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Sample records for controlled particle removal

  1. Particle Removal by Electrostatic and Dielectrophoretic Forces for Dust Control During Lunar Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; McFall, J. L.; Snyder, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Particle removal during lunar exploration activities is of prime importance for the success of robotic and human exploration of the moon. We report on our efforts to use electrostatic and dielectrophoretic forces to develop a dust removal technology that prevents the accumulation of dust on solar panels and removes dust adhering to those surfaces. Testing of several prototypes showed solar shield output above 90% of the initial potentials after dust clearing.

  2. Biological control of the removal of abiogenic particles from the surface ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deuser, W.G.; Brewer, P.G.; Jickells, T.D.; Commeau, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    Concurrent measurements of particle concentrations in the near-surface water and of particle fluxes in the deep water of the Sargasso Sea show a close coupling between the two for biogenic components. The concentrations of suspended matter appear to follow an annual cycle similar to that of primary production and deepwater particle flux. Although the concentration of particulate aluminum in the surface water appears to vary randomly with respect to that cycle, the removal of aluminum to deep water is intimately linked to the rapid downward transport of organic matter.

  3. Hourglass control for Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics removes tensile and rank-deficiency instabilities. Hourglass control for SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzenmüller, G. C.; Sauer, M.; May, M.; Hiermaier, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present a stabilization scheme for elastoplastic Smooth-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) which overcomes two major challenges: (i) the tensile instability inherent to the updated Lagrangian approach is suppressed and (ii) the rank-deficiency instability inherent to the nodal integration approach is cured. To achieve these goals, lessons learned from the Finite-Element Method are transferred to SPH. In particular, an analogue of hourglass control is derived for SPH, which locally linearizes the deformation field to obtain stable and accurate solutions, without the need to resort to stabilization via excessive artificial viscosity. The resulting SPH scheme combines the ability of updated Lagrangian SPH to model truly large deformations with the accuracy and stability needed to faithfully perform simulations. This claim is supported by the analysis of problematic cases and the simulation of an impact scenario.

  4. Hourglass control for Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics removes tensile and rank-deficiency instabilities. Hourglass control for SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzenmüller, G. C.; Sauer, M.; May, M.; Hiermaier, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present a stabilization scheme for elastoplastic Smooth-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) which overcomes two major challenges: (i) the tensile instability inherent to the updated Lagrangian approach is suppressed and (ii) the rank-deficiency instability inherent to the nodal integration approach is cured. To achieve these goals, lessons learned from the Finite-Element Method are transferred to SPH. In particular, an analogue of hourglass control is derived for SPH, which locally linearizes the deformation field to obtain stable and accurate solutions, without the need to resort to stabilization via excessive artificial viscosity. The resulting SPH scheme combines the ability of updated Lagrangian SPH to model truly large deformations with the accuracy and stability needed to faithfully perform simulations. This claim is supported by the analysis of problematic cases and the simulation of an impact scenario.

  5. Hourglass control for Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics removes tensile and rank-deficiency instabilities - Hourglass control for SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzenmüller, G. C.; Sauer, M.; May, M.; Hiermaier, S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a stabilization scheme for elastoplastic Smooth-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) which overcomes two major challenges: (i) the tensile instability inherent to the updated Lagrangian approach is suppressed and (ii) the rank-deficiency instability inherent to the nodal integration approach is cured. To achieve these goals, lessons learned from the Finite-Element Method are transferred to SPH. In particular, an analogue of hourglass control is derived for SPH, which locally linearizes the deformation field to obtain stable and accurate solutions, without the need to resort to stabilization via excessive artificial viscosity. The resulting SPH scheme combines the ability of updated Lagrangian SPH to model truly large deformations with the accuracy and stability needed to faithfully perform simulations. This claim is supported by the analysis of problematic cases and the simulation of an impact scenario.

  6. Nano-particle laser removal from silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. M.; Cho, S. H.; Kim, T. H.; Park, Jin-Goo; Busnaina, Ahmed A.

    2003-11-01

    A laser shock cleaning (LSC) technique as a new dry cleaning methodology has been applied to remove micro and nano-scale inorganic particulate contaminants. Shock wave is generated in the air just above the wafer surface by focusing intensive laser beam. The velocity of shock wave can be controlled to 10,000 m/sec. The sub-micron sized silica and alumina particles are attempted to remove from bare silicon wafer surfaces. More than 95% of removal efficiency of the both particles are carried out by the laser-induced airborne shock waves. In the final, a removal of nano-scale slurry particles from real patterned wafers are successfully demonstrated by LSC after chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process.

  7. Mechanisms for nano particle removal in brush scrubber cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yating; Guo, Dan; Lu, Xinchun; Luo, Jianbin

    2011-01-01

    A model describing the nano particle (<100 nm) removal behavior in brush scrubber cleaning is presented based on experiment results and theoretical analysis. The forces on the particles in different situations are analyzed and discussed. The adhesion forces of the van der Waals force, the electrostatic force, the brush load and the static friction between the particle and the wafer are calculated. The contact elastic force, hydrodynamic drag force and friction between the brush and the particle are considered as removal forces and are evaluated. The porous structure and roughness surface of brush material are considered in the hydrodynamic model to describe the brush deformation and the flow field in the cleaning process. The porous structure will result in decrease of hydrodynamic drag force. There are four situations of the particles relative to the brush roughness asperities for which the forces on the particle are different. When the particle is in contact with a brush asperity or on the wafer surface and in a semi-infinite fluid flow field, the particle may be removed by hydrodynamic force and elastic force in the presence of surfactant. When the particle is embedded in the brush asperity, the remove will realized when the friction caused by adhesion between the brush and the particle overcome the adhesion force between particle and wafer surface. The removed particles will be in the flow field or adhered on the brush surface and may redeposit on the wafer surface.

  8. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael Dean; Schlager, Richard John; Ebner, Timothy George; Stewart, Robin Michele; Hyatt, David E.; Bustard, Cynthia Jean; Sjostrom, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

  9. Plasma polymer-functionalized silica particles for heavy metals removal.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Behnam; Jarvis, Karyn; Majewski, Peter

    2015-02-25

    Highly negatively charged particles were fabricated via an innovative plasma-assisted approach for the removal of heavy metal ions. Thiophene plasma polymerization was used to deposit sulfur-rich films onto silica particles followed by the introduction of oxidized sulfur functionalities, such as sulfonate and sulfonic acid, via water-plasma treatments. Surface chemistry analyses were conducted by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Electrokinetic measurements quantified the zeta potentials and isoelectric points (IEPs) of modified particles and indicated significant decreases of zeta potentials and IEPs upon plasma modification of particles. Plasma polymerized thiophene-coated particles treated with water plasma for 10 min exhibited an IEP of less than 3.5. The effectiveness of developed surfaces in the adsorption of heavy metal ions was demonstrated through copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) removal experiments. The removal of metal ions was examined through changing initial pH of solution, removal time, and mass of particles. Increasing the water plasma treatment time to 20 min significantly increased the metal removal efficiency (MRE) of modified particles, whereas further increasing the plasma treatment time reduced the MRE due to the influence of an ablation mechanism. The developed particulate surfaces were capable of removing more than 96.7% of both Cu and Zn ions in 1 h. The combination of plasma polymerization and oxidative plasma treatment is an effective method for the fabrication of new adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals. PMID:25603034

  10. Selective removal of persistent particles with no photomask damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tod; Bozak, Ron; White, Roy; Archuletta, Mike; Lee, David

    2009-04-01

    Makers and users of advanced technology photomasks have seen increased difficulties with the removal of persistent, or stubborn, nano-particle contamination. Shrinking pattern geometries, and new mask clean technologies to minimize haze, have both increased the number of problems and loss of mask yield due to these non-removable nano-particles. A novel technique (BitCleanTM) has been developed using a scanning probe microscope system originally designed for nanomachining photomask defect repair. Progress in the technical development of this approach into a manufacture-able solution is reviewed and its effectiveness is shown in selectively removing adherent particles without touching surrounding sensitive structures. Methods for generating targeted edge test particles along with considerations for removal of particles in various pattern geometries and materials are also discussed.

  11. Exhaust particle removing system for an engine

    SciTech Connect

    Shinzawa, M.

    1986-12-23

    A method is described comprising the steps of: (a) measuring degree of clogging of a filter which traps particles suspended in exhaust gas emitted from an engine; (b) indicating when the measured degree of clogging of the filter is equal to or greater than a first reference level; (c) burning off the particles deposited on the filter when the measured degree of clogging of the filter is equal to or greater than the first reference level and when a manual switch is in a preset position; and (d) burning off the particles deposited on the filter independent of whether or not the manual switch is in the preset position when the measured degree of clogging of the filter is equal to or greater than a second reference level greater than the first reference level.

  12. Removal of endocrine disrupting compounds from wastewater using polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Murray, Audrey; Örmeci, Banu; Lai, Edward P C

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of particles of molecularly imprinted and non-imprinted polymers (MIP and NIP) as a wastewater treatment method for endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). MIP and NIP remove EDCs through adsorption and therefore do not result in the formation of partially degraded products. The results show that both MIP and NIP particles are effective for removal of EDCs, and NIP have the advantage of not being as compound-specific as the MIP and hence can remove a diverse range of compounds including 17-β-estradiol (E2), atrazine, bisphenol A, and diethylstilbestrol. Removal of E2 from wastewater was also tested to determine the effectiveness of NIP in the presence of interfering substances and natural organic matter. Removal of E2 from wastewater samples was high and increased with increasing NIP. NIP represent an effective way of removing a wide variety of EDCs from wastewater. PMID:26744949

  13. Exhaust particle removing system for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Shinzawa, M.

    1986-08-05

    An exhaust particle removing system is described for an internal combustion engine, comprising: (a) a filter disposed in an engine exhaust passage for trapping particles suspended in exhaust gas; (b) a burner for burning off the particles deposited on the filter; (c) means for sensing the pressure in the exhaust passage at a point upstream of the filter; (d) means for sensing the pressure in the exhaust passage at a point downstream of the filter; (e) means for determining whether or not the sensed upstream pressure is lower than a preset level; (f) means for, when the sensed upstream pressure is not lower than the preset level, deducing the degree of clogging of the filter on the basis of the sensed upstream and downstream pressures; (g) means for, when the sensed upstream pressure is lower than the preset level, measuring a time elapsed since the moment at which the sensed upstream pressure dropped below the preset level; (h) means for, when the sensed upstream pressure is lower than the preset level, deducing the degree of clogging of the filter on the basis of the time elapsed and the sensed upstream and downstream pressures obtained immediately prior to the moment at which the sensed upstream pressure dropped below the preset level; and (i) means for controlling the burner on the basis of the deduced degree of clogging of the filter.

  14. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Ebner, T.G.; Stewart, R.M.; Hyatt, D.E.; Bustard, C.J.; Sjostrom, S.

    1998-11-10

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency. 11 figs.

  15. STS-31: APU Controller Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The launch April 10 of the STS-31 was scrubbed at T-4 minutes due to a faulty valve in auxiliary power unit (APU) number one. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. This video shows the removal of the STS-31's auxiliary power unit (APU).

  16. Enhanced removal of radioactive particles by fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.; Harling, O.K.

    1993-08-01

    The proposed research addressed the application of ESI`s particle removal process to the non-destructive decontamination of nuclear equipment. The cleaning medium used in this process is a solution of a high molecular weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid which results in enhanced particle removal. The perfluorinated liquids of interest, which are recycled in the process, are nontoxic, nonflammable, and environmentally compatible, and do not present a hazard to the ozone layer. The information obtained in the Phase 1 program indicated that the proposed ESI process is technically effective and economically attractive. The fluorocarbon surfactant solutions used as working media in the ESI process survived exposure of up to 10 Mrad doses of gamma rays, and are considered sufficiently radiation resistant for the proposed process. Ultrasonic cleaning in perfluorinated surfactant solutions was found to be an effective method of removing radioactive iron (Fe 59) oxide particles from contaminated test pieces. Radioactive particles suspended in the process liquids could be quantitatively removed by filtration through a 0.1 um membrane filter. Projected economics indicate a pre-tax pay back time of 1 month for a commercial scale system.

  17. Dustbathing in food particles does not remove feather lipids.

    PubMed

    Scholz, B; Kjaer, J B; Petow, S; Schrader, L

    2014-08-01

    Within the European Union, dustbathing material in cage-housing systems for laying hens became compulsory in 2012. In practice, most producers use food particles as litter substrate. The feed is dropped in small amounts on scratching mats by an automatic transporting system. However, because dustbathing behavior is meant to remove stale lipids from hens' plumage, food particles may not be a suitable substrate due to their fat content. This study analyzes feather lipid concentration (FLC) of laying hens with access to food particles (F) or lignocellulose (L) as litter substrates. In each of 2 identical trials, 84 laying hens of 2 genotypes (Lohmann Selected Leghorn, Lohmann Brown) were kept in 12 compartments (7 hens each). Compartments were equipped with a grid floor and additionally contained a closed dustbathing tray holding F or L. Feather samples (150 feathers) were taken 2 times throughout the experiment. At 23 wk of age, 4 hens per compartment were sampled after they were allowed pair-wise access to a dustbath for 2.5 h and 3 hens were sampled without access to a dustbathing tray (control). After 10 wk of free access to the dustbathing trays, all hens were sampled again. In trial 2, an additional third sampling was made after dustbaths had been closed again for 6 wk. Here, 6 hens per compartment were sampled immediately before and after a dustbath. Dustbathing in F resulted in higher FLC compared with L and control (P < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was found between L and control (P = 0.103). When open access to litter was provided, hens had higher FLC in F compared with L (P < 0.001). The FLC immediately after dustbathing in F was higher compared with the level before dustbathing (P < 0.001), whereas it was lower after dustbathing in L (P = 0.006). These results show that F are not suitable litter material for laying hens because they lead to lipid accumulation on the plumage. PMID:24894524

  18. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  19. Ultrafine particle removal and generation by portable air cleaners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, Michael S.; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Corsi, Richard L.

    Portable air cleaners can both remove and generate pollutants indoors. To investigate these phenomena, we conducted a two-phase investigation in a 14.75 m 3 stainless steel chamber. In the first phase, particle size-resolved (12.6-514 nm diameter) clean air delivery rates (CADR) and efficiencies were determined, as were ozone emission rates, for two high-efficiency particle arresting (HEPA) filters, one electrostatic precipitator with a fan, and two ion generators without fans. The two HEPA air cleaners had count average CADR (standard deviation) of 188 (30) and 324 (44) m 3 h -1; the electrostatic precipitator 284 (62) m 3 h -1; and the two ion generators 41 (11) and 35 (13) m 3 h -1. The electrostatic precipitator emitted ozone at a rate of 3.8±0.2 mg h -1, and the two ion generators 3.3±0.2 and 4.3±0.2 mg h -1. Ozone initiates reactions with certain unsaturated organic compounds that produce ultrafine and fine particles, carbonyls, other oxidized products, and free radicals. During the second phase, five different ion generators were operated separately in the presence of a plug-in liquid or solid air freshener, representing a strong terpene source. For air exchange rates of between 0.49 and 0.96 h -1, three ion generators acted as steady-state net particle generators in the entire measured range of 4.61-157 nm, and two generated particles in the range of approximately 10 to 39-55 nm. Terpene and aldehyde concentrations were also sampled for one ion generator, and concentrations of terpenes decreased and formaldehyde increased. Given these results, the pollutant removal benefits of ozone-generating air cleaners may be outweighed by the generation of indoor pollution.

  20. The removal of deformed submicron particles from silicon wafers by spin rinse and megasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Busnaina, Ahmed A.; Fury, Michael A.; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2000-02-01

    In order to successfully clean particulate contamination from wafer surfaces, it is necessary to understand the adhesion and deformation between the particles and the substrate in contact. The adhesion and removal mechanisms of deformed submicron particles have not been addressed in many previous studies. Submicron polystyrene latex particles (0.1-0.5 µm) were deposited on silicon wafers and removed by spin rinse and megasonic cleanings. Particle rolling is identified as the major removal mechanism for the deformed submicron particles from silicon wafers. Megasonics provides larger streaming velocity because of the extremely thin boundary layer resulting in a larger removal force that is capable of achieving complete removal of contamination particles.

  1. Flow-controlled magnetic particle manipulation

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J [Richland, WA; Holman, David A [Las Vegas, NV

    2011-02-22

    Inventive methods and apparatus are useful for collecting magnetic materials in one or more magnetic fields and resuspending the particles into a dispersion medium, and optionally repeating collection/resuspension one or more times in the same or a different medium, by controlling the direction and rate of fluid flow through a fluid flow path. The methods provide for contacting derivatized particles with test samples and reagents, removal of excess reagent, washing of magnetic material, and resuspension for analysis, among other uses. The methods are applicable to a wide variety of chemical and biological materials that are susceptible to magnetic labeling, including, for example, cells, viruses, oligonucleotides, proteins, hormones, receptor-ligand complexes, environmental contaminants and the like.

  2. Exhaust particle removing system for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Shinzawa, M.

    1988-07-12

    An exhaust particle removing system is described for an engine, comprising: (a) a filter for trapping particles in exhaust from the engine; (b) means for determining whether or not the degree of clogging of the filter is unacceptable; (c) means for detecting an operating condition of the engine; (d) means for when the degree of clogging of the filter is unacceptable, throttling the flow of intake air into the engine and thus varying the pressure of the intake air in accordance with the detected engine operating condition in cases where the detected engine operating condition resides in a first predetermined range within which the temperature of the engine exhaust would be inadequate to burn off the trapped particles if the intake air flow were not throttled, the throttling means comprising a movable throttle valve disposed in an air intake passage, a bypass passage connected to the air intake passage and bypassing the throttle valve, and a movable bypass valve disposed in the bypass passage; and (e) means for, when the degree of clogging of the filter is unacceptable, allowing free flow of the intake air in cases where the detected engine operating condition resides in a second predetermined range within which the temperature of the engine exhaust would be adequate to burn off the trapped particles even if the intake air flow were not throttled.

  3. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  4. Removal of fine and ultrafine particles from indoor air environments by the unipolar ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uk Lee, Byung; Yermakov, Mikhail; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2004-09-01

    The continuous emission of unipolar ions was evaluated in order to determine its ability to remove fine and ultrafine particles from indoor air environments. The evolution of the indoor aerosol concentration and particle size distribution was measured in real time with the ELPI in a room-size (24.3 m3) test chamber where the ion emitter was operating. After the results were compared with the natural decay, the air cleaning factor was determined. The particle aerodynamic size range of ∼0.04-2 μm was targeted because it represents many bioaerosol agents that cause emerging diseases, as well as those that can be used for biological warfare or in the event of bioterrorism. The particle electric charge distribution (also measured in the test chamber with the ELPI) was rapidly affected by the ion emission. It was concluded that the corona discharge ion emitters (either positive or negative), which are capable of creating an ion density of 105-106 e± cm-3, can be efficient in controlling fine and ultrafine aerosol pollutants in indoor air environments, such as a typical office or residential room. At a high ion emission rate, the particle mobility becomes sufficient so that the particle migration results in their deposition on the walls and other indoor surfaces. Within the tested ranges of the particle size and ion density, the particles were charged primarily due to the diffusion charging mechanism. The particle removal efficiency was not significantly affected by the particle size, while it increased with increasing ion emission rate and the time of emission. The performance characteristics of three commercially available ionic air purifiers, which produce unipolar ions by corona discharge at relatively high emission rates, were evaluated. A 30-minute operation of the most powerful device among those tested resulted in the removal of about 97% of 0.1 μm particles and about 95% of 1 μm particles from the air in addition to the natural decay effect.

  5. Particle control studies on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduszewski, P.

    1987-01-01

    The report consists of viewgraphs. The goal of the particle control program at Tore Supra is to study plasma performance with strong pellet fueling and corresponding particle exhaust in a limiter tokamak. (WRF)

  6. Submicron particle removal in post-oxide chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Busnaina, A.

    Particle removal models for soft-pad buffing (the second-step polishing with DI water) and mechanical brush-cleaning processes are proposed and the removal forces are evaluated and compared with the average particle adhesion force to the oxide wafer surface resulting from the primary polishing (the first-step polishing with slurry). The hydrodynamic force due to the fluid flow is too small to remove slurry particles by itself and particles are most likely removed from the surfaces by the pad or brush asperity contact forces and the hydrodynamic drag force together. This conclusion is consistent with the experimental observations.

  7. Nanoscale Fe(0) particles for pentachlorophenol removal from aqueous solution: temperature effect and particles transformation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Rong; Zheng, Xiang; Liu, Peng; Wang, Jian-Long

    2014-09-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP), as an important contaminant which was toxic and intractable, has received extensive attention. In this paper, the temperature effect during the transformation of PCP using nanoscale Fe(0) particles was studied, and the transformation processes of PCP and iron particles was explained. The results revealed that the removal processes of PCP followed pseudo first-order kinetics. The scale of dechlorination to the transformation of PCP increased with the increase of temperature, though the transformation rate decreased after reacting for 2 h under the experimental condition. However, the initial apparent transformation rate constants were calculated to be 0.312-0.536 h(-1) at the temperature of 20-50 degrees C, which showed an increase of transformation rate along with the increase of temperature. And the surface-area-normalized rate constants were calculated to be 9.50 x 10-3-1.63 x 10-2 L . h-1 . m-2. The experimental activation energy was calculated to be 15.0 kJ x mol(-1) from these rate constants using Arrhenius equation. A phenomenon observed at 50 degrees C indicated that more than one chlorine atom was removed from PCP and suggested β-elimination might be the major pathway for transformation. Sorption experiments showed that the sorption process on the surface of particles could be ignored in the kinetics and thermodynamics models. The changes of morphologies of nanoparticles before and after reaction indicated the transformation process of iron particles, and could be used to explain the changes of activity of nanoparticles. Magnetite (Fe3O4) and/or maghemite (Fe2O3) and lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) were corrosion products of iron. And along with the increase of temperature, the increased intensity of XRD peaks revealed the related a better crystallizing. PMID:25924353

  8. An ultrasonic scrubber: enhanced removal of particles by water sprays via ultrasonic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, J. R.; Ran, Weiyu; Holt, R. Glynn

    2013-11-01

    Sprays are commonly used to remove pollutant particles in smokestacks, to reduce coal dust levels in mines, and in dust abatement applications. For typical conditions, sprays work poorly on particles having a diameter on the order of a micron, which is also the particle size most deleterious to the human lung. The acoustic radiation force can be used to move particles and drops, and we hypothesized that by forcing a particle laden flow and a spray into an ultrasonic standing wave field, particles and drops would be concentrated, thereby increasing the effectiveness of particle removal by sprays. Experimental data is presented in the form of scavenging coefficients for micron scale particles that supports this hypothesis. Also discussed is whether increased scavenging by ultrasonics is due to particle/drop interactions particle/particle interactions, or both.

  9. Removal of thiol ligands from surface-confined nanoparticles without particle growth or desorption.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Edward W; Glover, Richard D; Hutchison, James E

    2015-03-24

    Size-dependent properties of surface-confined inorganic nanostructures are of interest for applications ranging from sensing to catalysis and energy production. Ligand-stabilized nanoparticles are attractive precursors for producing such nanostructures because the stabilizing ligands may be used to direct assembly of thoroughly characterized nanoparticles on the surface. Upon assembly; however, the ligands block the active surface of the nanoparticle. Methods used to remove these ligands typically result in release of nanoparticles from the surface or cause undesired growth of the nanoparticle core. Here, we demonstrate that mild chemical oxidation (50 ppm of ozone in nitrogen) oxidizes the thiolate headgroups, lowering the ligand's affinity for the gold nanoparticle surface and permitting the removal of the ligands at room temperature by rinsing with water. XPS and TEM measurements, performed using a custom planar analysis platform that permits detailed imaging and chemical analysis, provide insight into the mechanism of ligand removal and show that the particles retain their core size and remain tethered on the surface core during treatment. By varying the ozone exposure time, it is possible to control the amount of ligand removed. Catalytic carbon monoxide oxidation was used as a functional assay to demonstrate ligand removal from the gold surface for nanoparticles assembled on a high surface area support (fumed silica). PMID:25727562

  10. Process and apparatus for adding and removing particles from pressurized reactors

    DOEpatents

    Milligan, John D.

    1983-01-01

    A method for adding and removing fine particles from a pressurized reactor is provided, which comprises connecting the reactor to a container, sealing the container from the reactor, filling the container with particles and a liquid material compatible with the reactants, pressurizing the container to substantially the reactor pressure, removing the seal between the reactor and the container, permitting particles to fall into or out of the reactor, and resealing the container from the reactor. An apparatus for adding and removing particles is also disclosed.

  11. Ultrafine particle removal and ozone generation by in-duct electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Poppendieck, Dustin G; Rim, Donghyun; Persily, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to airborne ultrafine particles (UFP, < 100 nm) has been shown to have adverse health effects and can be elevated in buildings. In-duct electrostatic precipitator filters (ESP) have been shown to be an effective particulate control device for reducing UFP concentrations (20-100 nm) in buildings, although they have the potential to increase indoor ozone concentrations. This study investigated residential ESP filters to reduce ultrafine particles between 4 to 15 nm and quantified the resulting ozone generation. In-duct ESPs were operated in the central air handling unit of a test house. Results for the two tested ESP brands indicate that removal efficiency of 8 to 14 nm particles was near zero and always less than 10% (± 15%), possibly due to particle generation or low charging efficiency. Adding a media filter downstream of the ESP increased the decay rate for particles in the same size range. Continuous operation of one brand of ESP raised indoor ozone concentrations to 77 ppbv and 20 ppbv for a second brand. Using commercial filters containing activated carbon downstream of the installed ESP reduced the indoor steady-state ozone concentrations between 6% and 39%. PMID:24387032

  12. Hydraulic gradient control for groundwater contaminant removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Atwood D.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal near Denver, Colarado, U.S.A., is used as a realistic setting for a hypothetical test of a procedure that plans the hydraulic stabilization and removal of a groundwater contaminant plume. A two-stage planning procedure successfully selects the best wells and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules to contain the plume while a well or system of wells within the plume removes the contaminated water. In stage I, a combined groundwater flow and solute transport model is used to simulate contaminant removal under an assumed velocity field. The result is the approximated plume boundary location as a function of time. In stage II, a linear program, which includes a groundwater flow model as part of the set of constraints, determines the optimal well selection and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules by minimizing total pumping and recharge. The simulation-management model eliminates wells far from the plume perimeter and activates wells near the perimeter as the plume decreases in size. This successfully stablizes the hydraulic gradient during aquifer cleanup.The Rocky Mountain Arsenal near Denver, Colorado, USA, is used as a realistic setting for a hypothetical test of a procedure that plans the hydraulic stabilization and removal of a groundwater contaminant plume. A two-stage planning procedure successfully selects the best wells and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules to contain the plume while a well or system of wells within the plume removes the contaminated water. In stage I, a combined groundwater flow and solute transport model is used to simulate contaminant removal under an assumed velocity field. The result is the approximated plume boundary location as a function of time. In stage II, a linear program, which includes a groundwater flow model as part of the set of constraints, determines the optimal well selection and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules by minimizing total pumping and recharge. Refs.

  13. 40 CFR 52.1890 - Removed control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Removed control measures. 52.1890 Section 52.1890 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... measures. On the dates listed below, Ohio requested that the indicated control measures be removed from...

  14. 40 CFR 52.1890 - Removed control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Removed control measures. 52.1890 Section 52.1890 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... measures. On the dates listed below, Ohio requested that the indicated control measures be removed from...

  15. 40 CFR 52.1890 - Removed control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Removed control measures. 52.1890 Section 52.1890 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... measures. On the dates listed below, Ohio requested that the indicated control measures be removed from...

  16. 40 CFR 52.1890 - Removed control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Removed control measures. 52.1890 Section 52.1890 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... measures. On the dates listed below, Ohio requested that the indicated control measures be removed from...

  17. 40 CFR 52.1890 - Removed control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Removed control measures. 52.1890 Section 52.1890 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... measures. On the dates listed below, Ohio requested that the indicated control measures be removed from...

  18. Optimization of removal function in computer controlled optical surfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Guo, Peiji; Ren, Jianfeng

    2010-10-01

    The technical principle of computer controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) and the common method of optimizing removal function that is used in CCOS are introduced in this paper. A new optimizing method time-sharing synthesis of removal function is proposed to solve problems of the removal function being far away from Gaussian type and slow approaching of the removal function error that encountered in the mode of planet motion or translation-rotation. Detailed time-sharing synthesis of using six removal functions is discussed. For a given region on the workpiece, six positions are selected as the centers of the removal function; polishing tool controlled by the executive system of CCOS revolves around each centre to complete a cycle in proper order. The overall removal function obtained by the time-sharing process is the ratio of total material removal in six cycles to time duration of the six cycles, which depends on the arrangement and distribution of the six removal functions. Simulations on the synthesized overall removal functions under two different modes of motion, i.e., planet motion and translation-rotation are performed from which the optimized combination of tool parameters and distribution of time-sharing synthesis removal functions are obtained. The evaluation function when optimizing is determined by an approaching factor which is defined as the ratio of the material removal within the area of half of the polishing tool coverage from the polishing center to the total material removal within the full polishing tool coverage area. After optimization, it is found that the optimized removal function obtained by time-sharing synthesis is closer to the ideal Gaussian type removal function than those by the traditional methods. The time-sharing synthesis method of the removal function provides an efficient way to increase the convergence speed of the surface error in CCOS for the fabrication of aspheric optical surfaces, and to reduce the intermediate- and high

  19. Measurement of the Hygroscopicity and Wet Removal of Black-Carbon-Containing Particles in the Urban Atmosphere of Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohata, Sho; Moteki, Nobuhiro; Mori, Tatsuhiro; Koike, Makoto; Schwarz, Joshua; Takami, Akinori; Kondo, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Megacities are very large, concentrated anthropogenic sources of black carbon (BC) aerosols. Freshly emitted BC particles inside megacities affect local air quality and regional and global climate. The microphysical properties (e.g., number size distribution, coating thickness, and hygroscopicity) of atmospheric BC-containing particles are important because their efficiency of wet removal from the atmosphere can be highly dependent on these properties. In this study, we developed a method for independent measurement of the hygroscopicity of BC-free and BC-containing particles, and then applied it to the ambient observation in the urban atmosphere of Tokyo. A single particle soot photometer (SP2) was modified as a humidified-SP2, which quantifies the BC-core mass (BC content within a BC-containing particle) and optical diameter of individual aerosol particles, under controlled relative humidity (RH), by detecting both the laser-induced incandescence emitted and laser light scattered from each particle (Schwarz et al., 2014, Journal of Aerosol Science). Measurements of growth factor (GF) and hygroscopicity parameter κ for BC-free and BC-containing particles can be achieved by combining an aerosol particle mass analyzer with the newly developed humidified-SP2. This method was tested in the laboratory and then employed in ambient observations in summer 2014. The ambient measurements were made while also measuring number size distribution of BC cores in rainwater with a nebulizer-SP2 system. Throughout the observation period, for BC-containing particles with a dry diameter of about 200 nm, the particles with smaller BC fractions tended to represent greater water uptake, and the number fraction of the less hygroscopic (GF < 1.2 at 85% RH) BC-containing particles was more than 70% of the total BC-containing particles. The measured average number size distribution of BC cores in rainwater was larger than that in the surface air before precipitation began, and the

  20. Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1981-10-26

    In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

  1. Toner display based on particle control technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    Toner Display is based on an electrical movement of charged particles. Two types of black toner and white particles charged in the different electric polarity are enclosed between two electrodes. The particle movement is controlled by the external electric field applied between two transparent electrodes. The toner is collected to the electrode by an electrostatic force across the insulating layer to display a black image. The toners can be put back to the counter electrode by applying a reverse electric field, and white solid image is displayed. We have studied on the movement of three color particles independently to display color image in Toner Display. Two positively charged color particles with different amount of charge to mass ratio and negatively charged white particles were enclosed in the toner display cell. Yellow, cyan and white images were displayed by an application of voltage.

