Angeles on 2MAR04. The attendance list for Reynolds personnel is attached. there was an initial presentation which gave a brief history and the current status of pin wire coating at Reynolds. There was a presentation by Lori Primus on the requirements and issues for the coating. There was a presentation by Jim Smith of LANL on the chemistry and to some extent process development done to date. There was a long session covering what steps should be taken in the short term and, to a lesser extent, the long term. The coating currently being used is a blend of two polymers, polyethersulfone and polyparabanic acid (PPA) and some TiO2 filler. This system was accepted and put into production when the pin wire coating was outsourced to another company in 1974. When that company no longer was interested, the wire coating was brought in-house to Reynolds. At that time polyparabanic acid was actually a commercial product available from Exxon under the trade name Tradlon. However, it appears that the material used at Reynolds was synthesized locally. Also, it appears that a single large batch was synthesized in that time period and used up to 1997 when the supply ran out. The reason for the inclusion of TiO2 is not known although it does act as a rheological thickener. However, a more controlled thickening can be obtained with materials such as fumed silica. This material would have less likelihood of causing point imperfections in the coatings. Also, the mixing technique being used for all stages of the process is a relatively low shear ball mill process and the author recommends a high shear process such as a three roll paint mill, at least for the final mixing. Since solvent is added to the powder at Reynolds, it may be that they need to have the paint mill there.

  11. Impact of the World Trade Organization TRIPS agreement on the pharmaceutical industry in Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Supakankunti, S.; Janjaroen, W. S.; Tangphao, O.; Ratanawijitrasin, S.; Kraipornsak, P.; Pradithavanij, P.

    2001-01-01

    The 1994 World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) established minimum universal standards in all areas of intellectual property. It is intended to implement these standards globally through a WTO enforcement mechanism. The present article proposes a strategy for alleviating the potentially negative impact of TRIPS in Thailand in relation to the following: purchasers; prescribers and dispensers; producers; products; price control; patent-to-third-party; parallel imports; power of the customer; patentable new drugs; personnel; and prevention policies. The following TRIPS provisions are pertinent to the pharmaceutical industry in Thailand: the limited term of product and process patents; the conditions of protection; and the broad scope for compulsory licensing and enforcement procedures in the national patent system. PMID:11417042

  12. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  13. System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module

    DOEpatents

    Matchett, R.L.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Bacvinsicas, W.S.; Roof, D.R.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1988-07-28

    A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system. 7 figs.

  14. System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module

    DOEpatents

    Matchett, Richard L.; Roof, David R.; Kikta, Thomas J.; Wilczynski, Rosemarie; Nilsen, Roy J.; Bacvinskas, William S.; Fodor, George

    1990-01-01

    A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system.

  15. 26. A typical outer rod room, or rack room, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. A typical outer rod room, or rack room, showing the racks for the nine horizontal control rods (HCRs) that would be inserted or withdrawn from the pile to control the rate of reaction. In this case, it is the 105-F Reactor in February 1945. The view is looking away from the pile, which is out of the picture on the left. Several of the cooling water hose reels for the rods can be seen at the end of the racks near the wall. D-8323 - B Reactor, Richland, Benton County, WA

  16. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N.

    1983-11-01

    Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

  17. Investigating the optical XNOR gate using plasmonic nano-rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Majid; Kaboli, Milad

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a coherent perfect absorption (CPA)-type XNOR gate based on plasmonic nano particle is proposed. It consists of two plasmonic nano rod arrays on top of two parallel arms with quartz substrate. The operation principle is based on the absorbable formation of a conductive path in the dielectric layer of a plasmonic nano-particles waveguide. Since the CPA efficiency depends strongly on the number of plasmonic nano-rod and the nano rod location, an efficient binary optimization method based the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is used to design an optimized array of the plasmonic nano-rod in order to achieve the maximum absorption coefficient in the 'off' state and the minimum absorption coefficient in the 'on' state. In Binary PSO (BPSO), a group of birds consists a matrix with binary entries, control the presence ('1‧) or the absence ('0‧) of nano rod in the array.

  18. Methodology of the Westinghouse dynamic rod worth measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.A.; Chapman, D.M.; Easter, M.E.; Hill, D.J.; Hoerner, J.A. ); Kurtz, P.N. )

    1992-01-01

    During zero-power physics testing, plant operations personnel use one of various techniques to measure the reactivity worth of the control rods to confirm shutdown margin. A simple and fast procedure for measuring rod worths called dynamic rod worth measurement (DRWM) has been developed at Westinghouse. This procedure was tested at the recent startups of Point Beach Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 cycle 20 and Unit 2 cycle 18. The results of these tests show that DRWM measures rod worths with accuracy comparable to that of both boron dilution and rod bank exchange measurements. The DRWM procedure is a fast process of measuring the reactivity worth of individual banks by inserting and withdrawing the bank continuously at the maximum stepping speed without changing the boron concentration and recording the signals of the ex-core detectors.

  19. Piston and connecting rod assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor); Chatten, John K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A piston and connecting rod assembly includes a piston crown, a piston skirt, a connecting rod, and a bearing insert. The piston skirt is a component separate from the piston crown and is connected to the piston crown to provide a piston body. The bearing insert is a component separate from the piston crown and the piston skirt and is fixedly disposed within the piston body. A bearing surface of a connecting rod contacts the bearing insert to thereby movably associate the connecting rod and the piston body.

  20. Microprocessor tester for the treat upgrade reactor trip system

    SciTech Connect

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Bucher, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The upgrading of the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility at ANL-Idaho has been designed to provide additional experimental capabilities for the study of core disruptive accident (CDA) phenomena. In addition, a programmable Automated Reactor Control System (ARCS) will permit high-power transients up to 11,000 MW having a controlled reactor period of from 15 to 0.1 sec. These modifications to the core neutronics will improve simulation of LMFBR accident conditions. Finally, a sophisticated, multiply-redundant safety system, the Reactor Trip System (RTS), will provide safe operation for both steady state and transient production operating modes. To insure that this complex safety system is functioning properly, a Dedicated Microprocessor Tester (DMT) has been implemented to perform a thorough checkout of the RTS prior to all TREAT operations.

  1. Relaxation of rod misalignment technical specification requirements: An increased operational flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    John, G.; Leipner-Gomes, C.I.; Johansen, B.J.

    1995-12-31

    The pressurized water reactor technical specification (T/S) limiting condition for operation (LCO) for rod misalignment and rod position indication (RPI) typically requires all rod cluster control assemblies to be positioned with {+-}12 steps of the group demand position. The LCO is approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for use by all Westinghouse plants, and the core design incorporates a peaking factor uncertainty to accommodate potential rod misalignments within this approved LCO. Also, the LCO requires all RPI channels and the demand position indicator system to be operable and capable of determining the control rod position within {+-}12 steps.

  2. Predictors of trips to food destinations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Food environment studies have focused on ethnic and income disparities in food access. Few studies have investigated distance travelled for food and did not aim to inform the geographic scales at which to study the relationship between food environments and obesity. Further, studies have not considered neighborhood design as a predictor of food purchasing behavior. Methods Atlanta residents (N = 4800) who completed a travel diary and reported purchasing or consuming food at one of five food locations were included in the analyses. A total of 11,995 food-related trips were reported. Using mixed modeling to adjust for clustering of trips by participants and households, person-level variables (e.g. demographics), neighborhood-level urban form measures, created in GIS, and trip characteristics (e.g. time of day, origin and destination) were investigated as correlates of distance travelled for food and frequency of grocery store and fast food outlet trips. Results Mean travel distance for food ranged from 4.5 miles for coffee shops to 6.3 miles for superstores. Type of store, urban form, type of tour, day of the week and ethnicity were all significantly related to distance travelled for food. Origin and destination environment, type of tour, day of week, age, gender, income, ethnicity, vehicle access and obesity status were all significantly related to visiting a grocery store. Home neighborhood environment, day of week, type of tour, gender, income, education level, age, and obesity status were all significantly related to likelihood of visiting a fastfood outlet. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that people travel sizeable distances for food and this distance is related to urban. Results suggest that researchers need to employ different methods to characterize food environments than have been used to assess urban form in studies of physical activity. Food is most often purchased while traveling from locations other than home, so future studies

  3. Hunton Group core workshop and field trip

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.S.

    1993-12-31

    The Late Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group is a moderately thick sequence of shallow-marine carbonates deposited on the south edge of the North American craton. This rock unit is a major target for petroleum exploration and reservoir development in the southern Midcontinent. The workshop described here was held to display cores, outcrop samples, and other reservoir-characterization studies of the Hunton Group and equivalent strata throughout the region. A field trip was organized to complement the workshop by allowing examination of excellent outcrops of the Hunton Group of the Arbuckle Mountains.

  4. Rod Climbing of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Wang, Xiaorong

    We wish to report an unexpected effect observed for particle suspensions sucked to pass through a vertical pipe. Above a critical concentration, the suspension on the outside of the pipe may climb along the outside wall of the pipe and then display a surprising rod-climbing effect. Our study shows that the phenomenon is influenced mainly by the suspension composition, the pipe dimension and the suction speed. The effects of the pipe materials of different kinds are negligible. Increasing the suction force and the concentration increases the climbing height. Increasing the pipe diameter and wall thickness reduces the climbing effect. This behavior may be relevant to that the suspensions of the type described are all displaying markedly shear-thickening.

  5. Mediating cultural borders during science field trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebak, Kimberly

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, I analyze teacher and student roles in the teaching and learning of science at an informal learning center, The Outdoor Classroom. As a white middle class informal learning science teacher, I examine my struggles to teach science to students across boundaries of race, class, gender, and experience with the outdoors during field trips. Through the field trip I did not have the time or face-to-face experience to make sense of the students' culture, see their culture in terms of capital, and align my enactment to benefit their learning. Likewise, the students did not have the time or face-to-face experience with me in order to adapt their cultural capital and build the essential stocks of symbolic and social capital. This research demonstrates how the classroom teacher draws upon previous transactions and emotions to successfully engage her students in practices that promote the participation and learning of science. Through creating culturally adaptive ways of transacting, teachers can provide opportunities for their students to generate positive emotional energy and group solidarity in the learning of science at an informal science center.

  6. INSTRUCTIONAL TRIPS, A PROGRAM FOR ENRICHING EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FINK, ALLAN; AND OTHERS

    A TEACHER GUIDE FOR FIELD TRIPS IN THE PASADENA, CALIFORNIA, AREA IS PRESENTED. EACH TRIP SHOULD BE PRECEDED BY AN EXPLANATION OF THE PURPOSES OF THE TRIP IN RELATION TO PRESENT COURSE OF STUDY. AS A FOLLOWUP ACTIVITY, DISCUSSION OF IDEAS GAINED DURING THE TRIP SHOULD BE ENCOURAGED. THE RULES, REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES OF THE TRIP ARE GIVEN. TRIP…

  7. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1957-08-20

    An electromagnetic device for moving an object in a linear path by increments is described. The device is specifically adapted for moving a neutron absorbing control rod into and out of the core of a reactor and consists essentially of an extension member made of magnetic material connected to one end of the control rod and mechanically flexible to grip the walls of a sleeve member when flexed, a magnetic sleeve member coaxial with and slidable between limit stops along the flexible extension, electromagnetic coils substantially centrally located with respect to the flexible extension to flex the extension member into gripping engagement with the sleeve member when ener gized, moving electromagnets at each end of the sleeve to attract the sleeve when energized, and a second gripping electromagnet positioned along the flexible extension at a distance from the previously mentioned electromagnets for gripping the extension member when energized. In use, the second gripping electromagnet is deenergized, the first gripping electromagnet is energized to fix the extension member in the sleeve, and one of the moving electromagnets is energized to attract the sleeve member toward it, thereby moving the control rod.

  8. Regenerative hyperpolarization in rods.

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, F S

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical properties of the rods in Necturus maculosus were studied at the cell body and the outer segments in dark and light under current and voltage clamp with a pair of intracellular electrodes separated by about 1 mum. 2. The membrane resistance in the dark was voltage- and time-dependent both for the cell body and the outer segment. Slight depolarizations in the cell body reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 10 M omega with a time constant of about 1 sec. Polarization in either direction, at the outer segment, when greater than about 20 mV, reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 30 M omega. The dark potential in the cell body was typically -30 to -35 m V; at the outer segment it was typically only -10 to -15 mV. 3. The light-elicited voltage response in both the cell body and the outer segment was largest with the membrane near the dark potential level. In both regions, the response was reduced when the membrane was polarized in either direction. 4. Under voltage-clamp conditions, a reversal potential for the light response near + 10 mV was measured at the outer segment. At the cell body no reversal potential for the light response was measured; there the clamping current required during the light response was almost of the same magnitude at all potential levels. 5. When the membrane at the cell body was hyperpolarized in the dark under voltage clamp, a transient outward current, typically about one-half the magnitude of the initial inward clamping current was required to maintain the membrane at the clamped potential level. This outward current transient was associated with a decrease in membrane resistance with similar time course. The transient outward current reversed and became inward when the membrane was clamped to potentials more negative than -80 mV. Thus, the transient outward current appears to involve a transient activation initiated by hyperpolarization. I is regenerative in that it is initiated by hyperpolarization and tends to

  9. Status of rod consolidation, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    It is estimated that the spent fuel storage pools at some domestic light-water reactors will run out of space before 2003, the year that the US Department of Energy currently predicts it will have a repository available. Of the methods being studied to alleviate the problem, rod consolidation is one of the leading candidates for achieving more efficient use of existing space in spent fuel storage pools. Rod consolidation involves mechanically removing all the fuel rods from the fuel assembly hardware (i.e., the structural components) and placing the fuel rods in a close-packed array in a canister without space grids. A typical goal of rod consolidation systems is to insert the fuel rods from two fuel assemblies into a canister that has the same exterior dimensions as one standard fuel assembly (i.e., to achieve a consolidation or compaction ratio of 2:1) and to compact the nonfuel-bearing structural components from those two fuel assemblies by a factor of 10 to 20. This report provides an overview of the current status of rod consolidation in the United States and a small amount of information on related activities in other countries. 85 refs., 36 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. 26 CFR 49.4264(e)-1 - Round trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... followed on the return trip from the destination to the point of departure as was taken on the going trip... from the point of departure to a specified destination and return from the specified destination to a... specified destination and return from a point other than the specified destination to the original point...

  11. 26 CFR 49.4264(e)-1 - Round trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... followed on the return trip from the destination to the point of departure as was taken on the going trip... from the point of departure to a specified destination and return from the specified destination to a... specified destination and return from a point other than the specified destination to the original point...

  12. Strategies for Planning an Overseas Field Trip for Young Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubball, Harry; Robertson, Scott

    2004-01-01

    Overseas field trips, when they are well planned, offer numerous benefits to young athletes. They contribute to player development, and fuel the team's energy and commitment to success. Field trips are enjoyable and exciting breaks from the regular routine of training and competing. The authors recommend strategies for positive results based on…

  13. Should You Rule Out Fund Raising, Trips, and Contests?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Stewart L.

    1992-01-01

    Schools need not rule out fund raising, trips, and contests. Well-organized groups of music students washing cars at local gas stations can create more positive publicity and goodwill toward music programs than can hundreds of news releases. Exchange concerts, trips to nearby schools, and competition against a predetermined scale can substitute…

  14. Mechanisms Influencing Student Understanding on an Outdoor Guided Field Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caskey, Nourah Al-Rashid

    2009-01-01

    Field trips are a basic and important, yet often overlooked part of the student experience. They provide the opportunity to integrate real world knowledge with classroom learning and student previous personal experiences. Outdoor guided field trips leave students with an increased understanding, awareness and interest and in science. However, the…

  15. Field Trips as Cognitive Motivators for High Level Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Marlene M.

    2006-01-01

    Using a composite example of field trips from several years of traveling to Yellowstone with high school biology students, the author illustrates how to raise the cognitive level of science instruction and student learning through science field trips. The author examines what teachers can do to raise the level of both teaching and learning in all…

  16. A Field Trip to Gettysburg: A Model Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olcott, Mark S.

    1987-01-01

    Using Gettysburg as an example, the author addresses the major components of a successful field trip, such as pre-teaching, memorizing, and the study of primary sources. Includes information on student participation and other factors of a successful field trip. (GEA)

  17. The Beginner's Guide to Interactive Virtual Field Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanetis, Jan

    2010-01-01

    For students, field trips can be the best of both worlds: a welcome and exciting break from day-to-day classroom activities and a memorable, real-world experience that will solidify the curriculum in their minds. Unfortunately, the most desirable trips--those to far-away, enticing destinations--have long been inaccessible to all but a select few,…

  18. Managing Health and Safety on International School Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter-Jones, John; Hunter-Jones, Philippa

    2007-01-01

    Organizing international school trips can be a demanding experience because of the age of the participants, the unfamiliar surroundings and the excitement associated with the foreign trip. As many organizers are full-time teachers, without a background in the travel sector, the pressures can be even greater. The need to anticipate potential risks…

  19. 30 CFR 56.19067 - Trips during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trips during shift changes. 56.19067 Section 56.19067 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Hoisting Procedures § 56.19067 Trips during shift changes. During shift changes, an authorized person...

  20. 30 CFR 57.19067 - Trips during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trips during shift changes. 57.19067 Section 57.19067 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19067 Trips during shift changes. During shift changes, an...

  1. 30 CFR 57.19067 - Trips during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trips during shift changes. 57.19067 Section 57.19067 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19067 Trips during shift changes. During shift changes, an...

  2. 30 CFR 56.19067 - Trips during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trips during shift changes. 56.19067 Section 56.19067 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Hoisting Procedures § 56.19067 Trips during shift changes. During shift changes, an authorized person...

  3. 30 CFR 56.19067 - Trips during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trips during shift changes. 56.19067 Section 56.19067 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Hoisting Procedures § 56.19067 Trips during shift changes. During shift changes, an authorized person...

  4. 30 CFR 57.19067 - Trips during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trips during shift changes. 57.19067 Section 57.19067 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19067 Trips during shift changes. During shift changes, an...

  5. Psychological Sense of Community and Group Cohesion on Wilderness Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breunig, Mary; O'Connell, Tim; Todd, Sharon; Young, Anderson; Anderson, Lynn; Anderson, Dale

    2008-01-01

    A primary purpose of many wilderness trip programs is the development of positive interpersonal relationships and group experiences that lead to enhanced sense of community among group members. Although there is anecdotal evidence to support the development of sense of community on wilderness trips, there is little empirical evidence to support…

  6. Collecting Planarians: A Good Choice for a Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cha, Heeyoung

    2001-01-01

    Describes a field trip to collect planarians as successful in generating interest in the sciences. This activity is suitable for all grade levels as a field trip or biology lab. Planarians can be easily collected from streams across the United States. Once in the classroom, planaria are easily fed and cared for. (SAH)

  7. Evidence, Explanations, and Recommendations for Teachers' Field Trip Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebar, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Field trips are well recognized by researchers as an educational approach with the potential to complement and enhance classroom science teaching by exposing students to unique activities, resources, and content in informal settings. The following investigation addresses teachers' field trip practices in three related manuscripts: (1) A study…

  8. Effectiveness of Field Trips in Teaching Groundwater Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pederson, Darryll T.

    1979-01-01

    The field trip procedures described were devised for use with freshman college students as an alternative to a classroom or laboratory session. Pre-test and post-test of students' knowledge of groundwater concepts show significant change in students' understanding of groundwater occurance and movement following such a trip. (RE)

  9. Development of Teacher Attitude Scale towards the Field Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tortop, Hasan Said

    2012-01-01

    A field trip is an excursion by group of students with teachers to a place away from classroom such as natural field, science center, and zoo. So, it is an important tool for renewable energy education. This study was carried out to develop a new scale for measuring teacher attitudes towards the field trip. Teacher attitude scale towards the field…

  10. The "Science" Behind a Successful Field Trip to the Zoo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Catherine Marie; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2011-01-01

    A field trip to the local zoo is often a staple in many elementary school curricula. Many zoos offer free entry to local teachers and their students. Teachers take students on field trips to enrich the curriculum, make connections to what students are learning in school, and provide students with meaningful learning experiences (Kisiel 2007).…

  11. Off-Site Trip Leaders: Selecting Appropriate Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Will

    1996-01-01

    Well-trained off-site trip leaders can turn a trip into a positive educational lesson. American Camping Association standards are referenced, and some personality traits are suggested as criteria for determining the suitability of staff to act responsibly "in loco director." Discusses factors that determine counselor-to-camper ratios, medical…

  12. 50 CFR 622.43 - Commercial trip limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.43 Commercial trip limits. Commercial trip limits are limits on the amount of the applicable species that may be possessed on board or landed, purchased, or sold from...

