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Sample records for control software architecture

  1. A Software Architecture for Semiautonomous Robot Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortenkamp, David

    2004-01-01

    A software architecture has been developed to increase the safety and effectiveness with which tasks are performed by robots that are capable of functioning autonomously but sometimes are operated under control by humans. The control system of such a robot designed according to a prior software architecture has no way of taking account of how the environment has changed or what parts of a task were performed during an interval of control by a human, so that errors can occur (and, hence, safety and effectiveness jeopardized) when the human relinquishes control. The present architecture incorporates the control, task-planning, and sensor-based-monitoring features of typical prior autonomous-robot software architectures, plus features for updating information on the environment and planning of tasks during control by a human operator in order to enable the robot to track the actions taken by the operator and to be ready to resume autonomous operation with minimal error. The present architecture also provides a user interface that presents, to the operator, a variety of information on the internal state of the robot and the status of the task.

  2. Domain specific software architectures: Command and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Christine; Hatch, William; Ruegsegger, Theodore; Balzer, Bob; Feather, Martin; Goldman, Neil; Wile, Dave

    1992-01-01

    GTE is the Command and Control contractor for the Domain Specific Software Architectures program. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate an architecture-driven, component-based capability for the automated generation of command and control (C2) applications. Such a capability will significantly reduce the cost of C2 applications development and will lead to improved system quality and reliability through the use of proven architectures and components. A major focus of GTE's approach is the automated generation of application components in particular subdomains. Our initial work in this area has concentrated in the message handling subdomain; we have defined and prototyped an approach that can automate one of the most software-intensive parts of C2 systems development. This paper provides an overview of the GTE team's DSSA approach and then presents our work on automated support for message processing.

  3. Software control architecture for autonomous vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; DeAnda, Juan R.; Fox, Richard K.; Meng, Xiannong

    1999-07-01

    The Strategic-Tactical-Execution Software Control Architecture (STESCA) is a tri-level approach to controlling autonomous vehicles. Using an object-oriented approach, STESCA has been developed as a generalization of the Rational Behavior Model (RBM). STESCA was initially implemented for the Phoenix Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (Naval Postgraduate School -- Monterey, CA), and is currently being implemented for the Pioneer AT land-based wheeled vehicle. The goals of STESCA are twofold. First is to create a generic framework to simplify the process of creating a software control architecture for autonomous vehicles of any type. Second is to allow for mission specification system by 'anyone' with minimal training to control the overall vehicle functionality. This paper describes the prototype implementation of STESCA for the Pioneer AT.

  4. Software architecture for an unattended remotely controlled telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, R. J.; Kolb, U.

    2011-10-01

    We report on the software architecture we developed for the Open University's remotely controlled telescope PIRATE. This facility is based in Mallorca and used in distance learning modules by undergraduate students and by postgraduate students for research projects.

  5. NASA Integrated Network Monitor and Control Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shames, Peter; Anderson, Michael; Kowal, Steve; Levesque, Michael; Sindiy, Oleg; Donahue, Kenneth; Barnes, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Communications and Navigation office (SCaN) has commissioned a series of trade studies to define a new architecture intended to integrate the three existing networks that it operates, the Deep Space Network (DSN), Space Network (SN), and Near Earth Network (NEN), into one integrated network that offers users a set of common, standardized, services and interfaces. The integrated monitor and control architecture utilizes common software and common operator interfaces that can be deployed at all three network elements. This software uses state-of-the-art concepts such as a pool of re-programmable equipment that acts like a configurable software radio, distributed hierarchical control, and centralized management of the whole SCaN integrated network. For this trade space study a model-based approach using SysML was adopted to describe and analyze several possible options for the integrated network monitor and control architecture. This model was used to refine the design and to drive the costing of the four different software options. This trade study modeled the three existing self standing network elements at point of departure, and then described how to integrate them using variations of new and existing monitor and control system components for the different proposed deployments under consideration. This paper will describe the trade space explored, the selected system architecture, the modeling and trade study methods, and some observations on useful approaches to implementing such model based trade space representation and analysis.

  6. Software Architecture for Simultaneous Process Control and Software Development/Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Hileman, Michael S; McMillan, David E; Holmes Jr, William; Blankenship, Mark; Wilder, Terry

    2011-01-01

    A software architecture is described that allows modification of some application code sections while the remainder of the application continues executing. This architecture facilitates long term testing and process control because the overall process need not be stopped and restarted to allow modifications or additions to the software. A working implementation using National Instruments LabVIEW{trademark} sub-panel and shared variable features is described as an example. This architecture provides several benefits in both the program development and execution environments. The software is easier to maintain and it is not necessary to recompile the entire program after a modification.

  7. Key characteristics for software for open architecture controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Lawrence E.; Tran, Hy D.

    1997-01-01

    Software development time, cost, and ease of (re)use are now among the major issues in development of advanced machines, whether for machine tools, automation systems, or process systems. Two keys to reducing development time are powerful, user-friendly development tools and software architectures that provide clean, well-documented interfaces to the various real-time functions that such machines require. Examples of essential functions are signal conditioning, servo-control, trajectory generation, calibration/registration, coordination of a synchronous events, task sequencing, communication with external systems, and user interfaces. There are a number of existing standards that can help with software development, such as the IEEE POSIX standards for operating systems and real time services; software tools to compliment these standards are beginning to see use. This paper will detail some of the existing standards, some new tools, and development activities relevant to advanced, 'smart' machines.

  8. Software architecture considerations for ion source control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, J.W.

    1997-09-01

    General characteristics of distributed control system software tools are examined from the perspective of ion source control system requirements. Emphasis is placed on strategies for building extensible, distributed systems in which the ion source element is one component of a larger system. Vsystem, a commercial software tool kit from Vista Control Systems was utilized extensively in the control system upgrade of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. Part of the control system is described and the characteristics of Vsystem are examined and compared with those of EPICS, the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System.

  9. Robust Software Architecture for Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aghazanian, Hrand; Baumgartner, Eric; Garrett, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Robust Real-Time Reconfigurable Robotics Software Architecture (R4SA) is the name of both a software architecture and software that embodies the architecture. The architecture was conceived in the spirit of current practice in designing modular, hard, realtime aerospace systems. The architecture facilitates the integration of new sensory, motor, and control software modules into the software of a given robotic system. R4SA was developed for initial application aboard exploratory mobile robots on Mars, but is adaptable to terrestrial robotic systems, real-time embedded computing systems in general, and robotic toys.

  10. Service-oriented architecture for the ARGOS instrument control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borelli, J.; Barl, L.; Gässler, W.; Kulas, M.; Rabien, Sebastian

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Rayleigh Guided ground layer Adaptive optic System, ARGOS, equips the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) with a constellation of six rayleigh laser guide stars. By correcting atmospheric turbulence near the ground, the system is designed to increase the image quality of the multi-object spectrograph LUCIFER approximately by a factor of 3 over a field of 4 arc minute diameter. The control software has the critical task of orchestrating several devices, instruments, and high level services, including the already existing adaptive optic system and the telescope control software. All these components are widely distributed over the telescope, adding more complexity to the system design. The approach used by the ARGOS engineers is to write loosely coupled and distributed services under the control of different ownership systems, providing a uniform mechanism to offer, discover, interact and use these distributed capabilities. The control system counts with several finite state machines, vibration and flexure compensation loops, and safety mechanism, such as interlocks, aircraft, and satellite avoidance systems.

  11. Software Architecture Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  12. Architecture for Verifiable Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinholtz, William; Dvorak, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Verifiable MDS Architecture (VMA) is a software architecture that facilitates the construction of highly verifiable flight software for NASA s Mission Data System (MDS), especially for smaller missions subject to cost constraints. More specifically, the purpose served by VMA is to facilitate aggressive verification and validation of flight software while imposing a minimum of constraints on overall functionality. VMA exploits the state-based architecture of the MDS and partitions verification issues into elements susceptible to independent verification and validation, in such a manner that scaling issues are minimized, so that relatively large software systems can be aggressively verified in a cost-effective manner.

  13. Adoption of new software and hardware solutions at the VLT: the ESPRESSO control architecture case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirami, R.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Coretti, I.; Santin, P.; Mannetta, M.; Baldini, V.; Cristiani, S.; Abreu, M.; Cabral, A.; Monteiro, M.; Mégevand, D.; Zerbi, F.

    2012-09-01

    ESPRESSO is a fiber-fed cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph which can be operated with one or up to 4 UT (Unit Telescope) of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It will be located in the Combined-Coudé Laboratory (CCL) of the VLT and it will be the first permanent instrument using a 16-m equivalent telescope. The ESPRESSO control software and electronics are in charge of the control of all instrument subsystems: the four Coudé Trains (one for each UT), the front-end and the fiber-fed spectrograph itself contained within a vacuum vessel. The spectrograph is installed inside a series of thermal enclosures following an onion-shell principle with increasing temperature stability from outside to inside. The proposed electronics architecture will use the OPC Unified Architecture (OPC UA) as a standard layer to communicate with PLCs (Programmable Logical Controller), replacing the old Instrument Local Control Units (LCUs) for ESO instruments based on VME technology. The instrument control software will be based on the VLT Control Software package and will use the IC0 Field Bus extension for the control of the instrument hardware. In this paper we present the ESPRESSO software architectural design proposed at the Preliminary Design Review as well as the control electronics architecture.

  14. A software architecture for hard real-time execution of automatically synthesized plans or control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoppers, Marcel

    1994-01-01

    The design of a flexible, real-time software architecture for trajectory planning and automatic control of redundant manipulators is described. Emphasis is placed on a technique of designing control systems that are both flexible and robust yet have good real-time performance. The solution presented involves an artificial intelligence algorithm that dynamically reprograms the real-time control system while planning system behavior.

  15. Software Defined Networking (SDN) controlled all optical switching networks with multi-dimensional switching architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Ji, Yuefeng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Hui; Xiong, Qianjin; Qiu, Shaofeng

    2014-08-01

    Ultrahigh throughout capacity requirement is challenging the current optical switching nodes with the fast development of data center networks. Pbit/s level all optical switching networks need to be deployed soon, which will cause the high complexity of node architecture. How to control the future network and node equipment together will become a new problem. An enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN) control architecture is proposed in the paper, which consists of Provider NOX (P-NOX) and Node NOX (N-NOX). With the cooperation of P-NOX and N-NOX, the flexible control of the entire network can be achieved. All optical switching network testbed has been experimentally demonstrated with efficient control of enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN). Pbit/s level all optical switching nodes in the testbed are implemented based on multi-dimensional switching architecture, i.e. multi-level and multi-planar. Due to the space and cost limitation, each optical switching node is only equipped with four input line boxes and four output line boxes respectively. Experimental results are given to verify the performance of our proposed control and switching architecture.

  16. Software Architecture Design Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Antony; van Vliet, Hans

    Despite recent advancements in software architecture knowledge management and design rationale modeling, industrial practice is behind in adopting these methods. The lack of empirical proofs and the lack of a practical process that can be easily incorporated by practitioners are some of the hindrance for adoptions. In particular, the process to support systematic design reasoning is not available. To rectify this issue, we propose a design reasoning process to help architects cope with an architectural design environment where design concerns are cross-cutting and diversified.We use an industrial case study to validate that the design reasoning process can help improve the quality of software architecture design. The results have indicated that associating design concerns and identifying design options are important steps in design reasoning.

  17. CONRAD Software Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, J. C.; Bennett, T.

    2008-08-01

    The Convergent Radio Astronomy Demonstrator (CONRAD) is a collaboration between the computing teams of two SKA pathfinder instruments, MeerKAT (South Africa) and ASKAP (Australia). Our goal is to produce the required common software to operate, process and store the data from the two instruments. Both instruments are synthesis arrays composed of a large number of antennas (40 - 100) operating at centimeter wavelengths with wide-field capabilities. Key challenges are the processing of high volume of data in real-time as well as the remote mode of operations. Here we present the software architecture for CONRAD. Our design approach is to maximize the use of open solutions and third-party software widely deployed in commercial applications, such as SNMP and LDAP, and to utilize modern web-based technologies for the user interfaces, such as AJAX.

  18. Compositional Specification of Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penix, John; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes our experience using parameterized algebraic specifications to model properties of software architectures. The goal is to model the decomposition of requirements independent of the style used to implement the architecture. We begin by providing an overview of the role of architecture specification in software development. We then describe how architecture specifications are build up from component and connector specifications and give an overview of insights gained from a case study used to validate the method.

  19. Software synthesis using generic architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhansali, Sanjay

    1993-01-01

    A framework for synthesizing software systems based on abstracting software system designs and the design process is described. The result of such an abstraction process is a generic architecture and the process knowledge for customizing the architecture. The customization process knowledge is used to assist a designer in customizing the architecture as opposed to completely automating the design of systems. Our approach using an implemented example of a generic tracking architecture which was customized in two different domains is illustrated. How the designs produced using KASE compare to the original designs of the two systems, and current work and plans for extending KASE to other application areas are described.

  20. Generic Software Architecture for Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carre, Emilien; Gast, Philippe; Hiron, Emmanuel; Leblanc, Alain; Lesens, David; Mescam, Emmanuelle; Moro, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    The definition and reuse of generic software architecture for launchers is not so usual for several reasons: the number of European launcher families is very small (Ariane 5 and Vega for these last decades); the real time constraints (reactivity and determinism needs) are very hard; low levels of versatility are required (implying often an ad hoc development of the launcher mission). In comparison, satellites are often built on a generic platform made up of reusable hardware building blocks (processors, star-trackers, gyroscopes, etc.) and reusable software building blocks (middleware, TM/TC, On Board Control Procedure, etc.). If some of these reasons are still valid (e.g. the limited number of development), the increase of the available CPU power makes today an approach based on a generic time triggered middleware (ensuring the full determinism of the system) and a centralised mission and vehicle management (offering more flexibility in the design and facilitating the long term maintenance) achievable. This paper presents an example of generic software architecture which could be envisaged for future launchers, based on the previously described principles and supported by model driven engineering and automatic code generation.

  1. SIFT - Multiprocessor architecture for Software Implemented Fault Tolerance flight control and avionics computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, P.; Moses, K.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of a SIFT (Software Implemented Fault Tolerance) Flight Control Computer with emphasis on implementation is presented. A multiprocessor system that relies on software-implemented fault detection and reconfiguration algorithms is described. A high level reliability and fault tolerance is achieved by the replication of computing tasks among processing units.

  2. A comparison of two software architectural styles for space-based control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the hardware/software design of control systems it is almost an article of faith to decompose a system into loosely coupled subsystems, with state variables encapsulated inside device and subsystem objects.

  3. Software Defined Radio with Parallelized Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This software implements software-defined radio procession over multicore, multi-CPU systems in a way that maximizes the use of CPU resources in the system. The software treats each processing step in either a communications or navigation modulator or demodulator system as an independent, threaded block. Each threaded block is defined with a programmable number of input or output buffers; these buffers are implemented using POSIX pipes. In addition, each threaded block is assigned a unique thread upon block installation. A modulator or demodulator system is built by assembly of the threaded blocks into a flow graph, which assembles the processing blocks to accomplish the desired signal processing. This software architecture allows the software to scale effortlessly between single CPU/single-core computers or multi-CPU/multi-core computers without recompilation. NASA spaceflight and ground communications systems currently rely exclusively on ASICs or FPGAs. This software allows low- and medium-bandwidth (100 bps to approx.50 Mbps) software defined radios to be designed and implemented solely in C/C++ software, while lowering development costs and facilitating reuse and extensibility.

  4. Software Defined Radio with Parallelized Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This software implements software-defined radio procession over multi-core, multi-CPU systems in a way that maximizes the use of CPU resources in the system. The software treats each processing step in either a communications or navigation modulator or demodulator system as an independent, threaded block. Each threaded block is defined with a programmable number of input or output buffers; these buffers are implemented using POSIX pipes. In addition, each threaded block is assigned a unique thread upon block installation. A modulator or demodulator system is built by assembly of the threaded blocks into a flow graph, which assembles the processing blocks to accomplish the desired signal processing. This software architecture allows the software to scale effortlessly between single CPU/single-core computers or multi-CPU/multi-core computers without recompilation. NASA spaceflight and ground communications systems currently rely exclusively on ASICs or FPGAs. This software allows low- and medium-bandwidth (100 bps to .50 Mbps) software defined radios to be designed and implemented solely in C/C++ software, while lowering development costs and facilitating reuse and extensibility.

  5. Software design by reusing architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhansali, Sanjay; Nii, H. Penny

    1992-01-01

    Abstraction fosters reuse by providing a class of artifacts that can be instantiated or customized to produce a set of artifacts meeting different specific requirements. It is proposed that significant leverage can be obtained by abstracting software system designs and the design process. The result of such an abstraction is a generic architecture and a set of knowledge-based, customization tools that can be used to instantiate the generic architecture. An approach for designing software systems based on the above idea are described. The approach is illustrated through an implemented example, and the advantages and limitations of the approach are discussed.

  6. Control Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Real-Time Innovations, Inc. (RTI) collaborated with Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Stanford University to leverage NASA research to produce ControlShell software. RTI is the first "graduate" of Ames Research Center's Technology Commercialization Center. The ControlShell system was used extensively on a cooperative project to enhance the capabilities of a Russian-built Marsokhod rover being evaluated for eventual flight to Mars. RTI's ControlShell is complex, real-time command and control software, capable of processing information and controlling mechanical devices. One ControlShell tool is StethoScope. As a real-time data collection and display tool, StethoScope allows a user to see how a program is running without changing its execution. RTI has successfully applied its software savvy in other arenas, such as telecommunications, networking, video editing, semiconductor manufacturing, automobile systems, and medical imaging.

  7. Software Architecture for Planetary and Lunar Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utz, Hans; Fong, Teny; Nesnas, Iasa A. D.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the role that software architecture plays in space and lunar robotics is shown. The topics include: 1) The Intelligent Robotics Group; 2) The Lunar Mission; 3) Lunar Robotics; and 4) Software Architecture for Space Robotics.

  8. Architecture-Centric Software Quality Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciaszek, Leszek A.

    Software quality is a multi-faceted concept defined using different attributes and models. From all various quality requirements, the quality of adaptiveness is by far most critical. Based on this assumption, this paper offers an architecture-centric approach to production of measurably-adaptive systems. The paper uses the PCBMER (Presentation, Controller, Bean, Mediator, Entity, and Resource) meta-architecture to demonstrate how complexity of a software solution can be measured and kept under control in standalone applications. Meta-architectural extensions aimed at managing quality in integration development projects are also introduced. The DSM (Design Structure Matrix) method is used to explain our approach to measure the quality. The discussion is conducted against the background of the holonic approach to science (as the middle-ground between holism and reductionism).

  9. Neural Architectures for Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, James K.

    1991-01-01

    The cerebellar model articulated controller (CMAC) neural architectures are shown to be viable for the purposes of real-time learning and control. Software tools for the exploration of CMAC performance are developed for three hardware platforms, the MacIntosh, the IBM PC, and the SUN workstation. All algorithm development was done using the C programming language. These software tools were then used to implement an adaptive critic neuro-control design that learns in real-time how to back up a trailer truck. The truck backer-upper experiment is a standard performance measure in the neural network literature, but previously the training of the controllers was done off-line. With the CMAC neural architectures, it was possible to train the neuro-controllers on-line in real-time on a MS-DOS PC 386. CMAC neural architectures are also used in conjunction with a hierarchical planning approach to find collision-free paths over 2-D analog valued obstacle fields. The method constructs a coarse resolution version of the original problem and then finds the corresponding coarse optimal path using multipass dynamic programming. CMAC artificial neural architectures are used to estimate the analog transition costs that dynamic programming requires. The CMAC architectures are trained in real-time for each obstacle field presented. The coarse optimal path is then used as a baseline for the construction of a fine scale optimal path through the original obstacle array. These results are a very good indication of the potential power of the neural architectures in control design. In order to reach as wide an audience as possible, we have run a seminar on neuro-control that has met once per week since 20 May 1991. This seminar has thoroughly discussed the CMAC architecture, relevant portions of classical control, back propagation through time, and adaptive critic designs.

  10. The telescope control of the ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov telescope Array: hardware and software design architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolini, Elisa; Cascone, Enrico; Schwarz, Joseph; Stringhetti, Luca; Tanci, Claudio; Tosti, Gino; Aisa, Damiano; Aisa, Simone; Bagaglia, Marco; Busatta, Andrea; Campeggi, Carlo; Cefala, Marco; Farnesini, Lucio; Giacomel, Stefano; Marchiori, Gianpiero; Marcuzzi, Enrico; Nucciarelli, Giuliano; Piluso, Antonfranco

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Research and led by the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics (INAF). One of its aims is to develop, within the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) framework, an end-to-end small-sized telescope prototype in a dual-mirror configuration (SST-2M) in order to investigate the energy range E ~ 1-100 TeV. A long-term goal of the ASTRI program is the production of an ASTRI/CTA mini-array composed of seven SST-2M telescopes. The prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, is seen as a standalone system that needs only network and power connections to work. The software system that is being developed to control the prototype is the base for the Mini-Array Software System (MASS), which has the task to make possible the operation of both the ASTRI SST-2M prototype and the ASTRI/CTA mini-array. The scope of this contribution is to give an overview of the hardware and software architecture adopted for the ASTRI SST- 2M prototype, showing how to apply state of the art industrial technologies to telescope control and monitoring systems.

  11. Power, Avionics and Software Communication Network Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Sands, Obed S.; Bakula, Casey J.; Oldham, Daniel R.; Wright, Ted; Bradish, Martin A.; Klebau, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the communication architecture for the Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 2.0 subsystem for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobile Unit (AEMU). The following systems are described in detail: Caution Warn- ing and Control System, Informatics, Storage, Video, Audio, Communication, and Monitoring Test and Validation. This document also provides some background as well as the purpose and goals of the PAS project at Glenn Research Center (GRC).

  12. CNEOST Control Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhao, H. B.; Xia, Y.; Lu, H.; Li, B.

    2015-03-01

    In 2013, CNEOST (China Near Earth Object Survey Telescope) adapted its hardware system for the new CCD camera. Based on the new system architecture, the control software is re-designed and implemented. The software system adopts the message passing mechanism via WebSocket protocol, and improves its flexibility, expansibility, and scalability. The user interface with responsive web design realizes the remote operating under both desktop and mobile devices. The stable operating of software system has greatly enhanced the operation efficiency while reducing the complexity, and has also made a successful attempt for the future system design of telescope and telescope cloud.

  13. CNEOST Control Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Zhao, Hai-bin; Xia, Yan; Lu, Hao; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, CNEOST (China Near Earth Object Survey Telescope) adapted its hardware system for the new CCD camera. Based on the new system architecture, the control software is re-designed and implemented. The software system adopts the messaging mechanism based on the WebSocket protocol, and possesses good flexibility and expansibility. The user interface based on the responsive web design has realized the remote observations under both desktop and mobile devices. The stable operation of the software system has greatly enhanced the operation efficiency while reducing the complexity, and has also made a successful attempt for the future system design of telescope and telescope cloud.

  14. Software Architecture Review: The State of Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Babar, Muhammad A.; Gorton, Ian

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey we carried out to investigate the state of practice of software architecture reviews. Of the survey results we describe, two are particularly significant for the software architecture research community. First, the survey respondents evaluate architectures mostly using informal, experience-based approaches. Second, the survey respondents rarely adopt the techniques that are highly recommended in architecture review research, such as the use of project-independent reviewers. We conclude that the software engineering practitioner community has yet to become fully aware of the methods and techniques available to support disciplined architecture review processes and their potential benefits. The architecture review research community needs to concentrate on helping practitioners by providing guidelines for justifying and institutionalizing the architecture review processes, and associated tools support.

  15. TRANSIMS software architecture for IOC-1

    SciTech Connect

    Berkbigler, K.P.; Bush, B.W.; Davis, J.F.

    1997-04-03

    This document describes the TRANSIMS software architecture and high-level design for the first Interim Operational Capability (IOC-1). Our primary goal in establishing the TRANSIMS software architecture is to lay down a framework for IOC-1. We aim to make sure that the various components of TRANSIMS are effectively integrated, both for IOC-1 and beyond, so that TRANSIMS remains flexible, expandable, portable, and maintainable throughout its lifetime. In addition to outlining the high-level design of the TRANSIMS software, we also set forth the software development environment and software engineering practices used for TRANSIMS.

  16. An open architecture motion controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossol, Lothar

    1994-01-01

    Nomad, an open architecture motion controller, is described. It is formed by a combination of TMOS, C-WORKS, and other utilities. Nomad software runs in a UNIX environment and provides for sensor-controlled robotic motions, with user replaceable kinematics. It can also be tailored for highly specialized applications. Open controllers such as Nomad should have a major impact on the robotics industry.

  17. A Software Architecture for High Level Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen,G.

    2009-05-04

    A modular software platform for high level applications is under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. This platform is based on client-server architecture, and the components of high level applications on this platform will be modular and distributed, and therefore reusable. An online model server is indispensable for model based control. Different accelerator facilities have different requirements for the online simulation. To supply various accelerator simulators, a set of narrow and general application programming interfaces is developed based on Tracy-3 and Elegant. This paper describes the system architecture for the modular high level applications, the design of narrow and general application programming interface for an online model server, and the prototype of online model server.

  18. Software Architecture for Autonomous Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Jimmy S.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis objective is to design an autonomous spacecraft architecture to perform both deliberative and reactive behaviors. The Autonomous Small Planet In-Situ Reaction to Events (ASPIRE) project uses the architecture to integrate several autonomous technologies for a comet orbiter mission.