  2. Design of Free-Standing Microstructured Conducting Polymer Films for Enhanced Particle Removal from Non-uniform Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laster, Jennifer; Deom, Nicholas; Boudouris, Bryan; Beaudoin, Stephen

    Particle removal from surfaces is important for a wide range of industrial applications (e.g., microelectronics fabrication). One of the main forces of particle adhesion to a surface is the van der Waals attraction force, which will be the focus of this effort. The surface features of interacting bodies can play a controlling role in the adhesion of particles by increasing or decreasing the amount of mass within the range of strong van der Waals forces. In order to control these interactions, specific geometries can be designed in order to manipulate the micro- and nanostructure of a material, which can conform to the features of a corresponding substrate increasing the overall contact area between the two surfaces. In this work, microstructured films of the conducting polymer polypyrrole (PPy) were synthesized through template-assisted electropolymerization techniques. The removal of fluorescently-labeled polystyrene beads from aluminum surfaces of varying roughness was measured and compared for microstructured and flat PPy films. The microstructured films were found to have an overall increase in the amount of particles removed from the aluminum surfaces; this demonstrates the ability to manipulate particle adhesion through advanced nanostructured polymer templating.

  3. Chromatographic removal of endotoxin from protein solutions by polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Chuichi; Sakata, Masayo

    2002-12-01

    Endotoxins, constituents of cell walls of gram-negative bacteria, are potential contaminants of the protein solutions originating from biological products. Such contaminants have to be removed from solutions used for intravenous administration, because of their potent biological activities causing pyrogenic reactions. Separation methods used for decontamination of water, such as ultrafiltration, have little effect on endotoxin levels in protein solutions. To remove endotoxin from a solution of high-molecular-mass compounds, such as proteins, the adsorption method has proven to be most effective. In this review, we first introduce endotoxin-specific properties in an aqueous solution, and then provide various methods of chromatographic separation of endotoxins from cellular products using polymer adsorbents. We also provide the design of novel endotoxin-specific polymer adsorbents. PMID:12450672

  4. Removal of Waterborne Particles by Electrofiltration: Pilot-Scale Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Theoretical analysis using a trajectory approach indicated that in the presence of an external electric field, charged waterborne particles are subject to an additional migration velocity which increases their deposition on the surface of collectors (e.g. sand filter). In this st...

  5. Controlled manipulation of engineered colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Janine

    This research utilized the Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINTRTM) technology to fabricate highly tailored colloidal particles. The behavior of these engineered particles were studied as they were subjected to different precisely controlled external influences, including electric fields, magnetic fields and a templating approach based on the PRINT process. Given the tunability in particle properties afforded by the PRINT process, exceptional control of the resulting particle assemblies and particle mobility were observed, suggesting potential applications in numerous materials and life science applications that require control on the nanoscale. As the PRINT process was integral to all aspects of this research, it was important to gain a clear understanding of mechanism by which perfluoropolyether (PFPE) elastomeric molds can generate monodisperse arrays of discrete, uniform particles with tailored size, shape and composition. Thus, fundamental studies were conducted on the PFPE elastomers, focusing on contact mechanics measurements and capillary flow experiments. The results confirmed the low surface energy of PFPE, an important property that renders the PFPE molds ideal for the PRINT process. Capillary flow experiments were conducted to study the method by which PFPE molds can be filled during the PRINT process. The flow in closed PFPE microchannels was compared to that in PDMS and glass. Suspensions of PRINT particles were studied in the presence of electric and magnetic fields. Electric field experiments were conducted using non-uniform alternating current electric fields and uniform direct current electric fields. Magnetic field experiments were conducted using both stationary and rotating magnetic fields. Particle assemblies were observed to form and could be tuned by particle shape and composition. Particle motion, both translational and rotational, was also controlled. Properties were found to be both shape and composition dependent. These

  6. Controlling chaos in wave-particle interactions.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, M C; Caldas, I L; Rizzato, F B; Pakter, R; Steffens, F M

    2012-07-01

    We analyze the behavior of a relativistic particle moving under the influence of a uniform magnetic field and a stationary electrostatic wave. We work with a set of pulsed waves that allows us to obtain an exact map for the system. We also use a method of control for near-integrable Hamiltonians that consists of the addition of a small and simple control term to the system. This control term creates invariant tori in phase space that prevent chaos from spreading to large regions, making the controlled dynamics more regular. We show numerically that the control term just slightly modifies the system but is able to drastically reduce chaos with a low additional cost of energy. Moreover, we discuss how the control of chaos and the consequent recovery of regular trajectories in phase space are useful to improve regular particle acceleration. PMID:23005517

  7. Apparatus and method for destructive removal of particles contained in flowing fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1980-10-01

    An apparatus and method for destructively removing particles from a flowing gas containing the particles is described. In the specific embodiments disclosed the apparatus is adapted to remove carbon particles from diesel engine exhaust products. The exhaust products are directed to a predetermined location where they are rapidly vaporized and combine with oxygen in the exhaust products to form carbon dioxide. Vaporization in one embodiment is effected by a discharge grid located within an exhaust conduit, the grid being chosen so that alternate conductors defining the grid are spaced apart a distance approximately 125 times the mean diameter of the particles to be removed. A voltage differential of approximately 690 volts is applied across adjacent conductors.

  8. Apparatus and method for destructive removal of particles contained in flowing fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus and method for destructively removing particles from a flowing gas containing the particles is described. In the specific embodiments disclosed the apparatus is adapted to remove carbon particles from diesel engine exhaust products. The exhaust products are directed to a predetermined location where they are rapidly vaporized and combine with oxygen in the exhaust products to form carbon dioxide. Vaporization in one embodiment is effected by a discharge grid located within an exhaust conduit, the grid being chosen so that alternate conductors defining the grid are spaced apart a distance approximately 125 times the mean diameter of the particles to be removed. A voltage differential of approximately 690 volts is applied across adjacent conductors.

  9. Ice nucleation active particles are efficiently removed by precipitating clouds

    PubMed Central

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Morris, Cindy E.; Herrmann, Erik; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Alewell, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Ice nucleation in cold clouds is a decisive step in the formation of rain and snow. Observations and modelling suggest that variations in the concentrations of ice nucleating particles (INPs) affect timing, location and amount of precipitation. A quantitative description of the abundance and variability of INPs is crucial to assess and predict their influence on precipitation. Here we used the hydrological indicator δ18O to derive the fraction of water vapour lost from precipitating clouds and correlated it with the abundance of INPs in freshly fallen snow. Results show that the number of INPs active at temperatures ≥ −10 °C (INPs−10) halves for every 10% of vapour lost through precipitation. Particles of similar size (>0.5 μm) halve in number for only every 20% of vapour lost, suggesting effective microphysical processing of INPs during precipitation. We show that INPs active at moderate supercooling are rapidly depleted by precipitating clouds, limiting their impact on subsequent rainfall development in time and space. PMID:26553559

  10. A method of removing oxides from the surface of Fe-Ni-Co alloy particles by chemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Yelton, W.G.

    1989-04-01

    The addition of metal particles to bulk glass has been shown to increase fracture strength and toughness. Composites containing well-bonded particles exhibit the largest increases in these properties. This report discusses a study in which a method was developed to alter the surfaces of Fe--Ni--Co particles so that improved particle/glass matrix bonding resulted. In this method, as received Fe--Ni--Co particles were intentionally oxidized to create surface and grain boundary oxides. The surface and grain boundary oxides were then preferentially removed from the surfaces of iron-nickel-cobalt alloy particles by chemical etching. After removal of the surface oxides, coral-like structures remained on the surfaces of the metal particles and furnished good mechanical bonding sites to the glass matrix. The progression of this study involved completion of three designed experiments. In the first experiment, an etching process was identified by controlling etching solution temperature and hold time. Data from the first study were then incorporated into the design of a second experiment which examined solution temperature heating rate and hold time at 60/degree/C. Finally, the best conditions of the previous studies were selected to investigate the effects of the agitation rate of the etching solution on the particle yield. Combining the best conditions from each study yielded the most efficient method of removing oxides, in which a solution of 120 ml/l H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ and 50 ml/l HCl was heated at 1/degree/C/min to 60/degree/C, held at 60/degree/C, and then moderately agitated for 30 min. 6 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Evaluation of the particle measurement programme (PMP) protocol to remove the vehicles' exhaust aerosol volatile phase.

    PubMed

    Giechaskiel, B; Chirico, R; Decarlo, P F; Clairotte, M; Adam, T; Martini, G; Heringa, M F; Richter, R; Prevot, A S H; Baltensperger, U; Astorga, C

    2010-10-01

    European regulation for Euro 5/6 light duty emissions introduced the measurement of non-volatile particles with diameter >23 nm. The volatile phase is removed by using a heated dilution stage (150 degrees C) and a heated tube (at 300-400 degrees C). We investigated experimentally the removal efficiency for volatile species of the specific protocol by conducting measurements with two Euro 3 diesel light duty vehicles, a Euro 2 moped, and a Euro III heavy duty vehicle with the system's heaters on and off. The particle number distributions were measured with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). An Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was used to identify the non-refractory chemical composition of the particles. A Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) was used to measure the black carbon concentration. The results showed that the condensed material in the accumulation mode (defined here as particles in the diameter range of approximately 50-500 nm) was removed with an efficiency of 50-90%. The (volatile) nucleation mode was also completely evaporated or was decreased to sizes <23 nm; thus these particles wouldn't be counted from the particle counter, indicating the robustness of the protocol. PMID:20692024

  12. Ghost hunting—an assessment of ghost particle detection and removal methods for tomographic-PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsinga, G. E.; Tokgoz, S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper discusses and compares several methods, which aim to remove spurious peaks, i.e. ghost particles, from the volume intensity reconstruction in tomographic-PIV. The assessment is based on numerical simulations of time-resolved tomographic-PIV experiments in linear shear flows. Within the reconstructed volumes, intensity peaks are detected and tracked over time. These peaks are associated with particles (either ghosts or actual particles) and are characterized by their peak intensity, size and track length. Peak intensity and track length are found to be effective in discriminating between most ghosts and the actual particles, although not all ghosts can be detected using only a single threshold. The size of the reconstructed particles does not reveal an important difference between ghosts and actual particles. The joint distribution of peak intensity and track length however does, under certain conditions, allow a complete separation of ghosts and actual particles. The ghosts can have either a high intensity or a long track length, but not both combined, like all the actual particles. Removing the detected ghosts from the reconstructed volume and performing additional MART iterations can decrease the particle position error at low to moderate seeding densities, but increases the position error, velocity error and tracking errors at higher densities. The observed trends in the joint distribution of peak intensity and track length are confirmed by results from a real experiment in laminar Taylor-Couette flow. This diagnostic plot allows an estimate of the number of ghosts that are indistinguishable from the actual particles.

  13. Assessment of Biofilter Media Particle Sizes for Removing Ammonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increased concerns over odor and gas emissions from livestock production facilities more efficient technologies of air pollution control are needed to mitigate the deleterious effects of air contaminants. Gas-phase biofilters for treating contaminant gases from poultry and livestock operations ...

  14. ASSESSMENT OF BIOFILTER MEDIA PARTICLE SIZES FOR REMOVING AMMONIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increased concerns over odor and gas emissions from livestock production facilities more efficient technologies of air pollution control are needed to mitigate the deleterious effects of air contaminants. Gas-phase biofilters for treating contaminant gases from poultry and livestock operations ...

  15. Optimization of Microdermabrasion for Controlled Removal of Stratum Corneum

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Samantha N.; Zarnitsyn, Vladimir; Brian, Bondy; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Microdermabrasion has been shown to increase skin permeability for transdermal drug delivery by damaging or removing skin’s outer layer, stratum corneum. However, relationships between microdermabrasion parameters and effects on the stratum corneum barrier have not been developed. In this study, we determined the effect of microdermabrasion crystal flow rate, time, and suction pressure applied in both static and dynamic modes on the extent of stratum corneum removal from excised porcine skin. In addition to controlling the depth of tissue removal by microdermabrasion parameters, we also controlled the area of tissue removal by applying a metal mask patterned with 125- or 250-μm holes to selectively expose small spots of tissue to microdermabrasion. We found that the extent of stratum corneum removal depended strongly on the crystal flow rate and exposure time and only weakly on pressure or static/dynamic mode operation. Masking the skin was effective to localize stratum corneum removal to exposed sites. Overall, this study demonstrates that optimized microdermabrasion in combination with a mask can be used to selectively remove stratum corneum with three-dimensional control, which is important to translating this technique into a novel method of transdermal drug delivery. PMID:21272628

  16. The removal of nitrate by nanoscale iron particles produced using the sodium borohydride method.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyoung-Chan; Park, Sung Hoon; Ahn, Ho-Geun; Chung, Minchul; Kim, Byungwhan; Kim, Sun-Jae; Seo, Seong-Gyu; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2011-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate removal of nitrate by nanoscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in aqueous solution. ZVI particles was produced from wasted acid that is by-products of a pickling line at a steel work. The reaction activity of ZVI particles was evaluated through decomposition experiments of NO3-N aqueous solution. Addition of a larger amount of ZVI particles resulted in a higher decomposition rate. ZVI particles showed higher decomposition efficiencies than commercially purchased ZVI particles at all pH values. Both ZVIs showed a higher decomposition rate at a lower pH. Virtually no decomposition reaction was observed at pH of 4 or higher for purchased ZVI. The ZVI particles produced directly from wasted acid by the sodium borohydride method were not easy to handle because they were very small (10-200 nm) and were oxidized easily in the air. PMID:21456267

  17. Independent regulation of chylomicron lipolysis and particle removal rates: effects of insulin and thyroid hormones on the metabolism of artificial chylomicrons.

    PubMed

    Zerbinatti, C V; Oliveira, H C; Wechesler, S; Quintao, E C

    1991-11-01

    The processes of chylomicron lipolysis and removal from plasma were investigated by the intra-arterial infusion of doubly labeled artificial chylomicrons in rats. The rate of lipolysis was measured as a delipidation index (DI), which is the glyceryl-tri-9,10(N)-3H oleate (3H-TO) fraction removed from the particle as fatty acids, whereas the cholesteryl(1-14C) oleate (14C-CO) plasma disappearance rate measures the splanchnic organ particle uptake. In the alloxan-diabetic rats, despite a normal DI, the 14C-CO plasma residence time (RT) was longer than in control animals and remained longer after stimulation of the lipoprotein lipase by heparin. DI and 14C-CO removal rate were not significantly altered by insulin administration to glucose-supplemented control rats. Lipolysis was remarkable in propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism, and yet the 14C-CO removal rate was retarded. In hypothyroidism, heparin enhanced the 14C-CO removal more than in the control group; however, after heparin, the 14C-CO RT still remained higher in the hypothyroid animals as compared with the control group. Hyperthyroidism lowered the DI; nevertheless, the 14C-CO disappearance rate was faster than in controls. In summary, lack or excess of thyroid hormone influences both the chylomicron lipolysis and removal systems, whereas lack of insulin impairs mostly the particle removal from plasma, and excess of insulin has no effect on the chylomicron metabolism. PMID:1943739

  18. Mechanistic studies of SC-1 particle removal and post piranha rinsing

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, P.; Adkins, C.; Clews, P.; Matlock, C.; Kittelson, D.; Kuehn, T.; Gouk, R.; Wu, Y.

    1996-10-01

    SC-1 (NH{sub 4}OH/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O) and piranha (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) cleans have been used for many years to remove particulate and organic contamination. Although the SC-1 clean, often used with applied megasonic power, is known to be highly effective for particle removal, the removal mechanism remains unclear. For the removal of heavy organic contamination, the piranha cleaning chemistry is an effective process; however, post-piranha residue adheres tenaciously to the wafer surface, causing a particle growth phenomenon. A series of experiments have been performed to help understand the interaction of these processes with silicon surfaces.

  19. Adhesion and removal of glass, silica and PSL particles from silicon dioxide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiangwei

    As circuit minimum feature size continues to shrink, surface cleanliness requirements become more stringent, making surface cleaning more challenging. To develop effective cleaning techniques, it is important to understand particle adhesion and removal mechanisms. Although many studies have been conducted in particle adhesion, the effects of humidity and aging, hydrogen and covalent bonds, and particle's submicron size on adhesion are not well understood. It is necessary to study and understand how the adhesion force changes with time under different conditions in order to develop effective cleaning techniques. The humidity and aging effects on the adhesion and removal of glass particles on flat panel display glass surface, silica particles on thermal oxide silicon wafers and PSL (Polystyrene Latex) particles on silicon wafers are investigated. The results show that silica particles' contact area increases dramatically in high humidity environment over time. This is due to the water reacting with the silica and forming a covalent bond. The results show that silica particles' adhesion force is found to depend on the aging time. After six weeks 95%RH aging, the adhesion force is larger than MP model (for plastic deformation) predicted adhesion force. This is due to the formation of hydrogen bonds and covalent bonds. Removal of glass particles on Flat Panel Display aged in a humid environment using megasonic cleaning is also investigated. The effect of temperature, cleaning time and megasonic power on particle removal is shown. The time and humidity effect on submicron PSL particles' adhesion is also investigated. The combined effect of time and humidity results in increased particle deformation and consequently the increased adhesion force. An empirical model is proposed to describe the relationship between the contact diameter, particle diameter and aging time. The proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data. The results suggest that a greater

  20. Alternate particle removal technologies for the Airborne Activity Confinement System at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, J.E.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Gelbard, F. )

    1991-09-01

    This report presents a review of the filtration technologies available for the removal of particulate material from a gas stream. It was undertaken to identify alternate filtration technologies that may be employed in the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. This report is organized into six sections: (1) a discussion of the aerosol source term and its definition, (2) a short discussion of particle and gaseous contaminant removal mechanisms, (3) a brief overview of particle removal technologies, (4) a discussion of the existing AACS and its potential shortcomings, (5) an enumeration of issues to be addressed in upgrading the AACS, and, (6) a detailed discussion of the identified technologies. The purpose of this report is to identity available options to the existing particle removal system. This system is in continuous operation during routine operation of the reactor. As will be seen, there are a number of options and the selection of any technology or combination of technologies will depend on the design aerosol source term (yet to be appropriately defined) as well as the flow requirements and configuration. This report does not select a specific technology. It focuses on particulate removal and qualitatively on the removal of radio-iodine and mist elimination. Candidate technologies have been selected from industrial and nuclear gas cleaning applications.

  1. Polymer hollow particles with controllable holes in their surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyuk Im, Sang; Jeong, Unyong; Xia, Younan

    2005-09-01

    Colloidal particles with hollow interiors play important roles in microencapsulation-a process that has found widespread use in applications such as controlled release of drugs, cosmetics, inks, pigments or chemical reagents; protection of biologically active species; and removal of pollutants. The hollow particles are most commonly prepared by coating the surfaces of colloidal templates with thin layers of the desired material (or its precursor), followed by selective removal of the templates by means of calcination or chemical etching. This simple and straightforward approach works for a variety of materials that include polymers, ceramics, composites and metals. For polymers, methods such as emulsion polymerization, phase separation, crosslinking of micelles and self-assembly have also been demonstrated for generating hollow structures. However, diffusion through these closed shells with pores <10 nm is often a slow process. To solve this problem, macroporous capsules have been fabricated by organizing colloids around liquid droplets to form colloidosomes or by controlling the mixing of liquid droplets. Here we report the preparation of another class of macroporous capsules-polymer shells with controllable holes in their surfaces. After loading of functional materials, the holes can be closed by means of thermal annealing or solvent treatment.

  2. An investigation into the removal of oil from rock utilising magnetic particle technology.

    PubMed

    Orbell, John D; Dao, Hien V; Kapadia, Jignesh; Ngeh, Lawrence N; Bigger, Stephen W; Healy, Margaret; Jessop, Rosalind; Dann, Peter

    2007-12-01

    The application of magnetic particle technology to environmental remediation has tended to focus, up to now, upon the removal of oil contamination from plumage and fur. The present research demonstrates the potential of this technology to remove oil contamination from the surface of rock. Specifically, a single treatment has been demonstrated to remove more than 80% by weight of heavy bunker oil from the surface of a common foreshore rock type. A further three treatments have been shown to result in an optimum removal of up to 94% by weight. The results are highly reproducible and offer the possibility of achieving up to 100% removal with the appropriate use of pre-conditioners. PMID:17967468

  3. Improvements in laser flare removal for particle image velocimetry using fluorescent dye-doped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosky, B. J.; Lowe, K. T.; Danehy, P. M.; Wohl, C. J.; Tiemsin, P. I.

    2015-11-01

    Laser flare, or scattering of laser light from a surface, can often be a major issue in particle image velocimetry (PIV) involving solid boundaries in the flow or a gas-liquid interface. The use of fluorescent light from dye-doped particles has been demonstrated in water applications, but reproducing the technique in an airflow is more difficult due to particle size constraints and safety concerns. The following work presents fluorescent Kiton Red 620 (KR620)-doped polystyrene latex microspheres as a solution to this issue. The particles are small and narrowly distributed, with a mean diameter of 0.87 μ \\text{m} and diameter distribution standard deviation of 0.30 μ \\text{m} . Furthermore, the KR620 dye exhibits much lower toxicity than other common fluorescent dyes, and would be safe to use in large flow facilities. The fluorescent signal from the particles is measured on average to be 320  ±  10 times weaker than the Mie scattering signal from the particles. This reduction in signal is counterbalanced by greatly enhanced contrast via optical rejection of the incident laser wavelength. Fluorescent PIV with these particles is shown to eliminate laser flare near surfaces, allowing for velocity measurements as close as 100 μ \\text{m} to the surface. In one case, fluorescent PIV led to velocity vector validation rates more than 20 times that of the Mie scattering results in the boundary layer region of an angled surface.

  4. Eutrophication control and the fallacy of nitrogen removal

    SciTech Connect

    Sincero, A.P.

    1984-11-01

    There has been a great deal of controversy over the issue of nitrogen control from sewage treatment plants discharges to alleviate excessive algae growths in receiving bodies of water. Some of the controversy seems to have risen from a thorough misunderstanding of the microbiology involved in the utilization of nitrogen by microbes. In a haste to control eutrophication, some regulators have required the removal of nitrogen from the effluent of sewage treatment plants; e.g., the Patuxent Nitrogen Removal Policy of the State of Maryland.

  5. Particle removal challenges with EUV patterned mask for the sub-22nm HP node

    SciTech Connect

    Rastegar, A.; Eichenlaub, S.; Kadaksham, A. J.; Lee, B.; House, M.; Huh, S.; Cha, B.; Yun, H.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

    2010-03-12

    The particle removal efficiency (PRE) of cleaning processes diminishes whenever the minimum defect size for a specific technology node becomes smaller. For the sub-22 nm half-pitch (HP) node, it was demonstrated that exposure to high power megasonic up to 200 W/cm{sup 2} did not damage 60 nm wide TaBN absorber lines corresponding to the 16 nm HP node on wafer. An ammonium hydroxide mixture and megasonics removes {ge}50 nm SiO{sub 2} particles with a very high PRE, A sulfuric acid hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM) in addition to ammonium hydroxide mixture (APM) and megasonic is required to remove {ge}28 nm SiO{sub 2} particles with a high PRE. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOFSIMS) studies show that the presence of O{sub 2} during a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ({lambda} = 172 nm) surface conditioning step will result in both surface oxidation and Ru removal, which drastically reduce extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask life time under multiple cleanings. New EUV mask cleaning processes show negligible or no EUV reflectivity loss and no increase in surface roughness after up to 15 cleaning cycles. Reviewing of defect with a high current density scanning electron microscope (SEM) drastically reduces PRE and deforms SiO{sub 2} particles. 28 nm SiO{sub 2} particles on EUV masks age very fast and will deform over time, Care must be taken when reviewing EUV mask defects by SEM. Potentially new particles should be identified to calibrate short wavelength inspection tools, Based on actinic image review, 50 nm SiO{sub 2} particles on top of the EUV mask will be printed on the wafer.

  6. Effect of Process Parameters on Particle Removal Efficiency in Poly(vinyl alcohol) Brush Scrubber Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Joonho; Lee, Hyunseop; Kim, Hyoungjae; Jeong, Haedo

    2012-02-01

    Wafer cleaning is one of the most critical processes in the semiconductor device manufacturing. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) brush scrubber cleaning is much attractive when compared with traditional wet-batch cleaning which causes the cross-contamination among the wafers in a bath and environmental issues with huge amount of chemical and deionized water (DIW) usages. The mechanical forces generated from PVA brush contact can remove the particles on a wafer surface under low concentration of chemical solution without cross-contamination. In this research, we monitored the change of the dynamic forces including normal and friction force generated by PVA brush contacts during cleaning process, and also investigated the effects of scrubbing conditions of PVA brush overlap and velocity, and the surface tension (low- or high-hydrophilic) of the wafer on the particle removal efficiency. The results show that the driving mechanism to remove the particle on a wafer surface can be changed by the PVA brush overlap and velocity condition such as the hydrodynamic drag force in the brush soft contact condition and friction force in the brush hard contact condition. The particle removal efficiency is higher under the low-hydrophilic surface having a low surface tension compared to high-hydrophilic surface.

  7. Assessment of Different Biofilter Media Particle Sizes for Ammonia Removal Optimization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The main objective of this study is to determine a range of particle sizes that provides low resistance to the air flow but also sufficient surface area for microbial attachment, which is needed for higher biofiltration efficiency. This will be done by assessing ammonia removal and pressure drop in ...

  8. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, S.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-04-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The function control allows unattended quality assurance experiments at remote air quality monitoring or research stations under field conditions. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter while removing diffusive particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. Another feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The performance of the function control is illustrated with the aid of a 1-year data set recorded at Annaberg-Buchholz, a station in the Saxon air quality monitoring network. During the period of concern, the total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer slightly overestimated the particle number concentration recorded by the condensation particle counter by 2 % (grand average). Based on our first year of experience with the function control, we developed tolerance criteria that allow a performance evaluation of a tested mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the total particle number concentration. We conclude that the automated function control enhances the quality and reliability of unattended long-term particle number size distribution measurements. This will have beneficial effects for intercomparison studies involving different measurement sites, and help provide a higher

  9. Effect of weathering on mobilization of biochar particles and bacterial removal in a stormwater biofilter.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2015-11-15

    To improve bacterial removal, a traditional stormwater biofilter can be augmented with biochar, but it is unknown whether bacterial removal remains consistent as the biochar weathers during intermittent exposure to stormwater under dry-wet and freeze-thaw cycles. To examine the effect of weathering on bacterial removal capacity of biochar, we subjected biochar-augmented sand filters (or simplified biofilters) to multiple freeze-thaw or dry-wet cycles for a month and then compared their bacterial removal capacity with the removal capacity of unweathered biofilters. To isolate the effect of physical and chemical weathering processes from that of biological processes, the biofilters were operated without any developed biofilm. Biochar particles were mobilized during intermittent infiltration of stormwater, but the mobilization depended on temperature and antecedent conditions. During stormwater infiltration without intermediate drying, exposure to natural organic matter (NOM) in the stormwater decreased the bacterial removal capacity of biochar, partly due to exhaustion of attachment sites by NOM adsorption. In contrast, exposure to the same amount of NOM during stormwater infiltration with intermediate drying resulted in higher bacterial removal. This result suggests that dry-wet cycles may enhance recovery of the previously exhausted attachment sites, possibly due to diffusion of NOM from biochar surfaces into intraparticle pores during intermediate drying periods. Overall, these results indicate that physical weathering has net positive effect on bacterial removal by biochar-augmented biofilters. PMID:26320722

  10. Effects of the particle residence time and the spray droplet size on the particle removal efficiencies in a wet scrubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, J.; Hong, J.; Lee, H.; Shin, S.

    2010-06-01

    A new type of scrubbing system equipped with air-atomized spray nozzles, full cone type spray nozzles and the maze shape channels has been developed and the mass transfer mechanism to remove sub-micron particles is analyzed. There is a minimal time duration for the mixture of air and sprayed water droplets should remain in the scrubbing zone for the sub-micron particles and hydrogen fluoride (HF) gas to diffuse and be captured by water droplets. The grown water droplets enter the maze shape channels which have sharp corners and bends to eliminate the water droplets by collision with the walls. As a result of applying the developed design methodology, the sub-micron particle removal efficiencies of the scrubber are found to be above 99% for the particles of 0.5-1 μm, 96% for those of 0.3-0.5 μm, and 86% for those smaller than 0.3 μm in diameter under the optimum operating condition.