  13. 50 CFR 622.43 - Commercial trip limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.43 Commercial trip limits. Commercial trip limits are limits on the amount of the applicable species that may be possessed on board or landed, purchased, or sold from...

  14. Creating Local Field Trips: Seeing Geographical Principles through Empirical Eyes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, James O.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses how instructors can design a local field trip for undergraduate students enrolled in an economic geography class. The purpose of the field trip is to help students observe and interpret familiar scenes in terms of geographical concepts such as central place theory, changing land use, and spatial competition. (RM)

  15. 46 CFR 58.01-30 - Trial-trip observance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trial-trip observance. 58.01-30 Section 58.01-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-30 Trial-trip observance. The operation of...

  16. Slip, trip, and fall injuries among nursing care facility workers.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jennifer L; Collins, James W; Tiesman, Hope M; Ridenour, Marilyn; Konda, Srinivas; Wolf, Laurie; Evanoff, Bradley

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this research was to describe the slip, trip, and fall injury experience and trends in a population of nursing home workers, identify risk factors for slip, trip, and fall injuries, and develop prevention strategies for slip, trip, and fall hazards. Workers' compensation injury claims data and payroll data from 1996 through 2003 were obtained from six nursing homes and used to calculate injury incidence rates. Narrative information was used to describe details of slip, trip, and fall events. A total of 86 slip, trip, and fall-related workers' compensation claims were filed during the 8-year period. Slip, trip, and fall claim rates showed a nonsignificant increase during the 8-year period. Most slips, trips, and falls were attributed to hazards that can be mitigated (e.g., water on the floor or loose cords in a walkway). Nursing home workers experience more slip, trip, and fall-related injury claims than workers in other industries. Preventive programs should be implemented and evaluated in this industry. PMID:23521142

  17. Statistical properties of a folded elastic rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Deboeuf, Stéphanie; Boué, Laurent; Corson, Francis; Boudaoud, Arezki; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    2010-03-01

    A large variety of elastic structures naturally seem to be confined into environments too small to accommodate them; the geometry of folded structures span a wide range of length-scales. The elastic properties of these confined systems are further constrained by self-avoidance as well as by the dimensionality of both structures and container. To mimic crumpled paper, we devised an experimental setup to study the packing of a dimensional elastic object in 2D geometries: an elastic rod is folded at the center of a circular Hele-Shaw cell by a centripetal force. The initial configuration of the rod and the acceleration of the rotating disk allow to span different final folded configurations while the final rotation speed controls the packing intensity. Using image analysis we measure geometrical and mechanical properties of the folded configurations, focusing on length, curvature and energy distributions.

  18. TREAT Reactor Control and Protection System

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, W.C.; Brookshier, W.K.; Burrows, D.R.; Lenkszus, F.R.; McDowell, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    The main control algorithm of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) Automatic Reactor Control System (ARCS) resides in Read Only Memory (ROM) and only experiment specific parameters are input via keyboard entry. Prior to executing an experiment, the software and hardware of the control computer is tested by a closed loop real-time simulation. Two computers with parallel processing are used for the reactor simulation and another computer is used for simulation of the control rod system. A monitor computer, used as a redundant diverse reactor protection channel, uses more conservative setpoints and reduces challenges to the Reactor Trip System (RTS). The RTS consists of triplicated hardwired channels with one out of three logic. The RTS is automatically tested by a digital Dedicated Microprocessor Tester (DMT) prior to the execution of an experiment. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Hopf solitons and elastic rods

    SciTech Connect

    Harland, Derek; Sutcliffe, Paul; Speight, Martin

    2011-03-15

    Hopf solitons in the Skyrme-Faddeev model are stringlike topological solitons classified by the integer-valued Hopf charge. In this paper we introduce an approximate description of Hopf solitons in terms of elastic rods. The general form of the elastic rod energy is derived from the field theory energy and is found to be an extension of the classical Kirchhoff rod energy. Using a minimal extension of the Kirchhoff energy, it is shown that a simple elastic rod model can reproduce many of the qualitative features of Hopf solitons in the Skyrme-Faddeev model. Features that are captured by the model include the buckling of the charge three solution, the formation of links at charges five and six, and the minimal energy trefoil knot at charge seven.

  20. Nuclear design of Helical Cruciform Fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to increase the power density of current and new light water reactor designs, the Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods are proposed. The HCF rods are equivalent to a cylindrical rod, with the fuel in a cruciform shaped, twisted axially. The HCF rods increase the surface area to volume ratio and inter-subchannel mixing behavior due to their cruciform and helical shapes, respectively. In a previous study, the HCF rods have shown the potential to up-rate existing PWRs by 50% and BWRs by 25%. However, HCF rods do display different neutronics modeling and performance. The cruciform cross section of HCF rods creates radially asymmetric heat generation and temperature distribution. The nominal HCF rod's beginning of life reactivity is reduced, compared to a cylindrical rod with the same fuel volume, by 500 pcm, due to increase in absorption in cladding. The rotation of these rods accounts for reactivity changes, which depends on the H/HM ratio of the pin cell. The HCF geometry shows large sensitivities to U{sup 235} or gadolinium enrichments compared to a cylindrical geometry. In addition, the gadolinium-containing HCF rods show a stronger effect on neighboring HCF rods than in case of cylindrical rods, depending on the orientation of the HCF rods. The helical geometry of the rods introduces axial shadowing of about 600 pcm, not seen in typical cylindrical rods. (authors)

  1. Process-based tolerance assessment of connecting rod machining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G. V. S. S.; Rao, P. Srinivasa; Surendra Babu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Process tolerancing based on the process capability studies is the optimistic and pragmatic approach of determining the manufacturing process tolerances. On adopting the define-measure-analyze-improve-control approach, the process potential capability index ( C p) and the process performance capability index ( C pk) values of identified process characteristics of connecting rod machining process are achieved to be greater than the industry benchmark of 1.33, i.e., four sigma level. The tolerance chain diagram methodology is applied to the connecting rod in order to verify the manufacturing process tolerances at various operations of the connecting rod manufacturing process. This paper bridges the gap between the existing dimensional tolerances obtained via tolerance charting and process capability studies of the connecting rod component. Finally, the process tolerancing comparison has been done by adopting a tolerance capability expert software.

  2. Student perspectives on their school trips to zoos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Susan Kay

    This dissertation aimed to explore students' perspectives on their school trips to informal education sites. In particular, what did students think they learned, what did they want to do, what was fun or boring, and how did their trip relate to classroom activities? The two case studies presented here explore these ideas with 11-12-year olds in New Zealand and their class trips to zoos, in contrasting situations: one is a class in which the teacher thoughtfully and explicitly linked the trip to classroom learning both before and after the trip; the other classroom teacher did not. These differences impacted how students thought about their learning and how they valued the trip. Despite the differences, students had similarities in some of their perspectives, particularly in their focus on social interactions with peers and their desire to see the animals at the zoos. This study concludes with recommendations for informal and classroom educators, especially to find out what students are interested in, give them choices, and connect trips to classroom activities.

  3. Experimental investigation of flow past a sphere with trip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Rahul; Desai, Aditya; Kanti, Vivek; Mittal, Sanjay

    2015-11-01

    The flow over a smooth sphere and a sphere with a trip was experimentally investigated in the Reynolds number range 1 × 105 to 5 × 105 through unsteady force measurements. The size of the trip is 1.5 percent of the diameter D of the sphere and measurements are made for its streamwise location from the stagnation point for 10, 20 and 30 degrees. The statistics of the drag and lateral forces were studied for a range of subcritical to supercritical Reynolds numbers to understand the effect of a trip on the critical flow regime of a sphere. Two different flow characteristics are observed over the sphere surface depending on the streamwise location of the trip. For subcritical Reynolds numbers, a significant mean side force is observed in the direction of the trip side of the sphere. On gradually increasing the Reynolds number, the flow over the sphere enters the critical regime and the direction of the side force reverses from the trip side to the non - trip side of the sphere which continues to be observed well within the early supercritical regime. The authors would like to thank the efforts put in by Mr. Sharad Saxena and Mr. Akhilesh Pal from National Wind Tunnel Facility, IIT - Kanpur in conducting the experiments.

  4. Flow in Rotating Serpentine Coolant Passages With Skewed Trip Strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, David G.N.; Steuber, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Laser velocimetry was utilized to map the velocity field in serpentine turbine blade cooling passages with skewed trip strips. The measurements were obtained at Reynolds and Rotation numbers of 25,000 and 0.24 to assess the influence of trips, passage curvature and Coriolis force on the flow field. The interaction of the secondary flows induced by skewed trips with the passage rotation produces a swirling vortex and a corner recirculation zone. With trips skewed at +45 deg, the secondary flows remain unaltered as the cross-flow proceeds from the passage to the turn. However, the flow characteristics at these locations differ when trips are skewed at -45 deg. Changes in the flow structure are expected to augment heat transfer, in agreement with the heat transfer measurements of Johnson, et al. The present results show that trips are skewed at -45 deg in the outward flow passage and trips are skewed at +45 deg in the inward flow passage maximize heat transfer. Details of the present measurements were related to the heat transfer measurements of Johnson, et al. to relate fluid flow and heat transfer measurements.

  5. Analysis of Double-encapsulated Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, Jason Dean; Medvedev, Pavel G; Novascone, Stephen Rhead; Perez, Danielle Marie; Williamson, Richard L

    2014-09-01

    In an LWR fuel rod, the cladding encapsulates the fuel, contains fission products, and transfers heat directly to the water coolant. In some situations, it may be advantageous to separate the cladding from the coolant through use of a secondary cladding or capsule. This may be done to increase confidence that the fuel or fission products will not mix with the coolant, to provide a mechanism for controlling the rod temperature, or to place multiple experimental rodlets within a single housing. With an axisymmetric assumption, it is possible to derive closed-form expressions for the temperature profile in a fuel rod using radially-constant thermal conductivity in the fuel. This is true for both a traditional fuel-cladding rod and a double-encapsulated fuel (fuel, cladding, capsule) configuration. Likewise, it is possible to employ a fuel performance code to analyse both a traditional and a double-encapsulated fuel. In the case of the latter, two sets of gap heat transfer conditions must be imposed. In this work, we review the equations associated with radial heat transfer in a cylindrical system, present analytic and computational results for a postulated power and gas mixture history for IFA-744, and describe the analysis of the AFC-2A, 2B metallic fuel alloy experiments at the Advanced Test Reactor, including the effect of a release of fission products into the cladding-capsule gap. The computational results for these two cases were obtained using BISON, a fuel performance code under development at Idaho National Laboratory.

  6. Advanced transportation concept for round-trip space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Chen-Wan L.

    1988-01-01

    A departure from the conventional concept of round-trip space travel is introduced. It is shown that a substantial reduction in the initial load required of the Shuttle or other launch vehicle can be achieved by staging the ascent orbit and leaving fuel for the return trip at each stage of the orbit. Examples of round trips from a low-inclination LEO to a high-inclination LEO and from an LEO to a GEO are used to show the merits of the new concept. Potential problem areas and research needed for the development of an efficient space transportation network are discussed.

  7. Successful Components of Planetary Science Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, B. H.; Kenealy, R.; Nash, D. B.

    1996-03-01

    Over 12,000 students in the 3rd to 8th grades have come to the San Juan Institute (SJI) over the last four years to attend SJI's field trip programs, including Journey Through the Solar System, a two hour introduction to the Solar System. We have evolved the program based upon teacher, student, and educator feedback, and have found several successful components. Some of these are relatively obvious, while others may not be. Here we wish to pass those lessons along to others who may try similar programs. The components we have identified as successful include: having a two-pronged philosophy of what is to be accomplished which consists of (1) trying to excite students about science, and helping them get over science anxiety by seeing science as fun, and (2) passing along basic planetary science and physical science information in the process; utilizing table top demonstrations; providing the students with workbooks to use during the presentation; providing hands-on activities including meteorites as ways to "touch space" (SJI has also recently put on display a local meteorite); having a drawing contest; utilizing visual aids including pictures and video; having lectures with coherent themes; having a question and answer session; giving students a tour through a working science lab facility; obtaining formal evaluations and informal feedback from teachers and students, and revising the program in response; and providing students with current planetary and space events and sky information updates.

  8. Peer Pressure Road Trip 2012 - A Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popnoe, Olivia

    2012-10-01

    Each year since 2005 the Angelo State University SPS ``Peer Pressure Team'' has travelled for a week in May to promote physics and other sciences for grades K-12. This year, the Peer Pressure Team visited schools in West Texas and New Mexico. This was the first year the team has traveled outside of Texas, inspired by the SPS 2012 theme ``Physics Beyond Borders.'' The purpose of the Road Tours is to encourage an interest in science in children in grades K-12 and give experience in presenting and explaining physics to the undergraduate volunteers. The schools attended are carefully selected based on socioeconomic need and an underrepresentation in physics, as well as other sciences. During this week, the Peer Pressure Team saw about 1,500 students over 10 shows. Surveys were given to teachers post-demonstration to have students complete and return so the Team could gauge the effectiveness of the outreach program. In addition, the surveys allow the Team to determine which demonstrations had the most impact. We present the details of this year's road trip with the results and analysis of the survey data.

  9. You Can't Reach for the Stars if You are Tripping Over the Ground! (Preventing Slips, Trips, and Falls)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Darcy; Raysich, Mark; Kirkland, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Although there are very few mishaps related to ground, vehicle or payload processing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), employees have experienced a significant number of injuries due to slips, trips, and falls outside of performing flight processing operations. Slips, trips, and falls are major causes of occupational injuries at KSC, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and in general industry. To help KSC employees avoid these injuries, and allow them to be fully productive, KSC launched an initiative in 2013 to reduce slips, trips, and falls. This initiative is based on a four-part model focusing on DATA analysis, HAZARD awareness, PREVENTIVE methods, and BALANCE.

  10. Synthesis and Liquid-Crystal Behavior of Bent Colloidal Silica Rods.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Chen, Guangdong; Martinez-Miranda, Luz J; Yu, Hua; Liu, Kun; Nie, Zhihong

    2016-01-13

    The design and assembly of novel colloidal particles are of both academic and technological interest. We developed a wet-chemical route to synthesize monodisperse bent rigid silica rods by controlled perturbation of emulsion-templated growth. The bending angle of the rods can be tuned in a range of 0-50° by varying the strength of perturbation in the reaction temperature or pH in the course of rod growth. The length of each arm of the bent rods can be individually controlled by adjusting the reaction time. For the first time we demonstrated that the bent silica rods resemble banana-shaped liquid-crystal molecules and assemble into ordered structures with a typical smectic B2 phase. The bent silica rods could serve as a visualizable mesoscopic model for exploiting the phase behaviors of bent molecules which represent a typical class of liquid-crystal molecules. PMID:26700616

  11. Vibrational Power Flow Analysis of Rods and Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlever, James Christopher; Bernhard, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method to model vibrational power flow and predict the resulting energy density levels in uniform rods and beams is investigated. This method models the flow of vibrational power in a manner analogous to the flow of thermal power in a heat conduction problem. The classical displacement solutions for harmonically excited, hysteretically damped rods and beams are used to derive expressions for the vibrational power flow and energy density in the rod and beam. Under certain conditions, the power flow in these two structural elements will be shown to be proportional to the energy density gradient. Using the relationship between power flow and energy density, an energy balance on differential control volumes in the rod and beam leads to a Poisson's equation which models the energy density distribution in the rod and beam. Coupling the energy density and power flow solutions for rods and beams is also discussed. It is shown that the resonant behavior of finite structures complicates the coupling of solutions, especially when the excitations are single frequency inputs. Two coupling formulations are discussed, the first based on the receptance method, and the second on the travelling wave approach used in Statistical Energy Analysis. The receptance method is the more computationally intensive but is capable of analyzing single frequency excitation cases. The traveling wave approach gives a good approximation of the frequency average of energy density and power flow in coupled systems, and thus, is an efficient technique for use with broadband frequency excitation.

  12. Fission gas release restrictor for breached fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kadambi, N. Prasad; Tilbrook, Roger W.; Spencer, Daniel R.; Schwallie, Ambrose L.

    1986-01-01

    In the event of a breach in the cladding of a rod in an operating liquid metal fast breeder reactor, the rapid release of high-pressure gas from the fission gas plenum may result in a gas blanketing of the breached rod and rods adjacent thereto which impairs the heat transfer to the liquid metal coolant. In order to control the release rate of fission gas in the event of a breached rod, the substantial portion of the conventional fission gas plenum is formed as a gas bottle means which includes a gas pervious means in a small portion thereof. During normal reactor operation, as the fission gas pressure gradually increases, the gas pressure interiorly of and exteriorly of the gas bottle means equalizes. In the event of a breach in the cladding, the gas pervious means in the gas bottle means constitutes a sufficient restriction to the rapid flow of gas therethrough that under maximum design pressure differential conditions, the fission gas flow through the breach will not significantly reduce the heat transfer from the affected rod and adjacent rods to the liquid metal heat transfer fluid flowing therebetween.

  13. LWR fuel rod bundle behavior under severe fuel damage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuczera, B. Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.

    1988-01-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) safety research and development activities conducted at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe have recently been reorganized with a concentrated mission under the LWR safety project group. The topics treated relate mainly to severe-accident analysis research and source term assessment as well as to source term mitigation measures. A major part of the investigations concerns the early phase of a severe core meltdown accident, specifically LWR rod assembly behavior under sever fuel damage (SFD) conditions. To determine the extent of fuel rod damage, including the relocation behavior of molten reaction products, damage propagation, time-dependent H{sub 2} generation from clad oxidation, and fragmentation of oxygen-embrittled materials during cooldown and quenching, extensive out-of-pile rod bundle experiments have been initiated in the new CORA test facility. The bundle parameters, such as rod dimensions, rod pitch, and grid spacer, can be adjusted to both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions. Currently, the test program consists of 15 experiments in which the influence of Inconel grid spacer, (Ag,In,Cd)-absorber rods (PWR) and of B{sub 4}C control blades (BWR) on fuel damage initiation and damage propagation are being investigated for different boundary conditions. As of June 1988, four bundle tests had been successfully carried out for PWR accident conditions.

  14. Uncertainty analysis of spent nuclear fuel isotopics and rod internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratton, Ryan N.

    The bias and uncertainty in fuel isotopic calculations for a well-defined radio- chemical assay benchmark are investigated with Sampler, the new sampling-based uncertainty quantification tool in the SCALE code system. Isotopic predictions are compared to measurements of fuel rod MKP109 of assembly D047 from the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 core at three axial locations, representing a range of discharged fuel burnups. A methodology is developed which quantifies the significance of input parameter uncertainties and modeling decisions on isotopic prediction by compar- ing to isotopic measurement uncertainties. The SCALE Sampler model of the D047 assembly incorporates input parameter uncertainties for key input data such as multigroup cross sections, decay constants, fission product yields, the cladding thickness, and the power history for fuel rod MKP109. The effects of each set of input parameter uncertainty on the uncertainty of isotopic predictions have been quantified. In this work, isotopic prediction biases are identified and an investiga- tion into their sources is proposed; namely, biases have been identified for certain plutonium, europium, and gadolinium isotopes for all three axial locations. More- over, isotopic prediction uncertainty resulting from only nuclear data is found to be greatest for Eu-154, Gd-154, and Gd-160. The discharge rod internal pressure (RIP) and cladding hoop stress (CHS) distributions are quantified for Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 1 (WBN1) fuel rods by modeling core cycle design data, operation data (including modeling significant trips and downpowers), and as-built fuel enrichments and densities of each fuel rod in FRAPCON-3.5. A methodology is developed which tracks inter-cycle as- sembly movements and assembly batch fabrication information to build individual FRAPCON inputs for each considered WBN1 fuel rod. An alternate model for the amount of helium released from zirconium diboride (ZrB2) integral fuel burn- able absorber (IFBA) layers is

  15. Astronaut Neil Armstrong studies rock samples during geological field trip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Neil Armstrong, commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, studies rock samples during a geological field trip to the Quitman Mountains area near the Fort Quitman ruins in far west Texas.