  19. The LUCIFER control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jütte, Marcus; Knierim, Volker; Polsterer, Kai; Lehmitz, Michael; Storz, Clemens; Seifert, Walter; Ageorges, Nancy

    2010-07-01

    The successful roll-out of the control software for a complex NIR imager/spectrograph with MOS calls for flexible development strategies due to changing requirements during different phases of the project. A waterfall strategy used in the beginning has to change to a more iterative and agile process in the later stages. The choice of an appropriate program language as well as suitable software layout is crucial. For example the software has to accomplish multiple demands of different user groups, including a high level of flexibility for later changes and extensions. Different access levels to the instrument are mandatory to afford direct control mechanisms for lab operations and inspections of the instrument as well as tools to accomplish efficient science observations. Our hierarchical software structure with four layers of increasing abstract levels and the use of an object oriented language ideally supports these requirements. Here we describe our software architecture, the software development process, the different access levels and our commissioning experiences with LUCIFER 1.

  20. The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Juan C.; Humphreys, Ben

    2010-07-01

    The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a 1% Square Kilometre Array (SKA) pathfinder radio telescope, comprising of 36 12-metre diameter reflector antennas, each with a Focal Plane Array consisting of approximately 100 dualpolarised elements operating at centimetre wavelengths and yielding a wide field-of-view (FOV) on the sky of about 30 square degrees. ASKAP is currently under construction and will be located in the remote radio-quiet desert Midwest region of Western Australia. It is expected to be fully operational in 2013. Key challenges include near real-time processing of large amount of data (~ 4 GB/s), control and monitoring of widely distributed devices (approx. 150,000 monitoring I/O points) and remote semi-automated operations. After evaluating several software technologies we have decided to use the EPICS framework for the Telescope Operating System and the Internet Communications Engine (ICE) middleware for the high-level service bus. This paper presents a summary of the overall ASKAP software architecture, as well as describing how EPICS and ICE technologies fit in the control software design.

  1. A Software Architecture for Intelligent Synthesis Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA's Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE) program is a grand attempt to develop a system to transform the way complex artifacts are engineered. This paper discusses a "middleware" architecture for enabling the development of ISE. Desirable elements of such an Intelligent Synthesis Architecture (ISA) include remote invocation; plug-and-play applications; scripting of applications; management of design artifacts, tools, and artifact and tool attributes; common system services; system management; and systematic enforcement of policies. This paper argues that the ISA extend conventional distributed object technology (DOT) such as CORBA and Product Data Managers with flexible repositories of product and tool annotations and "plug-and-play" mechanisms for inserting "ility" or orthogonal concerns into the system. I describe the Object Infrastructure Framework, an Aspect Oriented Programming (AOP) environment for developing distributed systems that provides utility insertion and enables consistent annotation maintenance. This technology can be used to enforce policies such as maintaining the annotations of artifacts, particularly the provenance and access control rules of artifacts-, performing automatic datatype transformations between representations; supplying alternative servers of the same service; reporting on the status of jobs and the system; conveying privileges throughout an application; supporting long-lived transactions; maintaining version consistency; and providing software redundancy and mobility.

  2. Selection of a Data Acquisition and Controls System Communications and Software Architecture for Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory Thermal and Vacuum Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Eric A.

    2004-01-01

    Upgrade of data acquisition and controls systems software at Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) involved the definition, evaluation and selection of a system communication architecture and software components. A brief discussion of the background of the SESL and its data acquisition and controls systems provides a context for discussion of the requirements for each selection. Further framework is provided as upgrades to these systems accomplished in the 1990s and in 2003 are compared to demonstrate the role that technological advances have had in their improvement. Both of the selections were similar in their three phases; 1) definition of requirements, 2) identification of candidate products and their evaluation and testing and 3) selection by comparison of requirement fulfillment. The candidates for the communication architecture selection embraced several different methodologies which are explained and contrasted. Requirements for this selection are presented and the selection process is described. Several candidates for the software component of the data acquisition and controls system are identified, requirements for evaluation and selection are presented, and the evaluation process is described.

  3. A Practical Software Architecture for Virtual Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiang, Peifeng; Shi, Yuanchun; Qin, Weijun

    2006-01-01

    This article introduces a practical software architecture called CUBES, which focuses on system integration and evolvement for online virtual universities. The key of CUBES is a supporting platform that helps to integrate and evolve heterogeneous educational applications developed by different organizations. Both standardized educational…

  4. Programmable bandwidth management in software-defined EPON architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengjun; Guo, Wei; Wang, Wei; Hu, Weisheng; Xia, Ming

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a software-defined EPON architecture which replaces the hardware-implemented DBA module with reprogrammable DBA module. The DBA module allows pluggable bandwidth allocation algorithms among multiple ONUs adaptive to traffic profiles and network states. We also introduce a bandwidth management scheme executed at the controller to manage the customized DBA algorithms for all date queues of ONUs. Our performance investigation verifies the effectiveness of this new EPON architecture, and numerical results show that software-defined EPONs can achieve less traffic delay and provide better support to service differentiation in comparison with traditional EPONs.

  5. The Software Architecture of Global Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K. A.; Easterbrook, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    It has become common to compare and contrast the output of multiple global climate models (GCMs), such as in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). However, intercomparisons of the software architecture of GCMs are almost nonexistent. In this qualitative study of seven GCMs from Canada, the United States, and Europe, we attempt to fill this gap in research. We describe the various representations of the climate system as computer programs, and account for architectural differences between models. Most GCMs now practice component-based software engineering, where Earth system components (such as the atmosphere or land surface) are present as highly encapsulated sub-models. This architecture facilitates a mix-and-match approach to climate modelling that allows for convenient sharing of model components between institutions, but it also leads to difficulty when choosing where to draw the lines between systems that are not encapsulated in the real world, such as sea ice. We also examine different styles of couplers in GCMs, which manage interaction and data flow between components. Finally, we pay particular attention to the varying levels of complexity in GCMs, both between and within models. Many GCMs have some components that are significantly more complex than others, a phenomenon which can be explained by the respective institution's research goals as well as the origin of the model components. In conclusion, although some features of software architecture have been adopted by every GCM we examined, other features show a wide range of different design choices and strategies. These architectural differences may provide new insights into variability and spread between models.

  6. A software architecture for autonomous orbital robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henshaw, Carl G.; Akins, Keith; Creamer, N. Glenn; Faria, Matthew; Flagg, Cris; Hayden, Matthew; Healy, Liam; Hrolenok, Brian; Johnson, Jeffrey; Lyons, Kimberly; Pipitone, Frank; Tasker, Fred

    2006-05-01

    SUMO, the Spacecraft for the Universal Modification of Orbits, is a DARPA-sponsored spacecraft designed to provide orbital repositioning services to geosynchronous satellites. Such services may be needed to facilitate changing the geostationary slot of a satellite, to allow a satellite to be used until the propellant is expended instead of reserving propellant for a retirement burn, or to rescue a satellite stranded in geosynchronous transfer orbit due to a launch failure. Notably, SUMO is being designed to be compatible with the current geosynchronous satellite catalog, which implies that it does not require the customer spacecraft to have special docking fixtures, optical guides, or cooperative communications or pose sensors. In addition, the final approach and grapple will be performed autonomously. SUMO is being designed and built by the Naval Center for Space Technology, a division of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC. The nature of the SUMO concept mission leads to significant challenges in onboard spacecraft autonomy. Also, because research and development in machine vision, trajectory planning, and automation algorithms for SUMO is being pursued in parallel with flight software development, there are considerable challenges in prototyping and testing algorithms in situ and in transitioning these algorithms from laboratory form into software suitable for flight. This paper discusses these challenges, outlining the current SUMO design from the standpoint of flight algorithms and software. In particular, the design of the SUMO phase 1 laboratory demonstration software is described in detail. The proposed flight-like software architecture is also described.

  7. Software Use Control

    SciTech Connect

    Trussell, F.G.

    1994-03-01

    The topic of this technical presentation is Use Control Software. The nuclear weapon software design community is being subjected to many surety forces that are stretching the envelope of their designs. Given that software is a critical part of the use control system design, we must work to limit the errors of the software development process. The objective of this paper is to discuss a methodology that the author, as a member of the Security and Use Control Assessment Department, is working on. This is the first introduction of the proposed methodology. Software that is a part of any use control system, subsystem, device, or component is critical to the operation of that apparatus. The software is expected to meet the criteria of modern software quality. In a use control application, meeting the normal quality standards is short of the expectations in meeting the use control obligations. The NWC community expects the use control features of a nuclear weapon to provide assurance that the weapon is protected from unauthorized nuclear detonation. The methodology that the author is proposing will provide a focused scrutiny to software that is used in the hardware of use control systems, subsystems, devices, and components. The methodology proposes further scrutiny of the structure of the software, memory, variables, storage, and control features.

  8. Survey of software and hardware VLC architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, Chad E.

    1994-05-01

    In implementation of hybrid compression algorithms, the Huffman or Modified Huffman codec can consume a significant portion of silicon real-estate or CPU cycles. To reduce this cost, several schemes have been published that take advantage of one or more inherent properties of the variable length code tables. This paper examines some of these properties and their corresponding architectural components which can be pieced together to form custom hybrids suited to specific applications. Hardware architectural classifications include: serial and parallel Trees, Content Addressable Memory, Programmable Logic Arrays, and parallel comparators schemes that resemble flash A/D architectures. Assessment criteria include: bit rate vs. symbolic rate performance, clock cycle ratios, latencies, pre-buffering and post- buffering, codebook and source channel statistical dependencies, encoder and decoder circuitry sharing, pre-processing of codebooks, critical path, register use in software, breakdown between memory and logical operators, custom vs. standard cells, and code word order. Finally, the performance and size of current industrial implementations for specific application (JPEG, MPEG) are summarized.

  9. Plating Tank Control Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-03-01

    The Plating Tank Control Software is a graphical user interface that controls and records plating process conditions for plating in high aspect ratio channels that require use of low current and long times. The software is written for a Pentium II PC with an 8 channel data acquisition card, and the necessary shunt resistors for measuring currents in the millampere range.

  10. Java based open architecture controller

    SciTech Connect

    Weinert, G F

    2000-01-13

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) the authors have been developing an open architecture machine tool controller. This work has been patterned after the General Motors (GM) led Open Modular Architecture Controller (OMAC) work, where they have been involved since its inception. The OMAC work has centered on creating sets of implementation neutral application programming interfaces (APIs) for machine control software components. In the work at LLNL, they were among the early adopters of the Java programming language. As an application programming language, it is particularly well suited for component software development. The language contains many features, which along with a well-defined implementation API (such as the OMAC APIs) allows third party binary files to be integrated into a working system. Because of its interpreted nature, Java allows rapid integration testing of components. However, for real-time systems development, the Java programming language presents many drawbacks. For instance, lack of well defined scheduling semantics and threading behavior can present many unwanted challenges. Also, the interpreted nature of the standard Java Virtual Machine (JVM) presents an immediate performance hit. Various real-time Java vendors are currently addressing some of these drawbacks. The various pluses and minuses of using the Java programming language and environment, with regard to a component-based controller, will be outlined.

  11. COG Software Architecture Design Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, R M; Lent, E M

    2009-09-21

    This COG Software Architecture Design Description Document describes the organization and functionality of the COG Multiparticle Monte Carlo Transport Code for radiation shielding and criticality calculations, at a level of detail suitable for guiding a new code developer in the maintenance and enhancement of COG. The intended audience also includes managers and scientists and engineers who wish to have a general knowledge of how the code works. This Document is not intended for end-users. This document covers the software implemented in the standard COG Version 10, as released through RSICC and IAEA. Software resources provided by other institutions will not be covered. This document presents the routines grouped by modules and in the order of the three processing phases. Some routines are used in multiple phases. The routine description is presented once - the first time the routine is referenced. Since this is presented at the level of detail for guiding a new code developer, only the routines invoked by another routine that are significant for the processing phase that is being detailed are presented. An index to all routines detailed is included. Tables for the primary data structures are also presented.

  12. Formalization and visualization of domain-specific software architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailor, Paul D.; Luginbuhl, David R.; Robinson, John S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a domain-specific software design system based on the concepts of software architectures engineering and domain-specific models and languages. In this system, software architectures are used as high level abstractions to formulate a domain-specific software design. The software architecture serves as a framework for composing architectural fragments (e.g., domain objects, system components, and hardware interfaces) that make up the knowledge (or model) base for solving a problem in a particular application area. A corresponding software design is generated by analyzing and describing a system in the context of the software architecture. While the software architecture serves as the framework for the design, this concept is insufficient by itself for supplying the additional details required for a specific design. Additional domain knowledge is still needed to instantiate components of the architecture and develop optimized algorithms for the problem domain. One possible way to obtain the additional details is through the use of domain-specific languages. Thus, the general concept of a software architecture and the specific design details provided by domain-specific languages are combined to create what can be termed a domain-specific software architecture (DSSA).

  13. Software based controls module development

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, v.b.; kelley, g; welch, j.c.

    1999-12-10

    A project was initiated at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to implement software geometric error compensation within a PC-based machine tool controller from Manufacturing Data Systems, Inc. This project may be the first in which this type of compensation system was implemented in a commercially available machine tool controller totally in software. Previous implementations typically required using an external computer and hardware to interface through the position feedback loop of the controller because direct access to the controller software was not available. The test-bed machine for this project was a 2-axis Excello 921 T-base lathe. A mathematical error model of the lathe was created using homogeneous transformation matrices to relate the positions of the machine's slides to each other and to a world reference system. Equations describing the effects of the geometric errors were derived from the model. A software architecture was developed to support geometric error compensation for machine tools with up to 3 linear axes. Rotary axes were not supported in this implementation, but the developed architecture would not preclude their support in the future. Specific implementations will be dependent upon the configuration of the machine tool. A laser measuring system from Automated Precision, Inc. was used to characterize the lathe's geometric errors as functions of axis position and direction of motion. Multiple data files generated by the laser system were combined into a single Error File that was read at system startup and used by the compensation system to provide real-time position adjustments to the axis servos. A Renishaw Ballbar was used to evaluate the compensation system. Static positioning tests were conducted in an attempt to observe improved positioning accuracy with the compensation system enabled. These tests gave inconsistent results due to the lathe's inability to position the tool repeatably. The development of the architecture and compensation

  14. Multicore Software Architectures on Virtualized Partitioned Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrascosa, E.; Masmano, M.; Balbastre, P.; Crespo, A.; Galizzi, J.

    2014-08-01

    Embedded system design is evolving in terms of complexity towards the use of multiprocessor architectures, increasing performance and reducing costs while presenting a low impact on critical design aspects. However, the use of multi-core technologies entails an increment in the level of indeterminism that is not acceptable for safety critical applications where predictability is crucial. This paper focuses on analysing the factors related to indeterminism on multicore systems and the methods to attenuate their impact, providing a series of guidelines aimed to obtain on-board software qualification. Time and space partitioning (TSP) is presented as a suitable mean to handle indeterminism, while XtratuM, an open source TSP hyper-visor designed to comply with safety critical real-time requirements, has been selected to adopt a practical approach to the subject.

  15. The Software Architecture of the Upgraded ESA DRAMA Software Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebschull, Christopher; Flegel, Sven; Gelhaus, Johannes; Mockel, Marek; Braun, Vitali; Radtke, Jonas; Wiedemann, Carsten; Vorsmann, Peter; Sanchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Krag, Holger

    2013-08-01

    In the beginnings of man's space flight activities there was the belief that space is so big that everybody could use it without any repercussions. However during the last six decades the increasing use of Earth's orbits has lead to a rapid growth in the space debris environment, which has a big influence on current and future space missions. For this reason ESA issued the "Requirements on Space Debris Mitigation for ESA Projects" [1] in 2008, which apply to all ESA missions henceforth. The DRAMA (Debris Risk Assessment and Mitigation Analysis) software suite had been developed to support the planning of space missions to comply with these requirements. During the last year the DRAMA software suite has been upgraded under ESA contract by TUBS and DEIMOS to include additional tools and increase the performance of existing ones. This paper describes the overall software architecture of the ESA DRAMA software suite. Specifically the new graphical user interface, which manages the five main tools ARES (Assessment of Risk Event Statistics), MIDAS (MASTER-based Impact Flux and Damage Assessment Software), OSCAR (Orbital Spacecraft Active Removal), CROC (Cross Section of Complex Bodies) and SARA (Re-entry Survival and Risk Analysis) is being discussed. The advancements are highlighted as well as the challenges that arise from the integration of the five tool interfaces. A framework had been developed at the ILR and was used for MASTER-2009 and PROOF-2009. The Java based GUI framework, enables the cross-platform deployment, and its underlying model-view-presenter (MVP) software pattern, meet strict design requirements necessary to ensure a robust and reliable method of operation in an environment where the GUI is separated from the processing back-end. While the GUI framework evolved with each project, allowing an increasing degree of integration of services like validators for input fields, it has also increased in complexity. The paper will conclude with an outlook on

  16. Conceptual Architecture of Building Energy Management Open Source Software (BEMOSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Khamphanchai, Warodom; Saha, Avijit; Rathinavel, Kruthika; Kuzlu, Murat; Pipattanasomporn, Manisa; Rahman, Saifur; Akyol, Bora A.; Haack, Jereme N.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a conceptual architecture of a Building Energy Management Open Source Software (BEMOSS) platform. The proposed BEMOSS platform is expected to improve sensing and control of equipment in small- and medium-sized buildings, reduce energy consumption and help implement demand response (DR). It aims to offer: scalability, robustness, plug and play, open protocol, interoperability, cost-effectiveness, as well as local and remote monitoring. In this paper, four essential layers of BEMOSS software architecture -- namely User Interface, Application and Data Management, Operating System and Framework, and Connectivity layers -- are presented. A laboratory test bed to demonstrate the functionality of BEMOSS located at the Advanced Research Institute of Virginia Tech is also briefly described.

  17. Modular Rocket Engine Control Software (MRECS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarrant, C.; Crook, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Modular Rocket Engine Control Software (MRECS) Program is a technology demonstration effort designed to advance the state-of-the-art in launch vehicle propulsion systems. Its emphasis is on developing and demonstrating a modular software architecture for advanced engine control systems that will result in lower software maintenance (operations) costs. It effectively accommodates software requirement changes that occur due to hardware technology upgrades and engine development testing. Ground rules directed by MSFC were to optimize modularity and implement the software in the Ada programming language. MRECS system software and the software development environment utilize Commercial-Off-the-Shelf (COTS) products. This paper presents the objectives, benefits, and status of the program. The software architecture, design, and development environment are described. MRECS tasks are defined and timing relationships given. Major accomplishments are listed. MRECS offers benefits to a wide variety of advanced technology programs in the areas of modular software architecture, reuse software, and reduced software reverification time related to software changes. MRECS was recently modified to support a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) hot-fire test. Cold Flow and Flight Readiness Testing were completed before the test was cancelled. Currently, the program is focused on supporting NASA MSFC in accomplishing development testing of the Fastrac Engine, part of NASA's Low Cost Technologies (LCT) Program. MRECS will be used for all engine development testing.

  18. Modular Rocket Engine Control Software (MRECS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarrant, Charlie; Crook, Jerry

    1997-01-01

    The Modular Rocket Engine Control Software (MRECS) Program is a technology demonstration effort designed to advance the state-of-the-art in launch vehicle propulsion systems. Its emphasis is on developing and demonstrating a modular software architecture for a generic, advanced engine control system that will result in lower software maintenance (operations) costs. It effectively accommodates software requirements changes that occur due to hardware. technology upgrades and engine development testing. Ground rules directed by MSFC were to optimize modularity and implement the software in the Ada programming language. MRECS system software and the software development environment utilize Commercial-Off-the-Shelf (COTS) products. This paper presents the objectives and benefits of the program. The software architecture, design, and development environment are described. MRECS tasks are defined and timing relationships given. Major accomplishment are listed. MRECS offers benefits to a wide variety of advanced technology programs in the areas of modular software, architecture, reuse software, and reduced software reverification time related to software changes. Currently, the program is focused on supporting MSFC in accomplishing a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) hot-fire test at Stennis Space Center and the Low Cost Boost Technology (LCBT) Program.

  19. A Tool for Managing Software Architecture Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Babar, Muhammad A.; Gorton, Ian

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes a tool for managing architectural knowledge and rationale. The tool has been developed to support a framework for capturing and using architectural knowledge to improve the architecture process. This paper describes the main architectural components and features of the tool. The paper also provides examples of using the tool for supporting wellknown architecture design and analysis methods.

  20. LIGA Scanner Control Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-02-01

    The LIGA Scanner Software is a graphical user interface package that facilitates controlling the scanning operation of x-rays from a synchrotron and sample manipulation for making LIGA parts. The process requires scanning of the LIGA mask and the PMMA resist through a stationary x-ray beam to provide an evenly distributed x-ray exposure over the wafer. This software package has been written specifically to interface with Aerotech motor controllers.

  1. Power Systems Control Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    James Davidson

    2005-01-01

    A diagram provided in the report depicts the complexity of the power systems control architecture used by the national power structure. It shows the structural hierarchy and the relationship of the each system to those other systems interconnected to it. Each of these levels provides a different focus for vulnerability testing and has its own weaknesses. In evaluating each level, of prime concern is what vulnerabilities exist that provide a path into the system, either to cause the system to malfunction or to take control of a field device. An additional vulnerability to consider is can the system be compromised in such a manner that the attacker can obtain critical information about the system and the portion of the national power structure that it controls.

  2. Controlling Material Reactivity Using Architecture.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kyle T; Zhu, Cheng; Duoss, Eric B; Gash, Alexander E; Kolesky, David B; Kuntz, Joshua D; Lewis, Jennifer A; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    3D-printing methods are used to generate reactive material architectures. Several geometric parameters are observed to influence the resultant flame propagation velocity, indicating that the architecture can be utilized to control reactivity. Two different architectures, channels and hurdles, are generated, and thin films of thermite are deposited onto the surface. The architecture offers an additional route to control, at will, the energy release rate in reactive composite materials. PMID:26669517

  3. Safety-Critical Partitioned Software Architecture: A Partitioned Software Architecture for Robotic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Greg; Chung, Seung H.; Cilloniz-Bicchi, Ferner

    2011-01-01

    The flight software on virtually every mission currently managed by JPL has several major flaws that make it vulnerable to potentially fatal software defects. Many of these problems can be addressed by recently developed partitioned operating systems (OS). JPL has avoided adopting a partitioned operating system on its flight missions, primarily because doing so would require significant changes in flight software design, and the risks associated with changes of that magnitude cannot be accepted by an active flight project. The choice of a partitioned OS can have a dramatic effect on the overall system and software architecture, allowing for realization of benefits far beyond the concerns typically associated with the choice of OS. Specifically, we believe that a partitioned operating system, when coupled with an appropriate architecture, can provide a strong infrastructure for developing systems for which reusability, modifiability, testability, and reliability are essential qualities. By adopting a partitioned OS, projects can gain benefits throughout the entire development lifecycle, from requirements and design, all the way to implementation, testing, and operations.

  4. Software Defined Radio Standard Architecture and its Application to NASA Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andro, Monty; Reinhart, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG's SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA's current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

  5. Application of parallelized software architecture to an autonomous ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, Rahul; Wright, Adam; Shin, Young Ho; Momin, Orko; Petkovsek, Steven; Wortman, Paul; Gautam, Prasanna; Norton, Adam

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents improvements made to Q, an autonomous ground vehicle designed to participate in the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC). For the 2010 IGVC, Q was upgraded with a new parallelized software architecture and a new vision processor. Improvements were made to the power system reducing the number of batteries required for operation from six to one. In previous years, a single state machine was used to execute the bulk of processing activities including sensor interfacing, data processing, path planning, navigation algorithms and motor control. This inefficient approach led to poor software performance and made it difficult to maintain or modify. For IGVC 2010, the team implemented a modular parallel architecture using the National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW programming language. The new architecture divides all the necessary tasks - motor control, navigation, sensor data collection, etc. into well-organized components that execute in parallel, providing considerable flexibility and facilitating efficient use of processing power. Computer vision is used to detect white lines on the ground and determine their location relative to the robot. With the new vision processor and some optimization of the image processing algorithm used last year, two frames can be acquired and processed in 70ms. With all these improvements, Q placed 2nd in the autonomous challenge.

  6. Software Architecture of the Spitzer Archive Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, J.; Wu, X.; Roby, W.; Hoac, A.; Goldina, T.; Hartley, B.

    2007-10-01

    The Spitzer Science Center (SSC) provides a set of user tools to support search and retrieval of Spitzer Archive (SA) data via the Internet. This presentation describes the software architecture and design principles that support the Archive Interface subsystem of the SA (Handley 2007). The Archive Interface is an extension of the core components of the Uplink subsystem and provides a set web services to allow open access to the SA data set. Web services technology provides a basis for searching the archive and retrieving data products. The archive interface provides three modes of access: a rich client, a Web browser, and scripts (via Web services). The rich client allows the user to perform complex queries and submit requests for data that are asynchronously down-loaded to the local workstation. Asynchronous down-load is a critical feature given the large volume of a typical data set (on the order of 40~GB). For basic queries and retrieval of data the Web browser interface is provided. For advanced users, scripting languages with web services capabilities (i.e. Perl) can used to query and down-load data from the SA. The archive interface subsystem is the primary means for searching and retrieving data from the SA and is critical to the success of the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  7. A software architecture for automating operations processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kevin J.