  11. Quantification of nanoscale silver particles removal and release from municipal wastewater treatment plants in Germany.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingxiangyu; Hartmann, Georg; Döblinger, Markus; Schuster, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The majority of pure silver nanoparticles in consumer products are likely released into sewer systems and usually end up in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Research investigating the reduction in nanoscale silver particles (n-Ag-Ps) has focused on the biological treatment process, generally in controlled laboratory experiments. This study, analyzing the field-collected samples from nine municipal WWTPs in Germany, is the first to evaluate the reduction in n-Ag-Ps by mechanical and biological treatments in sequence in WWTPs. Additionally, the concentration of n-Ag-Ps in effluent was determined through two different methods that are presented here: novel ionic exchange resin (IER) and cloud point extraction (CPE) methods. The n-Ag-Ps concentrations in influent were all low (<1.5 μg/L) and decreased (average removal efficiency of ∼35%) significantly after mechanical treatment, indicating that the mechanical treatment contributes to the n-Ag-Ps removal. Afterward, more than 72% of the remaining n-Ag-Ps in the semi-treated wastewater (i.e., wastewater after mechanical treatment) were reduced by biological treatment. Together, these processes reduced 95% of the n-Ag-Ps that entered WWTPs, which resulted in low concentration of n-Ag-Ps in the effluents (<12 ng/L). For a WWTP with 520,000 t/d treatment capacity, we estimated that the daily n-Ag-Ps load in effluent discharge equated to about 4.4 g/d. Obviously, WWTPs are not potential point sources for n-Ag-Ps in the aquatic environment. PMID:23750458

  12. Improved sulfur removal from coals by redox potential control of surfaces during grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Tampy, G.K.; Birlingmair, D.H.; Burkhart, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Control of the redox potential of an Upper Freeport run-of-mine coal slurry during wet grinding and subsequent beneficiation gave better sulfur removal, with no decrease in coal recovery, than either potential control during grinding or beneficiation alone. Sodium dithionite, a reducing agent used to depress the sulfur, also gave substantially better results than pH control alone, irrespective of whether the physical beneficiation was by oil agglomeration, foam flotation, or microbubble batch flotation. Three-phase contact angle measurements and pulp potential measurements suggest that slow electrochemical reactions at the particle surfaces may be responsible for the improved results obtained when the reductant is added at the grinding stage.

  13. Preparation of polyethersulfone-organophilic montmorillonite hybrid particles for the removal of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fuming; Bai, Pengli; Li, Haocheng; Ma, Yunli; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhao, Changsheng

    2009-03-15

    Polyethersulfone (PES)-organophilic montmorillonite (OMMT) hybrid particles, with various proportions of OMMT, were prepared by using a liquid-liquid phase separation technique, and then were used for the removal of bisphenol A (BPA) from aqueous solution. The adsorbed BPA amounts increased significantly when the OMMT were embedded into the particles. The structure of the particle was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM); and these particles hardly release small molecules below 250 degrees C which was testified by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The experimental data of BPA adsorption were adequately fitted with Langmuir equations. Three simplified kinetics model including the pseudo-first-order (Lagergren equation), the pseudo-second-order, and the intraparticle diffusion model were used to describe the adsorption process. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorbed BPA amount reached an equilibrium value after 300 min, and the experimental data could be expressed by the intraparticular mass transfer diffusion model. Furthermore, the adsorbed BPA could be effectively removed by ethanol, which indicated that the hybrid particles could be reused. These results showed that the PES-OMMT hybrid particles have the potential to be used in the environmental application. PMID:18597933

  14. Nano-particle removal from surface of materials used in EUV mask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Viraj Sadanand

    With device scaling, the current optical lithography technique is reaching its technological limit to print small features. Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) lithography has shown promise to print extremely thin lines reliably and cost-effectively. Many challenges remain before introducing EUV to large scale manufacturing. The main challenge addressed in this study is particle removal from EUV mask surfaces (CrON1, CrON2, and fused silica) and thermal oxide (SiO2). Effective pre-clean procedures were developed for each surface. As chemical cleaning methods fail to meet SEMATECH criteria, addition of megasonic energy to EUV mask cleaning baths is seen as a promising cleaning methodology. As the requirement to print fine lines needs to be met, all materials used in EUV mask fabrication either absorb the incident EUV wavelength light or reflect it. Therefore, the masks used in the industry will be reflective instead of the conventional transmissive masks. Also, for the same reason, no protective pellicle can be used leading to all the surfaces unprotected from particle contamination. To avoid the detrimental effect of the particle contamination, a cleaning study for nano-particle removal was performed. A dark field microscope was utilized to study the removal of gold nano-particles from surfaces. The cleaning procedures utilized H2SO4 and NH4OH chemistries with and without megasonic irradiation. The cleaning variables were bath concentration, temperature, and megasonic power. The contamination variables were the gold nanoparticles charge and size, from 40nm to 100nm. For 100 nm negatively charged gold nano-particles deposited on a CrON1 surface, a 1:10 H2SO4:DI bath at boiling temperature (101°C) without megasonics gave high particle removal efficiency (PRE) values as did a 1:10 H2SO4:DI bath at 35°C with 100W megasonics. Comparison of removal of poly diallyl-dimethyl ammonium chloride (PDAC) coated and uncoated gold nano-particles deposited on a CrON1 surface using dilute

  15. Impurity and particle control for INTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.

    1985-02-01

    The INTOR impurity control system studies have been focused on the development of an impurity control system which would be able to provide the necessary heat removal and He pumping while satisfying the requirements for (1) minimum plasma contamination by impurities, (2) reasonable component lifetime (approx. 1 year), and (3) minimum size and cost. The major systems examined were poloidal divertors and pumped limiters. The poloidal divertor was chosen as the reference option since it offered the possibility of low sputtering rates due to the formation of a cool, dense plasma near the collector plates. Estimates of the sputtering rates associated with pumped limiters indicated that they would be too high for a reasonable system. Development of an engineering design concept was done for both the poloidal divertor and the pumped limiter.

  16. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schladitz, A.; Merkel, M.; Bastian, S.; Birmili, W.; Weinhold, K.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-12-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The aim of the new feature is to conduct unattended quality control experiments under field conditions at remote air quality monitoring or research stations. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter removing the diffusive particles approximately smaller than 25 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. The other feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. An exemplary one-year data set is presented for the measurement site Annaberg-Buchholz as part of the Saxon air quality monitoring network. The total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer overestimates the particle number concentration by only 2% (grand average offset). Furthermore, tolerance criteria are presented to judge the performance of the mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the particle number concentration. An upgrade of a mobility particle size spectrometer with an automated function control enhances the quality of long-term particle number size distribution measurements. Quality assured measurements are a precondition for intercomparison studies of different sites. Comparable measurements will improve cohort health and also climate-relevant research studies.

  17. Optimization of circular plate separators with cross flow for removal of oil droplets and solid particles.

    PubMed

    Ngu, Hei; Wong, Kien Kuok; Law, Puong Ling

    2012-04-01

    A circular gravity-phase separator using coalescing medium with cross flow was developed to remove oil and suspended solids from wastewaters. Coalescence medium in the form of inclined plates promotes rising of oil droplets through coalescence and settling of solid particles through coagulation. It exhibits 22.67% higher removal of total suspended solids (TSS) compared to separators without coalescing medium. Moreover, it removed more than 70% of oil compared to conventional American Petroleum Institute separators, which exhibit an average of 33% oil removal. The flowrate required to attain an effluent oil concentration of 10 mg/L (Q(o10)) at different influent oil concentrations (C(io)) can be represented by Q(o10) x 10(-5) = -0.0012C(io) + 0.352. The flowrate required to attain an effluent TSS concentration of 50 mg/L (Q(ss50)) at different influent TSS concentrations (C(iss)) can be represented by Q(ss50) x 10(-5) = 1.0 x 10(6) C(iss)(-2.9576). The smallest removable solid particle size was 4.87 microm. PMID:22834217

  18. Evaluation of the SC-1/megasonic clean for sub-0.15 micron particle removal

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, C.L.J.; Resnick, P.J.; Clews, P.J.; Thomas, E.V.; Korbe, N.C.; Cannaday, S.T.

    1994-07-01

    A statistical design of experiments approach has been employed to evaluate the particle removal efficacy of the SC-1/megasonic clean for sub-0.15 {mu}m inorganic particles. The effects of megasonic input power, solution chemistry, bath temperature, and immersion time have been investigated. Immersion time was not observed to be a statistically significant factor. The NH{sub 4}OH/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ratio was significant, but varying the molar H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration had no effect on inorganic particle removal. Substantially diluted chemistries, performed with high megasonic input power and moderate-to-elevated temperatures, was shown to be very effective for small particle removal. Bath composition data show extended lifetimes can be obtained when high purity chemicals are used at moderate (eg., 45{degrees}C) temperature. Transition metal surface concentrations and surface roughness have been measured after dilute SC-1 processing and compared to metallic contamination following traditional SC-1.

  19. Controlled rotation of optically trapped microscopic particles.

    PubMed

    Paterson, L; MacDonald, M P; Arlt, J; Sibbett, W; Bryant, P E; Dholakia, K

    2001-05-01

    We demonstrate controlled rotation of optically trapped objects in a spiral interference pattern. This pattern is generated by interfering an annular shaped laser beam with a reference beam. Objects are trapped in the spiral arms of the pattern. Changing the optical path length causes this pattern, and thus the trapped objects, to rotate. Structures of silica microspheres, microscopic glass rods, and chromosomes are set into rotation at rates in excess of 5 hertz. This technique does not depend on intrinsic properties of the trapped particle and thus offers important applications in optical and biological micromachines. PMID:11340200

  20. Toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.E.; Silbar, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a program aiming toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams. A hybrid approach is used, combining knowledge- based system programming techniques and traditional numerical simulations. We use an expert system shell for the symbolic processing and have incorporated the FORTRAN beam optics code TRANSPORT for numerical simulation. The paper discusses the symbolic model we built, the reasoning components, how the knowledge base accesses information from an operating beamline, and the experience gained in merging the two worlds of numeric and symbolic processing. We also discuss plans for a future real-time system. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Deciphering the science behind electrocoagulation to remove suspended clay particles from water.

    PubMed

    Holt, P K; Barton, G W; Mitchell, C A

    2004-01-01

    Electrocoagulation removes pollutant material from water by a combination of coagulant delivered from a sacrificial aluminium anode and hydrogen bubbles evolved at an inert cathode. Rates of clay particle flotation and settling were experimentally determined in a 7 L batch reactor over a range of currents (0.25-2.0 A) and pollutant loadings (0.1-1.7 g/L). Sedimentation and flotation are the dominant removal mechanism at low and high currents, respectively. This shift in separation mode can be explained by analysing the reactor in terms of a published dissolved air flotation model. PMID:15686019

  2. FINE PARTICLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY: CONVENTIONAL AND NOVEL DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews the development of technology in fine particle control. Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), scrubbers, fabric filters, and novel devices were assessed to determine their efficiency. ESPs were found to be excellent in controlling fine particles: with an efficien...

  3. Experimental investigation of submicron and ultrafine soot particle removal by tree leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hee-Jae; Yook, Se-Jin; Ahn, Kang-Ho

    2011-12-01

    Soot particles emitted from vehicles are one of the major sources of air pollution in urban areas. In this study, five kinds of trees were selected as Pinus densiflora, Taxus cuspidata, Platanus occidentalis, Zelkova serrata, and Ginkgo biloba, and the removal of submicron (<1 μm) and ultrafine (<0.1 μm) soot particles by tree leaves was quantitatively compared in terms of deposition velocity. Soot particles were produced by a diffusion flame burner using acetylene as the fuel. The sizes of monodisperse soot particles classified with the Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMA) were 30, 55, 90, 150, 250, 400, and 600 nm. A deposition chamber was designed to simulate the omni-directional flow condition around the tree leaves. Deposition velocities onto the needle-leaf trees were higher than those onto the broadleaf trees. P. densiflora showed the greatest deposition velocity, followed by T. cuspidata, Platanus occidentalis, Zelkova serrata, and Ginkgo biloba. In addition, from the comparison of deposition velocity between two groups of Platanus occidentalis leaves, i.e. one group of leaves with front sides only and the other with back sides only, it was supposed in case of the broadleaf trees that the removal of airborne soot particles of submicron and ultrafine sizes could be affected by the surface roughness of tree leaves, i.e. the veins and other structures on the leaves.

  4. Performance of Sorbent Particles for Removal of Cadmium in Hot Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiie, Ryo; Goto, Shinya; Nishimura, Makoto; Moritomi, Hiroshi

    The use of particulate kaolinite as a sorbent for capturing cadmium compounds in hot flue gas was studied in the influence of temperature and residence time on removal efficiency. More than a half of the cadmium fed into the reactor was captured by kaolinite samples. It was also found that the amount of cadmium captured increased with time and that the removal efficiency at a temperature of 1073K was slightly higher than at 873K. To clarify the mechanism of cadmium adsorption, the solubility of cadmium captured by particulate kaolinite was examined in both water and nitric acid. Acid-soluble cadmium constituted more than 80% of the total captured cadmium, while water-soluble cadmium constituted between 40-80%. This suggests that cadmium does not penetrate into the kaolinite particles, but it remains on the surface and that physical condensation accounts for approximately half of the cadmium aerosol captured by kaolinite particles.

  5. Development of NSTX Particle Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel; R. Maingi; M. Bell; D. Gates; K. Hill; B. LeBlanc; D. Mueller; R. Kaita; S. Paul; S. Sabbagh; C.H. Skinner; V. Soukhanovskii; B. Stratton; R. Raman

    2004-07-30

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) current-drive discharges will require density control for acceptable efficiency. In NSTX, this involves primarily controlling impurity influxes and recycling. We have compared boronization on hot and cold surfaces, varying helium glow discharge conditioning (HeGDC) durations, helium discharge cleaning, brief daily boronization, and between discharge boronization to reduce and control spontaneous density rises. Access to Ohmic H-modes was enabled by boronization on hot surfaces, however, the duration of the effectiveness of hot and cold boronization was comparable. A 15 minute HeGDC between discharges was needed for reproducible L-H transitions. Helium discharge conditioning yielded slower density rises than 15 minutes of HeGDC. Brief daily boronization followed by a comparable duration of applied HeGDC restored and enhanced good conditions. Additional brief boronizations between discharges did not improve plasma performance (reduced recycling, reduced impurity luminosities, earlier L-H transitions, longer plasma current flattops, higher stored energies) if conditions were already good. Between discharge boronization required increases in the NSTX duty cycle due to the need for additional HeGDC to remove codeposited D.

  6. Control of respirable particles and radon progeny with portable air cleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-02-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles and radon progeny. Following injection of cigarette smoke and radon in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particles and radon progeny concentrations were measured with and without air cleaner operation. Particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size. In tests with no air cleaner the natural decay rate for cigarette smoke was observed to be 0.2 hr/sup -1/. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filters, a residential ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. The electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters tested had significant particle removal rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner. The evaluation of radon progeny control produced similar results; the air cleaners which were effective in removing particles were also effective in removing radon progeny. At low particle concentrations plateout of the unattached radon progeny is an important removal mechanism. Based on data from these tests, the plateout rate for unattached progeny was found to be 15 hr/sup -1/. The unattached fraction and the overall removal rate due to deposition of attached and unattached nuclides have been estimated for each radon decay product as a function of particle concentration. While air cleaning can be effective in reducing total radon progeny, concentrations of unattached radon progeny can increase with increasing air cleaning. 39 references, 26 figures, 9 tables.

  7. Ultrafine particle removal by residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning filters.

    PubMed

    Stephens, B; Siegel, J A

    2013-12-01

    This work uses an in situ filter test method to measure the size-resolved removal efficiency of indoor-generated ultrafine particles (approximately 7-100 nm) for six new commercially available filters installed in a recirculating heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system in an unoccupied test house. The fibrous HVAC filters were previously rated by the manufacturers according to ASHRAE Standard 52.2 and ranged from shallow (2.5 cm) fiberglass panel filters (MERV 4) to deep-bed (12.7 cm) electrostatically charged synthetic media filters (MERV 16). Measured removal efficiency ranged from 0 to 10% for most ultrafine particles (UFP) sizes with the lowest rated filters (MERV 4 and 6) to 60-80% for most UFP sizes with the highest rated filter (MERV 16). The deeper bed filters generally achieved higher removal efficiencies than the panel filters, while maintaining a low pressure drop and higher airflow rate in the operating HVAC system. Assuming constant efficiency, a modeling effort using these measured values for new filters and other inputs from real buildings shows that MERV 13-16 filters could reduce the indoor proportion of outdoor UFPs (in the absence of indoor sources) by as much as a factor of 2-3 in a typical single-family residence relative to the lowest efficiency filters, depending in part on particle size. PMID:23590456

  8. Removal of particles from holes in submerged plates with oscillating bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavard, Delphine; Klaseboer, Evert; Ohl, Siew-Wan; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2009-08-01

    This study is motivated by a common problem in submerged tubes and structures, which is the blockage of the tubes by pollutant particles or debris from the surrounding fluid. To clear the obstruction from the tube, an expanding bubble is used to propel the obstruction away from the tube (the tube is represented as a submerged transparent plate with a hole in our experiments). In some cases the obstruction removal effect is reinforced by the impacting jet of such a collapsing bubble. The bubble is generated via a simple low voltage electric spark discharge circuit. The pressure generated by the oscillating bubble effectively pushes the particle away from the tube, thereby successfully clearing the obstruction. High-speed photography is used to record and analyze the phenomenon. The speed of the particle is found to be around 1 m/s shortly after the collapse of the bubble. Interestingly, there is a clear difference between air-backed plates and water-backed plates in terms of bubble and particle dynamics. The bubbles in the current study are typically of millimeter size. Since the physics are similar for smaller bubbles, the process can possibly be downsized for other microapplications such as the removal of blood clots in vessels [S. R. Visuri et al., U.S. Patent No. 6428531 (August 6, 2002)].

  9. Monodisperse Block Copolymer Particles with Controllable Size, Shape, and Nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Man; Kim, Yongjoo; Kim, Bumjoon; PNEL Team

    Shape-anisotropic particles are important class of novel colloidal building block for their functionality is more strongly governed by their shape, size and nanostructure compared to conventional spherical particles. Recently, facile strategy for producing non-spherical polymeric particles by interfacial engineering received significant attention. However, achieving uniform size distribution of particles together with controlled shape and nanostructure has not been achieved. Here, we introduce versatile system for producing monodisperse BCP particles with controlled size, shape and morphology. Polystyrene-b-polybutadiene (PS-b-PB) self-assembled to either onion-like or striped ellipsoid particle, where final structure is governed by amount of adsorbed sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant at the particle/surrounding interface. Further control of molecular weight and particle size enabled fine-tuning of aspect ratio of ellipsoid particle. Underlying physics of free energy for morphology formation and entropic penalty associated with bending BCP chains strongly affects particle structure and specification.

  10. Absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by falling water droplets in the presence of inert solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Hung; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Liu, Su-Chin; Chang, I.-Cheng; Shih, Shin-Min

    An experimental analysis of the absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by the free falling water droplets containing the inert solid particles is presented. The wheat flour powder is introduced as the inert solid particles. Tests with and without the flour powder in the water droplets are examined. The mass fluxes and mass transfer coefficients of SO 2 for the cases with and without the flour powder are compared to elucidate the effects of the inert solid particles contained in the water droplets on the gas absorption. The results indicate aignificant difference between the two cases for the concentrations of the flour powder in the absorbent droplets ( Cs) within the ranges of the experimental conditions, namely 0.1 to 10 wt% flour powder in the absorbent droplets. In general, the inert solid particles of the flour powder as the impurities in the water droplets tend to decrease the SO 2 absorption rate for the experimental absorption system under investigation. Various values of Cs cause various levels of the interfacial resistance and affect the gas absorption rate. The interfacial resistance is recognized by introducing an interfacial mass transfer coefficient ks with its reciprocal being proportional to the magnitude of the interfacial resistance. The values of 1/ ks may be computed by the use of the equation 1/ ks=(1/ KOLs-1/ KOL), where KOLs and KOL are the overall liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients with and without the inert solid particles, respectively. The values of ks with Cs of 0.1 to 10 wt% are about 0.295-0.032 cms -1 for absorbing 1000-3000 ppmv SO 2 with the water droplets. This kind of information is useful for the SO 2 removal and the information of acid rain that the impurities of the inert solid particles contaminate the water droplets.

  11. Planck 2013 results. X. HFI energetic particle effects: characterization, removal, and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miniussi, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the detection, interpretation, and removal of the signal resulting from interactions of high energy particles with the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI). There are two types of interactions: heating of the 0.1 K bolometer plate; and glitches in each detector time stream. The transientresponses to detector glitch shapes are not simple single-pole exponential decays and fall into three families. The glitch shape for each family has been characterized empirically in flight data and these shapes have been used to remove glitches from the detector time streams. The spectrum of the count rate per unit energy is computed for each family and a correspondence is made to the location on the detector of the particle hit. Most of the detected glitches are from Galactic protons incident on the die frame supporting the micro-machined bolometric detectors. In the Planck orbit at L2, the particle flux is around 5 cm-2 s-1 and is dominated by protons incident on the spacecraft with energy >39 MeV, at a rate of typically one event per second per detector. Different categories of glitches have different signatures in the time stream. Two of the glitch types have a low amplitude component that decays over nearly 1 s. This component produces excess noise if not properly removed from the time-ordered data. We have used a glitch detection and subtraction method based on the joint fit of population templates. The application of this novel glitch subtraction method removes excess noise from the time streams. Using realistic simulations, we find that this method does not introduce signal bias into the Planck data.

  12. Removal of Microcystis aeruginosa using nano-Fe3O4 particles as a coagulant aid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Dan; Guo, Xiaochen; He, Yiliang; Ong, Choon Nam; Xu, Yongpeng; Pal, Amrita

    2015-12-01

    Blue-green algae bloom is of great concern globally since they adversely affect the water ecosystem and also drinking water treatment processes. This work investigated the removal of Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) by combining the conventional coagulant polyaluminum chloride (PACl) with nano-Fe3O4 particles as a coagulant aid. The results showed that the addition of nano-Fe3O4 significantly improved the removal efficiency of M. aeruginosa by reducing the amount of PACl dosage and simultaneously hastening the sedimentation. At the M. aeruginosa density of an order of magnitude of 10(7), 10(6), and 10(5) pcs/mL, respectively, the corresponding PACl dose of 200, 20, and 2 mg/L and the mass ratio of PACl to nano-Fe3O4 of 4:1, the removal efficiency of M. aeruginosa could be increased by 33.0, 44.7, and 173.1%, respectively. Compared to PACl, PACl combined with the nano-Fe3O4 as a coagulant aid had higher removal efficiency at a wider pH range. SEM images showed that nano-Fe3O4 first combined with PACl to form clusters and further generated the flocs with algae. Results from the laser particle analyzer further suggested that the floc size increased with the addition of nano-Fe3O4. It was noted that the addition of nano-Fe3O4 led to aluminum species change after PACl hydrolyzed in the algae solution, from Ala to Alb and Alc subsequently. As a coagulant aid, the nano-Fe3O4, in conjunction with PACl, apparently provided nucleation sites for larger flocs to integrate with M. aeruginosa. In addition, increased floc density improved the removal of M. aeruginosa. PMID:26194241

  13. Particle count monitoring of reverse osmosis water treatment for removal of low-level radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, E.J.; Hoffman, C.R.; Hergert, T.R.

    1995-03-01

    Laser diode particle counting technology and analytical measurements were used to evaluate a pilot-scale reverse osmosis (RO) water treatment system for removal of particulate matter and sub-picocurie low-level radionuclides. Stormwater mixed with Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) effluent from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), formerly a Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons production facility, were treated. No chemical pretreatment of the water was utilized during this study. The treatment system was staged as follows: multimedia filtration, granular activated carbon adsorption, hollow tube ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis membrane filtration. Various recovery rates and two RO membrane models were tested. Analytical measurements included total suspended solids (TSS), total dissolved solids (TDS), gross alpha ({alpha}) and gross beta ({beta}) activity, uranium isotopes {sup 233/234}U and {sup 238}U, plutonium {sup 239/240}Pu, and americium {sup 241}Am. Particle measurement between 1--150 microns ({mu}) included differential particle counts (DPC), and total particle counts (TPC) before and after treatment at various sampling points throughout the test. Performance testing showed this treatment system produced a high quality effluent in clarity and purity. Compared to raw water levels, TSS was reduced to below detection of 5 milligrams per liter (mg/L) and TDS reduced by 98%. Gross {alpha} was essentially removed 100%, and gross {beta} was reduced an average of 94%. Uranium activity was reduced by 99%. TPC between 1-150{mu} were reduced by an average 99.8% to less than 1,000 counts per milliliter (mL), similar in purity to a good drinking water treatment plant. Raw water levels of {sup 239/240}Pu and {sup 241}Am were below reliable quantitation limits and thus no removal efficiencies could be determined for these species.

  14. Methodologies for Removing/Desorbing and Transporting Particles from Surfaces to Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Carla J.; Cespedes, Ernesto R.

    2012-12-01

    Explosive trace detection (ETD) continues to be a key technology supporting the fight against terrorist bombing threats. Very selective and sensitive ETD instruments have been developed to detect explosive threats concealed on personnel, in vehicles, in luggage, and in cargo containers, as well as for forensic analysis (e.g. post blast inspection, bomb-maker identification, etc.) in a broad range of homeland security, law enforcement, and military applications. A number of recent studies have highlighted the fact that significant improvements in ETD systems' capabilities will be achieved, not by increasing the selectivity/sensitivity of the sensors, but by improved techniques for particle/vapor sampling, pre-concentration, and transport to the sensors. This review article represents a compilation of studies focused on characterizing the adhesive properties of explosive particles, the methodologies for removing/desorbing these particles from a range of surfaces, and approaches for transporting them to the instrument. The objectives of this review are to summarize fundamental work in explosive particle characterization, to describe experimental work performed in harvesting and transport of these particles, and to highlight those approaches that indicate high potential for improving ETD capabilities.

  15. Bioinspired production of magnetic laccase-biotitania particles for the removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ardao, Inés; Magnin, Delphine; Agathos, Spiros N

    2015-10-01

    Microbial laccases are powerful enzymes capable of degrading lignin and other recalcitrant compounds including endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Efficient EDC removal on an industrial scale requires robust, stable, easy to handle and cost-effective immobilized biocatalysts. In this direction, magnetic biocatalysts are attractive due to their easy separation through an external magnetic field. Recently, a bioinspired immobilization technique that mimics the natural biomineralization reactions in diatoms has emerged as a fast and versatile tool for generating robust, cheap, and highly stable (nano) biocatalysts. In this work, bioinspired formation of a biotitania matrix is triggered on the surface of magnetic particles in the presence of laccase in order to produce laccase-biotitania (lac-bioTiO2 ) biocatalysts suitable for environmental applications using a novel, fast and versatile enzyme entrapment technique. Highly active lac-bioTiO2 particles have been produced and the effect of different parameters (enzyme loading, titania precursor concentration, pH, duration of the biotitania formation, and laccase adsorption steps) on the apparent activity yield of these biocatalysts were evaluated, the concentration of the titania precursor being the most influential. The lac-bioTiO2 particles were able to catalyze the removal of bisphenol A, 17α-ethinylestradiol and diclofenac in a mixture of six model EDCs and retained 90% of activity after five reaction cycles and 60% after 10 cycles. PMID:26058804

  16. A Particle Population Control Method for Dynamic Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweezy, Jeremy; Nolen, Steve; Adams, Terry; Zukaitis, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    A general particle population control method has been derived from splitting and Russian Roulette for dynamic Monte Carlo particle transport. A well-known particle population control method, known as the particle population comb, has been shown to be a special case of this general method. This general method has been incorporated in Los Alamos National Laboratory's Monte Carlo Application Toolkit (MCATK) and examples of it's use are shown for both super-critical and sub-critical systems.

  17. Removal of two waterborne pathogenic bacterial strains by activated carbon particles prior to and after charge modification.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Engels, Eefje; Langworthy, Don E; Collias, Dimitris I; Bjorkquist, David W; Mitchell, Michael D; Van der Mei, Henny C

    2006-11-01

    Waterborne diseases constitute a threat to public health despite costly treatment measures aimed at removing pathogenic microorganisms from potable water supplies. This paper compared the removal of Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by negatively and positively charged types of activated carbon particles. Both strains display bimodal negative zeta-potential distributions in stabilized water. Carbon particles were suspended to an equivalent external geometric surface area of 700 cm2 in 250 mL of a bacterial suspension, with shaking. Samples were taken after different durations for plate counting. Initial removal rates were less elevated for the positively charged carbon particle than expected, yielding the conclusion that bacterial adhesion under shaking is mass-transport limited. After 360 min, however, the log-reduction of the more negatively charged R. terrigena in suspension was largest for the positively charged carbon particles as compared with the negatively charged ones, although conditioning in ultrapure or tap water of positively charged carbon particles for 21 days eliminated the favorable effect of the positive charge due to counterion adsorption from the water. Removal of the less negatively charged E. coli was less affected by aging of the (positively charged) carbon particles, confirming the role of electrostatic interactions in bacterial removal by activated carbon particles. The microporous, negatively charged coconut carbon performed less than the mesoporous, positively charged carbon particle prior to conditioning but did not suffer from loss of effect after conditioning in ultrapure or tap water. PMID:17144313

  18. Simultaneous removal of mercury, PCDD/F, and fine particles from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Korell, Jens; Paur, Hanns-R; Seifert, Helmut; Andersson, Sven

    2009-11-01

    A multifunctional scrubber (MFS) has been developed to reduce the complexity of flue gas cleaning plants. The MFS integrates an oxidizing scrubber equipped with a dioxin-absorbing tower packing material and a space charge electrostatic precipitator. All these processes have been previously developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. In the described multifunctional scrubber, mercury, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), and submicrometer particles are removed simultaneously. A MFS pilot plant with a flue gas volume flow of 250 m(3)/h has been installed in a slipstream of a waste incineration pilot plant. Pilot scale testing was performed to measure mercury, particles, and PCDD/F in the raw and clean gas. After optimization of the process these three flue gas components were separated from the flue gas in the range 87-97%. PMID:19924961

  19. Particle fueling and impurity control in PDX

    SciTech Connect

    Fonck, R.J.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.; Budny, R.; Couture, P.; Darrow, D.; Dylla, H.; Goldston, R.; Grek, B.; Hawryluk, R.

    1984-12-01

    Fueling requirements and impurity levels in neutral-beam-heated discharges in the PDX tokamak have been compared for plasmas formed with conventional graphite rail limiters, a particle scoop limiter, and an open or closed poloidal divertor. Gas flows necessary to obtain a given density are highest for diverted discharges and lowest for the scoop limiter. Hydrogen pellet injection provides an efficient alternate fueling technique, and a multiple pellet injector has produced high density discharges for an absorbed neutral beam power of up to 600 kW, above which higher speeds or more massive pellets are required for penetration to the plasma core. Power balance studies indicate that 30 to 40% of the total input power is radiated while approx. 15% is absorbed by the limiting surface, except in the open divertor case, where 60% flows to the neutralizer plate. In all operating configurations, Z/sub eff/ usually rises at the onset of neutral beam injection. Both open divertor plasmas and those formed on a well conditioned water-cooled limiter have Z/sub eff/ less than or equal to 2 at the end of neutral injection. A definitive comparison of divertors and limiters for impurity control purposes requires longer beam pulses or higher power levels than available on present machines.