  16. Human round trip to Mars: Six months and radiation safe

    SciTech Connect

    Lazareth, O.W.; Schmidt, E.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a different type of round trip to Mars, using a combination of spacecraft. Compared to typical proposals, this flight is relatively fast and relatively safe from biological radiation dosage. Our study is concerned with the trip from Earth orbit to Mars orbit. Four spacecraft are required for the round trip. The crew spends most of their time on board a comparatively large, well shielded spacecraft (LC) which is in free (non-powered) orbit about the sun. The crew travels from Earth orbit to the LC while on board a comparatively small, powered spacecraft (SC). At Mars, the procedure is reversed and the crew returns on a second LC. In addition, a cargo craft, with no crew, is sent to Mars prior to the crew leaving Earth orbit. The trip time is about six months and the radiation dose equivalent is within guidelines recommended by the National Commission on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  17. 28 CFR 570.42 - Non-medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... persons (e.g., attending physician, hospital staff, funeral home staff, family members, U.S. Probation Officer) who can contribute to a determination on whether an escorted trip should be approved. (1)...

  18. 28 CFR 570.42 - Non-medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... persons (e.g., attending physician, hospital staff, funeral home staff, family members, U.S. Probation Officer) who can contribute to a determination on whether an escorted trip should be approved. (1)...

  19. Field-Trip Tips--A Baker's Dozen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoke, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Twelve strategies for planning and implementing successful field trips are presented. Preplanning, bad weather, safety, budget, travel, chaperones, facilities of destination, lesson planning, time constraints, snacking, and special guests are topics of discussion. (KR)

  20. 18. Blacksmith Shop (first floor): view looking north; trip hammer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Blacksmith Shop (first floor): view looking north; trip hammer and coal bin in background, shears and swage block in foreground - Ben Thresher's Mill, State Aid No. 1, Barnet, Caledonia County, VT

  1. 7. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH WITH STOVE TO CENTER, TRIP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH WITH STOVE TO CENTER, TRIP HAMMER TO LEFT WITH FORGE BEHIND IT, AND WORK BENCH TO FRONT RIGHT - City Blacksmith Shop, Corner of Douglas Street & Second Avenue, Lamberton, Redwood County, MN

  2. 50 CFR 622.385 - Commercial trip limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Coastal... a trip limit specified in this section taken in the EEZ may not be transferred at sea, regardless...

  3. 50 CFR 622.385 - Commercial trip limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Coastal... a trip limit specified in this section taken in the EEZ may not be transferred at sea, regardless...

  4. Stuck fuel rod capping sleeve

    DOEpatents

    Gorscak, Donald A.; Maringo, John J.; Nilsen, Roy J.

    1988-01-01

    A stuck fuel rod capping sleeve to be used during derodding of spent fuel assemblies if a fuel rod becomes stuck in a partially withdrawn position and, thus, has to be severed. The capping sleeve has an inner sleeve made of a lower work hardening highly ductile material (e.g., Inconel 600) and an outer sleeve made of a moderately ductile material (e.g., 304 stainless steel). The inner sleeve may be made of an epoxy filler. The capping sleeve is placed on a fuel rod which is then severed by using a bolt cutter device. Upon cutting, the capping sleeve deforms in such a manner as to prevent the gross release of radioactive fuel material

  5. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a main feedwater turbopump trip transient in the Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, C.; Casals, A.; Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R.

    1993-12-01

    The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) and the Asociacion Nuclear Vandellos (ANV) have developed a model of Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant. The ANV collaboration consisted in the supply of design and actual data, the cooperation in the simulation of the control systems and other model components, as well as in the results analysis. The obtained model has been assessed against the following transients occurred in plant: A trip from the 100% power level (CSN); a load rejection from 100% to 50% (CSN); a load rejection from 75% to 65% (ANV); and, a feedwater turbopump trip (ANV). This copy is a report of the feedwater turbopump trip transient simulation. This transient actually occurred in the plant on June 19, 1989.

  6. A Field Trip without Buses: Connecting Your Students to Scientists through a Virtual Visit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedokun, Omolola; Parker, Loran Carleton; Loizzo, Jamie; Burgess, Wilella; Robinson, J. Paul

    2011-01-01

    One school offers zipTrips as an alternative to actual field trips taken outside of school. ZipTrips are web- and broadcast-delivered electronic field trips that include online videos, lesson plans, and a live, 45-minute interactive program consisting of four core components: an in-studio audience, live interaction with scientists, prerecorded…

  7. Language Travel or Language Tourism: Have Educational Trips Changed So Much?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laborda, Jesus Garcia

    2007-01-01

    This article points out the changes in organization, students and language learning that language trips, as contrasted with educational trips (of which language trips are a subgroup) have gone through in the last years. The article emphasizes the need to differentiate between language trips and language tourism based on issues of additional…

  8. Field Trips in Early Childhood Settings: Expanding the Walls of the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Satomi Izumi; Cordeau-Young, Carol; Morris, Vivian Gunn

    1997-01-01

    Presents suggestions for conducting safe and educationally stimulating field trips for young children, including factors to consider when planning trips, such as suitability and cost; preparation needed just prior to taking the trip, such as safety rule observance; considerations during the trip, including liability insurance; and follow-up…

  9. Open the Door Let's Explore: Neighborhood Field Trips for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redleaf, Rhoda

    Designed as a resource for teachers and parents, this guide contains activities to help children from 2 to 8 years old learn from neighborhood walks and field trips. Information is presented on: field trips as an approach to learning, learning processes of children, and techniques to make trips meaningful. Teaching material for each trip includes…

  10. Field Trips Put Chemistry in Context for Non-Science Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Keith E.

    2008-01-01

    Field trips can provide excellent real-world learning situations for students in non-science major chemistry courses. The field trips described in this article are accessible, most trips can be completed within a scheduled three-hour laboratory time period, and they can be conducted at minimal cost. These field trips significantly enhanced student…

  11. Round trip landing missions to the asteroid Eros, 1981 opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zambo, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    A comprehensive, Del V (magnitude of impulsive velocity-change vector) study of short staytime (0 to 30 days), short total trip time (10 to 160 days) round trip landing missions (fast missions) is presented. The characteristics of the following selected round trip landing missions are described: mission A (fast mission) with 120-day total trip time, 0-day stay-time, and 73,000-fps total mission Del V; mission B (opposition class) with 380-day total trip time, 0-day staytime, and 52,000-fps total mission Del V; and mission C (conjuction class) with 540-day total trip time, 175-day staytime, and 39,000-fps total mission Del V. A study of large-tank Agena, chemical propulsion stage (CPS), and nuclear stage was conducted. A payload of 5000 pounds was assumed. The propulsion requirements for mission A were found to be two large-tank Agenas and ten CPSs (or alternatively, two large-tank Agenas and five nuclear stages) while mission B required two large-tank Agenas and two CPSs. Mission C can be performed with one large-tank Agena and one CPS.

  12. Managing the effect of TRIPS on availability of priority vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Milstien, Julie; Kaddar, Miloud

    2006-01-01

    The stated purpose of intellectual property protection is to stimulate innovation. The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) requires all Members of the World Trade Organization (WTO) to enact national laws conferring minimum standards of intellectual property protection by certain deadlines. Critics of the Agreement fear that such action is inconsistent with ensuring access to medicines in the developing world. A WHO convened meeting on intellectual property rights and vaccines in developing countries, on which this paper is based, found no evidence that TRIPS has stimulated innovation in developing market vaccine development (where markets are weak) or that protection of intellectual property rights has had a negative effect on access to vaccines. However, access to future vaccines in the developing world could be threatened by compliance with TRIPS. The management of such threats requires adherence of all countries to the Doha Declaration on TRIPS, and the protections guaranteed by the Agreement itself, vigilance on TRIPS-plus elements of free trade agreements, developing frameworks for licensing and technology transfer, and promoting innovative vaccine development in developing countries. The role of international organizations in defining best practices, dissemination of information, and monitoring TRIPS impact will be crucial to ensuring optimal access to priority new vaccines for the developing world. PMID:16710544

  13. Managing the effect of TRIPS on availability of priority vaccines.

    PubMed

    Milstien, Julie; Kaddar, Miloud

    2006-05-01

    The stated purpose of intellectual property protection is to stimulate innovation. The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) requires all Members of the World Trade Organization (WTO) to enact national laws conferring minimum standards of intellectual property protection by certain deadlines. Critics of the Agreement fear that such action is inconsistent with ensuring access to medicines in the developing world. A WHO convened meeting on intellectual property rights and vaccines in developing countries, on which this paper is based, found no evidence that TRIPS has stimulated innovation in developing market vaccine development (where markets are weak) or that protection of intellectual property rights has had a negative effect on access to vaccines. However, access to future vaccines in the developing world could be threatened by compliance with TRIPS. The management of such threats requires adherence of all countries to the Doha Declaration on TRIPS, and the protections guaranteed by the Agreement itself, vigilance on TRIPS-plus elements of free trade agreements, developing frameworks for licensing and technology transfer, and promoting innovative vaccine development in developing countries. The role of international organizations in defining best practices, dissemination of information, and monitoring TRIPS impact will be crucial to ensuring optimal access to priority new vaccines for the developing world. PMID:16710544

  14. Causal models of trip replanning in TravTek

    SciTech Connect

    Schryver, J.C.

    1998-07-01

    The TravTek operational field test was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of route planning, route guidance and various navigational aiding modalities for Advanced Traveler Information Systems in ground vehicles. A causal network was constructed in order to achieve a better understanding of the dependencies among variables implicated in the replanning process. Causal inferences were modeled using path analysis techniques. The original Yoked Driver study reported that addition of real-time navigation planning did not increase trip efficiency during initial trip planning. Data mining of the relatively complete database revealed that the incidence of dynamic trip replanning was only 0.51% or 1 out of every 198 trips. Nevertheless, the replanning acceptance rate was 92.8%, suggesting that less conservative criteria might have been acceptable to drivers. Several points can be made based upon the path analysis techniques. Drivers who rejected better route offers were more likely to be male renters; rejected routes were apparently offered at earlier times with a lower predicted time savings and fewer maneuvers. Failure to accept a better route also apparently resulted in fewer wrong-turn deviations. Contrary to expectations, wrong-turn count and time loss appeared as semi-independent hubs in the resultant causal network. Implications of the path analysis are discussed. Proposals for in-vehicle information systems are formulated to increase driver participation as co-planner, and increase the likelihood that trip replanning will positively impact trip efficiency.

  15. Pain relief in knee osteoarthritis reduces the propensity to trip on an obstacle.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Nirav K; Piotrowski, Gary A; Pottenger, Lawrence; Draganich, Louis F

    2007-01-01

    The pain associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to lead to an increased propensity to trip on an obstacle. Pain-relieving intra-articular injections are widely utilized in the treatment of knee OA. This study examined the effects of pain-relieving intra-articular knee injections on the ability to avoid contacting a suddenly appearing obstacle in patients with knee OA. Obstacle avoidance success rates, pain, body mass index, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, depth perception, and single-leg stance duration were evaluated in nine patients with painful osteoarthritis of the knee and 14 age-matched healthy control subjects. Obstacle avoidance success rates, pain, and single leg stance duration were tested a second time in the patients with knee OA after they received their injections, which contained a fast-acting local anesthetic to provide rapid pain relief. After receiving the pain-relieving knee injections, patients with knee OA had 48% less pain and were 31% more successful in avoiding stepping on the obstacle. However, after receiving the injection, the obstacle avoidance success rates remained 20% less than those of the healthy controls. The results of this study suggest that knee pain-relief can decrease the propensity of people with painful knee OA to trip and fall over an obstacle. However, pain-relief alone did not return the patients with knee OA in this study to a disease-free risk of tripping. PMID:16529934

  16. Site controlled red-yellow-green light emitting InGaN quantum discs on nano-tipped GaN rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, M.; Li, H.; Kusch, G.; Zhao, C.; Ooi, B.; Edwards, P. R.; Martin, R. W.; Holmes, J. D.; Parbrook, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips' broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD's confinement dimensions, rather than significantly increasing the In%. This article details the easily controlled method of manipulating the QDs dimensions producing high crystal quality InGaN without complicated growth conditions needed for strain relaxation and alloy compositional changes seen for bulk planar GaN templates.We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips' broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD

  17. Thermal beam distortions in end-pumped Nd:YAG, Nd:GSGG, and Nd:YLF rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfistner, C.; Weber, R.; Weber, H. P.; Merazzi, S.; Gruber, R.

    1994-07-01

    The thermally induced beam distortions in end-pumped Nd:YAG, Nd:GSGG, and Nd:YLF rods were analyzed and the influence of edge- and face-cooling was investigated. The distributions of temperature, stress, and strain in the crystals were calculated by finite element analysis. Based on these data, the space-resolved changes of the refractive index were determined considering thermal dispersion, surface deformation, and strain-induced birefringence. The resulting optical path difference for one round-trip in the end-pumped rods was integrated numerically. For each rod, the induced thermal lens was determined over the extent of the pump spot radius. The calculations of the optical path difference were experimentally confirmed by investigations using a modified Twyman-Green interferometer with a polarized HeNe probe beam at 633 nm under lasing and nonlasing conditions.

  18. Fundamental study of the austenite formation and decomposition in low-silicon, aluminum added TRIP steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Enrique

    2005-11-01

    TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels are under development for automotive applications that require high strength and excellent formability. Conventional TRIP steels consist of a multiphase microstructure comprised of a ferrite matrix with a dispersion of bainite and metastable retained austenite. The high ductility exhibited by these steels results from the transformation of the metastable retained austenite to martensite during straining. In conventional TRIP steel processing, the multiphase microstructure is obtained by controlled cooling from the alpha + gamma region to an isothermal holding temperature. During this holding, bainite forms and carbon is rejected out into the austenite, which lowers the Ms temperature and stabilizes the austenite to room temperature. In this research project, a fundamental study of a low-Si, Mo-Nb added cold rolled TRIP steel with and without Al additions was conducted. In this study, the recrystallization of cold-rolled ferrite, the formation of austenite during intercritical annealing and the characteristics of the decomposition of the intercritically annealed austenite by controlled cooling rates were systematically assessed. Of special interest were: (i) the effect of the initial hot band microstructure, (ii) the formation of epitaxial ferrite during cooling from the intercritical annealing temperature to the isothermal holding temperature, (iii) the influence of the intercritically annealed austenite on the formation of bainite during the isothermal holding temperature, and (iv) the influence of the processing variables on the type, amount, composition and stability of the retained austenite. During this research study, techniques such as OM, SEM, EBSD, TEM, XRD and Magnetometry were used to fully characterize the microstructures. Furthermore, a Gleeble 3500 unit at US Steel Laboratories was used for dilatometry studies and to simulate different CGL processing routes, from which specimens were obtained to evaluate

  19. Site controlled red-yellow-green light emitting InGaN quantum discs on nano-tipped GaN rods.

    PubMed

    Conroy, M; Li, H; Kusch, G; Zhao, C; Ooi, B; Edwards, P R; Martin, R W; Holmes, J D; Parbrook, P J

    2016-06-01

    We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips' broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD's confinement dimensions, rather than significantly increasing the In%. This article details the easily controlled method of manipulating the QDs dimensions producing high crystal quality InGaN without complicated growth conditions needed for strain relaxation and alloy compositional changes seen for bulk planar GaN templates. PMID:27174084

  20. UNOCAL Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program. Environmental Monitoring Plan - supplemental environmental. Volume 1. Trip 2 report. Rept. for 1988-90

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The Program agreed to comply with existing environmental monitoring regulations and to develop an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) incorporating supplemental monitoring in the areas of water, air, solid waste, and worker health and safety during the period 1985-1992. These activities are described in a series of quarterly and annual reports. The report contains results of three years of supplemental environmental sampling (Trial Trip, 1988; Trip 1, 1989; and Trip 2, 1990); Trip 2 sampling and analytical methods; quality assurance and quality control procedures; sampling and analytical methods; and corrected data from 1988 and 1989 gas and particulate concentrations.

  1. Hydraulic lock for displacer rod drive mechanism (DRDM) and method of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, E.D.

    1990-12-18

    This paper describes a drive rod latch in combination with a nuclear reactor having a drive rod disposed in a rod housing characterized in that the drive rod has one end selectively exposed to a first, relatively low pressure zone of the reactor and another end thereof in communication with a second, relatively high pressure zone of the reactor. The drive rod further having disposed on an end thereof a valve member and the rod housing having disposed thereon a corresponding valve seat, and a control valve for selectively establishing communication between the housing and the first zone of the reactor whereby a pressure differential is created across the piston. The pressure differential being sufficient to seat the valve member against the valve seat to thereby establish a pressure boundary.

  2. Process development and fabrication for sphere-pac fuel rods. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Welty, R.K.; Campbell, M.H.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium fuel rods containing sphere-pac fuel have been fabricated for in-reactor tests and demonstrations. A process for the development, qualification, and fabrication of acceptable sphere-pac fuel rods is described. Special equipment to control fuel contamination with moisture or air and the equipment layout needed for rod fabrication is described and tests for assuring the uniformity of the fuel column are discussed. Fuel retainers required for sphere-pac fuel column stability and instrumentation to measure fuel column smear density are described. Results of sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication campaigns are reviewed and recommended improvements for high throughput production are noted.

  3. Three-Rod Linear Ion Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, Gary R.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1993-01-01

    Three-parallel-rod electrode structures proposed for use in linear ion traps and possibly for electrostatic levitation of macroscopic particles. Provides wider viewing angle because they confine ions in regions outside rod-electrode structures.

  4. Solid-state-laser-rod holder

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.; Barnes, N.P.; Griggs, J.E.

    1981-08-11

    The disclosure relates to a solid state laser rod holder comprising Invar, copper tubing, and epoxy joints. Materials and coefficients of expansion of the components of the holder combine with the rod to produce a joint which will give before the rod itself will. The rod may be lased at about 70 to 80/sup 0/K and returned from such a temperature to room temperature repeatedly without its or the holder's destruction.

  5. Field Trips and Their Effect on Student Achievement and Attitudes: A Comparison of Physical versus Virtual Field Trips to the Indian River Lagoon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Lesley C.; Gallo, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effect of physical and virtual field trips on undergraduate, nonscience majors. No significant differences were seen in achievement, attitudes, learning styles, interactions between field trip and learning styles, or students' ability to answer questions at different levels. Results imply that both field trips promote…

  6. Parametric Analysis of a Turbine Trip Event in a BWR Using a 3D Nodal Code

    SciTech Connect

    Gorzel, A.

    2006-07-01

    Two essential thermal hydraulics safety criteria concerning the reactor core are that even during operational transients there is no fuel melting and not-permissible cladding temperatures are avoided. A common concept for boiling water reactors is to establish a minimum critical power ratio (MCPR) for steady state operation. For this MCPR it is shown that only a very small number of fuel rods suffers a short-term dryout during the transient. It is known from experience that the limiting transient for the determination of the MCPR is the turbine trip with blocked bypass system. This fast transient was simulated for a German BWR by use of the three-dimensional reactor analysis transient code SIMULATE-3K. The transient behaviour of the hot channels was used as input for the dryout calculation with the transient thermal hydraulics code FRANCESCA. By this way the maximum reduction of the CPR during the transient could be calculated. The fast increase in reactor power due to the pressure increase and to an increased core inlet flow is limited mainly by the Doppler effect, but automatically triggered operational measures also can contribute to the mitigation of the turbine trip. One very important method is the short-term fast reduction of the recirculation pump speed which is initiated e. g. by a pressure increase in front of the turbine. The large impacts of the starting time and of the rate of the pump speed reduction on the power progression and hence on the deterioration of CPR is presented. Another important procedure to limit the effects of the transient is the fast shutdown of the reactor that is caused when the reactor power reaches the limit value. It is shown that the SCRAM is not fast enough to reduce the first power maximum, but is able to prevent the appearance of a second - much smaller - maximum that would occur around one second after the first one in the absence of a SCRAM. (author)

  7. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  8. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  9. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  10. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  11. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  12. Mechanoresponsive change in photoluminescent color of rod-like liquid-crystalline compounds and control of molecular orientation on photoaligned layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Mizuho; Miura, Seiya; Okumoto, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Mayuko; Fukae, Ryohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we reported novel liquid-crystalline luminophore that switches its photoluminescent color by mechanically grinding. Mechanochromic luminescence (MCL) is expected for mechanical sensor, cellular imaging, detection of microenvironmental changes, and optical memory. In this work, we focused on liquid-crystalline MCL compounds on alignment layer. Controlling the molecular alignment of MCL compounds with photoalignment layer have potential to succeed in functional MCL film such as polarized micropatterned MCL and directional detection of mechanical stimuli. Herein, we prepared asymmetric rodlike MCL compounds containing cyano- and pyridyl molecular terminal and explored their photoluminescence behavior under mechanical stimulus. The cyano terminated compound showed a nematic phase and tuned its photoluminescent color from green to yellow upon grinding, while the pyridyl-terminated compounds that show no mesophase changed its photoluminescent color from blue to green and reverted to its initial color by heating above its melting point. The cyano-terminated MCL was aligned along the orientation direction of photoalignment layer and pyridyl-terminated MCL exhibited uniaxial alignment when it coated on photoaligned film containing carboxylic acid.