    1994-01-01

    The Operations Engineering Lab (OEL) at JPL has developed a software architecture based on an integrated toolkit approach for simplifying and automating mission operations tasks. The toolkit approach is based on building adaptable, reusable graphical tools that are integrated through a combination of libraries, scripts, and system-level user interface shells. The graphical interface shells are designed to integrate and visually guide a user through the complex steps in an operations process. They provide a user with an integrated system-level picture of an overall process, defining the required inputs and possible output through interactive on-screen graphics. The OEL has developed the software for building these process-oriented graphical user interface (GUI) shells. The OEL Shell development system (OEL Shell) is an extension of JPL's Widget Creation Library (WCL). The OEL Shell system can be used to easily build user interfaces for running complex processes, applications with extensive command-line interfaces, and tool-integration tasks. The interface shells display a logical process flow using arrows and box graphics. They also allow a user to select which output products are desired and which input sources are needed, eliminating the need to know which program and its associated command-line parameters must be executed in each case. The shells have also proved valuable for use as operations training tools because of the OEL Shell hypertext help environment. The OEL toolkit approach is guided by several principles, including the use of ASCII text file interfaces with a multimission format, Perl scripts for mission-specific adaptation code, and programs that include a simple command-line interface for batch mode processing. Projects can adapt the interface shells by simple changes to the resources configuration file. This approach has allowed the development of sophisticated, automated software systems that are easy, cheap, and fast to build. This paper will

  8. Advancing Software Architecture Modeling for Large Scale Heterogeneous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan

    2010-11-07

    In this paper we describe how incorporating technology-specific modeling at the architecture level can help reduce risks and produce better designs for large, heterogeneous software applications. We draw an analogy with established modeling approaches in scientific domains, using groundwater modeling as an example, to help illustrate gaps in current software architecture modeling approaches. We then describe the advances in modeling, analysis and tooling that are required to bring sophisticated modeling and development methods within reach of software architects.

  9. SAR Product Control Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, P. J.; Hounam, D.; Rye, A. J.; Rosich, B.; Börner, T.; Closa, J.; Schättler, B.; Smith, P. J.; Zink, M.

    2003-03-01

    As SAR instruments and their operating modes become more complex, as new applications place more and more demands on image quality and as our understanding of their imperfections becomes more sophisticated, there is increasing recognition that SAR data quality has to be controlled more completely to keep pace. The SAR product CONtrol software (SARCON) is a comprehensive SAR product control software suite tailored to the latest generation of SAR sensors. SARCON profits from the most up-to-date thinking on SAR image performance derived from other spaceborne and airborne SAR projects and is based on the newest applications. This paper gives an overview of the structure and the features of this new software tool, which is a product of a co-operation between teams at BAE SYSTEMS Advanced Technology Centre and DLR under contract to ESA (ESRIN). Work on SARCON began in 1999 and is continuing.

  10. An intelligent CNC machine control system architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.; Loucks, C.S.

    1996-10-01

    Intelligent, agile manufacturing relies on automated programming of digitally controlled processes. Currently, processes such as Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machining are difficult to automate because of highly restrictive controllers and poor software environments. It is also difficult to utilize sensors and process models for adaptive control, or to integrate machining processes with other tasks within a factory floor setting. As part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program, a CNC machine control system architecture based on object-oriented design and graphical programming has been developed to address some of these problems and to demonstrate automated agile machining applications using platform-independent software.

  11. PLDAPS: A Hardware Architecture and Software Toolbox for Neurophysiology Requiring Complex Visual Stimuli and Online Behavioral Control.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Kyler M; Huk, Alexander C

    2012-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies in awake, behaving primates (both human and non-human) have focused with increasing scrutiny on the temporal relationship between neural signals and behaviors. Consequently, laboratories are often faced with the problem of developing experimental equipment that can support data recording with high temporal precision and also be flexible enough to accommodate a wide variety of experimental paradigms. To this end, we have developed a MATLAB toolbox that integrates several modern pieces of equipment, but still grants experimenters the flexibility of a high-level programming language. Our toolbox takes advantage of three popular and powerful technologies: the Plexon apparatus for neurophysiological recordings (Plexon, Inc., Dallas, TX, USA), a Datapixx peripheral (Vpixx Technologies, Saint-Bruno, QC, Canada) for control of analog, digital, and video input-output signals, and the Psychtoolbox MATLAB toolbox for stimulus generation (Brainard, 1997; Pelli, 1997; Kleiner et al., 2007). The PLDAPS ("Platypus") system is designed to support the study of the visual systems of awake, behaving primates during multi-electrode neurophysiological recordings, but can be easily applied to other related domains. Despite its wide range of capabilities and support for cutting-edge video displays and neural recording systems, the PLDAPS system is simple enough for someone with basic MATLAB programming skills to design their own experiments. PMID:22319490

  12. Dataflow architecture for machine control

    SciTech Connect

    Lent, B.

    1989-01-01

    The author describes how to implement the latest control strategies using state-of-the-art control technology and computing principles. Provides all the basic definitions, taxonomy, and analysis of currently used architectures, including microprocessor communication schemes. This book describes in detail the analysis and implementation of the selected OR dataflow driven architecture in a grinding machine control system.

  13. Software Management Environment (SME) concepts and architecture, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrick, Robert; Kistler, David; Valett, Jon

    1992-01-01

    This document presents the concepts and architecture of the Software Management Environment (SME), developed for the Software Engineering Branch of the Flight Dynamic Division (FDD) of GSFC. The SME provides an integrated set of experience-based management tools that can assist software development managers in managing and planning flight dynamics software development projects. This document provides a high-level description of the types of information required to implement such an automated management tool.

  14. Verifying Architectural Design Rules of the Flight Software Product Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, Dharmalingam; Lindvall, Mikael; Ackermann, Chris; McComas, David; Bartholomew, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experiences of verifying architectural design rules of the NASA Core Flight Software (CFS) product line implementation. The goal of the verification is to check whether the implementation is consistent with the CFS architectural rules derived from the developer's guide. The results indicate that consistency checking helps a) identifying architecturally significant deviations that were eluded during code reviews, b) clarifying the design rules to the team, and c) assessing the overall implementation quality. Furthermore, it helps connecting business goals to architectural principles, and to the implementation. This paper is the first step in the definition of a method for analyzing and evaluating product line implementations from an architecture-centric perspective.

  15. Hardware Architecture Study for NASA's Space Software Defined Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Mortensen, Dale J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Andro, Monty; Smith, Carl; Liebetreu, John

    2008-01-01

    This study defines a hardware architecture approach for software defined radios to enable commonality among NASA space missions. The architecture accommodates a range of reconfigurable processing technologies including general purpose processors, digital signal processors, field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in addition to flexible and tunable radio frequency (RF) front-ends to satisfy varying mission requirements. The hardware architecture consists of modules, radio functions, and and interfaces. The modules are a logical division of common radio functions that comprise a typical communication radio. This paper describes the architecture details, module definitions, and the typical functions on each module as well as the module interfaces. Trade-offs between component-based, custom architecture and a functional-based, open architecture are described. The architecture does not specify the internal physical implementation within each module, nor does the architecture mandate the standards or ratings of the hardware used to construct the radios.

  16. Architecture independent environment for developing engineering software on MIMD computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valimohamed, Karim A.; Lopez, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    Engineers are constantly faced with solving problems of increasing complexity and detail. Multiple Instruction stream Multiple Data stream (MIMD) computers have been developed to overcome the performance limitations of serial computers. The hardware architectures of MIMD computers vary considerably and are much more sophisticated than serial computers. Developing large scale software for a variety of MIMD computers is difficult and expensive. There is a need to provide tools that facilitate programming these machines. First, the issues that must be considered to develop those tools are examined. The two main areas of concern were architecture independence and data management. Architecture independent software facilitates software portability and improves the longevity and utility of the software product. It provides some form of insurance for the investment of time and effort that goes into developing the software. The management of data is a crucial aspect of solving large engineering problems. It must be considered in light of the new hardware organizations that are available. Second, the functional design and implementation of a software environment that facilitates developing architecture independent software for large engineering applications are described. The topics of discussion include: a description of the model that supports the development of architecture independent software; identifying and exploiting concurrency within the application program; data coherence; engineering data base and memory management.

  17. Software architecture and engineering for patient records: current and future.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chunhua; Levine, Betty A; Mun, Seong K

    2009-05-01

    During the "The National Forum on the Future of the Defense Health Information System," a track focusing on "Systems Architecture and Software Engineering" included eight presenters. These presenters identified three key areas of interest in this field, which include the need for open enterprise architecture and a federated database design, net centrality based on service-oriented architecture, and the need for focus on software usability and reusability. The eight panelists provided recommendations related to the suitability of service-oriented architecture and the enabling technologies of grid computing and Web 2.0 for building health services research centers and federated data warehouses to facilitate large-scale collaborative health care and research. Finally, they discussed the need to leverage industry best practices for software engineering to facilitate rapid software development, testing, and deployment. PMID:19562959

  18. Antenna Controller Replacement Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Roger Y.; Morgan, Scott C.; Strain, Martha M.; Rockwell, Stephen T.; Shimizu, Kenneth J.; Tehrani, Barzia J.; Kwok, Jaclyn H.; Tuazon-Wong, Michelle; Valtier, Henry; Nalbandi, Reza; Wert, Michael; Leung, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The Antenna Controller Replacement (ACR) software accurately points and monitors the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70-m and 34-m high-efficiency (HEF) ground-based antennas that are used to track primarily spacecraft and, periodically, celestial targets. To track a spacecraft, or other targets, the antenna must be accurately pointed at the spacecraft, which can be very far away with very weak signals. ACR s conical scanning capability collects the signal in a circular pattern around the target, calculates the location of the strongest signal, and adjusts the antenna pointing to point directly at the spacecraft. A real-time, closed-loop servo control algorithm performed every 0.02 second allows accurate positioning of the antenna in order to track these distant spacecraft. Additionally, this advanced servo control algorithm provides better antenna pointing performance in windy conditions. The ACR software provides high-level commands that provide a very easy user interface for the DSN operator. The operator only needs to enter two commands to start the antenna and subreflector, and Master Equatorial tracking. The most accurate antenna pointing is accomplished by aligning the antenna to the Master Equatorial, which because of its small size and sheltered location, has the most stable pointing. The antenna has hundreds of digital and analog monitor points. The ACR software provides compact displays to summarize the status of the antenna, subreflector, and the Master Equatorial. The ACR software has two major functions. First, it performs all of the steps required to accurately point the antenna (and subreflector and Master Equatorial) at the spacecraft (or celestial target). This involves controlling the antenna/ subreflector/Master-Equatorial hardware, initiating and monitoring the correct sequence of operations, calculating the position of the spacecraft relative to the antenna, executing the real-time servo control algorithm to maintain the correct position, and

  19. Integrating Software Modules For Robot Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volpe, Richard A.; Khosla, Pradeep; Stewart, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Reconfigurable, sensor-based control system uses state variables in systematic integration of reusable control modules. Designed for open-architecture hardware including many general-purpose microprocessors, each having own local memory plus access to global shared memory. Implemented in software as extension of Chimera II real-time operating system. Provides transparent computing mechanism for intertask communication between control modules and generic process-module architecture for multiprocessor realtime computation. Used to control robot arm. Proves useful in variety of other control and robotic applications.

  20. Gemini Scout Control Software

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton Hobart, Justin Garretson

    2010-11-23

    The Gemini Scout Control Software consists of two Windows applications that allow the Gemini Scout vehicle to be controlled by an operator. The Embedded application runs on the vehicle's Gemini Scout Control Software onboard computer and controls the vehicle's various motors and sensors. This application reports the vehicle's status and receives vehicle commands overthe local-area-network. The Embedded applicationalso allows the user to control the vehicle using a USB game-pad connected directly to the vehicle. The Operator Control Unit (OCU) application runs on an external PC and communicates with the vehicle via an Ethernet connection. The OCU application sends commands to and receives data from the Embedded application running on the vehicle. The OCU application also communicates directly with the digital video encoders and radios in order to display video from the vehicle's cameras and the status of the radio link. The OCU application has a graphical user interface (GUI) that displays the vehicle's status and allows the user to change various vehicle settings. Finally, the OCU application receives input from a USB game-pad connected to the PC in order to control the vehicle's functions.

  1. Gemini Scout Control Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-11-23

    The Gemini Scout Control Software consists of two Windows applications that allow the Gemini Scout vehicle to be controlled by an operator. The Embedded application runs on the vehicle's Gemini Scout Control Software onboard computer and controls the vehicle's various motors and sensors. This application reports the vehicle's status and receives vehicle commands overthe local-area-network. The Embedded applicationalso allows the user to control the vehicle using a USB game-pad connected directly to the vehicle. Themore » Operator Control Unit (OCU) application runs on an external PC and communicates with the vehicle via an Ethernet connection. The OCU application sends commands to and receives data from the Embedded application running on the vehicle. The OCU application also communicates directly with the digital video encoders and radios in order to display video from the vehicle's cameras and the status of the radio link. The OCU application has a graphical user interface (GUI) that displays the vehicle's status and allows the user to change various vehicle settings. Finally, the OCU application receives input from a USB game-pad connected to the PC in order to control the vehicle's functions.« less

  2. Towards multi-platform software architecture for Collaborative Teleoperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, Christophe; Otmane, Samir; Davesne, Frederic; Mallem, Malik

    2009-03-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) can provide to a Human Operator (HO) a real help in achieving complex tasks, such as remote control of robots and cooperative teleassistance. Using appropriate augmentations, the HO can interact faster, safer and easier with the remote real world. In this paper, we present an extension of an existing distributed software and network architecture for collaborative teleoperation based on networked human-scaled mixed reality and mobile platform. The first teleoperation system was composed by a VR application and a Web application. However the 2 systems cannot be used together and it is impossible to control a distant robot simultaneously. Our goal is to update the teleoperation system to permit a heterogeneous collaborative teleoperation between the 2 platforms. An important feature of this interface is based on the use of different Virtual Reality platforms and different Mobile platforms to control one or many robots.

  3. Towards multi-platform software architecture for Collaborative Teleoperation

    SciTech Connect

    Domingues, Christophe; Otmane, Samir; Davesne, Frederic; Mallem, Malik

    2009-03-05

    Augmented Reality (AR) can provide to a Human Operator (HO) a real help in achieving complex tasks, such as remote control of robots and cooperative teleassistance. Using appropriate augmentations, the HO can interact faster, safer and easier with the remote real world. In this paper, we present an extension of an existing distributed software and network architecture for collaborative teleoperation based on networked human-scaled mixed reality and mobile platform. The first teleoperation system was composed by a VR application and a Web application. However the 2 systems cannot be used together and it is impossible to control a distant robot simultaneously. Our goal is to update the teleoperation system to permit a heterogeneous collaborative teleoperation between the 2 platforms. An important feature of this interface is based on the use of different Virtual Reality platforms and different Mobile platforms to control one or many robots.

  4. NASA Data Acquisitions System (NDAS) Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dawn; Duncan, Michael; Franzl, Richard; Holladay, Wendy; Marshall, Peggi; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The NDAS Software Project is for the development of common low speed data acquisition system software to support NASA's rocket propulsion testing facilities at John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC), White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), Plum Brook Station (PBS), and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  5. NASA Laboratory telerobotic manipulator control system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, J. C.; Butler, P. L.; Glassell, R. L.; Herndon, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    In support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) goals to increase the utilization of dexterous robotic systems in space, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM) system. It is a dexterous, dual-arm, force reflecting teleoperator system with robotic features for NASA ground-based research. This paper describes the overall control system architecture, including both the hardware and software. The control system is a distributed, modular, and hierarchical design with flexible expansion capabilities for future enhancements of both the hardware and software.

  6. Architecture for interoperable software in biology

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Nitin S.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding biological complexity demands a combination of high-throughput data and interdisciplinary skills. One way to bring to bear the necessary combination of data types and expertise is by encapsulating domain knowledge in software and composing that software to create a customized data analysis environment. To this end, simple flexible strategies are needed for interconnecting heterogeneous software tools and enabling data exchange between them. Drawing on our own work and that of others, we present several strategies for interoperability and their consequences, in particular, a set of simple data structures—list, matrix, network, table and tuple—that have proven sufficient to achieve a high degree of interoperability. We provide a few guidelines for the development of future software that will function as part of an interoperable community of software tools for biological data analysis and visualization. PMID:23235920

  7. Controlling Software Piracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Albert S.

    1992-01-01

    Explains what software manufacturers are doing to combat software piracy, recommends how managers should deal with this problem, and provides a role-playing exercise to help students understand the issues in software piracy. (SR)

  8. Towards a Domain Specific Software Architecture for Scientific Data Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Lindholm, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    A reference architecture is a "design that satisfies a clearly distinguished subset of the functional capabilities identified in the reference requirements within the boundaries of certain design and implementation constraints, also identified in reference requirements." [Tracz, 1995] Recognizing the value of a reference architecture, NASA's ESDSWG's Standards Process Group (SPG) is introducing a multi-disciplinary science data systems (SDS) reference architecture in order to provide an implementation neutral, template solution for an architecture to support scientific data systems in general [Burnett, et al, 2011]. This reference architecture describes common features and patterns in scientific data systems, and can thus provide guidelines in building and improving such systems. But, guidelines alone may not be sufficient to actually build a system. A domain specific software architecture (DSSA) is "an assemblage of software components, specialized for a particular type of task (domain), generalized for effective use across that domain, composed in a standardized structure (topology) effective for building successful applications." [Tracz, 1995]. It can be thought of as relatively specific reference architecture. The "DSSA Process" is a software life cycle developed at Carnegie Melon's Software Engineering Institute that is based on the development and use of domain-specific software architectures, components, and tools. The process has four distinct activities: 1) develop a domain specific base/model, 2) populate and maintain the library, 3) build applications, 4) operate and maintain applications [Armitage, 1993]. The DSSA process may provide the missing link between guidelines and actual system construction. In this presentation we focus specifically on the realm of scientific data access and distribution. Assuming the role of domain experts in building data access systems, we report the results of creating a DSSA for scientific data distribution. We describe

  9. Comprehending Software Architecture using a Single-View Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Panas, T; Epperly, T W; Quinlan, D J; Saebjoernsen, A; Vuduc, R W

    2007-01-17

    Software is among the most complex human artifacts, and visualization is widely acknowledged as important to understanding software. In this paper, we consider the problem of understanding a software system's architecture through visualization. Whereas traditional visualizations use multiple stakeholder-specific views to present different kinds of task-specific information, we propose an additional visualization technique that unifies the presentation of various kinds of architecture-level information, thereby allowing a variety of stakeholders to quickly see and communicate current development, quality, and costs of a software system. For future empirical evaluation of multi-aspect, single-view architectural visualizations, we have implemented our idea in an existing visualization tool, Vizz3D. Our implementation includes techniques, such as the use of a city metaphor, that reduce visual complexity in order to support single-view visualizations of large-scale programs.

  10. BLTC control system software

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, J.B., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-10

    This is a direct revision to Rev. 0 of the BLTC Control System Software. The entire document is being revised and released as HNF-SD-FF-CSWD-025, Rev 1. The changes incorporated by this revision include addition of a feature to automate the sodium drain when removing assemblies from sodium wetted facilities. Other changes eliminate locked in alarms during cold operation and improve the function of the Oxygen Analyzer. See FCN-620498 for further details regarding these changes. Note the change in the document number prefix, in accordance with HNF-MD-003.

  11. Issues in Defining Software Architectures in a GIS Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Jesus; Alvorado, Lori

    1997-01-01

    The primary mission of the Pan-American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES) is to advance the research areas that are relevant to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. One of the activities at PACES is the establishment of a repository for geographical, geological and environmental information that covers various regions of Mexico and the southwest region of the U.S. and that is acquired from NASA and other sources through remote sensing, ground studies or paper-based maps. The center will be providing access of this information to other government entities in the U.S. and Mexico, and research groups from universities, national laboratories and industry. Geographical Information Systems(GIS) provide the means to manage, manipulate, analyze and display geographically referenced information that will be managed by PACES. Excellent off-the-shelf software exists for a complete GIS as well as software for storing and managing spatial databases, processing images, networking and viewing maps with layered information. This allows the user flexibility in combining systems to create a GIS or to mix these software packages with custom-built application programs. Software architectural languages provide the ability to specify the computational components and interactions among these components, an important topic in the domain of GIS because of the need to integrate numerous software packages. This paper discusses the characteristics that architectural languages address with respect to the issues relating to the data that must be communicated between software systems and components when systems interact. The paper presents a background on GIS in section 2. Section 3 gives an overview of software architecture and architectural languages. Section 4 suggests issues that may be of concern when defining the software architecture of a GIS. The last section discusses the future research effort and finishes with a summary.

  12. The architecture of a reliable software monitoring system for embedded software systems

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, J.; Krings, A.; Hiromoto, R.

    2006-07-01

    away from the currently applied paradigm of addressing reliability, security and survivability in an add-on fashion at the end of the software development process. Rather, the integrity monitoring ability will be integrated into the overall architecture of the software system. The measurement and control methodology developed under this research program will readily migrate into hardware, leading to the development of new hardware architecture with built-in survivability, security and reliability attributes. (authors)

  13. A Software Architecture To Encourage Internal And External Software Reuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truslove, I.; Billingsley, B. W.; Lacy, J.; Reed, S.; Lewis, S.; Brodzik, M.; Kaminski, M.; Lopez, L.; McNulty, M.; Wu, H.

    2011-12-01

    At the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) we have build several systems that provide greater access to cryospheric data and tools to the external community. Internally, many of our projects have overlapping goals and mechanisms. To develop our latest generation of applications we have adopted a flexible architecture using componentized back-end libraries and data services, standards-based RESTful web services, and rich service-based web applications in order to increase primary and secondary uses of our services, and to encourage internal reuse of code modules and libraries. Our web applications are designed to allow end users simple and intuitive access to data. The services and data model is designed to easily allow integration of third-party standards-based services into our applications and services. Additionally our services are designed to be consumed by others, ideally to the degree that they could recreate our applications, explore our services to discover new data or tools, and even create as-yet unenvisioned mashups using multiple data services. Internally our aim is to reduce the amount of single-use code by creating a high quality reusable library of code and services. We present architectural and implementation details and cover some of the successes this model has given us both in terms of internal and external reuse.

  14. Implications of Responsive Space on the Flight Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmot, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The Responsive Space initiative has several implications for flight software that need to be addressed not only within the run-time element, but the development infrastructure and software life-cycle process elements as well. The runtime element must at a minimum support Plug & Play, while the development and process elements need to incorporate methods to quickly generate the needed documentation, code, tests, and all of the artifacts required of flight quality software. Very rapid response times go even further, and imply little or no new software development, requiring instead, using only predeveloped and certified software modules that can be integrated and tested through automated methods. These elements have typically been addressed individually with significant benefits, but it is when they are combined that they can have the greatest impact to Responsive Space. The Flight Software Branch at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has been developing the runtime, infrastructure and process elements needed for rapid integration with the Core Flight software System (CFS) architecture. The CFS architecture consists of three main components; the core Flight Executive (cFE), the component catalog, and the Integrated Development Environment (DE). This paper will discuss the design of the components, how they facilitate rapid integration, and lessons learned as the architecture is utilized for an upcoming spacecraft.

  15. Hardware and software fault tolerance - A unified architectural approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Alger, Linda S.

    1988-01-01

    The loss of hardware fault tolerance which often arises when design diversity is used to improve the fault tolerance of computer software is considered analytically, and a unified design approach is proposed to avoid the problem. The fundamental theory of fault-tolerant (FT) architectures is reviewed; the current status of design-diversity software development is surveyed; and the FT-processor/attached-processor (FTP/AP) architecture developed by Lala et al. (1986) is described in detail and illustrated with diagrams. FTP/AP is shown to permit efficient implementation of N-version FT software while still tolerating random hardware failures with very high coverage; the reliability is found to be significantly higher than that of conventional majority-vote N-version software.

  16. HERA-B higher-level triggers: architecture and software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellrich, Andreas; Medinnis, Mike

    1998-02-01

    HERA-B will be studying CP-violation in the B-system in a high-rate hadronic environment. To accomplish this goal, HERA-B needs a sophisticated data acquisition and trigger system. Except for the first level, all trigger levels are implemented as PC-farms, running the Unix-like operating system, Linux, thus blurring the sharp border between online and offline application software. The hardware architecture and software environments are discussed.