  20. Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) removal efficiency by a combination of coagulation and ultrafiltration to minimize SWRO membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Lee, Shang-Tse; Sinha, Shahnawaz; Leiknes, TorOve; Amy, Gary L; Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the impact of coagulation on the transformation between colloidal and particulate transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in seawater; and the effectiveness of a combined pretreatment consisting of coagulation and UF on minimizing TEP fouling of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes. Coagulation with ferric chloride at pH 5 substantially transformed colloidal TEP (0.1-0.4) into particulate TEP (>0.4) leading to a better membrane fouling control. Both 50 and 100 kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) UF membranes removed most of particulate and colloidal TEP without the assistance of coagulation, but coagulation is still necessary for better UF fouling control. The improvement of combined SWRO pretreatment with coagulation and 50 kDa UF membranes was not that much significant compared to UF pretreatment with 50 KDa alone. Therefore, the minimal coagulant dosage for seawater containing TEP should be based on the UF fouling control requirements rather than removal efficiency. PMID:27403871

  1. Dielectrophoretic sample preparation for environmental monitoring of microorganisms: Soil particle removal

    PubMed Central

    Fatoyinbo, Henry O.; McDonnell, Martin C.; Hughes, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of pathogens from environmental samples is often hampered by sensors interacting with environmental particles such as soot, pollen, or environmental dust such as soil or clay. These particles may be of similar size to the target bacterium, preventing removal by filtration, but may non-specifically bind to sensor surfaces, fouling them and causing artefactual results. In this paper, we report the selective manipulation of soil particles using an AC electrokinetic microfluidic system. Four heterogeneous soil samples (smectic clay, kaolinitic clay, peaty loam, and sandy loam) were characterised using dielectrophoresis to identify the electrical difference to a target organism. A flow-cell device was then constructed to evaluate dielectrophoretic separation of bacteria and clay in a continous flow through mode. The average separation efficiency of the system across all soil types was found to be 68.7% with a maximal separation efficiency for kaolinitic clay at 87.6%. This represents the first attempt to separate soil particles from bacteria using dielectrophoresis and indicate that the technique shows significant promise; with appropriate system optimisation, we believe that this preliminary study represents an opportunity to develop a simple yet highly effective sample processing system. PMID:25379100

  2. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and burrows pond rearing system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal eff...

  3. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and Burrows pond rearing system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal eff...

  4. Removal of dust particles from metal-mirror surfaces by excimer-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Klaus R.; Wolff-Rottke, B.; Mueller, F.

    1995-07-01

    The effect of particle desorption from Al mirror surfaces by the influence of pulsed UV laser radiation has been studied. The investigations are closely related to the demands of astronomers, who are looking for a more effective way of cleaning the Al coatings of future very large telescope mirrors. A systematic parameter study has been performed in order to determine the irradiation conditions which yield the highest dust removal efficiency (i.e. reflectivity increase) on contaminated samples, taking particularly into account laser-induced damage and degradation effects of coating and substrate. The particle removal rate increases with increasing laser fluence, being limited however by the damage threshold of the coating. Therefore, parameters influencing the damage threshold of metal coatings like wavelength, pulse width, and number of pulses have been studied in detail. Data indicate that on Al coated BK7 and Zerodur samples KrF laser radiation yields the optimum result, with cleaning efficiencies comparable to polymer film stripping. The initial reflectivity of the clean coating can nearly be reinstalled, in particular when an additional solvent film on the sample surface is applied. Hence, laser desorption seems to be a viable method of cleaning large Al mirrors for telescopes.

  5. Preparation, characterization, and phosphate removal and recovery of magnetic MnFe2O4 nano-particles as adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shumei; Xu, Xiaoming; Xu, Changsong; Wang, Hongshuai; Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Guangmin

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate removal is an important method for controlling eutrophication in bodies of water. Adsorption is an effective phosphate removal approach. In this research, the adsorbent, namely, MnFe2O4, was prepared through the improved co-precipitation method and investigated in terms of phosphate removal. MnFe2O4 was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Phosphate adsorption by MnFe2O4, desorption of adsorbed MnFe2O4 with the regeneration of desorbed MnFe2O4, and phosphate recovery were researched. Experimental results showed that adding the appropriate amount of polyethylene glycol to MnFe2O4 precursors during preparation inhibited the agglomeration of MnFe2O4 between particles because of the magnetic property of MnFe2O4 etc. High crystallinity and strong magnetism were achieved by MnFe2O4 at low temperatures. Average particle size was 5.1 nm. The hysteresis loops confirmed the ferrimagnetic behaviour of MnFe2O4 with a high saturation magnetization (i.e. 26.27 emu/g). The adsorption mechanism of phosphate was mainly physical. The prepared MnFe2O4 had a spinel structure. The proposed technique achieved a phosphate removal rate of 96.06%. A considerable amount of phosphate was desorbed from the adsorbed MnFe2O4 in 15 w/v% NaOH solution. The adsorption capacity of the desorbed MnFe2O4 could be restored to 96.73% in 10 w/v% NaNO3 solution through ion exchange. A sustainable phosphate source was recovered via hydroxyapatite crystallization in the desorption solution, which contained an abundant amount of phosphate as seed for suitable recovery condition. This finding suggested that MnFe2O4 could be a promising adsorbent for efficient phosphate removal. PMID:26292922

  6. Controlling seepage in discrete particle simulations of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Joldes, Grand R; Wong, Kelvin K L; Tan, Chin Wee; Smith, David W

    2016-08-01

    It is now commonplace to represent materials in a simulation using assemblies of discrete particles. Sometimes, one wishes to maintain the integrity of boundaries between particle types, for example, when modelling multiple tissue layers. However, as the particle assembly evolves during a simulation, particles may pass across interfaces. This behaviour is referred to as 'seepage'. The aims of this study were (i) to examine the conditions for seepage through a confining particle membrane and (ii) to define some simple rules that can be employed to control seepage. Based on the force-deformation response of spheres with various sizes and stiffness, we develop analytic expressions for the force required to move a 'probe particle' between confining 'membrane particles'. We analyse the influence that particle's size and stiffness have on the maximum force that can act on the probe particle before the onset of seepage. The theoretical results are applied in the simulation of a biological cell under unconfined compression. PMID:26629728

  7. Remote Control of T Cell Activation Using Magnetic Janus Particles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwahun; Yi, Yi; Yu, Yan

    2016-06-20

    We report a strategy for using magnetic Janus microparticles to control the stimulation of T cell signaling with single-cell precision. To achieve this, we designed Janus particles that are magnetically responsive on one hemisphere and stimulatory to T cells on the other side. By manipulating the rotation and locomotion of Janus particles under an external magnetic field, we could control the orientation of the particle-cell recognition and thereby the initiation of T cell activation. This study demonstrates a step towards employing anisotropic material properties of Janus particles to control single-cell activities without the need of complex magnetic manipulation devices. PMID:27144475

  8. Application of traditional cyclone with spray scrubber to remove airborne silica particles emitted from stone-crushing factories.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Abdulrahman; Ghorbani, Farshid; Mahjub, Hossien; Golbabei, Farideh; Aliabadi, Mohsan

    2009-08-01

    The traditional cyclone with spray scrubber was developed for the removal of airborne silica particles from local exhaust ventilation (LEV). The objective of this research is to evaluate the efficiency of this process for removing silica particles in LEV. After designing and installing a traditional cyclone and spray scrubber, air samples were obtained at the inlet and outlet of the apparatus. The mass of each collected sample was determined gravimetrically using EPA method. The efficiency of the cyclone with spray scrubber for the removal of dust particles from the LEV system was determined to be in the range of 92-99%. There was a high correlation between the inlet concentration of dust particles and the efficiency of the apparatus. The total pressure across the system was 772.17-1120.90 Pa. It was concluded that a traditional cyclone with a spray scrubber can effectively remove a very high percentage of the incoming silica particles from an LEV. The total pressure drop across the current process is less than the pressure drop across other treatment equipment, which means that our process can effectively remove silica particles while using less electricity than other processes. PMID:19672019

  9. Controlling particle trajectories using oscillating microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalikop, Shreyas; Wang, Cheng; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2010-11-01

    In many applications of microfluidics and biotechnology, such as cytometry and drug delivery, it is vital to manipulate the trajectories of microparticles such as vesicles or cells. On this small scale, inertial or gravitational effects are often too weak to exploit. We propose a mechanism to selectively trap and direct particles based on their size in creeping transport flows (Re1). We employ Rayleigh-Nyborg-Westervelt (RNW) streaming generated by an oscillating microbubble, which in turn generates a streaming flow component around the mobile particles. The result is an attractive interaction that draws the particle closer to the bubble. The impenetrability of the bubble interface destroys time-reversal symmetry and forces the particles onto either narrow trajectory bundles or well-defined closed trajectories, where they are trapped. The effect is dependent on particle size and thus allows for the passive focusing and sorting of selected sizes, on scales much smaller than the geometry of the microfluidic device. The device could eliminate the need for complicated microchannel designs with external magnetic or electric fields in applications such as particle focusing and size-based sorting.

  10. Advanced CO2 removal process control and monitor instrumentation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Dalhausen, M. J.; Klimes, R.

    1982-01-01

    A progam to evaluate, design and demonstrate major advances in control and monitor instrumentation was undertaken. A carbon dioxide removal process, one whose maturity level makes it a prime candidate for early flight demonstration was investigated. The instrumentation design incorporates features which are compatible with anticipated flight requirements. Current electronics technology and projected advances are included. In addition, the program established commonality of components for all advanced life support subsystems. It was concluded from the studies and design activities conducted under this program that the next generation of instrumentation will be greatly smaller than the prior one. Not only physical size but weight, power and heat rejection requirements were reduced in the range of 80 to 85% from the former level of research and development instrumentation. Using a microprocessor based computer, a standard computer bus structure and nonvolatile memory, improved fabrication techniques and aerospace packaging this instrumentation will greatly enhance overall reliability and total system availability.

  11. Removable inner turbine shell with bucket tip clearance control

    DOEpatents

    Sexton, Brendan F.; Knuijt, Hans M.; Eldrid, Sacheverel Q.; Myers, Albert; Coneybeer, Kyle E.; Johnson, David Martin; Kellock, Iain R.

    2000-01-01

    A turbine includes a plurality of inner shell sections mounting first and second stage nozzle and shroud portions. The inner shell sections are pinned to an outer containment shell formed of sections to preclude circumferential movement of the inner shell relative to the outer shell and enable thermal expansion and contraction of the inner shell relative to the outer shell. Positive bucket tip clearance control is afforded by passing a thermal medium about the inner shell in heat transfer relation with the shrouds about the first and second stage bucket tips, the thermal medium being provided from a source of heating/cooling fluid independent of the turbine. Access is provided to the rotor and turbine buckets by removing the outer and inner shell sections.

  12. Investigation of high velocity separator for particle removal in coal gasification plants. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Linhardt, H.D.

    1980-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of the High Velocity Particle Separator Program performed under Contract EF-77-C-01-2709. This high velocity wedge separator has the potential to reduce equipment size and cost of high temperature and pressurized particulate removal equipment for coal derived gases. Phase II has been directed toward testing and detailed conceptual design of an element suitable for a commercial scale high temperature, high pressure particle separator (HTPS). Concurrently, Phase IA has been conducted, which utilized the ambient analog method (AAM) for aerodynamic and collection performance investigation of each HTPS configuration prior and during hot testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase IA and II. The AAM effort established correlation of theoretical analysis and experiment for HTPS pressure drop, purge flow ratio and collection efficiency potential. Task I defined the initial test conditions to be the contract design point of 1800/sup 0/F and 350 psia. The 1800/sup 0/F, 350 psia testing represents the main high temperature testing with coal-derived particulates in the 2 to 10 micron range. Phase IA and Phase II have demonstrated efficient particle collection with acceptable pressure drop. In view of these encouraging results, it is reasonable to apply the developed technology toward future hot gas particulate cleanup requirements.

  13. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

    2013-04-30

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  14. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Grzyb, Justin A.

    2016-07-05

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  15. Schedules of controlled substances: removal of naloxegol from control. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-01-23

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration removes naloxegol ((5[alpha],6[alpha])-17-allyl-6-((20-hydroxy-3,6,9,12,15,18-hexaoxaicos-1-yl)oxy)-4,5-epoxymorphinon-3,14-diol) and its salts from the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). This scheduling action is pursuant to the CSA which requires that such actions be made on the record after opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. Prior to the effective date of this rule, naloxegol was a schedule II controlled substance because it can be derived from opium alkaloids. This action removes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to controlled substances, including those specific to schedule II controlled substances, on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, dispense, conduct research, import, export, or conduct chemical analysis) or propose to handle naloxegol. PMID:25730920

  16. Method and apparatus for removing coarse unentrained char particles from the second stage of a two-stage coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Donath, Ernest E.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing oversized, unentrained char particles from a two-stage coal gasification process so as to prevent clogging or plugging of the communicating passage between the two gasification stages. In the first stage of the process, recycled process char passes upwardly while reacting with steam and oxygen to yield a first stage synthesis gas containing hydrogen and oxides of carbon. In the second stage, the synthesis gas passes upwardly with coal and steam which react to yield partially gasified char entrained in a second stage product gas containing methane, hydrogen, and oxides of carbon. Agglomerated char particles, which result from caking coal particles in the second stage and are too heavy to be entrained in the second stage product gas, are removed through an outlet in the bottom of the second stage, the particles being separated from smaller char particles by a counter-current of steam injected into the outlet.

  17. Method for removing tilt control in adaptive optics systems

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, J.T.

    1998-04-28

    A new adaptive optics system and method of operation are disclosed, whereby the method removes tilt control, and includes the steps of using a steering mirror to steer a wavefront in the desired direction, for aiming an impinging aberrated light beam in the direction of a deformable mirror. The deformable mirror has its surface deformed selectively by means of a plurality of actuators, and compensates, at least partially, for existing aberrations in the light beam. The light beam is split into an output beam and a sample beam, and the sample beam is sampled using a wavefront sensor. The sampled signals are converted into corresponding electrical signals for driving a controller, which, in turn, drives the deformable mirror in a feedback loop in response to the sampled signals, for compensating for aberrations in the wavefront. To this purpose, a displacement error (gradient) of the wavefront is measured, and adjusted by a modified gain matrix, which satisfies the following equation: G{prime} = (I{minus}X(X{sup T} X){sup {minus}1}X{sup T})G(I{minus}A). 3 figs.

  18. Method for removing tilt control in adaptive optics systems

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, Joseph Thaddeus

    1998-01-01

    A new adaptive optics system and method of operation, whereby the method removes tilt control, and includes the steps of using a steering mirror to steer a wavefront in the desired direction, for aiming an impinging aberrated light beam in the direction of a deformable mirror. The deformable mirror has its surface deformed selectively by means of a plurality of actuators, and compensates, at least partially, for existing aberrations in the light beam. The light beam is split into an output beam and a sample beam, and the sample beam is sampled using a wavefront sensor. The sampled signals are converted into corresponding electrical signals for driving a controller, which, in turn, drives the deformable mirror in a feedback loop in response to the sampled signals, for compensating for aberrations in the wavefront. To this purpose, a displacement error (gradient) of the wavefront is measured, and adjusted by a modified gain matrix, which satisfies the following equation: G'=(I-X(X.sup.T X).sup.-1 X.sup.T)G(I-A)

  19. PARTICULATE CONTROL HIGHLIGHTS: FINE PARTICLE SCRUBBER RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives highlights of fine particle scrubber research performed by, or under the direction of, EPA's Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory (IERL-RTP) at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The U.S. EPA has been actively involved in research and development in ...

  20. Feedback control of an ensemble of self-propelled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-chun; Chen, Qun; Wang, Rang; Ai, Bao-quan

    2015-06-01

    Rectified transport of self-propelled particles in an asymmetric period potential is numerically investigated by employing a feedback control protocol. The feedback control is switched on and off depending on the direction of the self-propelled speed. It is found that the direction of the transport is determined by the asymmetry of the potential and the feedback control strength. In the presence of feedback control, the directed transport can be improved significantly by increasing the feedback control strength under appropriate conditions. For large ensembles of particles, however, the feedback control will not obviously affect the transport of self-propelled particles. The present studies may be relevant to some applications in biology and nanotechnology, and provide the predicting results in experiments of active particles.

  1. Removal of bisphenol A and some heavy metal ions by polydivinylbenzene magnetic latex particles.

    PubMed

    Marzougui, Zied; Chaabouni, Amel; Elleuch, Boubaker; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic polydivinylbenzene latex particles MPDVB with a core-shell structure were tested for the removal of bisphenol A (BPA), copper Cu(II), lead Pb(II), and zinc Zn(II) from aqueous solutions by a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of different parameters, such as initial concentration of pollutant, contact time, adsorbent dose, and initial pH solution on the adsorption of the different adsorbates considered was investigated. The adsorption of BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) was found to be fast, and the equilibrium was achieved within 30 min. The pH 5-5.5 was found to be the most suitable pH for metal removal. The presence of electrolytes and their increasing concentration reduced the metal adsorption capacity of the adsorbent. Whereas, the optimal pH for BPA adsorption was found 7, both hydrogen bonds and π-π interaction were thought responsible for the adsorption of BPA on MPDVB. The adsorption kinetics of BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) were found to follow a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Equilibrium data for BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) adsorption were fitted well by the Langmuir isotherm model. Furthermore, the desorption and regeneration studies have proven that MPDVB can be employed repeatedly without impacting its adsorption capacity. PMID:26396007

  2. Heat removal from a stratified UO/sub 2/ - sodium-particle bed

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.W.; Lipinski, R.J.; Schwarz, M.L.

    1982-02-01

    The D6 Debris Bed Experiment is one in a series of Post Accident Heat Removal (PAHR) Experiments being conducted to investigate the coolability of debris beds which might exist as a result of a severe nuclear reactor accident. The D6 experiment is the first in the series to investigate the effects of particle size stratification, which would likely exist for many accident scenarios, on debris bed coolability. The D6 debris bed contained 4.87 kg of UO/sub 2/ particulate, which formed a bed 114 mm high and 102 mm in diameter. At low power, heat removal could be described by the conduction equation, with effective bed conductivity in agreement with the Kampf-Karsten relation to within ten percent. Single phase convection was not observed in the bed. The power required to achieve dryout ranged from 0.28 to 0.45 W/g for overlying bulk sodium temperatures which were from 315/sup 0/ to 485/sup 0/K below the saturation temperature. These powers are significantly below that which would be predicted by current models. Based on evaluation of the data, it appears that stratification suppresses convection, reduces the power required to achieve dryout, and suppresses the formation of vapor channels which would result in increased coolability.

  3. Facile synthesis of copper(II)-decorated magnetic particles for selective removal of hemoglobin from blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun; Ma, Xiangdong; Yao, Xin; Jia, Li

    2015-12-11

    In this report, the Cu(2+)-immobilized magnetic particles were prepared by a facile route and they were used as adsorbents for removal of high abundance of hemoglobin in blood based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid modified magnetic particles (EDTA-Fe3O4) were first synthesized through a one-pot solvothermal method and then charged with copper ions. The as-prepared Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry and zeta potential. Factors affecting the adsorption of bovine hemoglobin on Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles (including contact time, solution pH, ionic strength and initial concentration of protein) were investigated. The adsorption process followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the adsorption equilibrium could be achieved in 60min. The adsorption isotherm data could be well described by a Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity was 1250mgg(-1). The as-prepared particles showed high efficiency and excellent selectivity for removal of hemoglobin from bovine and human blood. The removal process integrated the selectivity of immobilized metal affinity chromatography and the convenience of magnetic separation. The results demonstrated that Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles had potential application in removal of abundant histidine-rich proteins in biomedical diagnosis analysis. PMID:26596870

  4. Controlling Charged Particles with Inhomogeneous Electrostatic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An energy analyzer for a charged-particle spectrometer may include a top deflection plate and a bottom deflection plate. The top and bottom deflection plates may be non-symmetric and configured to generate an inhomogeneous electrostatic field when a voltage is applied to one of the top or bottom deflection plates. In some instances, the top and bottom deflection plates may be L-shaped deflection plates.

  5. Flexible particle array structures by controlling polymer graft architecture.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jihoon; Dong, Hongchen; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Bockstaller, Michael R

    2010-09-15

    Surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization is used to synthesize particle brushes with controlled fraction of extended and relaxed conformations of surface-grafted chains. In the semidilute brush limit, the grafting of polymeric ligands is shown to facilitate the formation of ordered yet plastic-compliant particle array structures in which chain entanglements give rise to fracture through a polymer-like crazing process that dramatically increases the toughness and flexibility of the particle assembly. PMID:20726581

  6. Ammonium-Functionalized Hollow Polymer Particles As a pH-Responsive Adsorbent for Selective Removal of Acid Dye.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yan; Wang, Li; Zhao, Changwen; Chen, Dong; Ma, Yuhong; Yang, Wantai

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a novel type of ammonium-functionalized hollow polymer particles (HPP-NH3(+)) with a high density of ammonium groups in the shell has been specially designed and synthesized. Benefiting from both the high surface area and from the high density of positively charged ammonium groups, the as-prepared HPP-NH3(+) can serve as a selective adsorbent for the removal of negatively charged acid dye (e.g., methyl blue a-MB). The equilibrium adsorption data of a-MB on the HPP-NH3(+) were evaluated using Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models, and Langmuir isotherm exhibited a better fit with a maximum adsorption capacity of 406 mg/g. Most importantly, because of the presence of dual functional groups (ammonium and carboxyl groups), the HPP-NH3(+) showed a significant pH-dependent equilibrium adsorption capacity, which increased dramatically from 59 mg/g to 449 mg/g as the solution pH decreased from 9 to 2. This uniqueness makes the dye-adsorbed HPP-NH3(+) can be facilely regenerated under mild condition (in weak alkaline solution, pH 10) to recover both a-MB and the HPP-NH3(+), whereas the recovery of conventional adsorbents is commonly performed under particularly severe conditions. The regenerated HPP-NH3(+) can be reused for dye removal and the dye removal efficiency remained above 98% even after five adsorption-desorption cycles. Because of its high adsorption capacity, pH-sensitivity, easy regeneration, and good reusability, the HPP-NH3(+) has great potential for the application in the field of water treatment, controlled drug release, and pH-responsive delivery. PMID:27302068

  7. Controlled epitaxial graphene growth within removable amorphous carbon corrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, James; Kunc, Jan; Hu, Yike; Hankinson, John; Guo, Zelei; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A.

    2014-07-01

    We address the question of control of the silicon carbide (SiC) steps and terraces under epitaxial graphene on SiC and demonstrate amorphous carbon (aC) corrals as an ideal method to pin SiC surface steps. aC is compatible with graphene growth, structurally stable at high temperatures, and can be removed after graphene growth. For this, aC is first evaporated and patterned on SiC, then annealed in the graphene growth furnace. There at temperatures above 1200 °C, mobile SiC steps accumulate at the aC corral that provide effective step flow barriers. Aligned step free regions are thereby formed for subsequent graphene growth at temperatures above 1330 °C. Atomic force microscopy imaging supports the formation of step-free terraces on SiC with the step morphology aligned to the aC corrals. Raman spectroscopy indicates the presence of good graphene sheets on the step-free terraces.

  8. Controlled epitaxial graphene growth within removable amorphous carbon corrals

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, James; Hu, Yike; Hankinson, John; Guo, Zelei; Heer, Walt A. de; Kunc, Jan; Berger, Claire

    2014-07-14

    We address the question of control of the silicon carbide (SiC) steps and terraces under epitaxial graphene on SiC and demonstrate amorphous carbon (aC) corrals as an ideal method to pin SiC surface steps. aC is compatible with graphene growth, structurally stable at high temperatures, and can be removed after graphene growth. For this, aC is first evaporated and patterned on SiC, then annealed in the graphene growth furnace. There at temperatures above 1200 °C, mobile SiC steps accumulate at the aC corral that provide effective step flow barriers. Aligned step free regions are thereby formed for subsequent graphene growth at temperatures above 1330 °C. Atomic force microscopy imaging supports the formation of step-free terraces on SiC with the step morphology aligned to the aC corrals. Raman spectroscopy indicates the presence of good graphene sheets on the step-free terraces.

  9. Effects of surface charge, micro-bubble size and particle size on removal efficiency of electro-flotation.

    PubMed

    Han, M Y; Kim, M K; Ahn, H J

    2006-01-01

    Flotation is a water treatment alternative to sedimentation, and uses small bubbles to remove low-density particles from potable water and wastewater. The effect of zeta potential, bubble size and particle size on removal efficiency of the electro-flotation process was investigated because previous model-simulations indicated that these attributes are critical for high collision efficiency between micro-bubbles and particles. Solutions containing Al3+ as the metal ion were subjected to various conditions. The zeta potentials of bubbles and particles were similar under identical conditions, and their charges were influenced by metal ion concentration and pH. Maximum removal efficiency was 98 and 12% in the presence and absence of flocculation, respectively. Removal efficiency was higher when particle size was similar to bubble size. These results agree with modelling simulations and indicate that collision efficiency is greater when the zeta potential of one is negative and that of the other is positive and when their sizes are similar. PMID:16752773

  10. Microfluidic Controlled Conformal Coating of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Scott; Wexler, Jason; Wan, Jiandi; Stone, Howard

    2011-11-01

    Coating flows are an important class of fluid mechanics problems. Typically a substrate is coated with a moving continuous film, but it is also possible to consider coating of discrete objects. In particular, in applications involving coating of particles that are useful in drug delivery, the coatings act as drug-carrying vehicles, while in cell therapy a thin polymeric coating is required to protect the cells from the host's immune system. Although many functional capabilities have been developed for lab-on-a-chip devices, a technique for coating has not been demonstrated. We present a microfluidic platform developed to coat micron-size spheres with a thin aqueous layer by magnetically pulling the particles from the aqueous phase to the non-aqueous phase in a co-flow. Coating thickness can be adjusted by the average fluid speed and the number of beads encapsulated inside a single coat is tuned by the ratio of magnetic to interfacial forces acting on the beads.

  11. Dislodgement and removal of dust-particles from a surface by a technique combining acoustic standing wave and airflow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Wu, Junru

    2010-01-01

    It is known that there are many fine particles on the moon and Mars. Their existence may cause risk for the success of a long-term project for NASA, i.e., exploration and habitation of the moon and Mars. These dust-particles might cover the solar panels, making them fail to generate electricity, and they might also penetrate through seals on space suits, hatches, and vehicle wheels causing many incidents. The fine particles would be hazardous to human health if they were inhaled. Development of robust dust mitigation technology is urgently needed for the viable long-term exploration and habilitation of either the moon or Mars. A feasibility study to develop a dust removal technique, which may be used in space-stations or other enclosures for habitation, is reported. It is shown experimentally that the acoustic radiation force produced by a 13.8 kHz 128 dB sound-level standing wave between a 3 cm-aperture tweeter and a reflector separated by 9 cm is strong enough to overcome the van der Waals adhesive force between the dust-particles and the reflector-surface. Thus the majority of fine particles (>2 microm diameter) on a reflector-surface can be dislodged and removed by a technique combining acoustic levitation and airflow methods. The removal efficiency deteriorates for particles of less than 2 microm in size. PMID:20058949

  12. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  13. Quantification of online removal of refractory black carbon using laser-induced incandescence in the single particle soot photometer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aiken, Allison C.; McMeeking, Gavin R.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; DeMott, Paul J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2016-04-05

    Refractory black carbon (rBC) is an aerosol that has important impacts on climate and human health. rBC is often mixed with other species, making it difficult to isolate and quantify its important effects on physical and optical properties of ambient aerosol. To solve this measurement challenge, a new method to remove rBC was developed using laser-induced incandescence (LII) by Levin et al. in 2014. Application of the method with the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) is used to determine the effects of rBC on ice nucleating particles (INP). Here, we quantify the efficacy of the method in the laboratory usingmore » the rBC surrogate Aquadag. Polydisperse and mobility-selected samples (100–500 nm diameter, 0.44–36.05 fg), are quantified by a second SP2. Removal rates are reported by mass and number. For the mobility-selected samples, the average percentages removed by mass and number of the original size are 88.9 ± 18.6% and 87.3 ± 21.9%, respectively. Removal of Aquadag is efficient for particles >100 nm mass-equivalent diameter (dme), enabling application for microphysical studies. However, the removal of particles ≤100 nm dme is less efficient. Absorption and scattering measurements are reported to assess its use to isolate brown carbon (BrC) absorption. Scattering removal rates for the mobility-selected samples are >90% on average, yet absorption rates are 53% on average across all wavelengths. Therefore, application to isolate effects of microphysical properties determined by larger sizes is promising, but will be challenging for optical properties. Lastly, the results reported also have implications for other instruments employing internal LII, e.g., the Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS).« less

  14. Pyrene removal from contaminated soils by modified Fenton oxidation using iron nano particles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The problems related to conventional Fenton oxidation, including low pH required and production of considerable amounts of sludge have led researchers to investigate chelating agents which might improve the operating range of pH and the use of nano iron particle to reduce the excess sludge. The pyrene removal from contaminated soils by modified Fenton oxidation at neutral pH was defined as the main objective of the current study. Methods Varying concentrations of H2O2 (0-500 mM) and iron nano oxide (0-60 mM), reaction times of 0.5-24 hours and variety of chelating agents including sodium pyrophosphate, sodium citrate, ethylene diamine tetraacetic, fulvic and humic acid were all investigated at pyrene concentration levels of 100 – 500 mg/kg. Results By applying the following conditions (H2O2 concentration of 300 mM, iron nano oxide of 30 mM, sodium pyrophosphate as chelating agent, pH 3 and reaction time of 6 hours) the pyrene removal efficiency at an initial concentration of 100 mg/kg was found to be 99%. As a result, the pyrene concentration was reduced from 100 to 93 mg/kg once the above optimum conditions are met. Conclusions In this research, the modified Fenton oxidation using iron nano oxide at optimum conditions is introduced as an efficient alternative method in lab scale for chemical remediation or pre-treatment of soils contaminated by pyrene at neutral pH. PMID:24499620

  15. Control of Lateral Inertial Migration Rate of Particles in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Armin; Roy, Rishav; Bray, Sam; di Carlo, Dino

    2015-11-01

    The net inertial lift force acting on particles results in lateral inertial migration across streams. The migration direction and magnitude is strongly dependent on channel geometry, size of the particle, Reynolds number and location of the particle within the channel cross-section. In many chemical and biological applications in which precise temporal control and solution exchange around particles is required, the initial variation in distribution of focusing positions of particles within the channel cross-section becomes a determining factor. This variation is shown to be a limiting factor in achieving precise control over the migration time in previous studies. In order to improve uniformity of the average migration rate, a microfluidic device is designed to aid particles in achieving a single stable equilibrium position by inducing a net helical flow. Using this inertial focusing platform, a comprehensive numerical and experimental study is performed to characterize the range of lateral migration rates for rigid spherical particles as a function of particle size, initial particle position, flow rates of each stream and Reynolds number for a given channel geometry. The tool developed in this study can be used to achieve precise migration characteristics for the microparticles crossing fluid streams in microchannels over millisecond time scales. Visiting student from IIT.