  13. Evidence, explanations, and recommendations for teachers' field trip strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebar, Bryan

    Field trips are well recognized by researchers as an educational approach with the potential to complement and enhance classroom science teaching by exposing students to unique activities, resources, and content in informal settings. The following investigation addresses teachers' field trip practices in three related manuscripts: (1) A study examining the details of teachers' pedagogical strategies intended to facilitate connections between students' experiences and the school curricula while visiting an aquarium; (2) A study documenting and describing sources of knowledge that teachers draw from when leading field trips to an aquarium; (3) A position paper that reviews and summarizes research on effective pedagogical strategies for field trips. Together these three pieces address key questions regarding teachers' practices on field trips: (1) What strategies are teachers employing (and not employing) during self-guided field trips to facilitate learning tied to the class curriculum? (2) What sources of knowledge do teachers utilize when leading field trips? (3) How can teachers be better prepared to lead trips that promote learning? The Oregon Coast Aquarium served as the field trip site for teachers included in this study. The setting suited these questions because the aquarium serves tens of thousands of students on field trips each year but provides no targeted programming for these students as they explore the exhibits. In other words, the teachers who lead field trips assume much of the responsibility for facilitating students' experience. In order to describe and characterize teachers' strategies to link students' experiences to the curriculum, a number of teachers (26) were observed as they led their students' visit to the public spaces of the aquarium. Artifacts, such as worksheets, used during the visit were collected for analysis as well. Subsequently, all teachers were surveyed regarding their use of the field trip and their sources of knowledge for

  14. Appraisal of boundary layer trips for landing gear testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Philip; Feltham, Graham; Ekmekci, Alis

    2013-11-01

    Dynamic similarity during scaled model testing is difficult to maintain. Forced boundary layer transition via a surface protuberance is a common method used to address this issue, however few guidelines exist for the effective tripping of complex geometries, such as aircraft landing gears. To address this shortcoming, preliminary wind tunnel tests were performed at Re = 500,000. Surface transition visualisation and pressure measurements show that zigzag type trips of a given size and location are effective at promoting transition, thus preventing the formation of laminar separation bubbles and increasing the effective Reynolds number from the critical regime to the supercritical regime. Extension of these experiments to include three additional tripping methods (wires, roughness strips, CADCUT dots) in a range of sizes, at Reynolds number of 200,000 and below, have been performed in a recirculating water channel. Analysis of surface pressure measurements and time resolved PIV for each trip device, size and location has established a set of recommendations for successful use of tripping for future, low Reynolds number landing gear testing.

  15. Understanding intra-urban trip patterns from taxi trajectory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Kang, Chaogui; Gao, Song; Xiao, Yu; Tian, Yuan

    2012-10-01

    Intra-urban human mobility is investigated by means of taxi trajectory data that are collected in Shanghai, China, where taxis play an important role in urban transportation. From the taxi trajectories, approximately 1.5 million trips of anonymous customers are extracted on seven consecutive days. The globally spatio-temporal patterns of trips exhibit a significant daily regularity. Since each trip can be viewed as a displacement in the random walk model, the distributions of the distance and direction of the extracted trips are investigated in this research. The direction distribution shows an NEE-SWW-dominant direction, and the distance distribution can be well fitted by an exponentially truncated power law, with the scaling exponent β = 1.2 ± 0.15. The observed patterns are attributed to the geographical heterogeneity of the study area, which makes the spatial distribution of trajectory stops to be non-uniform. We thus construct a model that integrates both the geographical heterogeneity and distance decay effect, to interpret the observed patterns. Our Monte Carlo simulation results closely match to the observed patterns and thus validate the proposed model. According to the proposed model, in a single-core urban area, the geographical heterogeneity and distance decay effect improve each other when influencing human mobility patterns. Geographical heterogeneity leads to a faster observed decay, and the distance decay effect makes the spatial distribution of trips more concentrated.

  16. Synaptic transmission from rods to rod-dominated bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Yang, X L; Wu, S M

    1993-06-11

    Synaptic transmission between photoreceptors and bipolar cells was studied in dark-adapted tiger salamander retinas. Based on the relative light sensitivity, bipolar cells, either depolarizing (DBC) or hyperpolarizing (HBC), fell into two groups: one receives inputs primarily from rods (rod-dominated bipolar cells, DBCR and HBCR) and the other receives inputs primarily from cones (cone-dominated bipolar cells, DBCC and HBCC). The input-output relations of the rod-DBCR and rod-HBCR synapses were determined by plotting the voltage responses of the rod and DBCR (or HBCR) to dim 500-nm light steps, which polarizes only the rods but not the cones. The slope gains of both synapses were the highest near the dark rod voltage (-2.5 for the rod-DBCR synapse and 4.0 for the rod-HBCR synapse), and they (the absolute values) became progressively smaller at more hyperpolarized rod voltages. PMID:8186975

  17. Use of ``virtual'' field trips in teaching introductory geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Stephen D.

    1998-08-01

    We designed a series of case studies for Introductory Geology Laboratory courses using computer visualization techniques integrated with traditional laboratory materials. These consist of a comprehensive case study which requires three two-hour long laboratory periods to complete, and several shorter case studies requiring one or two, two-hour laboratory periods. Currently we have prototypes of the Yellowstone National Park, Hawaii volcanoes and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge case studies. The Yellowstone prototype can be used to learn about a wide variety of rocks and minerals, about geothermal activity and hydrology, about volcanic hazards and the hot-spot theory of plate tectonics. The Hawaiian exercise goes into more depth about volcanoes, volcanic rocks and their relationship to plate movements. The Mid-Atlantic Ridge project focuses on formation of new ocean crust and mineral-rich hydrothermal deposits at spreading centers. With new improvements in visualization technology that are making their way to personal computers, we are now closer to the ideal of a "virtual" field trip. We are currently making scenes of field areas in Hawaii and Yellowstone which allow the student to pan around the area and zoom in on interesting objects. Specific rocks in the scene will be able to be "picked up" and studied in three dimensions. This technology improves the ability of the computer to present a realistic simulation of the field area and allows the student to have more control over the presentation. This advanced interactive technology is intuitive to control, relatively cheap and easy to add to existing computer programs and documents.

  18. Rod cluster having improved vane configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Shockling, L.A.; Francis, T.A.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes a pressurized water reactor vessel, the vessel defining a predetermined axial direction of the flow of coolant therewithin and having plural spider assemblies supporting, for vertical movement within the vessel, respective clusters of rods in spaced, parallel axial relationship, parallel to the predetermined axial direction of coolant flow, and a rod guide for each spider assembly and respective cluster of rods. The rod guide having horizontally oriented support plates therewithin, each plate having an interior opening for accommodating axial movement therethrough of the spider assembly and respective cluster of rods. The opening defining plural radially extending channels and corresponding parallel interior wall surfaces of the support plate.

  19. Principles of TRIP Steel Optimization for Passive Damping Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraley, George Jay

    Globally many historic structures of cultural significance which do not have systems to mitigate seismic damage are located in areas with heavy seismic activity. Efforts have been undertaken to develop strategies to retrofit such structures, however any intervention must be limited in size for aesthetic reasons. To contribute to this effort, ArcelorMittal aims to create steel-based solutions for passive energy dissipation through plastic deformation during cyclic loading. High-strength TRansformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels are proposed as an excellent candidate material for this application, due to the extreme combination of high strength and large ductility they are well-known to exhibit. To evaluate high-strength TRIP steels for passive damping applications, isothermal, fully-reversed, displacement-controlled Ultra-Low Cycle Fatigue (ULCF) experiments (Nf < 100) were conducted on two tempering conditions of austenitic BlastAlloy (BA) TRIP 180. One tempering condition resulted in a Mssigma temperature of 27 °C and stress-assisted martensitic nucleation, and the other a Mssigma temperature of -8 °C and strain-induced martensitic nucleation at room temperature. The higher austenite stability condition (Ms sigma = -8 °C) was found to have approximately twice the fatigue life and a lower rate of cyclic hardening at fixed displacement amplitudes for low to intermediate levels of plastic strain range (2-10%) compared to the lower stability austenite condition (Mssigma = 27 °C). However, at higher levels of plastic straining (10-16% strain range) the fatigue lives and strain hardening behavior converged for the two stabilities, indicating a likely exhaustion of transformation during the first few cycles. ULCF life behavior for the high-stability austenite condition compared favorably with literature values for structural stainless steel 316, despite having a yield strength approximately four times larger. For a similar number of cycles to failure the high

  20. Exploiting rod technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-06-01

    ROD development was proceeding apace until recent budgetary decisions caused funding support for ROD development to be drastically reduced. The funding which was originally provided by DARPA and the Balanced Technology Initiative (BTI) Office has been cut back to zero from $800K. To determine the aeroballistic coefficients of a candidate dart, ARDEC is currently supporting development out of its own 6.2 funds at about $100K. ARDEC has made slow progress toward achieving this end because of failures in the original dart during testing. It appears that the next dart design to be tested will diverge from the original concept visualized by DARPA and Science and Technology Associates (STA). STA, the design engineer, takes exception to these changes on the basis of inappropriate test conditions and insufficient testing. At this time, the full resolution of this issue will be difficult because of the current management structure, which separates the developer (ARDEC) from the designer (STA).

  1. The role of attractive interactions in rod-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Antypov, Dmytro; Cleaver, Douglas J

    2004-06-01

    We present a computer simulation study of binary mixtures of prolate Gay-Berne particles and Lennard-Jones spheres. Results are presented for three such rod-sphere systems which differ from each other only in the interaction between unlike particles. Both the mixing-demixing behavior and the transitions between the isotropic and any liquid crystalline phases are studied for each system, as a function of temperature and concentration ratio. For systems which show macroscopic demixing, the rod-sphere interaction is shown to give direct control over interfacial anchoring properties, giving rise to the possibility of micellar phase formation in the case of homeotropic anchoring. Additionally, it is shown that on incorporating high concentrations of spheres into a system of rods with weak demixing properties, microphase-separated structures can be induced, including bicontinuous and lamellar arrangements. PMID:15268056

  2. Texture developed during deformation of Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, M.; Shanta, C.; Asim, T.; Sushil, M.

    2015-04-01

    Automotive industry is currently focusing on using advanced high strength steels (AHSS) due to its high strength and formability for closure applications. Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel is promising material for this application among other AHSS. The present work is focused on the microstructure development during deformation of TRIP steel sheets. To mimic complex strain path condition during forming of automotive body, Limit Dome Height (LDH) tests were conducted and samples were deformed in servo hydraulic press to find the different strain path. FEM Simulations were done to predict different strain path diagrams and compared with experimental results. There is a significant difference between experimental and simulation results as the existing material models are not applicable for TRIP steels. Micro texture studies were performed on the samples using EBSD and X-RD techniques. It was observed that austenite is transformed to martensite and texture developed during deformation had strong impact on limit strain and strain path.

  3. Mechanical and Microstructural Characterization of an Aluminum Bearing Trip Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, Alberto; Guzmán, Alexis; De Barbieri, Flavio; Artigas, Alfredo; Carvajal, Linton; Bustos, Oscar; Garza-Montes-de Oca, Nelson F.; Colás, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of a steel able to sustain the TRIP-effect were studied. The material was prepared by taking in mind the partial substitution of silicon by aluminum following a processing route that included hot forging, hot and cold rolling, intercritical annealing, and a final bainitic isothermal treatment. The mechanical properties that were obtained resulted to be above those of commercial a 780 TRIP steel. The TRIP phenomenon was confirmed by the change in retained austenite before and after deforming the steel; X-ray diffraction was used to evaluate the volume content of retained austenite. Formability of the steel under study can be rationalized in terms of the texture developed in the material.

  4. Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Trip Development for Hyper-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Auslender, Aaron H.; Dilley, Authur D.; Calleja, John F.

    2000-01-01

    Boundary layer trip devices for the Hper-X forebody have been experimentally examined in several wind tunnels. Five different trip configurations were compared in three hypersonic facilities, the LaRC 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel, the LaRC 31 -Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel, and in the HYPULSE Reflected Shock Tunnel at GASL. Heat transfer distributions, utilizing the phosphor thermography and thin-film techniques, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 0-deg, 2-deg, and 4-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 1.2 to 15.4 million: and inlet cowl door simulated in both open and closed positions. Comparisons of transition due to discrete roughness elements have led to the selection of a trip configuration for the Hyper-X Mach 7 flight vehicle.

  5. Field trips in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.P.; Erslev, E.A.

    2004-07-01

    The theme of the 2004 GSA Annual Meeting and Exposition, 'Geoscience in a Changing World' covers both new and traditional areas of the earth sciences. The Front Range of the Rocky Mountains and the High Plains preserve an outstanding record of geological processes from Precambrian through Quaternary times, and thus served as excellent educational exhibits for the meeting. The chapters in this field guide all contain technical content as well as a field trip log describing field trip routes and stops. Of the 25 field trips offered at the Meeting. 14 are described in the guidebook, covering a wide variety of geoscience disciplines, with chapters on tectonics (Precambrian and Laramide), stratigraphy and paleoenvironments (e.g., early Paleozoic environments, Jurassic eolian environments, the K-T boundary, the famous Oligocene Florissant fossil beds), economic deposits (coal and molybdenum), geological hazards, and geoarchaeology. Two papers have been abstracted separately for the Coal Abstracts database.

  6. Tribe kills fuel rod proposal

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-13

    This article is a review of nuclear utilities` efforts to find a repository of spent fuel rods. The rejection by the Mescalero Apaches of plans to build a waste repository on tribal lands has left a number of utilities scrambling to find interim solutions. Prairie Island will have to close before the end of the year unless a solution is found, and the Hope Creek/Salem units, exhausting there storage capacity within ten years, are considering dry-cask storage.

  7. RECOVERY OF ROD PHOTORESPONSES IN ABCR-DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Ambarish S.; Qtaishat, Nasser M.; Little, Deborah M.; Pepperberg, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose ABCR protein in the rod outer segment is thought to facilitate movement of the all-trans retinal photoproduct of rhodopsin bleaching out of the disk lumen. We investigated the extent to which ABCR deficiency affects post-bleach recovery of the rod photoresponse in ABCR-deficient (abcr−/−) mice. Methods Electroretinographic (ERG) a-wave responses were recorded from abcr−/− mice and two control strains. Using a bright probe flash, we examined the course of rod recovery following fractional rhodopsin bleaches of ~10−6, ~3×10−5, ~0.03 and ~0.30–0.40. Results Dark-adapted abcr−/− mice and controls exhibited similar normalized near-peak amplitudes of the paired-flash-ERG-derived, weak-flash response. Response recovery following ~10−6 bleaching exhibited an average exponential time constant of 319, 171 and 213 ms, respectively, in the abcr−/− and the two control strains. Recovery time constants determined for ~3×10−5 bleaching did not differ significantly among strains. However, those determined for the ~0.03 bleach indicated significantly faster recovery in abcr−/− (2.34 ± 0.74 min) than in the controls (5.36 ± 2.20 min, and 5.92 ± 2.44 min). Following ~0.30–0.40 bleaching, the initial recovery in the abcr−/− was on average faster than in controls. Conclusions By comparison with controls, abcr−/− mice exhibit faster rod recovery following a bleach of ~0.03. The data suggest that ABCR in normal rods may directly or indirectly prolong all-trans retinal clearance from the disk lumen over a significant bleaching range, and that the essential function of ABCR may be to promote the clearance of residual amounts of all-trans retinal that remain in the disks long after bleaching. PMID:18263807

  8. Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment

    DOEpatents

    Donck, Harry A.; Veca, Anthony R.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

  9. Electric Fuel Rod Simulator Fabrication at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Larry J.; McCulloch, Reg

    2004-02-04

    Commercial vendors could not supply the high-quality, highly instrumented electric fuel rod simulators (FRS) required for large thermal-hydraulic safety-oriented experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1970s and early 1980s. Staff at ORNL designed, developed, and manufactured the simulators utilized in these safety experiments. Important FRS design requirements include (1) materials of construction, (2) test power requirements and availability, (3) experimental test objectives, (4) supporting thermal analyses, and (5) extensive quality control throughout all phases of FRS fabrication. This paper will present an overview of these requirements (design, analytics, and quality control) as practiced at ORNL to produce a durable high-quality FRS.

  10. Electric Fuel Rod Simulator Fabrication at ORNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Larry J.; McCulloch, Reg

    2004-02-01

    Commercial vendors could not supply the high-quality, highly instrumented electric fuel rod simulators (FRS) required for large thermal-hydraulic safety-oriented experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1970s and early 1980s. Staff at ORNL designed, developed, and manufactured the simulators utilized in these safety experiments. Important FRS design requirements include (1) materials of construction, (2) test power requirements and availability, (3) experimental test objectives, (4) supporting thermal analyses, and (5) extensive quality control throughout all phases of FRS fabrication. This paper will present an overview of these requirements (design, analytics, and quality control) as practiced at ORNL to produce a durable high-quality FRS.

  11. Factors affecting elementary principals' and teachers' decisions to support outdoor field trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, Michael Joseph

    Outdoor field trips are recommended in science education reform, yet they are not frequently taken. Barriers may prevent elementary public school teachers from participating in outdoor field trips (Mirka, 1973; Falk & Balling, 1979; Ham, 1988; Orion, 1993). To determine what would increase students' attendance at a nature preserve, factors that may affect elementary private and public school principals' and teachers' decisions to support field trips were identified and compared. Private school principals supported field trips. They believed field trips were safe, and easy to arrange, and that the field trips helped students experience culture in the community. Experienced public school principals who were supportive and believed field trips should be required believed field trips fit into the teacher's lesson plan and were taken for enrichment. Public school principals who were less experienced with field trips believed field trips should be extracurricular. They believed that field trips served as a reward, and that they needed more information. They did not support field trips. Private school teachers believed that field trips did not have overly demanding administrative concerns. They believed field trips were safe, easy to arrange, and were supported by their administrator. Public school teachers who supported field trips and believed field trips should be required were white, female, experienced, and older. They believed that field trips were safe, easy to arrange, enjoyable, and that they had enough help to conduct trips. Public school teachers who may not support trips had administrative concerns, and they did not believe field trips met the needs of students. These were male, white or non-white, young or middle-aged, and less experienced. They may believe field trips are a waste of time and money. They believed they had a nonsupportive administrator. Money for transportation was a barrier for older public school teachers and principals. No improvement on

  12. Stability and failure analysis of steering tie-rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, GongFeng; Zhang, YiLiang; Xu, XueDong; Ding, DaWei

    2008-11-01

    A new car in operation of only 8,000 km, because of malfunction, resulting in lost control and rammed into the edge of the road, and then the basic vehicle scrapped. According to the investigation of the site, it was found that the tie-rod of the car had been broken. For the subjective analysis of the accident and identifying the true causes of rupture of the tierod, a series of studies, from the angle of theory to experiment on the bended broken tie-rod, were conducted. The mechanical model was established; the stability of the defective tie-rod was simulated based on ANSYS software. Meanwhile, the process of the accident was simulated considering the effect of destabilization of different vehicle speed and direction of the impact. Simultaneously, macro graphic test, chemical composition analysis, microstructure analysis and SEM analysis of the fracture were implemented. The results showed that: 1) the toughness of the tie-rod is at a normal level, but there is some previous flaws. One quarter of the fracture surface has been cracked before the accident. However, there is no relationship between the flaw and this incident. The direct cause is the dynamic instability leading to the large deformation of impact loading. 2) The declining safety factor of the tie-rod greatly due to the previous flaws; the result of numerical simulation shows that previous flaw is the vital factor of structure instability, on the basis of the comparison of critical loads of the accident tie-rod and normal. The critical load can decrease by 51.3% when the initial defect increases 19.54% on the cross-sectional area, which meets the Theory of Koiter.