  17. Fault Management Architectures and the Challenges of Providing Software Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savarino, Shirley; Fitz, Rhonda; Fesq, Lorraine; Whitman, Gerek

    2015-01-01

    The satellite systems Fault Management (FM) is focused on safety, the preservation of assets, and maintaining the desired functionality of the system. How FM is implemented varies among missions. Common to most is system complexity due to a need to establish a multi-dimensional structure across hardware, software and operations. This structure is necessary to identify and respond to system faults, mitigate technical risks and ensure operational continuity. These architecture, implementation and software assurance efforts increase with mission complexity. Because FM is a systems engineering discipline with a distributed implementation, providing efficient and effective verification and validation (VV) is challenging. A breakout session at the 2012 NASA Independent Verification Validation (IVV) Annual Workshop titled VV of Fault Management: Challenges and Successes exposed these issues in terms of VV for a representative set of architectures. NASA's IVV is funded by NASA's Software Assurance Research Program (SARP) in partnership with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to extend the work performed at the Workshop session. NASA IVV will extract FM architectures across the IVV portfolio and evaluate the data set for robustness, assess visibility for validation and test, and define software assurance methods that could be applied to the various architectures and designs. This work focuses efforts on FM architectures from critical and complex projects within NASA. The identification of particular FM architectures, visibility, and associated VVIVV techniques provides a data set that can enable higher assurance that a satellite system will adequately detect and respond to adverse conditions. Ultimately, results from this activity will be incorporated into the NASA Fault Management Handbook providing dissemination across NASA, other agencies and the satellite community. This paper discusses the approach taken to perform the evaluations and preliminary findings from the

  18. Jitter Controller Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansdowne, Chatwin; Schlensinger, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Sinusoidal jitter is produced by simply modulating a clock frequency sinusoidally with a given frequency and amplitude. But this can be expressed as phase jitter, frequency jitter, or cycle-to-cycle jitter, rms or peak, absolute units, or normalized to the base clock frequency. Jitter using other waveforms requires calculating and downloading these waveforms to an arbitrary waveform generator, and helping the user manage relationships among phase jitter crest factor, frequency jitter crest factor, and cycle-to-cycle jitter (CCJ) crest factor. Software was developed for managing these relationships, automatically configuring the generator, and saving test results documentation. Tighter management of clock jitter and jitter sensitivity is required by new codes that further extend the already high performance of space communication links, completely correcting symbol error rates higher than 10 percent, and therefore typically requiring demodulation and symbol synchronization hardware to operating at signal-to-noise ratios of less than one. To accomplish this, greater demands are also made on transmitter performance, and measurement techniques are needed to confirm performance. It was discovered early that sinusoidal jitter can be stepped on a grid such that one can connect points by constant phase jitter, constant frequency jitter, or constant cycle-cycle jitter. The tool automates adherence to a grid while also allowing adjustments off-grid. Also, the jitter can be set by the user on any dimension and the others are calculated. The calculations are all recorded, allowing the data to be rapidly plotted or re-plotted against different interpretations just by changing pointers to columns. A key advantage is taking data on a carefully controlled grid, which allowed a single data set to be post-analyzed many different ways. Another innovation was building a software tool to provide very tight coupling between the generator and the recorded data product, and the operator

  19. Computer Software for Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Alfred Z.

    1984-01-01

    Computer software for process control has the primary function of communicating with and governing physical devices. The structure of such software, process-control systems, multitask systems, message passing, problems of deadlock, distributed computer systems, and protection against failure in process-control systems are among the areas examined.…

  20. A Parallel Software Architecture for Building Intelligent Medical Monitors

    PubMed Central

    Factor, Michael; Sittig, Dean F.; Cohn, Aaron I.; Gelernter, David H.; Miller, Perry L.; Rosenbaum, Stanley

    1989-01-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) become more complicated each day; the number of devices to monitor various aspects of a patient's status continues to increase. Intelligent monitors attempt to reduce this complexity by interpreting the data and presenting a high-level summary of a patient's condition. We propose a parallel software architecture for constructing intelligent medical monitors, the process trellis; we contrast the process trellis to other software architectures that have been used for heuristic medical programs: blackboards and production rules. The process trellis is an explicitly parallel structure, and therefore can take advantage of the performance gains available from parallel computer hardware. Its use does not, however, presuppose any expertise in parallel programming. We are currently building an Intelligent Cardiovascular Monitor (ICM) using the process trellis. We describe the ICM and the use of the process trellis architecture in its construction.

  1. Fault Management Architectures and the Challenges of Providing Software Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savarino, Shirley; Fitz, Rhonda; Fesq, Lorraine; Whitman, Gerek

    2015-01-01

    Fault Management (FM) is focused on safety, the preservation of assets, and maintaining the desired functionality of the system. How FM is implemented varies among missions. Common to most missions is system complexity due to a need to establish a multi-dimensional structure across hardware, software and spacecraft operations. FM is necessary to identify and respond to system faults, mitigate technical risks and ensure operational continuity. Generally, FM architecture, implementation, and software assurance efforts increase with mission complexity. Because FM is a systems engineering discipline with a distributed implementation, providing efficient and effective verification and validation (V&V) is challenging. A breakout session at the 2012 NASA Independent Verification & Validation (IV&V) Annual Workshop titled "V&V of Fault Management: Challenges and Successes" exposed this issue in terms of V&V for a representative set of architectures. NASA's Software Assurance Research Program (SARP) has provided funds to NASA IV&V to extend the work performed at the Workshop session in partnership with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). NASA IV&V will extract FM architectures across the IV&V portfolio and evaluate the data set, assess visibility for validation and test, and define software assurance methods that could be applied to the various architectures and designs. This SARP initiative focuses efforts on FM architectures from critical and complex projects within NASA. The identification of particular FM architectures and associated V&V/IV&V techniques provides a data set that can enable improved assurance that a system will adequately detect and respond to adverse conditions. Ultimately, results from this activity will be incorporated into the NASA Fault Management Handbook providing dissemination across NASA, other agencies and the space community. This paper discusses the approach taken to perform the evaluations and preliminary findings from the research.

  2. Study of a unified hardware and software fault-tolerant architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan; Alger, Linda; Friend, Steven; Greeley, Gregory; Sacco, Stephen; Adams, Stuart

    1989-01-01

    A unified architectural concept, called the Fault Tolerant Processor Attached Processor (FTP-AP), that can tolerate hardware as well as software faults is proposed for applications requiring ultrareliable computation capability. An emulation of the FTP-AP architecture, consisting of a breadboard Motorola 68010-based quadruply redundant Fault Tolerant Processor, four VAX 750s as attached processors, and four versions of a transport aircraft yaw damper control law, is used as a testbed in the AIRLAB to examine a number of critical issues. Solutions of several basic problems associated with N-Version software are proposed and implemented on the testbed. This includes a confidence voter to resolve coincident errors in N-Version software. A reliability model of N-Version software that is based upon the recent understanding of software failure mechanisms is also developed. The basic FTP-AP architectural concept appears suitable for hosting N-Version application software while at the same time tolerating hardware failures. Architectural enhancements for greater efficiency, software reliability modeling, and N-Version issues that merit further research are identified.

  3. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

  4. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  5. Ensemble: an Architecture for Mission-Operations Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Powell, Mark; Fox, Jason; Rabe, Kenneth; Shu, IHsiang; McCurdy, Michael; Vera, Alonso

    2008-01-01

    Ensemble is the name of an open architecture for, and a methodology for the development of, spacecraft mission operations software. Ensemble is also potentially applicable to the development of non-spacecraft mission-operations- type software. Ensemble capitalizes on the strengths of the open-source Eclipse software and its architecture to address several issues that have arisen repeatedly in the development of mission-operations software: Heretofore, mission-operations application programs have been developed in disparate programming environments and integrated during the final stages of development of missions. The programs have been poorly integrated, and it has been costly to develop, test, and deploy them. Users of each program have been forced to interact with several different graphical user interfaces (GUIs). Also, the strategy typically used in integrating the programs has yielded serial chains of operational software tools of such a nature that during use of a given tool, it has not been possible to gain access to the capabilities afforded by other tools. In contrast, the Ensemble approach offers a low-risk path towards tighter integration of mission-operations software tools.

  6. Measurements of the LHCb software stack on the ARM architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay Kartik, S.; Couturier, Ben; Clemencic, Marco; Neufeld, Niko

    2014-06-01

    The ARM architecture is a power-efficient design that is used in most processors in mobile devices all around the world today since they provide reasonable compute performance per watt. The current LHCb software stack is designed (and thus expected) to build and run on machines with the x86/x86_64 architecture. This paper outlines the process of measuring the performance of the LHCb software stack on the ARM architecture - specifically, the ARMv7 architecture on Cortex-A9 processors from NVIDIA and on full-fledged ARM servers with chipsets from Calxeda - and makes comparisons with the performance on x86_64 architectures on the Intel Xeon L5520/X5650 and AMD Opteron 6272. The paper emphasises the aspects of performance per core with respect to the power drawn by the compute nodes for the given performance - this ensures a fair real-world comparison with much more 'powerful' Intel/AMD processors. The comparisons of these real workloads in the context of LHCb are also complemented with the standard synthetic benchmarks HEPSPEC and Coremark. The pitfalls and solutions for the non-trivial task of porting the source code to build for the ARMv7 instruction set are presented. The specific changes in the build process needed for ARM-specific portions of the software stack are described, to serve as pointers for further attempts taken up by other groups in this direction. Cases where architecture-specific tweaks at the assembler lever (both in ROOT and the LHCb software stack) were needed for a successful compile are detailed - these cases are good indicators of where/how the software stack as well as the build system can be made more portable and multi-arch friendly. The experience gained from the tasks described in this paper are intended to i) assist in making an informed choice about ARM-based server solutions as a feasible low-power alternative to the current compute nodes, and ii) revisit the software design and build system for portability and generic improvements.

  7. GridOPTICS(TM): A Design for Plug-and-Play Smart Grid Software Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian

    2012-06-03

    As the smart grid becomes reality, software architectures for integrating legacy systems with new innovative approaches for grid management are needed. These architectures must exhibit flexibility, extensibility, interoperability and scalability. In this position paper, we describe our preliminary work to design such an architecture, known as GridOPTICS, that will enable the deployment and integration of new software tools in smart grid operations. Our preliminary design is based upon use cases from PNNL’s Future Power Grid Initiative, which is a developing a collection of advanced software technologies for smart grid management and control. We describe the motivations for GridOPTICS, and the preliminary design that we are currently prototyping for several distinct use cases.

  8. DAQ: Software Architecture for Data Acquisition in Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Tran, Thanh; Nichols, Heidi; Bowles-Martinez, Jessica N.

    2011-01-01

    A multithreaded software application was developed by Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) to collect a set of correlated imagery, Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and GPS data for a Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) sounding rocket flight. The data set will be used to advance Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) technology algorithms being researched at JPL. This paper describes the software architecture and the tests used to meet the timing and data rate requirements for the software used to collect the dataset. Also discussed are the challenges of using commercial off the shelf (COTS) flight hardware and open source software. This includes multiple Camera Link (C-link) based cameras, a Pentium-M based computer, and Linux Fedora 11 operating system. Additionally, the paper talks about the history of the software architecture's usage in other JPL projects and its applicability for future missions, such as cubesats, UAVs, and research planes/balloons. Also talked about will be the human aspect of project especially JPL's Phaeton program and the results of the launch.

  9. Software Defined Radio Architecture Contributions to Next Generation Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.; Eddy, Wesley M.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John

    2015-01-01

    systems, as well as those communications and navigation systems operated by international space agencies and civilian and government agencies. In this paper, we review the philosophies, technologies, architectural attributes, mission services, and communications capabilities that form the structure of candidate next-generation integrated communication architectures for space communications and navigation. A key area that this paper explores is from the development and operation of the software defined radio for the NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed currently on the International Space Station (ISS). Evaluating the lessons learned from development and operation feed back into the communications architecture. Leveraging the reconfigurability provides a change in the way that operations are done and must be considered. Quantifying the impact on the NASA Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) software defined radio architecture provides feedback to keep the standard useful and up to date. NASA is not the only customer of these radios. Software defined radios are developed for other applications, and taking advantage of these developments promotes an architecture that is cost effective and sustainable. Developments in the following areas such as an updated operating environment, higher data rates, networking and security can be leveraged. The ability to sustain an architecture that uses radios for multiple markets can lower costs and keep new technology infused.

  10. Software Architecture of Sensor Data Distribution In Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Charles; Alena, Richard; Stone, Thom; Ossenfort, John; Walker, Ed; Notario, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    Data from mobile and stationary sensors will be vital in planetary surface exploration. The distribution and collection of sensor data in an ad-hoc wireless network presents a challenge. Irregular terrain, mobile nodes, new associations with access points and repeaters with stronger signals as the network reconfigures to adapt to new conditions, signal fade and hardware failures can cause: a) Data errors; b) Out of sequence packets; c) Duplicate packets; and d) Drop out periods (when node is not connected). To mitigate the effects of these impairments, a robust and reliable software architecture must be implemented. This architecture must also be tolerant of communications outages. This paper describes such a robust and reliable software infrastructure that meets the challenges of a distributed ad hoc network in a difficult environment and presents the results of actual field experiments testing the principles and actual code developed.

  11. DAQ software architecture for Aleph, a large HEP experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Belk, A.; Harvey, J.; Martin, J.; Mato, P.; Miotto, A. ); Botterill, D. ); Shade, J. )

    1989-10-01

    The Aleph experiment has over 700000 electronics channels and is expected to generate over 500 Mbytes of data per second. The data acquisition system (DAQ) has been designed to process information from different parts of the detector in parallel using a large number of processing elements. This talk describes the architecture of the software used to implement the readout functions and to configure the system for datataking.

  12. Supporting Community Emergency Management Planning Through a Geocollaboration Software Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Wendy A.; Ganoe, Craig H.; Carroll, John M.

    Emergency management is more than just events occurring within an emergency situation. It encompasses a variety of persistent activities such as planning, training, assessment, and organizational change. We are studying emergency management planning practices in which geographic communities (towns and regions) prepare to respond efficiently to significant emergency events. Community emergency management planning is an extensive collaboration involving numerous stakeholders throughout the community and both reflecting and challenging the community’s structure and resources. Geocollaboration is one aspect of the effort. Emergency managers, public works directors, first responders, and local transportation managers need to exchange information relating to possible emergency event locations and their surrounding areas. They need to examine geospatial maps together and collaboratively develop emergency plans and procedures. Issues such as emergency vehicle traffic routes and staging areas for command posts, arriving media, and personal first responders’ vehicles must be agreed upon prior to an emergency event to ensure an efficient and effective response. This work presents a software architecture that facilitates the development of geocollaboration solutions. The architecture extends prior geocollaboration research and reuses existing geospatial information models. Emergency management planning is one application domain for the architecture. Geocollaboration tools can be developed that support community-wide emergency management planning and preparedness. This chapter describes how the software architecture can be used for the geospatial, emergency management planning activities of one community.

  13. Integrity Constraint Monitoring in Software Development: Proposed Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Francisco G.

    1997-01-01

    In the development of complex software systems, designers are required to obtain from many sources and manage vast amounts of knowledge of the system being built and communicate this information to personnel with a variety of backgrounds. Knowledge concerning the properties of the system, including the structure of, relationships between and limitations of the data objects in the system, becomes increasingly more vital as the complexity of the system and the number of knowledge sources increases. Ensuring that violations of these properties do not occur becomes steadily more challenging. One approach toward managing the enforcement or system properties, called context monitoring, uses a centralized repository of integrity constraints and a constraint satisfiability mechanism for dynamic verification of property enforcement during program execution. The focus of this paper is to describe possible software architectures that define a mechanism for dynamically checking the satisfiability of a set of constraints on a program. The next section describes the context monitoring approach in general. Section 3 gives an overview of the work currently being done toward the addition of an integrity constraint satisfiability mechanism to a high-level program language, SequenceL, and demonstrates how this model is being examined to develop a general software architecture. Section 4 describes possible architectures for a general constraint satisfiability mechanism, as well as an alternative approach that, uses embedded database queries in lieu of an external monitor. The paper concludes with a brief summary outlining the, current state of the research and future work.

  14. Extensive Evaluation of Using a Game Project in a Software Architecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Alf Inge

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an extensive evaluation of introducing a game project to a software architecture course. In this project, university students have to construct and design a type of software architecture, evaluate the architecture, implement an application based on the architecture, and test this implementation. In previous years, the domain…

  15. Educational Software Architecture and Systematic Impact: The Promise of Component Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Kaput, James

    1996-01-01

    Examines the failure of current technology to meet education's flexible needs and points to a promising solution: component software architecture. Discusses the failure of stand-alone applications in their incompatibility, waste of funding, prevention of customization, and obstruction of integration. (AEF)

  16. NPOESS Interface Data Processing Segment Architecture and Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turek, S.; Souza, K. G.; Fox, C. A.; Grant, K. D.

    2004-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS is an estimated \\$6.5 billion program replacing the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS). The IDPS processes NPOESS satellite data to provide weather, oceanographic, and environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers and field terminals operated by the United States government. This paper describes Raytheon's high performance computer and software architecture for the NPOESS IDPS. NOAA, the DoD, and NASA selected this architecture after a 2.5-year Program Definition and Risk Reduction (PDRR) competition. The PDRR phase concluded in August of 2002, and has been followed by the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) phase. The NPP satellite, scheduled to launch in late 2006, will provide risk reduction for the future NPOESS satellites, and will enable data continuity between the current EOS missions and NPOESS. Efforts within the PDRR and NPP phases consist of: requirements definition and flowdown from system to segment to subsystem, Object-Oriented (OO) software design, software code development, science to operational code conversion, integration and qualification testing. The NPOESS phase, which supports a constellation of three satellites, will also consist of this same lifecycle during the 2005 through 2009 timeframe, with operations and support

  17. A Reconfigurable and Modular Open Architecture Controller: The New Frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Wang, Dao Bo; Dar, N. U.

    A novel and flexible open architecture controller platform is presented for PUMA Robot system. The original structure of the PUMA robot has been retained. All computational units are removed from the existing PUMA controller, and the PC assumes the role of computing the control strategy. By assembling the controller from off-the-shell hardware and software components, the benefits of reduced cost and improved robustness have been realized. An Intel Pentium IV industrial computer is used as the central controller. The control software has been implemented using VC ++ programming language. The trajectory tracking results show the validity of the new PC based controller.

  18. Experimental research control software system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, I. A.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Vystavkin, A. N.

    2014-05-01

    A software system, intended for automation of a small scale research, has been developed. The software allows one to control equipment, acquire and process data by means of simple scripts. The main purpose of that development is to increase experiment automation easiness, thus significantly reducing experimental setup automation efforts. In particular, minimal programming skills are required and supervisors have no reviewing troubles. Interactions between scripts and equipment are managed automatically, thus allowing to run multiple scripts simultaneously. Unlike well-known data acquisition commercial software systems, the control is performed by an imperative scripting language. This approach eases complex control and data acquisition algorithms implementation. A modular interface library performs interaction with external interfaces. While most widely used interfaces are already implemented, a simple framework is developed for fast implementations of new software and hardware interfaces. While the software is in continuous development with new features being implemented, it is already used in our laboratory for automation of a helium-3 cryostat control and data acquisition. The software is open source and distributed under Gnu Public License.

  19. Space Telecommunications Radio System Software Architecture Concepts and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handler, Louis M.; Hall, Charles S.; Briones, Janette C.; Blaser, Tammy M.

    2008-01-01

    The Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) project investigated various Software Defined Radio (SDR) architectures for Space. An STRS architecture has been selected that separates the STRS operating environment from its various waveforms and also abstracts any specialized hardware to limit its effect on the operating environment. The design supports software evolution where new functionality is incorporated into the radio. Radio hardware functionality has been moving from hardware based ASICs into firmware and software based processors such as FPGAs, DSPs and General Purpose Processors (GPPs). Use cases capture the requirements of a system by describing how the system should interact with the users or other systems (the actors) to achieve a specific goal. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is used to illustrate the Use Cases in a variety of ways. The Top Level Use Case diagram shows groupings of the use cases and how the actors are involved. The state diagrams depict the various states that a system or object may be in and the transitions between those states. The sequence diagrams show the main flow of activity as described in the use cases.

  20. Open architecture in control system integration

    SciTech Connect

    Wysor, R.W.; Carnal, C.L.; Igou, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    Open architecture offers the manufacturing community a number of advantages in the integration of future machine control systems. Among these advantages is the ability to upgrade and take advantage of innovative new control strategies. A key enabling technology in open architecture control systems is the digital signal processor (DSP). DSPs can be used to provide a complete control system or can enhance the computational capability of larger control systems. The use of DSPs in the integration of open architecture control systems is discussed, including their impact on reliability and control system functionality. In addition, the role of DSPs in control system architecture is addressed.

  1. Software architecture for time-constrained machine vision applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Molleda, Julio; García, Daniel F.; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2013-01-01

    Real-time image and video processing applications require skilled architects, and recent trends in the hardware platform make the design and implementation of these applications increasingly complex. Many frameworks and libraries have been proposed or commercialized to simplify the design and tuning of real-time image processing applications. However, they tend to lack flexibility, because they are normally oriented toward particular types of applications, or they impose specific data processing models such as the pipeline. Other issues include large memory footprints, difficulty for reuse, and inefficient execution on multicore processors. We present a novel software architecture for time-constrained machine vision applications that addresses these issues. The architecture is divided into three layers. The platform abstraction layer provides a high-level application programming interface for the rest of the architecture. The messaging layer provides a message-passing interface based on a dynamic publish/subscribe pattern. A topic-based filtering in which messages are published to topics is used to route the messages from the publishers to the subscribers interested in a particular type of message. The application layer provides a repository for reusable application modules designed for machine vision applications. These modules, which include acquisition, visualization, communication, user interface, and data processing, take advantage of the power of well-known libraries such as OpenCV, Intel IPP, or CUDA. Finally, the proposed architecture is applied to a real machine vision application: a jam detector for steel pickling lines.

  2. STOMP: A Software Architecture for the Design and Simulation UAV-Based Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E D; Roberts, R S; Hsia, T C S

    2002-10-28

    This paper presents the Simulation, Tactical Operations and Mission Planning (STOMP) software architecture and framework for simulating, controlling and communicating with unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) servicing large distributed sensor networks. STOMP provides hardware-in-the-loop capability enabling real UAVs and sensors to feedback state information, route data and receive command and control requests while interacting with other real or virtual objects thereby enhancing support for simulation of dynamic and complex events.

  3. A Software Architecture for Adaptive Modular Sensing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lyle, Andrew C.; Naish, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    By combining a number of simple transducer modules, an arbitrarily complex sensing system may be produced to accommodate a wide range of applications. This work outlines a novel software architecture and knowledge representation scheme that has been developed to support this type of flexible and reconfigurable modular sensing system. Template algorithms are used to embed intelligence within each module. As modules are added or removed, the composite sensor is able to automatically determine its overall geometry and assume an appropriate collective identity. A virtual machine-based middleware layer runs on top of a real-time operating system with a pre-emptive kernel, enabling platform-independent template algorithms to be written once and run on any module, irrespective of its underlying hardware architecture. Applications that may benefit from easily reconfigurable modular sensing systems include flexible inspection, mobile robotics, surveillance, and space exploration. PMID:22163614

  4. A software architecture for adaptive modular sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Lyle, Andrew C; Naish, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    By combining a number of simple transducer modules, an arbitrarily complex sensing system may be produced to accommodate a wide range of applications. This work outlines a novel software architecture and knowledge representation scheme that has been developed to support this type of flexible and reconfigurable modular sensing system. Template algorithms are used to embed intelligence within each module. As modules are added or removed, the composite sensor is able to automatically determine its overall geometry and assume an appropriate collective identity. A virtual machine-based middleware layer runs on top of a real-time operating system with a pre-emptive kernel, enabling platform-independent template algorithms to be written once and run on any module, irrespective of its underlying hardware architecture. Applications that may benefit from easily reconfigurable modular sensing systems include flexible inspection, mobile robotics, surveillance, and space exploration. PMID:22163614

  5. LBT-AdOpt control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fini, Luca; Puglisi, Alfio; Riccardi, Armando

    2004-09-01

    The LBT-AdOpt subsystem is a complex machine which includes several software controlled parts. It is essentially divided into two parts: a real-time loop which implements the actual adaptive optics control loop, from the wavefront sensor to the deformable secondary mirror, and a supervisor which performs a number of coordination and diagnostics tasks. The coordination and diagnostics task are essential for the proper operation of the system both as an aid for the preparation of observations and because only a continuous monitoring of dynamic system parameters can guarantee optimal performances and system safety during the operation. In the paper we describe the overall software architecture of the LBT-AdOpt supervisor and we discuss the functionalities required for a proper operation.

  6. Controlled Document Tracking Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-08-24

    MANTRACK is an automated, controlled document tracking system which does the following and reduces staff time required to perform these tasks: generates transmittal letters/receipts for every controlled copy issued (merged from a current distribution list), tracks the return of transmittal receipts, facilitates the check-in of the large number of transmittal receipts returned (using a barcode reader), generates a reminder list which prompts the cyclic review and evaluation of existing documents, generates overdue reminders for themore » return of past-due transmittal receipts, tracks the number of Procedure Change Directives (PCD) currently in effect for each procedure, generates and maintains current distribution lists for each document, generates a current table of contents when updates to the document (usually a procedure manual) are made.« less

  7. Wendelstein Observatory control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gössl, Claus; Snigula, Jan; Kodric, Mihael; Riffeser, Arno; Munzert, Tobias

    2014-07-01

    LMU München operates an astrophysical observatory on Mt. Wendelstein1 which has been equipped with a modern 2m-class telescope2, 3 recently. The new Fraunhofer telescope has started science operations in autumn 2013 with a 64 Mpixel, 0:5 x 0:5 square degree FoV wide field camera,4 and will successively be equipped with a 3 channel optical/NIR camera5 and 2 fibre coupled spectrographs (IFU spectrograph VIRUSW6 already in operation at the 2.7 McDonald, Texas and an upgraded Echelle spectrograph FOCES7, 8 formerly operated at Calar Alto oberservatory, Spain). All instruments will be mounted simultaneously and can be activated within a minute. The observatory also operates a small 40cm telescope with a CCD-camera and a simple fibre coupled spectrograph for students lab and photometric monitoring as well as a large number of support equipment like a meteo station, allsky cameras, a multitude of webcams, in addition to a complex building control system environment. Here we describe the ongoing effort to build a centralised controlling interface for all hardware. This includes remote/robotic operation, visualisation via web browser technologies, and data processing and archiving.

  8. Extreme Scaling of Production Visualization Software on Diverse Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Henry; Pugmire, David; Ahern, Sean; Whitlock, Brad; Howison, Mark; Weber, Gunther; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-12-22

    We present the results of a series of experiments studying how visualization software scales to massive data sets. Although several paradigms exist for processing large data, we focus on pure parallelism, the dominant approach for production software. These experiments utilized multiple visualization algorithms and were run on multiple architectures. Two types of experiments were performed. For the first, we examined performance at massive scale: 16,000 or more cores and one trillion or more cells. For the second, we studied weak scaling performance. These experiments were performed on the largest data set sizes published to date in visualization literature, and the findings on scaling characteristics and bottlenecks contribute to understanding of how pure parallelism will perform at high levels of concurrency and with very large data sets.