  16. Sonochemical synthesis of silica particles and their size control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwa-Min; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Bonghwan

    2016-09-01

    Using an ultrasound-assisted sol-gel method, we successfully synthesized very uniformly shaped, monodisperse, and size-controlled spherical silica particles from a mixture of ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of ammonia as catalyst, at room temperature. The diameters of the silica particles were distributed in the range from 40 to 400 nm; their morphology was well characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The silica particle size could be adjusted by choosing suitable concentrations of ammonium hydroxide and water, which in turn determined the nucleation and growth rates of the particles during the reaction. This sonochemical-based silica synthesis offers an alternative way to produce spherical silica particles in a relatively short reaction time. Thus, we suggest that this simple, low-cost, and efficient method of preparing uniform silica particles of various sizes will have practical and wide-ranging industrial applicability.

  17. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system particle removal system development

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, M.

    1994-03-01

    Solar Turbines developed a direct coal-fueled turbine system (DCFT) and tested each component in subscale facilities and the combustion system was tested at full-scale. The combustion system was comprised of a two-stage slagging combustor with an impact separator between the two combustors. Greater than 90 percent of the native ash in the coal was removed as liquid slag with this system. In the first combustor, coal water slurry mixture (CWM) was injected into a combustion chamber which was operated loan to suppress NO{sub x} formation. The slurry was introduced through four fuel injectors that created a toroidal vortex because of the combustor geometry and angle of orientation of the injectors. The liquid slag that was formed was directed downward toward an impaction plate made of a refractory material. Sixty to seventy percent of the coal-borne ash was collected in this fashion. An impact separator was used to remove additional slag that had escaped the primary combustor. The combined particulate collection efficiency from both combustors was above 95 percent. Unfortunately, a great deal of the original sulfur from the coal still remained in the gas stream and needed to be separated. To accomplish this, dolomite or hydrated lime were injected in the secondary combustor to react with the sulfur dioxide and form calcium sulfite and sulfates. This solution for the sulfur problem increased the dust concentrations to as much as 6000 ppmw. A downstream particulate control system was required, and one that could operate at 150 psia, 1850-1900{degrees}F and with low pressure drop. Solar designed and tested a particulate rejection system to remove essentially all particulate from the high temperature, high pressure gas stream. A thorough research and development program was aimed at identifying candidate technologies and testing them with Solar`s coal-fired system. This topical report summarizes these activities over a period beginning in 1987 and ending in 1992.

  18. Enhanced Removal of Hydrophobic Gas by Aerial Ultrasonic Waves and Two Kinds of Water Mists of Different Particle Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Keisuke; Miura, Hikaru

    2012-07-01

    Air pollutants can cause health problems, such as bronchitis and cancer, and are now recognized as a social problem. Hence, a method is proposed for the collection and removal of gaseous air pollutants by aerial ultrasonic waves and water mist. Typically, gas removal effects are studied using lemon oil vapor (“lemon gas”), which is a hydrophobic gas. Previous experiments using lemon gas have shown that a removal rate of up to 40% can be achieved in an intense standing wave at 20 kHz, for an amount of water mist of 1.39 cm3/s and an electrical input power of 50 W. Increasing the surface area of the water mist leads to greater removal of hydrophobic gas. In this study, the effects of gas removal are examined by conducting experiments using intense aerial ultrasonic waves to disperse two kinds of water mists, each composed of particles of different sizes: small particles (diameter: ≈3 µm) and conventional large particles (diameter: ≈60 µm).

  19. Removal of heavy metals in wastewater by using zeolite nano-particles impregnated polysulfone membranes.

    PubMed

    Yurekli, Yilmaz

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the adsorption and the filtration processes were coupled by a zeolite nanoparticle impregnated polysulfone (PSf) membrane which was used to remove the lead and the nickel cations from synthetically prepared solutions. The results obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis indicated that the synthesized zeolite nanoparticles, using conventional hydrothermal method, produced a pure NaX with ultrafine and uniform particles. The performance of the hybrid membrane was determined under dynamic conditions. The results also revealed that the sorption capacity as well as the water hydraulic permeability of the membranes could both be improved by simply tuning the membrane fabricating conditions such as evaporation period of the casting film and NaX loading. The maximum sorption capacity of the hybrid membrane for the lead and nickel ions was measured as 682 and 122 mg/g respectively at the end of 60 min of filtration, under 1 bar of transmembrane pressure. The coupling process suggested that the membrane architecture could be efficiently used for treating metal solutions with low concentrations and transmembrane pressures. PMID:26874311

  20. Procedure to Evaluate the Efficiency of Flocculants for the Removal of Dispersed Particles from Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Buyel, Johannes F

    2016-01-01

    Plants are important to humans not only because they provide commodities such as food, feed and raw materials, but increasingly because they can be used as manufacturing platforms for added-value products such as biopharmaceuticals. In both cases, liquid plant extracts may need to be clarified to remove particulates. Optimal clarification reduces the costs of filtration and centrifugation by increasing capacity and longevity. This can be achieved by introducing charged polymers known as flocculants, which cross-link dispersed particles to facilitate solid-liquid separation. There are no mechanistic flocculation models for complex mixtures such as plant extracts so empirical models are used instead. Here a design-of-experiments procedure is described that allows the rapid screening of different flocculants, optimizing the clarification of plant extracts and significantly reducing turbidity. The resulting predictive models allow the identification of robust process conditions and sets of polymers with complementary properties, e.g. effective flocculation in extracts with specific conductivities. The results presented for tobacco leaf extracts can easily be adapted to other plant species or tissues and will thus facilitate the development of more cost-effective downstream processes for commodities and plant-derived pharmaceuticals. PMID:27166577

  1. Applications of Nuclear Track Membranes to Filtration of Medical Injections and Various Transfusions to Remove Solid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi-Bo; Guo, S.-L.

    Nuclear track membranes produced by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) in Beijing, China, and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia have been used in the studies of filtration of medical injections and various transfusion liquid medicine to remove solid particles from the medicine. It shows that the filtration devices made of nuclear track membranes are superior to that made of any other types of membranes. Experiments have demonstrated that the removal efficiencies for solid particles with diameters 5 μm can reach over 95% and the flow rate is high enough for use in medical injection and transfusion. The reproducibility of removal efficiencies and flow rate of the new devices are satisfactory to the use in hospitals. Chinese authority in medicine has approved the new devices for use in Chinese hospitals.

  2. Controlling Particle Morphologies at Fluid Interfaces: Macro- and Micro- approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beesabathuni, Shilpa Naidu

    The controlled generation of varying shaped particles is important for many applications: consumer goods, biomedical diagnostics, food processing, adsorbents and pharmaceuticals which can benefit from the availability of geometrically complex and chemically inhomogeneous particles. This thesis presents two approaches to spherical and non-spherical particle synthesis using macro and microfluidics. In the first approach, a droplet microfluidic technique is explored to fabricate spherical conducting polymer, polyaniline, particles with precise control over morphology and functionality. Microfluidics has recently emerged as an important alternate to the synthesis of complex particles. The conducting polymer, polyaniline, is widely used and known for its stability, high conductivity, and favorable redox properties. In this approach, monodisperse micron-sized polyaniline spherical particles were synthesized using two-phase droplet microfluidics from Aniline and Ammonium persulfate oxidative polymerization in an oil-based continuous phase. The morphology of the polymerized particles is porous in nature which can be used for encapsulation as well as controlled release applications. Encapsulation of an enzyme, glucose oxidase, was also performed using the technique to synthesize microspheres for glucose sensing. The polymer microspheres were characterized using SEM, UV-Vis and EDX to understand the relationship between their microstructure and stability. In the second approach, molten drop impact in a cooling aqueous medium to generate non-spherical particles was explored. Viscoelastic wax based materials are widely used in many applications and their performance and application depends on the particle morphology and size. The deformation of millimeter size molten wax drops as they impacted an immiscible liquid interface was investigated. Spherical molten wax drops impinged on a cooling water bath, then deformed and as a result of solidification were arrested into various

  3. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control.

    PubMed

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Birkedal, Henrik; Olsen, Jakob; Skovgaard, Jonas; Sutherland, Duncan S; Wejse, Peter L; Nyvad, Bente; Meyer, Rikke L

    2016-01-01

    Caries is caused by acid production in biofilms on dental surfaces. Preventing caries therefore involves control of microorganisms and/or the acid produced. Here, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles are presented as a new approach to caries control. The particles are made by co-precipitation and designed to bind to bacteria in biofilms, impede biofilm build-up without killing the microflora, and release phosphate ions to buffer bacterial acid production if the pH decreases below 6. Analysis of biofilm formation and pH in a five-species biofilm model for dental caries showed that treatment with particles or pure osteopontin led to less biofilm formation compared to untreated controls or biofilms treated with osteopontin-free particles. The anti-biofilm effect can thus be ascribed to osteopontin. The particles also led to a slower acidification of the biofilm after exposure to glucose, and the pH always remained above 5.5. Hence, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles show potential for applications in caries control. PMID:26923119

  4. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  5. Morphological Control and Characterization of Monodispersed Ceria Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Minamidate, Y.; Yin, S.; Devaraju, M. K.; Sato, T.

    2010-11-24

    The morphological control of cerium oxide particles was carried out by a homogeneous precipitation followed by calcination in air at 400 deg. C. The effects of pre-aging temperature, aging time and precipitation reagents on the morphologies of final products were investigated. When urea was used as a precipitation reagent, monodispersed spherical and flake-like cerium carbonate hydroxide precursor was precipitated in the solution at 90 deg. C for 2 h after pre-aging at 25 deg. C - 50 deg. C for 24-72 h. On the other hand, monodispersed nanosize rod-like cerium hydroxide particles were obtained using triethanolamine as precipitation reagent. Ceria particles with the same morphologies and slightly smaller particle size than those of as-prepared cerium precursor could be obtained after calcination in air at 400 deg. C. Physical-chemical characteristics of the monodispersed cerium oxide particles were evaluated.

  6. Control over Colloidal Particle Morphology by Dispersion Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, B.

    2013-03-01

    The main subject of this thesis is the structure and morphology control of colloidal polymer particles, in particular, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles, by dispersion polymerization in polar solvents. The structure control, ranging from surface morphology and internal structure to shape manipulation of polymer particles, was attempted through copolymerization of monomers with various types of materials, such as cross-linkers, dyes, and colloidal silica spheres or rods. The obtained spherical or non-spherical particles are interesting as model systems as they mimic molecules at colloidal scales. Their phase behavior can be studied in the presence or absence of external fields (like electric and gravity fields). Additionally, they can be used for various applications, such as photonic crystals

  7. Investigation of the Profile Control Mechanisms of Dispersed Particle Gel

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guang; Dai, Caili; Zhao, Mingwei

    2014-01-01

    Dispersed particle gel (DPG) particles of nano- to micron- to mm-size have been prepared successfully and will be used for profile control treatment in mature oilfields. The profile control and enhanced oil recovery mechanisms of DPG particles have been investigated using core flow tests and visual simulation experiments. Core flow test results show that DPG particles can easily be injected into deep formations and can effectively plug the high permeability zones. The high profile improvement rate improves reservoir heterogeneity and diverts fluid into the low permeability zone. Both water and oil permeability were reduced when DPG particles were injected, but the disproportionate permeability reduction effect was significant. Water permeability decreases more than the oil permeability to ensure that oil flows in its own pathways and can easily be driven out. Visual simulation experiments demonstrate that DPG particles can pass directly or by deformation through porous media and enter deep formations. By retention, adsorption, trapping and bridging, DPG particles can effectively reduce the permeability of porous media in high permeability zones and divert fluid into a low permeability zone, thus improving formation profiles and enhancing oil recovery. PMID:24950174

  8. Silylated Precision Particles for Controlled Release of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandehlou, Khosrow; Kumbhar, Amar S.; Habibi, Sohrab; Pandya, Ashish A.; Luft, J. Christopher; Khan, Saad A.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    With the recent advances in the development of novel protein based therapeutics, controlled delivery of these biologics is an important area of research. Herein, we report the synthesis of microparticles from bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein using Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINT) with specific size and shape. These particles were functionalized at room temperature using multifunctional chlorosilane that cross-link the particles to render them to slowly-dissolving in aqueous media. Mass spectrometric study of the reaction products of diisopropyldichlorosilane with individual components of the particles revealed that they are capable of reacting and forming cross-links. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were also used to confirm the functionalization of the particles. Cross sectional analysis using focused ion beam (FIB) and EDS proved that the functionalization occurs throughout the bulk of the particles and is not just limited to the surface. Circular dichroism data confirmed that the fraction of BSA molecules released from the particles retains its secondary structure thereby indicating that the system can be used for delivering protein based formulations while controlling the dissolution kinetics. PMID:25742193

  9. Control of Respirable Particles in Indoor Air with Portable AirCleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-10-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles using in situ chamber decay tests. Following injection of cigarette smoke in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size with and without air cleaner operation. The size distribution of the tobacco smoke particles was log normal with a count median diameter of 0.15 {micro}m and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Without air cleaner operation, the natural mass-averaged surface deposition rate of particles was observed to be 0.1 h{sup -1}. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filter devices, a residential-sized ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. Electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters removed particles at substantial rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner studied.

  10. Controlled particle transport in a plasma chamber with striped electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Ke; Li Yangfang; Shimizu, T.; Konopka, U.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-12-15

    The controlled transport of micrometer size dust particles in a parallel-plate radio frequency discharge has been investigated. The lower stainless steel electrode consisted of 100 independently controllable electrical metal stripes. The voltage signals on these stripes were modulated, causing traveling plasma sheath distortions. Because the particles trapped in local potential wells moved according to the direction of the distortion, the transport velocity could be actively controlled by adjusting frequencies and phase shifts of the applied periodic voltage signals. To investigate the detailed principle of this transport, molecular dynamic simulations was performed to reproduce the observations with the plasma background conditions calculated by separated particle-in-cell simulations for the experimental parameters. The findings will help develop novel technologies for investigating large-scale complex plasma systems and techniques for achieving clean environments in plasma processing reactors.

  11. Whole house particle removal and clean air delivery rates for in-duct and portable ventilation systems.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, David L; Myatt, Theodore A; Ludwig, Jerry F; Baker, Brian J; Suh, Helen H; Spengler, John D

    2008-11-01

    A novel method for determining whole house particle removal and clean air delivery rates attributable to central and portable ventilation/air cleaning systems is described. The method is used to characterize total and air-cleaner-specific particle removal rates during operation of four in-duct air cleaners and two portable air-cleaning devices in a fully instrumented test home. Operation of in-duct and portable air cleaners typically increased particle removal rates over the baseline rates determined in the absence of operating a central fan or an indoor air cleaner. Removal rates of 0.3- to 0.5-microm particles ranged from 1.5 hr(-1) during operation of an in-duct, 5-in. pleated media filter to 7.2 hr(-1) for an in-duct electrostatic air cleaner in comparison to a baseline rate of 0 hr(-1) when the air handler was operating without a filter. Removal rates for total particulate matter less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) mass concentrations were 0.5 hr(-1) under baseline conditions, 0.5 hr(-1) during operation of three portable ionic air cleaners, 1 hr(-1) for an in-duct 1-in. media filter, 2.4 hr(-1) for a single high-efficiency particle arrestance (HEPA) portable air cleaner, 4.6 hr(-1) for an in-duct 5-in. media filter, 4.7 hr(-1) during operation of five portable HEPA filters, 6.1 hr(-1) for a conventional in-duct electronic air cleaner, and 7.5 hr(-1) for a high efficiency in-duct electrostatic air cleaner. Corresponding whole house clean air delivery rates for PM2.5 attributable to the air cleaner independent of losses within the central ventilation system ranged from 2 m3/min for the conventional media filter to 32 m3/min for the high efficiency in-duct electrostatic device. Except for the portable ionic air cleaner, the devices considered here increased particle removal indoors over baseline deposition rates. PMID:19044163

  12. A comparison of biologically active filters for the removal of ozone by-products, turbidity, and particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, B.M.; Krasner, S.W.; Sclimenti, M.J.; Hacker, P.A.; Gramith, J.T.

    1996-11-01

    Biofiltration tests were performed at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California`s 5.5-mgd (21,000 m{sup 3}d) demonstration plant using two 400 ft{sup 2} (37 m{sup 2}) anthracite/sand filters and a 6 ft{sup 2} (0.56 m{sup 2}) granular activated carbon (GAC)/sand filter operated in parallel. The empty-bed contact time (EBCT) within the GAC and anthracite ranged from 2.1-3.1 min. The filters were evaluated based on (1) conventional filtration performance (turbidity, particle removal, and headloss); (2) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products (assimilable organic carbon [AOC], aldehydes, and aldoketoacids) after startup; (3) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products at steady state; and (4) resistance to short-term process upsets such as intermittent chlorination or filter out-of-service time. Approximately 80 percent formaldehyde removal was achieved by the anthracite/sand filter operated at a 2.1-min EBCT (6 gpm/ft{sup 2} [15 m/h]) within 8 days of ozone operation. The GAC/sand filter operated at the same rate achieved 80 percent removal within 1 day, possibly as an additive effect of adsorption and biological removal. In-depth aldehyde monitoring at four depths (0.5-min EBCT intervals) provided additional insight into the removal kinetics. During periods of warmer water temperature, from 20 to 48 percent of the AOC was removed in the flocculation/sedimentation basins by 40-75 percent. This percentage removal typically resulted in AOC concentrations within 40 {mu}g C/L of the raw, unozonated water levels.

  13. An Optically Controlled Microscale Elevator Using Plasmonic Janus Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report how Janus particles, composed of a silica sphere with a gold half-shell, can be not only stably trapped by optical tweezers but also displaced controllably along the axis of the laser beam through a complex interplay between optical and thermal forces. Scattering forces orient the asymmetric particle, while strong absorption on the metal side induces a thermal gradient, resulting in particle motion. An increase in the laser power leads to an upward motion of the particle, while a decrease leads to a downward motion. We study this reversible axial displacement, including a hysteretic jump in the particle position that is a result of the complex pattern of a tightly focused laser beam structure above the focal plane. As a first application we simultaneously trap a spherical gold nanoparticle and show that we can control the distance between the two particles inside the trap. This photonic micron-scale “elevator” is a promising tool for thermal force studies, remote sensing, and optical and thermal micromanipulation experiments. PMID:25950013

  14. Optofluidics incorporating actively controlled micro- and nano-particles

    PubMed Central

    Kayani, Aminuddin A.; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Ward, Stephanie A.; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2012-01-01

    The advent of optofluidic systems incorporating suspended particles has resulted in the emergence of novel applications. Such systems operate based on the fact that suspended particles can be manipulated using well-appointed active forces, and their motions, locations and local concentrations can be controlled. These forces can be exerted on both individual and clusters of particles. Having the capability to manipulate suspended particles gives users the ability for tuning the physical and, to some extent, the chemical properties of the suspension media, which addresses the needs of various advanced optofluidic systems. Additionally, the incorporation of particles results in the realization of novel optofluidic solutions used for creating optical components and sensing platforms. In this review, we present different types of active forces that are used for particle manipulations and the resulting optofluidic systems incorporating them. These systems include optical components, optofluidic detection and analysis platforms, plasmonics and Raman systems, thermal and energy related systems, and platforms specifically incorporating biological particles. We conclude the review with a discussion of future perspectives, which are expected to further advance this rapidly growing field. PMID:23864925

  15. Controlling Lateral Inertial Migration Rate of Particles in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Armin; Bray, Samuel; di Carlo, Dino

    2014-11-01

    It was previously demonstrated that particles in confined channels can migrate across streams due to the net inertial lift force acting on them. The initial location of particles within the channel cross-section is shown to effect the migration time as particles starting at different locations experience a different history of lift forces. This initial variation in distribution of focusing positions of particles upstream was a limiting factor in achieving precise control over the migration time in previous studies. In order to improve uniformity of the focusing position, a set of sequential cylindrical pillars is integrated to one side of the channel which is shown to aid particles in achieving a single stable equilibrium position, by inducing a net helical flow. The modified focusing positions are characterized as a function of pillar diameter and spacing for various channel Reynolds numbers. Using this initial focusing channel, a comprehensive numerical and experimental study is performed to characterize the range of lateral migration rate for particles as a function of particle position, and flow rates of each stream for a given finite Reynolds number and channel geometry. The tool developed in this study can be used to achieve precise migration characteristics for the microparticles crossing fluid streams in microchannels.

  16. Nanosize cobalt boride particles: Control of the size and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, C.; Pileni, M. P.

    1997-02-01

    Cobalt boride is obtained by the reduction of cobalt (2-ethyl hexyl) sulfosuccinate, Co(AOT) 2, by sodium borohydride either in reverse micelles or in a diphasic system. In Co(AOT) 2/Na(AOT)/H 2O reverse micellar solution, the size and polydispersity of the Co 2B particles is controlled by the size of the water droplets, which increases from 4 to 7.5 nm by increasing the water content. In a diphasic system of Co(AOT) 2/isooctane and sodium borohydride in aqueous solution, large and polydisperse particles of cobalt boride are formed (˜ 10 nm), and their magnetization properties are presented. The smallest particles are in a superparamagnetic regime at room temperature, whereas the largest particles show ferromagnetic behavior.

  17. Controllable fabrication and characterization of biocompatible core-shell particles and hollow capsules as drug carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lingyun; Gong, Xinglong; Xuan, Shouhu; Zhang, Hong; Gong, Xiuqing; Jiang, Wanquan; Chen, Zuyao

    2006-10-01

    SiO 2@CdSe core-shell particles were fabricated by controllable deposition CdSe nanoparticles on silica colloidal spheres. Step-wise coating process was tracked by the TEM and XRD measurements. In addition, SiO 2@CdSe/polypyrrole(PPy) multi-composite particles were synthesized based on the as-prepared SiO 2@CdSe particles by cationic polymerization. The direct electrochemistry of myoglobin (Mb) could be performed by immobilizing Mb on the surface of SiO 2@CdSe particles. Immobilized with Mb, SiO 2@CdSe/PPy-Mb also displayed good bioelectrochemical activity. It confirmed the good biocompatible property of the materials with protein. CdSe hollow capsules were further obtained as the removal of the cores of SiO 2@CdSe spheres. Hollow and porous character of CdSe sub-meter size capsules made them becoming hopeful candidates as drug carriers. Doxorubicin, a typical an antineoplastic drug, was introduced into the capsules. A good sustained drug release behavior of the loading capsules was discovered via performing a release test in the PBS buffer (pH 7.4) solution at 310 k. Furthermore, SiO 2@CdSe/PPy could be converted to various smart hollow capsules via selectively removal of their relevant components.

  18. Atomic Bose-Hubbard Systems with Single-Particle Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Philipp Moritz

    Experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide outstanding opportunities to realize exotic quantum states due to a high degree of tunability and control. In this thesis, I present experiments that extend this control from global parameters to the level of individual particles. Using a quantum gas microscope for 87Rb, we have developed a single-site addressing scheme based on digital amplitude holograms. The system self-corrects for aberrations in the imaging setup and creates arbitrary beam profiles. We are thus able to shape optical potentials on the scale of single lattice sites and control the dynamics of individual atoms. We study the role of quantum statistics and interactions in the Bose-Hubbard model on the fundamental level of two particles. Bosonic quantum statistics are apparent in the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of massive particles, which we observe in tailored double-well potentials. These underlying statistics, in combination with tunable repulsive interactions, dominate the dynamics in single- and two-particle quantum walks. We observe highly coherent position-space Bloch oscillations, bosonic bunching in Hanbury Brown-Twiss interference and the fermionization of strongly interacting bosons. Many-body states of indistinguishable quantum particles are characterized by large-scale spatial entanglement, which is difficult to detect in itinerant systems. Here, we extend the concept of Hong-Ou-Mandel interference from individual particles to many-body states to directly quantify entanglement entropy. We perform collective measurements on two copies of a quantum state and detect entanglement entropy through many-body interference. We measure the second order Renyi entropy in small Bose-Hubbard systems and detect the buildup of spatial entanglement across the superfluid-insulator transition. Our experiments open new opportunities for the single-particle-resolved preparation and characterization of many-body quantum states.

  19. Entropic control of particle sizes during viral self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelnovo, M.; Muriaux, D.; Faivre-Moskalenko, C.

    2013-03-01

    Morphologic diversity is observed across all families of viruses. However, these supra-molecular assemblies are produced most of the time in a spontaneous way through complex molecular self-assembly scenarios. The modeling of these phenomena remains a challenging problem within the emerging field of physical virology. We present in this work a theoretical analysis aiming at highlighting the particular role of configuration entropy in the control of viral particle size distribution. Specializing this model to retroviruses such as HIV-1, we predict a new mechanism of entropic control of both RNA uptake into the viral particle and of the particle's size distribution. Evidence of this peculiar behavior has recently been reported experimentally.

  20. Chemistry with spatial control using particles and streams†

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Yevgeniy V.; Murali, Adithya

    2012-01-01

    Spatial control of chemical reactions, with micro- and nanometer scale resolution, has important consequences for one pot synthesis, engineering complex reactions, developmental biology, cellular biochemistry and emergent behavior. We review synthetic methods to engineer this spatial control using chemical diffusion from spherical particles, shells and polyhedra. We discuss systems that enable both isotropic and anisotropic chemical release from isolated and arrayed particles to create inhomogeneous and spatially patterned chemical fields. In addition to such finite chemical sources, we also discuss spatial control enabled with laminar flow in 2D and 3D microfluidic networks. Throughout the paper, we highlight applications of spatially controlled chemistry in chemical kinetics, reaction-diffusion systems, chemotaxis and morphogenesis. PMID:23145348

  1. NEW CHARGED FOG GENERATOR FOR INHALABLE PARTICLE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of a new charged fog generator (CFG) by modifying a commercial rotary atomizer. Extensive field tests of the CFG (at a bentonite ore unloading operation) were performed to determine the dependence of its inhalable particle control efficiency (...

  2. SPRAY CHARGING AND TRAPPING SCRUBBER FOR FUGITIVE PARTICLE EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a theoretical and experimental evaluation of the control of fugitive particle emissions (FPE) with a Spray Charging and Trapping (SCAT) Scrubber that uses an air curtain and/or jets to contain, convey, and divert the FPE into a charged spray scrubber. ...

  3. FUGITIVE AND FINE PARTICLE CONTROL USING ELECTROSTATICALLY CHARGED FOG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of fugitive and fine particle control using electrostatically charged fog. Most industrial pollutants acquire an electrostatic charge as they are dispersed into the air. Exposing this charged airborne material to an oppositely charged water fog...

  4. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and Burrows pond rearing system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal efficiency, and measures of velocity using several tools. Computational fluid dynamics was used first to characterize hydraulics in the proposed retrofit that included removal of the traditional Burrows pond dividing wall and establishment of four counter rotating cells with appropriate drains and inlet water jets. Hydraulic residence time was subsequently established in the four full scale test tanks using measures of conductivity of a salt tracer introduced into the systems both with and without fish present. Vertical and horizontal velocities were also measured with acoustic Doppler velocimetry in transects across each of the rearing systems. Finally, we introduced ABS sinking beads that simulated fish solids then followed the kinetics of their removal via the drains to establish relative purge rates. The mixed cell raceway provided higher mean velocities and a more uniform velocity distribution than did the Burrows pond. Vectors revealed well-defined, counter-rotating cells in the mixed cell raceway, and were likely contributing factors in achieving a relatively high particle removal efficiency-88.6% versus 8.0% during the test period. We speculate retrofits of rearing ponds to mixed cell systems will improve both the rearing environments for the fish and solids removal, improving the efficiency and bio-security of fish culture. We recommend further testing in hatchery production trials to evaluate fish physiology and growth.

  5. Method for non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis

    DOEpatents

    Goddard, Gregory Russ; Kaduchak, Gregory; Jett, James Hubert; Graves, Steven Wayde

    2013-09-10

    One or more of the embodiments of the present invention provide for a method of non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis which includes axial and radial acoustic standing wave fields. Particles are suspended in an aqueous solution, and this solution then flows into the cylindrical flow channel. While the solution flows through the flow channel, the outer structure of the flow channel is vibrated at a resonant frequency, causing a radial acoustic standing wave field to form inside the flow channel in the solution. These radial acoustic standing waves focus the particles suspended in the solution to the center axis of the cylindrical flow channel. At the same time, a transducer is used to create an axial acoustic standing wave field in the flow channel parallel to the axis of the flow channel. This drives the particles, which are already being focused to the center axis of the flow channel, to nodes or anti-nodes of the axial standing wave at half-wavelength intervals, depending on whether the particles are more or less dense and more or less compressible than the surrounding fluid.

  6. Boosting target tracking using particle filter with flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshtagh, Nima; Chan, Moses W.

    2013-05-01

    Target detection and tracking with passive infrared (IR) sensors can be challenging due to significant degradation and corruption of target signature by atmospheric transmission and clutter effects. This paper summarizes our efforts in phenomenology modeling of boosting targets with IR sensors, and developing algorithms for tracking targets in the presence of background clutter. On the phenomenology modeling side, the clutter images are generated using a high fidelity end-to-end simulation testbed. It models atmospheric transmission, structured clutter and solar reflections to create realistic background images. The dynamics and intensity of a boosting target are modeled and injected onto the background scene. Pixel level images are then generated with respect to the sensor characteristics. On the tracking analysis side, a particle filter for tracking targets in a sequence of clutter images is developed. The particle filter is augmented with a mechanism to control particle flow. Specifically, velocity feedback is used to constrain and control the particles. The performance of the developed "adaptive" particle filter is verified with tracking of a boosting target in the presence of clutter and occlusion.