  13. 50 CFR 622.44 - Commercial trip limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 622.44, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... Caribbean EEZ more than 150 queen conch per day. (f) Atlantic dolphin and wahoo. (1) The trip limit for... Federal commercial permit for Atlantic dolphin and wahoo, provided that the vessel is not operating as...

  14. 50 CFR 622.44 - Commercial trip limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 622.44, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... Caribbean EEZ more than 150 queen conch per day. (f) Atlantic dolphin and wahoo. (1) The trip limit for... Federal commercial permit for Atlantic dolphin and wahoo, provided that the vessel is not operating as...

  15. 50 CFR 622.278 - Commercial trip limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and... limits on the amount of Atlantic dolphin and wahoo that may be possessed on board or landed, purchased...) Atlantic dolphin and wahoo. (1) The trip limit for wahoo in or from the Atlantic EEZ is 500 lb (227...

  16. 50 CFR 622.278 - Commercial trip limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and... limits on the amount of Atlantic dolphin and wahoo that may be possessed on board or landed, purchased...) Atlantic dolphin and wahoo. (1) The trip limit for wahoo in or from the Atlantic EEZ is 500 lb (227...

  17. 50 CFR 622.44 - Commercial trip limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www... from the Caribbean EEZ more than 150 queen conch per day. (f) Atlantic dolphin and wahoo. (1) The trip... has a Federal commercial permit for Atlantic dolphin and wahoo, provided that the vessel is...

  18. A model for sustainable short-term international medical trips.

    PubMed

    Suchdev, Parminder; Ahrens, Kym; Click, Eleanor; Macklin, Lori; Evangelista, Doris; Graham, Elinor

    2007-01-01

    The health status of many people in developing countries is often dismal compared with the norms in industrialized countries. Increasingly, medical practitioners in the United States and other industrialized countries have become interested in global health issues, an interest that often takes the form of short-term international medical trips. We discuss several ethical issues associated with participation in such trips and use our experiences in developing the Children's Health International Medical Project of Seattle (CHIMPS) to outline and illustrate a set of 7 guiding principles for making these trips. CHIMPS is a resident-run, faculty-supported international medical program founded in 2002 by pediatric residents at the University of Washington in Seattle. Members of CHIMPS work with a rural community in El Salvador to support ongoing public health interventions there and provide sustainable medical care in collaboration with the community and a local nongovernmental organization. The 7 principles developed as a result of this work-mission, collaboration, education, service, teamwork, sustainability, and evaluation-can be used as a model for health practitioners as they develop or select international medical trips. The importance of partnering with the community and working within the existing medical and public health infrastructure is emphasized. Many of the challenges of doing international medical work can be overcome when efforts are guided by a few specific principles, such as those we have outlined. PMID:17660105

  19. Un Viaje al Aeropuerto (A Trip to the Airport).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This illustrated, bilingual Spanish-English intermediate reader describes a class trip to an airport, in which the class tours the airport, and learns about airport activities, the parts of an airplane, and other related topics. Each page of the text is illustrated with a drawing. The narrative is followed by a list of 24 suggested learning…

  20. Astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin study rock samples during field trip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Neil Armstrong, commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, and Astronaut Edwin Aldrin, Lunar module pilot for Apollo 11, study rock samples during a geological field trip to the Quitman Mountains area near the Fort Quitman ruins in far west Texas.

  1. Self-Guided Field Trips for Students of Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, G.; Kerr, Roger; Hadgraft, Roger

    2011-01-01

    In many learning institutions around the world, there is a trend towards larger classes, more flexible learning pathways and reduced teaching resources. Experiential learning is often used in the form of site visits or field trips for students studying engineering, natural resource management, geography and similar disciplines. Providing…

  2. Using a National Park for a Field Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Roy K.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a one-week camping trip to Acadia National Park (Maine) as a non-credit educational experience. Includes activities such as population studies in intertidal zones, wild life sketching, nature list hikes (forest devastation by fire, beaver ponds, glacial ponds and streams), fishing and clamming rips, and student projects. (CS)

  3. Examining the Effects of Field Trips on Science Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Leila A.; Katzman, William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work-in-progress study is to examine science identity of elementary school students in relation to participation in science. The questions asked in this initial analysis were: How will a field trip to a science research and learning center affect students' desires to learn and participate in science and does interviewing…

  4. A Trip to Historic Philadelphia on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Elizabeth K.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an electronic field trip to colonial Philadelphia (Pennsylvania). The historic locale has generated enough websites (Philadelphia Historic District, Betsy Ross homepage, and the Franklin Institute Science Museum) for students to take a virtual tour of the colonial capital. Suggests structuring the activity as a know-want-learn (KWL)…

  5. Trip Staff Training Practices: Survey and Discussion Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwaagstra, Lynn

    A discussion group and survey examined trip-staff training practices among outdoor and adventure recreation/education programs. Of the 40 participants, 80 percent worked with university noncredit programs, with the remaining participants representing university for-credit, military recreation, nonprofit, and for-profit programs. Although the…

  6. Field Trips as Teaching Tools in the Law Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Noelle; Dewhurst, Elaine; Watkins, Los

    2012-01-01

    While field trips are often employed in primary and even second level education as a pedagogical tool, aimed at exposing students to real life experiences, such activities are not as popular at third level (Falk and Balling, 1982; Muse, Chiarelott and Davidman, 1982; Anderson and Zhang, 2003). However, such experiential learning techniques can be…

  7. The Goat Portage: Students' Stories and Learning from Canoe Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwood, Bert

    This study explores how high school students learn from their experiences in an extracurricular adventure program and illustrates how students' narrative inquiries relate to experiential learning. Twelve canoe trips were studied by participant observation methods. Data were collected from recorded interviews with students and staff, field notes,…

  8. The Field Trip Book: Study Travel Experiences in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald V.

    2010-01-01

    Looking for social studies adventures to help students find connections to democratic citizenship? Look no further! This book provides just the answer teachers need for engaging students in field trips as researching learners with emphasis on interdisciplinary social studies plus skills in collecting and reporting data gathered from field…

  9. 50 CFR 622.495 - Commercial trip limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Queen Conch... trip limit specified in this section taken in the EEZ may not be transferred at sea, regardless of... conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ is 200 queen conch per day....

  10. The Nonverbal Communication Field Trip in Organizational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, David W.

    An effective communication learning experience is the nonverbal communication field trip in organizational settings. Objectives for this activity include defining and describing nonverbal areas such as "proxemics,""chronemics,""objectics,""kinesics,""haptics," and "vocalics," and to observe these areas in an organizational setting. The experience…

  11. Computer simulation of equilibrium conditions following a plant 'trip'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limb, D.

    When a process or part of a process experiences an emergency 'trip', the contained fluids redistribute themselves based upon the prevailing pressure gradients and depending upon the positions of valves at the time of the trip. Reverse flow through rotating compression machinery may occur, depending upon the locations of non-return valves. Reduction in pressure and mixing of cryogenic fluids of different compositions and/or temperatures can both lead to generation of significant volumes of vapour. This equilibration process is usually largely over in a matter of seconds rather than minutes. Key questions facing process and mechanical designers are: what is the settle-out pressure, and can we ensure relief valves do not lift following a trip? To answer these related questions it is necessary to analyse the state of the system prior to the trip, and then, based upon valve positions, etc., construct a model of the worst case probable scenarios for the qualitative redistribution of fluid inventory. At this point the simulation program may be employed to help calculate rigorously the final settle out conditions for each of the possible scenarios. This technique is particularly appropriate for cryogenic processes including refrigeration cycles. It is illustrated here with the help of a multistage hydrocarbon compressor example. Other related non-standard applications of the steady state process simulation program are identified.

  12. Cognitive Impact of a Grade School Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrell, Patricia D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a study to design and conduct a three-hour field experience for 3rd and 4th grade students on forestry and forest products, and to determine the cognitive effects of participation in this field trip on the children. Reports an increase in student knowledge after participating in this experience. Discusses the reasons for students'…

  13. Goldschmidt Conference 2005: Field Trip Guide to the Columbia River Basalt Group

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Barton S.; Petcovic, Heather L.; Reidel, Steve P.

    2005-06-16

    This field trip guide was prepared for the 2005 Goldschmidt Conference held in Moscow, Idaho. The field trip guide provides a two day introduction to the features of the Columbia River Basalt Group in eastern Washington.

  14. CONTROL FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lichtenberger, H.V.; Cameron, R.A.

    1959-03-31

    S>A control rod operating device in a nuclear reactor of the type in which the control rod is gradually withdrawn from the reactor to a position desired during stable operation is described. The apparatus is comprised essentially of a stop member movable in the direction of withdrawal of the control rod, a follower on the control rod engageable with the stop and means urging the follower against the stop in the direction of withdrawal. A means responsive to disengagement of the follower from the stop is provided for actuating the control rod to return to the reactor shut-down position.

  15. Self-assembly of rod-coil-rod ABA-type triblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Zhong; Sun, Zhao-Yan; Zhang, Cheng-Xiang; An, Li-Jia; Tong, Zhen

    2008-02-21

    Self-assembled behavior of symmetric ABA rod-coil-rod triblock copolymer melts is studied by applying self-consistent-field lattice techniques in three-dimensional space. The phase diagram is constructed to understand the effects of the chain architecture on the self-assembled behavior. Four stable structures are observed for the ABA rod-coil-rod triblock, i.e., spherelike, lamellar, gyroidlike, and cylindrical structures. Different from AB rod-coil diblock and BAB coil-rod-coil triblock copolymers, the lamellar structure observed in ABA rod-coil-rod triblock copolymer melts is not stable for high volume fraction of the rod component (f(rod)=0.8), which is attributed to the intramolecular interactions between the two rod blocks of the polymer chain. When 0.3rod)<0.7, the intramolecular interactions between the two rigid blocks of the polymer chain are decrease, which results in the occurrence of some interesting metastable mixed structures. These structures have not been observed in polymers containing only one rod block, such as a lamellar-alt-lamellar structure. The results are expected to provide guidance for the design of microstructures in experiments. PMID:18298171

  16. Assessment of Heat Up of Shut-Off Rods of 540 MWe IPHWRs Using CFD Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, D.H.; Pathak, N.K.; Datta, D.; Dharne, S.P.

    2006-07-01

    There are two independent, fast acting and diverse reactor shutdown systems in 540 MWe Indian PHWR viz. Shut down System no.1 (SDS no.1) and Shut down System no.2. Either of them is fully capable of reactor shut down with adequate shutdown margin. SDS no.1 consists of 28 shut-off rods (SRs) which are Stainless Steel (SS)-Cadmium- Stainless Steel sandwiched rods. The SRs remain in parked out condition during reactor operation. When any of the reactor operating conditions call for a reactor trip or the operator manually actuate the system the shut-off rods are dropped into the reactor core. The SRs take about 2.5 Sec. to drop into the core. The system adds about 72 mk negative reactivity into the core, thus bringing the reactor to a safe sub-critical condition. During reactor power operation, the Calandria is full of moderator and bottom tip of SR is partly immersed in the moderator. When a SR enters the core as a part of on-line testing or inadvertently during reactor operation, due to neutron flux heat is generated in the SR, which is carried away by the moderator. The present study is done to predict the maximum temperature of Cadmium inside the Cadmium sandwiched SS elements of SR, when the rod partly enters inside the Calandria and the reactor continues to operate at or close to full power i.e. when the heat generation rate in SRs is the maximum. 3-Dimensional temperature distribution in the shut-off rod is predicted using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) techniques. (authors)

  17. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Crever, F.E.

    1962-05-01

    BS>A slow-acting shim rod for control of major variations in reactor neutron flux and a fast-acting control rod to correct minor flux variations are employed to provide a sensitive, accurate control system. The fast-acting rod is responsive to an error signal which is produced by changes in the neutron flux from a predetermined optimum level. When the fast rod is thus actuated in a given direction, means is provided to actuate the slow-moving rod in that direction to return the fast rod to a position near the midpoint of its control range. (AEC)

  18. Rotation of a Thin Elastic Rod Injected into a Cylindrical Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, Connor; Su, Tianxiang; Wicks, Nathan; Pabon, Jahir; Reis, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    We report the results from an experimental investigation of the buckling of a thin elastic rod injected into a horizontal cylindrical constraint, with an emphasis on comparing the two cases of rotating, or not, the rod at the injection site. We are particularly interested on the total length of rod that can be injected into the pipe prior to the onset of helical buckling. This instability arises due to the frictional rod-constraint contact that eventually leads to the buildup of axial stress on the rod, above a critical value. We explore the dependence of the buckling conditions on the physical and control parameters of the system (e.g. material and geometric parameters, injection speed and rotation frequency) and rationalize the underlying physical mechanism through a reduced model. Funding and support provided by Schlumberger-Doll Research.

  19. The Use of Field Trips in Air-Photo Interpretation and Remote-Sensing Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giardino, John Richard; Fish, Ernest Bertley

    1986-01-01

    Advocates the use of field trips for improving students' image-interpretation abilities. Presents guidelines for developing a field trip for an aerial-photo interpretation class or a remote-sensing class. Reviews methodology employed, content emphasis, and includes an exercise that was used on a trip. (ML)

  20. Echoes from the Field: An Ethnographic Investigation of Outdoor Science Field Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxerman, Jonathan Zvi

    2013-01-01

    As popular as field trips are, one might think they have been well-studied. Nonetheless, field trips have not been heavily studied, and little research has mapped what actually transpires during field trips. Accordingly, to address this research gap, I asked two related research questions. The first question is a descriptive one: What happens on…

  1. Factors Which Influence Learning Ability during a Scientific Field Trip in a Natural Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orion, Nir; Hofstein, Avi

    The main goal of this study was to obtain insight about the factors that influence students' ability to learn during a field trip, in order to improve the planning and execution of learning field trips. The study was conducted in the context of a 1-day geological field trip for high school students in Israel. Three domains were tested by…

  2. Questionnaire-based person trip visualization and its integration to quantitative measurements in Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimijiama, S.; Nagai, M.

    2016-06-01

    With telecommunication development in Myanmar, person trip survey is supposed to shift from conversational questionnaire to GPS survey. Integration of both historical questionnaire data to GPS survey and visualizing them are very important to evaluate chronological trip changes with socio-economic and environmental events. The objectives of this paper are to: (a) visualize questionnaire-based person trip data, (b) compare the errors between questionnaire and GPS data sets with respect to sex and age and (c) assess the trip behaviour in time-series. Totally, 345 individual respondents were selected through random stratification to assess person trip using a questionnaire and GPS survey for each. Conversion of trip information such as a destination from the questionnaires was conducted by using GIS. The results show that errors between the two data sets in the number of trips, total trip distance and total trip duration are 25.5%, 33.2% and 37.2%, respectively. The smaller errors are found among working-age females mainly employed with the project-related activities generated by foreign investment. The trip distant was yearly increased. The study concluded that visualization of questionnaire-based person trip data and integrating them to current quantitative measurements are very useful to explore historical trip changes and understand impacts from socio-economic events.

  3. Multiple Stages of Weekend Field Trips To Expose Students to Nature: Emphasis on Discovery and Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krupa, James J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the three stages of a field trip and reviews stage 1, weekend field trips, which focuses on an organism's morphology, behavior, and ecology. Presents activities on salamanders, small mammals, fish, birds, and bats. Explains the difficulties of weekend trips. (YDS)

  4. 78 FR 53486 - Addition of Round-Trip Mailer Product to the Competitive Product List

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Round-Trip Mailer Product to the Competitive Product List AGENCY: Postal Service TM ACTION: Notice... Commission to add a product called ``Round-Trip Mailer'' to the competitive product list. DATES: Effective... (Commission) a request to add a ``Round-Trip Mailer'' product to its competitive product list, pursuant...

  5. The Effectiveness of a Virtual Field Trip (VFT) Module in Learning Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haris, Norbaizura; Osman, Kamisah

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Field Trip is a computer aided module of science developed to study the Colonisation and Succession in Mangrove Swamps, as an alternative to the real field trip in Form for Biology. This study is to identify the effectiveness of the Virtual Field Trip (VFT) module towards the level of achievement in the formative test for this topic. This…

  6. An 8000-Mile, 38-Day Field Trip for High-School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Mary Jo

    1988-01-01

    Describes an extended summer field trip through nine states and Canada on geology, biology, and ecology. Discusses how this trip helps students learn about the world they live in by first-hand experience and by learning to take responsibility for their own education. Highlights the history, organization, and value of this trip. (CW)

  7. Africana Acquisitions; Report of a Publication Survey Trip to Nigeria, Southern Africa, and Europe, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherell, Julian W.

    A publication survey trip to Nigeria, Southern Africa, and Europe was taken by Julian W. Witherell of the African Section of the Library of Congress in 1972. The purpose of the trip was to improve the flow of publications about Africa to the Library of Congress. The trip was successful in that personal contacts helpful in obtaining local materials…

  8. 49 CFR 236.560 - Contact element, mechanical trip type; location with respect to rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contact element, mechanical trip type; location... Instructions; Locomotives § 236.560 Contact element, mechanical trip type; location with respect to rail. Contact element of automatic train stop device of the mechanical trip type shall be maintained at a...

  9. A procedure for calculation of boundary layer trip protuberances in overexpanded rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmucker, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    A procedure is described for sizing, scaling, positioning and performance loss calculation of a boundary layer trip protuberance. The theoretical results are compared with some experimental data. The application of boundary layer trips, such as secondary injection, wall angle discontinuities, circumferential grooves, and circumferential trip protuberances for reducing side loads on rocket nozzle walls is discussed.

  10. Growth and Morphology of Rod Eutectics

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Teng; Shan Liu; R. Trivedi

    2008-03-17

    The formation of rod eutectic microstructure is investigated systematically in a succinonitrile-camphor alloy of eutectic composition by using the directional solidification technique. A new rod eutectic configuration is observed in which the rods form with elliptical cylindrical shape. Two different orientations of the ellipse are observed that differ by a 90{sup o} rotation such that the major and the minor axes are interchanged. Critical experiments in thin samples, where a single layer of rods forms, show that the spacing and orientation of the elliptic rods are governed by the growth rate and the sample thickness. In thicker samples, multi layers of rods form with circular cross-section and the scaling law between the spacing and velocity predicted by the Jackson and Hunt model is validated. A theoretical model is developed for a two-dimensional array of elliptical rods that are arranged in a hexagonal or a square array, and the results are shown to be consistent with the experimental observations. The model of elliptic rods is also shown to reduce to that for the circular rod eutectic when the lengths of the two axes are equal, and to the lamellar eutectic model when one of the axes is much larger than the other one.

  11. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest; Pardini, John A.; Walker, David E.

    1987-01-01

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  12. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  13. The directional sensitivity of retinal rods.