  9. Towards an Open, Distributed Software Architecture for UxS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Charles D.; Motter, Mark A.; Neilan, James H.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Tran, Loc; Trujillo, Anna C.; Allen, B. Danette

    2015-01-01

    To address the growing need to evaluate, test, and certify an ever expanding ecosystem of UxS platforms in preparation of cultural integration, NASA Langley Research Center's Autonomy Incubator (AI) has taken on the challenge of developing a software framework in which UxS platforms developed by third parties can be integrated into a single system which provides evaluation and testing, mission planning and operation, and out-of-the-box autonomy and data fusion capabilities. This software framework, named AEON (Autonomous Entity Operations Network), has two main goals. The first goal is the development of a cross-platform, extensible, onboard software system that provides autonomy at the mission execution and course-planning level, a highly configurable data fusion framework sensitive to the platform's available sensor hardware, and plug-and-play compatibility with a wide array of computer systems, sensors, software, and controls hardware. The second goal is the development of a ground control system that acts as a test-bed for integration of the proposed heterogeneous fleet, and allows for complex mission planning, tracking, and debugging capabilities. The ground control system should also be highly extensible and allow plug-and-play interoperability with third party software systems. In order to achieve these goals, this paper proposes an open, distributed software architecture which utilizes at its core the Data Distribution Service (DDS) standards, established by the Object Management Group (OMG), for inter-process communication and data flow. The design decisions proposed herein leverage the advantages of existing robotics software architectures and the DDS standards to develop software that is scalable, high-performance, fault tolerant, modular, and readily interoperable with external platforms and software.

  10. Enhancing User Customization through Novel Software Architecture for Utility Scale Solar Siting Software

    SciTech Connect

    Brant Peery; Sam Alessi; Randy Lee; Leng Vang; Scott Brown; David Solan; Dan Ames

    2014-06-01

    There is a need for a spatial decision support application that allows users to create customized metrics for comparing proposed locations of a new solar installation. This document discusses how PVMapper was designed to overcome the customization problem through the development of loosely coupled spatial and decision components in a JavaScript plugin architecture. This allows the user to easily add functionality and data to the system. The paper also explains how PVMapper provides the user with a dynamic and customizable decision tool that enables them to visually modify the formulas that are used in the decision algorithms that convert data to comparable metrics. The technologies that make up the presentation and calculation software stack are outlined. This document also explains the architecture that allows the tool to grow through custom plugins created by the software users. Some discussion is given on the difficulties encountered while designing the system.

  11. Integrating software architectures for distributed simulations and simulation analysis communities.

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsby, Michael E.; Fellig, Daniel; Linebarger, John Michael; Moore, Patrick Curtis; Sa, Timothy J.; Hawley, Marilyn F.

    2005-10-01

    The one-year Software Architecture LDRD (No.79819) was a cross-site effort between Sandia California and Sandia New Mexico. The purpose of this research was to further develop and demonstrate integrating software architecture frameworks for distributed simulation and distributed collaboration in the homeland security domain. The integrated frameworks were initially developed through the Weapons of Mass Destruction Decision Analysis Center (WMD-DAC), sited at SNL/CA, and the National Infrastructure Simulation & Analysis Center (NISAC), sited at SNL/NM. The primary deliverable was a demonstration of both a federation of distributed simulations and a federation of distributed collaborative simulation analysis communities in the context of the same integrated scenario, which was the release of smallpox in San Diego, California. To our knowledge this was the first time such a combination of federations under a single scenario has ever been demonstrated. A secondary deliverable was the creation of the standalone GroupMeld{trademark} collaboration client, which uses the GroupMeld{trademark} synchronous collaboration framework. In addition, a small pilot experiment that used both integrating frameworks allowed a greater range of crisis management options to be performed and evaluated than would have been possible without the use of the frameworks.

  12. Open Architecture Standard for NASA's Software-Defined Space Telecommunications Radio Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Hall, Charles S.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John

    2008-01-01

    NASA is developing an architecture standard for software-defined radios used in space- and ground-based platforms to enable commonality among radio developments to enhance capability and services while reducing mission and programmatic risk. Transceivers (or transponders) with functionality primarily defined in software (e.g., firmware) have the ability to change their functional behavior through software alone. This radio architecture standard offers value by employing common waveform software interfaces, method of instantiation, operation, and testing among different compliant hardware and software products. These common interfaces within the architecture abstract application software from the underlying hardware to enable technology insertion independently at either the software or hardware layer. This paper presents the initial Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture for NASA missions to provide the desired software abstraction and flexibility while minimizing the resources necessary to support the architecture.

  13. Nova control system: goals, architecture, and system design

    SciTech Connect

    Suski, G.J.; Duffy, J.M.; Gritton, D.G.; Holloway, F.W.; Krammen, J.R.; Ozarski, R.G.; Severyn, J.R.; Van Arsdall, P.J.

    1982-05-19

    The control system for the Nova laser must operate reliably in a harsh pulse power environment and satisfy requirements of technical functionality, flexibility, maintainability and operability. It is composed of four fundamental subsystems: Power Conditioning, Alignment, Laser Diagnostics, and Target Diagnostics, together with a fifth, unifying subsystem called Central Controls. The system architecture utilizes a collection of distributed microcomputers, minicomputers, and components interconnected through high speed fiber optic communications systems. The design objectives, development strategy and architecture of the overall control system and each of its four fundamental subsystems are discussed. Specific hardware and software developments in several areas are also covered.

  14. On the design of multimedia software and future system architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de With, Peter H. N.; Jaspers, Egbert G.

    2004-04-01

    A principal challenge for reducing the cost for designing complex systems-on-chip is to pursue more generic systems for a broad range of products. For this purpose, we explore three new architectural concepts for state-of-art video applications. First, we discuss a reusable scalable hardware architecture employing a hierarchical communication network fitting with the natural hierarchy of the application. In a case study, we show that MPEG streaming in DTV occurs at high level, while subsystems communicate at lower levels. The second concept is a software design that scales over a number of processors to enable reuse over a range of VLSI process technologies. We explore this via an H.264 decoder implementation scaling nearly linearly over up to eight processors by applying data partitioning. The third topic is resource-scalability, which is required to satisfy realtime constraints in a system with a high amount of shared resources. An example complexity-scalable MPEG-2 coder scales the required cycle budget with a factor of three, in parallel with a smooth degradation of quality.

  15. Open architecture controllers for advanced manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    The application of intelligent control systems to the real world of machining and manufacturing will benefit form the presence of open architecture control systems on the machines or the processes. The ability to modify the control system as the process or product changes can be essential to the success of the application of neural net or fuzzy logic controllers. The effort at Los Alamos to obtain a commercially available open architecture machine tool controller is described.

  16. Architecture for Payload Planning System (PPS) Software Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Eric; Hagopian, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    The complex and diverse nature of the pay load operations to be performed on the Space Station requires a robust and flexible planning approach, and the proper software tools which tools to support that approach. To date, the planning software for most manned operations in space has been utilized in a centralized planning environment. Centralized planning is characterized by the following: performed by a small team of people, performed at a single location, and performed using single-user planning systems. This approach, while valid for short duration flights, is not conducive to the long duration and highly distributed payload operations environment of the Space Station. The Payload Planning System (PPS) is being designed specifically to support the planning needs of the large number of geographically distributed users of the Space Station. This paper problem provides a general description of the distributed planning architecture that PPS must support and describes the concepts proposed for making PPS available to the Space Station payload user community.

  17. FLEX: A Modular Software Architecture for Flight License Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsan, Taner; Saka, Hamit Emre; Sahin, Ceyhun

    This paper is about the design and implementation of an examination system based on World Wide Web. It is called FLEX-Flight License Exam Software. We designed and implemented flexible and modular software architecture. The implemented system has basic specifications such as appending questions in system, building exams with these appended questions and making students to take these exams. There are three different types of users with different authorizations. These are system administrator, operators and students. System administrator operates and maintains the system, and also audits the system integrity. The system administrator can not be able to change the result of exams and can not take an exam. Operator module includes instructors. Operators have some privileges such as preparing exams, entering questions, changing the existing questions and etc. Students can log on the system and can be accessed to exams by a certain URL. The other characteristic of our system is that operators and system administrator are not able to delete questions due to the security problems. Exam questions can be inserted on their topics and lectures in the database. Thus; operators and system administrator can easily choose questions. When all these are taken into consideration, FLEX software provides opportunities to many students to take exams at the same time in safe, reliable and user friendly conditions. It is also reliable examination system for the authorized aviation administration companies. Web development platform - LAMP; Linux, Apache web server, MySQL, Object-oriented scripting Language - PHP are used for developing the system and page structures are developed by Content Management System - CMS.

  18. CMS software architecture. Software framework, services and persistency in high level trigger, reconstruction and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocente, V.; Silvestris, L.; Stickland, D.; CMS Software Group

    2001-10-01

    This paper describes the design of a resilient and flexible software architecture that has been developed to satisfy the data processing requirements of a large HEP experiment, CMS, currently being constructed at the LHC machine at CERN. We describe various components of a software framework that allows integration of physics modules and which can be easily adapted for use in different processing environments both real-time (online trigger) and offline (event reconstruction and analysis). Features such as the mechanisms for scheduling algorithms, configuring the application and managing the dependences among modules are described in detail. In particular, a major effort has been placed on providing a service for managing persistent data and the experience using a commercial ODBMS (Objectivity/DB) is therefore described in detail.

  19. Software documentation for compression-machine cavity control

    SciTech Connect

    Floersch, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    A new system design using closed loop control on the hydraulic system of compression transfer presses used to make filled elastomer parts will result in improved accuracy and repeatability of speed and pressure control during critical forming stages before part cure. The new design uses a microprocessor to supply set points and timing functions to the control system. Presented are the hardware and software architecture and objectives for the microprocessor portion of the control system.

  20. CARMENES. IV: instrument control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guàrdia, Josep; Colomé, Josep; Ribas, Ignasi; Hagen, Hans-Jürgen; Morales, Rafael; Abril, Miguel; Galadí-Enríquez, David; Seifert, Walter; Sánchez Carrasco, Miguel A.; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Amado, Pedro J.; Caballero, Jose A.; Mandel, Holger

    2012-09-01

    The overall purpose of the CARMENES instrument is to perform high-precision measurements of radial velocities of late-type stars with long-term stability. CARMENES will be installed in 2014 at the 3.5 m telescope in the German- Spanish Astronomical Center at Calar Alto observatory (CAHA, Spain) and will be equipped with two spectrographs in the near-infrared and visible windows. The technology involved in such instrument represents a challenge at all levels. The instrument coordination and management is handled by the Instrument Control System (ICS), which is responsible of carrying out the operations of the different subsystems and providing a tool to operate the instrument from low to high user interaction level. The main goal of the ICS and the CARMENES control layer architecture is to maximize the instrument efficiency by reducing time overheads and by operating it in an integrated manner. The ICS implements the CARMENES operational design. A description of the ICS architecture and the application programming interfaces for low- and high-level communication is given. Internet Communications Engine is the technology selected to implement most of the interface protocols.

  1. The SOFIA Mission Control System Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiligman, G. M.; Brock, D. R.; Culp, S. D.; Decker, P. H.; Estrada, J. C.; Graybeal, J. B.; Nichols, D. M.; Paluzzi, P. R.; Sharer, P. J.; Pampell, R. J.; Papke, B. L.; Salovich, R. D.; Schlappe, S. B.; Spriestersbach, K. K.; Webb, G. L.

    1999-05-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) will be delivered with a computerized mission control system (MCS). The MCS communicates with the aircraft's flight management system and coordinates the operations of the telescope assembly, mission-specific subsystems, and the science instruments. The software for the MCS must be reliable and flexible. It must be easily usable by many teams of observers with widely differing needs, and it must support non-intrusive access for education and public outreach. The technology must be appropriate for SOFIA's 20-year lifetime. The MCS software development process is an object-oriented, use case driven approach. The process is iterative: delivery will be phased over four "builds"; each build will be the result of many iterations; and each iteration will include analysis, design, implementation, and test activities. The team is geographically distributed, coordinating its work via Web pages, teleconferences, T.120 remote collaboration, and CVS (for Internet-enabled configuration management). The MCS software architectural design is derived in part from other observatories' experience. Some important features of the MCS are: * distributed computing over several UNIX and VxWorks computers * fast throughput of time-critical data * use of third-party components, such as the Adaptive Communications Environment (ACE) and the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) * extensive configurability via stored, editable configuration files * use of several computer languages so developers have "the right tool for the job". C++, Java, scripting languages, Interactive Data Language (from Research Systems, Int'l.), XML, and HTML will all be used in the final deliverables. This paper reports on work in progress, with the final product scheduled for delivery in 2001. This work was performed for Universities Space Research Association for NASA under contract NAS2-97001.

  2. A federated design for a neurobiological simulation engine: the CBI federated software architecture.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Hugo; Coop, Allan D; Bower, James M

    2012-01-01

    Simulator interoperability and extensibility has become a growing requirement in computational biology. To address this, we have developed a federated software architecture. It is federated by its union of independent disparate systems under a single cohesive view, provides interoperability through its capability to communicate, execute programs, or transfer data among different independent applications, and supports extensibility by enabling simulator expansion or enhancement without the need for major changes to system infrastructure. Historically, simulator interoperability has relied on development of declarative markup languages such as the neuron modeling language NeuroML, while simulator extension typically occurred through modification of existing functionality. The software architecture we describe here allows for both these approaches. However, it is designed to support alternative paradigms of interoperability and extensibility through the provision of logical relationships and defined application programming interfaces. They allow any appropriately configured component or software application to be incorporated into a simulator. The architecture defines independent functional modules that run stand-alone. They are arranged in logical layers that naturally correspond to the occurrence of high-level data (biological concepts) versus low-level data (numerical values) and distinguish data from control functions. The modular nature of the architecture and its independence from a given technology facilitates communication about similar concepts and functions for both users and developers. It provides several advantages for multiple independent contributions to software development. Importantly, these include: (1) Reduction in complexity of individual simulator components when compared to the complexity of a complete simulator, (2) Documentation of individual components in terms of their inputs and outputs, (3) Easy removal or replacement of unnecessary or

  3. A Federated Design for a Neurobiological Simulation Engine: The CBI Federated Software Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Hugo; Coop, Allan D.; Bower, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Simulator interoperability and extensibility has become a growing requirement in computational biology. To address this, we have developed a federated software architecture. It is federated by its union of independent disparate systems under a single cohesive view, provides interoperability through its capability to communicate, execute programs, or transfer data among different independent applications, and supports extensibility by enabling simulator expansion or enhancement without the need for major changes to system infrastructure. Historically, simulator interoperability has relied on development of declarative markup languages such as the neuron modeling language NeuroML, while simulator extension typically occurred through modification of existing functionality. The software architecture we describe here allows for both these approaches. However, it is designed to support alternative paradigms of interoperability and extensibility through the provision of logical relationships and defined application programming interfaces. They allow any appropriately configured component or software application to be incorporated into a simulator. The architecture defines independent functional modules that run stand-alone. They are arranged in logical layers that naturally correspond to the occurrence of high-level data (biological concepts) versus low-level data (numerical values) and distinguish data from control functions. The modular nature of the architecture and its independence from a given technology facilitates communication about similar concepts and functions for both users and developers. It provides several advantages for multiple independent contributions to software development. Importantly, these include: (1) Reduction in complexity of individual simulator components when compared to the complexity of a complete simulator, (2) Documentation of individual components in terms of their inputs and outputs, (3) Easy removal or replacement of unnecessary or

  4. Software architecture standard for simulation virtual machine, version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturtevant, Robert; Wessale, William

    1994-01-01

    The Simulation Virtual Machine (SBM) is an Ada architecture which eases the effort involved in the real-time software maintenance and sustaining engineering. The Software Architecture Standard defines the infrastructure which all the simulation models are built from. SVM was developed for and used in the Space Station Verification and Training Facility.

  5. Mars Science Laboratory thermal control architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana; Pauken, Michael; Paris, Anthony; Novak, Keith; Prina, Mauro; Ramirez, Brenda; Bame, David

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission to land a large rover on Mars is being planned for launch in 2009. This paper will describe the basic architecture of the thermal control system, the challenges and the methods used to overcome them by the use of an innovative architecture to maximize the use of heritage from past projects while meeting the requirements for the design.

  6. The UAS control segment architecture: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Douglas A.; Batavia, Parag; Coats, Mark; Allport, Chris; Jennings, Ann; Ernst, Richard

    2013-05-01

    The Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics) directed the Services in 2009 to jointly develop and demonstrate a common architecture for command and control of Department of Defense (DoD) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Groups 2 through 5. The UAS Control Segment (UCS) Architecture is an architecture framework for specifying and designing the softwareintensive capabilities of current and emerging UCS systems in the DoD inventory. The UCS Architecture is based on Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) principles that will be adopted by each of the Services as a common basis for acquiring, integrating, and extending the capabilities of the UAS Control Segment. The UAS Task Force established the UCS Working Group to develop and support the UCS Architecture. The Working Group currently has over three hundred members, and is open to qualified representatives from DoD-approved defense contractors, academia, and the Government. The UCS Architecture is currently at Release 2.2, with Release 3.0 planned for July 2013. This paper discusses the current and planned elements of the UCS Architecture, and related activities of the UCS Community of Interest.

  7. Experience with Intel's Many Integrated Core architecture in ATLAS software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, S.; Kama, S.; Lavrijsen, W.; Neumann, M.; Vitillo, R.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Intel recently released the first commercial boards of its Many Integrated Core (MIC) Architecture. MIC is Intel's solution for the domain of throughput computing, currently dominated by general purpose programming on graphics processors (GPGPU). MIC allows the use of the more familiar x86 programming model and supports standard technologies such as OpenMP, MPI, and Intel's Threading Building Blocks (TBB). This should make it possible to develop for both throughput and latency devices using a single code base. In ATLAS Software, track reconstruction has been shown to be a good candidate for throughput computing on GPGPU devices. In addition, the newly proposed offline parallel event-processing framework, GaudiHive, uses TBB for task scheduling. The MIC is thus, in principle, a good fit for this domain. In this paper, we report our experiences of porting to and optimizing ATLAS tracking algorithms for the MIC, comparing the programmability and relative cost/performance of the MIC against those of current GPGPUs and latency-optimized CPUs.

  8. EZ-Rhizo software: the gateway to root architecture analysis.

    PubMed

    Armengaud, Patrick

    2009-02-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that have to cope with the available nutritional resources and environmental constraints in the place where they germinate. To fully exploit their nearby resources, they have evolved a highly plastic and responsive root system. Adaptations to limited nutrients include a wide range of specific root responses, e.g., the emergence of new root types, root branching or specific growth of lateral roots. These root system architecture (RSA) features are of utmost importance when investigating the underlying mechanisms by forward, reverse or quantitative genetic approaches. The EZ-Rhizo software was developed to facilitate such root measurements in a fast, simple and accurate way. The performances of EZ-Rhizo in providing about 20 primary and derived RSA parameters were illustrated by looking at natural variability across 23 Arabidopsis accessions. The different RSA profiles obtained from plants grown in favorable condition illustrated the wide reservoir of natural genetic resources underlying specific features of root growth. This diversity was used here to correlate the RSA genetic variability with growth, development and environmental properties of accession origins. PMID:19649192

  9. The M68HC11 gripper controller software. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Jodi Wei-Duk

    1991-01-01

    This thesis discusses the development of firmware for the 68HC11 gripper controller. A general description of the software and hardware interfaces is given. The C library interface for the gripper is then described and followed by a detailed discussion of the software architecture of the firmware. A procedure to assemble and download 68HC11 programs is presented in the form of a tutorial. The tools used to implement this environment are then described. Finally, the implementation of the configuration management scheme used to manage all CIRSSE software is presented.

  10. The Development Process of the LUCIFER Control Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jütte, M.; Polsterer, K.; Lehmitz, M.

    2004-07-01

    We present the design and development process of the control software for the LBT NIR spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral-Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER) which is one of the first-light instruments for the LBT on Mt. Graham, Arizona. The LBT will be equipped with two identical LUCIFER instruments for both mirrors. We give an overview of the software architecture and the current state of the software package and describe the development process by using a virtual LUCIFER instrument.

  11. Software Architecture of the NASA Shuttle Ground Operations Simulator - SGOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Robert P.; Lostroscio, Charles T.

    2005-01-01

    The SGOS executive and its subsystems have been an integral component of the Shuttle Launch Safety Program for almost thirty years. It is usable (via the LAN) by over 2000 NASA employees at the Kennedy Space Center and 11,000 contractors. SGOS supports over 800 models comprised of several hundred thousand lines of code and over 1,000 MCP procedures. Yet neither language has a for loop!! The simulation software described in this paper is used to train ground controllers and to certify launch countdown readiness.

  12. Using UML Modeling to Facilitate Three-Tier Architecture Projects in Software Engineering Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitra, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the use of a model-centric approach to facilitate software development projects conforming to the three-tier architecture in undergraduate software engineering courses. Many instructors intend that such projects create software applications for use by real-world customers. While it is important that the first version of these…

  13. Software architecture for a distributed real-time system in Ada, with application to telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Douglas R.; Messiora, Steve; Leake, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    The architecture structure and software design methodology presented is described in the context of telerobotic application in Ada, specifically the Engineering Test Bed (ETB), which was developed to support the Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) Program at GSFC. However, the nature of the architecture is such that it has applications to any multiprocessor distributed real-time system. The ETB architecture, which is a derivation of the NASA/NBS Standard Reference Model (NASREM), defines a hierarchy for representing a telerobot system. Within this hierarchy, a module is a logical entity consisting of the software associated with a set of related hardware components in the robot system. A module is comprised of submodules, which are cyclically executing processes that each perform a specific set of functions. The submodules in a module can run on separate processors. The submodules in the system communicate via command/status (C/S) interface channels, which are used to send commands down and relay status back up the system hierarchy. Submodules also communicate via setpoint data links, which are used to transfer control data from one submodule to another. A submodule invokes submodule algorithms (SMA's) to perform algorithmic operations. Data that describe or models a physical component of the system are stored as objects in the World Model (WM). The WM is a system-wide distributed database that is accessible to submodules in all modules of the system for creating, reading, and writing objects.

  14. A resilient and secure software platform and architecture for distributed spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, William R.; Dubey, Abhishek; Karsai, Gabor

    2014-06-01

    A distributed spacecraft is a cluster of independent satellite modules flying in formation that communicate via ad-hoc wireless networks. This system in space is a cloud platform that facilitates sharing sensors and other computing and communication resources across multiple applications, potentially developed and maintained by different organizations. Effectively, such architecture can realize the functions of monolithic satellites at a reduced cost and with improved adaptivity and robustness. Openness of these architectures pose special challenges because the distributed software platform has to support applications from different security domains and organizations, and where information flows have to be carefully managed and compartmentalized. If the platform is used as a robust shared resource its management, configuration, and resilience becomes a challenge in itself. We have designed and prototyped a distributed software platform for such architectures. The core element of the platform is a new operating system whose services were designed to restrict access to the network and the file system, and to enforce resource management constraints for all non-privileged processes Mixed-criticality applications operating at different security labels are deployed and controlled by a privileged management process that is also pre-configuring all information flows. This paper describes the design and objective of this layer.

  15. Software requirements: Guidance and control software development specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, B. Edward; Rich, Don C.; Lowman, Douglas S.; Buckland, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    The software requirements for an implementation of Guidance and Control Software (GCS) are specified. The purpose of the GCS is to provide guidance and engine control to a planetary landing vehicle during its terminal descent onto a planetary surface and to communicate sensory information about that vehicle and its descent to some receiving device. The specification was developed using the structured analysis for real time system specification methodology by Hatley and Pirbhai and was based on a simulation program used to study the probability of success of the 1976 Viking Lander missions to Mars. Three versions of GCS are being generated for use in software error studies.

  16. Modular planning/control architecture for the semiautonomous control of telerobots in a hazardous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Brady, Kevin; Xi, Ning; Love, Lonnie; Lloyd, Peter; Burks, Barry; Davis, Hurley

    1997-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has demonstrated, evaluated, and deployed a telerobotic approach for the remote retrieval of hazardous and radioactive wastes from underground storage tanks. The telerobotic system, built by Spar Aerospace Ltd., is capable of dislodging and removing sludge and gravel- like wastes without endangering the human operators through contact with the environment. Working in partnership with Washington University, ORNL has implemented an Event based planner/function based sharing control (FBSC) as an integral part of their overall telerobotic architecture. These aspects of the system enable the seamless union of the human operator and an autonomous controller in such a way to emphasize safety without any loss of performance. The cooperation between ORNL, Spar, and Washington University requires an open and modular control software architecture to enable the parallel development of various components of the system. ControlShell has been used as the underlying software architecture to help meet these criteria of generality and modularity.

  17. Advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Markus; Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1997-06-01

    An advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles is presented. The hierarchical architecture consists of four levels: a vehicle level, a control level, a rule-based level and a knowledge-based level. A special focus is on forms of internal representation, which have to be chosen adequately for each level. The control scheme is applied to VaMP, a Mercedes passenger car which autonomously performs missions on German freeways. VaMP perceives the environment with its sense of vision and conventional sensors. It controls its actuators for locomotion and attention focusing. Modules for perception, cognition and action are discussed.

  18. A task control architecture for autonomous robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Reid; Mitchell, Tom

    1990-01-01

    An architecture is presented for controlling robots that have multiple tasks, operate in dynamic domains, and require a fair degree of autonomy. The architecture is built on several layers of functionality, including a distributed communication layer, a behavior layer for querying sensors, expanding goals, and executing commands, and a task level for managing the temporal aspects of planning and achieving goals, coordinating tasks, allocating resources, monitoring, and recovering from errors. Application to a legged planetary rover and an indoor mobile manipulator is described.