  7. Engineering and characterization of mesoporous silica-coated magnetic particles for mercury removal from industrial effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jie; Xu, Zhenghe; Wang, Feng

    2008-03-01

    Mesoporous silica coatings were synthesized on dense liquid silica-coated magnetite particles using cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium chloride (CTAC) as molecular templates, followed by sol-gel process. A specific surface area of the synthesized particles as high as 150 m 2/g was obtained. After functionalization with mercapto-propyl-trimethoxy-silane (MPTS) through silanation reaction, the particles exhibited high affinity of mercury in aqueous solutions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), zeta potential measurement, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) were used to characterize the synthesis processes, surface functionalization, and mercury adsorption on the synthesized magnetite particles. The loading capacity of the particles for mercury was determined to be as high as 14 mg/g at pH 2. A unique feature of strong magnetism of the synthesized nanocomposite particles makes the subsequent separation of the magnetic sorbents from complex multiphase suspensions convenient and effective.

  8. Changes in Fish Habitat And Demography Following Dam Removal in a Headwater Catchment: Linking Geomorphic, Hydrologic, and Ecological Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magilligan, F. J.; Nislow, K. H.; Kynard, B.; Hackman, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Dam removal is a major component of river restoration efforts in New England. More than 115 dams have been removed in the past few decades with the goal to restore historical runs of diadromous fish. Taking advantage of the Fall 2012 removal of the 5 m high Pelham Dam in central Massachusetts, we sampled pre- and post-removal geomorphic parameters (18 cross-sections along a 800 m reach, Wolman pebble counts, embeddedness surveys, and detailed long profiles) in Amethyst Brook (23 km2) an upstream tributary of the Fort River drainage. These geomorphic assessments were combined with detailed quantitative electrofishing surveys of stream fish richness and abundance above and below the dam site and throughout the watershed; genetic assignments and stable isotope analysis to determine population connectivity; and visual surveys of native anadromous Sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) nest sites. Post-removal assessments were complicated by two events: (1) upstream knickpoint migration exhumed an older (ca. early 19th century) intact wooden crib dam ~ 120 m upstream of the former stone dam, and (2) the occurrence of a 10-20 yr RI flood 6 months after removal which caused further upstream incision and downstream aggradation. Geomorphic results document that all 11 cross-sections downstream of the former dam fined significantly with typical reductions of 30-60% in mean particle size. This has major implications for Sea lamprey that require gravel for spawning which was largely absent downstream of the former sediment-trapping dam. This fining was associated with downstream bed aggradation, reflecting the new, post-removal flux of material. Similarly, post-removal, but pre-flood, bed surveys indicate ~ 2 m of incision had migrated 25 m upstream of the former reservoir before encountering the exhumed dam, which now acts as the new grade control, limiting progressive headcutting. The combination of changes in channel bed sedimentology, the occurrence of a large magnitude flood

  9. Adsorption, oxidation, and reduction behavior of arsenic in the removal of aqueous As(III) by mesoporous Fe/Al bimetallic particles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zihang; Fu, Fenglian; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Tang, Bing

    2016-06-01

    In this study, mesoporous iron/aluminum (Fe/Al) bimetallic particles were synthesized and employed for the removal of aqueous As(III). Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis method, Vibrating-sample magnetometry (VSM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were employed to characterize the Fe/Al bimetals before and after reaction with As(III). The physical properties, compositions, and structures of Fe/Al bimetallic particles as well as the As(III) removal mechanism were investigated. The characterization of the bimetallic particles after the reaction has revealed the removal of As(III) is a complex process including surface adsorption and oxidation, and intraparticle reduction. The good As(III) removal capability and stability of the Fe/Al bimetallic particles exhibited its great potential as an effective and environmental friendly agent for As(III) removal from water. PMID:27016635

  10. Control of particle precipitation by energy transfer from solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, J.; Gernandt, H.

    1985-12-01

    The energy transfer function (epsilon), introduced by Perreault and Akasofu (1978), appears to be well suited for the description of the long-term control of the particle precipitation by interplanetary parameters. An investigation was conducted with the objective to test this control in more detail. This investigation included the calculation of hourly epsilon values on the basis of satellite-measured solar wind and IMF (interplanetary magnetic field) data. The results were compared with corresponding geomagnetic and ionospheric data. The ionospheric data had been obtained by three GDR (German Democratic Republic) teams during the 21st, 22nd, and 23rd Soviet Antarctic Expeditions in the time period from 1976 to 1979. It was found that, in high latitudes, the properties of the solar wind exercise a pronounced degree of control on the precipitation of energetic particles into the atmosphere, taking into account a time delay of about one hour due to the occurrence of magnetospheric storage processes.

  11. 15 CFR 768.10 - Removal of controls on less sophisticated items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION... sophisticated items. Where the Secretary has removed national security controls on an item for foreign... security reasons and whose functions, technological approach, performance thresholds, and other...

  12. 15 CFR 768.10 - Removal of controls on less sophisticated items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION... sophisticated items. Where the Secretary has removed national security controls on an item for foreign... security reasons and whose functions, technological approach, performance thresholds, and other...

  13. 15 CFR 768.10 - Removal of controls on less sophisticated items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION... sophisticated items. Where the Secretary has removed national security controls on an item for foreign... security reasons and whose functions, technological approach, performance thresholds, and other...

  14. 15 CFR 768.10 - Removal of controls on less sophisticated items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION... sophisticated items. Where the Secretary has removed national security controls on an item for foreign... security reasons and whose functions, technological approach, performance thresholds, and other...

  15. 15 CFR 768.10 - Removal of controls on less sophisticated items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION... sophisticated items. Where the Secretary has removed national security controls on an item for foreign... security reasons and whose functions, technological approach, performance thresholds, and other...

  16. Nitrogen Removal over Nitrite by Aeration Control in Aerobic Granular Sludge Sequencing Batch Reactors

    PubMed Central

    Lochmatter, Samuel; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of aeration control for the achievement of N-removal over nitrite with aerobic granular sludge in sequencing batch reactors. N-removal over nitrite requires less COD, which is particularly interesting if COD is the limiting parameter for nutrient removal. The nutrient removal performances for COD, N and P have been analyzed as well as the concentration of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the granular sludge. Aeration phase length control combined with intermittent aeration or alternate high-low DO, has proven to be an efficient way to reduce the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria population and hence achieve N-removal over nitrite. N-removal efficiencies of up to 95% were achieved for an influent wastewater with COD:N:P ratios of 20:2.5:1. The total N-removal rate was 0.18 kgN·m−3·d−1. With N-removal over nitrate the N-removal was only 74%. At 20 °C, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria concentration decreased by over 95% in 60 days and it was possible to switch from N-removal over nitrite to N-removal over nitrate and back again. At 15 °C, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria concentration decreased too but less, and nitrite oxidation could not be completely suppressed. However, the combination of aeration phase length control and high-low DO was also at 15 °C successful to maintain the nitrite pathway despite the fact that the maximum growth rate of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria at temperatures below 20 °C is in general higher than the one of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:25006970

  17. Nitrogen removal over nitrite by aeration control in aerobic granular sludge sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Lochmatter, Samuel; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the potential of aeration control for the achievement of N-removal over nitrite with aerobic granular sludge in sequencing batch reactors. N-removal over nitrite requires less COD, which is particularly interesting if COD is the limiting parameter for nutrient removal. The nutrient removal performances for COD, N and P have been analyzed as well as the concentration of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the granular sludge. Aeration phase length control combined with intermittent aeration or alternate high-low DO, has proven to be an efficient way to reduce the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria population and hence achieve N-removal over nitrite. N-removal efficiencies of up to 95% were achieved for an influent wastewater with COD:N:P ratios of 20:2.5:1. The total N-removal rate was 0.18 kgN·m-3·d-1. With N-removal over nitrate the N-removal was only 74%. At 20 °C, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria concentration decreased by over 95% in 60 days and it was possible to switch from N-removal over nitrite to N-removal over nitrate and back again. At 15 °C, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria concentration decreased too but less, and nitrite oxidation could not be completely suppressed. However, the combination of aeration phase length control and high-low DO was also at 15 °C successful to maintain the nitrite pathway despite the fact that the maximum growth rate of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria at temperatures below 20 °C is in general higher than the one of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:25006970

  18. Particle reduction and control in EUV etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, JeaYoung; Ha, TaeJoong; Kim, SangPyo; Yim, DongGyu

    2014-10-01

    As the device design rule shrinks, photomask manufacturers need to have advanced defect controllability during the ARC (Anti-Reflection Coating) and ABS (Absorber) etch in an EUV (extreme ultraviolet) mask. Therefore we studied etching techniques of EUV absorber film to find out the evasion method of particle generation. Usually, Particles are generated by plasma ignition step in etching process. When we use the standard etching process, ARC and ABS films are etched step by step. To reduce the particle generation, the number of ignition steps need to decrease. In this paper, we present the experimental results of in-situ EUV dry etching process technique for ARC and ABS, which reduces the defect level significantly. Analysis tools used for this study are as follows; TEM (for cross-sectional inspection) , SEM (for in-line monitoring ) and OES (for checking optical emission spectrum)

  19. Phase Control of BR/SBR Blends by Silica Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inai, Motoyuki; Aizawa, Seiji; Ito, Masayoshi

    A phase control of butadiene rubber (BR)/styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) blends was examined by using silica particles. The phase structure of the blends was qualitatively evaluated from transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation and temperature dependence of mechanical tanδ. It was found that the temperature dependence of tanδ was dependent on the size of agglomerate formed by silica particles in the blend. The vulcanized blends with small agglomerates showed a single tanδ peak suggesting a pseudo-miscible state. The vulcanized blends with large agglomerates showed two tanδ peaks corresponding to the Tgs of BR and SBR. The mutual dissolution of BR and SBR phases above the UCST line where the vulcanization was carried out might be disturbed by large agglomerates formed by silica particles in the blends.

  20. Influence of surface tension on cavitation noise spectra and particle removal efficiency in high frequency ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerotto, Elisabeth; Brems, Steven; Hauptmann, Marc; Pacco, Antoine; Struyf, Herbert; Mertens, Paul W.; De Gendt, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Physical cleaning methods are applied in the semiconductor industry and have become increasingly challenging due to the continued scaling of semiconductors device elements. Cavitation and acoustic phenomena are known to play a fundamental role in megasonic cleaning. Hence, a better understanding of cavitation phenomena in multi-bubble systems is crucial. Here, a study on the effects of lower bulk surface tension and different O2 concentrations on the bubble activity in the megahertz range is presented. A lower bulk surface tension (45 mN/m) with respect to ultra pure water (72 mN/m) is obtained by adding a non-ionic surface-active agent (Triton X-100). After a thorough surfactant characterization, a Triton X-100-containing cleaning solution is investigated under pulsed and continuous acoustic fields, for different acoustic amplitudes and gas concentrations. It is demonstrated that cavitation activity, measured by means of ultraharmonic cavitation noise, is enhanced in presence of a lower surface tension, under continuous acoustic fields. In addition, cavitation measurements performed under pulsed fields reveal the existence of optimal pulse-off times, for which a maximum of activity is observed. These optimal pulse-off time values are linked to the bubble dissolution theoretical times and experimentally verified. To end, cavitation noise measurements are correlated to cleaning performance in megasonic fields by means of particle removal and damage tests on patterned wafers. A clear increase in particle removal efficiency of 78 nm SiO2 particles is obtained when Triton X-100 is employed, at the optimized process conditions. In addition, the number of defects due to cavitation bubbles is significantly reduced for lower surface tension, at particle removal efficiencies <60%. The results here reported constitute a different approach towards more efficient megasonic cleaning processes.

  1. Dynamic self-assembly and control of microfluidic particle crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonhee; Amini, Hamed; Stone, Howard A.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2010-01-01

    Engineered two-phase microfluidic systems have recently shown promise for computation, encryption, and biological processing. For many of these systems, complex control of dispersed-phase frequency and switching is enabled by nonlinearities associated with interfacial stresses. Introducing nonlinearity associated with fluid inertia has recently been identified as an easy to implement strategy to control two-phase (solid-liquid) microscale flows. By taking advantage of inertial effects we demonstrate controllable self-assembling particle systems, uncover dynamics suggesting a unique mechanism of dynamic self-assembly, and establish a framework for engineering microfluidic structures with the possibility of spatial frequency filtering. Focusing on the dynamics of the particle–particle interactions reveals a mechanism for the dynamic self-assembly process; inertial lift forces and a parabolic flow field act together to stabilize interparticle spacings that otherwise would diverge to infinity due to viscous disturbance flows. The interplay of the repulsive viscous interaction and inertial lift also allow us to design and implement microfluidic structures that irreversibly change interparticle spacing, similar to a low-pass filter. Although often not considered at the microscale, nonlinearity due to inertia can provide a platform for high-throughput passive control of particle positions in all directions, which will be useful for applications in flow cytometry, tissue engineering, and metamaterial synthesis. PMID:21149674

  2. Magnetic microswimmers: Controlling particle approach through magnetic and hydrodynamic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Minjun; Fu, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We investigate magnetic microswimmers actuated by a rotating magnetic field that may be useful for drug delivery, micro-surgery, or diagnostics in human body. For modular swimmers, assembly and disassembly requires understanding the interactions between the swimmer and other modules in the fluid. Here, we discuss possible mechanisms for a frequency-dependent attraction/repulsion between a three-bead, achiral swimmer and other magnetic particles, which represent modular assembly elements. We first investigate the hydrodynamic interaction between a swimmer and nearby particle by studying the Lagrangian trajectories in the vicinity of the swimmer. Then we show that the magnetic forces can be attractive or repulsive depending on the spatial arrangement of the swimmer and particle, with a magnitude that decreases with increasing frequency. Combining magnetic and hydrodynamic effects allows us to understand the overall behavior of magnetic particles near the swimmer. Interestingly, we find that the frequency of rotation can be used to control when the particle can closely approach the swimmer, with potential application to assembly.

  3. The effectiveness of faecal removal methods of pasture management to control the cyathostomin burden of donkeys

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The level of anthelmintic resistance within some cyathostomin parasite populations has increased to the level where sole reliance on anthelmintic-based control protocols is not possible. Management-based nematode control methods, including removal of faeces from pasture, are widely recommended for use in association with a reduction in anthelmintic use to reduce selection pressure for drug resistance; however, very little work has been performed to quantitatively assess the effectiveness of such methods. Methods We analysed data obtained from 345 donkeys at The Donkey Sanctuary (Devon, UK), managed under three different pasture management techniques, to investigate the effectiveness of faeces removal in strongyle control in equids. The management groups were as follows: no removal of faeces from pasture, manual, twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture and automatic, twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture (using a mechanical pasture sweeper). From turn-out onto pasture in May, monthly faecal egg counts were obtained for each donkey and the dataset subjected to an auto regressive moving average model. Results There was little to no difference in faecal egg counts between the two methods of faecal removal; both resulted in significantly improved cyathostomin control compared to the results obtained from the donkeys that grazed pasture from which there was no faecal removal. Conclusions This study represents a valuable and unique assessment of the effectiveness of the removal of equine faeces from pasture, and provides an evidence base from which to advocate twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture as an adjunct for equid nematode control. Widespread adoption of this practice could substantially reduce anthelmintic usage, and hence reduce selection pressure for nematode resistance to the currently effective anthelmintic products. PMID:24460700

  4. Mitigation of soiling losses in solar collectors: Removal of surface-adhered dust particles using an electrodynamic screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyah, Arash

    Particulate contamination of the optical surfaces of solar collectors, often called "soiling", can have a significant deteriorating impact on energy yield due to the absorption and scattering of incident light. Soiling has more destructive effect on concentrated solar systems than on flat-plate photovoltaic panels, as the former are incapable of converting scattered sunlight. The first part of this thesis deals with the soiling losses of flat-plate photovoltaic (PV), concentrated solar power (CSP), and concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) systems in operation in several regions of the world. Influential parameters in dust accumulation losses, as well as different cleaning mechanisms in pursuit of restoring the efficiency of soiled systems, have been thoroughly investigated. In lieu of the most commonly-practiced manual cleaning method of using high-pressure water jets, the concept of automatic dust removal using the electrostatic forces of electrodynamic screen (EDS) technology is in a developmental stage and on its way toward commercialization. This thesis provides comprehensive analytical solutions for the electric potential and electric field distribution in EDS devices having different configurations. Numerical simulations developed using finite element analysis (FEA) software have corroborated the analytical solutions which can easily be embedded into software programs for particle trajectory simulations while also providing flexibility and generality in the study on the effect of different parameters of the EDS on the electric field and ensuing dust-removal performance. Evaluation and comparison of different repelling and attracting forces exerted on dust particles is of utmost importance to a detailed analysis of EDS performance in dust removal. Hence, the balance of electrostatic and adhesion forces, including van der Waals and capillary forces, have received significant attention in this dissertation. Furthermore, different numerical analyses have been

  5. Decay heat removal from a Particle Bed Reactor Nuclear Thermal Rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, E.

    1993-06-01

    Nuclear Thermal Rockets used in propulsion systems for planetary exploration will generate significant amounts of heat following normal engine shutdown due to the buildup of and decay of radioactive fission products. The amount of energy that is generated as decay heat is approximately 2-5 percent of the energy released during nominal operation. Various schemes are possible for removing this heat, including using primary coolant (hydrogen) to cool the reactor. Depending on the amount of coolant required, this may result in a large weight penalty for the mission. This paper quantifies the amount of decay heat that must be removed from the engine, shows the resulting impact on the vehicle design for particular missions, and examines possible approaches for reducing the amount of coolant required for decay heat removal. The costs and benefits of these schemes will be shown for several different missions. The missions that will be considered include both manned Mars missions and unmanned planetary exploration missions. 6 refs.

  6. Tracking low SNR targets using particle filter with flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshtagh, Nima; Romberg, Paul M.; Chan, Moses W.

    2014-06-01

    In this work we study the problem of detecting and tracking challenging targets that exhibit low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). We have developed a particle filter-based track-before-detect (TBD) algorithm for tracking such dim targets. The approach incorporates the most recent state estimates to control the particle flow accounting for target dynamics. The flow control enables accumulation of signal information over time to compensate for target motion. The performance of this approach is evaluated using a sensitivity analysis based on varying target speed and SNR values. This analysis was conducted using high-fidelity sensor and target modeling in realistic scenarios. Our results show that the proposed TBD algorithm is capable of tracking targets in cluttered images with SNR values much less than one.

  7. Effects of Varying Particle Sizes and Different Types of LDH-Modified Anthracite in Simulated Test Columns for Phosphorous Removal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangling; Chen, Qiaozhen; Guo, Lu; Huang, Hualing; Ruan, Chongying

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out for the removal of phosphorus in simulated unplanted vertical-flow constructed wetlands with different layered double hydroxide (LDHs) coated anthracite substrates. Three particle sizes of anthracites were selected and modified separately with nine kinds of LDH coating. The simulated substrates test columns loaded with the original and modified anthracites were constructed to treat the contaminated water. For the medium and large particle size modified anthracite substrates, the purification effects of total phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus and phosphate were improved by various degrees, and the purification effect of the medium particle size anthracite is better than that of the large size one. The medium size anthracite modified by ZnCo-LDHs had optimal performance with average removal efficiencies of total phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus and phosphate reaching 95%, 95% and 98%, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity on ZnCo-LDHs and ZnAl-LDHs modified medium sizes anthracites were 65.79 (mg/kg) and 48.78 (mg/kg), respectively. In comparison, the small size anthracite is not suitable for LDHs modification. PMID:26086702

  8. Development of an ash particle deposition model considering build-up and removal mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kjell Strandstroem; Christian Muellera; Mikko Hupa

    2007-12-15

    Slagging and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces in power boilers fired with fossil fuels and fuel mixtures has a significant influence on boiler efficiency and availability. Mathematical modelling has long been considered a suitable method to assist boiler operators to determine optimized operating conditions for an existing furnace. The ultimate goal in ash deposition prediction is hereby the determination of the total amount of material deposited and hence the determination of the total reduction in efficiency. Depending on the fuels fired the total deposited mass is a combination of ash particle deposition and ash particle erosion due to non-sticky particles. The novel ash particle deposition model presented in this work considers deposition of sticky ash particles, cleansing of deposit by non-sticky sand particles and sticking of sand due to contact with sticky ash. The steady-state modelling results for the total amount of ash deposited on the deposition probe of an entrained flow reactor presented in this work agree well with the experimental data. Only at very high fractions of sand added as non-sticky material, a significant influence of the sand on the overall mass deposited was found. Since the model considers sticking of non-sticking sand due to contact with sticky ash, the fraction of sand deposited on the probe was especially studied. Using a correction factor to consider the influence of operating time on the steady-state simulations led to good agreement between simulations and experimental data. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Experimental Study on Ultrafine Particle Removal Performance of Portable Air Cleaners with Different Filters in an Office Room.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huan; Shen, Henggen; Shui, Tiantian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Liuke

    2016-01-01

    Size- and time-dependent aerodynamic behaviors of indoor particles, including PM1.0, were evaluated in a school office in order to test the performance of air-cleaning devices using different filters. In-situ real-time measurements were taken using an optical particle counter. The filtration characteristics of filter media, including single-pass efficiency, volume and effectiveness, were evaluated and analyzed. The electret filter (EE) medium shows better initial removal efficiency than the high efficiency (HE) medium in the 0.3-3.5 μm particle size range, while under the same face velocity, the filtration resistance of the HE medium is several times higher than that of the EE medium. During service life testing, the efficiency of the EE medium decreased to 60% with a total purifying air flow of 25 × 10⁴ m³/m². The resistance curve rose slightly before the efficiency reached the bottom, and then increased almost exponentially. The single-pass efficiency of portable air cleaner (PAC) with the pre-filter (PR) or the active carbon granule filter (CF) was relatively poor. While PAC with the pre-filter and the high efficiency filter (PR&HE) showed maximum single-pass efficiency for PM1.0 (88.6%), PAC with the HE was the most effective at removing PM1.0. The enhancement of PR with HE and electret filters augmented the single-pass efficiency, but lessened the airflow rate and effectiveness. Combined with PR, the decay constant of large-sized particles could be greater than for PACs without PR. Without regard to the lifetime, the electret filters performed better with respect to resource saving and purification improvement. A most penetrating particle size range (MPPS: 0.4-0.65 μm) exists in both HE and electret filters; the MPPS tends to become larger after HE and electret filters are combined with PR. These results serve to provide a better understanding of the indoor particle removal performance of PACs when combined with different kinds of filters in school

  10. Experimental Study on Ultrafine Particle Removal Performance of Portable Air Cleaners with Different Filters in an Office Room

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huan; Shen, Henggen; Shui, Tiantian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Liuke

    2016-01-01

    Size- and time-dependent aerodynamic behaviors of indoor particles, including PM1.0, were evaluated in a school office in order to test the performance of air-cleaning devices using different filters. In-situ real-time measurements were taken using an optical particle counter. The filtration characteristics of filter media, including single-pass efficiency, volume and effectiveness, were evaluated and analyzed. The electret filter (EE) medium shows better initial removal efficiency than the high efficiency (HE) medium in the 0.3–3.5 μm particle size range, while under the same face velocity, the filtration resistance of the HE medium is several times higher than that of the EE medium. During service life testing, the efficiency of the EE medium decreased to 60% with a total purifying air flow of 25 × 104 m3/m2. The resistance curve rose slightly before the efficiency reached the bottom, and then increased almost exponentially. The single-pass efficiency of portable air cleaner (PAC) with the pre-filter (PR) or the active carbon granule filter (CF) was relatively poor. While PAC with the pre-filter and the high efficiency filter (PR&HE) showed maximum single-pass efficiency for PM1.0 (88.6%), PAC with the HE was the most effective at removing PM1.0. The enhancement of PR with HE and electret filters augmented the single-pass efficiency, but lessened the airflow rate and effectiveness. Combined with PR, the decay constant of large-sized particles could be greater than for PACs without PR. Without regard to the lifetime, the electret filters performed better with respect to resource saving and purification improvement. A most penetrating particle size range (MPPS: 0.4–0.65 μm) exists in both HE and electret filters; the MPPS tends to become larger after HE and electret filters are combined with PR. These results serve to provide a better understanding of the indoor particle removal performance of PACs when combined with different kinds of filters in school

  11. Enhancement removal of tartrazine dye using HCl-doped polyaniline and TiO2-decorated PANI particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, M. A.; Gobara, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    HCl-doped polyaniline (HCl-PANI) and titanium dioxide decorated with polyaniline (TiO2-decorated PANI) with different TiO2:PANI ratios were chemically prepared and utilized for the removal of tartrazine (TZ) dye from a synthetic aqueous solution. The mechanism of preparation of the sample suggested that aniline was adsorbed on the TiO2 surface before the polymerization process took place. Samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The results showed that HCl-PANI and TiO2-decorated PANI have an amorphous structure. The thermal stability of the prepared samples was characterized using thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis. HCl-PANI is stable up to 200 °C and the relative weight per cent of PANI in the TiO2-decorated PANI was 20, 25, 40 and 45%. The removal activity of TiO2-decorated PANI via TZ azo dye was investigated under UV light irradiations and compared with HCl-PANI and TiO2 particles. The results indicated the superiority of the TiO2-decorated PANI over pure HCl-PANI and TiO2. However, the excessive PANI percentage tends to form a relatively thick layer, and even aggregates on the surface of TiO2. This hinders the migration of excited electrons from the outer PANI layer to the inner TiO2 particles, which consequently leads to a decrease in the removal efficiency. A possible mechanism for the removal oxidative degradation is also mentioned.

  12. Thermal control system. [removing waste heat from industrial process spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, D. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The temperature of an exothermic process plant carried aboard an Earth orbiting spacecraft is regulated using a number of curved radiator panels accurately positioned in a circular arrangement to form an open receptacle. A module containing the process is insertable into the receptacle. Heat exchangers having broad exterior surfaces extending axially above the circumference of the module fit within arcuate spacings between adjacent radiator panels. Banks of variable conductance heat pipes partially embedded within and thermally coupled to the radiator panels extend across the spacings and are thermally coupled to broad exterior surfaces of the heat exchangers by flanges. Temperature sensors monitor the temperature of process fluid flowing from the module through the heat exchanges. Thermal conduction between the heat exchangers and the radiator panels is regulated by heating a control fluid within the heat pipes to vary the effective thermal length of the heat pipes in inverse proportion to changes in the temperature of the process fluid.

  13. Transit Scratchitti Removal and Glass Resurfacing by Controlled Fire Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Seongchan; Hong, Shane Y.

    Scratchitti vandalism, a new type of graffiti vandalism, in public transits systems and city neighborhood is a serious problem. To solve this problem, an innovative approach was developed-controlled fire polishing, which incorporates a technique of localized softening and surface tension. Intensive heat is positioned near to the scratch marks on the glass panel. The heat melts a thin layer of glass into liquid, changing the glass’s viscosity to a formable state. The glass is melted to a level close to the depth of the scratch, and allowed to cool down naturally. During the cooling process, the surface tension of the melted glass will even out the scratching indent. After cooling, the glass will be as even and smooth as it was originally. The process will enable the reuse of the damaged window/door and eliminate the otherwise waste by replacement new glass.

  14. A novel control strategy for efficient biological phosphorus removal with carbon-limited wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Javier; Guisasola, Albert; Baeza, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    This work shows the development and the in silico evaluation of a novel control strategy aiming at successful biological phosphorus removal in a wastewater treatment plant operating in an A(2)/O configuration with carbon-limited influent. The principle of this novel approach is that the phosphorus in the effluent can be controlled with the nitrate setpoint in the anoxic reactor as manipulated variable. The theoretical background behind this control strategy is that reducing nitrate entrance to the anoxic reactor would result in more organic matter available for biological phosphorus removal. Thus, phosphorus removal would be enhanced at the expense of increasing nitrate in the effluent (but always below legal limits). The work shows the control development, tuning and performance in comparison to open-loop conditions and to two other conventional control strategies for phosphorus removal based on organic matter and metal addition. It is shown that the novel proposed strategy achieves positive nutrient removal results with similar operational costs to the other control strategies and open-loop operation. PMID:25116500

  15. Statistical estimate of mercury removal efficiencies for air pollution control devices of municipal solid waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumitake; Kida, Akiko; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2010-10-15

    Although representative removal efficiencies of gaseous mercury for air pollution control devices (APCDs) are important to prepare more reliable atmospheric emission inventories of mercury, they have been still uncertain because they depend sensitively on many factors like the type of APCDs, gas temperature, and mercury speciation. In this study, representative removal efficiencies of gaseous mercury for several types of APCDs of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) were offered using a statistical method. 534 data of mercury removal efficiencies for APCDs used in MSWI were collected. APCDs were categorized as fixed-bed absorber (FA), wet scrubber (WS), electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and fabric filter (FF), and their hybrid systems. Data series of all APCD types had Gaussian log-normality. The average removal efficiency with a 95% confidence interval for each APCD was estimated. The FA, WS, and FF with carbon and/or dry sorbent injection systems had 75% to 82% average removal efficiencies. On the other hand, the ESP with/without dry sorbent injection had lower removal efficiencies of up to 22%. The type of dry sorbent injection in the FF system, dry or semi-dry, did not make more than 1% difference to the removal efficiency. The injection of activated carbon and carbon-containing fly ash in the FF system made less than 3% difference. Estimation errors of removal efficiency were especially high for the ESP. The national average of removal efficiency of APCDs in Japanese MSWI plants was estimated on the basis of incineration capacity. Owing to the replacement of old APCDs for dioxin control, the national average removal efficiency increased from 34.5% in 1991 to 92.5% in 2003. This resulted in an additional reduction of about 0.86Mg emission in 2003. Further study using the methodology in this study to other important emission sources like coal-fired power plants will contribute to better emission inventories. PMID:20713298

  16. TiW particle control for VLSI manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gn, Fang H.; Yeap, Chuin B.; Li, He M.; Liu, E. Z.; Chew, Heng L.

    1995-09-01

    TiW has been used extensively as the barrier metal in submicron metallization. However, TiW has also drawn much attention as the source of defect generation contributing to functional yield loss. Usually, the defects are in the form of flakes which can be detected by either using light scattering metrology tools or naked eye in severe situations. In this paper various manufacturing techniques will be presented which reduce defect during the TiW sputtering process. Both arc-sprayed process kit (chamber shield and clamping ring) and TiW paste at fixed intervals have been proven to be effective in reducing TiW particles. Implementation of these two techniques is relatively simple and has been used very successfully in Chartered's 6 inch wafer fab. Another study shows that by reducing the process kit thermal cycling through continuously having the bake-out lamp turned on is effective for particle control. Effect of the grain size of TiW sputter target and the application of Particle Gettering (PG) foil will also be discussed in detail as other means of particle reduction.

  17. Particle Size Control of Polyethylene Glycol Coated Fe Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, B.; Bonder, M. J.; Zhang, Y.; Gallo, D.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.