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, M; Ching, C C; Kitahara, K

    1983-01-01

    Rod field sensitivity, 10-S(r) (i.e. the reciprocal of the radiance of a background required for 10-fold elevation of rod threshold) was measured for monochromatic backgrounds traversing the pupil at various points (r) on three subjects. The wave-length dependency of the directional sensitivities of the three foveal cone mechanisms of the principal subject have been reported previously (Alpern & Kitahara, 1983). Rods, as cones, are less sensitive to obliquely incident, than to normally incident backgrounds. At the pupil margin (4 mm) the effect is between 0.368 and 0.976 log10 units smaller for rods. After correction for losses by corneal reflexion and by absorption in the lens, S(r) for rods is reasonably described by the parabolic equation used by Stiles (1937) to quantify the directional sensitivity of cones. The small effect for rods precludes a description as consistently precise as this equation provides for cones. The steepness of the parabolic curve best fitting the directional sensitivity data of the rods of the principal subject was independent of background wave number. For a second subject, whose rods are supposed to be smaller, it was directly proportional to the square of that wave number. The latter is the expectation if the directional sensitivity of this subject's rods were determined by principles outlined in the diffraction theory of Simon (1970). PMID:6644624

  14. Using GIS for planning field trips: In-situ assessment of Geopoints for field trips with mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Sarah; Kisser, Thomas; Ditter, Raimund

    2016-04-01

    Up to now no application is existing for collecting data via mobile devices using a geographical information system referring to the evaluation of Geopoints. Classified in different geographical topics a Geopark can be rated for suitability of Geopoints for field trips. The systematically acquisition of the suitability of Geopoints is necessary, especially when doing field trips with lower grade students who see a physical-geographic phenomenon for the first time. For this reason, the development of such an application is an invention for easy handling evaluations of Geopoints on the basis of commonly valid criteria like esthetic attraction, interestingness, and pithiness (Streifinger 2010). Collecting data provides the opportunity of receiving information of particularly suitable Geopoints out of the sight from students, tourists and others. One solution for collecting data in a simple and intuitive form is Survey123 for ArcGIS (http://survey123.esri.com/#/). You can create surveys using an ArcGIS Online organizational account and download your own survey or surveys "that may have been shared with you" (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/survey-123-for-arcgis/id993015031?mt=8) on your mobile device. "Once a form is downloaded, you will be able to start collecting data."(https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/survey-123-for-arcgis/id993015031?mt=8) Free of cost and use while disconnected the application can easily be used via mobile device on field trips. On a 3-day field trip which is held three times per year in the Geopark Bergstraße-Odenwald Survey123 is being used to evaluate the suitability of different Geopoints for different topics (geology, soils, vegetation, climate). With every field trip about 25 students take part in the survey and evaluate each Geopoint at the route. So, over the time, the docents know exactly which Geopoints suites perfect for teaching geology for example, and why it suites that good. The field trip is organized in an innovative way. Before

  15. Using a Field Trip Inventory to Determine If Listening to Elementary School Students' Conversations, While on a Zoo Field Trip, Enhances Preservice Teachers' Abilities to Plan Zoo Field Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Patricia; Mathews, Cathy; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether listening to spontaneous conversations of elementary students and their teachers/chaperones, while they were visiting a zoo, affected preservice elementary teachers' conceptions about planning a field trip to the zoo. One hundred five preservice elementary teachers designed field trips prior to and after…

  16. Computing Temperatures In Optically Pumped Laser Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program presents new model solving temperature-distribution problem for laser rods of finite length and calculates both radial and axial components of temperature distributions in these rods. Contains several self-checking schemes to prevent over-writing of memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  17. Tipping Time of a Quantum Rod

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrikar, Onkar

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of a quantum rod, pivoted at its lower end on an impenetrable floor and restricted to moving in the vertical plane under the gravitational potential, is studied analytically under the approximation that the rod is initially localized to a "small-enough" neighbourhood around the point of classical unstable equilibrium. It is shown…

  18. Babcock and Wilcox Owners' Group program: Trip reduction and transient response improvement

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, W.T.; Mercado, A.L.; Ganthner, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    In 1985, the average trip frequency for the industry was 4.3 trips per plant per year while Babcock Wilcox (B W)-designed plants had 4.5 trips. In early 1986, the B W Owners' Group (B WOG) established goals to reduce trip frequency and improve posttrip transient response. Through the recommendations of the B WOG Trip Reduction and Transient Response Improvement Program (TR/TRIP) and other utility initiatives, the trip frequency for the B WOG plants has been on a progressive downward trend and has been consistently below the industry average since 1986. The successful results in trip reduction for the B WOG plants are shown. The B WOG has implemented several programs that have resulted in fewer trips per plant. This success can be attributed to the following: (1) a comprehensive program to evaluate each trip and transient for root-cause determination, define corrective actions, share information, and peer reviews; (2) a broad program to review systems and components that contribute to trips and transients, identify specific recommendations to correct deficiencies, utility commitment to implementation, conduct internal monitoring and indirectly exert peer pressure; (3) an awareness of the goals at all levels in the organization coupled with strong executive-level involvement; and (4) timely implementation of recommendations.

  19. 10 years after implementation of TRIPS obligations in India.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Mahesh D

    2015-01-01

    The Patent (Amendment) Act of 2005 enforced after TRIPS raises many issues which hinder growth of Indian pharma companies. To tackle this, Indian pharma companies doubled their R&D expenditure and became significant players in global generic drug market. Indian pharmaceutical companies, which predominantly focused on import-oriented market, shifted to research-based approach by signing various agreements with MNCs that led to M&A and technology transfer. At the same time growth in R&D activities increased ANDA and DMF filing in the USA and Europe. Companies also kept their social responsibility by selling medicines at affordable price to patients. This paper highlights the changing business scenario of Indian pharmaceutical companies to counteract various issues evolved from new patent regime after TRIPS. PMID:26030078

  20. Visiting the USSR: a trip of a lifetime.

    PubMed

    Brown, Geraldine

    2012-01-01

    To Russia, who me? That is actually how it all began. A decade or more ago, I had the opportunity to visit what was then known as the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), Russia. Although, this place held high priority on my list of places to go, I never thought such a trip was within my reach. This idea was quite fascinating to me because of the events that did happen there, including the Russian space ship Sputnik and the dog, the high stepping military officers, Red Square and the St. Basil's Cathedral. After reading a lot about Russia, I thought it would be great to see a clean place, where it was unlawful to throw paper on the streets, and ride in public transportation such as the buses, taxis and the subway system, which were immaculately clean. It was an exciting trip, one, I will always remember, but would be a difficult adjustment to make, to live. PMID:22774358

  1. Preliminary Analysis of Optimal Round Trip Lunar Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagg Filho, L. A.; da Silva Fernandes, S.

    2015-10-01

    A study of optimal bi-impulsive trajectories of round trip lunar missions is presented in this paper. The optimization criterion is the total velocity increment. The dynamical model utilized to describe the motion of the space vehicle is a full lunar patched-conic approximation, which embraces the lunar patched-conic of the outgoing trip and the lunar patched-conic of the return mission. Each one of these parts is considered separately to solve an optimization problem of two degrees of freedom. The Sequential Gradient Restoration Algorithm (SGRA) is employed to achieve the optimal solutions, which show a good agreement with the ones provided by literature, and, proved to be consistent with the image trajectories theorem.

  2. Acquisition of background and technical information and class trip planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackinnon, R. M.; Wake, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    Instructors who are very familiar with a study area, as well as those who are not, find the field trip information acquisition and planning process speeded and made more effective by organizing it in stages. The stage follow a deductive progression: from the associated context region, to the study area, to the specific sample window sites, and from generalized background information on the study region to specific technical data on the environmental and human use systems to be interpreted at each site. On the class trip and in the follow up laboratory, the learning/interpretive process are at first deductive in applying previously learned information and skills to analysis of the study site, then inductive in reading and interpreting the landscape, imagery, and maps of the site, correlating them with information of other samples sites and building valid generalizations about the larger study area, its context region, and other (similar and/or contrasting) regions.

  3. Power ascension strategy following a reactor trip during EOC coastdown

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.L.; Heibel, M.D. ); Lesnick, D.C. )

    1992-01-01

    The difficulties associated with returning a reactor to the pretrip power level following a reactor trip during an end-of-cycle (EOC) power coastdown maneuver, and maintaining it once achieved, have caused utilities to abandon the restart and enter their refueling outages ahead of schedule. The Commonwealth Edison Company (CECo) Braidwood and Byron units have experienced reactor trips during EOC power coastdown maneuvers and have successfully performed restarts. The installation of the BEACON core monitoring system, which provides core monitoring, measurement reduction, core analysis and follow, and core prediction capability utilizing a very fast and accurate three-dimensional nodal code, at the CECo Byron, Braidwood, and Zion stations allows the reactor engineers at these units to accurately determine reactor response. The capabilities of the BEACON system allow an optimal return to power strategy to be developed and continuously updated. This paper presents a method for establishing the optimal return to power strategy utilizing the BEACON system.

  4. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.; West, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

  5. Vortex Noise from Rotating Cylindrical Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, E Z; Deming, A F

    1935-01-01

    A series of round rods of the some diameter were rotated individually about the mid-point of each rod. Vortices are shed from the rods when in motion, giving rise to the emission of sound. With the rotating system placed in the open air, the distribution of sound in space, the acoustical power output, and the spectral distribution have been studied. The frequency of emission of vortices from any point on the rod is given by the formula von Karman. From the spectrum estimates are made of the distribution of acoustical power along the rod, the amount of air concerned in sound production, the "equivalent size" of the vortices, and the acoustical energy content for each vortex.

  6. Rod-Coil Block Polyimide Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Kinder, James D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    This invention is a series of rod-coil block polyimide copolymers that are easy to fabricate into mechanically resilient films with acceptable ionic or protonic conductivity at a variety of temperatures. The copolymers consist of short-rigid polyimide rod segments alternating with polyether coil segments. The rods and coil segments can be linear, branched or mixtures of linear and branched segments. The highly incompatible rods and coil segments phase separate, providing nanoscale channels for ion conduction. The polyimide segments provide dimensional and mechanical stability and can be functionalized in a number of ways to provide specialized functions for a given application. These rod-coil black polyimide copolymers are particularly useful in the preparation of ion conductive membranes for use in the manufacture of fuel cells and lithium based polymer batteries.

  7. Parallel Operation of Multiple Closely Spaced Small Aspect Ratio Rod Pinches

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor J.; Leckbee, Joshua; Bennett, Nichelle; Madrid, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David V.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale R.; Lake, Patrick W.; McCourt, Andrew L.

    2014-12-10

    A series of simulations and experiments to resolve questions about the operation of arrays of closely spaced small aspect ratio rod pinches has been performed. Design and post-shot analysis of the experimental results are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Both simulations and experiments support these conclusions. Penetration of current to the interior of the array appears to be efficient, as the current on the center rods is essentially equal to the current on the outer rods. Current loss in the feed due to the formation of magnetic nulls was avoided in these experiments by design of the feed surface ofmore » the cathode and control of the gap to keep the electric fields on the cathode below the emission threshold. Some asymmetry in the electron flow to the rod was observed, but the flow appeared to symmetrize as it reached the end of the rod. Interaction between the rod pinches can be controlled to allow the stable and consistent operation of arrays of rod pinches.« less

  8. Parallel Operation of Multiple Closely Spaced Small Aspect Ratio Rod Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor J.; Leckbee, Joshua; Bennett, Nichelle; Madrid, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David V.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale R.; Lake, Patrick W.; McCourt, Andrew L.

    2014-12-10

    A series of simulations and experiments to resolve questions about the operation of arrays of closely spaced small aspect ratio rod pinches has been performed. Design and post-shot analysis of the experimental results are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Both simulations and experiments support these conclusions. Penetration of current to the interior of the array appears to be efficient, as the current on the center rods is essentially equal to the current on the outer rods. Current loss in the feed due to the formation of magnetic nulls was avoided in these experiments by design of the feed surface of the cathode and control of the gap to keep the electric fields on the cathode below the emission threshold. Some asymmetry in the electron flow to the rod was observed, but the flow appeared to symmetrize as it reached the end of the rod. Interaction between the rod pinches can be controlled to allow the stable and consistent operation of arrays of rod pinches.

  9. Apollo 17 crewmembers examine rock specimens during geological field trip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Two members of the prime crew of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission examine rock specimens during lunar surface extravehicular activity simulation training on a geological field trip to the Pancake Range area of south-central Nevada. They are Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (right), commander; and Scientist-Astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. Note the backpacks and chest-mounted cameras they are wearing.

  10. RETRAN analysis of the Peach Bottom turbine trip tests

    SciTech Connect

    Naser, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    The RETRAN system thermal-hydraulics analysis code has been used to model a series of three turbine trip tests. These three tests were performed at the Peach Bottom Unit 2 (PB2) boiling water reactor (BWR) during April 1977. A detailed description of this analysis including sensitivity studies using RETRAN-01 has been issued by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Additional analysis using RETRAN-02 is described. 8 refs.

  11. Probing the characteristic deformation behavior of TRIP steels

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Sheng; Wang, Xun-Li; Feng, Zhili; Clausen, Bjorn; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter K

    2008-01-01

    Tensile behavior of two TRIP steels was investigated by in situ neutron diffraction. In the sample with a higher fraction of retained-austenite, the first load transfer was observed from the soft ferrite matrix to the hard retained austenite prior to martensitic transformation, while a second load transfer occurred from the austenite to the harder martensite as martensitic transformation was induced. In the sample with less retained-austenite, the martensitic transformation was limited, leading to significantly less tensile ductility.

  12. Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L

    2014-01-01

    Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

  13. Eulerian Formulation of Spatially Constrained Elastic Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynen, Alexandre

    Slender elastic rods are ubiquitous in nature and technology. For a vast majority of applications, the rod deflection is restricted by an external constraint and a significant part of the elastic body is in contact with a stiff constraining surface. The research work presented in this doctoral dissertation formulates a computational model for the solution of elastic rods constrained inside or around frictionless tube-like surfaces. The segmentation strategy adopted to cope with this complex class of problems consists in sequencing the global problem into, comparatively simpler, elementary problems either in continuous contact with the constraint or contact-free between their extremities. Within the conventional Lagrangian formulation of elastic rods, this approach is however associated with two major drawbacks. First, the boundary conditions specifying the locations of the rod centerline at both extremities of each elementary problem lead to the establishment of isoperimetric constraints, i.e., integral constraints on the unknown length of the rod. Second, the assessment of the unilateral contact condition requires, in principle, the comparison of two curves parametrized by distinct curvilinear coordinates, viz. the rod centerline and the constraint axis. Both conspire to burden the computations associated with the method. To streamline the solution along the elementary problems and rationalize the assessment of the unilateral contact condition, the rod governing equations are reformulated within the Eulerian framework of the constraint. The methodical exploration of both types of elementary problems leads to specific formulations of the rod governing equations that stress the profound connection between the mechanics of the rod and the geometry of the constraint surface. The proposed Eulerian reformulation, which restates the rod local equilibrium in terms of the curvilinear coordinate associated with the constraint axis, describes the rod deformed configuration

  14. Assessment of full power turbine trip start-up test for C. Trillo 1 with RELAP5/MOD2. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lozano, M.F.; Moreno, P.; de la Cal, C.; Larrea, E.; Lopez, A.; Santamaria, J.G.; Lopez, E.; Novo, M.

    1993-07-01

    C. Trillo I has developed a model of the plant with RELAP5/MOD2/36.04. This model will be validated against a selected set of start-up tests. One of the transients selected to that aim is the turbine trip, which presents very specific characteristics that make it significantly different from the same transient in other PWRs of different design, the main difference being that the reactor is not tripped: a reduction in primary power is carried out instead. Pre-test calculations were done of the Turbine Trip Test and compared against the actual test. Minor problems in the first model, specially in the Control and Limitation Systems, were identified and post-test calculations had been carried out. The results show a good agreement with data for all the compared variables.

  15. Determination of Biology Department Students' Past Field Trip Experiences and Examination of Their Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Planning and Organising Educational Field Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozdogan, Aykut Emre

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the past field trip experiences of pre-service teachers who are graduates of Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology and who had pedagogical formation training certificate and to examine their self-efficacy beliefs in planning and organizing field trips with regard to different variables. The study was…

  16. Thermoreversible Gels Composed of Colloidal Silica Rods with Short-Range Attractions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ryan P; Hong, Kunlun; Wagner, Norman J

    2016-08-23

    Dynamic arrest transitions of colloidal suspensions containing nonspherical particles are of interest for the design and processing of various particle technologies. To better understand the effects of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on gel and glass formation, we present a colloidal model system of octadecyl-coated silica rods, termed as adhesive hard rods (AHR), which enables control of rod aspect ratio and temperature-dependent interactions. The aspect ratios of silica rods were controlled by varying the initial TEOS concentration following the work of Kuijk et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 2346-2349) and temperature-dependent attractions were introduced by coating the calcined silica rods with an octadecyl-brush and suspending in tetradecane. The rod length and aspect ratio were found to increase with TEOS concentration as expected, while other properties such as the rod diameter, coating coverage, density, and surface roughness were nearly independent of the aspect ratio. Ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering measurements revealed temperature-dependent attractions between octadecyl-coated silica rods in tetradecane, as characterized by a low-q upturn in the scattered intensity upon thermal quenching. Lastly, the rheology of a concentrated AHR suspension in tetradecane demonstrated thermoreversible gelation behavior, displaying a nearly 5 orders of magnitude change in the dynamic moduli as the temperature was cycled between 15 and 40 °C. The adhesive hard rod model system serves as a tunable platform to explore the combined influence of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on the dynamic arrest transitions in colloidal suspensions with thermoreversible, short-range attractions. PMID:27466883

  17. Spreading Geodiversity awareness in schools through field trips and ICT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magagna, Alessandra; Giardino, Marco; Ferrero, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Geodiversity, unlike Biodiversity, is not a topic included in the Italian schools curriculum. Nevertheless, Geomorphology is taught at all levels, and it seems to be the right tool for introducing the students to the concepts related to Geodiversity. In this context, a research on the use of field trips and Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) is being carried out for spreading the value of Geodiversity in Secondary Schools. Relevant international literature states that field trips are effective didactic tools for Earth Science education, because they stimulate an active learning process and allow students to appreciate the geological complexity of an area. On the other side, ICT allow students to get knowledge about the variety of landforms of their own territory by staying indoor, using virtual field trips and free software like Google Earth, Google Maps, Bing etc. In order to connect the two strategies, an innovative educational project is proposed here; it involves both the indoor and the outdoor activities, by enhancing a critical approach to the complexity of geological processes. As a starting point, a multimedia product on 20 Italian geological tours, designed for analyzing Geodiversity at a regional scale, has been tested with teachers and students, in order to understand its effectiveness by using it solely indoor. In a second phase, teachers and students have been proposed to compare and integrate indoor and outdoor activities to approach Geodiversity directly at a local scale, by means of targeted field trips. For achieving this goal, during the field trips, students used their mobile devices (smartphone and tablet) equipped with free and/or open source applications (Epicollect, Trimble Outdoor Navigator). These tools allow to track field trips, to gather data (geomorphological observations and related photographs), and to elaborate them in the laboratory; a process useful for reasoning on concepts such as spatial and temporal scales and for

  18. Predictive Process Optimization for Fracture Ductility in Automotive TRIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiadong

    In light of the emerging challenges in the automotive industry of meeting new energy-saving and environment-friendly requirements imposed by both the government and the society, the auto makers have been working relentlessly to reduce the weight of automobiles. While steel makers pushed out a variety of novel Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) to serve this market with new needs, TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels is one of the most promising materials for auto-body due to its exceptional combination of strength and formability. However, current commercial automotive TRIP steels demonstrate relatively low hole-expansion (HE) capability, which is critical in stretch forming of various auto parts. This shortcoming on ductility has been causing fracture issues in the forming process and limits the wider applications of this steel. The kinetic theory of martensitic transformations and associated transformation plasticity is applied to the optimization of transformation stability for enhanced mechanical properties in a class of high strength galvannealed TRIP steel. This research leverages newly developed characterization and simulation capabilities, supporting computational design of high-performance steels exploiting optimized transformation plasticity for desired mechanical behaviors, especially for the hole-expansion ductility. The microstructure of the automotive TRIP sheet steels was investigated, using advanced tomographic characterization including nanoscale Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP) microanalysis. The microstructural basis of austenite stability, the austenite carbon concentration in particular, was quantified and correlated with measured fracture ductility through transformation plasticity constitutive laws. Plastic flow stability for enhanced local fracture ductility at high strength is sought to maintain high hole-expansion ductility, through quantifying the optimal stability and the heat-treatment process to achieve it. An additional

  19. Core design study of a supercritical light water reactor with double row fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    An equilibrium core for supercritical light water reactor has been designed. A novel type of fuel assembly with dual rows of fuel rods between water rods is chosen and optimized to get more uniform assembly power distributions. Stainless steel is used for fuel rod cladding and structural material. Honeycomb structure filled with thermal isolation is introduced to reduce the usage of stainless steel and to keep moderator temperature below the pseudo critical temperature. Water flow scheme with ascending coolant flow in inner regions is carried out to achieve high outlet temperature. In order to enhance coolant outlet temperature, the radial power distributions needs to be as flat as possible through operation cycle. Fuel loading pattern and control rod pattern are optimized to flatten power distribution at inner regions. Axial fuel enrichment is divided into three parts to control axial power peak, which affects maximum cladding surface temperature. (authors)

  20. Granular materials interacting with thin flexible rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Alfredo Gay; Campello, Eduardo M. B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we develop a computational model for the simulation of problems wherein granular materials interact with thin flexible rods. We treat granular materials as a collection of spherical particles following a discrete element method (DEM) approach, while flexible rods are described by a large deformation finite element (FEM) rod formulation. Grain-to-grain, grain-to-rod, and rod-to-rod contacts are fully permitted and resolved. A simple and efficient strategy is proposed for coupling the motion of the two types (discrete and continuum) of materials within an iterative time-stepping solution scheme. Implementation details are shown and discussed. Validity and applicability of the model are assessed by means of a few numerical examples. We believe that robust, efficiently coupled DEM-FEM schemes can be a useful tool to the simulation of problems wherein granular materials interact with thin flexible rods, such as (but not limited to) bombardment of grains on beam structures, flow of granular materials over surfaces covered by threads of hair in many biological processes, flow of grains through filters and strainers in various industrial segregation processes, and many others.