  19. Supervisory Control System Architecture for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cetiner, Sacit M; Cole, Daniel L; Fugate, David L; Kisner, Roger A; Melin, Alexander M; Muhlheim, Michael David; Rao, Nageswara S; Wood, Richard Thomas

    2013-08-01

    This technical report was generated as a product of the Supervisory Control for Multi-Modular SMR Plants project within the Instrumentation, Control and Human-Machine Interface technology area under the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report documents the definition of strategies, functional elements, and the structural architecture of a supervisory control system for multi-modular advanced SMR (AdvSMR) plants. This research activity advances the state-of-the art by incorporating decision making into the supervisory control system architectural layers through the introduction of a tiered-plant system approach. The report provides a brief history of hierarchical functional architectures and the current state-of-the-art, describes a reference AdvSMR to show the dependencies between systems, presents a hierarchical structure for supervisory control, indicates the importance of understanding trip setpoints, applies a new theoretic approach for comparing architectures, identifies cyber security controls that should be addressed early in system design, and describes ongoing work to develop system requirements and hardware/software configurations.

  20. Partially Decentralized Control Architectures for Satellite Formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Bauer, Frank H.

    2002-01-01

    In a partially decentralized control architecture, more than one but less than all nodes have supervisory capability. This paper describes an approach to choosing the number of supervisors in such au architecture, based on a reliability vs. cost trade. It also considers the implications of these results for the design of navigation systems for satellite formations that could be controlled with a partially decentralized architecture. Using an assumed cost model, analytic and simulation-based results indicate that it may be cheaper to achieve a given overall system reliability with a partially decentralized architecture containing only a few supervisors, than with either fully decentralized or purely centralized architectures. Nominally, the subset of supervisors may act as centralized estimation and control nodes for corresponding subsets of the remaining subordinate nodes, and act as decentralized estimation and control peers with respect to each other. However, in the context of partially decentralized satellite formation control, the absolute positions and velocities of each spacecraft are unique, so that correlations which make estimates using only local information suboptimal only occur through common biases and process noise. Covariance and monte-carlo analysis of a simplified system show that this lack of correlation may allow simplification of the local estimators while preserving the global optimality of the maneuvers commanded by the supervisors.

  1. Reliable software and communication 2: Controlling the software development process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Siddhartha R.; Horgan, Joseph R.; Kettenring, Jon R.

    1994-01-01

    The software created by industrial, educational, and research organizations is increasingly large and complex. It also occupies a central role in the reliability and safety of many essential services. We examine the software development process and suggest opportunities for improving the process by using a combination of statistical and other process control techniques. Data, analysis of data, and tools for collecting data are crucial to our approach. Although our views are based upon experiences with large telecommunications systems, they are likely to be useful to many other developers of large software systems.

  2. Control, acquisition and quick-look software for infrared spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Emanuel; Oliva, Ernesto; Origlia, Livia

    2010-07-01

    Modern IR spectrometers must be equipped with software well suited to a wide range of purposes starting from the low level controls and going through acquisition, handling and fast quick-look of data. Such a complex software structure can be conveniently managed by means of dedicated GUIs which allow one to access the system at different levels: from the lowest (cryogenic controls) to the highest (data acquisition and quick-look). We will briefly describe the structure of this software, whose original characteristics is in the use of SQLite. We will also show a couple of results from our quick-look procedure based on customized DS9 and IRAF. The software architecture, that we present here, is general and can be adapted to any astronomical instruments. We have specifically implemented and tested it on GIANO spectrometer

  3. Open architecture controller activities in Technology Enabling Agile Manufacturing (TEAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCue, Howard K.

    1997-01-01

    As part of its manufacturing initiative, TEAM is actively involved in open architecture controller activities. WIthin the TEAM community of members, TEAM is developing an open architecture controller requirements document and an open architecture controller application programming interface document. In addition, TEAM is also evaluating early open architecture controllers in a shop floor environment.

  4. Intersection-Controller Software Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Aaron; Foster, Conrad

    2005-01-01

    An important part of the emergency-vehicle traffic-light-preemption system summarized in the preceding article is a software module executed by a microcontroller in each intersection controller. This module monitors the broadcasts from all nearby participating emergency vehicles and intersections. It gathers the broadcast data pertaining to the positions and velocities of the vehicles and the timing of traffic and pedestrian lights and processes the data into predictions of the future positions of the vehicles. Analyzing the predictions by a combination of proximity tests, map-matching techniques, and statistical calculations designed to minimize the adverse effects of uncertainties in vehicle positions and headings, the module decides whether to preempt and issues the appropriate commands to the traffic lights, pedestrian lights, and electronic warning signs at the intersection. The module also broadcasts its state to all nearby vehicles and intersections. The module is designed to mitigate the effects of missing data and of unpredictable delays in the system. It has been intensively tested and refined so that it fails to warn in very few cases and issues very few false warnings.

  5. A software architecture to support a large-scale, multi-tier clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Yungton, J A; Sittig, D F; Reilly, P; Pappas, J; Flammini, S; Chueh, H C; Teich, J M

    1998-01-01

    A robust software architecture is necessary to support a large-scale multi-tier clinical information system. This paper describes our mechanism for enterprise distribution of applications and support files, the consolidation of data-access functions and system utilities stored on the data access tier, and an application framework which implements a coherent clinical computing environment. The software architecture and systems described in this paper have been robust through pilot testing of our applications at Massachusetts General Hospital. PMID:9929212

  6. E-maintenance Scenarios Based on Augmented Reality Software Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benbelkacem, S.; Zenati-Henda, N.; Belhocine, M.

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents architecture of augmented reality for e-maintenance application. In our case, the aim is not to develop a vision system based on augmented reality concept, but to show the relationship between the different actors in the proposed architecture and to facilitate maintenance of the machine. This architecture allows implementing different scenarios which give to the technician possibilities to intervene on a breakdown device with a distant expert help. Each scenario is established according to machine parameters and technician competences. In our case, a hardware platform is designed to carry out e-maintenance scenarios. An example of e-maintenance scenario is then presented.

  7. Mark 4A antenna control system data handling architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, H. C.; Eldred, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    A high-level review was conducted to provide an analysis of the existing architecture used to handle data and implement control algorithms for NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas and to make system-level recommendations for improving this architecture so that the DSN antennas can support the ever-tightening requirements of the next decade and beyond. It was found that the existing system is seriously overloaded, with processor utilization approaching 100 percent. A number of factors contribute to this overloading, including dated hardware, inefficient software, and a message-passing strategy that depends on serial connections between machines. At the same time, the system has shortcomings and idiosyncrasies that require extensive human intervention. A custom operating system kernel and an obscure programming language exacerbate the problems and should be modernized. A new architecture is presented that addresses these and other issues. Key features of the new architecture include a simplified message passing hierarchy that utilizes a high-speed local area network, redesign of particular processing function algorithms, consolidation of functions, and implementation of the architecture in modern hardware and software using mainstream computer languages and operating systems. The system would also allow incremental hardware improvements as better and faster hardware for such systems becomes available, and costs could potentially be low enough that redundancy would be provided economically. Such a system could support DSN requirements for the foreseeable future, though thorough consideration must be given to hard computational requirements, porting existing software functionality to the new system, and issues of fault tolerance and recovery.

  8. Software architecture of the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, Allen; Klinglesmith, Dan; Seamons, John; Torres, Nicolas; Buscher, David; Young, John

    2010-07-01

    Merging software from 36 independent work packages into a coherent, unified software system with a lifespan of twenty years is the challenge faced by the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer (MROI). We solve this problem by using standardized interface software automatically generated from simple highlevel descriptions of these systems, relying only on Linux, GNU, and POSIX without complex software such as CORBA. This approach, based on gigabit Ethernet with a TCP/IP protocol, provides the flexibility to integrate and manage diverse, independent systems using a centralized supervisory system that provides a database manager, data collectors, fault handling, and an operator interface.

  9. A flexible architecture for advanced process control solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faron, Kamyar; Iourovitski, Ilia

    2005-05-01

    Advanced Process Control (APC) is now mainstream practice in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Over the past decade and a half APC has evolved from a "good idea", and "wouldn"t it be great" concept to mandatory manufacturing practice. APC developments have primarily dealt with two major thrusts, algorithms and infrastructure, and often the line between them has been blurred. The algorithms have evolved from very simple single variable solutions to sophisticated and cutting edge adaptive multivariable (input and output) solutions. Spending patterns in recent times have demanded that the economics of a comprehensive APC infrastructure be completely justified for any and all cost conscious manufacturers. There are studies suggesting integration costs as high as 60% of the total APC solution costs. Such cost prohibitive figures clearly diminish the return on APC investments. This has limited the acceptance and development of pure APC infrastructure solutions for many fabs. Modern APC solution architectures must satisfy the wide array of requirements from very manual R&D environments to very advanced and automated "lights out" manufacturing facilities. A majority of commercially available control solutions and most in house developed solutions lack important attributes of scalability, flexibility, and adaptability and hence require significant resources for integration, deployment, and maintenance. Many APC improvement efforts have been abandoned and delayed due to legacy systems and inadequate architectural design. Recent advancements (Service Oriented Architectures) in the software industry have delivered ideal technologies for delivering scalable, flexible, and reliable solutions that can seamlessly integrate into any fabs" existing system and business practices. In this publication we shall evaluate the various attributes of the architectures required by fabs and illustrate the benefits of a Service Oriented Architecture to satisfy these requirements. Blue

  10. Software Architecture to Support the Evolution of the ISRU RESOLVE Engineering Breadboard Unit 2 (EBU2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, Thomas; Nurge, Mark; Perusich, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Regolith & Environmental Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatiles Extraction (RESOLVE) software provides operation of the physical plant from a remote location with a high-level interface that can access and control the data from external software applications of other subsystems. This software allows autonomous control over the entire system with manual computer control of individual system/process components. It gives non-programmer operators the capability to easily modify the high-level autonomous sequencing while the software is in operation, as well as the ability to modify the low-level, file-based sequences prior to the system operation. Local automated control in a distributed system is also enabled where component control is maintained during the loss of network connectivity with the remote workstation. This innovation also minimizes network traffic. The software architecture commands and controls the latest generation of RESOLVE processes used to obtain, process, and quantify lunar regolith. The system is grouped into six sub-processes: Drill, Crush, Reactor, Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD), Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) (see example), and Regolith Oxygen Extraction (ROE). Some processes are independent, some are dependent on other processes, and some are independent but run concurrently with other processes. The first goal is to analyze the volatiles emanating from lunar regolith, such as water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, ammonia, hydrogen, and others. This is done by heating the soil and analyzing and capturing the volatilized product. The second goal is to produce water by reducing the soil at high temperatures with hydrogen. This is done by raising the reactor temperature in the range of 800 to 900 C, causing the reaction to progress by adding hydrogen, and then capturing the water product in a desiccant bed. The software needs to run the entire unit and all sub-processes; however

  11. Using an architectural approach to integrate heterogeneous, distributed software components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.; Purtilo, James M.

    1995-01-01

    Many computer programs cannot be easily integrated because their components are distributed and heterogeneous, i.e., they are implemented in diverse programming languages, use different data representation formats, or their runtime environments are incompatible. In many cases, programs are integrated by modifying their components or interposing mechanisms that handle communication and conversion tasks. For example, remote procedure call (RPC) helps integrate heterogeneous, distributed programs. When configuring such programs, however, mechanisms like RPC must be used explicitly by software developers in order to integrate collections of diverse components. Each collection may require a unique integration solution. This paper describes improvements to the concepts of software packaging and some of our experiences in constructing complex software systems from a wide variety of components in different execution environments. Software packaging is a process that automatically determines how to integrate a diverse collection of computer programs based on the types of components involved and the capabilities of available translators and adapters in an environment. Software packaging provides a context that relates such mechanisms to software integration processes and reduces the cost of configuring applications whose components are distributed or implemented in different programming languages. Our software packaging tool subsumes traditional integration tools like UNIX make by providing a rule-based approach to software integration that is independent of execution environments.

  12. The Java based control software of the LUCIFER instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jütte, Marcus; Polsterer, Kai; Knierim, Volker; Luks, Thomas; Schimmelmann, Jan; Muhlack, Tobias; Mandel, Holger; Lehmitz, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The LUCIFER instrument is a near infrared spectrograph/imager with MOS for the Large Binocular Telescope. Here we present the final software design, the interrelation of the software packages and the used hardware architecture. The software package is completely running under Java using intensively its Remote Method Invocation (RMI) mechanisms in a distributed system environment. The use of Java helped us to cope with a small amount of available manpower for the SW development, providing many native built-in Java methods and classes, which speed up the development process a lot. The control software will be finally installed on a Solaris OS, hosted on a Sun Fire V880 server, which results from a specific hardware constraint. For testing purposes a standard Linux environment is used. This shows another big Java advantage, the platform independency. The "First Light" of LUCIFER 1 is estimated for summer/fall 2007, following LUCIFER 2 one year later.

  13. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: camera DAQ software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti, Vito; Trifoglio, Massimo; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Fioretti, Valentina; Tacchini, Alessandro; Zoli, Andrea; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Capalbi, Milvia; Catalano, Osvaldo

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is a Flagship Project financed by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, and led by INAF, the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics. Within this framework, INAF is currently developing an end-to-end prototype of a Small Size dual-mirror Telescope. In a second phase the ASTRI project foresees the installation of the first elements of the array at CTA southern site, a mini-array of 7 telescopes. The ASTRI Camera DAQ Software is aimed at the Camera data acquisition, storage and display during Camera development as well as during commissioning and operations on the ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype that will operate at the INAF observing station located at Serra La Nave on the Mount Etna (Sicily). The Camera DAQ configuration and operations will be sequenced either through local operator commands or through remote commands received from the Instrument Controller System that commands and controls the Camera. The Camera DAQ software will acquire data packets through a direct one-way socket connection with the Camera Back End Electronics. In near real time, the data will be stored in both raw and FITS format. The DAQ Quick Look component will allow the operator to display in near real time the Camera data packets. We are developing the DAQ software adopting the iterative and incremental model in order to maximize the software reuse and to implement a system which is easily adaptable to changes. This contribution presents the Camera DAQ Software architecture with particular emphasis on its potential reuse for the ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  14. Architecture of a Generic Telescope Control and Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohile, V.; Purkar, C.

    2009-09-01

    This paper focuses on a proposed architecture for a Generic Control and Monitoring System (CMS) which can be adapted for any telescope system. This architecture is largely based on an in-progress specification project that PSL is carrying out for IUCAA and NCRA. Historically, the communication link between the telescope and its users at IUCAA and NCRA has been unfriendly. Also, previously it was difficult to maintain and there was no facility to add support for new features or new hardware on the fly. PSL is proposing a new contemporary open-source software based architecture to be applied to both radio and optical telescopes that resolves some of these issues. We present the high-level architecture and design of this CMS. Specifically, we have proposed for the development of the commonality of GUI in platform-independent, modular, secure and robust Java environment. This application along with Extensible Markup Language-Document Type Definition (XML-DTD) structure can control the telescope as well as monitors the status of the telescope. Thus, using CMS we can provide various users having different access levels to control and monitor different telescope systems. The CMS thus achieves design objectives of being generic and not tightly coupled to the actual underlying hardware. In that way, it would enable easy and flexible upgrades of the hardware.

  15. Open Source Software to Control Bioflo Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Burdge, David A.; Libourel, Igor G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed auxiliary hardware is often sparse or absent. This work presents flexible open source freeware for the control of bioreactors of the Bioflo product family. The functionality of the software includes setpoint control, data logging, and protocol execution. Auxiliary hardware can be easily integrated and controlled through an integrated plugin interface without altering existing software. Simple experimental protocols can be entered as a CSV scripting file, and a Python-based protocol execution model is included for more demanding conditional experimental control. The software was designed to be a more flexible and free open source alternative to the commercially available solution. The source code and various auxiliary hardware plugins are publicly available for download from https://github.com/LibourelLab/BiofloSoftware. In addition to the source code, the software was compiled and packaged as a self-installing file for 32 and 64 bit windows operating systems. The compiled software will be able to control a Bioflo system, and will not require the installation of LabVIEW. PMID:24667828

  16. Open source software to control Bioflo bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Burdge, David A; Libourel, Igor G L

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed auxiliary hardware is often sparse or absent. This work presents flexible open source freeware for the control of bioreactors of the Bioflo product family. The functionality of the software includes setpoint control, data logging, and protocol execution. Auxiliary hardware can be easily integrated and controlled through an integrated plugin interface without altering existing software. Simple experimental protocols can be entered as a CSV scripting file, and a Python-based protocol execution model is included for more demanding conditional experimental control. The software was designed to be a more flexible and free open source alternative to the commercially available solution. The source code and various auxiliary hardware plugins are publicly available for download from https://github.com/LibourelLab/BiofloSoftware. In addition to the source code, the software was compiled and packaged as a self-installing file for 32 and 64 bit windows operating systems. The compiled software will be able to control a Bioflo system, and will not require the installation of LabVIEW. PMID:24667828

  17. An Architecture for Controlling Multiple Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aghazarian, Hrand; Pirjanian, Paolo; Schenker, Paul; Huntsberger, Terrance

    2004-01-01

    The Control Architecture for Multirobot Outpost (CAMPOUT) is a distributed-control architecture for coordinating the activities of multiple robots. In the CAMPOUT, multiple-agent activities and sensor-based controls are derived as group compositions and involve coordination of more basic controllers denoted, for present purposes, as behaviors. The CAMPOUT provides basic mechanistic concepts for representation and execution of distributed group activities. One considers a network of nodes that comprise behaviors (self-contained controllers) augmented with hyper-links, which are used to exchange information between the nodes to achieve coordinated activities. Group behavior is guided by a scripted plan, which encodes a conditional sequence of single-agent activities. Thus, higher-level functionality is composed by coordination of more basic behaviors under the downward task decomposition of a multi-agent planner

  18. Memory intensive functional architecture for distributed computer control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dimmler, D.G.

    1983-10-01

    A memory-intensive functional architectue for distributed data-acquisition, monitoring, and control systems with large numbers of nodes has been conceptually developed and applied in several large-scale and some smaller systems. This discussion concentrates on: (1) the basic architecture; (2) recent expansions of the architecture which now become feasible in view of the rapidly developing component technologies in microprocessors and functional large-scale integration circuits; and (3) implementation of some key hardware and software structures and one system implementation which is a system for performing control and data acquisition of a neutron spectrometer at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. The spectrometer is equipped with a large-area position-sensitive neutron detector.

  19. What is an open architecture robot controller?

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.E.

    1994-02-14

    This paper addresses the issue of what is an open architecture robot controllers. Three different classifications are defined along with the various advantages and shortcomings of each approach. Knowledge from past research and new technology has been included in this analysis. The conclusions recommend a communication-based hybrid approach with well defined interfaces between modules.

  20. Integrated computer control system architectural overview

    SciTech Connect

    Van Arsdall, P.

    1997-06-18

    This overview introduces the NIF Integrated Control System (ICCS) architecture. The design is abstract to allow the construction of many similar applications from a common framework. This summary lays the essential foundation for understanding the model-based engineering approach used to execute the design.

  1. Modeling of a 3DTV service in the software-defined networking architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczewski, Grzegorz

    2014-11-01

    In this article a newly developed concept towards modeling of a multimedia service offering stereoscopic motion imagery is presented. Proposed model is based on the approach of utilization of Software-defined Networking or Software Defined Networks architecture (SDN). The definition of 3D television service spanning SDN concept is identified, exposing basic characteristic of a 3DTV service in a modern networking organization layout. Furthermore, exemplary functionalities of the proposed 3DTV model are depicted. It is indicated that modeling of a 3DTV service in the Software-defined Networking architecture leads to multiplicity of improvements, especially towards flexibility of a service supporting heterogeneity of end user devices.

  2. The Orion GN and C Data-Driven Flight Software Architecture for Automated Sequencing and Fault Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ellis; Hart, Jeremy; Odegard, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CET) is being designed to include significantly more automation capability than either the Space Shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS). In particular, the vehicle flight software has requirements to accommodate increasingly automated missions throughout all phases of flight. A data-driven flight software architecture will provide an evolvable automation capability to sequence through Guidance, Navigation & Control (GN&C) flight software modes and configurations while maintaining the required flexibility and human control over the automation. This flexibility is a key aspect needed to address the maturation of operational concepts, to permit ground and crew operators to gain trust in the system and mitigate unpredictability in human spaceflight. To allow for mission flexibility and reconfrgurability, a data driven approach is being taken to load the mission event plan as well cis the flight software artifacts associated with the GN&C subsystem. A database of GN&C level sequencing data is presented which manages and tracks the mission specific and algorithm parameters to provide a capability to schedule GN&C events within mission segments. The flight software data schema for performing automated mission sequencing is presented with a concept of operations for interactions with ground and onboard crew members. A prototype architecture for fault identification, isolation and recovery interactions with the automation software is presented and discussed as a forward work item.

  3. OpenROCS: a software tool to control robotic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomé, Josep; Sanz, Josep; Vilardell, Francesc; Ribas, Ignasi; Gil, Pere

    2012-09-01

    We present the Open Robotic Observatory Control System (OpenROCS), an open source software platform developed for the robotic control of telescopes. It acts as a software infrastructure that executes all the necessary processes to implement responses to the system events that appear in the routine and non-routine operations associated to data-flow and housekeeping control. The OpenROCS software design and implementation provides a high flexibility to be adapted to different observatory configurations and event-action specifications. It is based on an abstract model that is independent of the specific hardware or software and is highly configurable. Interfaces to the system components are defined in a simple manner to achieve this goal. We give a detailed description of the version 2.0 of this software, based on a modular architecture developed in PHP and XML configuration files, and using standard communication protocols to interface with applications for hardware monitoring and control, environment monitoring, scheduling of tasks, image processing and data quality control. We provide two examples of how it is used as the core element of the control system in two robotic observatories: the Joan Oró Telescope at the Montsec Astronomical Observatory (Catalonia, Spain) and the SuperWASP Qatar Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Canary Islands, Spain).

  4. On-Board Software Reference Architecture for Payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Victor; Trcka, Adam

    2015-09-01

    This abstract summarizes the On-board Reference Architecture for Payloads activity carried out by Space Systems Finland (SSF) and Evolving Systems Consulting (ESC) under ESA contract. At the time of writing, the activity is ongoing. This abstract discusses study objectives, related activities, study approach, achieved and anticipated results, and directions for future work.

  5. The BaBar Software Architecture and Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Cosmo, Gabriele

    2003-04-28

    The BaBar experiment has in place since 1995 a software release system (SRT Software Release Tools) based on CVS (Concurrent Version System) which is in common for all the software developed for the experiment, online or offline, simulation or reconstruction. A software release is a snapshot of all BaBar code (online, offline, utilities, scripts, makefiles, etc.). This set of code is tested to work together, and is indexed by a release number (e.g., 6.8.2) so a user can refer to a particular release and get reproducible results. A release will involve particular versions of packages. A package generally consists of a set of code for a particular task, together with a GNU makefile, scripts and documentation. All BaBar software is maintained in AFS (Andrew File System) directories, so the code is accessible worldwide within the Collaboration. The combination SRT, CVS, AFS, has demonstrated to be a valid, powerful and efficient way of organizing the software infrastructure of a modern HEP experiment with collaborating Institutes distributed worldwide, both in a development and production phase.

  6. Simulation of a Reconfigurable Adaptive Control Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapetti, Ryan John

    A set of algorithms and software components are developed to investigate the use of a priori models of damaged aircraft to improve control of similarly damaged aircraft. An addition to Model Predictive Control called state trajectory extrapolation is also developed to deliver good handling qualities in nominal an off-nominal aircraft. System identification algorithms are also used to improve model accuracy after a damage event. Simulations were run to demonstrate the efficacy of the algorithms and software components developed herein. The effect of model order on system identification convergence and performance is also investigated. A feasibility study for flight testing is also conducted. A preliminary hardware prototype was developed, as was the necessary software to integrate the avionics and ground station systems. Simulation results show significant improvement in both tracking and cross-coupling performance when a priori control models are used, and further improvement when identified models are used.

  7. Assessment of the integration capability of system architectures from a complex and distributed software systems perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchter, S.; Reinert, F.; Müller, W.

    2014-06-01

    Procurement and design of system architectures capable of network centric operations demand for an assessment scheme in order to compare different alternative realizations. In this contribution an assessment method for system architectures targeted at the C4ISR domain is presented. The method addresses the integration capability of software systems from a complex and distributed software system perspective focusing communication, interfaces and software. The aim is to evaluate the capability to integrate a system or its functions within a system-of-systems network. This method uses approaches from software architecture quality assessment and applies them on the system architecture level. It features a specific goal tree of several dimensions that are relevant for enterprise integration. These dimensions have to be weighed against each other and totalized using methods from the normative decision theory in order to reflect the intention of the particular enterprise integration effort. The indicators and measurements for many of the considered quality features rely on a model based view on systems, networks, and the enterprise. That means it is applicable to System-of-System specifications based on enterprise architectural frameworks relying on defined meta-models or domain ontologies for defining views and viewpoints. In the defense context we use the NATO Architecture Framework (NAF) to ground respective system models. The proposed assessment method allows evaluating and comparing competing system designs regarding their future integration potential. It is a contribution to the system-of-systems engineering methodology.