    2006-03-01

    Recent interest in Fe nanoparticles with high magnetization is driven by their potential use in biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery, MRI contrast enhancement and hyperthermia treatment of cancer. This study looks at the use of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution to mediate the particle size and therefore control the coercivity of the resulting nanoparticles. Iron nanoparticles were synthesized using an aqueous sodium borohydride reduction of ferrous chloride by a simultaneous introduction of reagents in a Y- junction. The resulting product was collected in a vessel containing a 15 mg/ml carboxyl terminated polyethylene glycol (cPEG) in ethyl alcohol solution located under the Y junction. By varying the length of tubing below the Y junction, the particle size was varied from 5-25 nm. X-ray diffraction data indicates the presence of either amorphous Fe-B or crystalline alpha Fe, depending on the molar ratio of reagents. Magnetic measurements indicate the particles are ferromagnetic with values of coercivity ranging from 200-500 Oe and a saturation magnetization in range of 70-110 emu/g. The XRD shows that the particles are not affected by the polymer coating.

  18. Transient colloidal stability controls the particle formation of SBA-15.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Juanfang; Kjellman, Tomas; Sakamoto, Yasuhiro; Alfredsson, Viveka

    2012-08-01

    A hypothesis about (transient) colloidal stability as a controlling mechanism for particle formation in SBA-15 is presented. The hypothesis is based on results from both in situ and ex situ investigations, including cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), UV-vis spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cryo-TEM images show that particles grow via the formation of silica-Pluronic-water "flocs", which coalesce in a seemingly arbitrary manner. Despite this, the final material consists of well-defined particles with a small size distribution. We argue that the interface between the flocs and surrounding media is covered by Pluronic molecules, which provide steric stabilization. As the flocs grow, the coverage of polymers at the interface is increased until a stable size is reached, and that regulates the particle size. By targeting the characteristics of the Pluronic molecules, during the on-going synthesis, the hypothesis is tested. The results are consistent with the concept of (transient) colloidal stability. PMID:22758927

  19. Transient Colloidal Stability Controls the Particle Formation of SBA-15

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A hypothesis about (transient) colloidal stability as a controlling mechanism for particle formation in SBA-15 is presented. The hypothesis is based on results from both in situ and ex situ investigations, including cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), UV–vis spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cryo-TEM images show that particles grow via the formation of silica–Pluronic–water “flocs”, which coalesce in a seemingly arbitrary manner. Despite this, the final material consists of well-defined particles with a small size distribution. We argue that the interface between the flocs and surrounding media is covered by Pluronic molecules, which provide steric stabilization. As the flocs grow, the coverage of polymers at the interface is increased until a stable size is reached, and that regulates the particle size. By targeting the characteristics of the Pluronic molecules, during the on-going synthesis, the hypothesis is tested. The results are consistent with the concept of (transient) colloidal stability. PMID:22758927

  20. Removal of lead and cadmium ions from aqueous solution by adsorption onto micro-particles of dry plants.

    PubMed

    Benhima, H; Chiban, M; Sinan, F; Seta, P; Persin, M

    2008-01-15

    In the present work, Pb(II) and Cd(II) ion adsorption onto inert organic matter (IOM) obtained from ground dried plants: Euphorbia echinus, Launea arborescens, Senecio anthophorbium growing in semi-arid zones of Morocco and Carpobrotus edulis as the Mediterranean plant has been studied. A suspension of plant deroed micro-particles adsorbs lead and cadmium present as ionic species, with a higher affinity for Pb(II). The kinetics and the maximum capacity adsorption depend on the type of plant as well as on the metal ions (atomic weight, ionic radius and electronegativity). The adsorption process is affected by various parameters such as contact time, solution volume to mass of plant particles ratio (m/V), particle size, solution pH and metal concentration. A dose of 25 g/l of adsorbent was optimal to obtain maximum adsorption of both metal ions. The maximum metal uptake was obtained with particles of organic matter of <50 microm. As to classical ionic adsorption phenomena, the adsorption of both metal ions increases with the increase of the initial concentration in the solution. For the two metal cations, the uptake efficiency of the studied plants ranged from: C. edulis>E. echinus>S. anthophorbium>L. arborescens, however, the differences are rather small. Two different waste water types (domestic and industrial) were tested and good results were obtained for removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) at more than 90%. The removal of the metal and mineral ions waste water was observed for PO(4)(3-) at 88%, for NO(3)(-) at 96.5% and for metal ions (Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)) at about 100%, using IOM as absorbent. PMID:17869071

  1. Particle removal in a novel sequential mechanical filter system loaded with blackwater.

    PubMed

    Todt, Daniel; Jenssen, Petter D

    2015-01-01

    A novel sequential mechanical filter system was developed as an alternative primary treatment method for onsite wastewater treatment. The filter combines traditional screening with a novel type of counter-flow filter using wood-shavings as a biodegradable filter matrix. This study tested the system in a batch loading regime simulating high frequency toilet flushing using blackwater from a student dormitory. The filter removed 78-85% of suspended solids, 60-80% of chemical oxygen demand, and 42-57% of total-P in blackwater, giving a retentate with a dry matter content of 13-20%. Data analysis clearly indicated a tendency towards higher removal performance with high inlet concentrations, hence, the system seems to be most applicable to blackwater or other types of wastewater with a high content of suspended solids. PMID:25945859

  2. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Removal of [123I]Ioflupane From Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-11

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration removes [123I]ioflupane from the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act. This action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act which requires that such actions be made on the record after an opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. Prior to the effective date of this rule, [123I]ioflupane was, by definition, a schedule II controlled substance because it is derived from cocaine via ecgonine, both of which are schedule II controlled substances. This action removes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to controlled substances, including those specific to schedule II controlled substances, on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, dispense, conduct research, import, export, or conduct chemical analysis) or propose to handle [123I]ioflupane. PMID:26364325

  3. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR AND METHOD OF CONTROLLING THE TEMPERATURE THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1960-10-11

    A method and means for controlling the temperature of a particle accelerator and more particularly to the maintenance of a constant and uniform temperature throughout a particle accelerator is offered. The novel feature of the invention resides in the provision of two individual heating applications to the accelerator structure. The first heating application provided is substantially a duplication of the accelerator heat created from energization, this first application being employed only when the accelerator is de-energized thereby maintaining the accelerator temperature constant with regard to time whether the accelerator is energized or not. The second heating application provided is designed to add to either the first application or energization heat in a manner to create the same uniform temperature throughout all portions of the accelerator.

  4. Crystalline structure of ceria particles controlled by the oxygen partial pressure and STI CMP performances.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Kim, Sang-Kyun; Kim, Namsoo; Park, Jea-Gun; Paik, Ungyu

    2008-09-01

    The effect of the crystalline structures of nano-sized ceria particles on shallow trench isolation (STI) chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) performance was investigated. The ceria particles were synthesized via a solid-state displacement reaction method, and their crystalline structure was controlled by regulating the oxygen partial pressure at the reaction site on the precursor. The crystalline structures of ceria particles were analyzed by the high-resolution TEM nano-beam diffraction pattern. In a calcination process with a high oxygen concentration, the synthesized ceria particles had a cubic fluorite structure (CeO(2)), because of the decarbonation of the cerium precursor. However, a low oxygen concentration results in a hexagonal phase cerium oxide (Ce(2)O(3)) rather than the cubic phase due to the insufficient oxidation of Ce(3+) to Ce(4+). In the STI CMP evaluation, the ceria slurry prepared with the cubic CeO(2) shows enhanced performances of the oxide-to-nitride removal selectivity. PMID:18562111

  5. Removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solution using synthetic poly(catechol-diethylenetriamine-p-phenylenediamine) particles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Liu, Qinze; Ruan, Zining; Chang, Xiaoqing; Yao, Jinshui

    2016-07-01

    A novel poly(catechol-diethylenetriamine-pphenylenediamine)(PCEA) adsorbent was synthesized in methanol, with chelating groups supplied by catechol and diethylenetriamine, which showed a strong removal performance and efficient adsorption toward Cu(II) ions in aqueous solution. The adsorbent was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Besides, factors such as adsorbent dosage, pH, initial ionic and metal concentrations, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption of Cu(II) were studied. The data revealed that the adsorption followed a pseudo-second order kinetic model and the adsorption rate was influenced by the intra-particle diffusion. Furthermore, the adsorption process followed the Langmuir isotherm model, and the maximum adsorption capacity (Qm) was 44.2mg/g at 298K in simulated wastewater. The value of ΔG (kJ/mol) and ΔH (kJ/mol) also demonstrated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. Studies revealed that PCEA particles were powerful and stable for the removal of Cu(II) in water, and it could be directly applied to the Cu(II)-contaminated water. PMID:27057995

  6. Novel electrostatic precipitator using unipolar soft X-ray charger for removing fine particles: Application to a dry de-NOX process.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeongan; Kim, Hak Joon; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Sang Soo; Jung, Jae Hee

    2016-02-13

    The novel electrostatic precipitator (ESP), consisting of a soft X-ray charger and a collection part, was demonstrated and applied to a dry de-NOX process to evaluate its performance in by-product particle removal. NOX gas was oxidized by ozone (O3) and neutralized by ammonia (NH3) sequentially, and finally converted to an ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) aerosol with ∼ 100-nm peak particle diameter. The unipolar soft X-ray charger was introduced for charging the by-product particles in this dry de-NOX process. For the highest particle collection efficiency, the optimal operating conditions of the soft X-ray charger and collection part were investigated by adjusting the applied voltage of each device. The results showed that ∼ 99% of NOX was removed when the O3/NOX ratio was increased to 2 (i.e., the maximum production conditions of the NH4NO3 by-product particles by the gas-to-particle conversion process). The highest removal efficiency of particle (∼ 90%) was observed with operating conditions of positive polarity and an applied voltage of ∼ 2-3 kV in the charger chamber. The unipolar soft X-ray charger has potential for particle removal systems in industrial settings because of its compact size, ease of operation, and non-interruptive charging mechanism. PMID:26513563

  7. Effective removal of Ni(II) from aqueous solutions by modification of nano particles of clinoptilolite with dimethylglyoxime.

    PubMed

    Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza; Kabiri-Samani, Mehdi

    2013-09-15

    In this work an Iranian natural clinoptilolite tuff was pre-treated and changed to the micro (MCP) and nano (NCP) particles by mechanical method. Modification of micro and nano particles and also their Ni-exchanged forms were done by dimethylglyoxime (DMG). The raw and modified samples were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, SEM, BET, TG-DTG and energy dispersive analysis X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). Removal of Ni(II) by modified and unmodified samples was investigated in batch procedure. It was found that NCP-DMG has higher capacity for removal of Ni(II). The effects of analytical parameters such as pH, dose of DMG, concentration of nickel solution, contact time and selectivity were studied and the optimal operation parameters were found as follows: pHPZC: 7.6, CNi(II): 0.01 M, contact time: 360 min and DMG dosage: 5mM. The results of selectivity experiments showed that the modified zeolite has a good selectivity for nickel in the presence of different multivalent cations. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were adopted to describe the adsorption isotherms. Adsorption isotherms of Ni(II) ions could be best modelled by Langmuir equation, that indicate the monolayer sorption of Ni(II). Comparison of two kinetic models indicates that the adsorption kinetic can be well described by the pseudo-second-order rate equation that indicates that the rate limiting step for the process involves chemical reaction. The negative ΔH and ΔG indicate an exothermic and spontaneously process. The negative ΔS indicates that the adsorption of nickel cations from solution occurs with lower amount ion replacement, thus chemisorptions due to complex formation are dominant process in nickel removal. PMID:23792926

  8. Effects of Aftermarket Control Technologies on Gas and Particle Phase Oxidative Potential from Diesel Engine Emissions.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Jelica; Holder, Amara L; Yelverton, Tiffany L B

    2015-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM) originating from diesel combustion is a public health concern due to its association with adverse effects on respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and lung cancer. This study investigated emissions from three stationary diesel engines (gensets) and varying power output (230 kW, 400 kW, and 600 kW) at 50% and 90% load to determine concentrations of gaseous (GROS) and PM reactive oxygen species (PMROS). In addition, the influence of three modern emission control technologies on ROS emissions was evaluated: active and passive diesel particulate filters (A-DPF and P-DPF) and a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). PMROS made up 30-50% of the total ROS measured without aftermarket controls. All applied controls removed PMROS by more than 75% on average. However, the oxidative potential of PM downstream of these devices was not diminished at the same rate and particles surviving the A-PDF had an even higher oxidative potential on a per PM mass basis compared to the particles emitted by uncontrolled gensets. Further, the GROS as compared to PMROS emissions were not reduced with the same efficiency (<36%). GROS concentrations were highest with the DOC in use, indicating continued formation of GROS with this control. Correlation analyses showed that PMROS and to a lesser extent GROS have a good correlation with semivolatile organic carbon (OC1) subfraction. In addition, results suggest that chemical composition, rather than PM size, is responsible for differences in the PM oxidative potential. PMID:26252945

  9. Induction plasma calcining of pigment particles for thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Induction plasma heating techniques were studied for calcining zinc orthotitanate particles for use in thermal control coatings. Previous studies indicated that the optimum calcining temperature is between 1400 and 1750 C. An intermediate temperature (1670 C) was chosen as a reference point for running a temperature series at the reference point and 220 C on both sides. The effect of varying chamber temperature on the reflectance spectra, before and after vacuum UV irradiation, is presented. The correlation between Zn2Ti04 paramagnetic resonance activity and its susceptibility to vacuum UV damage is discussed.

  10. Evaluation of riverbank infiltration as a process for removing particles and DBP precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Smith, J.; Dooley, L.

    1996-11-01

    Recent outbreaks of waterborne disease attributed to Cryptosporidium in drinking water have raised serious concerns over the effectiveness of conventional water treatment processes to produce safe drinking water supplies. Past studies have shown Cryptosporidium and Giardia to be prevalent in surface water supplies, particularly in urban-impacted surface waters such as the Ohio River which Louisville Water Company (LWC) treatment facilities utilize as their source water. Such indications of the widespread occurrence of these pathogens in source waters underscore the need for the water supply industry to evaluate alternative technologies to conventional water treatment to reduce the risk of waterborne disease occurrence. Public health concerns, shared by the water utility industry, drinking water regulators, and public water supply consumers alike, prompted the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to propose regulatory action aimed at balancing the risks of microbial disease occurrence and the health risks associated with exposure to potentially harmful compounds formed during drinking water disinfection. In pursuit of this objective, USEPA proposed the Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (ESWTR) to improve public water supply treatment performance for microbial removal and proposed the Disinfectant/Disinfection Byproduct (D/DBP) Rule to reduce DBP exposure levels. As a consequence of these rules, many water utilities will be tasked with the challenge of developing treatment capabilities which improve microbial removal performance while minimizing the production of DBPs.

  11. Synthesis, modification and graft polymerization of magnetic nano particles for PAH removal in contaminated water

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were modified with 3-Mercaptopropytrimethoxysiline (MPTMS) and grafted with allyl glycidyl ether for coupling with beta naphtol as a method to form a novel nano-adsorbent to remove two poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated water. The modified MNPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Results showed that the modified MNPs enhanced the process of adsorption. Tests were done on the adsorption capacity of the two PAHs on grafted MNPs; factors applied to the tests were temperature, contact time, pH, salinity and initial concentration of PAHs. Results revealed that adsorption equilibrium was achieved in 10 min, and the maximum adsorption capacity was determined as 4.15 mg/g at pH = 7.0 and 20°C. The equilibrium adsorption data of the two PAHs by the modified MNPs were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin models. Equilibrium adsorption data was determined from the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin constants from tests under conditions of pH = 7 and temperature 20°C. Analysis of the adsorption-desorption process indicated that the modified MNPs had a high level of stability and good reusability. Magnetic separation in these tests was fast and this shows that the modified MNPs have great potential to be used as a new adsorbent for the two PAHs removal from contaminated water in water treatment. PMID:25101170

  12. Removal of Laryngeal Mask Airway in Adults Under Target-Controlled, Propofol–Fentanyl Infusion Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ren-Chih; Hung, Nan-Kai; Lu, Chueng-He; Wu, Zhi-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After emergence from anesthesia, the incidence and severity of adverse airway effects caused by the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) can vary, depending on when the device was removed; nonetheless, reports differ regarding the exact optimal timing of LMA removal. The purpose of this study was to compare the rate of adverse events between 2 groups: those whose LMA was removed under general anesthesia (“deep” group) or under target-controlled infusion (TCI) of propofol (“awake” group). Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent were obtained; 124 patients were then randomly allocated into either the “awake” group or the “deep” group. Anesthesia was induced and maintained using TCI of propofol, as well as intravenous fentanyl. In the “deep” group, the LMA was removed after surgery while the patients were deeply anesthetized using a target effect-site propofol concentration of 2 μg/mL, whereas in the “awake” group, the device was removed while the patients followed verbal instructions. The incidence of the following adverse events was recorded: coughing, straining, bronchospasm, laryngospasm, clenching, breath holding, gross purposeful movement, airway obstruction, retching, vomiting, and oxygen desaturation. If any such event occurred, the LMA removal was considered a failure. Airway hyperreactivity was recorded and graded – based on the severity of cough, breath holding, and oxygen desaturation. The failure rate was higher in the “awake” group (15/61; 24.6%) than in the “deep” group (5/60; 8.3%). Airway hyperreactivity was mild (score, <3) in both groups. Removal of the LMA under deep anesthesia using a target-controlled, effect-site propofol concentration of 2 μg/mL may be safer and more successful than removal when patients are fully awake after surgery. PMID:27124034

  13. An hourglass control algorithm for Lagrangian Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzenmüller, Georg C.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a stabilization scheme which addresses the rank-deficiency problem in meshless collocation methods for solid mechanics. Specifically, Smooth-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) in the Total Lagrangian formalism is considered. This method is rank-deficient in the sense that the SPH approximation of the deformation gradient is not unique with respect to the positions of the integration points. The non-uniqueness can result in the formation of zero-energy modes. If undetected, these modes can grow and completely dominate the solution. Here, an algorithm is introduced, which effectively suppresses these modes in a fashion similar to hour-glass control mechanisms in Finite-Element methods. Simulations utilizing this control algorithm result exhibit much improved stability, accuracy, and error convergence properties. In contrast to an alternative method which eliminates zero-energy modes, namely the use of additional integration points, the here presented algorithm is easy to implement and computationally very efficient.

  14. Controlled human exposures to ambient pollutant particles in susceptible populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have established an association between exposures to air pollution particles and human mortality and morbidity at concentrations of particles currently found in major metropolitan areas. The adverse effects of pollution particles are most prominent in suscep...

  15. New mass measurement method of aerosol particle using vibrating probe particle controlled by radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariyama, Tatsuo; Takaya, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Takashi

    2005-11-01

    Aerosol particles with sub-micro meter size inhaled into respiratory systems cause serious damage to human body. In order to evaluate the health effects of the particles, classification methods of the particles with size and mass are needed. Several measurement methods of the particle size are established. However, conventional mass measurement methods are not enough to measure the particles with sub- pico gram. We propose a new mass measurement method of the aerosol particles based on laser trapping. In this method, an optically trapped silica particle is used as a measuring probe particle. The probe particle is trapped at a beam waist of the focused laser light and is forced to vibrate by deflecting the beam waist using AOD. The vibrating probe particle has a resonance frequency because it is governed by the spring-mass-damper system. When an aerosol particle is attached to the probe particle, the resonance frequency shifts according to the increase of the total mass. The mass of the aerosol particle can be measured from the shift of the resonance frequency. Experimentally, it is confirmed that the probe particle is governed by the spring-mass-damper system and has a resonance frequency. When a silica fine particle of 3pg in mass used as an aerosol particle is attached to the probe particle, the resonance frequency shift occurs as expected in the dynamic system and the fine particle mass can be measured based on the proposed method.

  16. Controllable surface haptics via particle jamming and pneumatics.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Andrew A; Okamura, Allison M

    2015-01-01

    The combination of particle jamming and pneumatics allows the simultaneous control of shape and mechanical properties in a tactile display. A hollow silicone membrane is molded into an array of thin cells, each filled with coffee grounds such that adjusting the vacuum level in any individual cell rapidly switches it between flexible and rigid states. The array clamps over a pressure-regulated air chamber with internal mechanisms designed to pin the nodes between cells at any given height. Various sequences of cell vacuuming, node pinning, and chamber pressurization allow the surface to balloon into a variety of shapes. Experiments were performed to expand existing physical models of jamming at the inter-particle level to define the rheological characteristics of jammed systems from a macroscopic perspective, relevant to force-displacement interactions that would be experienced by human users. Force-displacement data show that a jammed cell in compression fits a Maxwell model and a cell deflected in the center while supported only at the edges fits a Zener model, each with stiffness and damping parameters that increase at higher levels of applied vacuum. This provides framework to tune and control the mechanical properties of a jamming haptic interface. PMID:25594980

  17. An experimental study for biological nitrogen removal and control strategies in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Venegas, C; Palma-Acosta, M J; Abad, D

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work is to present an overview about an experimental study for biological nitrogen removal implemented in a pilot-scale plant, located in the Universidad Del Norte in Barranquilla, Colombia. This plant was studied in two different periods. The first period, which was carried out in 90 days, was dedicated to study the influence of the daily variations on the influent and effluent wastewater, and prove some control routines for nitrogen removal. In the second period, which was carried out in 120 days, the removal process was optimized with the addition of acetic acid as an external carbon source, and the implementation of the final control strategy was performed based on the results of the previous period. PMID:17674653

  18. Aspects of droplet and particle size control in miniemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygi-Arslan, Oznur

    Miniemulsion polymerization has become increasingly popular among researchers since it can provide significant advantages over conventional emulsion polymerization in certain cases, such as production of high-solids, low-viscosity latexes with better stability and polymerization of highly water-insoluble monomers. Miniemulsions are relatively stable oil (e.g., monomer) droplets, which can range in size from 50 to 500 nm, and are normally dispersed in an aqueous phase with the aid of a surfactant and a costabilizer. These droplets are the primary locus of the initiation of the polymerization reaction. Since particle formation takes place in the monomer droplets, theoretically, in miniemulsion systems the final particle size can be controlled by the initial droplet size. The miniemulsion preparation process typically generates broad droplet size distributions and there is no complete treatment in the literature regarding the control of the mean droplet size or size distribution. This research aims to control the miniemulsion droplet size and its distribution. In situ emulsification, where the surfactant is synthesized spontaneously at the oil/water interface, has been put forth as a simpler method for the preparation of miniemulsions-like systems. Using the in situ method of preparation, emulsion stability and droplet and particle sizes were monitored and compared with conventional emulsions and miniemulsions. Styrene emulsions prepared by the in situ method do not demonstrate the stability of a comparable miniemulsion. Upon polymerization, the final particle size generated from the in situ emulsion did not differ significantly from the comparable conventional emulsion polymerization; the reaction mechanism for in situ emulsions is more like conventional emulsion polymerization rather than miniemulsion polymerization. Similar results were found when the in situ method was applied to controlled free radical polymerizations (CFRP), which have been advanced as a

  19. IET control building (TAN620). equipment removed. Lube oil and waste ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET control building (TAN-620). equipment removed. Lube oil and waste piping at upper right. Fire door on right. Rebar exposed in concrete of ceiling. INEEL negative no. HD-21-5-3 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Removal of particles in organic filters in experimental treatment systems for domestic wastewater and black water.

    PubMed

    Todt, Daniel; Jenssen, Petter D; Klemenčič, Aleksandra Krivograd; Oarga, Andreea; Bulc, Tjaša Griessler

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses the total suspended solids (TSS) retention capacity of different organic filter media for two potential applications: (i) a polishing unit for package treatment plants and (ii) a pretreatment for blackwater from low-flushing toilets. The results showed that the peat filter media used can be significantly improved in terms of structural stability and TSS removal capacity by mixing it with sawdust. Most of the TSS accumulated in the upper part of the filter material, and filter thickness exceeding 15 cm had no statistically significant effect (P < 0.1) on the TSS treatment performance. The experimental system reached a TSS reduction of 60-70% for blackwater and 80-90% for simulated effluent peaks from a package treatment plant. The main challenge of a full-scale application of an organic filter is the issue of clogging, especially when treating concentrated blackwater. However, this work indicates that a clogged filter media can be regenerated by mixing the uppermost filter layer without significant loss of filter performance regarding TSS. More research is needed to develop an appropriate mechanical unit for automatic filter media regeneration. PMID:24766596

  1. Biochar Supported Nanoscale Iron Particles for the Efficient Removal of Methyl Orange Dye in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Xue, Song; Zhao, Shichen; Yan, Jingchun; Qian, Linbo; Chen, Mengfang

    2015-01-01

    The presence of organic contaminants in industrial effluents is an environmental concern of increasing global importance. One innovative technology for treating contaminated industrial effluents is nanoscale zero-valent iron supported on biochar (nZVI/BC). Based on Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller characterizations, the nZVI was well dispersed on the biochar and aggregation was dramatically reduced. Methyl orange (MO) served as the representative organic contaminant for verifying the effectiveness of the composite. Using decolorization efficiency as an indicator of treatment effectiveness, increasing doses of nZVI/BC yielded progressively better results with 98.51% of MO decolorized by 0.6 g/L of composite at an nZVI/BC mass ratio of 1:5. The superior decolorization efficiency of the nZVI/BC was attributed to the increase in the dispersion and reactivity of nZVI while biochar increasing the contact area with contaminant and the adsorption of composites. Additionally, the buffering function of acid-washed biochar could be in favor of maintaining the reactivity of nZVI. Furthermore, the aging nZVI/BC for 30 day was able to maintain the removal efficiency indicating that the oxidation of nZVI may be delayed in the presence of biochar. Therefore, the composite of nZVI/BC could represent an effective functional material for treating wastewater containing organic dyes in the future. PMID:26204523

  2. Biochar Supported Nanoscale Iron Particles for the Efficient Removal of Methyl Orange Dye in Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shichen; Yan, Jingchun; Qian, Linbo; Chen, Mengfang

    2015-01-01

    The presence of organic contaminants in industrial effluents is an environmental concern of increasing global importance. One innovative technology for treating contaminated industrial effluents is nanoscale zero-valent iron supported on biochar (nZVI/BC). Based on Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller characterizations, the nZVI was well dispersed on the biochar and aggregation was dramatically reduced. Methyl orange (MO) served as the representative organic contaminant for verifying the effectiveness of the composite. Using decolorization efficiency as an indicator of treatment effectiveness, increasing doses of nZVI/BC yielded progressively better results with 98.51% of MO decolorized by 0.6 g/L of composite at an nZVI/BC mass ratio of 1:5. The superior decolorization efficiency of the nZVI/BC was attributed to the increase in the dispersion and reactivity of nZVI while biochar increasing the contact area with contaminant and the adsorption of composites. Additionally, the buffering function of acid-washed biochar could be in favor of maintaining the reactivity of nZVI. Furthermore, the aging nZVI/BC for 30 day was able to maintain the removal efficiency indicating that the oxidation of nZVI may be delayed in the presence of biochar. Therefore, the composite of nZVI/BC could represent an effective functional material for treating wastewater containing organic dyes in the future. PMID:26204523

  3. Fe/Al bimetallic particles for the fast and highly efficient removal of Cr(VI) over a wide pH range: Performance and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fenglian; Cheng, Zihang; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Tang, Bing

    2015-11-15

    The iron/aluminum (Fe/Al) bimetallic particles with high efficiency for the removal of Cr(VI) were prepared. Fe/Al bimetallic particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), SEM mapping, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SEM mapping showed that the core of bimetal was Al, and the planting Fe was deposited on the surface of Al. In acidic and neutral conditions, Fe/Al bimetal can completely remove Cr(VI) from wastewater in 20 min. Even at pH 11.0, the Cr(VI) removal efficiency achieved was 93.5%. Galvanic cell effect and high specific surface area are the main reasons for the enhanced removal of Cr(VI) by bimetallic particles. There were no iron ions released in solutions at pH values ranging from 3.0 to 11.0. The released Al(3+) ions concentrations in acidic and neutral conditions were all less than 0.2mg/L. The bimetal can be used 4 times without losing activity at initial pH 3.0. XPS indicated that the removed Cr(VI) was immobilized via the formation of Cr(III) hydroxide and Cr(III)-Fe(III) hydroxide/oxyhydroxide on the surface of Fe/Al bimetal. The Fe/Al bimetallic particles are promising for further testing for the rapid and effective removal of contaminants from water. PMID:26073381

  4. Use of hybrid composite particles prepared using alkoxysilane-functionalized amphiphilic polymer precursors for simultaneous removal of various pollutants from water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seulki; Kim, Nahae; Lee, Soonjae; Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang-Hyup; Kim, Juyoung; Choi, Jae-Woo

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we present new inorganic-organic hybrid particles and their possible application as an adsorbent for simultaneous removal of hydrophobic and hydrophilic pollutants from water. These hybrid particles were prepared using tailor-made alkoxysilane-functionalized amphiphilic polymer precursors (M-APAS), which have amphiphilic polymers and reactive alkoxysilane groups attached to the same backbone. Through a single conventional sol-gel process, the polymerization of M-APAS and the chemical conjugation of M-APAS onto silica nanoparticles was simultaneous, resulting in the formation of hybrid particles (M-APAS-SiO2) comprised of hyperbranch-like amphiphilic polymers bonded onto silica nanoparticles with a relatively high grafting efficiency. A test for the adsorption of water-soluble dye (organe-16) and water insoluble dye (solvent blue-35) onto the hybrid particles was performed to evaluate the possibility of adsorbing hydrophilic and hydrophobic compound within the same particle. The hybrid particle was also evaluated as an adsorbent for the removal of contaminated water containing various pollutants by wastewater treatment test. The hybrid particle could remove phenolic compounds from wastewater and the azo dye reactive orange-16 from aqueous solutions, and it was easily separated from the treated wastewater because of the different densities involved. These results demonstrate that the hybrid particles are a promising sorbent for hydrophilic and/or hydrophobic pollutants in water. PMID:27179430

  5. Method for non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Gregory Russ; Kaduchak, Gregory; Jett, James Hubert; Graves, Steven Wayde

    2012-09-11

    Method and system for uniformly spacing particles in a flowing system comprising suspending particles in an elongated fluid filled cavity; exposing said cavity to an axial acoustic standing wave field, wherein said axial acoustic standing wave field drives said particles to nodal and anti-nodal positions along the center axis of said cavity to result in uniformly spaced particles; and focusing said particles to the center axis of said cavity.