  1. Gelation and mechanical response of patchy rods.

    PubMed

    Kazem, Navid; Majidi, Carmel; Maloney, Craig E

    2015-10-28

    We perform Brownian dynamics simulations to study the gelation of suspensions of attractive, rod-like particles. We show that in detail the rod-rod surface interactions can dramatically affect the dynamics of gelation and the structure and mechanics of the networks that form. If the attraction between the rods is perfectly smooth along their length, they will collapse into compact bundles. If the attraction is sufficiently corrugated or patchy, over time, a rigid space-spanning network will form. We study the structure and mechanical properties of the networks that form as a function of the fraction of the surface, f, that is allowed to bind. Surprisingly, the structural and mechanical properties are non-monotonic in f. At low f, there are not a sufficient number of cross-linking sites to form networks. At high f, rods bundle and form disconnected clusters. At intermediate f, robust networks form. The elastic modulus and yield stress are both non-monotonic in the surface coverage. The stiffest and strongest networks show an essentially homogeneous deformation under strain with rods re-orienting along the extensional axis. Weaker, more clumpy networks at high f re-orient relatively little with strong non-affine deformation. These results suggest design strategies for tailoring surface interactions between rods to yield rigid networks with optimal mechanical properties. PMID:26381995

  2. More on the penetration of yawed rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Z.; Dekel, E.; Ashuach, Y.

    2006-08-01

    One of the most complex processes, in the field of terminal ballistics, is that of yawed impact of long rods. In spite of many experimental observations, and some analytical modeling, a clear picture of this issue is still lacking. In order to gain some insight into the operating mechanisms, we developed a simple engineering model which considers the yawed rod as a series of small disks. We then define the effective length and diameter of the rod by considering those disks which are going to hit the initial crater which is opened by the impact. We also performed a series of 3D numerical simulations with various L/D tungsten alloy rods impacting a steel target, at yaws in the full range of 0-90^circ. We analyzed the results of these simulations in terms of the normalized penetration (P/D), where D is the rod diameter, and looked for systematic trends in the results for the various rods. The agreement between our model predictions and both experimental data and simulation results is quite good. Based on this agreement we can highlight some new features of the penetration process of yawed rods.

  3. Echoes from the Field: An Ethnographic Investigation of Outdoor Science Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxerman, Jonathan Zvi

    As popular as field trips are, one might think they have been well-studied. Nonetheless, field trips have not been heavily studied, and little research has mapped what actually transpires during field trips. Accordingly, to address this research gap, I asked two related research questions. The first question is a descriptive one: What happens on field trips? The second question is explanatory: What field trip events are memorable and why? I employed design research and ethnographic methodologies to study learning in naturally occurring contexts. I collaborated with middle-school science teachers to design and implement more than a dozen field trips. The field trips were nested in particular biology and earth sciences focal units. Students were tasked with making scientific observations in the field and then analyzing this data during classroom activities. Audio and video recording devices captured what happened during the field trips, classroom activities and discussions, and the interviews. I conducted comparative microanalysis of videotaped interactions. I observed dozens of events during the field trips that reverberated across time and place. I characterize the features of these events and the objects that drew interest. Then, I trace the residue across contexts. This study suggests that field trips could be more than one-off experiences and have the potential to be resources to seed and enrich learning and to augment interest in the practice of science.

  4. Anisotropy in CdSe quantum rods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang-shi

    2003-09-01

    The size-dependent optical and electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals have drawn much attention in the past decade, and have been very well understood for spherical ones. The advent of the synthetic methods to make rod-like CdSe nanocrystals with wurtzite structure has offered us a new opportunity to study their properties as functions of their shape. This dissertation includes three main parts: synthesis of CdSe nanorods with tightly controlled widths and lengths, their optical and dielectric properties, and their large-scale assembly, all of which are either directly or indirectly caused by the uniaxial crystallographic structure of wurtzite CdSe. The hexagonal wurtzite structure is believed to be the primary reason for the growth of CdSe nanorods. It represents itself in the kinetic stabilization of the rod-like particles over the spherical ones in the presence of phosphonic acids. By varying the composition of the surfactant mixture used for synthesis we have achieved tight control of the widths and lengths of the nanorods. The synthesis of monodisperse CdSe nanorods enables us to systematically study their size-dependent properties. For example, room temperature single particle fluorescence spectroscopy has shown that nanorods emit linearly polarized photoluminescence. Theoretical calculations have shown that it is due to the crossing between the two highest occupied electronic levels with increasing aspect ratio. We also measured the permanent electric dipole moment of the nanorods with transient electric birefringence technique. Experimental results on nanorods with different sizes show that the dipole moment is linear to the particle volume, indicating that it originates from the non-centrosymmetric hexagonal lattice. The elongation of the nanocrystals also results in the anisotropic inter-particle interaction. One of the consequences is the formation of liquid crystalline phases when the nanorods are dispersed in solvent to a high enough

  5. Opsin activation of transduction in the rods of dark-reared Rpe65 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jie; Woodruff, Michael L; Cilluffo, Marianne C; Crouch, Rosalie K; Fain, Gordon L

    2005-10-01

    Rpe65 knockout mice (Rpe65-/-) are unable to synthesize the visual pigment chromophore 11-cis retinal; however, if these animals are reared in complete darkness, the rod photoreceptors accumulate a small amount of 9-cis retinal and its corresponding visual pigment isorhodopsin. Suction-electrode recording of single rods from dark-reared Rpe65-/- mice showed that the rods were about 400 times less sensitive than wild-type control rods and that the maximum responses were much smaller in amplitude. Spectral sensitivity measurements indicated that Rpe65-/- rod responses were generated by isorhodopsin rather than rhodopsin. Sensitivity and pigment concentration were compared in the same mice by measuring light responses from rods of one eye and pigment concentration from the retina of the other eye. Retinas had 11-35% of the normal pigment level, but the rods were of the order of 20-30 times less sensitive than could be accounted for by the loss in quantum catch. This extra desensitization must be caused by opsin-dependent activation of the visual cascade, which leads to a state equivalent to light adaptation in the dark-adapted rod. By comparing the sensitivity of dark-reared Rpe65-/- rods to that produced in normal rods by background light, we estimate that Rpe65-/- opsin is of the order of 2.5x10(-5) as efficient in activating transduction as photoactivated rhodopsin (Rh*) in WT mice. Dark-reared Rpe65-/- rods are less desensitized than rods from cyclic light-reared Rpe65-/- mice, have about 50% more photocurrent and degenerate at a slower rate. Retinas sectioned after 9 months in darkness show a larger number of photoreceptor nuclei in dark-reared animals than in cyclic light-reared animals, though both have fewer nuclei than in cyclic light-reared wild-type retinas. Both also have shorter outer segments and a lower free-Ca2+ concentration. These experiments provide the first quantitative measurement of opsin activation in physiologically responding mammalian rods

  6. Phototransduction in mouse rods and cones

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yingbin; Yau, King-Wai

    2010-01-01

    Phototransduction is the process by which light triggers an electrical signal in a photoreceptor cell. Image-forming vision in vertebrates is mediated by two types of photoreceptors: the rods and the cones. In this review, we provide a summary of the success in which the mouse has served as a vertebrate model for studying rod phototransduction, with respect to both the activation and termination steps. Cones are still not as well-understood as rods partly because it is difficult to work with mouse cones due to their scarcity and fragility. The situation may change, however. PMID:17226052

  7. Field trips and their effect on student achievement in and attitudes toward science: A comparison of a physical versus a virtual field trip to the Indian River Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Lesley Cochran

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of physical and virtual field trips on students' achievement in estuarine ecology and their attitudes toward science. The study also assessed the effect of students' learning styles, the interaction between group membership and learning styles, and the effect of group membership on students' ability to answer questions at different levels of Bloom's (1956) taxonomy. Working with a convenient sample of 67 freshmen and sophomore non-science majors, students were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups (physical, n = 32 and virtual, n = 35). Prior to treatment, students' learning styles were determined, students were pre-assessed on the two targeted measures, and all students attended four consecutive, in-class, 75-minute lectures on estuarine ecology and the Indian River Lagoon (IRL). Pre-assessed data indicated no significant differences between the groups on the two dependent measures. On the weekend following the lecture series, the physical field trip group engaged in a set of predetermined activities at the IRL for 2 hours in the morning. Later that afternoon, the virtual field trip group participated in a 2-hour virtual trip to the IRL that exactly matched the physical field trip activities. This virtual trip incorporated the CD-ROM The Living Lagoon: An Electronic Field Trip. Following each trip, students were post-assessed using the same pre-assessment instruments. MANCOVA results indicated no significant differences on all research factors (i.e., group membership, learning style, and group-learning style interaction). Data analysis also revealed that there was no significant effect of group membership on students' ability to answer questions at different levels of Bloom's taxonomy. These findings imply that educators can integrate virtual field trips that are structured in the same manner as their corresponding physical field trips without significantly impacting student achievement or attitudes.

  8. How Combined Trip Purposes Are Associated with Transport Choice for Short Distance Trips. Results from a Cross-Sectional Study in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Scheepers, Eline; Slinger, Minke; Wendel-Vos, Wanda; Schuit, Jantine

    2014-01-01

    Background One way to increase physical activity is to stimulate a shift from car use to walking or cycling. In single-purpose trips, purpose was found to be an important predictor of transport choice. However, as far as known, no studies have been conducted to see how trips with combined purposes affect this decision. This study was designed to provide insight into associations between combined purposes and transport choice. Methods An online questionnaire (N = 3,663) was used to collect data concerning transport choice for four primary purposes: shopping, going to public natural spaces, sports, and commuting. Per combination of primary trip purpose and transport choice, participants were asked to give examples of secondary purposes that they combine with the primary purpose. Logistic regression analyses were used to model the odds of both cycling and walking versus car use. Results Primary trip purposes combined with commuting, shopping, visiting private contacts or medical care were more likely to be made by car than by cycling or walking. Combinations with visiting catering facilities, trips to social infrastructure facilities, recreational outings, trips to facilities for the provision of daily requirements or private contacts during the trip were more likely to be made by walking and/or cycling than by car. Conclusion Combined trip purposes were found to be associated with transport choice. When stimulating active transport focus should be on the combined-trip purposes which were more likely to be made by car, namely trips combined with commuting, other shopping, visiting private contacts or medical care. PMID:25474653

  9. Tensile behavior of TRIP-aided multi-phase steels studied by in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tomota, Y. . E-mail: tomota@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp; Tokuda, H.; Adachi, Y.; Wakita, M.; Minakawa, N.; Moriai, A.; Morii, Y.

    2004-12-01

    TRIP-aided multi-phase steels were made by thermo-mechanically controlled process, where the ferrite grain size and the amount of the retained austenite were changed by controlling process conditions. The tensile behavior of four steels was studied by in situ neutron diffraction. It is found that the retained austenite bearing about 1.0 wt% C is plastically harder than the ferrite matrix. The steel with a ferrite grain size of {approx}2.0 {mu}m showed tensile strength of 1.1 GPa and a uniform elongation of 18.4%, in which stress-induced martensitic transformation occurs during plastic deformation but a considerable amount of austenite remains even after the onset of necking. It is concluded that the enhancement of uniform elongation is caused mainly by the work-hardening due to the hard austenite and martensite, where the contribution of the transformation strain is negligible.

  10. Interaction of Fixed Number of Photons with Retinal Rod Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Nam Mai; Cheng, Mei Fun; Bessarab, Dmitri A.; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2014-05-01

    New tools and approaches of quantum optics offer a unique opportunity to generate light pulses carrying a precise number of photons. Accurate control over the light pulses helps to improve the characterization of photoinduced processes. Here, we study interaction of a specialized light source which provides flashes containing just one photon, with retinal rod cells of Xenopus laevis toads. We provide unambiguous proof of the single-photon sensitivity of rod cells without relying on the statistical modeling. We determine their quantum efficiencies without the use of any precalibrated detectors and obtain the value of (29±4.7)%. Our approach provides the path for future studies and applications of quantum properties of light in phototransduction, vision, and photosynthesis.

  11. Syntaxin 3 and SNAP-25 pairing, regulated by omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid, controls the delivery of rhodopsin for the biogenesis of cilia-derived sensory organelles, the rod outer segments.

    PubMed

    Mazelova, Jana; Ransom, Nancy; Astuto-Gribble, Lisa; Wilson, Michael C; Deretic, Dusanka

    2009-06-15

    The biogenesis of cilia-derived sensory organelles, the photoreceptor rod outer segments (ROS), is mediated by rhodopsin transport carriers (RTCs). The small GTPase Rab8 regulates ciliary targeting of RTCs, but their specific fusion sites have not been characterized. Here, we report that the Sec6/8 complex, or exocyst, is a candidate effector for Rab8. We also show that the Qa-SNARE syntaxin 3 is present in the rod inner segment (RIS) plasma membrane at the base of the cilium and displays a microtubule-dependent concentration gradient, whereas the Qbc-SNARE SNAP-25 is uniformly distributed in the RIS plasma membrane and the synapse. Treatment with omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid [DHA, 22:6(n-3)] causes increased co-immunoprecipitation and colocalization of SNAP-25 and syntaxin 3 at the base of the cilium, which results in the increased delivery of membrane to the ROS. This is particularly evident in propranolol-treated retinas, in which the DHA-mediated increase in SNARE pairing overcomes the tethering block, including dissociation of Sec8 into the cytosol. Together, our data indicate that the Sec6/8 complex, syntaxin 3 and SNAP-25 regulate rhodopsin delivery, probably by mediating docking and fusion of RTCs. We show further that DHA, an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid of the ROS, increases pairing of syntaxin 3 and SNAP-25 to regulate expansion of the ciliary membrane and ROS biogenesis. PMID:19454479

  12. Flux Pinning Properties in YBa2Cu3Oy Films with BaSnO3 Nano-rods and Spatially-controlled Y2O3 Nano-dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueyoshi, Tetsuro; Tokita, Yuuki; Fujiyoshi, Takanori; Mitsugi, Fumiaki; Ikegami, Tomoaki

    The quasi-multilayered films consisting of YBa2Cu3Oy layers with BaSnO3 nano-rods and pseudo-layers of Y2O3 were prepared using a multilayering process in a PLD method, in order to investigate the influence of the spatial distribution of Y2O3 nano-dots on the hybrid flux pinning. The additional doping of Y2O3, however, hardly contributed to the flux pinning at higher temperature, probably due to Y2O3 nano-dots in small size in this work. At lower temperature, on the other hand, all the multilayered films show higher critical current density Jc than the film only with BaSnO3 nano-rods in a wide range of magnetic field orientations centered at B || ab. In particular, more flat angular dependence of Jc at low magnetic field around B || ab was found for the multilayered film with Y2O3 nano-dots more distributed in the out-of-plane direction. For B || c, by contrast, the magnetic field dependence of Jc was more weakened for the multilayered film with more correlated row of Y2O3 nano-dots along the in-plane direction.

  13. Flow in serpentine coolant passages with trip strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, D. G.-N.

    1995-01-01

    Under the subject contract, an effort is being conducted at Scientific Research Associates, Inc. (SRA) to obtain flow field measurements in the coolant passage of a rotating turbine blade with ribbed walls, both in the stationary and rotating frames. The data obtained will be used for validation of computational tools and assessment of turbine blade cooling strategies. The configuration of the turbine blade passage model is given, and the measuring plane locations are given. The model has a four-pass passage with three 180 turns. This geometry was chosen to allow analyses of the velocity measurements corresponding to the heat transfer results obtained by Wagner. Two passes of the passage have a rectangular cross-section of 1.0 in x 0.5 in. Another two passes have a square cross-section of 0.5 in x 0.5 in. Trips with a streamwise pitch to trip height (P/e) = 5 and trip height to coolant passage width (e/Z) = 0.1, were machined along the leading and trailing walls. These dimensions are typical of those used in turbine blade coolant passages. The trips on these walls are staggered by the half-pitch. The trips are skewed at +/- 45 deg, and this allows the effect of trip orientation to be examined. Experiments will be conducted with flow entering the model through the 1.0 in x 0.5 in rectangular passage (Configuration C) and the 0.5 in x 0. 5 in square passage (Configuration D) to examine the effect of passage aspect ratio. Velocity measurements were obtained with a Reynolds number (Re) of 25,000, based on the hydraulic diameter of and bulk mean velocity in the half inch square passage. The coordinate system used in presenting the results for configurations C and D, respectively, is shown. The first, second and third passes of the passage will be referred to as the first, second and third passages, respectively, in later discussion. Streamwise distance (x) from the entrance is normalized by the hydraulic diameter (D). Vertical (y) and tangential (z) distances are

  14. Impact of AD995 alumina rods

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Furnish, M.D.; Reinhart, W.D.; Grady, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Gas guns and velocity interferometric techniques have been used to determine the loading behavior of an AD995 alumina rod 19 mm in diameter by 75 mm and 150 mm long, respectively. Graded-density materials were used to impact both bare and sleeved alumina rods while the velocity interferometer was used to monitor the axial-velocity of the free end of the rods. Results of these experiments demonstrate that (1) a time-dependent stress pulse generated during impact allows an efficient transition from the initial uniaxial strain loading to a uniaxial stress state as the stress pulse propagates through the rod, and (2) the intermediate loading rates obtained in this configuration lie between split Hopkinson bar and shock-loading techniques.

  15. Effects of Retained Austenite Stability and Volume Fraction on Deformation Behaviors of TRIP Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Soulami, Ayoub; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-10-02

    In this paper, the separate effects of austenite stability and its volume fraction on the deformation behaviors of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels are investigated based on the microstructure-based finite element modeling method. The effects of austenite stability on the strength, ductility and formability of TRIP steels are first examined based on the microstructure of a commercial TRIP 800 steel. Then, the separate effects of the austenite volume fraction on the overall deformation behaviors of TRIP steels are examined based on the various representative volume elements (RVEs). The computational results suggest that the higher austenite stability is helpful to increase the ductility and formability, but not the UTS. However, the increase of austenite volume fraction alone is not helpful in improving the performance of TRIP steels. This may indicate that various other material factors should also be concurrently adjusted during thermo-mechanical manufacturing process in a way to increase the performance of TRIP steels, which needs further investigation.

  16. Implementing virtual field trips in the curriculum of geography students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steegen, An; Verstraeten, Gert; Martens, Lotte

    2016-04-01

    Current online geospatial databases and tools offer many opportunities in geoscience education. On the one hand a variety of geoscientific topics and regions can be studied without traditional fieldwork, and on the other hand, field-based learning activities can be prepared or post-processed. In this research, the use of Virtual Field Trips (VFTs) in Google EarthTM is studied. In the framework of geomorphology courses, undergraduate geography students were given VFTs as developed by the lecturers or had to develop VFTs themselves, after visiting a study area. Maps, photographs, GPS-tracks, literature and other spatial information were integrated in the VFTs. The effect of VFTs on learning outcomes, on the insight in the horizontal and vertical relationships between the spatially varying topics, and motivation were measured. Results confirm that students are positive about the use of VFTs. They indicate that VFTs significantly improve their mental map of the study area, whereby horizontal relationships were strengthened. Also the additional information in some VFTs proved to have positive effects on studying and structuring the learning content. Students also appreciated to work independently with the VFTs and saw possibilities for integrating various geoscientific topics. However, there are also some constraints in working with VFTs. It was clear from the study that VFTs have to be embedded in the curriculum as students do not use or develop VFTs spontaneously. Indeed, it takes a lot of time to develop a VFT, and students also appreciate a variety in work forms. Also some technical difficulties on sufficient wireless internet access and flexible work spaces have to be encountered. Besides this, curricula developers should be aware that VFTs are an interesting tool additionally to field trips, but that they cannot replace the field trips.