  8. An Architecture to Enable Autonomous Control of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Dever, Timothy P.; Soeder, James F.; George, Patrick J.; Morris, Paul H.; Colombano, Silvano P.; Frank, Jeremy D.; Schwabacher, Mark A.; Wang, Liu; LawLer, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Autonomy is required for manned spacecraft missions distant enough that light-time communication delays make ground-based mission control infeasible. Presently, ground controllers develop a complete schedule of power modes for all spacecraft components based on a large number of factors. The proposed architecture is an early attempt to formalize and automate this process using on-vehicle computation resources. In order to demonstrate this architecture, an autonomous electrical power system controller and vehicle Mission Manager are constructed. These two components are designed to work together in order to plan upcoming load use as well as respond to unanticipated deviations from the plan. The communication protocol was developed using "paper" simulations prior to formally encoding the messages and developing software to implement the required functionality. These software routines exchange data via TCP/IP sockets with the Mission Manager operating at NASA Ames Research Center and the autonomous power controller running at NASA Glenn Research Center. The interconnected systems are tested and shown to be effective at planning the operation of a simulated quasi-steady state spacecraft power system and responding to unexpected disturbances.

  9. A Pipeline Software Architecture for NMR Spectrum Data Translation

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Heidi J.C.; Weatherby, Gerard; Nowling, Ronald J.; Vyas, Jay; Fenwick, Matthew; Gryk, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of formatting data so that it conforms to the required input for scientific data processing tools pervades scientific computing. The CONNecticut Joint University Research Group (CONNJUR) has developed a data translation tool based on a pipeline architecture that partially solves this problem. The CONNJUR Spectrum Translator supports data format translation for experiments that use Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to determine the structure of large protein molecules. PMID:24634607

  10. Designing Control System Application Software for Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The Unified Modeling Language (UML) was used to design the Environmental Systems Test Stand (ESTS) control system software. The UML was chosen for its ability to facilitate a clear dialog between software designer and customer, from which requirements are discovered and documented in a manner which transposes directly to program objects. Applying the UML to control system software design has resulted in a baseline set of documents from which change and effort of that change can be accurately measured. As the Environmental Systems Test Stand evolves, accurate estimates of the time and effort required to change the control system software will be made. Accurate quantification of the cost of software change can be before implementation, improving schedule and budget accuracy.

  11. Autonomous control systems - Architecture and fundamental issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antsaklis, P. J.; Passino, K. M.; Wang, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchical functional autonomous controller architecture is introduced. In particular, the architecture for the control of future space vehicles is described in detail; it is designed to ensure the autonomous operation of the control system and it allows interaction with the pilot and crew/ground station, and the systems on board the autonomous vehicle. The fundamental issues in autonomous control system modeling and analysis are discussed. It is proposed to utilize a hybrid approach to modeling and analysis of autonomous systems. This will incorporate conventional control methods based on differential equations and techniques for the analysis of systems described with a symbolic formalism. In this way, the theory of conventional control can be fully utilized. It is stressed that autonomy is the design requirement and intelligent control methods appear at present, to offer some of the necessary tools to achieve autonomy. A conventional approach may evolve and replace some or all of the `intelligent' functions. It is shown that in addition to conventional controllers, the autonomous control system incorporates planning, learning, and FDI (fault detection and identification).

  12. Software architecture for large scale, distributed, data-intensive systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattmann, Chris A.; Medvidovic, Nenad; Ramirez, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents our experience with OODT, a novel software architectual style, and middlware-based implementation for data-intensive systems. To date, OODT has been successfully evaluated in several different science domains including Cancer Research with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and Planetary Science with NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS).

  13. Peeling the Onion: Okapi System Architecture and Software Design Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, S.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Discusses software design issues for Okapi, an information retrieval system that incorporates both search engine and user interface and supports weighted searching, relevance feedback, and query expansion. The basic search system, adjacency searching, and moving toward a distributed system are discussed. (Author/LRW)

  14. Software architecture of the light weight kernel, catamount.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie

    2005-05-01

    Catamount is designed to be a low overhead operating system for a parallel computing environment. Functionality is limited to the minimum set needed to run a scientific computation. The design choices and implementations will be presented. A massively parallel processor (MPP), high performance computing (HPC) system is particularly sensitive to operating system overhead. Traditional, multi-purpose, operating systems are designed to support a wide range of usage models and requirements. To support the range of needs, a large number of system processes are provided and are often interdependent on each other. The overhead of these processes leads to an unpredictable amount of processor time available to a parallel application. Except in the case of the most embarrassingly parallel of applications, an MPP application must share interim results with its peers before it can make further progress. These synchronization events are made at specific points in the application code. If one processor takes longer to reach that point than all the other processors, everyone must wait. The overall finish time is increased. Sandia National Laboratories began addressing this problem more than a decade ago with an architecture based on node specialization. Sets of nodes in an MPP are designated to perform specific tasks, each running an operating system best suited to the specialized function. Sandia chose to not use a multi-purpose operating system for the computational nodes and instead began developing its first light weight operating system, SUNMOS, which ran on the compute nodes on the Intel Paragon system. Based on its viability, the architecture evolved into the PUMA operating system. Intel ported PUMA to the ASCI Red TFLOPS system, thus creating the Cougar operating system. Most recently, Cougar has been ported to Cray's XT3 system and renamed to Catamount. As the references indicate, there are a number of descriptions of the predecessor operating systems. While the majority

  15. Hardware additions to microprocessor architecture aid software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, M. W.

    1976-01-01

    An address trap (breakpoint) mechanism and last-in-first-out (LIFO) address stack are suggested as two additions to the basic microprocessor architecture whose functions are solely to aid the programmer. These devices provide the programmer with the ability to specify address breakpoints and to trace program execution back through N instructions, where N is the depth of the stack. Both devices, plus interface logic and buffering, have been designed for an INTEL 8080-based system using approximately 25 integrated-circuit packages.

  16. Continuous Software Integration and Quality Control during Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettl, M.; Neidhardt, A.; Brisken, W.; Dassing, R.

    2012-12-01

    Modern software has to be stable, portable, fast, and reliable. This requires a sophisticated infrastructure supporting and providing the developers with additional information about the state and the quality of the project. That is why we have created a centralized software repository, where the whole code-base is managed and version controlled on a centralized server. Based on this, a hierarchical build system has been developed where each project and their sub-projects can be compiled by simply calling the top level Makefile. On the top of this, a nightly build system has been created where the top level Makefiles of each project are called every night. The results of the build including the compiler warnings are reported to the developers using generated HTML pages. In addition, all the source code is automatically checked using a static code analysis tool, called "cppcheck". This tool produces warnings, similar to those of a compiler, but more pedantic. The reports of this analysis are translated to HTML and reported to the developers similar to the nightly builds. Armed with this information,the developers can discover issues in their projects at an early development stage. In combination it reduces the number of possible issues in our software to ensure quality of our projects at different development stages. These checks are also offered to the community. They are currently used within the DiFX software correlator project.

  17. Source code management with version control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arraki, Kenza S.

    2016-01-01

    Developing and maintaining software is an important part of astronomy research. As time progresses projects can move in unexpected directions or simply last longer than expected. Making changes to software can quickly result in many different versions of the code, wanting to return to a previous lost version, and problems sharing updated code with others. It is simple to update and collaboratively edit source code when you use version control software. This short talk will highlight the version control softwares svn, git, and hg for use with local and remote software repositories. In addition I will touch on using GitHub and BitBucket as excellent ways to share your code using an online interface.

  18. Automated Cryocooler Monitor and Control System Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britchcliffe, Michael J.; Conroy, Bruce L.; Anderson, Paul E.; Wilson, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    This software is used in an automated cryogenic control system developed to monitor and control the operation of small-scale cryocoolers. The system was designed to automate the cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier system described in "Automated Cryocooler Monitor and Control System" (NPO-47246), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 5 (May 2011), page 7a. The software contains algorithms necessary to convert non-linear output voltages from the cryogenic diode-type thermometers and vacuum pressure and helium pressure sensors, to temperature and pressure units. The control function algorithms use the monitor data to control the cooler power, vacuum solenoid, vacuum pump, and electrical warm-up heaters. The control algorithms are based on a rule-based system that activates the required device based on the operating mode. The external interface is Web-based. It acts as a Web server, providing pages for monitor, control, and configuration. No client software from the external user is required.

  19. NASA's Advanced Multimission Operations System: A Case Study in Formalizing Software Architecture Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    All software systems of significant size and longevity eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by evolving requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the cause, software architecture evolution is commonplace in real world software projects. Recently, software architecture researchers have begun to study this phenomenon in depth. However, this work has suffered from problems of validation; research in this area has tended to make heavy use of toy examples and hypothetical scenarios and has not been well supported by real world examples. To help address this problem, I describe an ongoing effort at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to re-architect the Advanced Multimission Operations System (AMMOS), which is used to operate NASA's deep-space and astrophysics missions. Based on examination of project documents and interviews with project personnel, I describe the goals and approach of this evolution effort and then present models that capture some of the key architectural changes. Finally, I demonstrate how approaches and formal methods from my previous research in architecture evolution may be applied to this evolution, while using languages and tools already in place at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  20. Control system devices : architectures and supply channels overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, Jason; Atkins, William Dee; Schwartz, Moses Daniel; Mulder, John C.

    2010-08-01

    This report describes a research project to examine the hardware used in automated control systems like those that control the electric grid. This report provides an overview of the vendors, architectures, and supply channels for a number of control system devices. The research itself represents an attempt to probe more deeply into the area of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) - the specialized digital computers that control individual processes within supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. The report (1) provides an overview of control system networks and PLC architecture, (2) furnishes profiles for the top eight vendors in the PLC industry, (3) discusses the communications protocols used in different industries, and (4) analyzes the hardware used in several PLC devices. As part of the project, several PLCs were disassembled to identify constituent components. That information will direct the next step of the research, which will greatly increase our understanding of PLC security in both the hardware and software areas. Such an understanding is vital for discerning the potential national security impact of security flaws in these devices, as well as for developing proactive countermeasures.

  1. MACOP modular architecture with control primitives.

    PubMed

    Waegeman, Tim; Hermans, Michiel; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Walking, catching a ball and reaching are all tasks in which humans and animals exhibit advanced motor skills. Findings in biological research concerning motor control suggest a modular control hierarchy which combines movement/motor primitives into complex and natural movements. Engineers inspire their research on these findings in the quest for adaptive and skillful control for robots. In this work we propose a modular architecture with control primitives (MACOP) which uses a set of controllers, where each controller becomes specialized in a subregion of its joint and task-space. Instead of having a single controller being used in this subregion [such as MOSAIC (modular selection and identification for control) on which MACOP is inspired], MACOP relates more to the idea of continuously mixing a limited set of primitive controllers. By enforcing a set of desired properties on the mixing mechanism, a mixture of primitives emerges unsupervised which successfully solves the control task. We evaluate MACOP on a numerical model of a robot arm by training it to generate desired trajectories. We investigate how the tracking performance is affected by the number of controllers in MACOP and examine how the individual controllers and their generated control primitives contribute to solving the task. Furthermore, we show how MACOP compensates for the dynamic effects caused by a fixed control rate and the inertia of the robot. PMID:23888140

  2. New Control Software for CEBAF Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Chevtsov

    2005-03-01

    Wire scanners (WS) are the most popular beam profile measurement devices at Jefferson Lab. The WS for the CEBAF accelerator and beam extraction lines were created and supported by different user groups. As a result, they are not only implemented in different hardware standards (CAMAC and VME) but until recently also had different control functions that made them very difficult to use for accelerator beam diagnostic applications. To integrate all WS into one homogeneous system that is very easy to support and use for accelerator operations, new WS control software has been created. The software is implemented as a library of WS control and status modules. The control modules handle the WS hardware components and make their data available for beam diagnostic applications. The status modules monitor data communication channels between WS components and control computers and generate alarms in case of hardware failures. The paper presents the functionality of the new WS control software a nd its positive impact on accelerator operations.

  3. Klystron control software in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, R.K.; Thompson, K.; Phinney, N.

    1985-05-01

    Triggering, control, and monitoring of 240 high-power klystrons will be supported by the SLC control system this summer. The control software is distributed among a VAX host computer, a local microprocessor cluster, and a dedicated intelligent CAMAC module. The functions performed by these three components and the algorithms used are discussed.

  4. Super instruction architecture of petascale electronic structure software: the story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotrich, V. F.; Ponton, J. M.; Perera, A. S.; Deumens, E.; Bartlett, R. J.; Sanders, B. A.

    2010-11-01

    Theoretical methods in chemistry lead to algorithms for the computation of electronic energies and other properties of electronic wave functions that require large numbers of floating point operations and involve large data sets. Thus, computational chemists are very interested in using massively parallel computer systems and in particular the new petascale systems. In this paper we discuss a new programming paradigm that was developed at the Quantum Theory Project to construct electronic structure software that can scale to large numbers of cores of the order of 100,000 and beyond to solve problems in materials engineering relevant to the problems facing society today.

  5. Beyond the Renderer: Software Architecture for Parallel Graphics and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    As numerous implementations have demonstrated, software-based parallel rendering is an effective way to obtain the needed computational power for a variety of challenging applications in computer graphics and scientific visualization. To fully realize their potential, however, parallel renderers need to be integrated into a complete environment for generating, manipulating, and delivering visual data. We examine the structure and components of such an environment, including the programming and user interfaces, rendering engines, and image delivery systems. We consider some of the constraints imposed by real-world applications and discuss the problems and issues involved in bringing parallel rendering out of the lab and into production.

  6. Reconfigurable Software for Controlling Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Joseph B.

    2006-01-01

    Software for a system to control the trajectories of multiple spacecraft flying in formation is being developed to reflect underlying concepts of (1) a decentralized approach to guidance and control and (2) reconfigurability of the control system, including reconfigurability of the software and of control laws. The software is organized as a modular network of software tasks. The computational load for both determining relative trajectories and planning maneuvers is shared equally among all spacecraft in a cluster. The flexibility and robustness of the software are apparent in the fact that tasks can be added, removed, or replaced during flight. In a computational simulation of a representative formation-flying scenario, it was demonstrated that the following are among the services performed by the software: Uploading of commands from a ground station and distribution of the commands among the spacecraft, Autonomous initiation and reconfiguration of formations, Autonomous formation of teams through negotiations among the spacecraft, Working out details of high-level commands (e.g., shapes and sizes of geometrically complex formations), Implementation of a distributed guidance law providing autonomous optimization and assignment of target states, and Implementation of a decentralized, fuel-optimal, impulsive control law for planning maneuvers.

  7. Precision Segmented Reflector figure control system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, E.; Eldred, D.; Briggs, C.; Kiceniuk, T.; Agronin, M.

    1989-01-01

    A control system architecture for an actively controlled segmented reflector is described along with a design realization for achieving precision alignment of reflector panels. Performance requirements are derived in part from the Large Deployable Reflector, which is a representative mission, and error allocations are made which consider mirror panel surface errors, position measurement and figure estimation, and position control of both quasi-static and dynamic disturbances. The design uses multiple wavelength interferometric edge sensors and voice coil actuators in conjunction with a hybrid control strategy to correct panel position errors. A unit cell shown to be central to the concept is analyzed. The cell integrates the sensing, actuation, and mechanical functions of a control module together with a reflector panel to form a unitized assembly.

  8. Optimizing Flight Control Software With an Application Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Irene Skupniewicz; Shi, Nija; Webster, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Flight controllers in NASA s mission control centers work day and night to ensure that missions succeed and crews are safe. The IT goals of NASA mission control centers are similar to those of most businesses: to evolve IT infrastructure from basic to dynamic. This paper describes Mission Control Technologies (MCT), an application platform that is powering mission control today and is designed to meet the needs of future NASA control centers. MCT is an extensible platform that provides GUI components and a runtime environment. The platform enables NASA s IT goals through its use of lightweight interfaces and configurable components, which promote standardization and incorporate useful solution patterns. The MCT architecture positions mission control centers to reach the goal of dynamic IT, leading to lower cost of ownership, and treating software as a strategic investment.

  9. Software Productivity of Field Experiments Using the Mobile Agents Open Architecture with Workflow Interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Lowry, Michael R.; Nado, Robert Allen; Sierhuis, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed a series of ten systematically developed surface exploration systems that integrated a variety of hardware and software components. Design, development, and testing data suggest that incremental buildup of an exploration system for long-duration capabilities is facilitated by an open architecture with appropriate-level APIs, specifically designed to facilitate integration of new components. This improves software productivity by reducing changes required for reconfiguring an existing system.

  10. A multitasking finite state architecture for computer control of an electric powertrain

    SciTech Connect

    Burba, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite state techniques provide a common design language between the control engineer and the computer engineer for event driven computer control systems. They simplify communication and provide a highly maintainable control system understandable by both. This paper describes the development of a control system for an electric vehicle powertrain utilizing finite state concepts. The basics of finite state automata are provided as a framework to discuss a unique multitasking software architecture developed for this application. The architecture employs conventional time-sliced techniques with task scheduling controlled by a finite state machine representation of the control strategy of the powertrain. The complexities of excitation variable sampling in this environment are also considered.

  11. Dynamic assertion testing of flight control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. M.; Mahmood, A.; Mccluskey, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Digital Flight Control System (DFCS) software was used as a test case for assertion testing. The assertions were written and embedded in the code, then errors were inserted (seeded) one at a time and the code executed. Results indicate that assertion testing is an effective and efficient method of detecting errors in flight software. Most errors are eliminate at an earlier stage in the development than before.

  12. Design and reliability analysis of DP-3 dynamic positioning control architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Wan, Lei; Jiang, Da-Peng; Xu, Yu-Ru

    2011-12-01

    As the exploration and exploitation of oil and gas proliferate throughout deepwater area, the requirements on the reliability of dynamic positioning system become increasingly stringent. The control objective ensuring safety operation at deep water will not be met by a single controller for dynamic positioning. In order to increase the availability and reliability of dynamic positioning control system, the triple redundancy hardware and software control architectures were designed and developed according to the safe specifications of DP-3 classification notation for dynamically positioned ships and rigs. The hardware redundant configuration takes the form of triple-redundant hot standby configuration including three identical operator stations and three real-time control computers which connect each other through dual networks. The function of motion control and redundancy management of control computers were implemented by software on the real-time operating system VxWorks. The software realization of task loose synchronization, majority voting and fault detection were presented in details. A hierarchical software architecture was planed during the development of software, consisting of application layer, real-time layer and physical layer. The behavior of the DP-3 dynamic positioning control system was modeled by a Markov model to analyze its reliability. The effects of variation in parameters on the reliability measures were investigated. The time domain dynamic simulation was carried out on a deepwater drilling rig to prove the feasibility of the proposed control architecture.

  13. The Avionics SOIS Services of CORDET On-Board Software Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alana, Elena; del Carmen Lomba, Maria; Jung, Andreas; Grenham, Adrian; Fowell, Stuart

    2013-08-01

    This paper introduces the specification of the Execution Platform Layer of the On-Board Software Reference Architecture (OBSW-RA) presented in COrDeT-2 study. In particular, the paper addresses the avionics services defined within the context of the overall Spacecraft On-board Interface Services (SOIS) available at the Execution Platform Layer of the OBSW-RA.

  14. A Scalable Software Architecture Booting and Configuring Nodes in the Whitney Commodity Computing Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineberg, Samuel A.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Whitney project is integrating commodity off-the-shelf PC hardware and software technology to build a parallel supercomputer with hundreds to thousands of nodes. To build such a system, one must have a scalable software model, and the installation and maintenance of the system software must be completely automated. We describe the design of an architecture for booting, installing, and configuring nodes in such a system with particular consideration given to scalability and ease of maintenance. This system has been implemented on a 40-node prototype of Whitney and is to be used on the 500 processor Whitney system to be built in 1998.

  15. Clementine auto exposure control software

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, E.

    1994-11-15

    The primary mission of the Clementine program was to test technology developed under the auspices of BMDO (the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization). A secondary goal of the program was to provide astronomical data to the scientific and educational community. The mission plan developed to accomplish these goals included complete mapping of the lunar surface and a close fly-by of a near-Earth asteroid, 1620 Geographos. Exposure control for the Clementine mission was driven by mission phase requirements and sensor characteristics. Thus, there were a total of twelve algorithms developed for three primary mission phases and the four imaging sensors (two additional sensors operated as star trackers). The three mission phases in question were lunar mapping, distant observation of the asteroid for the purpose of tracking, and close-up viewing (as close as 100 Km) of Geographos. The four non-star tracker sensors consisted of an Ultra Violet/Visible (UV/Vis) camera, a High Resolution (HiRes) camera with a built-in LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) unit, a Near Infrared (NIR) camera, and a Long Wave InfraRed (LWIR) camera. Due to lack of test time and uncertainties about the imaging environment, numerous input parameters were provided in the algorithms to allow extensive tuning of the exposure control during the mission.

  16. The Impact of Autonomy Technology on Spacecraft Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, E. B., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Autonomy technology for high-level, closed-loop control of spacecraft offers considerable benefits to space-flight projects. Those benefits can enable whole new classes of missions; however, they are not without cost.

  17. A near-miss management system architecture for the forensic investigation of software failures.

    PubMed

    Bella, M A Bihina; Eloff, J H P

    2016-02-01

    Digital forensics has been proposed as a methodology for doing root-cause analysis of major software failures for quite a while. Despite this, similar software failures still occur repeatedly. A reason for this is the difficulty of obtaining detailed evidence of software failures. Acquiring such evidence can be challenging, as the relevant data may be lost or corrupt following a software system's crash. This paper proposes the use of near-miss analysis to improve on the collection of evidence for software failures. Near-miss analysis is an incident investigation technique that detects and subsequently analyses indicators of failures. The results of a near-miss analysis investigation are then used to detect an upcoming failure before the failure unfolds. The detection of these indicators - known as near misses - therefore provides an opportunity to proactively collect relevant data that can be used as digital evidence, pertaining to software failures. A Near Miss Management System (NMS) architecture for the forensic investigation of software failures is proposed. The viability of the proposed architecture is demonstrated through a prototype. PMID:26727616

  18. Spaceport Command and Control System - Support Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tremblay, Shayne

    2016-01-01

    The Information Architecture Support (IAS) Team, the component of the Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) that is in charge of all the pre-runtime data, was in need of some report features to be added to their internal web application, Information Architecture (IA). Development of these reports is crucial for the speed and productivity of the development team, as they are needed to quickly and efficiently make specific and complicated data requests against the massive IA database. These reports were being put on the back burner, as other development of IA was prioritized over them, but the need for them resulted in internships being created to fill this need. The creation of these reports required learning Ruby on Rails development, along with related web technologies, and they will continue to serve IAS and other support software teams and their IA data needs.

  19. AdOpt@TNG control system software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruffolo, Andrea; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo

    1998-09-01

    AdOptTNG is the Adaptive Optics Module for the Galileo National telescope (TNG). At first light this module will feature tip-tilt correction capabilities and a speckle interferometry facility. In this paper we describe the main characteristics of the AdOptTNG Control System Software. The system is composed by a real-time part and a graphical user interface. The real-time software computes the required corrections, drives the tip-tilt mirror and function. The user interface has been written in IDL, using the IDL Widget set, taking advantage of its powerful data manipulation and analysis capabilities for data presentation and diagnostics. The integration of all these components into the TNG Control System Software, in order to allow for remote control and data archiving, is also briefly described.

  20. ControlShell: A real-time software framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stanley A.; Chen, Vincent W.; Pardo-Castellote, Gerardo

    1994-01-01

    The ControlShell system is a programming environment that enables the development and implementation of complex real-time software. It includes many building tools for complex systems, such as a graphical finite state machine (FSM) tool to provide strategic control. ControlShell has a component-based design, providing interface definitions and mechanisms for building real-time code modules along with providing basic data management. Some of the system-building tools incorporated in ControlShell are a graphical data flow editor, a component data requirement editor, and a state-machine editor. It also includes a distributed data flow package, an execution configuration manager, a matrix package, and an object database and dynamic binding facility. This paper presents an overview of ControlShell's architecture and examines the functions of several of its tools.

  1. Reconfigurable Transceiver and Software-Defined Radio Architecture and Technology Evaluated for NASA Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating the development and suitability of a software-based open-architecture for space-based reconfigurable transceivers (RTs) and software-defined radios (SDRs). The main objectives of this project are to enable advanced operations and reduce mission costs. SDRs are becoming more common because of the capabilities of reconfigurable digital signal processing technologies such as field programmable gate arrays and digital signal processors, which place radio functions in firmware and software that were traditionally performed with analog hardware components. Features of interest of this communications architecture include nonproprietary open standards and application programming interfaces to enable software reuse and portability, independent hardware and software development, and hardware and software functional separation. The goals for RT and SDR technologies for NASA space missions include prelaunch and on-orbit frequency and waveform reconfigurability and programmability, high data rate capability, and overall communications and processing flexibility. These operational advances over current state-of-art transceivers will be provided to reduce the power, mass, and cost of RTs and SDRs for space communications. The open architecture for NASA communications will support existing (legacy) communications needs and capabilities while providing a path to more capable, advanced waveform development and mission concepts (e.g., ad hoc constellations with self-healing networks and high-rate science data return). A study was completed to assess the state of the art in RT architectures, implementations, and technologies. In-house researchers conducted literature searches and analysis, interviewed Government and industry contacts, and solicited information and white papers from industry on space-qualifiable RTs and SDRs and their associated technologies for space-based NASA applications. The white papers were evaluated, compiled, and

  2. Software to Control and Monitor Gas Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C.; Curley, Charles; Gore, Eric; Floyd, David; Lucas, Damion

    2012-01-01

    This software package interfaces with various gas stream devices such as pressure transducers, flow meters, flow controllers, valves, and analyzers such as a mass spectrometer. The software provides excellent user interfacing with various windows that provide time-domain graphs, valve state buttons, priority- colored messages, and warning icons. The user can configure the software to save as much or as little data as needed to a comma-delimited file. The software also includes an intuitive scripting language for automated processing. The configuration allows for the assignment of measured values or calibration so that raw signals can be viewed as usable pressures, flows, or concentrations in real time. The software is based on those used in two safety systems for shuttle processing and one volcanic gas analysis system. Mass analyzers typically have very unique applications and vary from job to job. As such, software available on the market is usually inadequate or targeted on a specific application (such as EPA methods). The goal was to develop powerful software that could be used with prototype systems. The key problem was to generalize the software to be easily and quickly reconfigurable. At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), the prior art consists of two primary methods. The first method was to utilize Lab- VIEW and a commercial data acquisition system. This method required rewriting code for each different application and only provided raw data. To obtain data in engineering units, manual calculations were required. The second method was to utilize one of the embedded computer systems developed for another system. This second method had the benefit of providing data in engineering units, but was limited in the number of control parameters.