  6. Removal of black carbon particles from experimental flue gas by surfactant solution in a new type of umbrella plate scrubber.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming; Zhao, Yapei; Zhan, Qi; Song, Jingke; Fan, Xiaopeng

    2013-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles were removed from experimental flue gas by the surfactant solutions of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), fatty alcohol polyoxyethylene ether-9 (AEO-9) and polyoxy ethrlene nonyl phinyl ether-10 (TX-10), as well as AEO-9-SDBS, AEO-9-CTAB and SDBS-CTAB, in a new type of umbrella plate scrubber. Among the four independent surfactants, AEO-9 has the lowest surface tension, 35.9 mN/m, which resulted in the highest BC removal ratio among the alone surfactants. The experimental conditions were as follows: dust concentration = 3000 mg/m3; gas velocity = 14 m/s; liquid-gas ratio = 0.80 l/m3; and gas flow = 400 m3/h. When the mole ratio of the mixed surfactants was 1:1, the lowest surface tension could be detected among the studied mixed surfactants. According to the molecular interaction parameters (beta) and the mole ratio of surfactant 1 in the mixture (x1), the synergistic effects of AEO-9-SDBS and SDBS-CTAB solutions were obviously higher than those of AEO-9-TX-10 and AEO-9-CTAB. Therefore, AEO-9-SDBS solution had the lowest surface tension among the mixtures due to its beta < 0 and x1 = 0.85. The mixture solution of AEO-9-SDBS (1:1 mole ratio, 0.2 mmol/l) yielded the highest BC removal ratio, about 99.8%, and it was about 12% higher than that of only water, which was about 87.9%. The calculated critical micelle concentration was almost the same as that of the experimental concentration when the related equation was corrected by beta. PMID:23530320

  7. Γ-Al₂O₃-based nanocomposite adsorbents for arsenic(V) removal: assessing performance, toxicity and particle leakage.

    PubMed

    Onnby, Linda; Svensson, Christian; Mbundi, Lubinda; Busquets, Rosa; Cundy, Andrew; Kirsebom, Harald

    2014-03-01

    The generation and development of effective adsorption materials for arsenic removal are urgently needed due to acute arsenic contamination of water sources in many regions around the world. In the search for these new adsorbents, the application of nanomaterials or nanocomposites, and especially the use of nanoparticles (NPs), has proven increasingly attractive. While the adsorptive performance of a range of nanocomposite and nanomaterial-based systems has been extensively reviewed in previously-published literature, the stability of these systems in terms of NP release, i.e. the ability of the nanomaterial or nanocomposite to retain incorporated NPs, is less well understood. Here we examine the performance of nanocomposites comprised of aluminium oxide nanoparticles (AluNPs) incorporated in macroporous polyacrylamide-based cryogels (n-Alu-cryo, where n indicates the percentage of AluNPs in the polymer material (n=0-6%, w/v)) for As(V) adsorption, and evaluate AluNP leakage before and after the use of these materials. A range of techniques is utilised and assessed (SEM, TEM, mass weight change, PIXE and in vitro toxicity studies). The 4-Alu-cryo nanocomposite was shown to be optimal for minimising AluNP losses while maximising As(V) removal. From the same nanocomposite we were further able to show that NP losses were not detectable at the AluNP concentrations used in the study. Toxicity tests revealed that no cytotoxic effects could be observed. The cryogel-AluNPs composites were not only effective in As(V) removal but also in immobilising the AluNPs. More challenging flow-through conditions for the evaluation of NP leakage could be included as a next step in a continued study assessing particle loss and subsequent toxicity. PMID:24370695

  8. Nitrous oxide generation in denitrifying phosphorus removal process: main causes and control measures.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Shuang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Yingying; Zou, Yina

    2013-08-01

    Despite the many benefits of denitrifying phosphorus removal process, the significant generation of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, remains a problem for this innovative and promising process. To better understand and more effectively control N2O generation in denitrifying phosphorus removal process, batch experiments were carried out to investigate the main causes of N2O generation, based on which the control measures were subsequently proposed. The results showed that N2O generation accounted for 0.41 % of the total nitrogen removal in denitrifying phosphorus removal process, whereas, in contrast, almost no N2O was generated in conventional denitrification process. It was further demonstrated that the weak competition of N2O reductase for electrons and the high nitrite accumulation were the two main causes for N2O generation, evidenced by N2O production and reduction rates under different conditions. Accordingly, the reduction of N2O generation was successfully achieved via two control measures: (1) the use of continuous nitrate addition reducing N2O generation by around 91.4 % and (2) the use of propionate as the carbon source reducing N2O generation by around 69.8 %. PMID:23407928

  9. In-situ removal and characterisation of uranium-containing particles from sediments surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. G.; Griffiths, I.; Jones, C. P.; Stitt, C. A.; Davies-Milner, M.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Yamashiki, Y.; Richards, D. A.; Scott, T. B.

    2016-03-01

    Traditional methods to locate and subsequently study radioactive fallout particles have focused heavily on autoradiography coupled with in-situ analytical techniques. Presented here is the application of a Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope with both backscattered electron and energy dispersive spectroscopy detectors, along with a micromanipulator setup and electron-hardening adhesive to isolate and remove individual particles before synchrotron radiation analysis. This system allows for a greater range of new and existing analytical techniques, at increased detail and speed, to be applied to the material. Using this method, it was possible to erform detailed energy dispersive spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation characterisation of material likely ejected from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant found within a sediment sample collected from the edge of the 30 km exclusion zone. Particulate material sub-micron in maximum dimension examined during this work via energy dispersive spectroscopy was observed to contain uranium at levels between 19.68 and 28.35 weight percent, with the application of synchrotron radiation spectroscopy confirming its presence as a major constituent. With great effort and cost being devoted to the remediation of significant areas of eastern Japan affected by the incident, it is crucial to gain the greatest possible understanding of the nature of this contamination in order to inform the most appropriate clean-up response.

  10. Control Experiment of Positively Charged Fine Particles at the Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Toshiaki; Ando, Ayumi; Sato, Noriyoshi

    2005-10-31

    It is already reported that the negatively charged fine particle flow was controlled by application of external electric field. The control of positively charged fine particles was examined in this experiment.The fine particles are able to take charges in the air under the atmospheric pressure by irradiation of UV light. The control of the positively charged fine particles has been attempted by the external electric field applied the negative potential. The fine particles for experiments are volcanic ashes, nylon 16, glass, and ice. Experiment was performed in the T-shaped glass chamber under the atmospheric pressure. The halogen lamp (500 W) was used to exit the electrons from particles by photo-emission. The ring and disk electrodes to control the positively charged particles were set at the bottom of chamber. The parallel electrodes were set at the middle of chamber and horizontal static electric fields (E = 0 {approx} 210 V/cm) were created in order to estimate the charge of fine particles. The charges of particle were estimated by the deflection of particle trajectory in the static electric fields and particle velocity. The estimated charges were 104e {approx} 5x106e and 103e {approx} 105e for volcanic ashes and nylon 16, respectively. When positively charged particles were introduced into collecting electrodes, the fine particles are collected in the electrodes. The result of control of positively charged fine particles is shown in this conference.

  11. Tuning selectivity in catalysis by controlling particle shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ilkeun; Delbecq, Françoise; Morales, Ricardo; Albiter, Manuel A.; Zaera, Francisco

    2009-02-01

    A catalytic process for the selective formation of cis olefins would help minimize the production of unhealthy trans fats during the partial hydrogenation of edible oils. Here we report on the design of such a process on the basis of studies with model systems. Temperature programmed desorption data on single crystals showed that the isomerization of trans olefins to their cis counterparts is promoted by (111) facets of platinum, and that such selectivity is reversed on more open surfaces. Quantum mechanics calculations suggested that the extra stability of cis olefins seen on hydrogen-saturated Pt(111) surfaces may be due to a lesser degree of surface reconstruction, a factor found to be significant in the adsorption on close-packed platinum surfaces. Kinetic data using catalysts made out of dispersed tetrahedral Pt nanoparticles corroborated the selective promotion of the trans-to-cis isomerization on the (111) facets of the metal. Our work provides an example for how catalytic selectivity may be controlled by controlling the shape of the catalytic particles.

  12. Ammonia-based intermittent aeration control optimized for efficient nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Pusker; Bunce, Ryder; Miller, Mark W; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B

    2015-10-01

    This work describes the development of an intermittently aerated pilot-scale process (V = 0.45 m(3) ) operated for optimized efficient nitrogen removal in terms of volume, supplemental carbon and alkalinity requirements. The intermittent aeration pattern was controlled using a strategy based on effluent ammonia concentration set-points. The unique feature of the ammonia-based aeration control was that a fixed dissolved oxygen (DO) set-point was used and the length of the aerobic and anoxic time (anoxic time ≥25% of total cycle time) were changed based on the effluent ammonia concentration. Unlike continuously aerated ammonia-based aeration control strategies, this approach offered control over the aerobic solids retention time (SRT) to deal with fluctuating ammonia loading without solely relying on changes to the total SRT. This approach allowed the system to be operated at a total SRT with a small safety factor. The benefits of operating at an aggressive SRT were reduced hydraulic retention time (HRT) for nitrogen removal. As a result of such an operation, nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) out-selection was also obtained (ammonia oxidizing bacteria [AOB] maximum activity: 400 ± 79 mgN/L/d, NOB maximum activity: 257 ± 133 mgN/L/d, P < 0.001) expanding opportunities for short-cut nitrogen removal. The pilot demonstrated a total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) removal rate of 95 ± 30 mgN/L/d at an influent chemical oxygen demand: ammonia (COD/NH4 (+) -N) ratio of 10.2 ± 2.2 at 25°C within the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 h and within a total SRT of 5-10 days. The TIN removal efficiency up to 91% was observed during the study, while effluent TIN was 9.6 ± 4.4 mgN/L. Therefore, this pilot-scale study demonstrates that application of the proposed on-line aeration control is capable of relatively high nitrogen removal without supplemental carbon and alkalinity addition at a low HRT. PMID:26058705

  13. The effect of particle size distribution on the design of urban stormwater control measures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, William R.; Fienen, Michael N.; Horwatich, Judy A.; Bannerman, Roger T.

    2016-01-01

    An urban pollutant loading model was used to demonstrate how incorrect assumptions on the particle size distribution (PSD) in urban runoff can alter the design characteristics of stormwater control measures (SCMs) used to remove solids in stormwater. Field-measured PSD, although highly variable, is generally coarser than the widely-accepted PSD characterized by the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program (NURP). PSDs can be predicted based on environmental surrogate data. There were no appreciable differences in predicted PSD when grouped by season. Model simulations of a wet detention pond and catch basin showed a much smaller surface area is needed to achieve the same level of solids removal using the median value of field-measured PSD as compared to NURP PSD. Therefore, SCMs that used the NURP PSD in the design process could be unnecessarily oversized. The median of measured PSDs, although more site-specific than NURP PSDs, could still misrepresent the efficiency of an SCM because it may not adequately capture the variability of individual runoff events. Future pollutant loading models may account for this variability through regression with environmental surrogates, but until then, without proper site characterization, the adoption of a single PSD to represent all runoff conditions may result in SCMs that are under- or over-sized, rendering them ineffective or unnecessarily costly.

  14. Removal of Particles and Acid Gases (SO2 or HCl) with a Ceramic Filter by Addition of Dry Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmer, G.; Kasper, G.; Wang, J.; Schaub, G.

    2002-09-20

    The present investigation intends to add to the fundamental process design know-how for dry flue gas cleaning, especially with respect to process flexibility, in cases where variations in the type of fuel and thus in concentration of contaminants in the flue gas require optimization of operating conditions. In particular, temperature effects of the physical and chemical processes occurring simultaneously in the gas-particle dispersion and in the filter cake/filter medium are investigated in order to improve the predictive capabilities for identifying optimum operating conditions. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}) and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH){sub 2}) are known as efficient sorbents for neutralizing acid flue gas components such as HCl, HF, and SO{sub 2}. According to their physical properties (e.g. porosity, pore size) and chemical behavior (e.g. thermal decomposition, reactivity for gas-solid reactions), optimum conditions for their application vary widely. The results presented concentrate on the development of quantitative data for filtration stability and overall removal efficiency as affected by operating temperature. Experiments were performed in a small pilot unit with a ceramic filter disk of the type Dia-Schumalith 10-20 (Fig. 1, described in more detail in Hemmer 2002 and Hemmer et al. 1999), using model flue gases containing SO{sub 2} and HCl, flyash from wood bark combustion, and NaHCO{sub 3} as well as Ca(OH){sub 2} as sorbent material (particle size d{sub 50}/d{sub 84} : 35/192 {micro}m, and 3.5/16, respectively). The pilot unit consists of an entrained flow reactor (gas duct) representing the raw gas volume of a filter house and the filter disk with a filter cake, operating continuously, simulating filter cake build-up and cleaning of the filter medium by jet pulse. Temperatures varied from 200 to 600 C, sorbent stoichiometric ratios from zero to 2, inlet concentrations were on the order of 500 to 700 mg/m{sup 3}, water vapor contents ranged from

  15. Evaluation of mercury speciation and removal through air pollution control devices of a 190 MW boiler.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengli; Cao, Yan; Dong, Zhongbing; Cheng, Chinmin; Li, Hanxu; Pan, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Air pollution control devices (APCDs) are installed at coal-fired power plants for air pollutant regulation. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems have the co-benefits of air pollutant and mercury removal. Configuration and operational conditions of APCDs and mercury speciation affect mercury removal efficiently at coal-fired utilities. The Ontario Hydro Method (OHM) recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was used to determine mercury speciation simultaneously at five sampling locations through SCR-ESP-FGD at a 190 MW unit. Chlorine in coal had been suggested as a factor affecting the mercury speciation in flue gas; and low-chlorine coal was purported to produce less oxidized mercury (Hg2+) and more elemental mercury (Hg0) at the SCR inlet compared to higher chlorine coal. SCR could oxidize elemental mercury into oxidized mercury when SCR was in service, and oxidation efficiency reached 71.0%. Therefore, oxidized mercury removal efficiency was enhanced through a wet FGD system. In the non-ozone season, about 89.5%-96.8% of oxidized mercury was controlled, but only 54.9%-68.8% of the total mercury was captured through wet FGD. Oxidized mercury removal efficiency was 95.9%-98.0%, and there was a big difference in the total mercury removal efficiencies from 78.0% to 90.2% in the ozone season. Mercury mass balance was evaluated to validate reliability of OHM testing data, and the ratio of mercury input in the coal to mercury output at the stack was from 0.84 to 1.08. PMID:20397418

  16. Reconstitutable control assembly having removable control rods with detachable split upper end plugs

    SciTech Connect

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Knott, R.P.; Sparrow, J.A.

    1989-12-19

    This patent describes, in a reconstitutable control assembly for use with a nuclear fuel assembly, the control assembly including a spider structure and at least one control rod, an attachment joint for detachable fastening the control rod to the spider structure. The attachment joint comprising: a hollow connecting finger on the spider structure; and an elongated detachable split upper end plug on the control rod having a pair of separate upper and lower plug portions, the upper plug portion having integrally-connected tandemly- arranged upper, middle and lower sections. The lower plug portion having integrally-connected tandemly-arranged upper, middle and lower segments.

  17. Control of adhesion force between ceria particles and polishing pad in shallow trench isolation chemical mechanical planarization.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jihoon; Moon, Jinok; Bae, Jae-Young; Yoon, Kwang Seob; Sigmund, Wolfgang; Paik, Ungyu

    2014-06-01

    The adhesion force between ceria and polyurethane (PU) pad was controlled to remove the step height from cell region to peripheral region during Shallow Trench Isolation Chemical Mechanical Planarization (STI-CMP) for NAND flash. Picolinic acid was found to be adsorbed on ceria particles at pH 4.5 following a Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorbed amount of 0.36 mg/m2. The ceria suspension with full surface coverage of picolinic acid showed a threefold increase in the number of adhered ceria particles on the PU pad over non-coated ceria particles. It was shown that the coverage percent of picolinic acid on ceria corresponds well with the amount percent of adsorbed ceria on PU pad. The change in adsorbed particles was directly reflected in the CMP polishing process where significant improvements were achieved. Particularly, convex areas on the chip experienced higher friction force from the attached abrasives on the PU pad than concave areas. As a result, the convex areas have increased removal rate of step height compared to the ceria suspension without picolinic acid. The changing profiles of convex areas are reported during the step height reduction as a function of polishing time. PMID:24738395

  18. Optimal planning of LEO active debris removal based on hybrid optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao-qian; Chen, Li-hu

    2015-06-01

    The mission planning of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) active debris removal problem is studied in this paper. Specifically, the Servicing Spacecraft (SSc) and several debris exist on near-circular near-coplanar LEOs. The SSc should repeatedly rendezvous with the debris, and de-orbit them until all debris are removed. Considering the long-duration effect of J2 perturbation, a linear dynamics model is used for each rendezvous. The purpose of this paper is to find the optimal service sequence and rendezvous path with minimum total rendezvous cost (Δv) for the whole mission, and some complex constraints (communication time window constraint, terminal state constraint, and time distribution constraint) should be satisfied meanwhile. Considering this mission as a hybrid optimal control problem, a mathematical model is proposed, as well as the solution method. The proposed approach is demonstrated by a typical active debris removal problem. Numerical experiments show that (1) the model and solution method proposed in this paper can effectively address the planning problem of LEO debris removal; (2) the communication time window constraint and the J2 perturbation have considerable influences on the optimization results; and (3) under the same configuration, some suboptimal sequences are equivalent to the optimal one since their difference in Δv cost is very small.

  19. Removal versus retention of asymptomatic third molars in mandibular angle fractures: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Z; Findlay, G; O'Rourke, P; Batstone, M

    2016-05-01

    The treatment dilemma provided by asymptomatic third molars in mandibular angle fractures remains controversial. This prospective randomized controlled trial was undertaken to determine whether there is an advantage to extraction or retention of the third molar whilst repairing a mandibular angle fracture. Sixty-four patients were allocated randomly to the two treatment groups. All underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with standard postoperative care. The primary outcome measure was uncomplicated fracture healing. Secondary measures were surgical duration, malocclusion, wound healing, nerve injury, and return to theatre. All patients had uncomplicated fracture healing. The incidence of nerve injury was 16% for the retention group compared with 39% for the removal group (P=0.038). The average operating time for ORIF and third molar retention cases was 58.5min and for ORIF and third molar removal cases was 66.3min (P=0.26). There was no statistically significant difference between groups for wound healing, occlusion outcomes, or return to theatre. Given the additional risk of nerve injury and the additional operating time required for removal of a third molar, in the absence of an absolute indicator for removal of the third molar, it appears justifiable to advise retaining the tooth in the line of a mandibular angle fracture. PMID:26867667

  20. Improvement of COD removal by controlling the substrate degradability during the anaerobic digestion of recalcitrant wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Minako; Nagao, Norio; Kawasaki, Nobuyuki; Imai, Akio; Toda, Tatsuki

    2016-10-01

    The recalcitrant landfill leachate was anaerobically digested at various mixing ratios with labile synthetic wastewater to evaluate the degradation properties of recalcitrant wastewater. The proportion of leachate to the digestion system was increased in three equal steps, starting from 0% to 100%, and later decreased back to 0% with the same steps. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) for organic carbon and other components were calculated by analyzing the COD and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and the removal efficiencies of COD carbon and COD others were evaluated separately. The degradation properties of COD carbon and COD others shifted owing to changing of substrate degradability, and the removal efficiencies of COD carbon and COD others were improved after supplying 100% recalcitrant wastewater. The UV absorptive property and total organic carbon (TOC) of each molecular size using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with UVA and TOC detectors were also investigated, and the degradability of different molecular sizes was determined. Although the SEC system detected extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are produced by microbes in stressful environments, during early stages of the experiment, EPS were not detected after feeding 100% recalcitrant wastewater. These results suggest that the microbes had acclimatized to the recalcitrant wastewater degradation. The high removal rates of both COD carbon and COD others were sustained when the proportion of labile wastewater in the substrate was 33%, indicating that the effective removal of recalcitrant COD might be controlled by changing the substrate's degradability. PMID:27449962

  1. Synthesizing aluminum particles towards controlling electrostatic discharge ignition sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Eric S. Collins; Jeffery P. Gesner; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael A. Daniels

    2014-02-01

    Aluminum particles were synthesized with shell thicknesses ranging from 2.7 to 8.3 nm and a constant diameter of 95 nm. These fuel particles were combined with molybdenum trioxide particles and the electrostatic discharge (ESD) sensitivity of the mixture was measured. Results show ignition delay increased as the alumina shell thickness increased. These results correlated with electrical resistivity measurements of the mixture which increased with alumina concentration. A model was developed using COMSOL for ignition of a single Al particle. The ignition delay in the model was consistent with the experimental results suggesting that the primary ESD ignition mechanism is joule heating.

  2. Removal of oxygen demand and nitrogen using different particle-sizes of anthracite coated with nine kinds of LDHs for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangling; Guo, Lu; Wang, Yafen; Ruan, Congying

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the application of anthracite particles of different sizes and coated with nine kinds of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) varying in M(II)-M(III) cations, as alternative substrates in the simulated vertical-flow constructed wetland columns. Effects of LDHs-coating and particle size of modified anthracites were examined to evaluate their abilities in removing oxygen demand and nitrogen from sewage wastewater. Results showed that LDHs modification effectively enhanced the removal of nitrogen and organics. The removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) , ammonia and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were best improved by 28.5%, 11.9% and 4.1% for the medium particle size (1-3 mm), followed by 9.2%, 5.5% and 13.6% for the large size (3-5 mm), respectively. Only TN removal was improved up to 16.6% for the small particle size (0.5-1 mm). Nitrate tended to accumulate and fluctuate greatly across all the treatments, probably due to the dominancy of aerobic condition in the vertical-flow columns. Overall, MgFe-LDHs was selected as the best-modified coating for anthracite. The results suggested LDHs modification would be one of the promising strategies to provide new-types of highly efficient and lasting wetland substrates. PMID:26456850

  3. Removal of oxygen demand and nitrogen using different particle-sizes of anthracite coated with nine kinds of LDHs for wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangling; Guo, Lu; Wang, Yafen; Ruan, Congying

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the application of anthracite particles of different sizes and coated with nine kinds of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) varying in MII-MIII cations, as alternative substrates in the simulated vertical-flow constructed wetland columns. Effects of LDHs-coating and particle size of modified anthracites were examined to evaluate their abilities in removing oxygen demand and nitrogen from sewage wastewater. Results showed that LDHs modification effectively enhanced the removal of nitrogen and organics. The removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) , ammonia and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were best improved by 28.5%, 11.9% and 4.1% for the medium particle size (1-3 mm), followed by 9.2%, 5.5% and 13.6% for the large size (3-5 mm), respectively. Only TN removal was improved up to 16.6% for the small particle size (0.5-1 mm). Nitrate tended to accumulate and fluctuate greatly across all the treatments, probably due to the dominancy of aerobic condition in the vertical-flow columns. Overall, MgFe-LDHs was selected as the best-modified coating for anthracite. The results suggested LDHs modification would be one of the promising strategies to provide new-types of highly efficient and lasting wetland substrates.

  4. Preoperative hair removal and surgical site infections: network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, A; Saliou, P; Lucet, J C; Mimoz, O; Keita-Perse, O; Grandbastien, B; Bruyère, F; Boisrenoult, P; Lepelletier, D; Aho-Glélé, L S

    2015-10-01

    Preoperative hair removal has been used to prevent surgical site infections (SSIs) or to prevent hair from interfering with the incision site. We aimed to update the meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials about hair removal for the prevention of SSIs, and conduct network meta-analyses to combine direct and indirect evidence and to compare chemical depilation with clipping. The PubMed, ScienceDirect and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized controlled trials analysing different hair removal techniques and no hair removal in similar groups. Paired and network meta-analyses were conducted. Two readers independently assessed the study limitations for each selected article according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) method. Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria. No study compared clipping with chemical depilation. Network meta-analyses with shaving as the reference showed significantly fewer SSIs with clipping, chemical depilation, or no depilation [relative risk 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.79; 0.60, 0.36-0.97; and 0.56, 0.34-0.96, respectively]. No significant difference was observed between the absence of depilation and chemical depilation or clipping (1.05, 0.55-2.00; 0.97, 0.51-1.82, respectively] or between chemical depilation and clipping (1.09, 0.59-2.01). This meta-analysis of 19 randomized controlled trials confirmed the absence of any benefit of depilation to prevent surgical site infection, and the higher risk of surgical site infection when shaving is used for depilation. Chemical depilation and clipping were compared for the first time. The risk of SSI seems to be similar with both methods. PMID:26320612

  5. Inspection Report on "Internal Controls over Accountable Classified Removable Electronic Media at Oak Ridge National Laboratory"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts cutting edge scientific research. ORNL utilizes removable electronic media, such as computer hard drives, compact disks, data tapes, etc., to store vast amounts of classified information. Incidents involving breakdowns in controls over classified removable electronic media have been a continuous challenge for the Department. The loss of even one piece of such media can have serious national security implications. In 2004, the Department had a complex-wide 'stand-down' of all activities using classified removable electronic media, and such media containing Secret/Restricted Data or higher classified data was designated 'Accountable Classified Removable Electronic Media' (ACREM). As part of the stand-down, sites were required to conduct a 100 percent physical inventory of all ACREM; enter it all into accountability; and conduct security procedure reviews and training. Further, the Department implemented a series of controls, including conducting periodic inventories, utilizing tamper proof devices on ACREM safes, and appointing trained custodians to be responsible for the material. After performance testing and validation that the required accountability systems were in place, ACREM operations at ORNL were approved for restart on August 10, 2004. We conducted a review at ORNL and associated facilities to determine whether ACREM is managed, protected, and controlled consistent with applicable requirements. We found that: (1) Eight pieces of Secret/Restricted Data media had not been identified as ACREM and placed into a system of accountability. Consequently, the items were not subject to all required protections and controls, such as periodic accountability inventories, oversight by a trained custodian, or storage in a designated ACREM safe. (However, the items were secured in safes approved for classified material.) (2) Other required ACREM protections and controls were not implemented as

  6. Method and means for remote removal of guide balls from nuclear reactor control rods

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.H.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of remotely removing guide balls from nuclear reactor control rods using a punch mechanism, comprising: (a) providing attachment means in the punch mechanism for attaching the punch mechanism to means for reversibly lowering the punch mechanism over the top of one of the control rods; (b) providing a die within the punch mechanism; (c) providing cylinder means within the punch mechanism operatively connected to the die for axially moving the die in a back-and-forth direction; (d) providing a die block within the punch mechanism cooperating with the die; (e) providing guide means within the punch mechanism for self-aligning the punch mechanism so that the die and the die block are automatically aligned with a first one of the guide balls therebetween when the punch mechanism is lowered over the top of the control rod; (f) lowering the punch mechanism over the control rod so that the die, the die block, and the first guide ball are in alignment; and (g) then operating the cylinder means so that the die advances into the die block, thereby removing the first guide ball from the control rod.

  7. Developing real-time control software for Space Station Freedom carbon dioxide removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, Steven A.; Morando, Alexander R.; Johnson, Jim

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents AiResearch experience to date in using the NASA/Boeing Application Generator (AG) to develop real-time control systems for the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) in Work Package 01. The AG provides an integrated design and development tool encompassing: system analysis, modeling, control law design, simulation, code generation, real-time hardware-in-the-loop simulation and operation, and documentation. This allows rapid interactive prototyping of real-time control systems in a single, integrated, environment. Advantages and disadvantages of using the AG for real-time control system development will be addressed, with the CDRA specification to delivery cycle serving as a basis for discussion. Suggestions for improving the AG are offered and observations on its potential as a top-level system specification tool are made.

  8. Demolition and removal of radioactively contaminated concrete soil: Aerosol control and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, G.J.; Hoover, M.D.; Grace, A.C. III

    1995-12-01

    From 1963 to 1985, two concrete-lined ponds were used to reduce the volume of radioactive liquids from the Institute`s research programs. Following withdrawal of the {open_quotes}hot ponds{close_quotes} from active use, the residual sludges and plastic liners of the ponds were removed and shipped to a radioactive waste disposal site. From 1987 to 1994, the concrete structures remained undisturbed pending environmental restoration on the site. Restoration began in 1994 and was completed in 1995. Restoration involved mechanical breakup and removal of the concrete structures and removal of areas of contaminated soils from the site. This report describes the design and results of the aerosol control and monitoring program that was conducted to ensure protection of workers and the environment during the restoration process. The aerosol control and monitoring strategy developed for remediation of the ITRI hot ponds was successful both in preventing dispersion of radioactive dusts and in demonstrating that exposures of workers and offsite releases were within statutory limits.

  9. Nitrogen Removal in Aerobic Granular Sludge SBR: Real-time Control Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiangjuan; Gao, Dawen

    2010-11-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with aerobic granules was operated to determine the effect of different DO concentration on biological nitrogen removal for synthetic sewage treatment, and the spatial profiles of DO, ORP and pH as on-line control parameters in such systems were investigated. The results showed that DO concentrations had significant effect on nitrification efficiencies and the profiles of DO, ORP and pH. High DO concentration improved the nitrification causing volumetric NH4+-N removal increased and shortened the nitrification duration. Also there existed a good correlation between on-line control parameters (ORP, pH) and nutrients (COD, NH4+-N, NO2--N, NO3--N) variations in aerobic granules when DO was 2.5 mg/L, 3.5 mg/L and 4.5 mg/L. However it is difficult to identify the end of nitrification and denitrification when DO was 1.0 mg/L, due to no apparent bending points on ORP and pH curves. In conclusion the optimal DO concentration was suggested at 2.5 mg/L as it not only achieved high nitrogen removal efficiency and decreased the reaction duration, but also saved operation cost by aeration and mixing.

  10. Computational Prediction of Cryogenic Micro-nano Solid Nitrogen Particle Production Using Laval Nozzle for Physical Photo Resist Removal-cleaning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Abe, Haruto; Ochiai, Naoya

    The fundamental characteristics of the cryogenic single-component micro-nano solid nitrogen (SN2) particle production using super adiabatic Laval nozzle and its application to the physical photo resist removal-cleaning technology are investigated by a new type of integrated measurement coupled computational technique. As a result of present computation, it is found that high-speed ultra-fine SN2 particles are continuously generated due to the freezing of liquid nitrogen (LN2) droplets induced by rapid adiabatic expansion of transonic subcooled two-phase nitrogen flow passing through the Laval nozzle. Furthermore, the effect of SN2 particle diameter, injection velocity, and attack angle to the wafer substrate on resist removal-cleaning performance is investigated in detail by integrated measurement coupled computational technique.