  17. Older adults who have previously fallen due to a trip walk differently than those who have fallen due to a slip.

    PubMed

    Wright, Rachel L; Peters, Derek M; Robinson, Paul D; Watt, Thomas N; Hollands, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Studying the relationships between centre of mass (COM) and centre of pressure (COP) during walking has been shown to be useful in determining movement stability. The aim of the current study was to compare COM-COP separation measures during walking between groups of older adults with no history of falling, and a history of falling due to tripping or slipping. Any differences between individuals who have fallen due to a slip and those who have fallen due to a trip in measures of dynamic balance could potentially indicate differences in the mechanisms responsible for falls. Forty older adults were allocated into groups based on their self-reported fall history during walking. The non-faller group had not experienced a fall in at least the previous year. Participants who had experienced a fall were split into two groups based on whether a trip or slip resulted in the fall(s). A Vicon system was used to collect full body kinematic trajectories. Two force platforms were used to measure ground reaction forces. The COM was significantly further ahead of the COP at heel strike for the trip (14.3 ± 2.7 cm) and slip (15.3 ± 1.1 cm) groups compared to the non-fallers (12.0 ± 2.7 cm). COM was significantly further behind the COP at foot flat for the slip group (-14.9 ± 3.6 cm) compared to the non-fallers (-10.3 ± 3.9 cm). At mid-swing, the COM of the trip group was ahead of the COP (0.9 ± 1.6 cm), whereas for the slip group the COM was behind the COP (-1.2 ± 2.2 cm). These results show identifiable differences in dynamic balance control of walking between older adults with a history of tripping or slipping and non-fallers. PMID:25455700

  18. Bringing Grand Canyon to the College Campus: Assessment of Student Learning in the Geosciences Through Virtual Field Trip Games for Mobile Smart-Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursztyn, N.; Walker, A.; Shelton, B.; Pederson, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Geoscience educators have long considered field trips to be the most effective way of attracting students into the discipline. A solution for bringing student-driven, engaging, kinesthetic field experiences to a broader audience lies in ongoing advances in mobile-communication technology. This NSF-TUES funded project developed three virtual field trip experiences for smartphones and tablets (on geologic time, geologic structures, and hydrologic processes), and then tested their performance in terms of student interest in geoscience as well as gains in learning. The virtual field trips utilize the GPS capabilities of smartphones and tablets, requiring the students to navigate outdoors in the real world while following a map on their smart device. This research, involving 873 students at five different college campuses, used analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and multiple regression for statistical methods. Gains in learning across all participants are minor, and not statistically different between intervention and control groups. Predictors of gains in content comprehension for all three modules are the students' initial interest in the subject and their base level knowledge. For the Geologic Time and Structures modules, being a STEM major is an important predictor of student success. Most pertinent for this research, for Geologic Time and Hydrologic Processes, gains in student learning can be predicted by having completed those particular virtual field trips. Gender and race had no statistical impact, indicating that the virtual field trip modules have broad reach across student demographics. In related research, these modules have been shown to increase student interest in the geosciences more definitively than the learning gains here. Thus, future work should focus on improving the educational impact of mobile-device field trips, as their eventual incorporation into curricula is inevitable.

  19. Double-clad nuclear fuel safety rod

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, William H.; Atcheson, Donald B.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan

    1984-01-01

    A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

  20. Arizona Geology Trip - February 25-28, 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Gretchen A.; Ross, Amy J.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of hardware developers, crew, mission planners, and headquarters personnel traveled to Gila Bend, Arizona, in February 2008 for a CxP Lunar Surface Systems Team geology experience. Participating in this field trip were the CxP Space Suit System (EC5) leads: Thomas (PLSS) and Ross (PGS), who presented the activities and findings learned from being in the field during this KC. As for the design of a new spacesuit system, this allowed the engineers to understand the demands this type of activity will have on NASA's hardware, systems, and planning efforts. The engineers also experienced the methods and tools required for lunar surface activity.

  1. Apollo 17 crewmembers examine rock specimens during geological field trip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Two members of the prime crew of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission examine rock specimens during lunar surface extravehicular activity simulation training on a geological field trip to the Pancake Range area of south-central Nevada. They are Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (right), commander; and Scientist-Astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. They are standing on the rim of Lunar Crater, which is about 600 ft. deep and five-eighths of a mile in diameter. It is a volcanic crater.

  2. Activity Time Budget during Foraging Trips of Emperor Penguins

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Sato, Katsufumi; Ponganis, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    We developed an automated method using depth and one axis of body acceleration data recorded by animal-borne data loggers to identify activities of penguins over long-term deployments. Using this technique, we evaluated the activity time budget of emperor penguins (n = 10) both in water and on sea ice during foraging trips in chick-rearing season. During the foraging trips, emperor penguins alternated dive bouts (4.8±4.5 h) and rest periods on sea ice (2.5±2.3 h). After recorder deployment and release near the colony, the birds spent 17.9±8.4% of their time traveling until they reached the ice edge. Once at the ice edge, they stayed there more than 4 hours before the first dive. After the first dive, the mean proportions of time spent on the ice and in water were 30.8±7.4% and 69.2±7.4%, respectively. When in the water, they spent 67.9±3.1% of time making dives deeper than 5 m. Dive activity had no typical diurnal pattern for individual birds. While in the water between dives, the birds had short resting periods (1.2±1.7 min) and periods of swimming at depths shallower than 5 m (0.25±0.38 min). When the birds were on the ice, they primarily used time for resting (90.3±4.1% of time) and spent only 9.7±4.1% of time traveling. Thus, it appears that, during foraging trips at sea, emperor penguins traveled during dives >5 m depth, and that sea ice was primarily used for resting. Sea ice probably provides refuge from natural predators such as leopard seals. We also suggest that 24 hours of sunlight and the cycling of dive bouts with short rest periods on sea ice allow emperor penguins to dive continuously throughout the day during foraging trips to sea. PMID:23185608

  3. Round trip trajectory options for human exploration of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; McAdams, James V.; Niehoff, John C.

    The study deals with round-trip trajectory options as they are related to a phased exploration of Mars. Trajectory types covered include flyby, flyby-rendezvous, opposition, sprint, conjuction, Versatile International Station for Interplanetary Transport (VISIT), and escalator. For each trajectory type, a sample trajectory plot and data for opportunities beginning in the early 2000s are presented in order to provide a comparison of the launch and return dates, flight times, and energy requirements. The potential for combining different trajectory types to accomplish mission goals is illustrated.

  4. A simple retinal mechanism contributes to perceptual interactions between rod- and cone-mediated responses in primates.

    PubMed

    Grimes, William N; Graves, Logan R; Summers, Mathew T; Rieke, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Visual perception across a broad range of light levels is shaped by interactions between rod- and cone-mediated signals. Because responses of retinal ganglion cells, the output cells of the retina, depend on signals from both rod and cone photoreceptors, interactions occurring in retinal circuits provide an opportunity to link the mechanistic operation of parallel pathways and perception. Here we show that rod- and cone-mediated responses interact nonlinearly to control the responses of primate retinal ganglion cells; these nonlinear interactions, surprisingly, were asymmetric, with rod responses strongly suppressing subsequent cone responses but not vice-versa. Human psychophysical experiments revealed a similar perceptual asymmetry. Nonlinear interactions in the retinal output cells were well-predicted by linear summation of kinetically-distinct rod- and cone-mediated signals followed by a synaptic nonlinearity. These experiments thus reveal how a simple mechanism controlling interactions between parallel pathways shapes circuit output and perception. PMID:26098124

  5. 77 FR 14697 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    .... Therefore, an inseason action that published in the Federal Register on May 19, 2011 (76 FR 30035) increased... August 30, 2011 (76 FR 53832), reduced the GB cod trip limit to 300 lb (136.1 kg) per DAS, up to 600 lb... reduced to 25 lb (11.3 kg) per trip from 75 lb (34.0 kg) per trip on October 3, 2011 (76 FR 61060). For...

  6. Epigenomic landscapes of retinal rods and cones

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Alisa; Luo, Chongyuan; Davis, Fred P; Mukamel, Eran A; Henry, Gilbert L; Nery, Joseph R; Urich, Mark A; Picard, Serge; Lister, Ryan; Eddy, Sean R; Beer, Michael A; Ecker, Joseph R; Nathans, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptors are highly similar in many respects but they have important functional and molecular differences. Here, we investigate genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation and chromatin accessibility in mouse rods and cones and correlate differences in these features with gene expression, histone marks, transcription factor binding, and DNA sequence motifs. Loss of NR2E3 in rods shifts their epigenomes to a more cone-like state. The data further reveal wide differences in DNA methylation between retinal photoreceptors and brain neurons. Surprisingly, we also find a substantial fraction of DNA hypo-methylated regions in adult rods that are not in active chromatin. Many of these regions exhibit hallmarks of regulatory regions that were active earlier in neuronal development, suggesting that these regions could remain undermethylated due to the highly compact chromatin in mature rods. This work defines the epigenomic landscapes of rods and cones, revealing features relevant to photoreceptor development and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11613.001 PMID:26949250

  7. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  8. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets. PMID:27131565

  9. High-throughput rod-induced electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Teh, Kwok Siong; Han, Zhibin; Luo, Guoxi; Shi, Chuan; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao; Lin, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    A high throughput electrospinning process, directly from flat polymer solution surfaces induced by a moving insulating rod, has been proposed and demonstrated. Different rods made of either phenolic resin or paper with a diameter of 1–3 cm and a resistance of about 100–500 MΩ, has been successfully utilized in the process. The rod is placed approximately 10 mm above the flat polymer solution surface with a moving speed of 0.005–0.4 m s‑1 this causes the solution to generate multiple liquid jets under an applied voltage of 15–60 kV for the tip-less electrospinning process. The local electric field induced by the rod can boost electrohydrodynamic instability in order to generate Taylor cones and liquid jets. Experimentally, it is found that a large rod diameter and a small solution-to-rod distance can enhance the local electrical field to reduce the magnitude of the applied voltage. In the prototype setup with poly (ethylene oxide) polymer solution, an area of 5 cm  ×  10 cm and under an applied voltage of 60 kV, the maximum throughput of nanofibers is recorded to be approximately144 g m‑2 h‑1.

  10. 49 CFR 230.93 - Pistons and piston rods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pistons and piston rods. 230.93 Section 230.93... Tenders Driving Gear § 230.93 Pistons and piston rods. (a) Maintenance and testing. Pistons and piston rods shall be maintained in safe and suitable condition for service. Piston rods shall be inspected...

  11. International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.

    1981-05-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

  12. Mechanical performance of fiberglass sucker-rod strings

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, H.A.

    1988-08-01

    The natural frequencies of fiberglass sucker-rod strings can be calculated by treating the rod strings as modified spring/mass vibration systems. The ratio of the pumping-unit operating speed to the rod-string natural frequency can then be used as a basis for understanding fiberglass-rod performance and for predicting downhole pump stroke lengths.

  13. Teachers as Secondary Players: Involvement in Field Trips to Natural Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Nirit Lavie; Tal, Tali

    2016-07-01

    This study focused on field trips to natural environments where the teacher plays a secondary role alongside a professional guide. We investigated teachers' and field trip guides' views of the teacher's role, the teacher's actual function on the field trip, and the relationship between them. We observed field trips, interviewed teachers and guides, and administered questionnaires. We found different levels of teacher involvement, ranging from mainly supervising and giving technical help, to high involvement especially in the cognitive domain and sometimes in the social domain. Analysis of students' self-reported outcomes showed that the more students believe their teachers are involved, the higher the self-reported learning outcomes.

  14. Educational, personal, and cultural attributes of dental students' humanitarian trips to Latin America.

    PubMed

    Bimstein, Enrique; Gardner, Quinton W; Riley, Joseph L; Gibson, Robert W

    2008-12-01

    This article evaluates the educational, personal, and cultural attributes that motivate or inhibit dental students' participation in humanitarian and educational trips to underserved communities in Latin America. Interviews, concentrating on students' expectations and experiences, were conducted with students who participated in the trips and with those who did not. A survey of a larger group of students (including those interviewed) was also conducted; the survey included demographic data, ethnic affiliation, cultural competence, motivators and inhibitors to attend trips, and trip attributes. One hundred and seventy-four students at one dental school completed the survey; the group interviews were conducted with twenty-three students who attended humanitarian and educational trips and nine students who did not. This research found that skill development, educational opportunity, and philanthropy were the most important motivators for trip participation. Cost and time commitments were the strongest inhibitors to participate. Exposure to infectious diseases, substandard working and living conditions, threat of crime, and language barriers were mostly considered as "not important." However, female dental students were more concerned than males about crime, living conditions, and infectious diseases during the trips. Cultural education, increased knowledge, cross-cultural professional relationships, increased self-confidence, and public health awareness were the most important attributes of the trips. This study indicates that the undergraduate humanitarian educational trips to underserved Latin American communities have a most significant personal, professional, and social impact on dental students. PMID:19056629

  15. Bacterial Flagella as a Model Rigid Rod of Tunable Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Walter; Yardimci, Sevim; Gibaud, Thomas; Snow, Henry; Urbach, Jeff; Dogic, Zvonimir

    In this research, we study the physical properties of suspensions of bacterial flagella from Salmonella typhimurium prepared in a variety of rigid polymorphic shapes. Flagella act as a rigid colloidal particle that can exhibit non-trivial geometry including helices of varying dimensions, straight rods, or a combination of the two in the same filament. By controlling the conditions in which flagella are prepared, the polymorphic shape assumed by the filament can be controlled. Utilizing different polymorphic shapes, we combine results from optical microscopy observations of single filaments with bulk rheological measurements to help understand the role that constituent colloidal geometry plays in complex bulk behavior.

  16. [Workshop: "Woman--a trip through her body"].

    PubMed

    Amorim, M H; de Freitas, A B; Batista, E M; Pacheco, L N

    1996-01-01

    Morbidity due to cervical and breast cancer in Brazilian woman is high, despite the fact that these pathologies are preventable when detected early. The coverage of public health in this disease is unsatisfactory specially if one takes into account the fact that the techniques used for early detection and prevention of those types of cancer are simple and inexpensive. We observed that not many activities have been developed aiming at the education of women with regard to self-knowledge of their bodies. As a result, we prepared in 1993 a workshop entitled "Woman, a trip through her body" comprising 6 group dynamics where there is an intense participation of every woman as it is a very exciting process. The workshop is carried on by one member of the faculty staff, three nurses and nursing students of Federal University of Espírito Santo. There are 30 participants per workshop each one receiving a name tag. This workshop is composed of the following group dynamics which are developed in a cosy and informal atmosphere: Dynamic 1-Pocket History; Dynamic 2-Hands Touch; Dynamic 3-Drawing/ Modelling; Dynamic 4-Trip through the Body; Dynamic 5-Self-examination; Dynamic 6-Body Feeling. PMID:9220844

  17. A Virtual Field Trip to the Gemini Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R. Scott; Michaud, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    Live from Gemini (LfG) is a virtual field trip using video conferencing technology to connect primary, secondary and post-secondary students with scientists and educators at the Gemini Observatory. As a pilot project, LfG is rapidly becoming one of the observatory's most often-requested educational programs for learners of all ages. The program aligns exceptionally well with national science (and technology) standards, as well as existing school curricula. This combination makes it easy for teachers to justify participation in the program, especially as the necessary video conferencing technology becomes ever more ubiquitous in classrooms and technology learning centers around the world. In developing and testing this pilot project, a programmatic approach and philosophy evolved that includes post-field-trip educational materials, multi-disciplinary subject matter (astronomy, geology, mathematics, meteorology, engineering and even language - the program is offered in Spanish from Gemini South in Chile), and the establishment of a personal connection and rapport with students. The presenters work to create a comfortable interaction despite the perceived technological barriers. The authors’ experiences with the LfG pilot project convince us that this model is viable for almost any astronomical observatory and should be considered by any dynamic, technology- and education-oriented facility.

  18. Transforming the radiological interpretation process: the SCAR TRIP initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Morin, Richard L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Carrino, John A.; Erickson, Bradley J.; Horii, Steven C.; Piraino, David W.; Reiner, Bruce I.; Seibert, James A.; Siegel, Eliot L.

    2004-04-01

    The Society for Computer Applications in Radiology (SCAR) Transforming the Radiological Interpretation Process (TRIP) Initiative aims to spearhead research, education, and discovery of innovative solutions to address the problem of information and image data overload. The initiative will foster inter-disciplinary research on technological, environmental and human factors to better manage and exploit the massive amounts of data. TRIP will focus on the following basic objectives: improving the efficiency of interpretation of large data sets, improving the timeliness and effectiveness of communication, and decreasing medical errors. The ultimate goal of the initiative is to improve the quality and safety of patient care. Interdisciplinary research into several broad areas will be necessary to make progress in managing the ever-increasing volume of data. The six concepts involved include: human perception, image processing and computer-aided detection (CAD), visualization, navigation and usability, databases and integration, and evaluation and validation of methods and performance. The result of this transformation will affect several key processes in radiology, including image interpretation; communication of imaging results; workflow and efficiency within the health care enterprise; diagnostic accuracy and a reduction in medical errors; and, ultimately, the overall quality of care.

  19. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    predictions. After confirming that the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF worked and provided consistent results with FRAPTRAN predictions for a single fuel rod configuration, the same type of analysis was carried out for a bigger system which is the 4x4 PWR bundle consisting of 15 fuel pins and one control guide tube. Steady- state calculations at Hot Full Power (HFP) conditions for control guide tube out (unrodded) were performed using the 4x4 PWR array with CTF/TORT-TD coupled code system. Fuel centerline, surface and average temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD with and without the new fuel thermal conductivity model were compared against CTF/TORT-TD/FRAPTRAN predictions to demonstrate the improvement in fuel centerline predictions when new model was used. In addition to that constant and CTF dynamic gap conductance model were used with the new thermal conductivity model to show the performance of the CTF dynamic gap conductance model and its impact on fuel centerline and surface temperatures. Finally, a Rod Ejection Accident (REA) scenario using the same 4x4 PWR array was run both at Hot Zero Power (HZP) and Hot Full Power (HFP) condition, starting at a position where half of the control rod is inserted. This scenario was run using CTF/TORT-TD coupled code system with and without the new fuel thermal conductivity model. The purpose of this transient analysis was to show the impact of thermal conductivity degradation (TCD) on feedback effects, specifically Doppler Reactivity Coefficient (DRC) and, eventually, total core reactivity.

  20. Preliminary design report for the prototypical fuel rod consolidation system

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, J.M.

    1986-12-03

    This report documents NUTECH's preliminary design of a dry, spent fuel rod consolidation system. This preliminary design is the result of Phase I of a planned four phase project. The present report on this project provides a considerable amount of detail for a preliminary design effort. The design and all of its details are described in this Preliminary Design Report (PDR). The NUTECH dry rod consolidation system described herein is remotely operated. It provides for automatic operation, but with operator hold points between key steps in the process. The operator has the ability to switch to a manual operation mode at any point in the process. The system is directed by the operator using an executive computer which controls and coordinates the operation of the in-cell equipment. The operator monitors the process using an in-cell closed circuit television (CCTV) system with audio output and equipment status displays on the computer monitor. The in-cell mechanical equipment consists of the following: (1) two overhead cranes with manipulators; (2) a multi-degree of freedom fuel handling table and its clamping equipment; (3) a fuel assembly end fitting removal station and its tools; (4) a consolidator (which pulls rods, assembles the consolidated bundle and loads the canister); (5) a canister end cap welder and weld inspection system; (6) decontamination systems; and (7) the CCTV and microphone systems.