  3. Regulatory modules controlling maize inflorescence architecture

    PubMed Central

    Eveland, Andrea L.; Goldshmidt, Alexander; Pautler, Michael; Morohashi, Kengo; Liseron-Monfils, Christophe; Lewis, Michael W.; Kumari, Sunita; Hiraga, Susumu; Yang, Fang; Unger-Wallace, Erica; Olson, Andrew; Hake, Sarah; Vollbrecht, Erik; Grotewold, Erich; Ware, Doreen; Jackson, David

    2014-01-01

    Genetic control of branching is a primary determinant of yield, regulating seed number and harvesting ability, yet little is known about the molecular networks that shape grain-bearing inflorescences of cereal crops. Here, we used the maize (Zea mays) inflorescence to investigate gene networks that modulate determinacy, specifically the decision to allow branch growth. We characterized developmental transitions by associating spatiotemporal expression profiles with morphological changes resulting from genetic perturbations that disrupt steps in a pathway controlling branching. Developmental dynamics of genes targeted in vivo by the transcription factor RAMOSA1, a key regulator of determinacy, revealed potential mechanisms for repressing branches in distinct stem cell populations, including interactions with KNOTTED1, a master regulator of stem cell maintenance. Our results uncover discrete developmental modules that function in determining grass-specific morphology and provide a basis for targeted crop improvement and translation to other cereal crops with comparable inflorescence architectures. PMID:24307553

  4. Software Framework for Controlling Unsupervised Scientific Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Benjamin; Jahr, Wiebke; Weber, Michael; Huisken, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Science outreach and communication are gaining more and more importance for conveying the meaning of today’s research to the general public. Public exhibitions of scientific instruments can provide hands-on experience with technical advances and their applications in the life sciences. The software of such devices, however, is oftentimes not appropriate for this purpose. In this study, we describe a software framework and the necessary computer configuration that is well suited for exposing a complex self-built and software-controlled instrument such as a microscope to laymen under limited supervision, e.g. in museums or schools. We identify several aspects that must be met by such software, and we describe a design that can simultaneously be used to control either (i) a fully functional instrument in a robust and fail-safe manner, (ii) an instrument that has low-cost or only partially working hardware attached for illustration purposes or (iii) a completely virtual instrument without hardware attached. We describe how to assess the educational success of such a device, how to monitor its operation and how to facilitate its maintenance. The introduced concepts are illustrated using our software to control eduSPIM, a fluorescent light sheet microscope that we are currently exhibiting in a technical museum. PMID:27570966

  5. Software Framework for Controlling Unsupervised Scientific Instruments.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Benjamin; Jahr, Wiebke; Weber, Michael; Huisken, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Science outreach and communication are gaining more and more importance for conveying the meaning of today's research to the general public. Public exhibitions of scientific instruments can provide hands-on experience with technical advances and their applications in the life sciences. The software of such devices, however, is oftentimes not appropriate for this purpose. In this study, we describe a software framework and the necessary computer configuration that is well suited for exposing a complex self-built and software-controlled instrument such as a microscope to laymen under limited supervision, e.g. in museums or schools. We identify several aspects that must be met by such software, and we describe a design that can simultaneously be used to control either (i) a fully functional instrument in a robust and fail-safe manner, (ii) an instrument that has low-cost or only partially working hardware attached for illustration purposes or (iii) a completely virtual instrument without hardware attached. We describe how to assess the educational success of such a device, how to monitor its operation and how to facilitate its maintenance. The introduced concepts are illustrated using our software to control eduSPIM, a fluorescent light sheet microscope that we are currently exhibiting in a technical museum. PMID:27570966

  6. Advanced Active Thermal Control Systems Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Anthony J.; Ewert, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) initiated a dynamic study to determine possible improvements available through advanced technologies (not used on previous or current human vehicles), identify promising development initiatives for advanced active thermal control systems (ATCS's), and help prioritize funding and personnel distribution among many research projects by providing a common basis to compare several diverse technologies. Some technologies included were two-phase thermal control systems, light-weight radiators, phase-change thermal storage, rotary fluid coupler, and heat pumps. JSC designed the study to estimate potential benefits from these various proposed and under-development thermal control technologies for five possible human missions early in the next century. The study compared all the technologies to a baseline mission using mass as a basis. Each baseline mission assumed an internal thermal control system; an external thermal control system; and aluminum, flow-through radiators. Solar vapor compression heat pumps and light-weight radiators showed the greatest promise as general advanced thermal technologies which can be applied across a range of missions. This initial study identified several other promising ATCS technologies which offer mass savings and other savings compared to traditional thermal control systems. Because the study format compares various architectures with a commonly defined baseline, it is versatile and expandable, and is expected to be updated as needed.

  7. AERCam Autonomy: Intelligent Software Architecture for Robotic Free Flying Nanosatellite Inspection Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven E.; Duran, Steve G.; Braun, Angela N.; Straube, Timothy M.; Mitchell, Jennifer D.

    2006-01-01

    with minimal impact on IVA operators and ground controllers, the Mini AERCam system architecture incorporates intelligent systems attributes that support various autonomous capabilities. 1) A robust command sequencer enables task-level command scripting. Command scripting is employed for operations such as automatic inspection scans over a region of interest, and operator-hands-off automated docking. 2) A system manager built on the same expert-system software as the command sequencer provides detection and smart-response capability for potential system-level anomalies, like loss of communications between the Free Flyer and control station. 3) An AERCam dynamics manager provides nominal and off-nominal management of guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) functions. It is employed for safe trajectory monitoring, contingency maneuvering, and related roles. This paper will describe these architectural components of Mini AERCam autonomy, as well as the interaction of these elements with a human operator during supervised autonomous control.

  8. An Object-Oriented Network-Centric Software Architecture for Physical Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Richard

    1997-08-01

    Recent developments in object-oriented computer languages and infrastructure such as the Internet, Web browsers, and the like provide an opportunity to define a more productive computational environment for scientific programming that is based more closely on the underlying mathematics describing physics than traditional programming languages such as FORTRAN or C++. In this talk I describe an object-oriented software architecture for representing physical problems that includes classes for such common mathematical objects as geometry, boundary conditions, partial differential and integral equations, discretization and numerical solution methods, etc. In practice, a scientific program written using this architecture looks remarkably like the mathematics used to understand the problem, is typically an order of magnitude smaller than traditional FORTRAN or C++ codes, and hence easier to understand, debug, describe, etc. All objects in this architecture are ``network-enabled,'' which means that components of a software solution to a physical problem can be transparently loaded from anywhere on the Internet or other global network. The architecture is expressed as an ``API,'' or application programmers interface specification, with reference embeddings in Java, Python, and C++. A C++ class library for an early version of this API has been implemented for machines ranging from PC's to the IBM SP2, meaning that phidentical codes run on all architectures.

  9. Verification and validation of control system software

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, J.K. Jr.; Kisner, R.A. ); Bhadtt, S.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The following guidelines are proposed for verification and validation (V V) of nuclear power plant control system software: (a) use risk management to decide what and how much V V is needed; (b) classify each software application using a scheme that reflects what type and how much V V is needed; (c) maintain a set of reference documents with current information about each application; (d) use Program Inspection as the initial basic verification method; and (e) establish a deficiencies log for each software application. The following additional practices are strongly recommended: (a) use a computer-based configuration management system to track all aspects of development and maintenance; (b) establish reference baselines of the software, associated reference documents, and development tools at regular intervals during development; (c) use object-oriented design and programming to promote greater software reliability and reuse; (d) provide a copy of the software development environment as part of the package of deliverables; and (e) initiate an effort to use formal methods for preparation of Technical Specifications. The paper provides background information and reasons for the guidelines and recommendations. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Towards a State Based Control Architecture for Large Telescopes: Laying a Foundation at the VLT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karban, R.; Kornweibel, N.; Dvorak, D.; Ingham, M.; Wagner, D.

    2011-01-01

    Large telescopes are characterized by a high level of distribution of control-related tasks and will feature diverse data flow patterns and large ranges of sampling frequencies; there will often be no single, fixed server-client relationship between the control tasks. the architecture is also challenged by the task of integrating heterogeneous subsystems which will be delivered by multiple different contractors. Due to the high number of distributed components, the control system needs to effectively detect errors and faults, impede their propagation, and accurately mitigate them in the shortest time possible, enabling the service to be restored. The presented Data-Driven Architecture is based on a decentralized approach with an end-to-end integration of disparate, independently developed software components. These components employ a high-performance standards-based communication middle-ware infrastructure, based on the Data Distribution Service. A set of rules and principles, based on JPL's State Analysis method and architecture, are use to constrain component-to component interactions, where the Control System and System Under Control are clearly separated. State Analysis provide a model-based process for capturing system and software requirements and design, greatly reducing the gap between the requirements on software specified by systems engineers and the implementation by software engineers. The method and architecture has been field tested at the Very Large Telescope, where it has been integrated into an operational system.

  11. Minimizing communication cost among distributed controllers in software defined networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlimatti, Shivaleela; Elbreiki, Walid; Hassan, Suhaidi; Habbal, Adib; Elshaikh, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) is a new paradigm to increase the flexibility of today's network by promising for a programmable network. The fundamental idea behind this new architecture is to simplify network complexity by decoupling control plane and data plane of the network devices, and by making the control plane centralized. Recently controllers have distributed to solve the problem of single point of failure, and to increase scalability and flexibility during workload distribution. Even though, controllers are flexible and scalable to accommodate more number of network switches, yet the problem of intercommunication cost between distributed controllers is still challenging issue in the Software Defined Network environment. This paper, aims to fill the gap by proposing a new mechanism, which minimizes intercommunication cost with graph partitioning algorithm, an NP hard problem. The methodology proposed in this paper is, swapping of network elements between controller domains to minimize communication cost by calculating communication gain. The swapping of elements minimizes inter and intra communication cost among network domains. We validate our work with the OMNeT++ simulation environment tool. Simulation results show that the proposed mechanism minimizes the inter domain communication cost among controllers compared to traditional distributed controllers.

  12. CICADA, CCD and Instrument Control Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Peter J.; Brooks, Mick; Meatheringham, Stephen J.; Roberts, William H.

    Computerised Instrument Control and Data Acquisition (CICADA) is a software system for control of telescope instruments in a distributed computing environment. It is designed using object-oriented techniques and built with standard computing tools such as RPC, SysV IPC, Posix threads, Tcl, and GUI builders. The system is readily extensible to new instruments and currently supports the Astromed 3200 CCD controller and MSSSO's new tip-tilt system. Work is currently underway to provide support for the SDSU CCD controller and MSSSO's Double Beam Spectrograph. A core set of processes handle common communication and control tasks, while specific instruments are ``bolted'' on using C++ inheritance techniques.

  13. Design of an integrated airframe/propulsion control system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Gerald C.; Lee, C. William; Strickland, Michael J.; Torkelson, Thomas C.

    1990-01-01

    The design of an integrated airframe/propulsion control system architecture is described. The design is based on a prevalidation methodology that uses both reliability and performance. A detailed account is given for the testing associated with a subset of the architecture and concludes with general observations of applying the methodology to the architecture.

  14. Control Software for Advanced Video Guidance Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Book, Michael L.; Bryan, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    Embedded software has been developed specifically for controlling an Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS). A Video Guidance Sensor is an optoelectronic system that provides guidance for automated docking of two vehicles. Such a system includes pulsed laser diodes and a video camera, the output of which is digitized. From the positions of digitized target images and known geometric relationships, the relative position and orientation of the vehicles are computed. The present software consists of two subprograms running in two processors that are parts of the AVGS. The subprogram in the first processor receives commands from an external source, checks the commands for correctness, performs commanded non-image-data-processing control functions, and sends image data processing parts of commands to the second processor. The subprogram in the second processor processes image data as commanded. Upon power-up, the software performs basic tests of functionality, then effects a transition to a standby mode. When a command is received, the software goes into one of several operational modes (e.g. acquisition or tracking). The software then returns, to the external source, the data appropriate to the command.

  15. Designing the Undesignable: Social Software and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dron, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Social software, such as blogs, wikis, tagging systems and collaborative filters, treats the group as a first-class object within the system. Drawing from theories of transactional distance and control, this paper proposes a model of e-learning that extends traditional concepts of learner-teacher-content interactions to include these emergent…

  16. Architectures & requirements for advanced weapon controllers.

    SciTech Connect

    McMurtrey, Brian J.; Klarer, Paul Richard; Bryan, Jon R.

    2004-02-01

    This report describes work done in FY2003 under Advanced and Exploratory Studies funding for Advanced Weapons Controllers. The contemporary requirements and envisioned missions for nuclear weapons are changing from the class of missions originally envisioned during development of the current stockpile. Technology available today in electronics, computing, and software provides capabilities not practical or even possible 20 years ago. This exploratory work looks at how Weapon Electrical Systems can be improved to accommodate new missions and new technologies while maintaining or improving existing standards in nuclear safety and reliability.

  17. The control architecture of the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J. Fredrick Bartlett et al.

    2002-11-21

    From a controls viewpoint, contemporary high energy physics collider detectors are comparable in complexity to small to medium size accelerators: however, their controls requirements often differ significantly. D0, one of two collider experiments at Fermilab, has recently started a second, extended running period that will continue for the next five years. EPICS [1], an integrated set of software building blocks for implementing a distributed control system, has been adapted to satisfy the slow controls needs of the D0 detector by (1) extending the support for new device types and an additional field bus, (2) by the addition of a global event reporting system that augments the existing EPICS alarm support, and (3) by the addition of a centralized database with supporting tools for defining the configuration of the control system. This paper discusses the control architecture of the current D0 experiment, how the EPICS system was extended to meet the control requirements of a large, high-energy physics detector, and how a formal control system contributes to the management of detector operations.

  18. Flight Controller Software Protects Lightweight Flexible Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight flexible aircraft may be the future of aviation, but a major problem is their susceptibility to flutter-uncontrollable vibrations that can destroy wings. Armstrong Flight Research Center awarded SBIR funding to Minneapolis, Minnesota-based MUSYN Inc. to develop software that helps program flight controllers to suppress flutter. The technology is now available for aircraft manufacturers and other industries that use equipment with automated controls.

  19. Control System Architectures, Technologies and Concepts for Near Term and Future Human Exploration of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard; Overland, David

    2004-01-01

    Technologies that facilitate the design and control of complex, hybrid, and resource-constrained systems are examined. This paper focuses on design methodologies, and system architectures, not on specific control methods that may be applied to life support subsystems. Honeywell and Boeing have estimated that 60-80Y0 of the effort in developing complex control systems is software development, and only 20-40% is control system development. It has also been shown that large software projects have failure rates of as high as 50-65%. Concepts discussed include the Unified Modeling Language (UML) and design patterns with the goal of creating a self-improving, self-documenting system design process. Successful architectures for control must not only facilitate hardware to software integration, but must also reconcile continuously changing software with much less frequently changing hardware. These architectures rely on software modules or components to facilitate change. Architecting such systems for change leverages the interfaces between these modules or components.

  20. Software Support during a Control Room Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Michele Joyce; Michael Spata; Thomas Oren; Anthony Cuffe; Theo McGuckin; Isadoro Carlino; C. Higgins; Harry Fanning; Matthew Bickley; Brian Bevins

    2005-09-21

    In 2004, after 14 years of accelerator operations and commissioning, Jefferson Lab renovated its main control room. Changes in technology and lessons learned during those 14 years drove the control room redesign in a new direction, one that optimizes workflow and makes critical information and controls available to everyone in the control room. Fundamental changes in a variety of software applications were required to facilitate the new operating paradigm. A critical component of the new control room design is a large-format video wall that is used to make a variety of operating information available to everyone in the room. Analog devices such as oscilloscopes and function generators are now displayed on the video wall through two crosspoint switchers: one for analog signals and another for video signals. A new software GUI replaces manual configuration of the oscilloscopes and function generators and helps automate setup. Monitoring screens, customized for the video wall, now make important operating information visible to everyone, not just a single operator. New alarm handler software gives any operator, on any workstation, access to all alarm handler functionality, and multiple users can now contribute to a single electronic logbook entry. To further support the shift to distributed access and control, many applications have been redesigned to run on servers instead of on individual workstations.

  1. Microgrid and Inverter Control and Simulator Software

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-13

    A collection of software that can simulate the operation of an inverter on a microgrid or control a real inverter. In addition, it can simulate the control of multiple nodes on a microgrid." Application: Simulation of inverters and microgrids; control of inverters on microgrids." The MMI submodule is designed to control custom inverter hardware, and to simulate that hardware. The INVERTER submodule is only the simulator code, and is of an earlier generation than the simulator in MMI. The MICROGRID submodule is an agent-based simulator of multiple nodes on a microgrid which presents a web interface. The WIND submodule produces movies of wind data with a web interface.

  2. Overview and Software Architecture of the Copernicus Trajectory Design and Optimization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jacob; Senent, Juan S.; Ocampo, Cesar; Mathur, Ravi; Davis, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    The Copernicus Trajectory Design and Optimization System represents an innovative and comprehensive approach to on-orbit mission design, trajectory analysis and optimization. Copernicus integrates state of the art algorithms in optimization, interactive visualization, spacecraft state propagation, and data input-output interfaces, allowing the analyst to design spacecraft missions to all possible Solar System destinations. All of these features are incorporated within a single architecture that can be used interactively via a comprehensive GUI interface, or passively via external interfaces that execute batch processes. This paper describes the Copernicus software architecture together with the challenges associated with its implementation. Additionally, future development and planned new capabilities are discussed. Key words: Copernicus, Spacecraft Trajectory Optimization Software.

  3. An Open Specification for Space Project Mission Operations Control Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, A.; Heuser, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An 'open specification' for Space Project Mission Operations Control Architectures is under development in the Spacecraft Control Working Group of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astro- nautics. This architecture identifies 5 basic elements incorporated in the design of similar operations systems: Data, System Management, Control Interface, Decision Support Engine, & Space Messaging Service.

  4. Novel architecture for data management and control for small satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, G.; Fossati, D.; Turri, M.

    1995-12-01

    The paper introduces an innovative architecture for the on-board units that are responsible to provide the data interface, control and processing capability normally allocated in separated electronics boxes in the data handling subsystem of the space system. A new solution for the attitude control of the space vehicle has been studied and developed and the utilization of this technological growth, in particular that concerns the GPS receiver, is matter for novel architecture. This new approach also involves in general the small satellite ground segment product as matter of a dedicated development approach. Small and medium satellites are considered an attractive solution for the low cost scientific experimentation, communication or remote sensing satellites. The functional and performance capability of the studied on-board units and ground segment are assessed in tight conjunction with the evolution of the European and the USA market. The design of these units has to be based on few and simple driving requirements, directly derived from the new modified scenario: (1) The limited budgets available for space system. (2) The quick mission data return, i.e., low development time by specific and tailored system development tools. The quick availability of data to scientists/user is requested without jeopardizing the maximum and guaranteed scientific or commercial return. The proposed system is then given thinking to an architecture based on a high degree of modularity (and reuse of existing library of modules) thus allowing to keep down costs and to speed up the time to market. The design ground rules are so established in order to cope with the following performance: (1) capability to adapt with few impacts the system interfaces, in particular for attitude sensors and actuators that are tightly mission dependent; (2) easy adaptation of on board computational performances and memory capacity (including mass memory storage capability); (3) definition of a hierarchical

  5. Algorithms and software for solving finite element equations on serial and parallel architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Over the past 15 years numerous new techniques have been developed for solving systems of equations and eigenvalue problems arising in finite element computations. A package called SPARSPAK has been developed by the author and his co-workers which exploits these new methods. The broad objective of this research project is to incorporate some of this software in the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) testbed, and to extend the techniques for use on multiprocessor architectures.

  6. An Open Source Software Platform for Visualizing and Teaching Conservation Tasks in Architectural Heritage Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Jose, I. Ignacio; Martinez, J.; Alvarez, N.; Fernandez, J. J.; Delgado, F.; Martinez, R.; Puche, J. C.; Finat, J.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we present a new software platform for interactive volumetric visualization of complex architectural objects and their applications to teaching and training conservation interventions in Architectural Cultural Heritage. Photogrammetric surveying is performed by processing the information arising from image- and range-based devices. Our visualization application is based on an adaptation of WebGL open standard; the performed adaptation allows to import open standards and an interactive navigation of 3D models in ordinary web navigators with a good performance. The Visualization platform is scalable and can be applied to urban environments, provided open source files be used; CityGML is an open standard based on a geometry -driven Ontology which is compatible with this approach. We illustrate our results with examples concerning to very damaged churches and a urban district of Segovia (World Cultural Heritage). Their connection with appropriate database eases the building evolution and interventions tracking. We have incorporated some preliminary examples to illustrate Advanced Visualization Tools and architectural e-Learning software platform which have been created for assessing conservation and restoration tasks in very damaged buildings. First version of the Advanced Visualization application has been developed in the framework of ADISPA Spanish Project Results. Our results are illustrated with the application of these software applications to several very damaged cultural heritage buildings in rural zones of Castilla y Leon (Spain).

  7. Control system architecture of QUIJOTE multi-frequency instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Reñasco, María. F.; Aguiar, Marta; Herreros, José Miguel; Hoyland, Roger J.; Sánchez de la Rosa, Vicente; Vega-Moreno, Afrodisio; Viera-Curbelo, Teodora; Génova-Santos, Ricardo; López-Caraballo, Carlos; Rebolo, Rafael; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto

    2012-09-01

    The QUIJOTE-CMB experiment has been described in previous publications. Here we describe the architecture of the control system, hardware and software, of the QUIJOTE I instrument (MFI). It is a multi-channel instrument with five separate polarimeters: two of which operate at 10-14 GHz, two of which operate at 16-20 GHz, and a central polarimeter at 26-36 GHz. Each polarimeter can rotate at a speed of up to 1 Hz and also can move to discrete angular positions which allow the linear polar parameters Q, U and I to be derived. The instrument is installed in an alt-azimuth telescope which implements several operational modes: movement around the azimuth axis at a constant velocity while the elevation axis is held at a fixed elevation; tracking of a sky object; and raster of a rectangular area both in horizontal and sky coordinates. The control system of both, telescope and instrument, is based in the following technologies: an LXI-VXI bus is used for the signal acquisition system; an EtherCAT bus implements software PLCs developed in TwinCAT to perform the movement of the 5 polarimeters and the 2 axes of the telescope. Science signal, angular positions of the 5 polarimeters and telescope coordinates are sampled at up to 4000 Hz. All these data are correlated by a time stamp obtained from an external GPS clock implementing the Precise Time Protocol-1588 which provides synchronization to less than 1 microsecond. The control software also acquires housekeeping (HK) from the different subsystems. LabVIEW implements the instrument user interface.

  8. Software verification plan for GCS. [guidance and control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dent, Leslie A.; Shagnea, Anita M.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.

    1990-01-01

    This verification plan is written as part of an experiment designed to study the fundamental characteristics of the software failure process. The experiment will be conducted using several implementations of software that were produced according to industry-standard guidelines, namely the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics RTCA/DO-178A guidelines, Software Consideration in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification, for the development of flight software. This plan fulfills the DO-178A requirements for providing instructions on the testing of each implementation of software. The plan details the verification activities to be performed at each phase in the development process, contains a step by step description of the testing procedures, and discusses all of the tools used throughout the verification process.

  9. SEPAC software configuration control plan and procedures, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    SEPAC Software Configuration Control Plan and Procedures are presented. The objective of the software configuration control is to establish the process for maintaining configuration control of the SEPAC software beginning with the baselining of SEPAC Flight Software Version 1 and encompass the integration and verification tests through Spacelab Level IV Integration. They are designed to provide a simplified but complete configuration control process. The intent is to require a minimum amount of paperwork but provide total traceability of SEPAC software.

  10. Adaptive software architecture based on confident HCI for the deployment of sensitive services in Smart Homes.

    PubMed

    Vega-Barbas, Mario; Pau, Iván; Martín-Ruiz, María Luisa; Seoane, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Smart spaces foster the development of natural and appropriate forms of human-computer interaction by taking advantage of home customization. The interaction potential of the Smart Home, which is a special type of smart space, is of particular interest in fields in which the acceptance of new technologies is limited and restrictive. The integration of smart home design patterns with sensitive solutions can increase user acceptance. In this paper, we present the main challenges that have been identified in the literature for the successful deployment of sensitive services (e.g., telemedicine and assistive services) in smart spaces and a software architecture that models the functionalities of a Smart Home platform that are required to maintain and support such sensitive services. This architecture emphasizes user interaction as a key concept to facilitate the acceptance of sensitive services by end-users and utilizes activity theory to support its innovative design. The application of activity theory to the architecture eases the handling of novel concepts, such as understanding of the system by patients at home or the affordability of assistive services. Finally, we provide a proof-of-concept implementation of the architecture and compare the results with other architectures from the literature. PMID:25815449